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Sample records for aesthetic all-ceramic restorations

  1. All-ceramic restorations: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, F; Carossa, S; Pera, P; Preti, G

    1998-09-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations are reviewed particularly from the aesthetic point of view. All-ceramic restorations offer the best results because they let the light through optimally. In constructing all-ceramic crowns on teeth which have been endodontically treated, the material used to rebuild the pin-abutments must be taken into consideration if the best aesthetic results are to be achieved. Materials which, because of their translucent characteristics, are the most aesthetic alternatives to metal alloy pin-abutments in rebuilding teeth which have been endodontically treated, are then described.

  2. [Research on the aging of all-ceramics restoration materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongjiao; Chen, Xinmin

    2011-10-01

    All-ceramic crowns and bridges have been widely used for dental restorations owing to their excellent functionality, aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, the premature clinical failure of all-ceramic crowns and bridges may easily occur when they are subjected to the complex environment of oral cavity. In the oral environment, all-ceramic materials are prone to aging. Aging can lead all-ceramic materials to change color, to lower bending strength, and to reduce anti-fracture toughness. There are many factors affecting the aging of the all-ceramic materials, for example, the grain size, the type of stabilizer, the residual stress and the water environment. In order to analyze the aging behavior, to optimize the design of all-ceramic crowns and bridges, and to evaluate the reliability and durability, we review in this paper recent research progress of aging behavior for all-ceramics restoration materials.

  3. Prestresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Feilzer, Albert J; de Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J

    2008-10-01

    A general trend in all ceramic systems is to use veneering ceramics of slightly lower thermal expansion coefficients compared with that of the framework resulting in a positive mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient (+DeltaTEC). The concept behind this TEC mismatch is to generate compressive stresses in the weaker veneering ceramic and thus enhance the overall strength of the restoration. This technique had excellent results with porcelain fused to metal restorations (PFM). However, there are concerns to apply this concept to all-ceramic restorations. The aim of this research was to determine the stresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations due to the mismatch in TEC. Two commercial veneering ceramics with a TEC lower than that of zirconia (+DeltaTEC); NobelRondo zirconiatrade mark and Lava Ceramtrade mark, plus one experimental veneering ceramic with an identical TEC that matches that of zirconia (DeltaTEC = 0) were used to veneer zirconia discs. The specimens were loaded in biaxial flexure test setup with the veneer ceramic in tension. The stresses due to load application and TEC mismatch were calculated using fractography, engineering mathematics, and finite element analysis (FEA). In this study, the highest load at failure (64 N) was obtained with the experimental veneer where the thermal mismatch between zirconia and veneering ceramic was minimal. For the two commercial veneer ceramics the magnitude of the thermal mismatch localized at the zirconia veneer interface (42 MPa) exceeded the bond strength between the two materials and resulted in delamination failure during testing (ca. 50 MPa). For all-ceramic zirconia veneered restorations it is recommended to minimize the thermal mismatch as much as possible. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Use of the Empress all-ceramic restoration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, M K

    1997-01-01

    New dental materials and techniques have been introduced in the past few years to fabricate aesthetic ceramic restorations with improved strength, biocompatibility, resistance to wear, and better fit. Aesthetic concerns and increasing demand for tooth-colored posterior restorations have led to a number of all-ceramic restorations such as IPS Empress (Ivoclar-Williams, Amherst, NY). The Empress system offers superior aesthetics and physical properties. New generation ceramics along with the current adhesive techniques have resulted in the ability to provide higher strength, therefore indicating crowns for posterior restorations as well. These materials are being used more frequently and in more extensive oral prosthetic rehabilitations such as the case that will be presented. We discuss the different properties and advantages of IPS Empress.

  5. Prestresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: A general trend in all ceramic systems is to use veneering ceramics of slightly lower thermal expansion coefficients compared with that of the framework resulting in a positive mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient (+ΔTEC). The concept behind this TEC mismatch is to generate

  6. Thermal Energy Transfer Through All Ceramic Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    correlate to a histological status or disease process. A positive response only expresses that there is a viable nerve fibers located within the pulp ...INTRODUCTION: The literature has demonstrated that cold testing with 1,1,1,2- tetrafluoroethane (TFE) can be used to assess the pulp vitality of teeth restored...restorative materials to natural teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thermoprobes (T-type, Omega) were inserted into the pulp chamber of 3 extracted human

  7. Restoration of Endodontically Treated Molars Using All Ceramic Endocrowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopak Bose Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical success of endodontically treated posterior teeth is determined by the postendodontic restoration. Several options have been proposed to restore endodontically treated teeth. Endocrowns represent a conservative and esthetic restorative alternative to full coverage crowns. The preparation consists of a circular equigingival butt-joint margin and central retention cavity into the entire pulp chamber constructing both the crown and the core as a single unit. The case reports discussed here are moderately damaged endodontically treated molars restored using all ceramic endocrowns fabricated using two different systems, namely, CAD/CAM and pressed ceramic.

  8. The Use of All-Ceramic Resin-Bonded Bridges in the Anterior Aesthetic Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rupal; Laverty, Dominic P

    2017-03-01

    For several years, all-ceramic resin-bonded bridges (RBBs) have been considered an aesthetic treatment option for the replacement of missing teeth in the anterior region. With continued developments in technology, various different ceramic materials have been used to fabricate all-ceramic RBBs including zirconia, glass-reinforced, alumina-based ceramics, and lithium disilicate glass ceramics. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of all-ceramic RBBs, the advantages and disadvantages associated with these prostheses, as well as to demonstrate their application in replacing missing anterior teeth. Clinical relevance: To present the current literature and clinical application of all-ceramic resin-bonded bridges for replacing missing anterior teeth.

  9. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single-tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation of crowns, cement excess and technical complications. The aesthetic outcome was assessed by using the Copenhagen Index Score, and the patient-reported outcomes were recorded using the OHIP-49 questionnaire. The statistical analyses were mainly performed by using mixed model of ANOVA for quantitative data and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic crowns were significantly less optimal than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.020). The professional-reported aesthetic outcome demonstrated significantly superior colour match of all-ceramic over metal

  10. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  11. Survival of all-ceramic restorations after a minimum follow-up of five years: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Nara Santos; Moda, Mariana Dias; Silva, Ebele Adaobi; Zavanelli, Adriana Cristina; Mazaro, José Vitor Quinelli; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the survival and complication rates of all-ceramic restorations after a minimum follow-up time of 5 years. A comprehensive search of studies published from 2005 to November 2015 and listed in the PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases was performed in accordance with the PRISMA statement. Two reviewers independently analyzed the abstracts. Relevant studies were selected according to predetermined inclusion criteria. Twenty-nine studies were selected for the final analysis from an initial yield of 514. Only four studies fulfilled the requirement of having a randomized design, and 25 studies were prospective with a mean follow-up period of 5 to 16 years. Overall, the 5-year complication rates were low. The most frequent complications were secondary caries, endodontic problems, ceramic fractures, ceramic chipping, and loss of retention. This systematic review showed that all-ceramic restorations fabricated using the correct clinical protocol have an adequate clinical survival for at least 5 years of clinical service with very low complication rates. Minor ceramic chipping and debonding did not affect the longevity of the restorations. Long-term clinical performance of all-ceramic restorations manufactured using various ceramic systems provides clinical evidence of complications and long-term management of these restorations. Available evidence indicates the effectiveness of many ceramic systems for numerous clinical applications. Correct planning and a rigorous technical execution protocol increase clinical success. Studies of ceramic prostheses indicate more problems with ceramic failure and debonding.

  12. Anterior provisional restorations used to determine form, function, and esthetics for complex restorative situations, using all-ceramic restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshad, Mamaly; Cascione, Domenico; Kim, Tae

    2010-02-01

    A technique is proposed for the restoration of a large and visible maxillary anterior defect. The importance of proper diagnosis, treatment planning, and communication is emphasized. Irreversible treatment should only be rendered once patient approval has been obtained through objective evaluation with provisional restorations. The techniques presented in this article use a combination of ceramic systems currently available to satisfy functional demands while achieving acceptable esthetics. A controlled series of steps, where the provisional restorative components are being replaced by the definitive ones is planned. The only difference between the provisional and definitive restorative components is the material used. The definitive restorations consisted of an implant-supported zirconium oxide framework. Individual pressed porcelain restorations were luted to the framework and a natural tooth. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Provisional restorations allow an objective form of communication. Vertical and horizontal transitional lines can be effectively masked with appropriate treatment planning and a skilled ceramist. Many traditional dental laboratory steps may be eliminated or simplified without compromising the definitive restorations.

  13. Influence of all-ceramic and porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations on peri-implant gingival discoloration:a spectrophotometric comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Min; Fei, Wei; Hosseini, Mandana

    2013-01-01

    discoloration scores were evaluated by clinician. SPSS17.0 was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the all-ceramic group (3.4+1.8) and PFM group (4.9+3.4) spectrophotometrically. No significant difference was found between the all-ceramic restorations and PFM...

  14. Advancements in all-ceramics for dental restorations and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Misbahuddin, Syed; Kazmi, Murtaza Raza; Qureshi, Sameer; Uddin, Muhammad Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a process that is usually a result of tooth to tooth and/or tooth and restoration contact. The process of wear essentially becomes accelerated by the introduction of restorations inside the oral cavity, especially in case of opposing ceramic restorations. The newest materials have vastly contributed toward the interest in esthetic dental restorations and have been extensively studied in laboratories. However, despite the recent technological advancements, there has not been a valid in vivo method of evaluation involving clinical wear caused due to ceramics upon restored teeth and natural dentition. The aim of this paper is to review the latest advancements in all-ceramic materials, and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition. The descriptive review has been written after a thorough MEDLINE/PubMed search by the authors. It is imperative that clinicians are aware of recent advancements and that they should always consider the type of ceramic restorative materials used to maintain a stable occlusal relation. The ceramic restorations should be adequately finished and polished after the chair-side adjustment process of occlusal surfaces. PMID:28042280

  15. Adhesive luting of all-ceramic restorations--the impact of cementation variables and short-term water storage on the strength of a feldspathic dental ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the impact of resin cement luting variables and short-term water storage on the strength of an adhesively luted all-ceramic restorative material. An understanding of the strengthening mechanisms will result in optimisation of operative techniques and materials selection criteria.

  16. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration prosthesis... (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part...

  17. Interfacial characterization of ceramic core materials with veneering porcelain for all-ceramic bi-layered restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagmatarchis, Alexander; Tripodakis, Aris-Petros; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, George

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the elemental distribution at the interface between all-ceramic core and veneering porcelain materials. Three groups of all-ceramic cores were selected: A) Glass-ceramics (Cergo, IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, e-max Press, Finesse); B) Glass-infiltrated ceramics (Celay Alumina, Celay Zirconia) and C) Densely sintered ceramics (Cercon, Procera Alumina, ZirCAD, Noritake Zirconia). The cores were combined with compatible veneering porcelains and three flat square test specimens were produced for each system. The core-veneer interfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. The glass-ceramic systems showed interfacial zones reach in Si and O, with the presence of K, Ca, Al in core and Ca, Ce, Na, Mg or Al in veneer material, depending on the system tested. IPS Empress and IPS Empress 2 demonstrated distinct transitional phases at the core-veneer interface. In the glassinfiltrated systems, intermixing of core (Ce, La) with veneer (Na, Si) elements occurred, whereas an abrupt drop of the core-veneer elemental concentration was documented at the interfaces of all densely sintered ceramics. The results of the study provided no evidence of elemental interdiffusion at the core-veneer interfaces in densely sintered ceramics, which implies lack of primary chemical bonding. For the glass-containing systems (glassceramics and glass-infiltrated ceramics) interdiffusion of the glass-phase seems to play a critical role in establishing a primary bonding condition between ceramic core and veneering porcelain.

  18. Color stability evaluation of aesthetic restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Postiglione Bührer Samra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Color match is one of the most important characteristics of aesthetic restorative materials. Maintenance of color throughout the functional lifetime of restorations is important for the durability of treatment. This characteristic is not constant among dental materials. The purpose of this research was to assess the color stability of five aesthetic restorative materials when immersed in a coffee solution. Seventy-one 17 mm x 1 mm specimens, divided into five groups, were made using one direct composite resin (Tetric Ceram®, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G1, three indirect composite resins (Targis, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G2; Resilab Master, Wilcos - G3; belleGlassTM HP, Kerr - G4 and one porcelain (IPS Empress® 2, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G5. The specimens were immersed in a coffee staining media for 15 days and stored under a controlled temperature of 37°C ± 1°C in the dark. The evaluations were made after 1, 7 and 15 days by means of reflectance spectrophotometry. The data was submitted to two-way ANOVA (p < 0.005 and post hoc tests. Statistical difference was observed between G1 / G3 and the other groups; G2 / G4 and the other groups; and G5 and all the other groups. It was concluded that G1 and G3 showed significantly higher discoloration than the other groups. G2 and G4 showed intermediary pigmentation, while G5 showed the smallest changes.

  19. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2013-01-01

    -tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow......-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation...... and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. RESULTS: The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three...

  20. Science in Action: Aesthetic Considerations for Stream Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aesthetics are an integral component of the social and economic benefits of stream restoration and should be considered in restoration projects for sustainable management. According to Bernhardt et al. (2005), aesthetics is one of the frequently listed goals for stream restoratio...

  1. Effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations: in vitro study of color masking ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seon-Hee; Kim, Seok-Gyu

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations. Three different types of disk-shaped zirconia coping specimens (Lava, Cercon, Zirkonzahn: ø10 mm × 0.4 mm) were fabricated and veneered with IPS e.max Press Ceram (shade A2), for total thicknesses of 1 and 1.5 mm. A total of sixty zirconia restoration specimens were divided into six groups based on their coping types and thicknesses. The abutment specimens (ø10 mm × 7 mm) were prepared with gold alloy, base metal (nickel-chromium) alloy, and four different shades (A1, A2, A3, A4) of composite resins. The average L*, a*, b* values of the zirconia specimens on the six abutment specimens were measured with a dental colorimeter, and the statistical significance in the effects of three variables was analyzed by using repeated measures analysis of variance (α=.05).The average shade difference (ΔE) values of the zirconia specimens between the A2 composite resin abutment and other abutments were also evaluated. The effects of zirconia specimen thickness (Pabutment shade (Pabutments was higher (close to the acceptability threshold of 5.5 ΔE) than th ose between the A2 composite resin and other abutments. This in-vitro study demonstrated that abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type affected the resulting shade of zirconia restorations.

  2. Fracture resistance of prepared premolars restored with bonded new lab composite and all-ceramic inlay/onlay restorations: Laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafaie, Ramy Ahmed; Ibrahim Ali, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Salah Hasab

    2018-01-25

    To assess the influence of new light curing lab composite, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic and yttrium-stabilized zirconia-based ceramic on the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with class II inlay and onlay preparations. Seventy sound maxillary premolars were divided randomly into seven main groups. The first group was left intact (control group). The remaining six groups were prepared with inlay and onlay cavities and restored with lab composite (SR Nexco), lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press) and yttrium-stabilized zirconia-based ceramic (ICE Zirkon). The restorations were cemented with luting resin composite (Variolink N). All specimens were thermocycled 5000 cycles between 5°C ± 2°C and 55°C ± 2°C and were then cyclic loaded for 500 000 cycles. The specimens were subjected to a compressive load in a universal testing machine using a metal sphere until fracture occurred. The results were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post hoc tests. The level of significance was set at P  .05). However, statistically significant differences were found among the means of control group and the groups restored with lab composite inlays, lab composite onlays, pressable glass ceramic inlays and pressable glass ceramic onlays (P lab composite is used. Conversely, when a ceramic material being used, the prepared teeth for inlay and onlay restorations showed a comparable strength to the intact teeth especially zirconia ceramic. Premolar teeth restored with zirconia ceramic inlays and onlays exhibited fracture resistance comparable to intact teeth. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Sub-ablative Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation under all-ceramic restorations: effects on demineralization and shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağlar, Serdar

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the caries resistant effects of sub-ablative Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation alone and combined with fluoride in comparison with fluoride application alone on enamel prepared for veneer restorations. And also, evaluated these treatments' effects on the shear bond strength of all-ceramic veneer restorations. One hundred and thirty-five human maxillary central teeth were assigned to groups of 1a-control, 1b-laser treated, 1c-fluoride treated, 1d-laser + fluoride treated for shear bond testing and to groups of 2a-positive control(non-demineralised), 2b-laser treated, 2c-fluoride treated, 2d-laser + fluoride treated, 2e-negative control (demineralised) for microhardness testing (n = 15, N = 135). Demineralisation solutions of microhardness measurements were used for the ICP-OES elemental analysis. The parameters for laser irradiation were as follows: power output, 0.25 W; total energy density, 62.5 J/cm 2 and energy density per pulse, 4.48 J/cm 2 with an irradiation time of 20 s and with no water cooling. Five percent NaF varnish was used as fluoride preparate. ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were performed (α = 5%). Surface treatments showed no significant effects on shear bond strength values (p = 0.579). However, significant differences were found in microhardness measurements and in elemental analysis of Ca and P amounts (p < 0.01). Surface-treated groups showed significantly high VNH values and significantly low ICP-OES values when compared with non-treated (-control) group while there were no significance among surface-treated groups regarding VHN and ICP-OES values. Sub-ablative Er,Cr:YSGG treatment alone or combined with fluoride is as an effective method as at least fluoride alone for preventing the prepared enamel to demineralization with no negative effect on shear bond strength.

  4. [Collaboration from periodontics in the aesthetic restoration of anterior teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qintao, Wang; Yumei, Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Anterior teeth are the main zones that reflect oral aesthetics. The histological structure, outside appearance, relative ratios, and other characteristics of tissues must be understood to obtain relatively ideal and natural restoration effects. A collaboration of different disciplines must be implemented to obtain harmonious and stable restoration outcomes that help the majority appreciate beauty. This article aims to discuss the role of periodontics in this collaboration and introduce several common techniques.

  5. Quality Assessment of Prosthetic Rehabilitation Using Aesthetic Fixed Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinovii Ozhohan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to study and assess the quality of prosthetic treatment using aesthetic fixed restorations. Materials and methods. The study included 79 patients without a comorbidity who underwent prosthetic rehabilitation. All the patients were divided into 3 groups: Group I included 25 patients with metal-plastic restorations; Group II comprised 34 patients with porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations; Group III consisted of 20 patients with a combined occlusal surface of prosthetic restorations. The patients were observed 6 months after prosthetic repair. Only patients with single molar and premolar crowns were examined. Bridge prostheses were not taken into account in order to eliminate the effect of masticatory force redistribution on the abutment crowns. Results. In Group I, 11 (44% patients were satisfied with the results of prosthetic treatment. In Group II, 25 (78.12% patients reported that they were satisfied with their treatment. In Group III, there were 17 (85% patients satisfied with their outcome. However, the patients’ complaints are often subjective and do not fully reflect the objective state of the dentoalveolar system. An objective examination revealed that in indirect restorations, marginal periodontium pathology is typical. Conclusions. Aesthetic fixed restorations with a combined occlusal surface have demonstrated good clinical results, even at long-term follow-up. Combining positive properties of two different construction materials, namely zirconium dioxide and ceramics, they reduce the risk of complications such as marginal periodontium pathology and chipping along the occlusal surface as well as contribute to minimal abrasion of the occlusal surfaces of the antagonistic teeth. We cannot recommend metal-plastic restorations due to their low clinical effectiveness, poor aesthetic qualities as well as a high level of marginal periodontium pathology.

  6. Rotational accuracy of all-ceramic restorations on ceraone components = Liberdade rotacional de restaurações totalmente cerâmicas sobre componentes ceraone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Este estudo avaliou a desadaptação interna de sistemas cerâmicos em prótese sobre implantes em relação à liberdade rotacional das restaurações após várias cocções da porcelana. Materiais e métodos: Foram analisados três sistemas cerâmicos: Procera AllCeram, In-Ceram e CeraOne sobre análogo e intermediário CeraOne. A liberdade rotacional foi medida com um dispositivo acoplado a um relógio comparador em quatro tempos: fase de coifa, após aplicação do corpo da porcelana e glaze, e após duas queimas adicionais. Os dados foram analisados por testes de Friedman, de Kruskal-Wallis e de Wilcoxon, a = 0,01. Resultados: As médias de liberdade rotacional em graus foram: 0,08 para In-Ceram/Análogo; 1,64 para Procera/ Intermediário; 1,72 para CeraOne/Intermediário; 1,88 para CeraOne/Análogo e 1,97 para Procera/Análogo. O sistema In-Ceram sobre o análogo apresentou níveis de liberdade rotacional dez a vinte vezes menores que CeraOne e Procera. Não houve diferença entre as fases de confecção da restauração para In-Ceram. O comportamento de CeraOne e Procera foi similar, com aumento da liberdade rotacional sobre intermediário e análogo com a progressão da confecção da restauração. A liberdade rotacional sobre intermediário foi menor que sobre análogo. Conclusão: A liberdade rotacional variou em função da etapa do processo de fabricação dependendo do sistema totalmente cerâmico

  7. Evaluation of fit and efficiency of CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic restorations based on direct and indirect digitalization: a double-blinded, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrberg, Danush; Lauer, Hans Christoph; Ahrberg, Martin; Weigl, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the marginal and internal fit of CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia crowns and three-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) resulting from direct versus indirect digitalization. The efficiency of both methods was analyzed. In 25 patients, 17 single crowns and eight three-unit FDPs were fabricated with all-ceramic zirconia using CAD/CAM technology. Each patient underwent two different impression methods; a computer-aided impression with Lava C.O.S. (CAI) and a conventional polyether impression with Impregum pent soft (CI). The working time for each group was recorded. Before insertion, the marginal and internal fit was recorded using silicone replicas of the frameworks. Each sample was cut into four sections and evaluated at four sites (marginal gap, mid-axial wall, axio-occlusal transition, centro-occlusal site) under ×64 magnification. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to detect significant differences between the two groups in terms of marginal and internal fit (α = 0.05). The mean for the marginal gap was 61.08 μm (±24.77 μm) for CAI compared with 70.40 μm (±28.87 μm) for CI, which was a statistically significant difference. The other mean values for CAI and CI, respectively, were as follows in micrometers (± standard deviation): 88.27 (±41.49) and 92.13 (±49.87) at the mid-axial wall; 144.78 (±46.23) and 155.60 (±55.77) at the axio-occlusal transition; and 155.57 (49.85) and 171.51 (±60.98) at the centro-occlusal site. The CAI group showed significantly lower values of internal fit at the centro-occlusal site. A quadrant scan with a computer-aided impression was 5 min 6 s more time efficient when compared with a conventional impression, and a full-arch scan was 1 min 34 s more efficient. Although both direct and indirect digitalization facilitate the fabrication of single crowns and three-unit FDPs with clinically acceptable marginal fit, a significantly better marginal fit was noted with direct

  8. Management of Tooth Surface Loss of Varying Etiology with Full Mouth all Ceramic Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacture Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettie, Nirmal Famila; Kandasamy, Saravanan; Prasad, Venkat

    2017-11-01

    The anatomical form of a tooth can undergo changes leading to loss of tooth form. The loss of tooth surface can be due to varying etiology. Dental caries, attrition, abrasion, erosion, involving any surface of the tooth can lead to loss of tooth structure. The rate of tooth destruction may proceed to such an extent that the esthetics, function and comfort may be lost. The role of a practioner lies in identification and screening of such case and motivate for oral rehabilitation that includes habit cessation. Computerized dentistry has raised the bar as far as esthetic restorations are concerned. Demanding esthetics has made zirconia crowns as the material of choice in full mouth rehabilitations. However, appropriate treatment planning with scientific evidence and a recommended treatment protocol with careful implementation results in successful restorations and satisfied patients.

  9. Urban river design and aesthetics: A river restoration case study from the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Prior, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the restoration of an urbanized section of the River Skerne where it flows through a suburb of Darlington, England; a project which was one of the first comprehensive urban river restorations undertaken in the UK. It is shown how aesthetic values were central to the identification of the River Skerne as a site for restoration, the production of restoration objectives, and a design vision of urban river renewal via restoration. Secondly, the means by which these aesthetic v...

  10. Effect of in vitro aging on the flexural strength and probability to fracture of Y-TZP zirconia ceramics for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarampi, Eleni; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Andrikopoulos, Konstantinos S; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Voyiatzis, George A; Zorba, Triantafillia; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M; Koidis, Petros

    2014-12-01

    Dental zirconia restorations should present long-term clinical survival and be in service within the oral environment for many years. However, low temperature degradation could affect their mechanical properties and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in vitro aging on the flexural strength of yttrium-stabilized (Y-TZP) zirconia ceramics for ceramic restorations. One hundred twenty bar-shaped specimens were prepared from two ceramics (ZENO Zr (WI) and IPS e.max(®) ZirCAD (IV)), and loaded until fracture according to ISO 6872. The specimens from each ceramic (nx=60) were divided in three groups (control, aged for 5h, aged for 10h). One-way ANOVA was used to assess statistically significant differences among flexural strength values (Pceramics, however statistically significant was for the WI group (Pceramics presented a t→m phase transformation, with the m-phase increasing from 4 to 5% at 5h to around 15% after 10h. The significant reduction of the flexural strength after 10h of in vitro aging, suggests high fracture probability for one of the zirconia ceramics tested. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  12. [Clinical application of IPS-empress 2 pressable all-ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-jun; He, Xiao-ming; Liu, Li-xia; Zhang, Chao-biao; Zhang, Min; Shen, Bei-yong

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical prosthetic effect of IPS-Empress 2 pressahie ceramic crowns. 198 teeth of 70 patients were restored with IPS-Empress 2 pressahie ceramic crowns. The patients were asked to return in one week and every half year. The clinical prosthetic effect was evaluated. Through follow-up of 3-38 months, the veneer porcelain crowns of 3 teeth were broken. 2 crowns fall off due to teeth fracture, gingivitis occurred in 2 teeth, pulpitis or periapical periodontitis occurred in 3 teeth. The shades of 3 crowns were darkening. The prosthetic effect of 185 teeth was satisfied. The rate of satisfaction was 93.4%. IPS-Empress 2 pressable all-ceramic crown has the advantages of aesthetic effect, good hiocompatihility and simple fabrication. But its strength is not enough for posterior teeth and it can not cover the deep color of non-vital teeth and metal materials.

  13. Gingival and dental parameters in the evaluation of aesthetic characteristics of fixed restorations (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a continuing evaluation of dental and facial parameters in the estimation of aesthetic characteristic of fixed restorations. First of all, attention is paid to the phenomenon describing the tooth tissue's characteristics (transiucency, opalescence, and transparency. The paper also discusses tooth color as a special occurrence, the position of the lower lip line as well as the symmetry of the smile. In addition to these fundamental objective criteria, the paper also deals with subjective criteria (tooth arrangement and position, variation in tooth form, and relative crown length, which play a part in the successful aesthetic integration of fixed restorations.

  14. The wall paintings in Tirsted Church: problems of aesthetic presentation after the fourth re-restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brajer, Isabelle Eve; Thillemann, Lise

    2002-01-01

    according to the whim of the restorer. The most recent re-restoration of the paintings took place in 1999 and 2000. After completing the technical treatments, the conservators faced difficult decisions about the aesthetic presentation. The case study presented here describes the historical background......Throughout the 20th century, numerous interventions were carried out on the wall paintings in Tirsted Church, including four complete re-restorations and many local attempts to preserve deteriorated scenes. During several of these re-restorations the pictorial content was repeatedly altered...

  15. Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This anthology is the proceedings publication from the 2013 NAF Symposium Aesthetics, the Uneasy Dimension in Architecture. As a co-production between the Nordic Association of Architectural Research (NAF) and the Faculty of Architecture and Fine Arts at the Norwegian University of Science...

  16. Smile design: rules, tools and strategies to help plan aesthetic restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyoak, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    This article is intended to provide dentists with a framework to help in objectively assessing upper anterior aesthetic restorations. Not all of the areas discussed will be equally important in all cases, and a degree of subjectivity, based on clinical experience, is essential. There has been a huge increase in settlements in cases when aesthetic treatment has not led to patient satisfaction. The author hopes that this type of approach, in conjunction with good patient communication and detailed records, will minimise the potential for litigation, should problems arise. Success or failure is largely defined during the planning stage.

  17. Cleidocranial Dysplasia Case Report: Remodeling of Teeth as Aesthetic Restorative Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Fernandes da Cunha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD, is an autosomal dominant disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 1,000,000 individuals. It is generally characterized by orofacial manifestations, including enamel hypoplasia, retained primary teeth, and impacted permanent and supernumerary teeth. The successful treatment involving a timing intervention (orthodontic-maxillofacial surgeons-restorative is already described. However, the restorative treatment might improve the aesthetic final result in dentistry management for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. Objective. Therefore, this clinical report presents a conservative restorative management (enamel microabrasion, dental bleaching, and direct composite resin for aesthetic solution for a patient with CCD. Clinical Considerations. The cosmetic remodeling is a conservative, secure, and low cost therapy that can be associated with other procedures such as enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to achieve optimal outcome. Additionally, the Golden Proportion can be used to guide dental remodeling to improve the harmony of the smile and the facial composition. Conclusions. Thus, dentists must know and be able to treat dental aesthetic problems in cleidocranial dysplasia patients. The intention of this paper is to describe a restorative approach with the cosmetic remodeling teeth (by grinding or addicting material associated with enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to reestablish the form, shape, and color of smile for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia.

  18. A method for the easy fabrication of all-ceramic bridges with the Cerec system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbad, A; Schnock, H A

    2009-01-01

    Both pressing technology and CAD/CAM methods have proven themselves clinically for the fabrication of all-ceramic restorations. The advantages of the Cerec technology for the economic fabrication of all-ceramic bridges can be exploited by the use of burn-out blanks of polymer material. The milling process of very hard ceramics in the milling unit, which has some disadvantages, is replaced by the pressing process and makes the IPS e.max press material accessible to CAD/CAM users, primarily for extending the range of indications to splinted crowns and small all-ceramic bridges.

  19. Aesthetic guidelines for second-generation indirect inlay and onlay composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miara, P

    1998-05-01

    Recent innovations in indirect composite technology and adhesive bonding procedures have resulted in the development of advanced materials particularly suited for inlay and onlay restorations. Microhybrid composite resins are characterized by a filler/matrix ratio that is significantly greater than that of earlier materials. This article reviews the physical properties and clinical application of these "second-generation" composite resins, with emphasis on a system that utilizes a heat-curing process in conjunction with nitrogen pressure to fabricate a material with improved mechanical and aesthetic properties.

  20. Opalescence of all-ceramic core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Sang; Yu, Bin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-06-01

    The enamel of natural teeth is opalescent, where there is light scattering of the shorter wavelengths of the visible spectrum, giving a tooth a bluish appearance in the reflected color and an orange/brown appearance in the transmitted color. The objective of this study was to determine the opalescence of all-ceramic core, veneer and layered specimens with a color measuring spectrophotometer. Colors of core (A2-corresponding shade), veneer (A2- and A3-corresponding shades) and layered (A2- and A3-layered) ceramics for all-ceramic restorations in clinically relevant thicknesses were measured in the reflectance and transmittance modes. The opalescence parameter (OP), which was calculated as the difference in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab(*)) and red-green coordinate (Deltaa(*)), and the differences in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab(*)) and in color (DeltaE(ab)(*)) between the reflected and transmitted colors were calculated. One-way ANOVA was performed for the OP values of the core, veneer and layered specimens by the kind of materials. Regression analysis was performed between the OP and Deltab(*), and the OP and DeltaE(ab)(*) values. The range of the OP value was 1.6-6.1, 2.0-7.1, 1.3-5.0 and 1.6-4.2 for the core, veneer, A2- and A3-layered specimens, respectively, all of which were significantly influenced by the kind of materials (pOpalescence varied by kind of ceramics. The OP values of ceramics were lower than those of tooth enamel. All-ceramic materials that can simulate the opalescence of natural teeth should be developed.

  1. All-ceramic posts and cores: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutayas, S O; Kern, M

    1999-06-01

    Metal posts used to restore endodontically treated teeth may shine through all-ceramic crowns and thin gingival tissue. When nonprecious alloys are used, corrosion products may lead to discoloration. All-ceramic posts and cores can be used in combination with all-ceramic crowns to prevent these problems. All-ceramic posts and cores are highly biocompatible and will almost always increase the translucency of an all-ceramic restoration. The purpose of this article is to describe the fabrication of all-ceramic posts and cores, using high-toughness ceramic materials such as alumina or zirconia ceramics, through 4 different techniques: the slip-casting technique; the copy-milling technique; the 2-piece technique, which involves a prefabricated zirconia ceramic post and a copy-milled alumina or zirconia ceramic core; and the heat-press technique, which involves a prefabricated zirconia ceramic post and a heat-pressed glass-ceramic core. Indications, contraindications, advantages, and disadvantages of the different techniques are compared.

  2. Aesthetics and Survival of Immediately Restored Implants in Partially Edentulous Anterior Maxillary Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Kolerman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study was undertaken to determine survival rates and aesthetic outcomes of immediate placement of multiple implants at anterior maxilla sites. One hundred and eighteen implants placed in 39 patients (21 women and 18 men; average age 58.3 years were immediately restored (24–72 h after placement. Aesthetic assessment, radiographic bone loss, and biological and prosthetic complications were evaluated. Data collection between 12 and 84 months (mean 32.2 ± 18 after final prosthetic installation revealed that no implants were lost, and that 106/118 (89.8% implants had no more than 1.5 mm of bone loss by the end of the first year and an additional 0.2 mm for each successive year. The marginal bone loss was higher for extractions due to periodontitis compared to extractions due to caries (mean mesial loss of 1.37 mm vs. 1.01 mm, respectively, and mean distal loss of 1.37 mm and 0.99 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. The mesial papilla was present in 83/118 implants (70.3%, while the distal papilla was present in 76/118 implants (64.4%. The cervical metallic part of the abutment was exposed in 16/118 (13.5% implants. There was a higher ratio of recessions and missing papillae in patients in whom the extractions were performed due to periodontal reasons. Within the limitations of the present study, aesthetic and radiographic parameters support immediate restoration of partially edentulous maxillae.

  3. The effect of bleaching agents on the microhardness of dental aesthetic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, S B; Biskin, T

    2002-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of three home bleaching agents on the microhardness of various dental aesthetic restorative materials. The restorative materials were: feldspatic porcelain, microfilled composite resin and light-cured modified glass-ionomer cement and the bleaching agents Nite-White (16% carbamide peroxide), Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide and carbapol jel) and Rembrandt (10% carbamide peroxide jel). A total of 90 restorative material samples were prepared 1 cm diameter and 6 mm thick and kept in distilled water for 24 h before commencing bleaching which was carried out for 8 h day-1 for 4 weeks. Microhardness measurements were then made using a Tukon tester. Statistically significant differences with respect to unbleached controls were found only for the feldspatic porcelain and microfilled composite resins (P light cured modified glass-ionomer cement. For the composite resin, whereas Nite-White increased its microhardness, the other bleaching agents decreased it. There were no significant differences between the bleaching agents for any of the restorative materials.

  4. Restoration of mires - the question of ethics, aesthetics and environmental awareness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lode, Elve

    1998-01-01

    In the introductory part of her paper, under the subtitles Shortly about the condition of peatlands in Europe of today and The future of Estonian peatlands, Elvi Lode, a wetland hydrologist of the Institute of Ecology at Tallinn University of Educational Sciences, considers the condition of peatlands in Europe and the future of Estonian peatlands. The annual peat production quota established by the Government of Estonia (2.78 million t) is compared with reserves established in the course of the latest inventory of Estonian peat cuttings and the existing natural and managed peatlands. In view of the allowed usable peat reserves in Estonia the area for peat cuttings in the future may be about 20 % larger than the present area under natural bog centre sites. Based on world experience and knowledge in the parts subtitled Restoration - a question of ethics and Restoration of mires a question of aesthetics the tasks related to the restoration of peatlands have been stated and institutions in charge have been determined. (author)

  5. Marginal Integrity of Glass Ionomer and All Ceramic Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    that would be expected with daily food and beverage intake. And no toothbrush or flossing abrasion occurred. Future studies could incorporate... management of dental caries. Quintessence International, 33(6), 427-432. 65. Frencken J.E., Peters M.C., Manton D.J., Leal S.C., Gordan V.V., Eden E...2012). Minimal intervention dentistry for managing dental caries - a review: Report of a FDI task group. International Dental Journal, 62(5), 223

  6. Marginal Integrity of Glass Ionomer and All Ceramic Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    North Carolina), scanned by the CEREC Omnicam , and milled by CEREC inLab MC XL system. 15 List of Procedures in Chronological Order 1. The...Fuji II LC, GC America, Alsip, Illinois). Forty lithium disilicate porcelain ceramic inlays will be milled from CEREC Block PC (Sirona, Charlotte...evolution of the CEREC system. Journal of the American Dental Association, 137, 7s-13s. Mount G.J. (1991). Adhesion of glass-ionomer cement in the clinical

  7. [A preliminary study on the color effect of IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-yong; Cheng, Xiang-rong; Wang, Yi-ning

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the opaquing capacity, color compatibility and stability of IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers. A total of 86 IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers were made for 18 patients. The patients were divided into three groups: Group A was tetracycline teeth, 64 veneers for 5 patients; Group B was non-tetracycline teeth, 22 veneers for 13 patients; Group C was 22 natural vital teeth with normal color as control group. Before and after veneers were inserted, ShadeEye NCC was employed to obtain L * a * b * values of each tooth. The values of cemented veneers used as the baseline, the L * a * b * values of each veneer were measured half a year, 1 year, and 2 years after restoration respectively. All L * a * b * values at different evaluation times were analyzed by SPSS 10.0. Before and after veneers were restored, the L * a * b * values of both Group A and Group B were significantly different, the color difference being 5.01 and 4.15 respectively. The color difference between Group A and selected shade guides was 2.45. Compared with the baseline value, the L * value of Group A significantly decreased 2 years after restoration, but the DeltaE of different evaluation times was not significantly different. The color difference between Group B and Group C was 0.22 and there was no significant color difference after restoration. IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers have excellent opaquing capacity, color compatibility and stability to non-tetracycline teeth. To tetracycline teeth IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers have a certain opaquing capacity, but they cannot completely match with shade guides; the L * value is significantly different after restoration and further studies are needed to evaluate its color effect.

  8. [Application of single-retainer all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed partial denture in replacing single anterior tooth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lili, Yang; Debiao, Du; Ruoyu, Ning; Deying, Chen; Junling, Wu

    2017-08-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical effect of single-retainer all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD) on the single anterior tooth loss patients. Methods A total of 20 single-retainer all-ceramic RBFPD
were fabricated and evaluated in a two-year follow-up observation. The restorations were examined on the basis of the American Public Health Association (APHA) criteria. Results A total of 20 single-retainer all-ceramic RBFPD achieved class A evaluation after a six-month follow-up observation. One single-retainer all-ceramic RBFPD was classified as class B for secondary caries after a one-year follow-up observation. After a two-year follow-up observation, one single-retainer all-ceramic RBFPD was classified as class B because of secondary caries, and one single-retainer all-ceramic RBFPD was classified as class B because of fracture. Conclusion Single-retainer all-ceramic RBFPD is a promising and optional method in replacing single anterior tooth.

  9. Restoration of the orbital aesthetic subunit with the thoracodorsal artery system of flaps in patients undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanowski, Eric J P; Casper, Keith A; Eisbruch, Avraham; Heth, Jason A; Marentette, Lawrence J; Prince, Mark E; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Chepeha, Douglas B

    2013-10-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the advantages of the thoracodorsal artery scapular tip autogenous transplant (Tdast) for patients requiring restoration of the orbital aesthetic subunit. Design Prospective case series. Setting Tertiary center. Participants Ten patients (M:F,6:4) with a mean age of 56 years (range, 21 to 78 years) underwent restoration of the orbital aesthetic subunit and radiation therapy between 2001 and 2008. Main Outcome Measures The two reconstructive advantages of the thoracodorsal artery system of flaps for orbital reconstruction are a long pedicle and the suitability of the scapula tip to meet the three-dimensional requirements of the orbit. Patients were assessed 1 year or more after treatment for cosmetic outcome, work status, and socialization. Results Eight of 10 patients benefited from the three-dimensional nature of the scapula tip bone and 7 of 10 avoided vein grafting. Four of five evaluable patients reported "frequently" socializing outside their home. Four of five evaluable patients working before undergoing their treatment were able to return to work posttreatment. Seven of nine patients with postoperative photographs had minimal or no facial contour deformity. Conclusions The Tdast can restore orbital contour without osteotomy, and the thoracodorsal artery system of flaps has a long vascular pedicle that reduces vein grafting. Patients have an acceptable cosmetic result and return to preoperative work status and socialization.

  10. Clinical research in implant dentistry: evaluation of implant-supported restorations, aesthetic and patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Niklaus P; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2012-02-01

    The articles discussed in working group 3 dealt with specific aspects of clinical research. In this context, the literature reporting on survival and complication rates of implant-supported or implant-tooth supported restorations in longitudinal studies of at least 5 years were discussed. The second aspect dealt with the evaluation of aesthetic outcomes in clinical studies and the related index systems available. Finally, the third aspect discussed dealt with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). A detailed appraisal of the available methodology was presented. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Dentin-bonded all-ceramic crowns: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J; Qualtrough, A J; Hale, R W

    1998-04-01

    Dentin-bonded all-ceramic crowns employ contemporary techniques to lute the crown to the tooth using a resin luting material and dentin-bonding system. The advantages of these crowns are that they provide good esthetics and fracture resistance and can be used in cases of substantial tooth loss. Their principal disadvantages are that the luting procedure is more time-consuming and that these crowns should not be used where margins are subgingival. Dentin-bonded all-ceramic crowns may be a useful addition to the dentist's armamentarium, but long-term clinical studies are needed to fully assess their performance.

  12. Illuminating light-dependent color shifts in core and veneer layers of dental all-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Cha, Hyun-Suk; Yu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    The color of an object is perceived differently depending on the ambient light conditions. Since dental all-ceramic restorations are fabricated by building up several layers to reproduce the tooth shade, the optical properties of each layer should be optimized for successful shade reproduction. This study aimed to determine the separate contributions of the color shifts in each of the core and veneer layers of all-ceramics by switching the illuminating lights on the color shifts of layered ceramics. Specimens of seven kinds of core ceramics and the corresponding veneer ceramics for each core were fabricated with a layered thickness of 1.5 mm. A sintering ceramic was used as a reference core material. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates of core, veneer, and layered specimens were measured with a spectroradiometer under the CIE illuminant D65 (daylight), A (incandescent lamp), and F9 (fluorescent lamp) simulating lights. Color shifts of the layered specimens were primarily determined by the CIE a* shifts (D65 to A switch) or by the CIE b* shifts (D65 to F9 switch) of the veneer layer. The color coordinates shifts in the constituent layers differentially influenced those of the layered specimens by the kind of switched lights. Therefore, the optical properties of the constituent layers of all-ceramics should be controlled to reflect these findings.

  13. Topological design of all-ceramic dental bridges for enhancing fracture resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Chen, Junning; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Layered all-ceramic systems have been increasingly adopted in major dental prostheses. However, ceramics are inherently brittle, and they often subject to premature failure under high occlusion forces especially in the posterior region. This study aimed to develop mechanically sound novel topological designs for all-ceramic dental bridges by minimizing the fracture incidence under given loading conditions. A bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) technique is implemented within the extended finite element method (XFEM) framework. Extended finite element method allows modeling crack initiation and propagation inside all-ceramic restoration systems. Following this, BESO searches the optimum distribution of two different ceramic materials, namely porcelain and zirconia, for minimizing fracture incidence. A performance index, as per a ratio of peak tensile stress to material strength, is used as a design objective. In this study, the novel XFEM based BESO topology optimization significantly improved structural strength by minimizing performance index for suppressing fracture incidence in the structures. As expected, the fracture resistance and factor of safety of fixed partial dentures structure increased upon redistributing zirconia and porcelain in the optimal topological configuration. Dental CAD/CAM systems and the emerging 3D printing technology were commercially available to facilitate implementation of such a computational design, exhibiting considerable potential for clinical application in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Eco-experiential quality of urban forests: Combining ecological, restorative and aesthetic perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Hauru, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis I combined perspectives from urban forest ecology, environmental psychology and empirical aesthetics to determine whether ecologically beneficial urban forest planning and management can also be experientially good. The thesis consists of four interrelated papers, three of which are empirical research papers and the fourth a theoretical review article. All empirical work was performed in boreal forests in Helsinki, the capital of Finland. In the ecological part of the thes...

  15. Combined aesthetic interventions for prevention of facial ageing, and restoration and beautification of face and body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabi S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Fabi,1 Tatjana Pavicic,2 André Braz,3 Jeremy B Green,4,5 Kyle Seo,6 Jani AJ van Loghem7 1Cosmetic Laser Dermatology, San Diego, CA, USA; 2Private Practice for Dermatology and Aesthetics, Munich, Germany; 3Division of the Policlínica Geral do Rio de Janeiro (PGRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 4Skin Associates of South Florida, Miami, 5University of Miami Department of Dermatology, Miami, FL, USA; 6Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea; 7Doctors Inc., Amsterdam, The Netherlands Abstract: The Merz Institute of Advanced Aesthetics Expert Summit was held in Prague, Czech Republic, from 19–20 November 2016. The meeting had a distinct advisory board character and invited aesthetic practitioners from all over the world to hear an international faculty present a range of keynote lectures and conduct live injection sessions with an emphasis on recent developments in combination aesthetic interventions for face and body rejuvenation and beautification. Aging is associated with changes in bones, muscles, ligaments, adipose tissue, and skin and, moreover, involves interactions among these tissue types. To achieve the most natural and harmonious rejuvenation of the face, all changes that result from the aging process should be corrected, which generally involves treatment with more than a single agent or technology. Presentations described innovative treatment algorithms for the face and body and focused on patients’ desires for natural-looking rejuvenation and how this requires a three-dimensional approach combining products that relax the musculature, volumize, and re-drape the skin. Besides treating the aging face, these procedures are increasingly used to enhance facial features as well as to delay facial aging in younger patients. The presentations covered patients from different ethnicities as well as the treatment of non-facial areas, with a particular focus on the use of Ultherapy® for skin lifting and tightening, and new aesthetic

  16. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part I: core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    All-ceramic restorations have been advocated for superior esthetics. Various materials have been used to improve ceramic core strength, but it is unclear whether they affect the opacity of all-ceramic systems. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic system core materials at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Disc specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.49 +/- 0.01 mm in thickness were fabricated from the following materials (n = 5 per group): IPS Empress dentin, IPS Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina core, In-Ceram Spinell core, In-Ceram Zirconia core, and Procera AllCeram core. Empress and Empress 2 dentin specimens also were fabricated and tested at a thickness of 0.77 +/- 0.02 mm (the manufacturer's recommended core thickness is 0.8 mm). A high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) served as the control, and Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin was used as a standard. Sample reflectance (ratio of the intensity of reflected light to that of the incident light) was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white (Yw) backing to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (P In-Ceram Spinell > Empress, Procera, Empress 2 > In-Ceram Alumina > In-Ceram Zirconia, 52 SF alloy.

  17. [Fractographic analysis of clinically failed anterior all ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Qian; Zhou, Min-bo; Zhang, Xin-ping; Zhao, Ke

    2012-04-01

    To identify the site of crack initiation and propagation path of clinically failed all ceramic crowns by fractographic analysis. Three clinically failed anterior IPS Empress II crowns and two anterior In-Ceram alumina crowns were retrieved. Fracture surfaces were examined using both optical stereo and scanning electron microscopy. Fractographic theory and fracture mechanics principles were applied to disclose the damage characteristics and fracture mode. All the crowns failed by cohesive failure within the veneer on the labial surface. Critical crack originated at the incisal contact area and propagated gingivally. Porosity was found within the veneer because of slurry preparation and the sintering of veneer powder. Cohesive failure within the veneer is the main failure mode of all ceramic crown. Veneer becomes vulnerable when flaws are present. To reduce the chances of chipping, multi-point occlusal contacts are recommended, and layering and sintering technique of veneering layer should also be improved.

  18. The Immediate Aesthetic and Functional Restoration of Maxillary Incisors Compromised by Periodontitis Using Short Implants with Single Crown Restorations: A Minimally Invasive Approach and Five-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Marincola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The functional and aesthetic restoration of teeth compromised due to aggressive periodontitis presents numerous challenges for the clinician. Horizontal bone loss and soft tissue destruction resulting from periodontitis can impede implant placement and the regeneration of an aesthetically pleasing gingival smile line, often requiring bone augmentation and mucogingival surgery, respectively. Conservative approaches to the treatment of aggressive periodontitis (i.e., treatments that use minimally invasive tools and techniques have been purported to yield positive outcomes. Here, we report on the treatment and five-year follow-up of patient suffering from aggressive periodontitis using a minimally invasive surgical technique and implant system. By using the methods described herein, we were able to achieve the immediate aesthetic and functional restoration of the maxillary incisors in a case that would otherwise require bone augmentation and extensive mucogingival surgery. This technique represents a conservative and efficacious alternative to the aesthetic and functional replacement of teeth compromised due to aggressive periodontitis.

  19. Restoration of mires - the question of ethics, aesthetics and environmental awareness. 2. part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lode, Elve

    1999-01-01

    Restoration of mires is an issue of environmental awareness. This part of the paper has been divided into two sections: (i) description of international scientific experiments, and (ii) description of Estonian practice to restore or reclaim old peat cuttings. The presentations of the International Symposium on Peatland Restoration and Reclamation held in US in July 1998, and the IPS Jubilee Conference in Finland in September 1998 review the most common international scientific directions and practical results concerning peatland restoration and reclamation. The recolonising of the Sphagnum species and decreasing of gas emissions in old peat cuttings are a popular scientific task in the peatland restoration of today. In Estonia the area of old peat cuttings is currently about 3,000 ha to probably increase by 18,000 ha (Ramst, 1997). This means that Estonia should have its own program for sustainable peatland management, restoration and reclamation included. As an example of sustainable nature management the Summary considers the development of the US Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. This part is illustrated with photos demonstrating this law in practice in the Pennsylvania Coal Mining Region in summer 1997. Although regional institutions have been given priority to using mineral resources, the State should also be responsible for the restoration and reclamation of a exhausted mining area. (author)

  20. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part II: core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM All-ceramic core materials with various strengthening compositions have a range of translucencies. It is unknown whether translucency differs when all-ceramic materials are fabricated similarly to the clinical restoration with a veneered core material. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic materials veneered and glazed at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Core specimens (n = 5 per group) of Empress dentin, Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Spinell, In-Ceram Zirconia, and Procera AllCeram were fabricated as described in Part I of this study and veneered with their corresponding dentin porcelain to a final thickness of 1.47 +/- 0.01 mm. These specimens were compared with veneered Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin (as a standard), a clear glass disc (positive control), and a high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) veneered with Vitadur Omega dentin (negative control). Specimen reflectance was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Measurements were repeated after a glazing cycle. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white backing (Yw) to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (P<.05). Significant differences in contrast ratios were found among the ceramic systems tested when they were veneered (P<.0001) and after the glazing cycle (P<.0001). Significant changes in contrast ratios (P<.0001) also were identified when the veneered specimens were glazed. Within the limitations of this study, a range of translucency was identified in the veneered all-ceramic systems tested. Such variability may affect their ability to match natural teeth. The glazing cycle resulted

  1. Satisfaction After Restoring Aesthetics and Function in a Child with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Özcan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is a hereditary disorder that disrupts the formation of enamel in both primary and permanent dentition. Management of AI is a challenge for the patient and the clinician. This case report presents the management of AI in a six-year-old female patient. Considering the patient’s age, we decided to make removable dentures in order to avoid growth and development problems. Conventional complete dentures were made, vertical dimension was increased, and the desired aesthetics and function were gained. Additionally, satisfaction with prosthodontic rehabilitation was evaluated using a questionnaire. A high level of patient and parent satisfaction was obtained. Treatment planning for patients with AI is related to many factors including the age and socioeconomic status of the patient, the type and severity of the disorder, the intraoral situation at the time the treatment is planned and most importantly, cooperation of the patient plays a major role.

  2. Fifteen-year survival of anterior all-ceramic cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this follow-up study was to report the long-term outcome of all-ceramic cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs). In 16 patients (mean age of 33.3±17.5years) 22 RBFDPs made from a glass-infiltrated alumina ceramic (In-Ceram) were inserted with a phosphate monomer containing luting agent after air-abrasion of the retainer wings. The abutment preparation included a shallow groove on the cingulum and a small proximal box. The restorations replacing 16 maxillary and 6 mandibular incisors were followed over a mean observation time of 188.7 months. No restoration debonded. Two RBFDPs fractured and were lost 48 and 214 months after insertion, respectively. The 10-year and 15-year survival rates were both 95.4% and dropped to 81.8% after 18 years. Anterior all-ceramic cantilever RBFDPs exhibited an excellent clinical longevity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. All ceramic structure for molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1992-01-01

    An all-ceramic molten carbonate fuel cell having a composition formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The structure includes an anode and cathode separated by an electronically conductive interconnect. The electrodes and interconnect are compositions ceramic materials. Various combinations of ceramic compositions for the anode, cathode and interconnect are disclosed. The fuel cell exhibits stability in the fuel gas and oxidizing environments. It presents reduced sealing and expansion problems in fabrication and has improved long-term corrosion resistance.

  4. The Interplay of Orthodontics, Periodontics, and Restorative Dentistry to Achieve Aesthetic and Functional Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkowsky, Richard D; Alsadah, Zainab; Brea, Luis M; Oquendo, Anabella

    2015-07-01

    Previously dentists focused on repair and maintenance of function. However, the emphasis of many patients and dentists is now on esthetics. Often there is a need for the disciplines of orthodontics, periodontics, restorative dentistry, and maxillofacial surgery to work together in order to achieve optimum results. Currently the sequencing planning process begins with esthetics and then function, structure, and ultimately biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of rebonding on microleakage of class V aesthetic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Maria Carolina Guilherme; Magalhães, Cláudia Silami; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2002-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of rebonding on microleakage of a resin composite, a condensable resin and two polyacid-modified resin composite restorations. Standardized cylindrical Class V dentin cavities were prepared on the buccal root surfaces of 240 extracted bovine incisive teeth. The prepared teeth were randomly assigned to four groups of 60 teeth and restored with the following restorative systems: I--(ZS) Z100/Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus; II--(SS) Solitaire/Solid Bond; III--(FS) Freedom/Stae; IV--(FSB) F200/Single Bond. Thirty teeth of each group were rebonded with a low-viscosity resin (Fortify/BISCO), according to the manufacturer's instructions. The remaining teeth received no treatment. All teeth were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles and brushed by hand three times a day for 10 days using a toothbrush and a slurry of dentifrice and water. Specimens were stained in a 2% methylene blue solution and longitudinally sectioned with diamond disks. Microleakage was scored on a scale of 0 to 3. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed statistically significant differences among the groups (h=156.54; alpha<0.05). Pairwise comparison by means of the least significant difference showed that (SS) and (FS) with or without rebonding were not statistically different from each other. These groups showed the highest microleakage differences from (ZS) and (FSB) with or without rebonding. (ZS) with rebonding showed the lowest microleakage that was not statistically different from (ZS) without rebonding and (FSB) with rebonding.

  6. A comparison of the fabrication times of all-ceramic partial crowns: Cerec 3D vs IPS Empress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozdowski, S; Reich, S

    2009-01-01

    Apart from precision, the time factor plays a decisive role in the fabrication of all-ceramic dental restorations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare two all-ceramic systems with regard to the time required for the fabrication of partial crowns [MODB]. The null hypothesis tested was that the fabrication times of CAD/CAM generated partial crowns are shorter than the fabrication times of partial crowns manufactured in the laboratory. In sixteen model pairs mounted in the articulator, which corresponded to different clinical situations, tooth 36 was prepared for an all-ceramic partial crown [MODB]. With the Cerec3D method [CHAIR], the fabrication of the restoration was simulated directly on the "phantom patient". The IPS Empress system [LAB] was used forthe indirectfabrication method via an impression of the phantom patient. Both methods were used for each preparation. The adhesive luting procedure was not simulated and, therefore, not measured. The mean processing times [hh:mm:ss] were 00:35:05 (SD +/- 03:27 min) for the Cerec method and 04:17:54 (SD +/- 26:01 min) for the Empress method. The mean time on the phantom patient for process-induced activities was 11:47 minutes (SD +/- 02:08 min) for the Cerec method and 03:58 minutes (SD +/- 02:50 min) for the Empress method. Time expenditure for fabrication is only one aspect in order to assess the suitability of a restoration system. Both methods enable the dentist to provide high quality all ceramic restorations. Although the Empress method showed a time advantage of 65% during the fitting phase and occlusal grinding-in on the phantom patient in comparison to the Cerec method, the time spent during the laboratory phase has to be considered as well.

  7. [Study on the effect of different impression methods on the marginal fit of all-ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lilin; Zeng, Liwei; Chen, Ping; Liao, Lan; Li, Shiyue; Liu, Renying

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of three different impression methods on the marginal fit of all-ceramic crowns. The three methods include scanning silicone rubber impression, cast models, and direct optical impression. The polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) material of a mandibular first molar in standard model was prepared with 16 models duplicated. The all-ceramic crowns were prepared using three different impression methods. Accurate impressions were made using silicone rubber, and the cast models were obtained. The PMMA models, silicone rubber impressions, and cast models were scanned, and digital models of three groups were obtained to produce 48 zirconia all-ceramic crowns with computer aided design/computer aided manufacture. The marginal fit of these groups was measured by silicone rubber gap impression. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 17.0 software. The marginal fit of direct optical impression groups, silicone rubber impression groups, cast model groups was (69.18±9.47), (81.04±10.88), (84.42±9.96) µm. A significant difference was observed in the marginal fit of the direct optical impression groups and the other groups (Pimpression groups and the cast model groups (P>0.05). All marginal measurement sites are clinically acceptable by the three different impression scanning methods. The silicone rubber impression scanning method can be used for all-ceramic restorations.

  8. Staged Hard and Soft Tissue Reconstruction Followed by Implant Supported Restoration in the Aesthetic Zone: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Harinath; Ramachandran, Lakshmi; Tadepalli, Anupama; Ponnaiyan, Deepa

    2017-04-01

    Alveolar ridge deficiency is a common clinical consequence following tooth loss due to chronic periodontitis complicating ideal implant placement. Advanced hard and soft tissue augmentation procedures have been developed in the recent past with predictable clinical outcomes. A male patient presented with a Grade III mobile upper right central incisor associated with advanced bone loss and soft tissue deficit. Following extraction of tooth #11, socket augmentation was done using an autogenous cortico-cancellous block graft and subsequent soft tissue augmentation was done with palatal connective tissue graft. At the end of six months, a tapered self tapping implant fixture was placed with adequate primary stability and after eight weeks, second stage implant surgery was done with the Misch technique in order to recreate papillae and the implant was prosthetically restored. The alveolar ridge was adequately recontoured following the staged surgical protocol. The implant was well integrated at the end of 15 months. Execution of sequential surgical procedures in a highly deficient edentulous site made it possible to achieve of optimal pink and white aesthetics with stable implant supported fixed prosthesis.

  9. [Chromatic study of all-ceramic crown--IPS Empress: difference of color by manufacturing technique and cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Utako; Sadamitsu, Kenichiro; Yamamura, Osamu; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Fujii, Teruhisa

    2004-12-01

    In recent years,aesthetic appearance and function are called for and all-ceramic crowns are spreading. By choosing an all-ceramic crown the problem of metal ceramics is avoided. There are difficulties of color tone reproducibility of cervical margin and darkness of gingival margin. We examined IPS Empress also in various all-ceramic crowns. IPS Empress has high permeability a ceramic ingot of various color tones and excellent color tone reproducibility of natural teeth. Generally a layering technique is used for an anterior tooth and the staining technique is used for a molar. However the details are unknown We examined how differences of manufacturing method and cement affect the color tone of all ceramics clinically. Two kinds of Empress crown were fabricated for a 27 year-old woman's upper left-side central incisors:the staining technique of IPS Empress and the layering technique of IPS Empress II. Various try-in pastes(transparent opaque white white and yellow) of VariolinkII of the IPS Empress System were used for cementing. Color was measured using a spectrophotometer CMS 35FS. The L*a*b* color system was used for showing a color. The right-side central incisors on the opposite side of the same name teeth were used for comparison. We analyzed the color difference (DeltaE* ab)with a natural tooth. Consequently when it had no cement of staining technique and was tranceparent small values were obtained. It is considered that the color tone can be adjusted by color cement. It is effective to use the staining technique for an anterior tooth crown depending on the case. The crown manufactured using the layering technique is not easily influenced by cement. The crown manufactured by the staining technique tends to be influenced by cement.

  10. Effect of the shades of background substructures on the overall color of zirconia-based all-ceramic crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulapornchai, Chantana; Mamani, Jatuphol; Kamchatphai, Wannaporn; Thongpun, Noparat

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the color of a background substructure on the overall color of a zirconia-based all-ceramic crown. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty one posterior zirconia crowns were made for twenty subjects. Seven premolar crowns and six molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with metal post and core in the first and second group. In the third group, eight molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with a prefabricated post and composite core build-up. The color measurements of all-ceramic crowns were made before try-in, before and after cementation. A repeated measure ANOVA was used for a statistical analysis of a color change of all-ceramic crowns at α=.05. Twenty four zirconia specimens, with different core thicknesses (0.4-1 mm) were also prepared to obtain the contrast ratio of zirconia materials after veneering. RESULTS L*, a*, and b* values of all-ceramic crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or on a prefabricated post did not show significant changes (P>.05). However, the slight color changes of zirconia crowns were detected and represented by ΔE*ab values, ranging from 1.2 to 3.1. The contrast ratios of zirconia specimens were 0.92-0.95 after veneering. CONCLUSION No significant differences were observed between the L*, a*, and b* values of zirconia crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or a prefabricated post and composite core. However, the color of a background substructure could affect the overall color of posterior zirconia restorations with clinically recommended core thickness according to ΔE*ab values. PMID:24049574

  11. The all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture. Part 1. Ceramic inlay preparation design: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M C; Thompson, K M; Swain, M

    2010-06-01

    The effect of cavity design is a controversial and underrated factor in the clinical success of ceramic inlays and inlay supported prosthesis. Many articles and studies have been conducted into the advantages and disadvantages of isolated aspects of preparation design, but lacking is a review of the most relevant papers which bring together a consensus on all the critical features. Hence, a review and analysis of cavity depth, width, preparation taper and internal line angles is warranted in our attempts to formulate preparation guidelines that will lead to clinically successful, all-ceramic inlay restorations and ceramic inlay supported prosthesis.

  12. Biaxial flexural strength of Turkom-Cera core compared to two other all-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandar Mohammed Abdullah Al-Makramani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in all-ceramic systems have established predictable means of providing metal-free aesthetic and biocompatible materials. These materials must have sufficient strength to be a practical treatment alternative for the fabrication of crowns and fixed partial dentures. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the biaxial flexural strength of three core ceramic materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three groups of 10 disc-shaped specimens (16 mm diameter x 1.2 mm thickness - in accordance with ISO-6872, 1995 were made from the following ceramic materials: Turkom-Cera Fused Alumina [(Turkom-Ceramic (M Sdn Bhd, Puchong, Selangor, Malaysia], In-Ceram (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany and Vitadur-N (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, which were sintered according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The specimens were subjected to biaxial flexural strength test in an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The definitive fracture load was recorded for each specimen and the biaxial flexural strength was calculated from an equation in accordance with ISO-6872. RESULTS: The mean biaxial flexural strength values were: Turkom-Cera: 506.8±87.01 MPa, In-Ceram: 347.4±28.83 MPa and Vitadur-N: 128.7±12.72 MPa. The results were analyzed by the Levene's test and Dunnett's T3 post-hoc test (SPSS software V11.5.0 for Windows, SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA at a preset significance level of 5% because of unequal group variances (P<0.001. There was statistically significant difference between the three core ceramics (P<0.05. Turkom-Cera showed the highest biaxial flexural strength, followed by In-Ceram and Vitadur-N. CONCLUSIONS: Turkom-Cera core had significantly higher flexural strength than In-Ceram and Vitadur-N ceramic core materials.

  13. Immediate placement and restoration of implants in the aesthetic zone with a trimodal approach: soft tissue alterations and its relation to gingival biotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Gustavo; Rioboo, María; Fábrega, Javier G

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the soft tissue changes around implants in the aesthetic zone, placed under a trimodal approach (immediate post-extraction placement, flapless, and immediate provisional restoration) and its relationship to gingival/periodontal biotype of the patient. The sample consisted of 14 patients from two private practices that were in need of a tooth extraction in the anterior maxillary region (cuspid to cuspid) and were candidates to a replacement with a dental implant. An initial measurement (baseline) of the position or the mesial and distal papillae and gingival zenith was made at this time, with a rigid dental-supported stent and an electronic precision caliper, able to the second tenth of a millimeter; after careful tooth extraction, the periodontal thickness, at a point 5 mm apical to de gingival buccal margin, with an analogical thickness gauge, able to one tenth of a millimeter. Once the implant was inserted an immediate provisional restoration was delivered. To evaluate the soft tissue changes measurements were repeated at 3, 6, and 12 months. A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the changes in the gingival margin around the implant restorations and to identify a possible correlation to patient's periodontal thickness. All 14 patients received Straumann (®) implants (9 Tissue Level [TL] Regular Neck [RN], 2 TL Narrow Neck [NN], 2 Bone Level [BL] Narrow Crossfit [NC], and 1 BL Regular Crossfit [RC]). All implants integrated and none had any biological complications. Three provisional restorations presented screw loosening and retightened once and one loss retention and was recemented once. In one patient, with a severe bruxing habit, the final restoration suffered screw loosening and was retightened. Of the final restorations, 12 were screw-retained and 2 cemented on custom-made Zirconia abutments. A mean recession of the buccal margin of 0.45 mm was recorded at 12 months ( ± 0.25 mm). An acceptable

  14. Students’ evaluation of preclinical simulation for all ceramic preparation (In Faculty of Dentistry Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasya Ahmad Tarib

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to evaluate all ceramic crown (ACC preparations those were made by dental undergraduate students during the preclinical sessions. 104 plastic teeth were prepared by 4th year dental undergraduates during the preclinical session for ACC crown examined. The teeth were placed on the frasaco arches and were mounted in the frasaco head. The preparations were examined for the tapering, presence of undercuts, incisal and cingulum reductions as well as preparation of shoulder margin. Preparations were examined using hand instruments and visual. The sample size was 92 plastic teeth. Most of the preparations were acceptable with acceptable placement and types of margins, adequate axial and incisal reductions and acceptable tapered of the axial walls. On the other hand, most of the teeth showed absence of cingulum wall. Most of the crowns prepared by the students were acceptable. It showed that they understood the principles of crown preparation. Cingulum wall preparation has to be given greater emphasis as it is important in the retention and resistance of the restoration.

  15. Effect of Luting Cements On the Bond Strength to Turkom-Cera All-Ceramic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al–Makramani, Bandar M. A.; Razak, Abdul A. A.; Abu–Hassan, Mohamed I.; Al–Sanabani, Fuad A.; Albakri, Fahad M.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The selection of the appropriate luting cement is a key factor for achieving a strong bond between prepared teeth and dental restorations. AIM: To evaluate the shear bond strength of Zinc phosphate cement Elite, glass ionomer cement Fuji I, resin-modified glass ionomer cement Fuji Plus and resin luting cement Panavia-F to Turkom-Cera all-ceramic material. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Turkom-Cera was used to form discs 10mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness (n = 40). The ceramic discs were wet ground, air - particle abraded with 50 - μm aluminium oxide particles and randomly divided into four groups (n = 10). The luting cement was bonded to Turkom-Cera discs as per manufacturer instructions. The shear bond strengths were determined using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analysed using the tests One Way ANOVA, the nonparametric Kruskal - Wallis test and Mann - Whitney Post hoc test. RESULTS: The shear bond strength of the Elite, Fuji I, Fuji Plus and Panavia F groups were: 0.92 ± 0.42, 2.04 ± 0.78, 4.37 ± 1.18, and 16.42 ± 3.38 MPa, respectively. There was the statistically significant difference between the four luting cement tested (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: the phosphate-containing resin cement Panavia-F exhibited shear bond strength value significantly higher than all materials tested. PMID:29610618

  16. ADM guidance-Ceramics: all-ceramic multilayer interfaces in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Scherrer, Susanne S; Della Bona, Alvaro; Tholey, Michael; van Noort, Richard; Vichi, Alessandro; Kelly, J Robert; Cesar, Paulo F

    2017-06-01

    This guidance document describes the specific issues involved in dental multilayer ceramic systems. The material interactions with regard to specific thermal and mechanical properties are reviewed and the characteristics of dental tooth-shaped processing parameters (sintering, geometry, thickness ratio, etc.) are discussed. Several techniques for the measurement of bond quality and residual stresses are presented with a detailed discussion of advantages and disadvantages. In essence no single technique is able to describe adequately the all-ceramic interface. Invasive or semi-invasive methods have been shown to distort the information regarding the residual stress state while non-invasive methods are limited due to resolution, field of focus or working depth. This guidance document has endeavored to provide a scientific basis for future research aimed at characterizing the ceramic interface of dental restorations. Along with the methodological discussion it is seeking to provide an introduction and guidance to relatively inexperienced researchers. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Environmental Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie; Ekelund, Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    The philosophical subfield environmental aesthetics can contribute to the design of sustainable futures. Environmental aesthetics provides a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between nature and culture. Current positions in environmental aesthetics are lined out and used...

  18. Longevity of Single-Tooth All-Ceramic CAD/CAM Restorations: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    to the application of CAD/CAM technology in dentistry . The initial monetary investment for the equipment is significant. Systems currently on the...CURRENT DENTAL CAD/CAM SYSTEMS Current CAD/CAM systems in dentistry include: CEREC (CEramic REConstruction) and CEREC Acquisition Center (AC) with...of Adhesive Dentistry , 1 (3), 255- 265. 42     Bindl A, & Mörmann W. (2002). An up to 5-year clinical evaluation of posterior In- Ceram CAD

  19. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  20. Robot Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Putnam, Lance Jonathan

    This paper considers art-based research practice in robotics through a discussion of our course and relevant research projects in autonomous art. The undergraduate course integrates basic concepts of computer science, robotic art, live performance and aesthetic theory. Through practice...... in robotics research (such as aesthetics, culture and perception), we believe robot aesthetics is an important area for research in contemporary aesthetics....

  1. An interdisciplinary approach to reconstruct a fractured tooth under an intact all ceramic crown: Case report with four years follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Bhandari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma causing the fracture of a restored tooth with the extracoronal full coverage prosthesis remaining intact is a common occurrence in dental practice. Reconstruction of the damaged tooth foundation and recementation of the crown can pose quite a challenge for the restorative dentist. This case report describes an innovative interdisciplinary chairside technique for the recementation of an all-ceramic crown on a fractured maxillary central incisor. The course of care described is effective, affordable, and saves time in comparison with other treatment options for such clinical situations.

  2. Biomechanical Analysis of Individual All-Ceramic Abutments Used in Dental Implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziębowicz B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of finite element analysis and experimental testing under simulated physiological loading conditions on issues shaping the functional properties of individual all-ceramic abutments manufactured by CAD/CAM technology. The conducted research have cognitive significance showing the all-ceramic abutment behavior, as a key element of the implantological system, under the action of cyclic load. The aim of this study was evaluation the fatigue behavior of yttria-stabilized zirconia abutment submitted to cyclic stresses, conducted in accordance with EN ISO 14801 applies to dynamic fatigue tests of endosseous dental implants.

  3. The Effect of Gamma Radiation on the Bond Strength and Micro leakage of Two Aesthetic Restorative Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seif, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on bond strength and micro leakage of nano-composite and nano-glassionomer, and to detect any alterations in their molecular structure due to gamma radiation. Materials and Methods: 80 specimens were used as follow; 40 specimens for shear bond strength evaluation, 20 specimens for micro leakage assessment, while the remaining 20 specimens for deducing the chemical structure. For shear bond strength (SBS) test 2 mm thick wafers of dentine were sectioned and 3 mm diameter holes were drilled through the wafers. 20 specimens were restored with nano-composite and nano-glassionomer without irradiation (Group A1, B1). The remaining 20 specimens were restored with nano-composite and nano-glassionomer (Group A2, B2), then they were irradiated with therapeutic dose of 60 gray for 1 week (3 days/week). For micro leakage, 10 natural teeth with two prepared class V cavities were used. One of the cavities was restored with nano-composite while the other one with nano-glassionomer to be examined before and after gamma radiation. Spectrophotometric analysis was performed for all tested materials before and after radiation to trace any structural changes. Results: Significant increase in SBS of nano-composite after irradiation while nano-glassionomer was insignificantly increased. For micro leakage no significant difference existed between the irradiated and non-irradiated groups of both materials. Conclusion: Therapeutic dose of head and neck gamma radiation had improved dentin shear bond strength of nano-composite. On the other hand, it had not an effect on shear bond strength of nano-glassionomer and the micro leakage of both tested materials. Gamma radiation did not alter the chemical structure of the tested material.

  4. Comparison of two bond strength testing methodologies for bilayered all-ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gokce, Bulent; Comlekoglu, Erhan; Leite, Fabiola; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    Objectives. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) and microtensile (MTBS) testing methodologies for core and veneering ceramics in four types of all-ceramic systems. Methods. Four different ceramic veneer/core combinations, three of which were feldspathic and the other a fluor-apatite to

  5. In vitro evaluation of the marginal fit of different all-ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Tolga Yucel

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: In-Ceram all-ceramic crowns showed the largest marginal gap, and Celay crowns showed the smallest marginal gap in both die groups. The marginal discrepancies found in this study were all within the clinically acceptable standard of 120 μm.

  6. [A computer aided design approach of all-ceramics abutment for maxilla central incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-chun; Zhao, Yi-jiao; Wang, Yong; Han, Jing-yun; Lin, Ye; Lü, Pei-jun

    2010-10-01

    To establish the computer aided design (CAD) software platform of individualized abutment for the maxilla central incisor. Three-dimentional data of the incisor was collected by scanning and geometric transformation. Data mainly included the occlusal part of the healing abutment, the location carinae of the bedpiece, the occlusal 1/3 part of the artificial gingiva's inner surface, and so on. The all-ceramic crown designed in advanced was "virtual cutback" to get the original data of the abutment's supragingival part. The abutment's in-gum part was designed to simulate the individual natural tooth root. The functions such as "data offset", "bi-rail sweep surface" and "loft surface" were used in the process of CAD. The CAD route of the individualized all-ceramic abutment was set up. The functions and application methods were decided and the complete CAD process was realized. The software platform was basically set up according to the requests of the dental clinic.

  7. Evaluation of an all-ceramic tubesheet assembly for a hot gas filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitner, J.L. [Mallett Technology, Inc., Canonsburg, PA (United States); Mallett, R.H. [Mallett Technology, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Eggerstedt, P.M. [Industrial Filter and Pump Mfg. Co., Cicero, IL (United States); Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A 10-inch thick, all-ceramic tubesheet design is evaluated for differential pressure and thermal conditions. Primary stresses from differential pressure are well within a safe allowable. The calculated peak thermal stresses at local discontinuities approach the modules of rupture for the ceramic material. Kiln tests were performed to demonstrate differential temperatures between hot center and cooler rim do not cause failures or visible tensile cracks. There appear to be mitigating mechanisms and design features in the Industrial Filter and Pump (IF and P) Mfg. Co. all-ceramic tubesheet design concept that add forgiveness in accommodating differential pressure and thermal loading stresses. A material characterization program on the ceramic materials is recommended.

  8. Effect of esthetic core shades on the final color of IPS Empress all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Shereen S; Ayash, Ghada M; Johnston, William M; Khalil, Moustafa F; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2006-12-01

    Clinically relevant assessment of all-ceramic crowns supported by esthetic composite resin foundations has not been evaluated with regard to color reproducibility. This in vitro study quantitatively evaluated the influence of different shades of composite resin foundations and resin cement on the final color of a leucite-reinforced all-ceramic material. A total of 128 disks were fabricated; 64 (20 x 1 mm) were made of all-ceramic material (IPS Empress) and 64 (20 x 4 mm) of 4 different shades composite resin (Tetric Ceram). The ceramic and composite resin disks were luted using 2 shades (A3 and Transparent) of resin cement (Variolink II). Color was measured using a colorimeter configured with a diffuse illumination/0-degree viewing geometry, and Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) L( *)a( *)b( *) values were directly calculated. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed, and color differences (DeltaE) for the average L( *), a( *) and b( *) color parameters were calculated. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare mean values and SDs between the different color combinations (alpha=.05). The CIE L( *)a( *)b( *) color coordinate values showed no significant differences for variation in color parameters due to the effect of the different composite resin shades (P=.24) or cement shades (P=.12). The mean color difference (DeltaE) value between the groups was 0.8. Within the limitations of this study, the use of different shades for composite resin cores and resin cements presented no statistically significant effect on the final color of IPS Empress all-ceramic material.

  9. Evaluation of marginal fit of two all-ceramic copings with two finish lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Gulce; Ozturk, Nilgun; Inan, Ozgur; Bozogullari, Nalan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study investigated the marginal fit of two all-ceramic copings with 2 finish line designs. Methods: Forty machined stainless steel molar die models with two different margin designs (chamfer and rounded shoulder) were prepared. A total of 40 standardized copings were fabricated and divided into 4 groups (n=10 for each finish line-coping material). Coping materials tested were IPS e.max Press and Zirkonzahn; luting agent was Variolink II. Marginal fit was evaluated after cementation with a stereomicroscope (Leica MZ16). Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD test were performed to assess the influence of each finish line design and ceramic type on the marginal fit of 2 all-ceramic copings (α =.05). Results: Two-way analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant differences for marginal fit relative to finish lines (P=.362) and ceramic types (P=.065). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, both types of all-ceramic copings demonstrated that the mean marginal fit was considered acceptable for clinical application (⩽120 μm). PMID:22509119

  10. Manufacturing conditioned roughness and wear of biomedical oxide ceramics for all-ceramic knee implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turger, Anke; Köhler, Jens; Denkena, Berend; Correa, Tomas A; Becher, Christoph; Hurschler, Christof

    2013-08-29

    Ceramic materials are used in a growing proportion of hip joint prostheses due to their wear resistance and biocompatibility properties. However, ceramics have not been applied successfully in total knee joint endoprostheses to date. One reason for this is that with strict surface quality requirements, there are significant challenges with regard to machining. High-toughness bioceramics can only be machined by grinding and polishing processes. The aim of this study was to develop an automated process chain for the manufacturing of an all-ceramic knee implant. A five-axis machining process was developed for all-ceramic implant components. These components were used in an investigation of the influence of surface conformity on wear behavior under simplified knee joint motion. The implant components showed considerably reduced wear compared to conventional material combinations. Contact area resulting from a variety of component surface shapes, with a variety of levels of surface conformity, greatly influenced wear rate. It is possible to realize an all-ceramic knee endoprosthesis device, with a precise and affordable manufacturing process. The shape accuracy of the component surfaces, as specified by the design and achieved during the manufacturing process, has a substantial influence on the wear behavior of the prosthesis. This result, if corroborated by results with a greater sample size, is likely to influence the design parameters of such devices.

  11. CAD/CAM Zirconia vs. slip-cast glass-infiltrated Alumina/Zirconia all-ceramic crowns: 2-year results of a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Cavit Çehreli

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to compare the early clinical outcome of slip-cast glass-infiltrated Alumina/Zirconia and CAD/CAM Zirconia all-ceramic crowns. A total of 30 InCeram® Zirconia and Cercon® Zirconia crowns were fabricated and cemented with a glass ionomer cement in 20 patients. At baseline, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year recall appointments, Californian Dental Association (CDA quality evaluation system was used to evaluate the prosthetic replacements, and plaque and gingival index scores were used to explore the periodontal outcome of the treatments. No clinical sign of marginal discoloration, persistent pain and secondary caries was detected in any of the restorations. All InCeram® Zirconia crowns survived during the 2-year period, although one nonvital tooth experienced root fracture coupled with the fracture of the veneering porcelain of the restoration. One Cercon® Zirconia restoration fractured and was replaced. According to the CDA criteria, marginal integrity was rated excellent for InCeram® Zirconia (73% and Cercon® Zirconia (80% restorations, respectively. Slight color mismatch rate was higher for InCeram® Zirconia restorations (66% than Cercon® Zirconia (26% restorations. Plaque and gingival index scores were mostly zero and almost constant over time. Time-dependent changes in plaque and gingival index scores within and between groups were statistically similar (p>0.05. This clinical study demonstrates that single-tooth InCeram® Zirconia and Cercon® Zirconia crowns have comparable early clinical outcome, both seem as acceptable treatment modalities, and most importantly, all-ceramic alumina crowns strengthened by 25% zirconia can sufficiently withstand functional load in the posterior zone.

  12. Marginal and internal fit of heat pressed versus CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays after exposure to thermo-mechanical fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, Petra C.; Vagopoulou, Thaleia; Zhang, Yu; Wolkewitz, Martin; Strub, Joerg R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the marginal and internal fit of heat-pressed and CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays before and after luting as well as after thermo-mechanical fatigue. Materials and Methods Seventy-two caries-free, extracted human mandibular molars were randomly divided into three groups (n=24/group). All teeth received an onlay preparation with a mesio-occlusal-distal inlay cavity and an occlusal reduction of all cusps. Teeth were restored with heat-pressed IPS-e.max-Press* (IP, *Ivoclar-Vivadent) and Vita-PM9 (VP, Vita-Zahnfabrik) as well as CAD/CAM fabricated IPS-e.max-CAD* (IC, Cerec 3D/InLab/Sirona) all-ceramic materials. After cementation with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (VariolinkII*), all restorations were subjected to mouth-motion fatigue (98N, 1.2 million cycles; 5°C/55°C). Marginal fit discrepancies were examined on epoxy replicas before and after luting as well as after fatigue at 200x magnification. Internal fit was evaluated by multiple sectioning technique. For the statistical analysis, a linear model was fitted with accounting for repeated measurements. Results Adhesive cementation of onlays resulted in significantly increased marginal gap values in all groups, whereas thermo-mechanical fatigue had no effect. Marginal gap values of all test groups were equal after fatigue exposure. Internal discrepancies of CAD/CAM fabricated restorations were significantly higher than both press manufactured onlays. Conclusions Mean marginal gap values of the investigated onlays before and after luting as well as after fatigue were within the clinically acceptable range. Marginal fit was not affected by the investigated heat-press versus CAD/CAM fabrication technique. Press fabrication resulted in a superior internal fit of onlays as compared to the CAD/CAM technique. Clinical Relevance Clinical requirements of 100 μm for marginal fit were fulfilled by the heat-press as well as by the CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays

  13. Influence of the supporting die structures on the fracture strength of all-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Munir Tolga; Yondem, Isa; Aykent, Filiz; Eraslan, Oğuz

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of the elastic modulus of supporting dies on the fracture strengths of all-ceramic materials used in dental crowns. Four different types of supporting die materials (dentin, epoxy resin, brass, and stainless steel) (24 per group) were prepared using a milling machine to simulate a mandibular molar all-ceramic core preparation. A total number of 96 zirconia cores were fabricated using a CAD/CAM system. The specimens were divided into two groups. In the first group, cores were cemented to substructures using a dual-cure resin cement. In the second group, cores were not cemented to the supporting dies. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests (α = 0.05). The geometric models of cores and supporting die materials were developed using finite element method to obtain the stress distribution of the forces. Cemented groups showed statistically higher fracture strength values than non-cemented groups. While ceramic cores on stainless steel dies showed the highest fracture strength values, ceramic cores on dentin dies showed the lowest fracture strength values among the groups. The elastic modulus of the supporting die structure is a significant factor in determining the fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns. Using supporting die structures that have a low elastic modulus may be suitable for fracture strength tests, in order to accurately reflect clinical conditions.

  14. [Survival rate of IPS-Empress 2 all-ceramic crowns and bridges: three year's results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Doris; Gerds, Thomas; Strub, Jörg R

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical study was to calculate the survival rate of IPS-Empress2 crowns and fixed partial dentures (FPD) over a three-year period. In 43 patients 27 IPS-Empress2 crowns and 31 fixed partial dentures were adhesively luted. Crowns were placed on premolars and molars and FPDs were inserted in the anterior and premolar area. Abutments were prepared with a circular 1.2 mm wide shoulder. The clinical follow-up examination took place after 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months. After a mean of 38 months, the survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) of all-ceramic crowns was 100% and of the three unit FDP 72.4%. There were a total of six complete failures which occurred only with the three-unit IPS-Empress2 FPDs. Three FPDs exhibited fractures of the framework for which the manufacturer's instructions of connector-dimension was not satisfied, and one FPD exhibited an irreparable incomplete veneer fracture. Further two FPDs showed biological failures. The accuracy of fit and esthetics were clinically satisfactory. The three-year results showed the IPS-Empress2-ceramic as an adequate all-ceramic material for single crowns. The use for FPD needs further critical consideration.

  15. Comparison of two bond strength testing methodologies for bilayered all-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoğlu, Erhan; Leite, Fabiola; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2007-05-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) and microtensile (MTBS) testing methodologies for core and veneering ceramics in four types of all-ceramic systems. Four different ceramic veneer/core combinations, three of which were feldspathic and the other a fluor-apatite to their respectively corresponding cores, namely leucite-reinforced ceramic ((IPS)Empress, Ivoclar), low leucite-reinforced ceramic (Finesse, Ceramco), glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina, Vita) and lithium disilicate ((IPS)Empress 2, Ivoclar) were used for SBS and MTBS tests. Ceramic cores (N=40, n=10/group for SBS test method, N=5 blocks/group for MTBS test method) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (for SBS: thickness, 3mm; diameter, 5mm and for MTBS: 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm) and ultrasonically cleaned. The veneering ceramics (thickness: 2mm) were vibrated and condensed in stainless steel moulds and fired onto the core ceramic materials. After trying the specimens in the mould for minor adjustments, they were again ultrasonically cleaned and embedded in PMMA. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week and bond strength tests were performed in universal testing machines (cross-head speed: 1mm/min). The bond strengths (MPa+/-S.D.) and modes of failures were recorded. Significant difference between the two test methods and all-ceramic types were observed (P<0.05) (2-way ANOVA, Tukey's test and Bonferroni). The mean SBS values for veneering ceramic to lithium disilicate was significantly higher (41+/-8 MPa) than those to low leucite (28+/-4 MPa), glass-infiltrated (26+/-4 MPa) and leucite-reinforced (23+/-3 MPa) ceramics, while the mean MTBS for low leucite ceramic was significantly higher (15+/-2 MPa) than those of leucite (12+/-2 MPa), glass-infiltrated (9+/-1 MPa) and lithium disilicate ceramic (9+/-1 MPa) (ANOVA, P<0.05). Both the testing methodology and the differences in chemical compositions of the core and veneering ceramics

  16. Bond strength of the porcelain repair system to all-ceramic copings and porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang J; Cheong, Chan Wook; Wright, Robert F; Chang, Brian M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of the porcelain repair system on alumina and zirconia core ceramics, comparing this strength with that of veneering porcelain. Veneering ceramic (n = 12), alumina core (n = 24), and zirconia core (n = 24) blocks measuring 10 × 5 × 5 mm(3) were fabricated. Veneering ceramic blocks were used as the control. Alumina and zirconia core blocks were divided into 2 groups (n = 12 each), and a slot (2 × 2 × 4 mm(3)) filled with veneering ceramics was prepared into one of the alumina and zirconia core groups (n = 12). Followed by surface treatments of micro-abrasion with 30 μm alumina particles, etching with 35% phosphoric acid and silane primer and bond, composite resin blocks (2 × 2 × 2 mm(3)) were built up and light polymerized onto the treated surfaces by 3 configurations: (a) composite blocks bonded onto veneering ceramic surface alone, (b) composite blocks bonded onto alumina core or zirconia core surfaces, (c) a 50% surface area of the composite blocks bonded to veneering ceramics and the other 50% surface area of the composite blocks to alumina core or zirconia core surfaces. The shear bond strength of the composite to each specimen was tested by a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The shear bond strength was analyzed by unpaired t-tests for within the configuration groups and ANOVA for among the different configuration groups. When the mean shear bond strength was compared within groups of the same configuration, there were no statistically significant differences. Comparison of the shear bond strength among groups of different configurations revealed statistically significant differences. The mean shear bond strength of composite onto 100% veneering ceramic surface and composite onto 50% veneering 50% all-ceramic cores was statistically higher than that of composite onto 100% all-ceramic cores; however, the differences of the shear bond strength of composite bonded

  17. Restorative Management of Severe Localized Tooth Wear Using a Supraoccluding Appliance: A 5-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz Leung Wong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report illustrates a novel conservative restorative management of a patient with bulimia nervosa who presented with severe localized upper palatal tooth wear and an anterior reverse overjet. This was achieved by using a localized bite raising or supraoccluding appliance, cemented on the lingual side of the lower anterior teeth to create interocclusal space, obviating the need for tooth reduction of the eroded upper palatal and incisal tooth surfaces. Surgical crown lengthening was performed to create a better aesthetic gingival architecture. All-ceramic restorations were provided on the upper anterior teeth to restore the tooth surface loss and provide a positive overbite and overjet. There was no complication or other observable biological change detected at the 5-year follow-up. The use of an appliance applying the supraoccluding technique, or Dahl concept, is a safe, conservative, and useful treatment option in the management of localized tooth wear.

  18. All-ceramic inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses for replacing posterior missing teeth: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Sancho-Esper, Rocío; Lynch, Christopher D; Suárez-García, María-Jesús

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the current status of all-ceramic inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses (CIR-FDPs) for the replacement of posterior teeth. Screening of titles and abstracts, full-text analysis for inclusion eligibility, quality assessment, data extraction and evaluation of the scientific evidence were performed independently by two reviewers. The electronic databases MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Compludoc were searched with no restriction to publication date or language. The quality of the studies was evaluated through: the original 'QDP' ('Questionnaire for selecting articles on Dental Prostheses') (for research papers); the 'Guidelines for managing overviews' of the Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group (for reviews); the Cochrane risk of bias tool; and the GRADE scale for grading scientific evidence. This review started with 4942 articles, which were narrowed down to 23 according to the selection criteria. The data was not statistically treated because of the heterogeneity of the studies. Zirconia-based CIR-FDPs may be recommended for restoring posterior single missing teeth, although the prosthesis/tooth bonded interface has yet to be improved. The addition of lateral wings to the classical inlay preparation seems promising. The weakest parts of CIR-FDPs are the connectors and retainers, while caries and endodontic problems are the most common biological complications. The fabrication of CIR-FDPs with monolithic zirconia may eliminate chipping problems. A three-unit CIR-FDP is a viable treatment option for replacing a posterior missing tooth. Appropriate case selection, abutment preparation and luting procedures may be decisive for clinical success. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Masking ability of bi- and tri- laminate all-ceramic veneers on tooth-colored ceramic discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Daniel; Sukumar, Smitha; von Stein-Lausnitz, Axel; Aarabi, Ghazal; Alawneh, Ahmad; Reissmann, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    A predictable esthetic outcome is imperative when placing ceramic veneers. Discolored teeth pose a major challenge as sufficient material thickness is required to achieve a good esthetic result. There is limited evidence in the literature that compares the masking ability of multi-laminate veneers. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the masking ability of bi-laminate (BL) and tri-laminate (TL) all-ceramic veneers cemented on tooth-colored ceramic discs. A total of 40 veneers (shade A1, 10-mm diameter, 0.8-mm thick) were manufactured-20 BL veneers (0.4-mm pressable ceramic coping veneered with 0.4-mm thick enamel layer) and 20 TL veneers (0.4-mm coping veneered with 0.2-mm thick opaque interlayer and 0.2-mm thick enamel layer). A bonding apparatus was utilized to adhesively cement all veneers on the ceramic discs (shade A1), simulating teeth of light and dark color. The resulting groups (N = 10 each) were the reference groups (shade A1 ceramic base) BL-1 and TL-1 veneers, and the test groups (shade A4 ceramic base) BL-4 and TL-4 veneers. The color of the cemented veneers was measured using a spectrophotometer. The data were converted to CIE L*a*b* coordinates, and ΔE* were calculated to allow for statistical analysis. The color differences between the samples with the A1 and A4 ceramic bases were significantly lower when covered with TL veneers (mean ΔE*: 3.2 units) than with BL veneers (mean ΔE*: 4.0 units: p bi-laminate veneers. Patients with discolored/darker teeth may benefit from a more predictable esthetic result when teeth restored with tri-laminate rather than bi-laminate veneers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Aesthetic Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, aesthetics is defined as a manner of reinforcing the connectivity, or Anschlusswert, of communication. Without changing the content, a message can be made more attractive, strengthening the receiver's willingness to be attentive and accepting. As communic......Based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, aesthetics is defined as a manner of reinforcing the connectivity, or Anschlusswert, of communication. Without changing the content, a message can be made more attractive, strengthening the receiver's willingness to be attentive and accepting....... As communication inevitably makes use of a sensuous medium, such as light or sound, all communication has an aesthetic dimension. In the 19th Century, an important distinction was made between pure and applied art, following Immanuel Kant's separation of theory of knowledge, moral theory and aesthetic theory....... Whereas pure art is produced in order to be observed, applied art has to fulfill practical purposes as well. Modern organizations, defined as systems of communication, may use art works to embellish and define themselves. But they inevitably use applied art as a practical tool in their normal...

  1. Troiage Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sheldon

    As the world around us is transformed into digitally enabled forms and processes, aesthetic strategies are required that articulate this underlying condition. A method for doing so involves a formal and conceptual strategy that is derived from collage, montage and assemblage. This triple "age" is termed "troiage", and it uses a style of computational apparency which articulates the edges of our current representational forms and processes as the semantic elements of culture. Each of these component aesthetics has previously had an important effect upon different areas of contemporary art and culture. Collage in painting, montage in film, assemblage in sculpture and architecture, are recombined via algorithmic methods, forefronting the structure of the algorithmic itself. The dynamic of the aesthetic is put into play by examining binary relationships such as: nature/culture, personal/public, U.S/Mexico, freedom/coercion, mediation/experience, etc. Through this process, the pervasiveness of common algorithmic approaches across cultural and social operations is revealed. This aesthetic is used in the project "The Scalable City" in which a virtual urban landscape is created by users interacting with data taken from the physical world in the form of different photographic techniques. This data is transformed by algorithmic methods which have previously been unfamiliar to the types of data that they are utilizing. The Scalable City project creates works across many media; such as prints, procedural animations, digital cinema and interactive 3D computer graphic installations.

  2. Aesthetic Supererogation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archer, Alfred; Ware, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    A number of moral philosophers have accepted the need to make room for acts of supererogation, those that go beyond the call of duty. In this paper, we argue that there is also good reason to make room for acts of aesthetic supererogation.

  3. Wavefront Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Riis, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    . Subscribing to this view also confronts music and sound art as consistent autonomous categories and focuses on how the pieces attune to the environment, emphasising meetings, transformations and translations through and with other objects. These meetings generate an ecological awareness of causal aesthetics...

  4. Aesthetic Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2003-01-01

    Aesthetics, Art & Management - Towards a New Field of Flow. European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) Workshop , Gattières (France). 2003 Short description: This paper explores some of the rigid theoretical interpretations of the interplay between art and business through a case...... is often described in terms of what a business manager is not and vice versa. This paper explores some of the rigid theoretical interpretations of the interplay between art and business through a case study of two radical Danish artists, Kristian Hornsleth and Michael Brammer. Today, these two artists......, also create for myself, otherwise I don?t live up to people?s expectations.? (Brammer, Interview, August 6, 2002). This paper was presented at the European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) Workshop on "Aesthetics, Art & Management - Towards a New Field of Flow"....

  5. Aesthetic Appeal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    of experience, e.g. in appeal to emotions or pleasure. 2) On a conceptual-hermeneutical level, the staging of meaning by design objects is in question. This regards, on the one hand, the appeal to understanding by the human subject and, on the other hand, the ability of the object to reflect its own character...... on three levels: 1) On a sensual-phenomenological level, the focus is on sensual appeal, i.e. how the design object by its sensual and tactile effects and its outer shape creates an appeal to human experience. This is not a matter of style but of the object relating to and framing the conditions......, the question of aesthetics in design may be answered by both addressing the internal meaning formulation of the aesthetic appeal and the external cultural and discursive framing of design that influences how design is perceived as ‘aesthetic’....

  6. Periodontal response to all-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress) in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wahadni, A M; Mansour, Y; Khader, Y

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the periodontal response to the presence of all-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress) in general practice patients. The convenience sample included 82 IPS Empress crowns placed in 64 patients. These crowns had been in place for an average of 16.27 (SD 9.26) months and ranged from 6.2 to 48.87 months at the time of clinical examination. Periodontal health status (as determined by dental plaque, gingival health status, periodontal pockets) was assessed around all crowned teeth and around matched contralateral teeth by one calibrated examiner. Periodontal indices utilized included the Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI) and pocket depth (PD) with calibrated probes graduated in millimetres. Plaque, gingival and PD values for crowned teeth were compared with those for control teeth using Wilcoxon signed-rank test for each clinical parameters. Chi-square was used to test the significance of the difference in their distribution between crowns and control teeth. Statistically, PI (0.35), GI (0.41) and mean PD scores (1.42) of IPS Empress crowned teeth compared less favourably with scores of the control teeth (0.27, 0.23 and 0.86 respectively). Teeth with IPS Empress crowns had poorer periodontal health and more clinically evident plaque than uncrowned teeth.

  7. Fracture strength of three all-ceramic systems: Top-Ceram compared with IPS-Empress and In-Ceram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quran, Firas Al; Haj-Ali, Reem

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture loads and mode of failure of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using Top-Ceram and compare it with all-ceramic crowns fabricated from well-established systems: IPS-Empress II, In-Ceram. Thirty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated; 10 IPS-Empress II, 10 In-Ceram alumina and 10 Top-Ceram. Instron testing machine was used to measure the loads required to introduce fracture of each crown. Mean fracture load for In-Ceram alumina [941.8 (± 221.66) N] was significantly (p > 0.05) higher than those of Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II. There was no statistically significant difference between Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II mean fracture loads; 696.20 (+222.20) and 534 (+110.84) N respectively. Core fracture pattern was highest seen in Top- Ceram specimens.

  8. Aesthetic Cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toland, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    Art theorists, Carole Gray and Heather Delday (2010) pose the question, "What might be known through creative practice that could not be known by any other means?" As a visual artist with a doctorate degree in environmental planning from the TU-Berlin's Department of Soil Protection, I have long considered this question in my work and over the years contributed an active voice to discussions on research, education, and public engagement with soil and art and soil and culture in Germany and around the world. After presenting many other examples of artists' work at international scientific symposia, I would like to present examples of some of my own artistic practice with soil mapping and soil protection issues at the 2017 EGU. In combining methods of visual art, landscape analysis, and soil mapping, I have developed a practice called Aesthetic Cartography that employs sculptural techniques, object-making, installation and performance, printing and graphic design, as well as site analysis, data mining, and map reading and interpretation. Given my background in participatory planning practices, I also integrate small-group dialogic processes in the creation and implementation of my works. The projects making up the body of works in Aesthetic Cartography are mainly focused on urban issues, including: soil sealing, inner-city watershed management, creative brownfield use, rubble substrates and leachates, foraging and urban agriculture, and envisioning sustainable cities of the future. In the session SSS1.4 - Soil, Art, and Culture I will summarize project goals, materials and methods, venues and public contexts, elements of collaboration and participation, as well as target audiences involved in several projects of the Aesthetic Cartography series. The aim of the presentation is not to give a comprehensive answer to Gray and Delday's question above, but rather to share personal insights from a professional practice that merges artistic and scientific approaches to soil

  9. Effect of varying core thicknesses and artificial aging on the color difference of different all-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikicier, Sibel; Ayyildiz, Simel; Ozen, Julide; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2014-11-01

    Clinicians should reserve all-ceramics with high translucency for clinical applications in which high-level esthetics are required. Furthermore, it is unclear whether a correlation exists between core thickness and color change. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of different core thicknesses and artificial aging on the color stability of three all-ceramic systems. Ninety disc-shaped cores with different thicknesses (0.5 mm, 0.8 mm and 1.0 mm) were prepared from three all-ceramic systems, In-Ceram Alumina (IC), IPS e.max Press (EM) and Katana (K). The colors of the samples were measured with a spectrophotometer and the color parameters (L*, a*, b*, ΔE) were calculated according to the CIE L*a*b* (Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage) color system before and after aging. The effects of aging on color parameters were statistically significant (p artificial aging affected color stability of the all-ceramic materials tested.

  10. Fracture strength and bending of all-ceramic and fiber-reinforced composites in inlay-retained fixed partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Saridag

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: Zirconia-based ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated the highest fracture strength. The fiber-reinforced composite inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated higher bending values than did the all-ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures.

  11. Clinical Marginal and Internal Adaptation of Maxillary Anterior Single All-Ceramic Crowns and 2-year Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akın, Aslı; Toksavul, Suna; Toman, Muhittin

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this randomized-controlled clinical trial were to compare marginal and internal adaptation of all-ceramic crowns fabricated with CAD/CAM and heat-pressed (HP) techniques before luting and to evaluate the clinical outcomes at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months after luting. Fifteen CAD/CAM (CC) and 15 HP all-ceramic crowns were placed in 15 patients. A silicone replica was obtained to measure marginal and internal adaptation of each all-ceramic crown before luting, and they were sectioned buccolingually and mesiodistally. Marginal and internal adaptations were measured using computerized light microscope at 40× magnification. Clinical evaluations took place at baseline (2 days after luting) and at 6, 12, and 24 months after luting. Replica scores were analyzed with Mann-Whitney U and Student's t-test (α = 0.05). Survival rate of crowns was determined using Kaplan-Meier statistical analysis. The median marginal gap for the CC group was 132.2 μm and was 130.2 μm for the HP group. The mean internal adaptation for the CC group was 220.3 ± 51.3 μm and 210.5 ± 31 μm for the HP group. There were no statistically significant differences with respect to marginal opening (Mann-Whitney U test; p = 0.95) and internal adaptation (Student's t-test; p = 0.535) between the 2 groups. Based on modified Ryge criteria, 100% of the crowns were rated satisfactory during the 2-year period. In this in vivo study, CAD/CAM and HP all-ceramic crowns exhibited similar marginal and internal adaptations. A 100% success rate was recorded for the 15 CAD/CAM and for the 15 HP all-ceramic crowns during the 2-year period. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Aesthetic Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landgrebe, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    -verbal actions, gaze orientation, active and static interactional strategies and props. From the data investigated, it seems that the performance act is divided into different stages which each calls for different strategies: the group's initiation of the entire performance act reveals that the group stand out......This article deals with how an aesthetic performance is enacted and coordinated by a performance group attracting attention and engaging commuters in a public space. Multimodal interactional resources and the way they are coordinated by interactants are investigated, and include verbal and non...... as uncoordinated and it may have a significance for whether the 'street' performers manage to stay in character or not. Once attention from commuters is obtained, a continued gaze from these commuters opens up for subsequent interaction, which then ultimately may result in the successful handing over of a card...

  13. Measurement of the rotational misfit and implant-abutment gap of all-ceramic abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garine, Wael N; Funkenbusch, Paul D; Ercoli, Carlo; Wodenscheck, Joseph; Murphy, William C

    2007-01-01

    showed the smallest rotational misfit. All-ceramic abutments without a metal collar showed a greater rotational misfit than those with a metal collar.

  14. Wear characteristics of current aesthetic dental restorative CAD/CAM materials: two-body wear, gloss retention, roughness and Martens hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörmann, Werner H; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Ender, Andreas; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Mehl, Albert

    2013-04-01

    This study determined the two-body wear and toothbrushing wear parameters, including gloss and roughness measurements and additionally Martens hardness, of nine aesthetic CAD/CAM materials, one direct resin-based nanocomposite plus that of human enamel as a control group. Two-body wear was investigated in a computer-controlled chewing simulator (1.2 million loadings, 49N at 1.7Hz; 3000 thermocycles 5/50°C). Each of the 11 groups consisted of 12 specimens and 12 enamel antagonists. Quantitative analysis of wear was carried out with a 3D-surface analyser. Gloss and roughness measurements were evaluated using a glossmeter and an inductive surface profilometer before and after abrasive toothbrushing of machine-polished specimens. Additionally Martens hardness was measured. Statistically significant differences were calculated with one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance). Statistically significant differences were found for two-body wear, gloss, surface roughness and hardness. Zirconium dioxide ceramics showed no material wear and low wear of the enamel antagonist. Two-body wear of CAD/CAM-silicate and -lithium disilicate ceramics, -hybrid ceramics and -nanocomposite as well as direct nanocomposite did not differ significantly from that of human enamel. Temporary polymers showed significantly higher material wear than permanent materials. Abrasive toothbrushing significantly reduced gloss and increased roughness of all materials except zirconium dioxide ceramics. Gloss retention was highest with zirconium dioxide ceramics, silicate ceramics, hybrid ceramics and nanocomposites. Temporary polymers showed least gloss retention. Martens hardness differed significantly among ceramics, between ceramics and composites, and between resin composites and acrylic block materials as well. All permanent aesthetic CAD/CAM block materials tested behave similarly or better with respect to two-body wear and toothbrushing wear than human enamel, which is not true for temporary polymer CAD

  15. All-Ceramic Body Flap Qualified for Space Flight on X38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, H.; Peetz, K.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow design of high-temperature resistant, light and robust structures. CMC materials with silicon-carbide matrix reinforced by carbon fibers (C/SiC) show constant strength and damage-tolerant behavior up to very high temperatures. CMC thermal protection systems and hot structures have been developed in Europe over many years. MAN Technologie developed the necessary technologies to create the technological basis for CMC structures for future, more economical and reusable launch vehicles. Within the German space technology program TETRA (Technologies for Future Space Transportation Systems) body flaps were developed for X-38 by MAN Technologie. Key technologies like high strength oxidation protected CMC materials, manufacturing processes for large and complex structures, advanced high temperature lubricant coating combinations for bearings, joining with ceramic fasteners, metal-to-ceramic interfaces as well as dynamic seals are required for hot structures like control surfaces for re-entry vehicles. Because of the high heat and mechanical loads of a lifting body together with the low mass requirements the body flaps for NASA's X-38 re-entry vehicle V-201were selected to demonstrate as a first flight maturity of a large and complex ceramic structure. The flaps are designed as an all-ceramic, load-carrying hot structure, which needs no heavy metallic primary structure and no additional thermal protection tiles and subsequently offers considerable mass and volume savings. The X-38 body flaps are conceived as a revolutionary step forward. The twin flaps, each with the size of 1.6 m x 1.4 m (5.25 ft x 4.6 ft) and the low weight of 68 kg (150 lb) are all made of C/SiC material to operate up to temperatures of 1800 C (3.270 F) in oxidizing atmosphere while they are deflectable under high mechanical loads up to 50 kN (11.260 lbf) at the same time. The flaps are deflected about the hinge axis on two ceramic bearings and moved by an

  16. Fracture rates of IPS Empress all-ceramic crowns--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Rousson, Valentin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical fracture rate of crowns fabricated with the pressable, leucite-reinforced ceramic IPS Empress, and relate the results to the type of tooth restored. The database SCOPUS was searched for clinical studies involving full-coverage crowns made of IPS Empress. To assess the fracture rate of the crowns in relation to the type of restored tooth and study, Poisson regression analysis was used. Seven clinical studies were identified involving 1,487 adhesively luted crowns (mean observation time: 4.5+/-1.7 years) and 81 crowns cemented with zinc-phosphate cement (mean observation time: 1.6+/-0.8 years). Fifty-seven of the adhesively luted crowns fractured (3.8%). The majority of fractures (62%) occurred between the third and sixth year after placement. There was no significant influence regarding the test center on fracture rate, but the restored tooth type played a significant role. The hazard rate (per year) for crowns was estimated to be 5 in every 1,000 crowns for incisors, 7 in every 1,000 crowns for premolars, 12 in every 1,000 crowns for canines, and 16 in every 1,000 crowns for molars. One molar crown in the zinc-phosphate group fractured after 1.2 years. Adhesively luted IPS Empress crowns showed a low fracture rate for incisors and premolars and a somewhat higher rate for molars and canines. The sample size of the conventionally luted crowns was too small and the observation period too short to draw meaningful conclusions.

  17. Full Contoured Tooth-Implant Supported 3-Pointic All-Ceramic Denture During Occlusal Load Transfer in Lateral Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żmudzki J.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Implant and a tooth supported dentures are avoided by dentists because of uneven distribution of occlusal loads between a stiffer implant and a more pliable tooth. The hypothesis was that a 3-point all-ceramic bridge supported on a natural second premolar tooth and a two-pieces typical implant bears safely mastication loads. The finite element analysis showed that the implant splinted by all-ceramic zirconium bridge with the second premolar was safe under lateral mastication load, but there was found an overload at wide zone of bone tissue around the implant under the load of 800 N. The patients can safely masticate, but comminution of hard food should be avoided and they should be instructed that after such an indiscretion they need to contact a dental professional, because, in spite of integrity of the prosthesis, the bone tissue around the implant may fail and there is a hazard of intrusion of the tooth.

  18. Critical Aesthetic Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    A clear-cut concept of the aesthetic is elusive. Kant's "Critique of Judgment" presents one of the more comprehensive aesthetic theories from which one can extract a set of features, some of which pertain to aesthetic experience and others to the logical structure of aesthetic judgment. When considered together, however, these features present a…

  19. Volumetric lipoinjection of the fronto-orbital and temporal complex with adipose stem cells for the aesthetic restoration of sequelae of craniosynostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanko Castro-Govea

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Non-syndromic craniosynostosis causes craniofacial asymmetry and may persist after cranioplasty. These postoperative asymmetries are primarily depressions. In some cases, patients may be subjected to pranks and harassment by their peers, affecting their psychosocial development. We propose lipoinjection enriched with adipose stem cells (ASCs to treat the sequelae of craniosynostosis in the fronto-orbital and temporal complex in cranioplasty patients, with the goal of improving the appearance of the upper third of the face. Methods Twelve children (four boys and eight girls between 4 and 8 years of age (mean age, 6 years in the postoperative period after treatment for plagiocephaly, brachycephaly, and trigonocephaly were included, with a follow-up period of 1 to 18 months. Fat tissue was obtained from the lower abdomen, and ASCs were isolated using the Yoshimura technique. Lipoinjection was performed using several mini-approaches to ensure adequate distribution. Results Two different scales were used to evaluate the aesthetic outcomes. At 6 months, three plastic surgeons independent of the study classified the results using a Likert scale. The patients’ parents categorized the results using a visual analog scale at 6, 9, and 18 months. R esults were favorable on both scales, as the patients’ facial appearance improved and they reported increased happiness and self-esteem due to their remodeled facial appearance. Conclusions We suggest that lipoinjection enriched with ASCs is a good alternative for correcting asymmetry of the fronto-orbital and temporal contour in patients with sequelae of craniosynostosis. This treatment will help boost patients’ self-esteem starting at an early age.

  20. Bioeconomy analysis in Aesthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Dana Tudose

    2015-12-01

    technical report of treatment ( labor - price, average duration, satisfaction, relative to direct restoration techniques versus indirect techniques . In conclusion, SWOT analysis can be successfully applied to a better targeting of treatments, applying a plan lines for management in dental treatment units. None of direct techniques can not fit the bioeconomy principles (saves time, money, dental tissue in the short term. All maneuvers efficient in terms of functional aesthetics dentistry win at time saving and lost tooth structure chapter to the cost issue. In the long run costs can be amortized, especially since the restoration increases predictability.

  1. The bonding effectiveness of five luting resin cements to the IPS Empress 2 all ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhan, V; Essop, A R M; Du Preez, I C

    2005-04-01

    Variolink II is the only resin cement used for bonding IPS (Ivoclar Porcelain System) Empress 2 ceramic restorations. Alternative luting resin cements need to be investigated for their bonding effectiveness with the IPS Empress 2 ceramic. To determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and the effect of thermocycling, on the bonding effectiveness, of five resin cements to IPS Empress 2 ceramic. The projecting surfaces of one hundred ceramic discs were ground wet on silicone carbide paper. The specimens were divided into 5 groups of 20. The resin cements were bonded to the prepared ceramic surfaces, in the form of a stub. The specimens were stored under distilled water at 37 degrees C in an oven for 24 hours. Ten specimens in each group were thermocycled for 300 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. All the specimens were stressed to failure in an Instron Materials Testing Machine. The results were subjected to a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Statistically similar mean SBS values were grouped using the Bonferroni (Dunn) multiple comparison test. The means for the non-thermocycled group were: 26.21, 19.41, 17.69, 17.43, and 15.76. The means for the thermocycled group were: 22.90, 15.72, 14.34, 13.96 and 13.45. The differences between the means were highly significant (p Empress 2 ceramic was effective. Thermocycling had a significant effect on the mean SBS values of Calibra. Thermocycling had no significant effect on the mean SBS values of the other resin cements.

  2. Effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and preliminary exploration of possible molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and the possible molecular mechanisms. Methods: Fibroblast cell lines L929 were cultured, extracting solution of diatomite ceramic, casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain was prepared and used to process L929 cells, and then cell apoptosis, percentages of cell cycle as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 were detected. Results: Cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G1 phase, S phase and G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group had no differences from those of control group; cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group were lower than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group, and percentages of G1 phase and S phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2 were significantly higher than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group. Conclusion: The effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts has no differences and is weaker than that of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain crown, and biocompatibility of diatomite ceramic is equivalent to that of casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain; mechanisms of different materials of all-ceramic crowns to regulate cell viability include Bcl-2/Bax pathway and Caspase pathway.

  3. Laser all-ceramic crown removal and pulpal temperature--a laboratory proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, P; Buu, N C H; Rechmann, B M T; Finzen, F C

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this proof-of-principle laboratory pilot study was to evaluate the temperature increase in the pulp chamber in a worst case scenario during Er:YAG laser debonding of all-ceramic crowns. Twenty extracted molars were prepared to receive all-ceramic IPS E.max CAD full contour crowns. The crowns were bonded to the teeth with Ivoclar Multilink Automix. Times for laser debonding and temperature rise in the pulp chamber using micro-thermocouples were measured. The Er:YAG was used with 560 mJ/pulse. The irradiation was applied at a distance of 5 mm from the crown surface. Additional air-water spray for cooling was utilized. Each all-ceramic crown was successfully laser debonded with an average debonding time of 135 ± 35 s. No crown fractured, and no damage to the underlying dentin was detected. The bonding cement deteriorated, but no carbonization at the dentin/cement interface occurred. The temperature rise in the pulp chamber averaged 5.4° ± 2.2 °C. During 8 out of the 20 crown removals, the temperature rise exceeded 5.5 °C, lasting 5 to 43 s (average 18.8 ± 11.6 s). A temperature rise of 11.5 °C occurred only once, while seven times the temperature rise was limited to 6.8 ± 0.5 °C. Temperature rises above 5.5 °C occurred only when the laser was applied from one side and additional cooling from the side opposite the irradiation. Er:YAG laser energy can successfully be used to efficiently debond all-ceramic crowns from natural teeth. Temperature rises exceeding 5.5 °C only occur when an additional air/water cooling from a dental syringe is inaccurately directed. To avoid possible thermal damage and to allow further heat diffusion, clinically temperature-reduced water might be applied.

  4. Evaluating aesthetics in design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2010-01-01

    : an aesthetics of sensual relation and an aesthetics of communicative self-reflection. Following these concepts the article raises questions of dealing with design as a structure of sensual appearance, and of design as an act of communication that can contain an aesthetic coding in letting an idea or content...

  5. Effect of Lithium Disilicate Reinforced Liner Treatment on Bond and Fracture Strengths of Bilayered Zirconia All-Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Seok Jang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the effect of a lithium-disilicate spray-liner application on both the bond strength between zirconia cores and heat-pressed lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic veneers, and the fracture strength of all-ceramic zirconia crowns. A lithium-disilicate reinforced liner was applied on the surface of a zirconia core and lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic was veneered on zirconia through heat press forming. Microtensile and crown fracture tests were conducted in order to evaluate, respectively, the bonding strength between the zirconia cores and heat pressed lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic veneers, and the fracture strength of bilayered zirconia all-ceramic crowns. The role of lithium-disilicate spray-liner at the interface between zirconia and lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic veneers was investigated through surface and cross-sectional analyses. We confirmed that both the mean bonding strength between the zirconia ceramics and lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic veneers and the fracture strength of the liner-treated groups were significantly higher than those of the untreated groups, which resulted, on the one hand, from the chemical bonding at the interface of the zirconia and lithium-disilicate liner, and, on the other, from the existence of a microgap in the group not treated with liner.

  6. Clinical evaluation of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions based on the principle of active wavefront sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrek, Andreas; Reich, Gunnar; Ranftl, Dieter; Klein, Christoph; Cerny, Barbara; Brodesser, Jutta

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions with the fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated from silicone impressions. Twenty patients agreed to take part in the study to receive two Lava crowns each for the same preparation. One crown was fabricated from intraoral scans using the Lava Chairside Oral Scanner (Lava C.O.S.), and the other crown from a two-step silicone impression. Prior to cementation the fit of both crowns was clinically evaluated by two calibrated and blinded examiners; the marginal fit was also scored from replicas. Data from the replica scores were analysed by Anderson-Darling test, Levene's test and Mann-Whitney test. All tests were performed with alpha-level of 0.05. Median marginal gap in the conventional impression group was 71microm (Q1:45microm; Q3:98microm), and in the digital impression group 49microm (Q1:32microm; Q3:65microm). Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference between the groups (pdigitally fabricated crowns. 1. Crowns from intraoral scans revealed significantly better marginal fit than crowns from silicone impressions. 2. Marginal discrepancies in both groups were within the limits of clinical acceptability. 3. Crowns from intraoral scans tended to show better interproximal contact area quality. 4. Crowns from both groups performed equally well with regard to occlusion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Conceptualizing Aesthetics in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to introduce and discuss aesthetics as an approach to understand how design frames experience. In doing so, the chapter combines two philosophical interests in design, design phenomenology and design aesthetics, in order to promote a framework for discussing the impact...... of aesthetic meaning construction on experience. First, the chapter raises the phenomenological question of the relationship between design and experience, specifically, how design conditions experience. Second, in looking at aesthetics in terms of a) the sensual appeal of design, b) design objects...... as aesthetic media that frame modes of understanding, and c) contextual factors, such as media, influencing what is regarded as aesthetic, it is the thesis of the chapter that a reflective concept of design aesthetics can be employed to differentiate between three different ways in which design frame our...

  8. The Use of Newer High Translucency Zirconia in Aesthetic Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zishan Dangra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of anterior tooth causes aesthetic and functional disharmony. Although no restorative material can approach the appearance of intact tooth enamel, glass ceramic, at the increased risk of brittle fracture, can mimic original tooth color better than the other restorative options. The newest zirconia material comes with unparalleled individualization in aesthetics and optimal physical properties. One of the basic principles of tooth preparation is conservation of tooth structure. This clinical report describes the replacement of maxillary and mandibular incisor with latest generation zirconia adhesive fixed partial denture. The authors have achieved unmatched aesthetics with newer high translucency zirconia.

  9. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  10. [Evaluation of alumina effects on the mechanical property and translucency of nano-zirconia all-ceramics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Zhao, Yong-qi; Zhang, Jing-chao; Liao, Yun-mao; Li, Wei

    2010-06-01

    To study the effects of alumina content on sintered density, mechanical property and translucency of zirconia nanocomposite all-ceramics. Specimens of zirconia nanocomposite all-ceramics were divided into five groups based on their alumina content which are 0% (control group), 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10.0% respectively. The sintered densities were measured using Archimedes' method. Specimens' bending strengths were measured with three-point bending test (ISO 6872). The visible light transmittances were measured with spectrophotometric arrangements and the fractured surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The control group of pure zirconia could be sintered to the theoretical density under pressure-less sintering condition. The bending strength was (1100.27 ± 54.82) MPa, the fracture toughness was (4.96 ± 0.35) MPa×m(1/2) and the transmittance could reach 17.03%. The sintered density and transmittance decreased as alumina content increased from 2.5% to 10%. However, the fracture toughness only increased slightly. In all four alumina groups, the additions of alumina had no significant effect on samples' bending strengths (P > 0.05). When the content of alumina was 10%, fracture toughness of specimens reached (6.13 ± 0.44) MPa×m(1/2) while samples' transmittance declined to 6.21%. SEM results showed that alumina particles had no significant effect on the grain size and distribution of tetragonal zirconia polycrystals. Additions of alumina to yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystals could influence its mechanical property and translucency. Additions of the other phase to zirconia ceramics should meet the clinical demands of strength and esthetics.

  11. Effect of Taper on Stress Distribution of All Ceramic Fixed Partial Dentures: a 3D-FEA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gerami-Panah

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Mechanical failure of ceramic materials is controlled by brittle fracture, mostly occurred in tension. In 3-unit all-ceramic FPDs the connector area is considered to be at fracture risk because of tensile stress concentrations.Purpose: The aim of this FE analysis was to evaluate the effect of taper on stress distribution in all-ceramic FPDs.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study two 3-D finite element models of thee-unit IPS-Empress 2 FPDs replacing mandible second premolar were created by means of finite element software. The digital images were obtained from CT scan of human skull. Abutment was reduced with 12 and 22 degrees of taper. The cement layer,PDL, cancellous bone and cortical bone were also modeled. Frameworks of core material were fabricated. A static load of 100 N was applied at mid pontic area.Resolved stresses were calculated according to the Von Mises criterion and principal stresses.Results: In both models stresses were concentrated at the connectors. The maximum stresses were lower in the model with larger taper. The maximum Von Mises stress was recorded at the connector region of the premolar and the pontic. In model with larger taper the patterns of stresses were also more distributed and less concentrated.Conclusion: The highest Von Mises and principal stress were recorded at the connectors. Tensile stresses developed at the gingival connector of premolar and pontic was higher than molar. The stress level in model with 22-degree taper was lower compare to 12-degree and the stress pattern was more distributed, lowered the risk ofconcentrations.

  12. Comparison of Metal-Ceramic and All-Ceramic Three-Unit Posterior Fixed Dental Prostheses: A 3-Year Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaisen, Maj H; Bahrami, Golnosh; Schropp, Lars; Isidor, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical study was to compare the 3-year clinical outcome of metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (MC-FDPs) and zirconia all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (AC-FDPs) replacing a posterior tooth. A sample of 34 patients with a missing posterior tooth were randomly chosen to receive either a MC-FDP (n = 17) or an AC-FDP (n = 17). The FDPs were evaluated at baseline and yearly until 3 years after cementation. They were assessed using the California Dental Association assessment system. Periodontal parameters were measured at the abutment teeth, and the contralateral teeth served as control. The statistical unit was the FDP/patient. The survival rates for MC-FDPs and AC-FDPs were 100%. The success rate was 76% and 71% for MC-FDPs and AC-FDPs, respectively. Three technical complications were observed in the MC-FDP group and five in the AC-FDP group, all chipping fractures of the ceramic veneer. Furthermore, one biologic complication in the MC-FDP group (an apical lesion) was observed. No framework fractures occurred. All patients had optimal oral hygiene and showed no bleeding on periodontal probing at any of the recalls. Only minor changes in the periodontal parameters were observed during the 3 years of observation. Three-unit posterior MC-FDPs and AC-FDPs showed similar high survival rates and acceptable success rates after 3 years of function, and ceramic veneer chipping fracture was the most frequent complication for both types of restorations.

  13. Survival rates of IPS empress 2 all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures: results of a 5-year prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Pascal; Strub, Jörg Rudolf

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the survival rates of IPS Empress 2 (Ivoclar Vivadent) all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures (FPDs) after an observation period of up to 5 years. Forty-three patients (19 women and 24 men) were included in this study. The patients were treated with a total of 58 adhesive bonded IPS Empress 2 restorations. A total of 27 single crowns were placed on molars and premolars, and 31 three-unit FPDs were placed in the anterior and premolar regions. Clinical follow-up examinations took place at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after insertion. Statistical analysis of the data was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results of the 50-month analysis (interquartile range, 33 to 61 months) showed that the survival rate was 100% for crowns and 70% for FPDs. Six failures that occurred exclusively in the three-unit FPDs were observed. Framework fractures were recorded in three FPD units where the connector dimensions did not meet the manufacturer specifications. Only one FPD exhibited an irreparable partial veneer fracture, and 2 FPDs showed evidence of biologic failures. The accuracy of fit and esthetic parameters were clinically satisfactory for crowns and FPDs. The results of this 5-year clinical evaluation suggest that IPS Empress 2 ceramic is an appropriate material for the fabrication of single crowns. Because of the reduced survival rates, strict conditions should be considered before the use of IPS Empress 2 material for the fabrication of three-unit FPDs.

  14. Stop "cruising for a bruising": mitigating bruising in aesthetic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Connie

    2014-01-01

    The quest to restore a more youthful appearance by filling and volumizing facial deformities and deficiencies continues to be an ongoing pursuit in the noninvasive aesthetics market. Bruising can result from the delivery of neuromodulators and dermal fillers--common tools in the aesthetic provider's armamentarium to combat the ravages of aging. There are steps both the aesthetic provider and the client can take to minimize the potential for bruising. This article focuses on the etiology of bruising, the pharmacological and herbal agents to avoid prior to an aesthetic procedure, techniques to utilize during aesthetic procedures that lessen the potential of bruise formation, and pharmacological and herbal agents to administer after an aesthetic procedure to ultimately mitigate bruise formation.

  15. Hair restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawnsley, Jeffrey D

    2008-08-01

    The impact of male hair loss as a personal and social marker of aging is tremendous and its persistence as a human concern throughout recorded history places it in the forefront of male concern about the physical signs of aging. Restoration of the frontal hairline has the visual effect of re-establishing facial symmetry and turning back time. Follicular unit transplantation has revolutionized hair restoration, with its focus on redistributing large numbers of genetically stable hair to balding scalp in a natural distribution. Follicular unit hair restoration surgery is a powerful tool for the facial plastic surgeon in male aesthetic facial rejuvenation because it offers high-impact, natural-appearing results with minimal downtime and risk for adverse outcome.

  16. Virtual reality - aesthetic consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Benda, Lubor

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we study aesthetic consequences of virtual reality. Exploring the fringe between fictional and virtual is one of the key goals, that will be achieved through etymologic and technologic definition of both fiction and virtual reality, fictional and virtual worlds. Both fiction and virtual reality will be then studied from aesthetic distance and aesthetic pleasure point of view. At the end, we will see the main difference as well as an common grounds between fiction and virtu...

  17. Aesthetic Response and Cosmic Aesthetic Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madacsi, D.

    2013-04-01

    For Homo sapiens, the experience of a primal aesthetic response to nature was perhaps a necessary precursor to the arousal of an artistic impulse. Among the likely visual candidates for primal initiators of aesthetic response, arguments can be made in favor of the flower, the human face and form, and the sky and light itself as primordial aesthetic stimulants. Although visual perception of the sensory world of flowers and human faces and forms is mediated by light, it was most certainly in the sky that humans first could respond to the beauty of light per se. It is clear that as a species we do not yet identify and comprehend as nature, or part of nature, the entire universe beyond our terrestrial environs, the universe from which we remain inexorably separated by space and time. However, we now enjoy a technologically-enabled opportunity to probe the ultimate limits of visual aesthetic distance and the origins of human aesthetic response as we remotely explore deep space via the Hubble Space Telescope and its successors.

  18. Esthetic and Clinical Performance of Implant-Supported All-Ceramic Crowns Made with Prefabricated or CAD/CAM Zirconia Abutments: A Randomized, Multicenter Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittneben, J G; Gavric, J; Belser, U C; Bornstein, M M; Joda, T; Chappuis, V; Sailer, I; Brägger, U

    2017-02-01

    Patients' esthetic expectations are increasing, and the options of the prosthetic pathways are currently evolving. The objective of this randomized multicenter clinical trial was to assess and compare the esthetic outcome and clinical performance of anterior maxillary all-ceramic implant crowns (ICs) based either on prefabricated zirconia abutments veneered with pressed ceramics or on CAD/CAM zirconia abutments veneered with hand buildup technique. The null hypothesis was that there is no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Forty implants were inserted in sites 14 to 24 (FDI) in 40 patients in 2 centers, the Universities of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland. After final impression, 20 patients were randomized into group A, restored with a 1-piece screw-retained single crown made of a prefabricated zirconia abutment with pressed ceramic as the veneering material using the cut-back technique, or group B using an individualized CAD/CAM zirconia abutment (CARES abutment; Institut Straumann AG) with a hand buildup technique. At baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y clinical, esthetic and radiographic parameters were assessed. Group A exhibited 1 dropout patient and 1 failure, resulting in a survival rate of 94.7% after 1 y, in comparison to 100% for group B. No other complications occurred. Clinical parameters presented stable and healthy peri-implant soft tissues. Overall, no or only minimal crestal bone changes were observed with a mean DIB (distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact) of -0.15 mm (group A) and 0.12 mm (group B) at 1 y. There were no significant differences at baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y for DIB values between the 2 groups. Pink esthetic score (PES) and white esthetic score (WES) values at all 3 examinations indicated stability over time for both groups and pleasing esthetic outcomes. Both implant-supported prosthetic pathways represent a valuable treatment option for the restoration of single ICs in the anterior maxilla

  19. Evaluación del módulo de elasticidad de materiales estéticos para la restauración de lesiones cervicales Assessment of the elasticity module of aesthetic materials for restoration of cervical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Estela Bonnin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available La pérdida de tejido en la zona cervical ha sido atribuida principalmente a la erosión y abrasión producidas por el cepillo de dientes. El rol de las fuerzas oclusales es un factor muy importante a tener en cuenta en el desarrollo y avance de estas lesiones cervicales no cariosas. Distinguir las diferentes propiedades mecánicas y sobre todo el módulo de elasticidad de los materiales estéticos utilizados para la restauración de este tipo de lesiones, permitirá una sobrevida mayor de las obturaciones y una gran mejoría en el tratamiento de nuestros pacientes. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar el módulo de elasticidad de 6 materiales restauradores estéticos. Siguiendo la norma ISO 4049 se confeccionaron 10 probetas de cada material experimental. Se empleó el ensayo de flexión de 3 puntos con una INSTRON 4486. De la relación numérica entre los valores de tensión (T y deformación (D, se obtuvo el módulo de elasticidad o de Young (E, para cada material experimental. El análisis de varianza mostró diferencias significativas (p Te loss of tissue in the cervical zone has been attributed to the erosion and abrasion provoked by toothbrush. The role of occlusal forces is a very important factor to be taken into account in the development and advance of these carious non-cervical lesions. To distinguish the different mechanical properties and mainly the elasticity module of aesthetic material used for repair of this type of lesion, will allows a great survival of the obturations and in large extent in the treatment of our patients. The aim of present paper was to assess the elasticity module of 6 esthetic restoring materials. Following the ISO 4049 rule 10 test tubes of ach experimental material. A flexion assay of 3 points with INSTRON 4486 was used. From the numerical relation among the tension values (T and deformation (D we obtained the elasticity or Young (E elasticity module for each experimental material. The variance

  20. Influence of sodalite zeolite infiltration on the coefficient of thermal expansion and bond strength of all-ceramic dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Ghassan Abdul-Hamid; Omar, Ros Anita; Yahya, Rosiyah

    2017-03-01

    In all-ceramic systems, a high incidence of veneer chip-off has been reported in clinical studies. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) behaviour is one of the factors that may increase residual stress in the interface and influence the veneer/core bond strength. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of sodalite zeolite-infiltration on the CTE behaviour and bond strength of different all-ceramic prostheses. The case-study groups were synthesized sodalite zeolite-infiltrated alumina (IA-SOD) and synthesized sodalite zeolite-infiltrated zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) (IZ-SOD), while the control groups were glass-infiltrated alumina (IA-glass) and glass-infiltrated ZTA (IZ-glass). Forty cylindrical-shaped samples measuring 5 mm in diameter and 10 mm in height were tested for CTE using a thermo-mechanical analyser machine, and forty disc-shaped ceramic samples measuring 12 mm in diameter and 1.2 ± 0.2 mm in thickness were prepared using specially designed stainless steel split mould and veneered by cylinder-shaped (2 mm high × 2 mm diameter) low-fusing porcelain (Vita VM7). The veneer/core samples were sintered and tested for shear bond strength using a high precision universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscope, stereo microscope, atomic force microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to investigate the structural characteristics of samples at the fracture surface. The collected data were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). IZ-SOD revealed highest CTE and shear bond strength values, while the IA-glass revealed the lowest values than the other groups. There was no significant difference in CTE and bond strength among IZ-SOD, IA-SOD and IZ-glass samples (p>0.05). The experimental SOD zeolite-infiltrated samples revealed higher CTE mismatch and bond strength along with a more favourable mode of failure than did the commercial glass-infiltrated samples. Sandblast technique is considered as effective

  1. Influence of CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials on cell viability, migration ability and adenylate kinase release of human gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Grassmann, L; Weyhrauch, M; Brüllmann, D D; Ziebart, T; Scheller, H; Lehmann, K M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of four CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials on cell viability, migration ability and adenylate kinase (ADK) release of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and oral keratinocytes (HOK). HGF and HOK were cultured on disc-shaped CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials (e.max CAD LT, e.max CAD HT, Empress CAD and Mark II) and on discs made of tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS) serving as control. Cell viability was analyzed by using an MTT assay, and migration ability was investigated by a scratch assay. A ToxiLight assay has been performed to analyze the effect of all-ceramic materials on ADK release and cell apoptosis. At MTT assay for HGF, no significant decrease of cell viability could be detected at all points of measurement (p each > 0.05), while HOK demonstrated a significant decrease in cell viability especially on Empress CAD and Mark II at each point of measurement (p each materials at all points of measurement (between -36 % and -71 %; p each ceramic materials could be investigated. This study disclosed significant differences in cell viability and migration ability of HGF and HOK on CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials. CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials can influence oral cell lines responsible for soft tissue creation which may affect the esthetic outcome.

  2. Aesthetics of Mundane Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Hassenzahl, M.

    2008-01-01

    John Dewey’s pragmatist aesthetics is used as a conceptual basis for designing new technologies that support staff-members’ mundane social interactions in an academic department. From this perspective, aesthetics is seen as a broader phenomenon that encompasses experiential aspects of staff-members’

  3. Aesthetics of Mundane Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Dhaval; Hassenzahl, M.

    2008-01-01

    John Dewey’s pragmatist aesthetics is used as a conceptual basis for designing new technologies that support staff-members’ mundane social interactions in an academic department. From this perspective, aesthetics is seen as a broader phenomenon that encompasses experiential aspects of staff-members’ everyday lives and not only a look-&-feel aspect.

  4. Aesthetics and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austring, Bennyé D.; Sørensen, Merete

    This paper is built on our book "Aesthetics and Learning", Hans Reizels Publishers, Copenhagen 2010. In this book we describe the relationship between aesthetic creative activities and children’s development and learning, based on among other the theories of Malcolm Ross (1988), Hansjörg Hohr (2000...

  5. Aesthetics of sustainable architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.; Hill, G.; Sauerbruch, M.; Hutton, L.; Knowles, R.; Bothwell, K.; Brennan, J.; Jauslin, D.; Holzheu, H.; AlSayyad, N.; Arboleda, G.; Bharne, V.; Røstvik, H.; Kuma, K.; Sunikka-Blank, M.; Glaser, M.; Pero, E.; Sjkonsberg, M.; Teuffel, P.; Mangone, G.; Finocchiaro, L.; Hestnes, A.; Briggs, D.; Frampton, K.; Lee, S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to reveal, explore and further the debate on the aesthetic potentials of sustainable architecture and its practice. This book opens a new area of scholarship and discourse in the design and production of sustainable architecture, one that is based in aesthetics. The

  6. Survival of anterior cantilevered all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses made from zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Martin; Kern, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the clinical outcome of all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) with a cantilevered single-retainer design made from zirconia ceramic. Forty-two anterior RBFDPs with a cantilevered single-retainer design were made from yttrium oxide-stabilized zirconium oxide ceramic. RBFDPs were inserted using Panavia 21 TC as luting agent after air-abrasion of the ceramic bonding surface. During a mean observation time of 61.8 months two debondings occurred. Both RBFDPs were rebonded using Panavia 21 TC and are still in function. A caries lesion was detected at one abutment tooth during recall and was treated with a composite filling. Therefore, the overall six-year failure-free rate according to Kaplan-Meier was 91.1%. If only debonding was defined as failure the survival rate increased to 95.2%. Since all RBFDPs are still in function the overall survival rate was 100% after six years. Cantilevered zirconia ceramic RBFDPs showed promising results within the observation period. Single-retainer resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses made from zirconia ceramic show very good mid-term clinical survival rates. They should therefore be considered as a viable treatment alternative for the replacement of single missing anterior teeth especially as compared to an implant therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The reproducibility and accuracy of internal fit of Cerec 3D CAD/CAM all ceramic crowns.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Arcy, Brian L

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and accuracy of internal fit using Cerec 3D CAD\\/CAM (computer aided design\\/computer aided manufacturing) all-ceramic crowns and to investigate the proximal contact point areas between the crowns and neighbouring teeth, in terms of location and the presence or absence of contact. A total of 48 crowns were milled and divided into two groups of twenty-four each. One group consisted of testing a Control die and the other group consisted of testing single Replica stone die duplicates of the Control die. The Internal Marginal Gap, Axio-Occlusal Transition Gap and Occlusal Gap were measured on each crown in both groups. No significant differences were identified between the mean thickness of the Marginal Gap, the Axio-Occlusal Transition Gap and the Occlusal Gap of the Control die when compared with the Replica dies indicating uniformity and consistency of the accuracy of fit and therefore die replication.

  8. Standards of teeth preparations for anterior resin bonded all-ceramic crowns in private dental practice in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Nawaf AL-Dwairi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate if general dental practitioners (GDPs in private practice in Jordan follow universal guidelines for preparation of anterior teeth for resin bonded all-ceramic crowns (RBCs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A sample (n=100 of laboratory models containing 208 tooth preparations for IPS Empress and In Ceram, featuring work from different GDPs, was obtained from 8 commercial dental laboratories. Aspects of preparations were quantified and compared with accepted criteria defined following a review of the literature and recommendations of the manufactures' guidelines. RESULTS: Subgingival margins on the buccal aspect were noticed in 36% of the preparations, 54% demonstrated overpreparation with a tendency to overprepare the teeth on the mesiodistal plane more than buccolingual plane. Twenty percent of samples presented a shoulder finish line while a chamfer margin design was noticed in 39%. Twenty-nine percent and 12% of samples had either a feathered or no clear margin design respectively. Incisal underpreparation was observed in 18% of dies of each type. Only 17% of all preparations were found to follow the recommended anatomical labial preparations while 29% of the RBC preparations were found to have the recommended axial convergence angle. In total, 43% of preparations were found to have the recommended depth of the finish line. CONCLUSIONS: It was found that relevant guidelines for RBC preparations were not being fully adhered to in private practice in Jordan.

  9. Composite Resin – A Versatile Restorative Tool | Koleoso | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the use of composite resin restorations as a treatment option in several situations where conventional aesthetic restorations such as porcelain veneers, crowns and cream-metal crown could otherwise be placed. Methods and Materials: Patients who presented with restoration aesthetic challenges over a six months period ...

  10. Functional and Esthetic Comparison of Metal-Ceramic and All-Ceramic Posterior Three-Unit Fixed Dental Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaisen, Maj H; Bahrami, Golnosh; Schropp, Lars; Isidor, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess functional and esthetic satisfaction plus evaluate changes in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) after insertion of a metal-ceramic (MC-FDP) or a veneered zirconia all-ceramic (AC-FDP) posterior three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Additionally, patients' and professionals' esthetic evaluations were compared. A convenience sample of 34 patients was randomized to receive a MC-FDP (n = 17) or an AC-FDP (n = 17). Patients were assessed using the OHIP-14 and also answered a questionnaire regarding satisfaction with function and esthetics using visual analog scales (VAS) before treatment and after 2 weeks, after 3 months, and after 1, 2, and 3 years. A fully dentate control group (n = 20) was also assessed using the OHIP-14. The operator and another observer evaluated the esthetics of the FDPs using VAS. The patients assessed the two FDP types similarly for all parameters. In contrast, there was a statistically significant difference in OHIP-14 results between the treated patients and the control group before treatment. After treatment, a statistically significant improvement in OHIP-14 was observed at all examinations. Patients were highly satisfied with the function and esthetics of the FDPs. The overall satisfaction with esthetics was statistically significantly higher among the patients than among the professionals at three out of five examinations. The patients experienced improved OHRQoL and increased satisfaction with function and esthetics after receiving a posterior three-unit FDP. No important differences were observed between the two types of FDPs when evaluated by the patient or the professionals.

  11. The Aesthetics Of Trademarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Karlen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trademarks are not just property, they are aesthetic creations that pervade everyday experience. One estimate is that the average person encounters more than 1,000 trademarks per day, many of which influence purchases and product use. As pervasive aesthetic creations having literary, pictorial, graphic, sculptural, and musical content, trademarks deserve aesthetic analysis. The article discusses the origins, strength, appeal, and effectiveness of trademarks within the context of aesthetic considerations such as meaning, intention, authorship, and mode of creation. Also reviewed are morphemic and phonemic analysis of trademarks, semantic positioning, the dichotomy between creation and discovery of trademarks, and the differences between trademarks and titles. The discussion is confined to "word marks" consisting of alphanumeric characters, since discussing other kinds of marks (such as designs, configurations, sounds, colors, and scents would raise issues well beyond the scope of a single article.

  12. Riding Pontic--Aesthetic Journey Aesthetic Goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohilla, Byajit Kumar; Choudhary, Shweta; Manisha, Kukreja; Walia, Pawanjit Singh; Nafria, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The increasing concern for esthetics during the orthodontic treatment can be measured by the increasing popularity ofaesthetic brackets, lingual technique, smaller sized metal brackets, and clear alignment therapy. Many clients, especially adolescents, are self-conscious about their appearance in social and professional situations, and they refuse to tolerate the inevitable "black holes" of edentulous spaces during orthodontic treatment. This article describes the use, fabrication, modifications, and shortcomings of riding pontics; and illustrates how their use provides aesthetic, psychological and functional benefits.

  13. [The study of the colorimetric characteristics of the cobalt-chrome alloys abutments covered by four different all-ceramic crowns by using dental spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifan; Liu, Hongchun; Meng, Yukun; Chao, Yonglie; Liu, Changhong

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the optical data of the different sites of the cobalt-chrome (Co-Cr) alloy abutments covered by four different all-ceramic crowns and the color difference between the crowns and target tab using a digital dental spectrophotometer. Ten Co-Cr alloy abutments were made and tried in four different groups of all-ceramic crowns, namely, Procera aluminia, Procera zirconia, Lava zirconia (Lava-Zir), and IPS E.max glass-ceramic lithium disilicate-reinforced monolithic. The color data of the cervical, body, and incisal sites of the samples were recorded and analyzed by dental spectrophotometer. The CIE L*, a*, b* values were again measured after veneering. The color difference between the abutments covered by all-ceramic crowns and A2 dentine shade tab was evaluated. The L* and b* values of the abutments can be increased by all of the four groups of all-ceramic copings, but a* values were decreased in most groups. A statistical difference was observed among four groups. After being veneered, the L* values of all the copings declined slightly, and the values of a*, b* increased significantly. When compared with A2 dentine shade tab, the ΔE of the crowns was below 4. Four ceramic copings were demonstrated to promote the lightness and hue of the alloy abutments effecttively. Though the colorimetric baseline of these copings was uneven, veneer porcelain can efficiently decrease the color difference between the samples and thee target.

  14. [Effect of core: dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength of IPS Empress II heat-pressed all-ceramic restorative material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-hong; Feng, Hai-lan; Bao, Yi-wang; Qiu, Yan

    2007-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of core:dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength, fracture mode and origin of bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens. IPS Empress II core ceramic, dentin porcelain and bilayered composite specimens with core:dentin thickness ratio of 2:1 and 1:1 were tested in three-point flexure strength. Mean strengths and standard deviations were determined. The optical microscopy was employed for identification of the fracture mode and origin. The flexure strength of dentin porcelain was the smallest(62.7 MPa), and the strength of bilayered composite specimens was smaller than single-layered core ceramic(190.2 MPa). The core: dentin ratio did not influence the strength of bilayered composite specimens. The frequency of occurrence of bilayered specimen delaminations was higher in the group of core: dentin thickness ratio of 1:1 than in the group of 2:1. IPS Empress II core ceramic was significantly stronger than veneering dentin porcelain. Core:dentin thickness ratio could significantly influence the fracture mode and origin, and bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens showed little influence in the fracture strength.

  15. On the aesthetic illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, L

    1999-01-01

    The aesthetic illusion--the experience of the content of a work of art as reality--occurs through the mobilization and intensification of typical infantile fantasies in the beholder. This necessarily evokes intrapsychic conflict in the mature adult. Two illusion-producing strategies ameliorate this conflict and effect the aesthetic illusion. The first illusion is that the artist's proffered fantasy is the beholder's own personal and private fantasy. This isolates the beholder from the shame- and guilt-evoking social surround. The second illusion is that the protagonist depicted in the work is an actual person. This defends the beholder from the painful emotions attendant upon his instinctually gratifying identification with the protagonist. The first illusion is necessary for the establishment of the second, but it is the second that establishes the aesthetic illusion. The aesthetic illusion exists in a highly unstable dynamic equilibrium with the beholder's usual reality orientation. If either orientation is too powerful, the dynamic equilibrium is disrupted and the aesthetic experience as such is abolished.

  16. Aesthetic responses to music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Istok, Eva; Brattico, Elvira; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We explored the content and structure of the cognitive, knowledge-based concept underlying aesthetic responses to music. To this aim, we asked 290 Finnish students to verbally associate the aesthetic value of music and to write down a list of appropriate adjectives within a given time limit....... No music was presented during the task. In addition, information about participants' musical background was collected. A variety of analysis techniques was used to determine the key results of our study. The adjective "beautiful" proved to be the core item of the concept under question. Interestingly......, the adjective "touching" was often listed together with "beautiful". In addition, we found music-specific vocabulary as well as adjectives related to emotions and mood states indicating that affective processes are an essential part of aesthetic responses to music. Differences between music experts and laymen...

  17. Empirical Music Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    The toolbox for empirically exploring the ways that artistic endeavors convey and activate meaning on the part of performers and audiences continues to expand. Current work employing methods at the intersection of performance studies, philosophy, motion capture and neuroscience to better understand...... musical performance and reception is inspired by traditional approaches within aesthetics, but it also challenges some of the presuppositions inherent in them. As an example of such work I present a research project in empirical music aesthetics begun last year and of which I am a team member....

  18. Empowerment of Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Showcasing the Danish architecture biennial catalogue Empowerment of Aesthetics (Venice Biennale 2014), which, in 2015, was announced ‘bookwork of the year’ by Foreningen for Boghaandværk (the Danish association for book craft), the research based exhibition will focus on the catalogue's represen......Showcasing the Danish architecture biennial catalogue Empowerment of Aesthetics (Venice Biennale 2014), which, in 2015, was announced ‘bookwork of the year’ by Foreningen for Boghaandværk (the Danish association for book craft), the research based exhibition will focus on the catalogue...

  19. [An experimental study on the effect of different optical impression methods on marginal and internal fit of all-ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fa-Bing; Wang, Lu; Fu, Gang; Wu, Shu-Hong; Jin, Ping

    2010-02-01

    To study the effect of different optical impression methods in Cerec 3D/Inlab MC XL system on marginal and internal fit of all-ceramic crowns. A right mandibular first molar in the standard model was used to prepare full crown and replicated into thirty-two plaster casts. Sixteen of them were selected randomly for bonding crown and the others were used for taking optical impression, in half of which the direct optical impression taking method were used and the others were used for the indirect method, and then eight Cerec Blocs all-ceramic crowns were manufactured respectively. The fit of all-ceramic crowns were evaluated by modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, and the data were statistically analyzed with SAS 9.1 software. The clinically acceptable rate for all marginal measurement sites was 87.5% according to USPHS criteria. There was no statistically significant difference in marginal fit between direct and indirect method group (P > 0.05). With SEM imaging, all marginal measurement sites were less than 120 microm and no statistically significant difference was found between direct and indirect method group in terms of marginal or internal fit (P > 0.05). But the direct method group showed better fit than indirect method group in terms of mesial surface, lingual surface, buccal surface and occlusal surface (P impression method had no significant effect on marginal fit of Cerec Blocs crowns, but it had certain effect on internal fit. Overall all-ceramic crowns appeared to have clinically acceptable marginal fit.

  20. An Evolution of Sustainable Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    . This paper is framed within the understanding that while sustainable architecture has showcased ethical technology, it lacks the holistic aesthetic language needed for the discipline to progress. A discussion of literature concerning sustainability, architecture, and aesthetics, articulating the particularly...

  1. Aesthetic experience of dance performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukadinović Maja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the aesthetic experience of dance performances is investigated. The study includes construction of an instrument for measuring the aesthetic experience of dance performances and an investigation of the structure of both dancers’ and spectators’ aesthetic experience. The experiments are carried out during eight different performances of various dance forms, including classical ballet, contemporary dance, flamenco and folklore. Three factors of aesthetic experience of dance performances are identified: Dynamism, Exceptionality and Affective Evaluation. The results show that dancers’ aesthetic experience has a somewhat different factorial structure from that of the spectators’. Unlike spectators’ aesthetic experience, dancers’ aesthetic experience singles out the Excitement factor. The results are discussed within the context of dancers’ proprioception and spectators’ exteroception since these findings confirm the idea of a significant role of proprioception in dancers’ aesthetic experience.

  2. Multidisciplinary approach to restoring anterior maxillary partial edentulous area using an IPS Empress 2 fixed partial denture: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Mine; Gungor, M Ali; Cal, Ebru

    2003-04-01

    Esthetics is a major concern during restoration of anterior partial edentulous areas. All-ceramic fixed partial dentures may provide better esthetics and biocompatibility in the restoration of anterior teeth. This clinic report describes a multidisciplinary approach and treatment procedures with an IPS Empress 2 fixed partial denture to restore missing anterior teeth.

  3. Interpretation and the Aesthetic Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Charles O.

    1976-01-01

    The author, utilizing a synthesis of philosophic comments on aesthetics, provides a discourse on the aesthetic dimension and offers examples of how interpreters can nurture the innate sense of beauty in man. Poetic forms, such as haiku, are used to relate the aesthetic relationship between man and the environment. (BT)

  4. Clinical Investigation of a New Bulk Fill Composite Resin in the Restoration of Posterior Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Dental Restoration Failure of Marginal Integrity; Dental Caries; Unrepairable Overhanging of Dental Restorative Materials; Poor Aesthetics of Existing Restoration; Secondary Dental Caries Associated With Failed or Defective Dental Restorations; Fractured Dental Restorative Materials Without Loss of Materials; Fracture of Dental Restorative Materials With Loss of Material

  5. Optimizing Aesthetic Outcomes in Delayed Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Dec, MD

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions:. Optimal aesthetic results can be achieved with: (1 restoration of breast skin envelope with tissue expansion when possible, (2 optimal positioning of a small skin paddle to be later incorporated entirely into a nipple areola reconstruction when adequate breast skin surface area is present, (3 limiting the reconstructed breast mound to 2 skin tones when large area skin resurfacing is required, (4 increasing breast volume by deepithelializing, not discarding, the inferior mastectomy flap skin, (5 eccentric division of abdominal flaps when an immediate and delayed bilateral breast reconstructions are performed simultaneously; and (6 performing second-stage breast reconstruction revisions and fat grafting.

  6. [History of aesthetic rhinoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, P S; Mazzola, R F

    2014-12-01

    One of the first surgical procedures described in the history of medicine is reconstructive surgery of the nose. Over the centuries, surgeons have developed techniques aimed at reconstructing noses amputated or traumatized by disease. The concept of aesthetic rhinoplasty was only introduced at the end of the 19th century. Since then, techniques have evolved toward constant ameliorations. Nowadays, this surgery is one of the most performed aesthetic procedures. Current technical sophistication is the result of over a century of history marked by many surgeons. All of these techniques derive from a detailed understanding of the anatomical nose from the surgical and artistic point of view. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Aesthetic self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2015-01-01

    The concept of aesthetic self-esteem was explored for utilization in the medical spa environment. The aims and purposes of the analysis were outlined. The literature review identified various uses of the self-esteem concept as well as published definitions of the word. Defining attributes were also explored and examined, including positive and negative connotations of self-esteem. Two tools were utilized to help aesthetic nurse specialists assess patients for self-esteem and assess for a possible mental illness that may present as low self-esteem. A culturally sensitive theoretical definition of self-esteem was constructed to fit the needs and environment of medical spas. A model case of this definition, as well as a borderline and contrary case, was presented. Antecedents and consequences, as well as empirical referents of the concept, were explored.

  8. Stylize Aesthetic QR Code

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Mingliang; Su, Hao; Li, Yafei; Li, Xi; Liao, Jing; Niu, Jianwei; Lv, Pei; Zhou, Bing

    2018-01-01

    With the continued proliferation of smart mobile devices, Quick Response (QR) code has become one of the most-used types of two-dimensional code in the world. Aiming at beautifying the appearance of QR codes, existing works have developed a series of techniques to make the QR code more visual-pleasant. However, these works still leave much to be desired, such as visual diversity, aesthetic quality, flexibility, universal property, and robustness. To address these issues, in this paper, we pro...

  9. Joint action aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicary, Staci; Sperling, Matthias; von Zimmermann, Jorina; Richardson, Daniel C; Orgs, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized movement is a ubiquitous feature of dance and music performance. Much research into the evolutionary origins of these cultural practices has focused on why humans perform rather than watch or listen to dance and music. In this study, we show that movement synchrony among a group of performers predicts the aesthetic appreciation of live dance performances. We developed a choreography that continuously manipulated group synchronization using a defined movement vocabulary based on arm swinging, walking and running. The choreography was performed live to four audiences, as we continuously tracked the performers' movements, and the spectators' affective responses. We computed dynamic synchrony among performers using cross recurrence analysis of data from wrist accelerometers, and implicit measures of arousal from spectators' heart rates. Additionally, a subset of spectators provided continuous ratings of enjoyment and perceived synchrony using tablet computers. Granger causality analyses demonstrate predictive relationships between synchrony, enjoyment ratings and spectator arousal, if audiences form a collectively consistent positive or negative aesthetic evaluation. Controlling for the influence of overall movement acceleration and visual change, we show that dance communicates group coordination via coupled movement dynamics among a group of performers. Our findings are in line with an evolutionary function of dance-and perhaps all performing arts-in transmitting social signals between groups of people. Human movement is the common denominator of dance, music and theatre. Acknowledging the time-sensitive and immediate nature of the performer-spectator relationship, our study makes a significant step towards an aesthetics of joint actions in the performing arts.

  10. All-ceramic or metal-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs)? A systematic review of the survival and complication rates. Part I: Single crowns (SCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Makarov, Nikolay Alexandrovich; Thoma, Daniel Stefan; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pjetursson, Bjarni Elvar

    2015-06-01

    To assess the 5-year survival of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic tooth-supported single crowns (SCs) and to describe the incidence of biological, technical and esthetic complications. Medline (PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) searches (2006-2013) were performed for clinical studies focusing on tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with a mean follow-up of at least 3 years. This was complimented by an additional hand search and the inclusion of 34 studies from a previous systematic review [1,2]. Survival and complication rates were analyzed using robust Poisson's regression models to obtain summary estimates of 5-year proportions. Sixty-seven studies reporting on 4663 metal-ceramic and 9434 all-ceramic SCs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Seventeen studies reported on metal-ceramic crowns, and 54 studies reported on all-ceramic crowns. Meta-analysis of the included studies indicated an estimated survival rate of metal-ceramic SCs of 94.7% (95% CI: 94.1-96.9%) after 5 years. This was similar to the estimated 5-year survival rate of leucit or lithium-disilicate reinforced glass ceramic SCs (96.6%; 95% CI: 94.9-96.7%), of glass infiltrated alumina SCs (94.6%; 95% CI: 92.7-96%) and densely sintered alumina and zirconia SCs (96%; 95% CI: 93.8-97.5%; 92.1%; 95% CI: 82.8-95.6%). In contrast, the 5-year survival rates of feldspathic/silica-based ceramic crowns were lower (pceramic and zirconia crowns exhibited significantly lower survival rates in the posterior region (pceramic fractures than metal-ceramic SCs (pceramic SCs than for metal-ceramic SCs. Survival rates of most types of all-ceramic SCs were similar to those reported for metal-ceramic SCs, both in anterior and posterior regions. Weaker feldspathic/silica-based ceramics should be limited to applications in the anterior region. Zirconia-based SCs should not be considered as primary option due to their high incidence of technical problems. Copyright © 2015 Academy

  11. Restoration of traumatized teeth with resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2018-01-01

    For a long time, the primary choice for initial restoration of a crown-fractured front tooth has been resin composite material. The restoration can in most cases be performed immediately after injury if there is no sign of periodontal injury. The method’s adhesive character is conservative to tooth...... present an aesthetic problem due to exposure of un-aesthetic crown-margins. The invasive permanent crown restorations are therefore often not suc-cessful on a long-term scale. On the other hand, a conservative direct restoration of an extensively fractured incisor crown with resin composite may......-structure and with minimal risk of pulpal complication. In addition, it offers an aesthetic solution to the patient immediately after an injury, which may bring a little comfort in a sad situation. The resin composite build-up is often changed or repaired a couple of times, before the tooth is restored with a porcelain...

  12. Aesthetic procedures in office practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Rebecca

    2009-12-01

    Since the approval of botulinum toxin, dermal fillers, and lasers for cosmetic use, minimally invasive aesthetic procedures have rapidly become the treatments of choice for age-related facial changes. In the past 10 years, aesthetic procedures have increased nearly five-fold. Of the 10.2 million aesthetic treatments performed in 2008, 83 percent were minimally invasive procedures. Botulinum toxin and dermal filler injections, laser hair reduction, chemical peels, laser skin resurfacing, microdermabrasion, and intense pulsed light photorejuvenation were the most commonly performed procedures in 2008. These procedures are effective and associated with minimal discomfort, and they have a low incidence of adverse effects and short recovery times. High patient and physician satisfaction have contributed to their growing popularity and availability in the primary care setting. As patient demand for aesthetic treatments increases, family physicians should be familiar with common minimally invasive aesthetic procedures when advising patients or incorporating aesthetic care into office practice.

  13. Influence of core thickness and artificial aging on the biaxial flexural strength of different all-ceramic materials: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikicier, Sibel; Ayyildiz, Simel; Ozen, Julide; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2017-05-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the flexural strength of all-ceramics with varying core thicknesses submitted to aging. In-Ceram Alumina (IC), IPS e.max Press (EM) and Katana (K) (n=40), were selected. Each group contained two core groups based on the core thickness as follows: IC/0.5, IC/0.8, EM/0.5, EM/0.8, K/0.5 and K/0.8 mm in thickness (n=20 each). Ten specimens from each group were subjected to aging and all specimens were tested for strength in a testing machine either with or without being subjected aging. The mean strength of the K were higher (873.05 MPa) than that of the IC (548.28 MPa) and EM (374.32 MPa) regardless of core thickness. Strength values increased with increasing core thickness for all IC, EM and K regardless of aging. Results of this study concluded that strength was not significantly affected by aging. Different core thicknesses affected strength of the all-ceramic materials tested (p<0.05).

  14. All-Ceramic Single Crown Restauration of Zirconia Oral Implants and Its Influence on Fracture Resistance: An Investigation in the Artificial Mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf-Joachim Kohal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the fracture resistance of one-piece zirconia oral implants with and without all-ceramic incisor crowns after long-term thermomechanical cycling. A total of 48 implants were evaluated. The groups with crowns (C, 24 samples and without crowns (N, 24 samples were subdivided according to the loading protocol, resulting in three groups of 8 samples each: Group “0” was not exposed to cyclic loading, whereas groups “5” and “10” were loaded with 5 and 10 million chewing cycles, respectively. This resulted in 6 different groups: C0/N0, C5/N5 and C10/N10. Subsequently, all 48 implants were statically loaded to fracture and bending moments were calculated. All implants survived the artificial aging. For the static loading the following average bending moments were calculated: C0: 326 Ncm; C5: 339 Ncm; C10: 369 Ncm; N0: 339 Ncm; N5: 398 Ncm and N10: 355 Ncm. To a certain extent, thermomechanical cycling resulted in an increase of fracture resistance which did not prove to be statistically significant. Regarding its fracture resistance, the evaluated ceramic implant system made of Y-TZP seems to be able to resist physiological chewing forces long-term. Restauration with all-ceramic single crowns showed no negative influence on fracture resistance.

  15. Joint action aesthetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staci Vicary

    Full Text Available Synchronized movement is a ubiquitous feature of dance and music performance. Much research into the evolutionary origins of these cultural practices has focused on why humans perform rather than watch or listen to dance and music. In this study, we show that movement synchrony among a group of performers predicts the aesthetic appreciation of live dance performances. We developed a choreography that continuously manipulated group synchronization using a defined movement vocabulary based on arm swinging, walking and running. The choreography was performed live to four audiences, as we continuously tracked the performers' movements, and the spectators' affective responses. We computed dynamic synchrony among performers using cross recurrence analysis of data from wrist accelerometers, and implicit measures of arousal from spectators' heart rates. Additionally, a subset of spectators provided continuous ratings of enjoyment and perceived synchrony using tablet computers. Granger causality analyses demonstrate predictive relationships between synchrony, enjoyment ratings and spectator arousal, if audiences form a collectively consistent positive or negative aesthetic evaluation. Controlling for the influence of overall movement acceleration and visual change, we show that dance communicates group coordination via coupled movement dynamics among a group of performers. Our findings are in line with an evolutionary function of dance-and perhaps all performing arts-in transmitting social signals between groups of people. Human movement is the common denominator of dance, music and theatre. Acknowledging the time-sensitive and immediate nature of the performer-spectator relationship, our study makes a significant step towards an aesthetics of joint actions in the performing arts.

  16. Joint action aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicary, Staci; Sperling, Matthias; von Zimmermann, Jorina; Richardson, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized movement is a ubiquitous feature of dance and music performance. Much research into the evolutionary origins of these cultural practices has focused on why humans perform rather than watch or listen to dance and music. In this study, we show that movement synchrony among a group of performers predicts the aesthetic appreciation of live dance performances. We developed a choreography that continuously manipulated group synchronization using a defined movement vocabulary based on arm swinging, walking and running. The choreography was performed live to four audiences, as we continuously tracked the performers’ movements, and the spectators’ affective responses. We computed dynamic synchrony among performers using cross recurrence analysis of data from wrist accelerometers, and implicit measures of arousal from spectators’ heart rates. Additionally, a subset of spectators provided continuous ratings of enjoyment and perceived synchrony using tablet computers. Granger causality analyses demonstrate predictive relationships between synchrony, enjoyment ratings and spectator arousal, if audiences form a collectively consistent positive or negative aesthetic evaluation. Controlling for the influence of overall movement acceleration and visual change, we show that dance communicates group coordination via coupled movement dynamics among a group of performers. Our findings are in line with an evolutionary function of dance–and perhaps all performing arts–in transmitting social signals between groups of people. Human movement is the common denominator of dance, music and theatre. Acknowledging the time-sensitive and immediate nature of the performer-spectator relationship, our study makes a significant step towards an aesthetics of joint actions in the performing arts. PMID:28742849

  17. Aura, Self, and Aesthetic Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall Battani

    2011-01-01

    Aesthetic experiences are generated in encounters with cultural objects and such experiences are marked by the free play of cognitive and numinous experience unstructured by concepts. Kant’s famous three types of pleasure, made infamous in social theory by Pierre Bourdieu, are examined in relation to the critical theoretical concept of aura, the social psychology of “flow,” and cognitive explanations of perception to explain experience in aesthetic fields. Theories of aesthetic experience de...

  18. Assembling an aesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Emily

    2012-12-01

    Recent research informing and related to the study of three-dimensional scientific models is assembled here in a way that explores an aesthetic, specifically, of touch. I concentrate on the materiality of models, drawing on insights from the history and philosophy of science, design and metaphysics. This article chronicles the ways in which touch, or material interactions, operate in the world of 3D models, and its role in what models mean and do. I end with a call for greater attention to scientific process, described as assembly of and within science, which is revealed by this focus on touch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An Afropolitan literary aesthetics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, Ulla; Knudsen, Eva Rask

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses what the authors call an emerging Afropolitan aesthetics. Through an exploration of recurring stylistic features, the article focuses particularly on the trope of a mobility-induced anxiety that entwines place and self. The ontological and affective troping of return...... and of self-understanding and the contemporary signification of Africa as a complex place of relocation and reconnection are explored in discussions of literary characters in Taiye Selasi’s Ghana Must Go (2013), Yvonne Owuor’s Dust (2014), Sefi Atta’s A Bit of Difference (2013) and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie...

  20. Advanced Implant-Prosthetic Rehabilitation: How to Obtain a Correct Restoration of Both Functions and Aesthetics in Patients with Complex Combined Dental and Maxillofacial Trauma: A Case Report and Topical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figliuzzi, M M; Giudice, A; Fortunato, L

    2017-01-01

    Aim . This study aims to explain the main steps that characterize the implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in complex combined dental and maxillofacial trauma. Material and Methods . A 20-year-old patient reported an extensive facial trauma which also involved the alveolar process of the maxillary bone. The patient reported a maxillofacial fracture and the loss of teeth 1.3, 1.2, 1.1, and 2.1. A "Le Fort" type 2 fracture was also reported, with the malar bone involvement. After reduction and containment of bone fractures, through appropriate mounting plates, appropriate functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the patient were replaced thanks to a temporary removable prosthesis. After 6 months, the patient performed numerous clinical investigations, aimed at a proper planning of implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper dental arch. Conclusion . With the planning of the case, as well as respecting the surrounding biological structures, the surgery of implants can be carried out with the most appropriate procedure. Lastly, new dental implants with highly bioactive surfaces have been developed, providing an excellent and rapid bone integration.

  1. A Road to Aesthetic Stylistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Al-Sheikh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Being a linguistic phenomenon, poetry is marked by the defamilarization of language in a poetic discourse there is an aesthetic distortion of  the normal codes, in which the aesthetic value is the most prominent function of the poetic texture . This study is a new  adventure in correlating linguistics to aesthetics by and through the so-called approach Aesthetic stylistics( As. Aesthetic stylistics is the application of the theory of beauty to the intentionally violated components in literary text. It proceeds with the hypothesis that John Keats's Ode on a Grecian Urn and Kabbani's Maritime Poem are disinterested poetic experiences which create ecstatic responses to the reader's awareness, therefore, the judgment of the reader's taste is aesthetic. The study aims at highlighting the stylistic-aesthetic factors which generate the judgment of taste. While drawing heavily on the aestheticism of the Prague Linguistic Circle and Halliday's Functional Linguistics (FL, or what has come to be called the Traditional European Functionalism, the study will analyze Keats' Ode and Kabbani's poem in terms of Kant's Kritik der Urteilstraft, KdU. The two circles of the linguistic description and aesthetic interpretation will be internally interlinked to create the coherence of the stylistic process. The study consists of an introduction, two parts, one in theory and the other in analysis; it is eventually rounded up with concluding remarks elicited from the semiotic quest.  Keywords: Stylistics, Functionalism, Aesthetics

  2. Aesthetics of religious authority. Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunier, J.T.; de Witte, M.; de Koning, M.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue brings together anthropologists in the field of religion with the aim of exploring the aesthetic dimensions of authority in religious leadership.Taking aesthetics to refer to the range of sensory forms and experiences that shape the relation between religious practitioners and

  3. Miserere. Aesthetics of Terror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Incampo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available I say: “Oh, what a beautiful surrealist picture!” With quite precise awareness: this páthos, these emotions of mine do not stem from our common sense. An aesthetic judgment is founded on an immediate subjective intuition: an emotion or a free feeling of a single subject towards an object. A universal sense, possibly. Some judgments of ours in ethics and in law are no different from our perceptions in front of art. It would be the same for a hypothetical sentence of the judge that concluded with these words: “I acquit Arsenio Lupin because of his magnificent handlebar moustache like that of Guy de Maupassant”. Everyone would think intuitively that it is an unfair sentence. Is there aesthetics of terror? The case that the article intends to examine is that of the famous kidnapping and murder of the Italian statesman Aldo Moro by the “Brigate Rosse” [Red Brigades] (1978. The method used here consists in studying the image of the kidnapping as iconic documentation of reality, and, above all, as an ethical-legal judgment about the terrorist crime. Moro was photographed during his kidnapping. There are at least two pictures. Both constitute an extraordinary source for a judgment on the basis of an image. In both of them, Aldo Moro is pictured in front of a Red Brigades banner during the captivity. In what sense do these pictures document an aesthetic judgment concerning the “case Moro”? The answer can be found in a remarkable iconic coincidence of these pictures with a masterpiece by Georges Rouault (Paris 1871-1958 devoted to the theme of the “Ecce Homo”. The Gospel in the “Ecce Homo” scene (John: 19, 4-5 narrates how Pontius Pilate wanted to arouse the compassion of the people with a scourging and the exposure of Jesus to the crowd. The plate under consideration is entitled “Qui ne se grime pas?” [Who does not have a painted face?] and is a key work in Rouault’s suite of prints Miserere, dated for 1923.

  4. THE AESTHETIC AXIOMATIC: DECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRINA VASKES SANTCHES

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El presente trabajo contribuye al debate sobre la actualidad estética, abordando diferentes enfoques del polémico concepto de deconstrucción, introducido por Jacques Derrida. Esta categoría es de referencia casi obligatoriacuando se habla sobre teoría estética contemporánea, forma parte de su nuevo aparato conceptual y expresa bien la nueva realidad que no tiene análogos históricos en lo que antes llamaban arte, estética y cultura. La elaboracióndel concepto de deconstrucción, el análisis de cómo funciona esa nueva forma del pensamiento crítico, y el método creativo de la interpretación y de la producción del texto artístico, nos permite entrar en el código de muchas obras artísticas actuales donde el espacio entre arte y teoría del arte es cada vez más incierto, especialmente en las diversas formas de arte conceptual o “performance art”.Abstract: Tackling polemic concept of deconstruction, introduced by Jacqes Derrida, from different approaches this article contributes to the debate on aesthetic current issues. This category is of almost obligatory reference when discussing about contemporary aesthetic theory. Deconstruction belongs to its new conceptual apparatus, and expresses well new reality that does not have historical analogy with what before was called art, aesthetics and culture. The elaboration of the concept of deconstruction, and the analysis of how this new form of strategical “procedure” of interpretation and production of the text (as textual reading is functioning allow us to enter the code of many current art works where the space between art and theory of the art is more and more uncertain, specially in the diverse forms of conceptual art or “performance art“.

  5. The psychology of Kant's aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Contrary to both his own intentions and the views of both older and more recent commentators. I argue that Kant's aesthetics remains within the confines of eighteenth-century aesthetics as a branch of empirical psychology, as it was then practiced. Kant established a plausible connection between aesthetic experience and judgment on the one hand and cognition in general on the other, through his explanatory concept of the free play of our cognitive powers. However, there is nothing distinctly 'a priori' or 'transcendental' in his claim that this state of mind is what causes our pleasure in beauty or other aesthetic properties. Nor did Kant establish a genuinely a priori or transcendental principle that all human beings have the same disposition to experience a free play of their cognitive powers, let alone in response to the same objects. This failure, however, in no way limits the continuing significance of Kant's aesthetic theory.

  6. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed. © 2016 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  7. Experience Communication and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    to user aspect (web 2.0), the personal engagement or the community spirit. This increasing demand of experiences reflects the postmodern cultural trends where rules for how to think and behave no longer exist. This results in individualism, where the identity of the human being has changed from something......-actualization. The individualization of the human being can lead to loneliness and a need of participating in communities as a replacement of an overall fixed point in one's life. (Anthony Giddens, 1990, 1991; Zygmunt Bauman, 1997; Carsten René Jørgensen, 2002). The field of communication is consequently experiencing a great......In this article the term "experience communication" will be introduced and discussed. It will be illustrated how different concepts of aesthetical experiences are an integrated part of experience communication and how these concepts are produced within the industries of consumerism, branding...

  8. SLAC site design aesthetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC

  9. Design articulation for Aesthetics of Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Peter; Graves Petersen, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present three categories of design articulations addressing the characteristic qualities of aesthetics of interaction. By aesthetics of interaction we point to the process in which interactive technology brings about aesthetic experience in the use of interactive technology......-designers. In this case the categories of design articulations frame intended aesthetic experiences. Our mission is that of using aesthetic theory to inform the design of interactive technology, which shapes aesthetic experiences in everyday use....

  10. Ten years of a model of aesthetic appreciation and aesthetic judgments : The aesthetic episode - Developments and challenges in empirical aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Helmut; Nadal, Marcos

    2014-11-01

    About a decade ago, psychology of the arts started to gain momentum owing to a number of drives: technological progress improved the conditions under which art could be studied in the laboratory, neuroscience discovered the arts as an area of interest, and new theories offered a more comprehensive look at aesthetic experiences. Ten years ago, Leder, Belke, Oeberst, and Augustin (2004) proposed a descriptive information-processing model of the components that integrate an aesthetic episode. This theory offered explanations for modern art's large number of individualized styles, innovativeness, and for the diverse aesthetic experiences it can stimulate. In addition, it described how information is processed over the time course of an aesthetic episode, within and over perceptual, cognitive and emotional components. Here, we review the current state of the model, and its relation to the major topics in empirical aesthetics today, including the nature of aesthetic emotions, the role of context, and the neural and evolutionary foundations of art and aesthetics. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Aesthetic occiput augmentation using methylmethacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong Tai

    2015-01-01

    Cranioplasty for only aesthetic reasons has not been commonly performed to date. However, recently there has been a new focus by the public on a more aesthetically pleasing head shape with frequent patient requests for purely aesthetic contouring of the occiput, an important definer of cosmetic head shape. For example, in Asia, where the normal cranial shape is mesocephalic or brachycephalic and often with a planar occiput, requests for its aesthetic correction are increasingly common. Accordingly, the author developed a minimally invasive occiput augmentation using methylmethacrylate. In this study, the indications for aesthetic occiput contouring were planar occiput, left-right asymmetric occiput, and grooved occiput. Under local anesthesia, soft methylmethacrylate is subperiosteally inserted through a small incision (about 5-cm length), manually and precisely contoured in situ through the scalp to the desired occipital shape. All is performed as an outpatient procedure, and a quick recovery is the case. Between March 2007 and October 2013, 959 patients received such aesthetic occiput augmentation. The mean follow-up period was 49 months (range, 3-84 months). Nearly all patients were satisfied with the outcome, and complications were very rare. Only 5 patients (0.5%) needed additional corrective procedures. The author has concluded that aesthetic occiput augmentation using methylmethacrylate yields consistent, predictable, and satisfactory results. Additional long-term follow-up is required for a final conclusion, however.

  12. Long Memory of Pathfinding Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Coleman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a new dynamic (i.e., space-time model to measure aesthetic values in pathfinding for videogames. The results we report are important firstly because the artificial intelligence literature has given relatively little attention to aesthetic considerations in pathfinding. Secondly, those investigators who have studied aesthetics in pathfinding have relied largely on anecdotal arguments rather than metrics. Finally, in those cases where metrics have been used in the past, they show only that aesthetic paths are different. They provide no quantitative means to classify aesthetic outcomes. The model we develop here overcomes these deficiencies using rescaled range (R/S analysis to estimate the Hurst exponent, . It measures long-range dependence (i.e., long memory in stochastic processes and provides a novel well-defined mathematical classification for pathfinding. Indeed, the data indicates that aesthetic and control paths have statistically significantly distinct signatures. Aesthetic paths furthermore have more long memory than controls with an effect size that is large, more than three times that of an alternative approach. These conclusions will be of interest to researchers investigating games as well as other forms of entertainment, simulation, and in general nonshortest path motion planning.

  13. Contemporary Culture and Aesthetic Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    relation to a specific cultural context, and our acquisition of it comes from being acquainted with cultural products. Aesthetics is thus closely related to hermeneutics, to how we interpret specific situations we find ourselves in. Key words: education, sensorial, judgement, hermeneutics, Kant...... century, a focus we on aesthetic education and communication. Important were arts and letters which still are important but very much on the defensive in our contemporary culture also because aesthetics often is a debate about criticism rather than about the sensorial and bodily aspect of cultural...

  14. Landscaping Considerations for Urban Stream Restoration Projects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailey, Pam

    2004-01-01

    ... after restoration and its functionality for public use. The landscaping component of such stream and riparian restoration projects must be emphasized given its importance of visual success and public perception. The purpose of this technical note is to address landscaping considerations associated with urban stream and riparian restoration projects, and provide ideas to managers for enhancing the visual appeal and aesthetic qualities of urban projects.

  15. Assessment of smile architecture and pink aesthetics: A successful methodology in cosmetic dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shital Hungund; Dhwani Gohil; Rakesh Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Aesthetic restorative treatment plays a very essential role in smile appearance. The aim of this study is to assess smile architecture and periodontium outlook for aesthetic evaluation. Materials and Methods: One hundred subjects (50 women and 50 men) aged from 18 to 62 years were enrolled and photographed. Standardized digital photographs were taken to assess smile architecture and gingival biotype during regular and expanded smile. Smile was assessed on the basis of following cri...

  16. Aesthetic Diagnosis in Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubal, Jan; Francesetti, Gianni; Gecele, Michela

    2017-10-17

    The diagnostic process in psychotherapy using the aesthetic evaluation is described in this article. Unlike the classical diagnostic process, which presents a result of comparing clinicians´ observations with a diagnostic system (DSM, ICD, etc.), the aesthetic evaluation is a pre-reflexive, embodied, and preverbal process. A Gestalt Therapy theoretical frame is used to introduce a concept of the aesthetic diagnostic process. During this process, the clinicians use their own here-and-now presence, which takes part in the co-creation of the shared relational field during the therapeutic session. A specific procedure of the aesthetic evaluation is introduced. The clinical work with depressed clients is presented to illustrate this perspective.

  17. Aura, Self, and Aesthetic Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Battani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic experiences are generated in encounters with cultural objects and such experiences are marked by the free play of cognitive and numinous experience unstructured by concepts. Kant’s famous three types of pleasure, made infamous in social theory by Pierre Bourdieu, are examined in relation to the critical theoretical concept of aura, the social psychology of “flow,” and cognitive explanations of perception to explain experience in aesthetic fields. Theories of aesthetic experience developed at the crossroad of critical social thought and cognitive science hold promise for a social analysis able to avoid the usual sociological pitfalls of either ignoring aesthetics or reducing it to structurally determined differences of taste.

  18. Social Ecology and Aesthetic Criticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen, Connor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While ecocriticism has become a respected field in literary theory and in the broader landscape of aesthetic philosophy, it could benefit from an enhanced ethical-political framework which social ecology – an underrated critical theory developed by Murray Bookchin – could provide. This essay attempts to tease out the potentials for such a framework, integrating the insights of social ecology, ecocriticism, Critical Realism, and John Dewey's aesthetic concepts into a layered idea-set used for the study of all kinds of aesthetic objects, from popular art to the gallery arts. Its key principles are the emergence of aesthetic objects (including formal artworks out of congealed human experience, the relation between organism and environment in assessing meaning, the breakdown of implicit or overt hierarchies within a work, and the idea of the artist and art-critic as a "gardener".

  19. Aesthetic Diagnosis in Gestalt Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Roubal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The diagnostic process in psychotherapy using the aesthetic evaluation is described in this article. Unlike the classical diagnostic process, which presents a result of comparing clinicians´ observations with a diagnostic system (DSM, ICD, etc., the aesthetic evaluation is a pre-reflexive, embodied, and preverbal process. A Gestalt Therapy theoretical frame is used to introduce a concept of the aesthetic diagnostic process. During this process, the clinicians use their own here-and-now presence, which takes part in the co-creation of the shared relational field during the therapeutic session. A specific procedure of the aesthetic evaluation is introduced. The clinical work with depressed clients is presented to illustrate this perspective.

  20. The psychosocial impacts of implantation on the dental aesthetics of missing anterior teeth patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P; Yu, S; Zhu, G

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics among patients who received anterior implant-supported prostheses. The current study is a cross-sectional evaluation involving 115 individuals who had gone through treatment at the dental clinics of general hospitals. Participants completed the Chinese version of the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics questionnaire (PIDAQ) before implantation and six months after crown restoration. Basic demographic information was recorded. Six months after implant crown restoration, participants were asked to self-assess their own oral aesthetics compared to before implantation. A total of 106 patients completed the study. PIDAQ scores correlated significantly with the self-assessment of the degree of oral aesthetics. Six months after crown restoration, the two factors (social impact and aesthetic attitude) decreased and the dental self-confidence score increased significantly compared to pre-implantation scores. Gender and education level significantly affected PIDAQ. Anterior implant-supported prostheses significantly affected the patients' psychosocial perception. Implantation of missing anterior teeth can significantly improve patients' negative psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics. Gender and education level are correlated with the degree of improvement. The PIDAQ can be used in assessing the psychosocial effects of implantation in missing anterior teeth.

  1. Naturalizing aesthetics: brain areas for aesthetic appraisal across sensory modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven; Gao, Xiaoqing; Tisdelle, Loren; Eickhoff, Simon B; Liotti, Mario

    2011-09-01

    We present here the most comprehensive analysis to date of neuroaesthetic processing by reporting the results of voxel-based meta-analyses of 93 neuroimaging studies of positive-valence aesthetic appraisal across four sensory modalities. The results demonstrate that the most concordant area of activation across all four modalities is the right anterior insula, an area typically associated with visceral perception, especially of negative valence (disgust, pain, etc.). We argue that aesthetic processing is, at its core, the appraisal of the valence of perceived objects. This appraisal is in no way limited to artworks but is instead applicable to all types of perceived objects. Therefore, one way to naturalize aesthetics is to argue that such a system evolved first for the appraisal of objects of survival advantage, such as food sources, and was later co-opted in humans for the experience of artworks for the satisfaction of social needs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Organization aesthetics in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujala, Anneli; Rissanen, Sari

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to make visible the material dimensions of nursing management.   Management theories have mainly ignored the material dimensions, namely the physical spaces in which management actually takes place as well as the physical bodies of organization members. The perspective of organization aesthetics enhances our understanding of the role of materiality in nursing management. The data were collected in 2009 using observation and interviews in eight nursing homes. Qualitative content analysis with critical interpretations was used. Three main issues of organizational aesthetics related to nursing management were identified: (1) the functionality of working spaces and equipment; (2) the relevance of 'organizational' space; and (3) the emotional-aesthetic dimension of daily work. Materiality is closely related to management topics, such as decision-making, values and identity formation of organizational members. Aesthetic dimensions of care are constructed by management practices which, in their turn, influence the nature of management. Implications for nursing management  Nurse managers need to be aware of the unintended and unnoticed consequences of materiality and aesthetics. Space and body issues may have considerable effects, for example, on the identity of care workers and on the attractiveness of the care branch. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. [Influence of La2O3 and Li2O on glass powder for infiltrating ZTA all-ceramic dental material formed by gel-casting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-fei; Yang, Zheng-yu; Tong, Yi-ping; Zhu, Li; Ma, Jian-feng

    2012-10-01

    The influence of La2O3 and Li2O on glass powder was studied in this paper, which is to infiltrate ZTA all-ceramic dental material formed by gel-casting. The performance of different component was analyzed to optimize glass formula. Six groups of glass powder were designed and prepared by conventional melt-quenching method. ZTA ceramic blocks were covered with glass paste, which were formed by gel-casting and sintered in 1200 degrees centigrade, then infiltrated in 1150 degrees centigrade for twice to make glass/ZTA ceramic composites. By detecting differential thermal analysis and melting range of infiltration glass power, as well as flexural strength, linear shrinkage, SEM and EDS of glass/ZTA ceramic composites, the optimized glass group was determined out. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software package by means of paired t test or one way ANOVA. The bending strength of group Li1 was (291.2±27.9) MPa, significantly higher than group Li2 and group La2(Pglass of group Li1 can lubricate ZTA ceramics well, their structure was compact and had a few small pores. Intergranular fracture existed on cross surface as well as transgranular fracture. The results showed that Li1(30%La2O3-15%Al2O3-15%SiO2-15%B2O3-5%Li2O) glass infiltrated ZTA ceramic composite had the best capability. Glass/ZTA composite material can be prepared by gel-casting and infiltrating way, and this process is simple and economically suitable for general dental laboratory.

  4. Clinical evaluation comparing the fit of all-ceramic crowns obtained from silicone and digital intraoral impressions based on wavefront sampling technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradíes, Guillermo; Zarauz, Cristina; Valverde, Arelhys; Ferreiroa, Alberto; Martínez-Rus, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fit of ceramic crowns fabricated from conventional silicone impressions with the fit of ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions. Twenty-five participants with 30 posterior teeth with a prosthetic demand were selected for the study. Two crowns were made for each preparation. One crown was fabricated from an intraoral digital impression system (IDI group) and the other crown was fabricated from a conventional two-step silicone impression (CI group). To replicate the interface between the crown and the preparation, each crown was cemented on its corresponding clinical preparation with ultra-flow silicone. Each crown was embedded in acrylic resin to stabilise the registered interface and then cut in 2mm thick slices in a buco-lingual orientation. The internal gap was determined as the vertical distance from the internal surface of the crown to the prepared tooth surface at four points (marginal gap, axial gap, crest gap, and occlusal fossa gap) using stereomicroscopy with a magnification of 40×. Data was analysed by using Wilcoxon signed rank test (α=0.05). Internal adaptation values were significantly affected by the impression technique (p=0.001). Mean marginal gap was 76.33 ± 65.32 μm for the crowns of the IDI group and 91.46 ± 72.17 μm for the CI group. All-ceramic crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions with wavefront sampling technology demonstrated better internal fit than crowns manufactured from silicone impressions. Impressions obtained from an intraoral digital scanner based on wavefront sampling technology can be used for manufacturing ceramic crowns in the normal clinical practice with better results than conventional impressions with elastomers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Restorative glass: reversible, discreet restoration using structural glass components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidra Oikonomopoulou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of structural glass as the principal material in restoration and conservation practices is a distinguishable, yet discreet approach. The transparency of glass allows the simultaneous perception of the monument at both its original and present condition, preserving its historical and aesthetical integrity. Concurrently, the material’s unique mechanical properties enable the structural consolidation of the monument. As a proof of concept, the restoration of Lichtenberg Castle is proposed. Solid cast glass units are suggested to complete the missing parts, in respect to the existing construction technique and aesthetics of the original masonry. Aiming for a reversible system, the glass units are interlocking, ensuring the overall stability without necessitating permanent, adhesive connections. This results in an elegant and reversible intervention.

  6. The Potential of Design Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise; Folkmann, Mads Nygaard; Jensen, Hans-Christian

    design practice, the humanities and the social sciences. The initial research question is a meta-question contesting the relevance of the concept of design aesthetics in design research in terms of the interest in practice methodology within design practice, the interest in understanding the object......The paper is a contribution to building a research discourse and methodology across disciplines. Taking design aesthetics as our theme, we present and discuss a research framework with roots in the interest in aesthetics within the humanities but aimed at producing research perspectives across...... within the humanities and the interest within the social sciences in investigating patterns and aspects of consumption. The research frame is guided by two aims: (i) to enable specific research interests by looking at possible combinations of empirical material and phenomena (processes, objects, contexts...

  7. [Some considerations about aesthetic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Francisco Romão

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we will discuss some aspects of the construction of the meanings concerning the body from the scientific speech which was modeled based on modern thinking and became the hegemonic thinking of some sectors of the medical field. Meanings attributed to the body bring questions that come from other areas of the social life and those questions will build the aesthetic parameters which will be part of the identity construction, in the relation with the body itself, subjectivity and healthcare. We will describe some moments of the construction of the modern scientific thought and how this thought became hegemonic, influences the common sense, naturalizes identity construction and how dealing with the body, interferes in the healthcare, show a division among some sectors of the biomedicine, reinforce an specific type of medical rationality and makes an epistemic base and principle (theoretical and discursive) to some sectors connected to aesthetic medicine and aesthetic surgeries.

  8. "Aesthetic Emotion": An Ambiguous Concept in John Dewey's Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohr, H.

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses the concept of "aesthetic emotion" in John Dewey's "Art as experience". The analysis shows that Dewey's line of investigation offers valuable insights as to the role of emotion in experience: it shows emotion as an integral part and structuring force, as a cultural and historical category. However, the notion of aesthetic…

  9. Environmental Aesthetics, Social Engagement and Aesthetic Experiences in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the Youth Theatre for Peace (YTP) project in relation to environmental aesthetics and engaged participatory practices towards tolerance building in Central Asia. My main argument is that cultural histories of storytelling, "manas" (an oral and now literary Kyrgyz epic) and trickster tales incorporate ideas and…

  10. North Korean Aesthetic Theory: Aesthetics, Beauty, and "Man"

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-West, Alzo

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetics is not a subject usually associated with North Korea in Western scholarship, the usual tropes being autocracy, counterfeiting, drugs, human-rights abuse, famine, nuclear weapons, party-military dictatorship, Stalinism, and totalitarianism. Where the arts are concerned, they are typically seen as crude political propaganda. One British…

  11. Design and the question of aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    In the article an approach to aesthetics is suggested with the focus on the education of the designer rather than on the outcome of the design. Design is taken to be an interpretative intervention into a social context which requires a sensibility for the context. The forming of this sensibility...... in the social context a central issue of aesthetics. Here, is the argument, is the link to an aesthetic education understood as an education of our senses through cultural products which is also a link to a perspective that appears to be absent in present debates on aesthetics in relation to design. Taking up...... is the goal of an aesthetic education. Through discussions of different approaches to aesthetics like Grant Kester’s dialogical aesthetics and Kant’s critique of the faculty of judgement, it is emphasized how sensibility as the key focus of aesthetics rather than art and beauty makes the ability to manoeuvre...

  12. Periocular Anesthesia in Aesthetic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Skibell, Bentley C.; Soparkar, Charles N.S.; Tower, Robert N.; Patrinely, James R.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the administration of anesthesia for periocular aesthetic procedures. Special emphasis is given to office-based procedures, most often without any systemic sedation, highlighting the importance of open communication with patients. Finally, attention is given to potential pitfalls including anesthetic systemic toxicity, ocular injuries, and orbicularis myotoxicity.

  13. Understanding the Black Aesthetic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marvin V.

    1988-01-01

    Discussing the importance of the Black aesthetic experience, Curtis examines Black cultural heritage and participatory style, the spiritual, and the creation and recreation of Black music. Advocating multicultural music education in teacher training, he suggests that Black music be studied for its value and contribution to society. Lists five ways…

  14. Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Ranciere. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Ranciere's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a…

  15. Psychotherapy in the aesthetic attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, John

    2010-04-01

    Drawing upon the writings of Jungian analyst Joseph Henderson on unconscious attitudes toward culture that patients and analysts may bring to therapy, the author defines the aesthetic attitude as one of the basic ways that cultural experience is instinctively accessed and processed so that it can become part of an individual's self experience. In analytic treatment, the aesthetic attitude emerges as part of what Jung called the transcendent function to create new symbolic possibilities for the growth of consciousness. It can provide creative opportunities for new adaptation where individuation has become stuck in unconscious complexes, both personal and cultural. In contrast to formulations that have compared depth psychotherapy to religious ritual, philosophic discourse, and renewal of socialization, this paper focuses upon the considerations of beauty that make psychotherapy also an art. In psychotherapeutic work, the aesthetic attitude confronts both analyst and patient with the problem of taste, affects how the treatment is shaped and 'framed', and can grant a dimension of grace to the analyst's mirroring of the struggles that attend the patient's effort to be a more smoothly functioning human being. The patient may learn to extend the same grace to the analyst's fumbling attempts to be helpful. The author suggests that the aesthetic attitude is thus a help in the resolution of both countertransference and transference en route to psychological healing.

  16. Birkhoff’s aesthetic measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Douchová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review and critically evaluate George D. Birkhoff’s work concerning formalisation of aesthetics, as it appeared in his book Aaesthetic Measure from 1933, and discuss its influence on further research in the field. In the book, Birkhoff defines an aesthetic measure M of an art object as the ratio between its order and complexity, or more generally a function f of this ratio: M = f (OC , where O stands for order and C for complexity. The specific definitions of O and C depend on the type of the analysed object. Birkhoff applied the formula to multiple classes of objects (e.g. vases, music, or English poetry and calculated the aesthetic measure for many art objects from these classes. We give an example of Birkhoff’s analysis using polygons, and we further discuss to what extent the ordering of the polygons (or other objects according to the resulting measures can be used, or interpreted, as an ordering according to a degree of aesthetic preference. We also include an extensive bibliography, supplemented by a critical discussion of the influence of Birkhoff’s work on further research.

  17. [Patients' decision for aesthetic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fansa, H; Haller, S

    2011-12-01

    Aesthetic surgery is a service which entails a high degree of trust. Service evaluation prior to provision is difficult for the patient. This leads to the question of how to manage the service successfully while still focusing on the medical needs. The decision to undergo an operation is not influenced by the operation itself, but by preoperative events which induce the patient to have the operation done. According to "buying decisions" for products or in service management, the decision for an aesthetic operation is extensive; the patient is highly involved and actively searching for information using different directed sources of information. The real "buying decision" consists of 5 phases: problem recognition, gathering of information, alternative education, purchase decision, and post purchase behaviour. A retrospective survey of 40 female patients who have already undergone an aesthetic operation assessed for problem recognition, which types of information were collected prior to the appointment with the surgeon, and why the patients have had the operation at our hospital. They were also asked how many alternative surgeons they had been seen before. Most of the patients had been thinking about undergoing an operation for several years. They mainly used the web for their research and were informed by other (non-aesthetic) physicians/general practitioners. Requested information was about the aesthetic results and possible problems and complications. Patients came based on web information and because of recommendations from other physicians. 60% of all interviewees did not see another surgeon and decided to have the operation because of positive patient-doctor communication and the surgeon's good reputation. Competence was considered to be the most important quality of the surgeon. However, the attribute was judged on subjective parameters. Environment, office rooms and staff were assessed as important but not very important. Costs of surgery were ranked second

  18. Magic and the aesthetic illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, Leon

    2002-01-01

    The aesthetic illusion is the subjective experience that the content of a work of art is reality. It has an intrinsic relation to magic, an intrapsychic maneuver oriented toward modification and control of the extraspyschic world, principally through ego functioning. Magic is ontogenetically and culturally archaic, expresses the omnipotence inherent in primary narcissism, and operates according to the logic of the primary process. Magic is a constituent of all ego functioning, usually latent in later development. It may persist as an archaic feature or may be evoked regressively in global or circumscribed ways. It causes a general disinhibition of instincts and impulses attended by a sense of confidence, exhiliration, and exuberance. The aesthetic illusion is a combination of illusions: (1) that the daydream embodied by the work of art is the beholder's own, the artist being ignored, and (2) that the artistically described protagonist is a real person with a real "world." The first illusion arises through the beholder's emotional-instinctual gratification from his or her own fantasy-memory constellations; the second comes about because the beholder, by taking the protagonist as proxy, mobilizes the subjective experience of the imaginary protagonist's "reality." The first illusion is necessary for the second to take place; the second establishes the aesthetic illusion proper. Both illusions are instances of magic. Accordingly, the aesthetic illusion is accompanied by a heady experience of excitement and euphoria. The relation among the aesthetic illusion, magic, and enthusiasm is illustrated by an analytic case, J. D. Salinger's "The Laughing Man," Woody Allen's Play It Again, Sam, Don Quixote, and the medieval Cult of the Saints.

  19. Coevolutionary aesthetics in human and biotic artworlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes a coevolutionary theory of aesthetics that encompasses both biotic and human arts. Anthropocentric perspectives in aesthetics prevent the recognition of the ontological complexity of the aesthetics of nature, and the aesthetic agency of many non-human organisms. The process of evaluative coevolution is shared by all biotic advertisements. I propose that art consists of a form of communication that coevolves with its own evaluation. Art and art history are population phenomena. I expand Arthur Danto's Artworld concept to any aesthetic population of producers and evaluators. Current concepts of art cannot exclusively circumscribe the human arts from many forms of non-human biotic art. Without assuming an arbitrarily anthropocentric perspective, any concept of art will need to engage with biodiversity, and either recognize many instances of biotic advertisements as art, or exclude some instances of human art. Coevolutionary aesthetic theory provides a heuristic account of aesthetic change in both human and biotic artworlds, including the coevolutionary origin of aesthetic properties and aesthetic value within artworlds. Restructuring aesthetics, art criticism, and art history without human beings at the organizing centers of these disciplines stimulate new progress in our understanding of art, and the unique human contributions to aesthetics and aesthetic diversity.

  20. Holding Aesthetics and Ideology in Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncum, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Studying imagery, irrespective of the kind, must focus equally upon its aesthetic attractiveness, its sensory lures, and its oftentimes dubious social ideology. The terms "aesthetic" and "ideology" are addressed as problematic and are defined in current, ordinary language terms: aesthetics as visual appearances and their effects and ideology as a…

  1. STRATIFICATION TECHNIQUE IN MAXILLARY ANTERIOR INCISORS RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Kirilova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of their main characteristics: transparency, opalescence and color density, the tooth structures are extremely difficult to restore by means of completely inconspicuous restorations of the natural tooth tissue characteristics. The aim is to show successful aesthetic restoration of III Class dental lesions in upper incisors by means of high quality composites. Materials and method: A female patient visited the clinic being not satisfied with the esthetics of her front teeth. The intraoral examination showed previous restorations and carious lesions in 12, 11, 21, 22. After defining the tooth color a silicone key was made. The treatment was performed under anesthesia, the existing restorations were removed and the carious lesions in teeth 11, 12, 21, 22 were treated with restorations using Vanini edge preparation. The teeth were restored by means of stratification technique. After etching and rinsing, bonding was applied for 20 sec. and then polymerized. After fixing the silicone key enamel shade was applied and then dentine shades UD2, UD3, UD4 of 0.5mm thickness each. The polymerization was done layer by layer. Applied were 10 to 15 layers in total. The composite material was preheated in oven up to 55. Teeth 21 and 22 are restored with Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium. Results and Discussion: Excellent aesthetics is achieved with composite material. They have enamel and dentine shades and allow high quality aesthetics. The polishing is excellent in Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium which is typical for this type of composite. The result of the carious lesion treatment in this patient is real improvement of the dental appearance of her anterior incisors. Conclusion: Materials show excellent aesthetic results due to their characteristics and the stratification technique used.

  2. Aesthetic composite veneers for an adult patient with amelogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignall, Ian; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir; Millar, Brian J

    2011-11-01

    This case has been presented as part of the continual assessment requirement for the MSc in Aesthetic Dentistry, King's College Dental Institute. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a hereditary disorder of enamel formation, affecting both the permanent and deciduous dentitions. It can be classified into hypoplastic, hypomaturation and hypocalcified types and presents with different hereditary patterns. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of amelogenesis imperfecta, including a detailed case report for an aesthetically concerned adult patient presenting in general practice with a Witkop's Type IA defect managed with the placement of direct, layered resin composite veneers. Amelogenesis imperfecta patients are susceptible to the restorative cycle of replacement restorations like any other patient, but start with a distinct disadvantage.This case report demonstrates a minimally invasive, relatively simple and cost-effective option for the aesthetic correction of a case of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with layered composite veneers. Dent Update 2011; 38:594-603

  3. The Aesthetics of Sustainable Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard; Riisberg, Vibeke

    This paper will investigate the aesthetics of sustainable design by exploring different strategies of communicating products as being sustainable. It can be questioned how the sustainable element is present and detectable in design: Whether it is a principle of internal construction, operates...... as a strategy of emotional commitment and subsequent prolonged use through employing symbolic elements or is detectable through ‘external’ signs designating e.g. “eco design” through a specific colour palette. “Aesthetic coding” will be employed as a central concept to describe the relationship between outer...... physical manifestation and inner idea of the object in the question of how the specific meaning content can be physically manifested and reflected in a variety of ways. In this way, the expression and appearance of sustainability in design may be contested along with the notions of sustainability behind...

  4. Bridge Aesthetics and Structural Honesty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In bridges the overall form must be chosen with due respect to the transmission of forces if efficient structures shall be created, The design must therefore be governed by experienced structural engineers - in some cases assisted by aesthetic advisers on specific issues. Some basic requirements...... decisive for choosing the form of trusses, arches and cable-stayed bridges are outlined, and several examples show bridges designed without giving priority to the structural aspects....

  5. The ethics of aesthetic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Mousavi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in plastic and reconstructive surgery have revolutionized the management of patients suffering from disfiguring congenital abnormalities, burns and skin cancers. The demand for aesthetic surgery has increased in recent years, as our culture has become more concerned with image and appearance. Several ethical considerations such as patient′s right for informed counseling, beneficience and maleficience need to be given careful consideration.

  6. Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP)

    OpenAIRE

    Câmara, Carlos Alexandre; Martins, Renato Parsekian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: A reasonable exposure of incisors and gingival tissues is generally considered more attractive than excess or lack of exposure. A reasonable gingival exposure is considered to be around 0 to 2 mm when smiling and 2-4 mm exposure of the maxillary incisor edge when the lips are at rest. Objective: The aim of this paper is to present the Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP), which aims to help in the diagnosis of the relationships established among molars, incisors...

  7. HD aesthetics and digital cinematography

    OpenAIRE

    Flaxton, T.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is accompanied by a series of online interviews entitled ‘A Verbatim History of the Aesthetics, Technology and Techniques of Digital Cinematography’. This online resource seeks to circumscribe and circumlocute the wide variety of interests and usages of incoming digital media with specific relation to the effects of increased resolution being offered by emerging digital technologies and can be found here: www.visualfields.co.uk/indexHDresource.htm

  8. Longterm survival and reason for failure of anterior composite restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Djustiana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Composites resin restorations have been used for repairing and restoring anterior teeth for decades due to the growing needs for a cost- effective aesthetic restoration and the advancement in dental material and polymer technology. Failure of composite restorations cannot be neglected, due to multiple factors, i.e. failure to diagnose the gingival tissue, inadequate tissue management, quality of remaining tooth structure, and inadequate preparation. The aim of this review is to improve clinical performances of direct composite as permanent restorations. Long lasting aesthetic composite restorations required proper mouth preparations ,which  includes supporting and dental hard tissue preparations, tooth preparation, proper isolation, bonding procedures, light cure unit, and the resin composite itself.

  9. Aesthetic Engagement, Ecosophy C, and Ecological Appreciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xiangzhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of healing the earth and sustain a healthy ecosystem for all life forms, not humankind alone, ecoaesthetics emerges as a critique of Enlightenment mentality and of modern aesthetics as it is embodied in it. This mentality contributes greatly to the global ecological crisis and to other problem areas, such as population, economic, political and religious ones. In my understanding of aesthetics, ecoaesthetics is defined as the theory of ecological aesthetic appreciation.[1] With ecoaesthetics as my research horizon, there are at least two reasons for me to pay special attention to American philosopher Arnold Berleant’s conception of aesthetic engagement and his aesthetic theory based on it, an aesthetics of engagement. The first is our shared theme, which is the critique of modern aesthetics. The second reason is more complex for it involves the crucial question of the proper manner of aesthetic appreciation. From the perspective of ecoaesthetics, the contemplation of objects by a separated perceiver, an approach that is based on the modern philosophical dualism of subject and object, is unsatisfactory and inadequate. Berleant’s aesthetic engagement is a more satisfactory account of appreciation that is aesthetic and ecological. This emphasizes the ecological continuity or interrelatedness between the human appreciator and objects. Of course, any theory can occasion critique and development. Based on Berleant’s idea of aesthetic engagement, I would like to propose Ecosophy C. This can be contrasted with Ecosophy T proposed by the Norwegian, Arne Naess, and with traditional Chinese aesthetic wisdom. In contrast with these, I would like to develop my own view of ecological understanding. In order to construct a more comprehensive and reasonable ecoaesthetics, my Ecosophy C contains eight points that are crucial in building an ecological model of aesthetic appreciation for this period of ecological crisis.

  10. Designers as Determinant for Aesthetic Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The innovation literature states that scientists are core ingredients in creating technological innovations. This paper investigates whether the hiring of a designer generates aesthetic innovations by a firm. Further we investigate what the level of design knowledge of the receiving firm means...... for the firms? absorptive capacity, in terms of turning the hiring of the designer into aesthetic innovations. We explore a unique dataset containing information on firms, their hiring of designers and aesthetic innovations measured by design applications (design patents). Our findings show that hiring...... a designer does increase firms? likelihood of producing aesthetic innovations. Secondly, firms with prior experience of aesthetic innovations are more likely to apply for design registrations. Thirdly, there is a positive moderating effect of firms with prior experience of generating aesthetic innovations...

  11. Designers as the Determinants of Aesthetic Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin

    the growing interest of firms in aesthetic innovations, knowledge on the ir determinants is limited. Work on labor mobility with in the innovation studies literature focuses mainly on discussion of scientists as crucial for creating technological innovations. This paper adds to work on labor mobility......Aesthetic innovations have become increasingly important appropriation mechanisms for firms. Since 2003, the number of design patent applications (to protect aesthetic innovations) has tripled compared to doubling in the numbers of both patent and trademark applications. However, despite...... and innovation by examining whether this holds in the case of designers' mobility and aesthetic innovations. Does the hiring of a new designer generate more aesthetic innovations than in a matched firm, which does not hire a designer? What is the importance of prior experience with aesthetic innovation...

  12. Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roald, Tone

    2014-01-01

    The first-person perspective is a central concept of critical psychology trying to make psychological processes and the subjective dimension of human life understandable. The concept refers to the point of view of the “I” as the way in which a human subject has access to herself/himself and the w...

  13. Aesthetics and function in web design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    Since the origin of the web site in the first part of the 90’s there has been discussions regarding the relative weighting of function and aesthetics. A renewed discussion is needed, however, to clarify what exactly is meant by aesthetics in web design. Moreover the balance between aesthetics...... and function ought to be considered more in respect to the target group and the genre of web site....

  14. Leadership and Management in Aesthetic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Connie

    2016-01-01

    The aesthetic provider is obligated to leverage their leadership, management, and teamwork skills on a daily basis in order to deliver optimum aesthetic outcomes for their clients. This article discusses leadership and motivational theories, leadership and management traits, complexity theory, Gardner's tasks of leadership, and the role of emotional intelligence in leading, managing, and following, so the aesthetic provider can identify and align with a particular leadership and management style that suits their practice philosophy.

  15. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires: Progress in their knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Rongo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In orthodontics, is quickly increasing the demand for treatments with a very low aesthetic impact in the social life. More and more adult patients want satisfy their necessity to have a beautiful smile, with “invisible” appliances. Numerous are the opportunities to perform an aesthetic orthodontic treatment such as lingual orthodontics, clear aligners or clear labial orthodontics. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires are a component of clear labial orthodontics together with aestheti...

  16. [The therapeutic function of the aesthetic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flageul, G; Godefroy, M; Lacoeuilhe, G

    2003-10-01

    By its definition and its etymology, aesthetic surgery is as much a surgery for the soul as for the body. Aesthetic surgery is a true "armed" therapy that essentially targets the psychology of the patient. This therapeutic "arsenal" preserves and/or restores the health of the patient according to its different aspects as defined by the World Health Organization. The plastic surgeon is always concerned about his patient as a whole, and as a human being, of whom he takes charge. Indeed there lies his specificity: He is as well a surgeon and a physician. We identify and analyze, in this chapter, the particular quality of patient-surgeon relationship on a surgical, psychological and juridical level. It is interesting to note that this collaboration results from a spontaneous convergence. The surgeon, the main interested figure, asserts himself mainly as a physician that is totally involved in a dialogue with his patient. He multiplies the interviews and he sharpens his clinical approach, and his own reactions, with regard to the demand for plastic surgery. The psychiatrist establishes the theoretical and practical aspects of the patient demand. The jurist, far from the barren dissertation of the law, reconsiders the environment of the demand and legitimates the generating wish: he insists on the necessary information but also on assuming responsibility. The therapeutic function of the plastic surgery appears essentially related to the success of a psychic repair solicited by the patient but that is scarcely specified by him as such, and of which he is, most probably, rarely fully aware. The process is to listen and to gather the information that guarantees mutual understanding. Plastic surgery is considered irreplaceable by many of our patients, and indisputable by us. It brings incomparable social and human fertility. It is, however, an ambitious and difficult project that is highly demanding. It is far from the impression of facility reflected by the media. Every

  17. Failure analysis of various monolithic posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porojan, Liliana; Topală, Florin

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of material stiffness and load on the biomechanical performance of the monolithic full-coverage posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element analysis. Three restorative materials for monolithic dental crowns were selected for the study: zirconia; lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, and resin-based composite. Stresses were calculated in the crowns for all materials and in the teeth structures, under different load values. The experiments show that dental crowns made from all this new aesthetic materials processed by CAD/CAM technologies would be indicated as monolithic dental crowns for posterior areas.

  18. Evolutionary Aesthetics and Print Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Luczaj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the extent to which predictions based on the theory of evolutionary aesthetics are utilized by the advertising industry. The purpose of a comprehensive content analysis of print advertising is to determine whether the items indicated by evolutionists such as animals, flowers, certain types of landscapes, beautiful humans, and some colors are part of real advertising strategies. This article has shown that many evolutionary hypotheses (although not all of them are supported by empirical data. Along with these hypotheses, some inferences from Bourdieu’s cultural capital theory were tested. It turned out that advertising uses both biological schemata and cultural patterns to make an image more likable.

  19. The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    In The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design, Mads Folkmann investigates design in both material and immaterial terms. Design objects, Folkmann argues, will always be dual phenomena--material, and immaterial, sensual and conceptual, actual and possible. Drawing on formal theories of aesthetics...... and the life of design objects; aesthetics describes the sensual, conceptual, and contextual codes through which design objects communicate; the concept of the possible--the enabling of new uses, conceptions, and perceptions--lies behind imagination and aesthetics. The possible, Folkmann argues, is contained...

  20. Dewey and Everyday Aesthetics - A New Look

    OpenAIRE

    Kalle Puolakka

    2014-01-01

    John Dewey is frequently mentioned as an important forerunner of everyday aesthetics. In this article, I attempt to provide an updated view of Dewey’s place within everyday aesthetics by drawing attention to aspects in Dewey’s own work and in contemporary interpretations of his philosophy that have not been thoroughly discussed in the context of everyday aesthetics. In the first part, I offer a reading of Dewey’s notion of aesthetic experience that unties its content through noting the impo...

  1. Assessment of psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Munizeh; Fida, Mubassar

    2008-09-01

    To assess the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics using the 'Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire' (PIDAQ) and self-rated Aesthetic Component (AC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Cross-sectional study. Dental Section, the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from August to September 2006. Adults with no prior orthodontic treatment were asked to complete a modified version of the 'Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire' (PIDAQ). A total of four variables including 'Dental Self-confidence', 'Social impact', 'Psychological impact' and 'Perceived orthodontic treatment need' were assessed by a series of statements, whereas dental aesthetics were assessed by the respondents using the IOTN Aesthetic Component (self-rated IOTN-AC). Kruskal-Walli's test was applied to determine significance. The respondents were 120 adults (70 females and 50 males; mean age 25.8 years), all four of the above-mentioned variables measuring psychosocial impact showed positive and significant correlations with the perceived severity of malocclusion as depicted by the Aesthetic Component (AC) of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN), with p-value of less than 0.01 for all variables. The results indicate the strong psychosocial impact of altered dental aesthetics on the emotional state of an individual. The association between self-rated IOTN-AC grading with psychosocial well-being stands established, indicating that the perceived aesthetics of malocclusion may be as significant a factor in determining treatment need as the degree of malocclusion.

  2. Exploring the Aesthetics of Sustainable Fashion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    , sustainable fashion. In programming the didactical setting for the students’ projects, several aesthetics must be considered: the aesthetic codes of the textile and fashion design discipline, both in terms of materials and expression, deriving from within the design practice itself and the aesthetic codes...... of mediated expressions seen in e.g. fashion magazines which create a frame of aestheticization influencing how fashion expressions are valued. In this tension between internal aesthetics and external aestheticization, the students are set out to create a new design expression for sustainable design which...

  3. “Taste is not to conform to the art, but the art to the taste”: aesthetic instrumentalism and the British body politic in the neoclassical age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Axelsson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The eighteenth century witnessed the historical change from aesthetic instrumentalism to aesthetic autonomy. Aesthetic research has often attempted to capture this change in teleological terms, wherein British aesthetic instrumentalism appears to contain the seeds of its own decline. The purpose of this article is to restore a balance between these two major historical modes of appreciating art, and to display the uniqueness of British aesthetic instrumentalism. During especially the first half of the eighteenth century, aesthetic instrumentalism was revitalised due to a new rationale for art in the reinforcement of a national body politic and in the strengthening of a British identity. In order to recognise the distinctiveness of aesthetic instrumentalism, as well as to acknowledge by what means it operated, I make essentially two claims: (1 aesthetic instrumentalism rediscovered its effective interaction with a national body politic by exploring a possible nexus between Britain and classical antiquity, and (2 although the philosophy of art advanced by Joseph Addison (1672–1719 frequently is held as a possible commencement of aesthetic autonomy, it was, first and foremost, characterised by a systematic aesthetic instrumentalism intended to reinforce the British body politic.

  4. Computational and Experimental Approaches to Visual Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachmann, Anselm; Redies, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Aesthetics has been the subject of long-standing debates by philosophers and psychologists alike. In psychology, it is generally agreed that aesthetic experience results from an interaction between perception, cognition, and emotion. By experimental means, this triad has been studied in the field of experimental aesthetics, which aims to gain a better understanding of how aesthetic experience relates to fundamental principles of human visual perception and brain processes. Recently, researchers in computer vision have also gained interest in the topic, giving rise to the field of computational aesthetics. With computing hardware and methodology developing at a high pace, the modeling of perceptually relevant aspect of aesthetic stimuli has a huge potential. In this review, we present an overview of recent developments in computational aesthetics and how they relate to experimental studies. In the first part, we cover topics such as the prediction of ratings, style and artist identification as well as computational methods in art history, such as the detection of influences among artists or forgeries. We also describe currently used computational algorithms, such as classifiers and deep neural networks. In the second part, we summarize results from the field of experimental aesthetics and cover several isolated image properties that are believed to have a effect on the aesthetic appeal of visual stimuli. Their relation to each other and to findings from computational aesthetics are discussed. Moreover, we compare the strategies in the two fields of research and suggest that both fields would greatly profit from a joined research effort. We hope to encourage researchers from both disciplines to work more closely together in order to understand visual aesthetics from an integrated point of view. PMID:29184491

  5. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne D; Ulsund, Amanda H; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-06-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based restorations were retrieved and analyzed. Fractographic features were examined using optical microscopy to determine crack initiation and crack propagation of the restorations. The material comprised fractured restorations from one canine, 10 incisors, four premolars, and 11 molars. One crown was not categorized because of difficulty in orientation of the fragments. The results revealed that all core and veneer fractures initiated in the cervical margin and usually from the approximal area close to the most coronally placed curvature of the margin. Three cases of occlusal chipping were found. The margin of dental all-ceramic single-tooth restorations was the area of fracture origin. The fracture features were similar for zirconia, glass-ceramic, and alumina single-tooth restorations. Design features seem to be of great importance for fracture initiation. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  6. Remakes of Colorlogic and IPS Empress ceramic restorations in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekland, Helge; Riise, Trond; Berg, Einar

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article was to study frequencies and distribution of remakes of all-ceramic inlays/onlays, veneers, and crowns occurring before and after cementation. A total of 2,069 sintered feldspathic ceramic restorations (Colorlogic) and 1,136 pressure-molded ceramic restorations (IPS Empress 1 and 2) were produced during the study period by one dental laboratory. The laboratory gave an unqualified and unlimited guarantee for their ceramic restorations. The outcome variable was reports from the clinicians to the dental laboratory about any problems related to the restoration, necessitating remake. Problems occurring before cementation occurred in 4.4% of the restorations. Veneers were remade more frequently than the other types of restorations (6.6%). After cementation, the overall 2-year rate of remakes was 1%, indicating a survival rate of the ceramic restorations of 99%, with inlays/onlays exhibiting the highest (99.8%) and crowns the lowest (98.4%) rates. This difference in rates was significant. No significant differences in remakes between ceramics or tooth categories were found. There were few problems in a short- to medium-term perspective that, in the opinion of general practitioners, necessitated remakes of all-ceramic restorations.

  7. Design Criteria Based on Aesthetic Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic criteria for designs are often debated in a very subjective manner which makes it difficult to reach consensus. In order to have a more rational and transparent process, in particular in industrial design, we propose a procedure based on Baumgarten's aesthetic considerations and Thommesen......'s dividing of a form into form elements. The procedure has been tested in student projects....

  8. 40 CFR 240.207 - Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aesthetics. 240.207 Section 240.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.207 Aesthetics. ...

  9. The Literary Aesthetics of Religious Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This volume is the first English language presentation of the innovative approaches developed in the aesthetics of religion. The chapters present diverse material and detailed analysis on descriptive, methodological and theoretical concepts that together explore the potential of an aesthetic appr...

  10. "Living Drawing": Aesthetic Teaching for Moral Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiwon

    2016-01-01

    With its inherent attributes such as qualitative immediacy, imaginativeness, and embodiment, John Dewey's concept of aesthetic experience makes a difference in moral education, in the ways of empathetic moral perception, moral reasoning, and moral action. If it matters then how can we help students gain aesthetic experience? By analyzing teacher…

  11. Coleridge's Biographia Literaria and Aesthetic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, David

    1980-01-01

    This paper makes two principal assertions: first, that Coleridge's "Biographia Literaria" is a valuable and hitherto neglected resource for aesthetic educators and, second, that the distinction Coleridge makes between fancy and imagination affords the aesthetic educator a unique insight into the differences between the popular and fine…

  12. Introducing Aesthetic Features in Gymnastic Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollatou, Elisana; Savrami, Katia; Karadimou, Konstanding

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on an aesthetic approach that takes the simplest functional skill, such as walking, and develops it into an artistic skill. The aim then is to identify aesthetic characteristics and examine ways to apply them in gymnastic classes. Because walking is the child's first experience with bipedal locomotion, the initial walking action…

  13. Modeling Human Aesthetic Perception of Visual Textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thumfart, Stefan; Jacobs, Richard H. A. H.; Lughofer, Edwin; Eitzinger, Christian; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Groissboeck, Werner; Richter, Roland

    Texture is extensively used in areas such as product design and architecture to convey specific aesthetic information. Using the results of a psychological experiment, we model the relationship between computational texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures. Contrary to previous

  14. Therapeutic Dimensions of the Black Aesthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldson, Ivory L.; Pasteur, Alfred B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors of this article see the black aesthetic largely in terms of the affective component. Emotional oneness which is foreign to the white world view is the means by which the black man can achieve optimal mental health and development. The therapeutic implications of the black aesthetic are outlined. (NG)

  15. All-ceramic or metal-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs)? A systematic review of the survival and complication rates. Part II: Multiple-unit FDPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pjetursson, Bjarni Elvar; Sailer, Irena; Makarov, Nikolay Alexandrovich; Zwahlen, Marcel; Thoma, Daniel Stefan

    2015-06-01

    To assess the 5-year survival of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) and to describe the incidence of biological, technical and esthetic complications. Medline (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) searches (2006-2013) were performed for clinical studies focusing on tooth-supported FDPs with a mean follow-up of at least 3 years. This was complemented by an additional hand search and the inclusion of 10 studies from a previous systematic review [1]. Survival and complication rates were analyzed using robust Poisson's regression models to obtain summary estimates of 5-year proportions. Forty studies reporting on 1796 metal-ceramic and 1110 all-ceramic FDPs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of the included studies indicated an estimated 5-year survival rate of metal-ceramic FDPs of 94.4% (95% CI: 91.2-96.5%). The estimated survival rate of reinforced glass ceramic FDPs was 89.1% (95% CI: 80.4-94.0%), the survival rate of glass-infiltrated alumina FDPs was 86.2% (95% CI: 69.3-94.2%) and the survival rate of densely sintered zirconia FDPs was 90.4% (95% CI: 84.8-94.0%) in 5 years of function. Even though the survival rate of all-ceramic FDPs was lower than for metal-ceramic FDPs, the differences did not reach statistical significance except for the glass-infiltrated alumina FDPs (p=0.05). A significantly higher incidence of caries in abutment teeth was observed for densely sintered zirconia FDPs compared to metal-ceramic FDPs. Significantly more framework fractures were reported for reinforced glass ceramic FDPs (8.0%) and glass-infiltrated alumina FDPs (12.9%) compared to metal-ceramic FDPs (0.6%) and densely sintered zirconia FDPs (1.9%) in 5 years in function. However, the incidence of ceramic fractures and loss of retention was significantly (p=0.018 and 0.028 respectively) higher for densely sintered zirconia FDPs compared to all other types of FDPs. Survival rates of all

  16. Art fighting its way back to aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejten, Anne Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    . In this essay, ‘Aesthetics is not what you think it is’ is thus an invitation to break through at the very point in which contemporary art seems to state the opposite—that art no longer should be a concern of aesthetics. The iconic example of Marcel Duchamp’s readymade, Fountain, which writes art history......When Claire Farago and Donald Preziosi claim that ‘art is not what you think it is,’ aesthetics itself is implicitly challenged, especially aesthetics’ seemingly inherent correlation with art. However, aesthetics, as complex and ambiguous as the concept of art, calls for a similar suspicion...... at the threshold of contemporary art, is summoned, on the contrary, to give evidence of an intact, though profoundly transformed, aesthetic engagement by the artist....

  17. Exploring the Aesthetics of Sustainable Fashion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    , sustainable fashion. In programming the didactical setting for the students’ projects, several aesthetics must be considered: the aesthetic codes of the textile and fashion design discipline, both in terms of materials and expression, deriving from within the design practice itself and the aesthetic codes...... of mediated expressions seen in e.g. fashion magazines which create a frame of aestheticization influencing how fashion expressions are valued. In this tension between internal aesthetics and external aestheticization, the students are set out to create a new design expression for sustainable design which......This working paper is a discussion of different notions and conceptions of aesthetics that may be at play when developing new design. The empirical case of the paper derives from the context of design education in a module aimed at the development of a new design expression for contemporary...

  18. The Role of Aesthetics for Design Phenomenology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    The aim of the paper is to conceptualize the means and effects of different dimensions of aesthetic meaning in relation to the experience of design. In doing so, the paper combines two philosophical interests in design, design phenomenology and design aesthetics, in order to promote a framework...... for discussing the impact of aesthetic meaning construction on experience. First, the paper raises the phenomenological question of the relationship between design and experience, specifically, how design conditions experience. Second, in looking at aesthetics in terms of a) the sensual appeal of design, b...... our experience: We can look at sensual, conceptual, and contextual aesthetic dimensions of design and examine their contribution to the framing of experience, that is, how different dimensions of meaning articulation in design offer different framings of the experiences promoted by design objects...

  19. The Aesthetic Experience of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2005-01-01

    to react on. In an ecological understanding of hearing our detection of audible information affords us ways of responding to our environment. In my paper I will address both these ways of using sound in relation to computer games. Since a game player is responsible for the unfolding of the game, his......The use of sound in (3D) computer games basically falls in two. Sound is used as an element in the design of the set and as a narrative. As set design sound stages the nature of the environment, it brings it to life. As a narrative it brings us information that we can choose to or perhaps need...... exploration of the virtual space laid out before him is pertinent. In this mood of exploration sound is important and heavily contributing to the aesthetic of the experience....

  20. Balancing bioethics by sensing the aesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneill, Paul

    2017-10-01

    This article is critical of "bioethics" as it is widely understood and taught, noting in particular an emphasis given to philosophical justification, reason and rationality. It is proposed that "balancing" bioethics be achieved by giving greater weight to practice and the aesthetic: Defined in terms of sensory perception, emotion and feeling. Each of those three elements is elaborated as a non-cognitive capacity and, when taken together, comprise aesthetic sensitivity and responsiveness. This is to recognise the aesthetic as a productive element in bioethics as practice. Contributions from the philosophy of art and aesthetics are drawn into the discussion to bring depth to an understanding of "the aesthetic". This approach is buttressed by philosophers - including Foucault and 18th century German philosophers (in particular Kant) - who recognized a link between ethics and aesthetics. The article aims to give substance to a claim that bioethics necessarily comprises a cognitive component, relating to reason, and a non-cognitive component that draws on aesthetic sensibility and relates to practice. A number of advantages of bioethics, understood to explicitly acknowledge the aesthetic, are proffered. Having defined bioethics in conventional terms, there is discussion of the extent to which other approaches to bioethics (including casuistry, virtue ethics, and narrative ethics) recognize aesthetic sensitivity in their practice. It is apparent that they do so to varying extents although not always explicitly. By examining this aspect of applied ethics, the paper aims to draw attention to aesthetic sensitivity and responsiveness as integral to ethical and effective health care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Viewpoint A Viewpoint of Personal Aesthetic Preferences and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Viewpoint A Viewpoint of Personal Aesthetic Preferences and Aesthetic Education, Landscape Theory and Survival in the Kalahari Region of South Africa: Implications for an Authentic Contemporary Curriculum.

  2. A feasible, aesthetic quality evaluation of implant-supported single crowns: an analysis of validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the reliability and validity of six aesthetic parameters and to compare the professional- and patient-reported aesthetic outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-four patients with 66 implant-supported premolar crowns were included. Two prosthodontists and 11 dental students......,24) were found between patient and professional evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: The feasibility, reliability and validity of the CIS make the parameters useful for quality control of implant-supported restorations. The professional- and patient-reported aesthetic outcomes had no significant correlation....... and the internal consistency were analysed by Cohen's ¿ and Cronbach's a, respectively. The validity of CIS parameters was tested against the corresponding Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) scores. The Spearman correlation coefficients were used. Six aesthetic Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) questions were correlated...

  3. Transcendental in Hans Urs von Balthasar’s theological aesthetics and its significance for Chinese academic aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Sheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    This thesis begins a dialogue between Hans Urs von Balthasar’s theological aesthetics and Chinese academic aesthetics. We identify a tension between aesthetics and religion in Chinese academic aesthetics, and argue that a dialogue with von Balthasar’s work has the potential to contribute to the development of Chinese academic aesthetics with regard to overcoming that tension. In order to set a ground for the dialogue, von Balthasar’s theological aesthetics is examined in Par...

  4. Avoiding Psychological Pitfalls in Aesthetic Medical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuyu; Cao, Chuan; Guo, Rui; Li, Xiaoge; Lu, Lele; Wang, Wenping; Li, Shirong

    2016-12-01

    To assess the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in an aesthetic surgery setting in the region of Southwest China, and to ascertain the differences in terms of body images between patients in the aesthetic setting and general Chinese population. This study tracked patient satisfaction with their body image changes while undergoing aesthetic medical procedures to identify whether the condition of patients who were presenting with BDD symptoms or their psychological symptoms could be improved by enhancing their appearance. Additionally, this study explored whether there was improvement in quality of life (QoL) and self-esteem after aesthetic medical procedures. A total of 106 female patients who were undergoing aesthetic medical procedures for the first time (plastic surgery, n = 26; minimally invasive aesthetic treatment, n = 42; and aesthetic dermatological treatment, n = 38) were classified as having body dysmorphic disorder symptoms or not having body dysmorphic disorder symptoms, based on the body dysmorphic disorder examination (BDDE), which was administered preoperatively. These patients were followed up for 1 month after the aesthetic procedures. The multidimensional body self-relations questionnaire-appearance scales (MBSRQ-AS) and rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSE-S) were used to assess patients' preoccupation with appearance and self-esteem pre-procedure and 1 month post-procedure. Additionally, 100 female healthy control participants were recruited as a comparative group into this study and they were also assessed using BDDE, MBSRQ-AS, and RSE-S. A total of 14.2 % of 106 aesthetic patients and 1 % of 100 healthy controls were diagnosed with BDD to varying extents. BDDE scores were 72.83 (SD ± 30.7) and 68.18 (SD ± 31.82), respectively, before and after the procedure for the aesthetic patient group and 43.44 (SD ± 15.65) for the healthy control group (F = 34.28; p aesthetic patients (pre-procedure) and female adult norms from

  5. The nature-disorder paradox: A perceptual study on how nature is disorderly yet aesthetically preferred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotabe, Hiroki P; Kardan, Omid; Berman, Marc G

    2017-08-01

    Natural environments have powerful aesthetic appeal linked to their capacity for psychological restoration. In contrast, disorderly environments are aesthetically aversive, and have various detrimental psychological effects. But in our research, we have repeatedly found that natural environments are perceptually disorderly. What could explain this paradox? We present 3 competing hypotheses: the aesthetic preference for naturalness is more powerful than the aesthetic aversion to disorder (the nature-trumps-disorder hypothesis ); disorder is trivial to aesthetic preference in natural contexts (the harmless-disorder hypothesis ); and disorder is aesthetically preferred in natural contexts (the beneficial-disorder hypothesis ). Utilizing novel methods of perceptual study and diverse stimuli, we rule in the nature-trumps-disorder hypothesis and rule out the harmless-disorder and beneficial-disorder hypotheses. In examining perceptual mechanisms, we find evidence that high-level scene semantics are both necessary and sufficient for the nature-trumps-disorder effect. Necessity is evidenced by the effect disappearing in experiments utilizing only low-level visual stimuli (i.e., where scene semantics have been removed) and experiments utilizing a rapid-scene-presentation procedure that obscures scene semantics. Sufficiency is evidenced by the effect reappearing in experiments utilizing noun stimuli which remove low-level visual features. Furthermore, we present evidence that the interaction of scene semantics with low-level visual features amplifies the nature-trumps-disorder effect-the effect is weaker both when statistically adjusting for quantified low-level visual features and when using noun stimuli which remove low-level visual features. These results have implications for psychological theories bearing on the joint influence of low- and high-level perceptual inputs on affect and cognition, as well as for aesthetic design. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all

  6. Sense Training as Basis for Aesthetic Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2016-01-01

    . It is a special problem for design engineers, who must guarantee the aesthetic, ethical and utilitarian qualities of products in a product development process. It does not matter whether they or other designers have conceived the product idea. It has been found that sense training can open up to aesthetic...... and train their specification of the basis for aesthetic experiences. The context for the study is a course and a project in interaction design about designing rehabilitation products, where undergraduate students must develop a project program with focus on theoretical scientific research and experiment...

  7. "Light and the aesthetics of the perception"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volf, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    through the meeting with form. Therefore, since form has been the major theme for the aesthetics up until now, giving form to light is a complex and challenging task and reducing it to Lux and measurable numbers only an escape from facing what is actually percieved. In this way light seems to suffer from...... this article tries to establish a dialogue between the daylight and the artificial lighting. The article describes how light - this intangible building block – can become a more workable size in the aesthetic and architectural practice of today. KEYWORDS Light, daylight, artificial light, aesthetics...

  8. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Haralur, Satheesh B; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  9. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Thamer AlShahrani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  10. Aesthetic chills: Knowledge-acquisition, meaning-making and aesthetic emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Perlovsky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the relation between aesthetic emotions, knowledge-acquisition, and meaning-making. We briefly review theoretical foundations and present experimental data related to aesthetic chills. These results suggest that aesthetic chills are inhibited by exposing the subject to an incoherent prime prior to the chill-eliciting stimulation, and that a meaningful prime makes the aesthetic experience more pleasurable than a neutral or an incoherent one. Aesthetic chills induced by narrative structures seem to be related to the pinnacle of the story, to have a significant calming effect and subjects describe a strong empathy for the characters. We discuss the relation between meaning-making and aesthetic emotions at the psychological, physiological, narratological, and mathematical levels and propose a series of hypotheses to be tested in future research.

  11. Brain and Aesthetic Attitude: How to Integrate "Old" and "New" Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Consoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, various efforts are being put forward to naturalize aesthetics. One of the most controversial disciplines of aesthetics is neuroaesthetics. The first applications of neuroimaging of the aesthetic experience of paintings occurred ten years ago. Over this decade, neuroscientific findings have determined three common centers of visual aesthetic experience: top-down processing; reward and evaluation; and cortical sensory processing. Undoubtedly, these common centers require better identification and further investigation. However, the experimental data currently available make it possible to falsify or corroborate traditional philosophical theories of aesthetic perception and evaluation. Within an integrated approach to aesthetics, this selective function might constitute a future role for neuroaesthetics in humanities research.

  12. Interest in Aesthetic Rhinoplasty Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraghi, Mohsen; Atari, Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    Interest in cosmetic surgery is increasing, with rhinoplasty being one of the most popular surgical procedures. It is essential that surgeons identify patients with existing psychological conditions before any procedure. This study aimed to develop and validate the Interest in Aesthetic Rhinoplasty Scale (IARS). Four studies were conducted to develop the IARS and to evaluate different indices of validity (face, content, construct, criterion, and concurrent validities) and reliability (internal consistency, split-half coefficient, and temporal stability) of the scale. The four study samples included a total of 463 participants. Statistical analysis revealed satisfactory psychometric properties in all samples. Scores on the IARS were negatively correlated with self-esteem scores ( r  = -0.296; p  social dysfunction ( r  = 0.268; p  < 0.01), and depression ( r  = 0.308; p  < 0.01). The internal and test-retest coefficients of consistency were found to be high (α = 0.93; intraclass coefficient = 0.94). Rhinoplasty patients were found to have significantly higher IARS scores than nonpatients ( p  < 0.001). Findings of the present studies provided evidence for face, content, construct, criterion, and concurrent validities and internal and test-retest reliability of the IARS. This evidence supports the use of the scale in clinical and research settings. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. The Evolutionary Value of an Aesthetic Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Davies

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic sense we inherited from our successful ancestors drew them toward conditions that made for survival and reproductive success and repelled them away from conditions that impacted negatively on longevity and fertility. But for them, as for us, those desirable outcomes were incidental and uncalculated. Their search was for the beautiful and sublime. Aesthetic behaviours are apparent in our forerunner species about 400,000 years ago. They sometimes made symmetrical hand axes that were then not used. We can take an aesthetic interest in more or less anything, but the aesthetic responses that are rooted in our biology include those to landscapes and environments, to non-human animals, and to the appearance and behaviour of our fellow humans.

  14. The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    and the life of design objects; aesthetics describes the sensual, conceptual, and contextual codes through which design objects communicate; the concept of the possible--the enabling of new uses, conceptions, and perceptions--lies behind imagination and aesthetics. The possible, Folkmann argues, is contained...... methodology to cultural studies. Throughout, he offers concrete examples to illustrate theoretical points. Folkmann’s philosophically informed account shows design--in all its manifestations, from physical products to principles of organization--to be an essential medium for the articulation......In The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design, Mads Folkmann investigates design in both material and immaterial terms. Design objects, Folkmann argues, will always be dual phenomena--material, and immaterial, sensual and conceptual, actual and possible. Drawing on formal theories of aesthetics...

  15. Teaching Art Criticism As Aesthetic Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, David W.

    1972-01-01

    The teaching model in the visual arts will be derived less from the painter and more from the art critic as art education moves into aesthetic inquiry. There are implications for other arts as well. (Editor)

  16. Minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina1, Alberto Goldman21Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande du Sul, BrazilAbstract: Age is a significant factor in modifying specific needs when it comes to medical aesthetic procedures. In this review we will focus on young adults in their third decade of life and review minimally invasive aesthetic procedures other than cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. Correction of asymmetries, correction after body modifying procedures, and facial sculpturing are important issues for young adults. The implication of aesthetic medicine as part of preventive medicine is a major ethical challenge that differentiates aesthetic medicine from fashion.Keywords: acne scars, ice pick scars, boxcar scars, fillers 

  17. The Listening Train: A Collaborative, Connective Aesthetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Listening Train: A Collaborative, Connective Aesthetics Approach to Transgressive Social Learning. ... Southern African Journal of Environmental Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ...

  18. Aesthetic Diagnosis in Gestalt Therapy †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubal, Jan; Francesetti, Gianni; Gecele, Michela

    2017-01-01

    The diagnostic process in psychotherapy using the aesthetic evaluation is described in this article. Unlike the classical diagnostic process, which presents a result of comparing clinicians´ observations with a diagnostic system (DSM, ICD, etc.), the aesthetic evaluation is a pre-reflexive, embodied, and preverbal process. A Gestalt Therapy theoretical frame is used to introduce a concept of the aesthetic diagnostic process. During this process, the clinicians use their own here-and-now presence, which takes part in the co-creation of the shared relational field during the therapeutic session. A specific procedure of the aesthetic evaluation is introduced. The clinical work with depressed clients is presented to illustrate this perspective. PMID:29039752

  19. The phenomenology in the environmental aesthetic education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera de Echeverri, Ana Patricia

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present an abstract about our Philosophical Doctor Thesis make on Campinas University (Sao Paulo, Brazil) titled educacion estetico ambiental y fenomenologia: problemas de la educacion estetico ambiental en la modernidad. In this thesis we do a critical thinking about the epistemological model of relation subject -object on modern education, and on the other side, we work in the construction about a aesthetic - environmental education model. We propose here an aesthetization of the education, for conjoint body and world-of-life (lebenswelt) into scenarios and actors of the pedagogical process. Body and world-of-life, are two concepts of Husserl's phenomenology that open the door about the environment' s studies aesthetization and aesthetic' s studies environment, separated on modernity, between the metaphysical subject and physicality objects. Body and world-of-life -symbolic-biotic- are marginal alterities on modernity. This marginality has been a structural lead on the contemporary environmental problems

  20. Trash and Aesthetics in the Hoard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Eddy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trash and Aesthetics in the Hoard by Charmaine Eddy, Issue 7: The Aesthetics of Trash. This article examines two reality television series, Hoarders and Hoarding: Buried Alive, in terms of a variation in the understanding of the object in relation to value based upon an aesthetic tied to consumer capitalism. Object collection is viewed as a spectacle of abjection in each episode, as items that were once worthy of purchase come to produce a garbage heap within the home. The concept of “trash” is an evaluative category applied to objects over time, but it also becomes part of the therapeutic process, as hoarders are required to dispose of their things. Object-oriented ontology, or “thing theory,” provides an alternate semiology for the object, ultimately illustrating how an evaluative aesthetics of the object in these series is linked to consumer capitalism and normative patterns of consumption.

  1. Cultural history and aesthetics of nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles González, José; Ruiz, Maria del Carmen Solano

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of aesthetics in the organization and motivation of care through history. The guiding questions were: What values and aesthetic feelings have supported and motivated pre-professional and professional care? and Based on what structures has pre-professional and professional care been historically socialized? Primary and secondary sources were consulted, selected according to established criteria with a view to avoiding search and selection bias. Data analysis was guided by the categories: "habitus" and "logical conformism". It was found that the relation between social structures and pre-professionals (motherhood, religiosity) and professional aesthetic standards (professionalism, technologism) of care through history is evidenced in the caregiving activity of the functional unit, in the functional framework and the functional element. In conclusion, in social structures, through the socialization process, "logical conformism" and "habitus" constitute the aesthetic standards of care through feelings like motherhood, religiosity, professionalism, technologism and humanism.

  2. The religion under the rule of aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto da Silva Moreira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the modern process of aestheticization of culture and religion as consequent unfolding of the expansion of market rationality to the subjective life and the libidinal sphere of subjects. Its main objective is to inquire about the future of religion under the impact of sensation seeking culture and the inflation of aesthetics. Firstly, with the help of Türcke, Welsch, Foucault and Schultze´s investigate the aestheticization process of of social life, its causes and characteristics; Secondly, following Dufour, Türcke Leiss, Kline, Jhally e Welsch, it asks how the dynamics of aesthetical impacts the daily life and the bio-psychic economy of people; thirdly, it applies the results obtained to the analysis of what is happening with religion under the regime of aesthetics and sensational culture. Finally, it asks about the possible emancipatory potential of aestheticized own religious experience and tries to draw some further consequences for religion in the aesthetic field.

  3. Interim restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, David G; Aquilino, Steven A

    2004-04-01

    Interim restorations are a critical component of fixed prosthodontic treatment, biologically and biomechanically. Interim restoration serves an important diagnostic role as a functional and esthetic try-in and as a blueprint for the design of the definitive prosthesis. When selecting materials for any interim restoration, clinicians must consider physical properties, handling properties, patient acceptance, and material cost. Although no single material meets all the requirements and material classification alone of a given product is not a predictor of clinical performance, bis-acryl materials are typically best suited to single-unit restorations, and poly(methylmethacrylate) interim materials are generally ideal for multi-unit, complex, long-term, interim fixed prostheses. As with most dental procedures, the technique used for fabrication has a greater effect on the final result than the specific material chosen.

  4. Restoring forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Douglass F.; Oliet, Juan A.; Aronson, James

    2015-01-01

    of land requiring restoration implies the need for spatial prioritization of restoration efforts according to cost-benefit analyses that include ecological risks. To design resistant and resilient ecosystems that can adapt to emerging circumstances, an adaptive management approach is needed. Global change......, in particular, imparts a high degree of uncertainty about the future ecological and societal conditions of forest ecosystems to be restored, as well as their desired goods and services. We must also reconsider the suite of species incorporated into restoration with the aim of moving toward more stress resistant...... and competitive combinations in the longer term. Non-native species may serve an important role under some circumstances, e.g., to facilitate reintroduction of native species. Propagation and field establishment techniques must promote survival through seedling stress resistance and site preparation. An improved...

  5. The struggle is beautiful: on the aesthetics of leftist politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartle, J.

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic discourse has always openly or secretly been linked to political projects. According to some main strands of aesthetic discourse modern aesthetics mirrors the structure of social and political emancipation and key elements of aesthetic discourse coincide with the political ontology of the

  6. Exploring the Relationship between Humor and Aesthetic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience." For Morreall, both humor and…

  7. Aesthetics and the Effects of Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian

    Based on an evolutionary understanding of aesthetics a cognitive approach to analyzing advertising is proposed. This approach is compared with different semiotic traditions, and the advantages of a semio-cognitive approach are foregrounded.......Based on an evolutionary understanding of aesthetics a cognitive approach to analyzing advertising is proposed. This approach is compared with different semiotic traditions, and the advantages of a semio-cognitive approach are foregrounded....

  8. Aesthetic Surgery of the Female Genitalia

    OpenAIRE

    Dobbeleir, Julie M.L.C.L.; Landuyt, Koenraad Van; Monstrey, Stan J.

    2011-01-01

    Aesthetic genital surgery seems to have become a fashionable issue nowadays. Many procedures and techniques have been described these last years, but very few long-term results or follow up studies are available. The novelty of this aspect of plastic surgery and the lack of evidence-based interventions, have led to a comparison with female genital mutilation. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the possible surgical procedures as well as the general principles of aesthetic sur...

  9. Should Advertising by Aesthetic Surgeons be Permitted?

    OpenAIRE

    Nagpal, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    Cosmetic, aesthetic and cutaneous surgical procedures require qualified specialists trained in the various procedures and competent to handle complications. However, it also requires huge investments in terms of infrastructure, trained staff and equipment. To be viable advertising is essential to any establishment which provides cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Business men with deep pockets establish beauty chains which also provide these services and advertise heavily to sway public opini...

  10. Minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Uwe Wollina1, Alberto Goldman21Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande du Sul, BrazilAbstract: Age is a significant factor in modifying specific needs when it comes to medical aesthetic procedures. In this review we will focus on young adults in their third decade of life and review minimally invasive aesthetic procedures other than cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. Correction of asy...

  11. The Aesthetics of Junkyards and Roadside Clutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Leddy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A little more than thirty years ago, Allen Carlson argued that although the concept of "Camp" would seem to allow for the aesthetic redemption of roadside clutter and junkyards, it does not.[1] He opposes those who claim that if one takes the right attitude to roadside clutter it can be seen as aesthetic. In this essay I argue that that there is nothing wrong with this, although I will not base my argument on the idea of Camp sensibility.

  12. Aesthetic surgery of the male genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Gary J; Salgado, Christopher J; Chim, Harvey

    2011-08-01

    Appearance of the male genitalia is linked with self-esteem and sexual identity. Aesthetic surgery of the male genitalia serves to correct perceived deficiencies as well as physical deformities, which may cause psychological distress. Attention to patient motivation for surgery and to surgical technique is key to achieving optimal results. In this review, the authors describe aesthetic surgical techniques for treatment of penile and scrotal deficiencies. They also discuss techniques for revision in patients with previous surgery.

  13. Orthodontics in the "Art" of Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mayuri

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetics in dentistry has of late become an awakening/actor among patients and often serves as a major reason for seeking dental treatment and care. Ever since the introduction of orthodontics as a separate specialty branch in dentistry, a variety of techniques have evolved, and methods developed both in the type of devices/instruments used and treatments planned. The discipline of orthodontic aesthetics involves micro and macro aesthetics, gingival, and facial aesthetics. This article helps focus on the artistic part of the orthodontic science. It brings out various important factors involved in customizing aesthetic orthodontic treatment planning according to the individual needs of the patient. Through this kind of treatment planning not only are the functional and biological needs of the patient met, they also provide a stable and durable results. Less invasive treatment planning makes it easier for the patient to select future treatment options as new technologies keep evolving. The review was selected by typing aesthetic orthodontics in the Google search engine, Pubmed, and Pubmed Central. Literature review of articles reflecting history, different analysis, factors responsible, and the latest technique was conducted.

  14. Reshaping Spectatorship: Immersive and Distributed Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwina Bartlem

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although discourses of immersive aesthetics and distributed aesthetics may evoke associations with different media, creative processes, modes of audience engagement and even political ideologies, artists using these aesthetics often share similar interests in transforming and enhancing notions of the body and perception through technological intervention. This paper undertakes a comparison between immersive and distributed aesthetics in relation to Virtual Reality (VR and Networked Art (net.art, particularly networked installation art. It focuses on the ways in which both VR and networked installations immerse the viewer in states of perceptual and cognitive transition. Central to this article is the argument that VR and net.art are able to generate immersive experiences in the viewer by creating the sensation of being (tele-present in an electronically mediated environment that is illusionistic and sometimes remote from the physical body of the participant. Furthermore, the immersive and distributed aesthetics generated by specific VR and net.art projects have revolutionary consequences for traditional aesthetic theories of spectatorship and art appreciation that assert the need for critical and physical distance.

  15. Brain correlates of aesthetic judgment of beauty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas; Schubotz, Ricarda I; Höfel, Lea; Cramon, D Yves V

    2006-01-01

    Functional MRI was used to investigate the neural correlates of aesthetic judgments of beauty of geometrical shapes. Participants performed evaluative aesthetic judgments (beautiful or not?) and descriptive symmetry judgments (symmetric or not?) on the same stimulus material. Symmetry was employed because aesthetic judgments are known to be often guided by criteria of symmetry. Novel, abstract graphic patterns were presented to minimize influences of attitudes or memory-related processes and to test effects of stimulus symmetry and complexity. Behavioral results confirmed the influence of stimulus symmetry and complexity on aesthetic judgments. Direct contrasts showed specific activations for aesthetic judgments in the frontomedian cortex (BA 9/10), bilateral prefrontal BA 45/47, and posterior cingulate, left temporal pole, and the temporoparietal junction. In contrast, symmetry judgments elicited specific activations in parietal and premotor areas subserving spatial processing. Interestingly, beautiful judgments enhanced BOLD signals not only in the frontomedian cortex, but also in the left intraparietal sulcus of the symmetry network. Moreover, stimulus complexity caused differential effects for each of the two judgment types. Findings indicate aesthetic judgments of beauty to rely on a network partially overlapping with that underlying evaluative judgments on social and moral cues and substantiate the significance of symmetry and complexity for our judgment of beauty.

  16. Natural look in volume restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Mary P

    2008-09-01

    Filling and volumizing injection procedures are currently widely used for facial augmentation and re-establishing a youthful appearance. Aesthetic physicians have advanced from the practice of treating single lines and wrinkles towards filling large facial areas to globally restore natural facial contours and meet patient demand for nonsurgical rejuvenation. This review describes the different categories of fillers and volumizers based on their duration of action and ability to create a natural looking effect; they can be broadly classified as temporary or long-lasting biodegradable agents, or permanent nonbiodegradable agents. Temporary fillers are effective to correct lines and wrinkles, but may not adequately meet the need for global facial rejuvenation and volume replacement in a long-term, cost-efficient manner. Permanent fillers for global restoration pose the issue of long-term safety, and may not be compatible with changes in facial architecture with continued aging. Longer lasting volumizers provide patients with a durable, effective option for the restoration of facial volume and the re-establishment of youthful facial contours. Temporary fillers and volumizers may also be used in combination to provide a wide source of options for the global restoration and rejuvenation of the face.

  17. Personality traits in aesthetic surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Visal Buturak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: It has been known that psychological factors have an important effect on the decision to undergo aesthetic surgery. In this study, we aimed to test the hypothesis that the personality traits of people admitted for aesthetic surgery differ from those of people who have never planned to undergo aesthetic surgery in their lives. Material and Methods: Forty-seven patients who were referred to the outpatient clinic of the Faculty of Medicine, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Kirikkale University to undergo aesthetic surgery were enrolled in the study. Forty-three subjects who neither underwent nor planned to undergo aesthetic surgery at any time in their lives were included in the study as a control group. Psychometric evaluation of the patients and the control group was conducted using the Turkish version of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI. Results: Taking 65 as a cut-off point, the ratio of patients who scored and #8805;65 on the hysteria subscale of the MMPI was found to be significantly higher in the sugery group than in the control group and the ratio on social introversion subscale was also higher in the patient group than in the control group, very closely approaching significance. Conclusion: It should be kept in mind that people who have personality traits that can be partially improved with psyachiatric treatment, such as social introverted, lonely, timid, shy, and hysterical and feel the need for validation by others, may be more often admitted for aesthetic surgery. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(3.000: 554-558

  18. Symbolic aesthetics in steel structural systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Abdul-Mun'em Khuraibet

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic expression and its orders are important for steel structures forming. Steel structures are a compilation of structural elements, where its shapes have standard dimensions and pre-fabricated. As the steel construction systems not only aim to achieve the functional requirements for users, but must also have the symbolic aesthetics which provides visually and cognitive expression for viewers. In this sense the research interested in expressional aesthetics in these systems and highlights the importance of attention as structural items. Therefore the visual items which related with steel structures contain some of the most powerful forms of modern architecture, steel structures with a glass cladding, agility and accuracy in manufacture of structural elements as visual items, structural interest in the forms of spaces which have long span systems or in high buildings are different forms of expression and influence. So the research focuses on the study of those expressive patterns related with the steel construction properties, including the advantages of these systems at the level of strength and firmness, flexibility and economy as well as aesthetic and expression. Accordingly, the research problem concentrated on educational shortage in the study of the structural steel system aspects concerning constructional characteristic, expressive and aesthetic features, and how to deal with them as a language bearing the symbols and meanings which have clear structural style, because it the best ways to make those systems as communication means with users, by premise that the use of expressional symbol in steel construction increases the aesthetic value. Therefore the research aims to reveal the most structural and expressive patterns by analysis the expressional means and steel structural aesthetics.

  19. The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The main intent of this article is to describe some opportunities for an education in aesthetics by referring to similarities between intensive experiences of music in the individual life and in the history of aesthetics. Here, the author discusses Romanticism through the writings of Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder. Among other things, she discusses…

  20. ramic restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish R Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration.

  1. Confidence, Visual Research, and the Aesthetic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Ruecker

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to identify and describe one of the primary purposes of aesthetic quality in the design of computer interfaces and visualization tools. We suggest that humanists can derive advantages in visual research by acknowledging by their efforts to advance aesthetic quality that a significant function of aesthetics in this context is to inspire the user’s confidence. This confidence typically serves to create a sense of trust in the provider of the interface or tool. In turn, this increased trust may result in an increased willingness to engage with the object, on the basis that it demonstrates an attention to detail that promises to reward increased engagement. In addition to confidence, the aesthetic may also contribute to a heightened degree of satisfaction with having spent time using or investigating the object. In the realm of interface design and visualization research, we propose that these aesthetic functions have implications not only for the quality of interactions, but also for the results of the standard measures of performance and preference.

  2. Aesthetic quality inference for online fashion shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Allebach, Jan

    2014-03-01

    On-line fashion communities in which participants post photos of personal fashion items for viewing and possible purchase by others are becoming increasingly popular. Generally, these photos are taken by individuals who have no training in photography with low-cost mobile phone cameras. It is desired that photos of the products have high aesthetic quality to improve the users' online shopping experience. In this work, we design features for aesthetic quality inference in the context of online fashion shopping. Psychophysical experiments are conducted to construct a database of the photos' aesthetic evaluation, specifically for photos from an online fashion shopping website. We then extract both generic low-level features and high-level image attributes to represent the aesthetic quality. Using a support vector machine framework, we train a predictor of the aesthetic quality rating based on the feature vector. Experimental results validate the efficacy of our approach. Metadata such as the product type are also used to further improve the result.

  3. Towards a sensorimotor aesthetics of performing art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Merino, B; Jola, C; Glaser, D E; Haggard, P

    2008-09-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of the performing arts. We investigated brain areas whose activity during passive viewing of dance stimuli was related to later, independent aesthetic evaluation of the same stimuli. Brain activity of six naïve male subjects was measured using fMRI, while they watched 24 dance movements, and performed an irrelevant task. In a later session, participants rated each movement along a set of established aesthetic dimensions. The ratings were used to identify brain regions that were more active when viewing moves that received high average ratings than moves that received low average ratings. This contrast revealed bilateral activity in the occipital cortices and in right premotor cortex. Our results suggest a possible role of visual and sensorimotor brain areas in an automatic aesthetic response to dance. This sensorimotor response may explain why dance is widely appreciated in so many human cultures.

  4. Hospitalization and aesthetic health in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Hilary; Donnellan, Claire; O'Neill, Desmond

    2015-02-01

    To assess the impact of hospitalization on arts engagement among older people; and to assess perceptions of whether hospitals are aesthetically deprived environments. A Survey of Aesthetic and Cultural Health was developed to explore the role of aesthetics before, during and after hospital. Study participants were n = 150 hospital in-patients aged >65. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Attendance at arts events was an important part of life for this sample and a large drop off was noted in continuation of these activities in the year post-hospital stay. Physical health issues were the main causes but also loss of confidence and transport issues. Film, dance, and music were the most popular arts for this sample prior to hospital stay. Noise pollution caused by other patients, lack of control over TV/radio, and access to receptive arts in hospital (reading and listening to music) were important issues for patients in hospital. This study identifies a trend for decreasing exposure to arts beginning with a hospital stay and concludes that older people may need encouragement to resume engagement in arts following a hospital stay. There is relatively limited evidence regarding the nature of, and potential benefit from, aesthetics in healthcare and limited studies with rigorous methodology, and further research is needed to understand the aesthetic preferences of older people in hospital. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Drivers of Ecological Restoration: Lessons from a Century of Restoration in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ása L. Aradóttir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the main drivers for ecological restoration in Iceland from 1907 to 2010 and assessed whether the drivers have changed over time and what factors might explain the changes, if any. Our study was based on a catalogue of 100 restoration projects, programs, and areas, representing 75% to 85% of all restoration activities in Iceland. Catastrophic erosion was an early driver for soil conservation and restoration efforts that still ranked high in the 2000s, reflecting the immense scale of soil erosion and desertification in Iceland. Socioeconomic drivers such as farming and the provision of wood products were strong motivators of ecological restoration over most of the 20th century, although their relative importance decreased with time as the number and diversity of drivers increased. In the 1960s and 1970s, the construction of hard infrastructure, and moral values such as improving the aesthetics of the countryside and "repaying the debt to the land" emerged as motivations for restoration actions. In the late 1990s, the United Nations Climate Change Convention became a driver for restoration, and the importance of nature conservation and recreation increased. Technological development and financial incentives did not show up as drivers of ecological restoration in our study, although there are some indications of their influence. Furthermore, policy was a minor driver, which might reflect weak policy instruments for ecological restoration and some counteractive policies.

  6. Patient assessment: preparing for a predictable aesthetic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir; Aulakh, Raman

    2015-01-01

    The flux of patients seeking to make changes to the appearance of their smile zone appears to be on a pathway of continual increase. This is possibly due to an increase in awareness towards oral health, and perhaps social, peer and media pressures, respectively. Cohorts of dental practitioners have thus responded to the latter demands by attending a plethora of educational courses, often focusing on either restorative techniques or other disciplines, notably orthodontics and clear aligners in particular. Consequently, treatment planning and thus treatment provision may carry the risk of being biased or indeed 'outcome driven' whereby the skills and knowledge of any clinician towards a particular faculty may significantly influence the ultimate treatment plan, with the unfortunate tendency sometimes to overlook the role of the interdisciplinary approach of concomitant restorative and contemporary techniques. The role of orthodontics to facilitate the provision of such treatment, along with predictable enamel bonding, has the distinct advantage of providing an acceptable aesthetic result with minimal biological intervention. However, to achieve an optimal result in such cases requires meticulous treatment planning and patient selection to avoid pitfalls with regards to long-term stability and function. This article suggests a standardized approach to patient assessment, with an interdisciplinary perspective in mind. Clinical Relevance: With the growth of patient demand for improving the appearance of the smile, a meticulous assessment protocol is required along with effective interdisciplinary communication. This enables a comprehensive treatment plan to be developed with the correct priorities.

  7. Transparent Restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barou, L.; Bristogianni, T.; Oikonomopoulou, F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the application of structural glass in restoration and conservation practices in order to highlight and safeguard our built heritage. Cast glass masonry is introduced in order to consolidate a half-ruined historic tower in Greece, by replacing the original parts of the façade

  8. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2001-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations.

  9. Site Restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations

  10. Restorative neuroscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, Robert H; Meyer, Morten; Ducray, Angélique D

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the search for therapeutic options for diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS), for which currently no effective treatment strategies are available. Replacement of damaged cells and restoration of function can be accomplished by transplantation of...

  11. Environmental Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaert, T.; Vanmarcke, H

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's programme on environmental restoration are (1) to optimize and validate models for the impact assessment from environmental, radioactive contaminations, including waste disposal or discharge; (2) to support the policy of national authorities for public health and radioactive waste management. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported.

  12. Should advertising by aesthetic surgeons be permitted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Nagpal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic, aesthetic and cutaneous surgical procedures require qualified specialists trained in the various procedures and competent to handle complications. However, it also requires huge investments in terms of infrastructure, trained staff and equipment. To be viable advertising is essential to any establishment which provides cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Business men with deep pockets establish beauty chains which also provide these services and advertise heavily to sway public opinion in their favour. However, these saloons and spas lack basic medical facilities in terms of staff or equipment to handle any complication or medical emergency. To have a level playing field ethical advertising should be permitted to qualified aesthetic surgeons as is permitted in the US and UK by their respective organisations.

  13. Complications associated with cutaneous aesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Daniela; Ruzicka, Thomas; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, a plethora of novel therapeutic approaches to fight signs of aging and to influence external body appearance have become available in aesthetic dermatology. Extensive research in this field has led to advanced understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the aging face. To successfully address the complex age-related alterations anti-aging treatment nowadays calls for a multi-faceted approach. Most frequently utilized aesthetic procedures include the use of botulinum toxin, a variety of filling substances, microneedling (collagen induction therapy), chemical peeling, lasers, radiofrequency, thread facelift and injectional lipolysis with phosphatidylcholine/deoxycholate among others. Unfortunately, many clinicians still lack in-depth understanding of potential complications, risk factors and side effects associated with minimal-invasive procedures. The following review aims to give a broad overview of nowadays most frequently used approaches in the dermato-aesthetic field and their related complications. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Fractal Analysis of Stealthy Pathfinding Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Coleman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses a fractal model to analyze aesthetic values of a new class of obstacle-prone or “stealthy” pathfinding which seeks to avoid detection, exposure, openness, and so forth in videogames. This study is important since in general the artificial intelligence literature has given relatively little attention to aesthetic outcomes in pathfinding. The data we report, according to the fractal model, suggests that stealthy paths are statistically significantly unique in relative aesthetic value when compared to control paths. We show furthermore that paths generated with different stealth regimes are also statistically significantly unique. These conclusions are supported by statistical analysis of model results on experimental trials involving pathfinding in randomly generated, multiroom virtual worlds.

  15. Aesthetic Qualities of Cross Laminated Timber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejder, Anne Kirkegaard

    to its sustainable profile. In parallel to this, new production methods and further refined timber products have been developed. Among these are the engineered timber-based product Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) that show enhanced structural properties compared to unrefined timber. However, the question...... an undefined aesthetic potential that may innovate how we construct and perceive timber architecture, the overall aim of the thesis is to inquire into the architectural and aesthetic qualities of CLT. Through three chapters this thesis examines and discusses 1) the architectural qualities of CLT, 2......) the materiality of CLT, and 3) how one can deal with these qualitative aspects in the design process. This leads to: firstly, the development of an explicit model to help structuring the analysis and evaluation of the materiality of CLT, and secondly, a clarification and articulation of the aesthetic qualities...

  16. Processes of aesthetic transformation in ordinary landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Jonna Majgaard

    2004-01-01

    it was distributed systematically as an almost industrially produced landscape element. Windbreaks are now regarded as a traditional element in the Danish agricultural landscape. As a landscape element it is an international phenomenon known and used in Germany, France, England etc. Originally local farming...... practices, natural conditions, techniques and national legislation in the respective countries, formed the aesthetic expression. In this respect one could speak of the impact of northern nature on the aesthetic expression of the Danish windbreaks, as well as the impact from national phenomena....... These features determined the specific aesthetic and architectural identity of ordinary Danish, i.e. Nordic, landscapes. Contemporary cultural changes such as the aesthetification of everyday life and of ordinary landscape, i.e. farming landscape, are now manifest in the way the windbreaks are motivated...

  17. Aesthetics of interdisciplinarity art and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Lähdesmäki, Tuuli

    2017-01-01

    This anthology fosters an interdisciplinary dialogue between the mathematical and artistic approaches in the field where mathematical and artistic thinking and practice merge. The articles included highlight the most significant current ideas and phenomena, providing a multifaceted and extensive snapshot of the field and indicating how interdisciplinary approaches are applied in the research of various cultural and artistic phenomena. The discussions are related, for example, to the fields of aesthetics, anthropology, art history, art theory, artistic practice, cultural studies, ethno-mathematics, geometry, mathematics, new physics, philosophy, physics, study of visual illusions, and symmetry studies. Further, the book introduces a new concept: the interdisciplinary aesthetics of mathematical art, which the editors use to explain the manifold nature of the aesthetic principles intertwined in these discussions.

  18. Introduction to the special issue on visual aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual aesthetics encompasses the studies of the relationship between vision and various aesthetic phenomena - from the beauty ratings of simple visual patterns to the appreciation of visual art, from the preference for natural objects and scenes to the preference for products of human creativity, from the aesthetic effects of culture to the aesthetic effects of biology, from the universal aesthetic sensitivity to the individual differences in taste, and so on. In this special issue ten papers reported the most recent studies on very different subjects related to visual aesthetics.

  19. Optimizing Maxillary Aesthetics of a Severe Compromised Tooth through Orthodontic Movement and Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Scaf de Molon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of severe compromised tooth in the maxillary anterior area still poses great challenge to the clinicians. Several treatment modalities have been proposed to restore the function and aesthetics in teeth with advanced periodontal disease. The present study aims to report a case of traumatic injury of a left-maxillary central incisor with ridge preservation, orthodontic movement, and implant therapy. A 45-year-old woman underwent the proposed treatment for her left central incisor: basic periodontal therapy, xenogenous bone graft, and guided bone regeneration (GBR. Six months after the graft procedure, orthodontic movement by means of alignment and leveling was made and a coronal displacement of the gingival margin and vertical bone apposition could be observed after 13 months of active movement. Afterwards, a dental implant was placed followed by a connective tissue graft and immediate provisionalization of the crown. In conclusion, orthodontic movement was effective to improve the gingival tissue and alveolar bone prior to implant placement favoring the aesthetic results. Six years postoperatively, the results revealed height and width alveolar bone gain indicating that the treatment proposed was able to restore all the functional and aesthetic parameters.

  20. A New Kind of Aesthetics —The Mathematical Structure of the Aesthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Kubota

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new approach to the investigation into aesthetics. Specifically, it~argues that it is possible to explain the aesthetic and its underlying dynamic relations with an~axiomatic structure (the octahedral axiom-derived category based on contemporary mathematics (namely category theory, and through this argument suggests the possibility for discussion about the mathematical structure of the aesthetic. If there were a way to describe the structure of the aesthetic with the language of mathematical structures and mathematical axioms---a~language completely devoid of arbitrariness---then we would make possible a universal argument about the essential human activity of ``the aesthetic'', and we would also gain a new method and viewpoint into the philosophy and meaning of the act of creating a work of art and artistic activities. This paper presents one mathematical structure as a foundation in constructing the science of dynamic aesthetics based on axiomatic functionalism, which is in turn based on a new interdisciplinary investigation into the generative structure of the aesthetic.

  1. Integrating the philosophy and psychology of aesthetic experience: development of the aesthetic experience scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulou, Despina

    2004-10-01

    This study assessed the dynamic relationship between person and object in aesthetic experience. Patterns of the structure of aesthetic experience were derived from a conceptual model based on philosophical and psychological ideas. These patterns were further informed by interviewing individuals with extensive involvement in aesthetic activities and 25 secondary students. Accordingly, patterns were tested by developing a large pool of items attempting to identify measurable structural components of aesthetic experience. Refined first in a pilot study, the 36-item questionnaire was administered to 652 Greek students, aged from 13 to 15 years. Correlation matrices and exploratory factor analyses on principal components were used to examine internal structural relationships. The obliquely rotated five-factor solution of the refined instrument accounted for the 44.1% of the total variance and was combatible with the conceptual model of aesthetic experience, indicating the plausibility of both. The internal consistency of the items was adequate and external correlational analysis offered preliminary support for subsequent development of a self-report measure that serves to operationalize the major constructs of aesthetic experience in the general adolescent population. The results also raise theoretical issues for those interested in empirical aesthetics, suggesting that in experiential functioning, expressive perception and affect may play a more constructive role in cognitive processes than is generally acknowledged.

  2. Importance of including cultural practices in ecological restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehi, Priscilla M; Lord, Janice M

    2017-10-01

    Ecosystems worldwide have a long history of use and management by indigenous cultures. However, environmental degradation can reduce the availability of culturally important resources. Ecological restoration aims to repair damage to ecosystems caused by human activity, but it is unclear how often restoration projects incorporate the return of harvesting or traditional life patterns for indigenous communities. We examined the incorporation of cultural use of natural resources into ecological restoration in the context of a culturally important but protected New Zealand bird; among award-winning restoration projects in Australasia and worldwide; and in the peer-reviewed restoration ecology literature. Among New Zealand's culturally important bird species, differences in threat status and availability for hunting were large. These differences indicate the values of a colonizing culture can inhibit harvesting by indigenous people. In Australasia among award-winning ecological restoration projects, restored areas beyond aesthetic or recreational use, despite many projects encouraging community participation. Globally, restoration goals differed among regions. For example, in North America, projects were primarily conservation oriented, whereas in Asia and Africa projects frequently focused on restoring cultural harvesting. From 1995 to 2014, the restoration ecology literature contained few references to cultural values or use. We argue that restoration practitioners are missing a vital component for reassembling functional ecosystems. Inclusion of sustainably harvestable areas within restored landscapes may allow for the continuation of traditional practices that shaped ecosystems for millennia, and also aid project success by ensuring community support. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. The history of aesthetic medicine and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Nils; Luebberding, Stefanie; Sattler, Gerhard; Hanke, C William; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene; Sadick, Neil

    2013-07-01

    The history of beauty is as old as mankind itself--throughout history people have tried to improve their attractiveness and to enhance their beauty. The technical basis for many of nowadays procedures like lipoplasty, breast augmentation or rhinoplasty was thereby initiated more than a hundred years ago and evolved to the modern standards of today. The aim of this article is to recall the early days of aesthetic medicine and show the swift progress up to the highly specialized medical discipline of our modern time. Combining the past, present and future of aesthetic medicine, allows to incorporate this perspective and ultimately to delivery better patient care.

  4. Film Aesthetics and the Embodied Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses - based on neuroscience and cognitive science - how the aesthetic experience of films depends on the brain's architecture and the mental flow called the PECMA flow. It describes how the flow from (visual and acoustic) perception of the film, via emotional and cognitive...... processes in the brain to simulated motor actions provides a series of options for aesthetic effects by the film's control of focus; focus on different steps in the flow will evoke different effects. The article further describe how shift of focus control experience of reality status, that is, whether...

  5. Toward Measuring Network Aesthetics Based on Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengqiang Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this exploratory paper, we discuss quantitative graph-theoretical measures of network aesthetics. Related work in this area has typically focused on geometrical features (e.g., line crossings or edge bendiness of drawings or visual representations of graphs which purportedly affect an observer’s perception. Here we take a very different approach, abandoning reliance on geometrical properties, and apply information-theoretic measures to abstract graphs and networks directly (rather than to their visual representaions as a means of capturing classical appreciation of structural symmetry. Examples are used solely to motivate the approach to measurement, and to elucidate our symmetry-based mathematical theory of network aesthetics.

  6. The biological roots of aesthetics and art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Bernd

    2013-07-18

    Animals' choice behavior is driven by motivation that is attributable to both innate urges and from positive and negative reinforcements. Using a comparative approach as well as experimental evidence, I explore how the first involves fitness-enhancing benefits from aesthetics that are derived from ancestral choices via natural selection. Innate urges and aesthetics help guide animals to produce appropriate positive and negative choices that are species-specific. Choices of food, habitat and mates or associates are considered. I propose that art is not a uniquely human product, but a representation or an extension of the maker, as are the ornaments, displays, and songs of a bird.

  7. The Role of Aesthetics in Web Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Web sites are rapidly becoming the preferred media choice for information search, company presentation, shopping, entertainment, education, and social contacts. At the same time we live in a period where visual symbols play an increasingly important role in our daily lives. The aim of this article...... is to present and discuss the four main areas in which aesthetics play an important role in the design of successful Web sites: aesthetics play an important role in supporting the content and the functionality, in appealing to the taste of the target audience, in creating the desired image for the sender......, and in addressing the requirements of the Web site genre....

  8. The Biological Roots of Aesthetics and Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Heinrich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Animals' choice behavior is driven by motivation that is attributable to both innate urges and from positive and negative reinforcements. Using a comparative approach as well as experimental evidence, I explore how the first involves fitness-enhancing benefits from aesthetics that are derived from ancestral choices via natural selection. Innate urges and aesthetics help guide animals to produce appropriate positive and negative choices that are species-specific. Choices of food, habitat and mates or associates are considered. I propose that art is not a uniquely human product, but a representation or an extension of the maker, as are the ornaments, displays, and songs of a bird.

  9. Aesthetics and Political Culture in Modern Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Kaare

    Do aesthetic appeals to senses and emotions in political debate necessarily marginalise political reason and reduce citizens to consumers – thus dangerously undermining democracy? Or is sensuous-emotional engagement, on the contrary, a basic fact of the political process and a crucial precondition...... in the political process do not by definition undermine politics’ content of reason. Instead, a differentiation must be made between a multiplicity of aesthetic forms of intervention – some of which tend to weaken the political judgement of citizens while other forms tend to stimulate competent judgement....... This book will be of interest to scholars in the fields of political science, sociology, media studies, and cultural studies....

  10. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohaty, Brenda S; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient’s caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth–restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth–restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of posterior composite restorations, the emphasis must remain on advancing our understanding of the clinical variables that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration–tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth. PMID:23750102

  11. Direct composite restoration of permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Evans Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An uncomplicated crown fracture is a fracture that involves only the tooth enamel or the dentin and tooth enamel without any damage or exposure to the pulp. Crown fracture of the anterior teeth usually caused by traumatic forces such as falls, accidents, violence, or sports activities. Traumatic injuries of the oral region frequently involve the anterior teeth, especially maxillary incisors due to the anatomic factors which may affect the functional and aesthetical values of the teeth. The objective of this literature study was to know more about uncomplicated crown fracture of the anterior teeth and its restoration. This research was a literature study performed by researching, highlighting various interesting facts and compiling the relevant published journals. The most common and ideal direct restoration of the anterior teeth was the composite resin restoration. The anterior teeth restoration was considered to be a complex and challenging case to solves due to the fact that besides reconstructing the tooth and regaining the function, the aesthetical aspect was also becoming the main objectives. The permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fracture was the most common case of tooth fractures which was mainly caused by traumatic injuries such as falls, accidents, excessive forces, violence, and also sports activities. Dental injuries of the anterior teeth also affected the aesthetical properties and the function of the tooth. Composite resin restoration was able to performed directly on the permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fracture.

  12. [A "dialogue" between the aesthetics of nursing and philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hsiu; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2012-02-01

    Nursing aesthetics belong to the broader school of aesthetics, a branch of philosophy, as well as the nursing arts, an element of professional nursing. The philosophy of aesthetics recognizes the connection between an author and appreciators and identifies both substantive and abstract aesthetic experiences in interpersonal communication through the fine arts. Nursing aesthetics values the meaningful moments of patients, is sensitive to the influences of different circumstances and situations, and appreciates the unique qualities of humanness. Nursing aesthetics is emancipatory knowledge and involves empirical, ethical and personal knowing. The article is based on a search of OvidSP and Chinese Electronic Periodical Services (CEPS) database references using key words including aesthetic, aesthetics, art of nursing, or nursing aesthetics as well as a review of books related to aesthetics, knowledge construction, and nursing aesthetics. Authors determined definitions as defined by nursing experts and the applications thereof in clinical practice. This article aimed to illustrate that the ultimate concern of philosophy is "goodness" and that the foundation of caring behaviors is "love". In practice, nursing aesthetics is expressed through empathy, appreciation, inspiration and the therapeutic use of the self. Through aesthetic knowing and enhanced perceptual sensibility and reflection, nurses can transform intuitive knowing into art-acts and ultimately enhance nursing care quality.

  13. Functional crown lengthening surgery in the aesthetic zone; periodontic and prosthodontic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajiv M; Baker, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Crown lengthening surgery aims to increase the amount of supragingival tooth tissue by resection of the soft and/or hard tissues to enable otherwise unrestorable teeth to be restored by increasing the retention and resistance forms of the teeth. Restoration of the worn dentition may require significant prosthodontic knowledge and skill. A prosthodontist should be involved from the beginning of the management of the patient. A number of key stages should be considered for correct management. Although the periodontist may guide the prosthodontist with regards to what may or may not be possible surgically, the overall treatment plan should be prosthodontically driven. Clinical Relevance: Toothwear of the anterior dentition provides a unique challenge to restore not only function but also to manage the aesthetic demands of the patient. To ensure that the correct outcome is reached, clinicians should be familiar with the normal anatomical proportions and relationships to enable planning and treatment to take place.

  14. Design and the question of contemporary aesthetic experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard; Jensen, Hans-Christian

    2017-01-01

    The article raises the question of the historical relativism of aesthetic experiences and argues that aesthetic experiences have changed according to new conditions in the contemporary age of globalization, mediatization and consumer culture. In this context, design gains attention as a primary...... case for aesthetic evaluation as design objects are, more than ever, framed and staged to be experienced aesthetically. Basing on this starting point, the article argues that an understanding of contemporary aesthetic experiences requires a meeting of cultural theory and philosophical approaches....... On the one hand, cultural theory is required to understand the changed conditions of the production, circulation and consumption of aesthetic meaning in cultural forms of art and design. On the other, philosophical aesthetics gives access to understanding the mechanisms of aesthetic judgments and how...

  15. Soft tissue injuries of the face: early aesthetic reconstruction in polytrauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveta, Achille; Casati, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Facial injuries are often accompanied by soft tissue injuries. The complexity of these injuries is represented by the potential for loss of relationships between the functional and the aesthetic subunits of the head. Most reviews of craniofacial trauma have concentrated on fractures. With this article, we want to emphasize the importance of early aesthetic reconstruction of the face in polytrauma patients. We present 13 patients with soft tissue injuries of the face, treated in our emergency department in the 'day one surgery", without "second look"procedures. The final result always restored a sense of normalcy to the face. The face is the first most visible part of the human anatomy, so, in emergency, surgeons must pay special attention also to the reconstruction of the face, in polytrauma patients.

  16. Foucault, Counselling and the Aesthetics of Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Michel Foucault was drawn late in life to study the "arts of the self" in Greco-Roman culture as a basis, following Nietzsche, for what he called an "aesthetics of existence." By this, he meant a set of creative and experimental processes and techniques by which an individual turns him- or herself into a work of art. For Nietzsche, it was above…

  17. The Aesthetic Classroom and the Beautiful Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurain, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores an analogy: A well-played soccer game has much in common with a well-taught lesson or course. Aesthetic pedagogy, as conceived by Dewey, Gadamer, and contemporary theorists and practitioners, is set alongside the world's favorite sport, including events from the 2006 World Cup and the autobiography of Pele. The discussion moves…

  18. Some Problems in the Aesthetics of Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, David N.

    1975-01-01

    Author considered the two-horned dilemma the teacher of dance is faced with concerning the aesthetic quality of her art; in the first case is the insistence on the importance of individual emotional response and secondly is the problem of being rational in one's approach to teaching dance. (Author/RK)

  19. Jacques Joseph: Father of modern aesthetic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Surajit

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available When we review the history of modern aesthetic surgery, a name that stands out as bright as a beacon and precious as gold is undoubtedly that of Jacques Joseph. A surgeon, par excellence, far ahead of his time, who chose to think out of the box, Joseph, despite all odds set out to give respectability to Aesthetic Surgery without depriving it of any scientific core values. By his words and deeds proved beyond doubt that only the very best in the field of reconstructive surgery, can visualize the hidden perfection in imperfection and formulate a treatment plan and a surgical strategy to achieve that elusive perfection. The rich surgical literature that he has left behind, the wealth of surgical instruments that he had designed and above all a way of thinking that he propagated, that aesthetic surgery is not frivolous but very serious endeavor, and treating the psychology of the patient is as important as treating his disease, undoubtedly makes him the revered ′Father of Modern Aesthetic Surgery′.

  20. Perception of Aesthetics in Consumer Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez Mata, Marta; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema; Yanagisawa, Hideyoshi

    2013-01-01

    In today´s highly saturated consumer markets, competition among products is high. Emotional design, kansei engineering and aesthetics are tools increasingly used to make products stand out from their competitors. This study investigates how the desire to own a product is related to the perceptions...

  1. Aesthetics and design for group music improvisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funk, M.; Hengeveld, B.J.; Frens, J.W.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Streitz, N.; Stephanidis, C.

    2013-01-01

    Performing music as a group—improvised or from sheet music—is an intensive and immersive interaction activity that bears its own aesthetics. Players in such a setting are usually skilled in playing an instrument up to the level where they do not need to focus on the "operation" of the instrument,

  2. Designers as determinants for aesthetic innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    The innovation literature states that scientists are core ingredients in creating technological innovations. This paper investigates whether the hiring of a designer generates aesthetic innovations by a firm. Further we investigate what the level of design knowledge of the receiving firm means fo...

  3. Aesthetic Solidarity "after" Kant and Lyotard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2008-01-01

    One of the most complex issues in Kant's "Critique of Judgment" is the aesthetic judgment's claim to universal validity and shareability. Kant is not very clear about the exact status of this claim. Kant's distinction between the beautiful and the sublime only complicates the matter, since the universal shareability of the judgment of the sublime…

  4. Windmills and the landscape. Architecture and aesthetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birk Nielsen, F.

    1996-01-01

    The authors' hope is that this document, which is richly illustrated with colour photographs, will encourage new visions, demonstrate new architectural possibilities and the aesthetic consequences of locating windmills throughout the Danish landscape. It aims at being an inspiring tool for local planning authorities. (AB) 29 refs

  5. Aesthetic Education for Morality: Schiller and Kant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Zvi

    2006-01-01

    Kant's "Critique of Judgment," which was published in 1790, referred in detail to the affinity between beauty and morality. Schiller's writings from the 1790s dealing with aesthetics and ethics are intertwined, simultaneously, both with an affirmative reception of Kant's ideas and with critical attitudes against them. This applies to essays such…

  6. Social aesthetics and the management of addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musalek, Michael

    2010-11-01

    One of the main causes of nonadherence is that the goals and forms of addiction treatment are not sufficiently attractive. To study the attractiveness of treatment in clinical practice inevitably means to enter the field of social aesthetics. The call for the implementation of social aesthetics in practice results in a shift of paradigms in the treatment of patients suffering from dependence syndromes. The main themes in the literature covered by the article focus on the role of social aesthetics in medicine in general, as well as on the attractiveness of addiction treatment, in particular. When treatment objectives and programmes become more attractive the result will be reduced drop-out rates, and in turn an increase of treatment effectiveness. Transferring theory of social aesthetics to clinical practice, the Anton Proksch Institute's Orpheus Programme is concerned with opening up spaces and creating atmospheres in which it becomes possible for the individual addicts to realise their possibilities. The challenge in the therapeutic process is not only to recognise the significance of the disorders' pathology but also to find ways out of the imagined impossibilities by opening up new possibilities and uncovering resources of the suffering human.

  7. [The aesthetic character of caring knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Yun

    2013-08-01

    The identity of nursing is founded on caring knowledge, which is derived from our understanding of its experience-revealed essence. This purposive knowledge differs from scientific knowledge because validity guides the latter and ethics guides the former. Therefore, justifying the objectivity of caring knowledge should be based on the aesthetic character of this knowledge rather than on a general social-science explanation.

  8. Capoeira, ADHD and Aesthetic Movements of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    to the conduct of everyday life. In this perspective the question of aesthetic expression cannot be reduced to a function of psychological, social or cultural representation of the lived, but must also be addressed as a field for producing or opening new possibilities for everyday practice. As a concrete example...

  9. Visual Perception with Color for Architectural Aesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bittermann, M.S.; Ciftcioglu, O.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on computer-based visual perception and aesthetical judgment for architectural design are presented. In the model, both color and the geometric aspects of human vision are jointly taken into account, quantifying the perception of an individual object, as well as a scene consisting of several

  10. Architecture and aesthetics of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreu, P.

    1977-01-01

    Having first analysed the main aesthetical and architectural problems related to the establishment of nuclear sites, the first results of the description is given of studies undertaken by a group of architects asked by E.D.F. to conceive the main buildings of a nuclear power plant and to imagine their insert in the site [fr

  11. The disruptive aesthetics of design activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    . In so doing, I will identify a theoretical ‘blind spot’ in the research literature, which has blocked our view of how design activism functions as an aesthetic practice and not only a socio-political one. To remedy this shortcoming, I then introduce some notions from Rancière (2004; 2010) that enable...

  12. Original Sin and T. E. Hulme's Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishler, Thomas C.

    1976-01-01

    T. E. Hulme, a vigorous opponent of romanticism in art, poetry, and philosophy, insisted that the underlying flaw of the romantic view was its rejection of the dogma of Original Sin and the fall of man. His views are explored for the significant bearing they have on the development of aesthetic insight and indirectly on value and outlook.…

  13. Purists, Partisans, and the Aesthetic Dimension of Sport

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Robinson

    2014-01-01

    Purists, Partisans, and the Aesthetic Dimension of Sport Stephen Mumford, in his book Watching Sport, identifies two types of sports spectator – partisans and purists. Partisans are more concerned to see their team win, whether they do so in an aesthetically pleasing way or not, while purists have no such irrational commitment, and instead pursues the higher aesthetic experience of sport. The purist, Mumford argues, is superior because she watches sport for aesthetic and intellectual reas...

  14. Aesthetic Appreciation, Ethics, and 9/11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Aretoulakis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous critical articles on what really happened on the otherwise beautiful morning of 11 September 2001. Beyond doubt, the bulk of the critical responses to the terrorist attacks focused on the ethical and humanitarian, or rather the unethical and inhumane implications of the atrocious act, leaving no room for any philosophical reflection on the potential assessment or reception of the event from the perspective of art and aesthetics. The few years that have gone by since 2001 have provided us with some a sense of emotional detachment from the horror of that day, a detachment that may have awakened our aesthetic and artistic instincts with regard to the attacks themselves as well as their visual representation. Chronological distance renders an unprejudiced and independent stance more possible now than ever. It also allows us to reconsider our initial politically correct and ethically justified repulsion of the efforts made by a few artists to aestheticize 9/11. Such repulsion, however, was associated with the delusion that by denouncing aesthetics we were really securing the prevalence of politics, morality and ethical responsibility in a terror-afflicted society. My point in this paper is that there is a need for aesthetic appreciation when contemplating a violent event such as the 9/11 terrorist attacks. What is more, appreciation of the beautiful, even in case of a 9/11, seems necessary because it is a key to establishing an ethical stance towards terror, life, and art. It should be stressed that independent aesthetic experience is not important in itself but is a means of cultivating an authentic moral and ethical judgment.

  15. The Cosmological Potential of Byzantine Ascetic Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аndrey Tsarenok

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study explores the peculiarities of the cosmological senses, which exist in Byzantine ascetic aesthetical doctrine. Underlining the obvious strong connection between theological aesthetics, ontology and cosmology, the author of the article points out the interpretation of world’s beauty, order and harmony by representatives of ascetic culture of Byzantium (sts. Grigoriy the Theologian, Grigoriy, bishop of Niss, Ioann Chrysostom, Ioann Damaskin, Simeon the New Theologian and others. The aesthetics of the asceticism is characterized as theocentrical ontology of beauty. Its development has been influenced by theism, trinitary monotheism and theocentrism of Christian world-view tradition. The theologians speak about the existence of the Highest Absolute Beauty, Who is the cause of the beautiful things in created reality. The impressive qualities of cosmos are considered as evidence of being of their Almighty Creator. Therefore, the sensual cognition can help believer in his or her search of God. At the same time, ascetic aesthetics prevents from unreasonable enjoying of the sensual (material, somatic beauty for such enjoying is able to make the true person’s spiritual perfection impossible. Moreover, according to Christian theology, absolutization of the cosmical beauty regularly distorts the person’s belief: Byzantine ascetics point out the “aesthetical” cause of paganism appearance. Appealing to Bible, theologians differentiate two periods in history of cosmos, which can be interpreted as the pre-sin and the post-sin ones. The beginning of visible world existence was marked with being of original beauty, order and harmony, but the transgression, committed by the first people, distorted the cosmos to a great degree. Acknowledging of this sorrowful fact does not ruin quite an optimistic character of ascetic aesthetical, ontological and cosmological conceptions of Byzantium. According to them, the beauty of Universe will be completely

  16. Aesthetic Discourses in Early Childhood Settings: Dewey, Steiner, and Vygotsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Booyeun

    2004-01-01

    Early childhood, when young children are already capable of undergoing aesthetic experience, must be the starting point for aesthetic education. Despite increasing attention to the significant values of the arts in early childhood classrooms, no theoretical framework to support aesthetic education has been established. This article introduces the…

  17. A Scandinavian View on the Aesthetics as a Learning Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austring, Bennye D.; Sorensen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    As the aesthetic learning process is always relational and developed in interaction with the surrounding culture, the participants in the aesthetic activities can develop cultural identity and social skills. Add to this that the individual can share its inner world with others through aesthetic activities in the potential space and in this way…

  18. The Use of the Digital Smile Design Concept as an Auxiliary Tool in Aesthetic Rehabilitation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Piero Rocha; Laia Rocha Zanardi, Raquel; Chaib Stegun, Roberto; Sesma, Newton; Costa, Bru-No; Cruz Laganá, Dalva

    2016-01-01

    The digital smile design is a practical diagnosis method that can assist the clinician to visualize and measure dentogingival discrepancies. This clinical report aims to present the associated steps, from the diagnosis of the alterations diagnosis through to the final aesthetic result. A 37-years-old female patient presented as her main complaint the tooth form and colour discrepancies. Applying the digital smile design principle, the necessary measures for a harmonic smile correction could be accurately determined. The initial diagnosis led to a wax up of the master cast that was duplicated in acrylic resin directly in the mouth. This temporary restoration guided the periodontal surgery and the final pressed ceramic crown restoration. We conclude that the digital smile design concept seems to be a useful tool to achieve a satisfactory aesthetic result.

  19. Ceramics in Restorative and Prosthetic DENTISTRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. Robert

    1997-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the ceramic engineer with information about the history and current use of ceramics in dentistry, contemporary research topics, and potential research agenda. Background material includes intra-oral design considerations, descriptions of ceramic dental components, and the origin, composition, and microstructure of current dental ceramics. Attention is paid to efforts involving net-shape processing, machining as a forming method, and the analysis of clinical failure. A rationale is presented for the further development of all-ceramic restorative systems. Current research topics receiving attention include microstructure/processing/property relationships, clinical failure mechanisms and in vitro testing, wear damage and wear testing, surface treatments, and microstructural modifications. The status of the field is critically reviewed with an eye toward future work. Significant improvements seem possible in the clinical use of ceramics based on engineering solutions derived from the study of clinically failed restorations, on the incorporation of higher levels of "biomimicry" in new systems, and on the synergistic developments in dental cements and adhesive dentin bonding.

  20. Information Technology and Aesthetics: Passive and Active Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Haynes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with examining and recognizing aesthetics in an Information System (an organization incorporating both humans and information technology. Aesthetics emerge from the wholeness of things, not from specific parts or components. As such, aesthetics may naturally be considered in “systems”, and we propose that an effective manner of thinking of aesthetics is to think in terms of “themes”. Humans have an extraordinary capacity to capture events thematically. In other words, human beings have a natural sense of aesthetics. To examine aesthetics in an information systems context, we argue that one must consider not only aesthetics that may be perceived by the senses (a passive dimension, but also aesthetics that may be conceived in the mind (an active dimension. This paper draws the conclusion that the benefits of aesthetics in relation to the study of Information Systems, has characteristics similar to the nature and importance of ethics in IS. Also, the study of aesthetics in IS has greater implications than simply recognizing and appreciating beauty and art. The very human capacity for recognizing and appreciating beauty and art is also the same capacity for effective creativity and happiness: the active aesthetic dimension. It follows that if an information system encouraged and provided the enabling circumstances for the human capacity of thematic recognition (as found in the human appreciation of art and beauty it thereby also provides the ground and the necessary thematically recognizable stimulus for effective creative and visionary organizational management.

  1. Rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta using porcelain veneers and CAD/CAM polymer restorations: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi Pour, Reza; Edelhoff, Daniel; Prandtner, Otto; Liebermann, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The complete dental rehabilitation of patients with a vertical dimension loss (VDL) caused by structural enamel deficits associated with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a difficult challenge for restorative teams. Accurate analysis and treatment planning that includes esthetic and functional evaluations and adequate material selection are important prerequisites for successful results. Long-term provisional restorations play an important role in exploring and elucidating the patients' esthetic demands and functional needs. Restorative treatment options can vary from requiring only oral hygiene instructions to extensive dental restorations that include composite fillings, ceramic veneers, metal-ceramic, or all-ceramic crowns. This case report describes a full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta including the case planning, bite replacement, preparation, and restoration setting steps with an experimental CAD/CAM polymer and porcelain veneers.

  2. Kin-aesthetic Space-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Body Space Object Symposium 26.02.2016 Strand: The (Moving) Body as Archive Title: Kin-aesthetic Space-making The paper presents a cross-medial practice exchanging body movement and tectonic space. Working with a performative model of gesture, the practice takes up a dialogue with Jean......’s How the Body Shapes the Mind forms part of the theoretical approach to motile kin-aesthetical forces of art-making, underlying this paper. In my practice I work with body- and space gestures, interchanging through a ‘third’ material, featured on screens. The hybrid production includes animated 2 and 3......D drawings, video sequences, and technological treatment constituted by movement of camera, light and diverse editing. Creating a mutable changing sensory surface, the modelling gestures draw attention to their actual occurring in space-time, articulating and transforming space-time configurations...

  3. Aesthetic Qualities of Cross Laminated Timber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejder, Anne Kirkegaard

    in the great importance wood has had as a building material throughout history as a naturally occurring, strong, light and workable construction material with various multi-sensuous qualities and great applicability. Over the last two decades, wood as a building material has gained renewed focus, partly due......The common thread through this thesis is the aim of bringing the aesthetic, poetic and sensuous qualities of materials into focus. This is done with the belief that materials are more than merely the means of construction, i.e. more than a building system. The thesis takes its point of departure...... is what happens to the aesthetic qualities of wood as a building material in this process? What does it mean to the experience and perception of CLT that it is processed to products whose properties differ significantly from those of wood in its raw form? Based on the hypothesis that CLT possesses...

  4. Aesthetic coatings for concrete bridge components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriha, Brent R.

    This thesis evaluated the durability and aesthetic performance of coating systems for utilization in concrete bridge applications. The principle objectives of this thesis were: 1) Identify aesthetic coating systems appropriate for concrete bridge applications; 2) Evaluate the performance of the selected systems through a laboratory testing regimen; 3) Develop guidelines for coating selection, surface preparation, and application. A series of site visits to various bridges throughout the State of Wisconsin provided insight into the performance of common coating systems and allowed problematic structural details to be identified. To aid in the selection of appropriate coating systems, questionnaires were distributed to coating manufacturers, bridge contractors, and various DOT offices to identify high performing coating systems and best practices for surface preparation and application. These efforts supplemented a literature review investigating recent publications related to formulation, selection, surface preparation, application, and performance evaluation of coating materials.

  5. Lasers in Facial Aesthetics- A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dishant Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lasers and optical technologies play a significant role in aesthetic and reconstructive surgery. The unique ability of optical technologies to target specific structures and layers in tissues to effect chemical, mechanical or thermal changes make them a powerful tool in cutaneous rejuvenation, hair removal, fat removal and treatment of vascular lesions such as port-wine stains, among many other procedures. With the development of adjunct techniques such as epidermal cooling, lasers and optical technologies have become more versatile and safe. The constant improvement of existing applications and the emergence of novel applications such as photodynamic therapy, nanoparticles, spectroscopy and noninvasive imaging continue to revolutionize aesthetic medicine by offering a minimally invasive alternative to traditional surgery. In the future, therapies will be based on individualized, maximum, safe radiant exposure to deliver optimal dosimetry. Lasers and optical technologies are headed toward safer, easier and more quantifiable individualized therapy.

  6. Increased complexity in aesthetic field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraskin, M.; Ring, B.

    1977-01-01

    The program of looking for increased complexity within aesthetic field theory is continued. We study a solution with five planar maxima and minima. Another solution in which one counted 19 planar maxima and minima is also studied. This latter solution was obtained by modifying previous principles by allowing for an arbitrariness associated with the integration path in conjunction with the equation GAMMA/sub jk;1//sup i/ = 0

  7. Virginia Woolf's Literary Aesthetics: The Epistemological Aspect

    OpenAIRE

    Bartkuvienė, Linara

    2012-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the epistemological aspect of Virginia Woolf‘s literary aethetics. The research problem of the thesis is an attempt at the conceptualization of the nature of knowledge in Woolf‘s writing and Bertrand Russell‘s philosophy. Methodologically and theoretically, the semantic relationship between Woolf‘s aesthetics and Russell‘s epistemology is closely examined within the framework of the history of ideas. The thesis arrives at the conclusion that Woolf‘s understanding of real...

  8. Aesthetics and Composition in Deep Sky Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendler, Robert

    It's safe to say that many of us began astrophotography feeling overwhelmed by the unnerving task of creating even the simplest astro image. Typically those first successful images were met with a healthy dose of humility as we began to understand the reality of assembling an aesthetically pleasing astronomical image. As we acquired more experience and gradually mastered the fundamentals of image processing our goals and objectives likely evolved and matured.

  9. Aesthetic evaluation of profile incisor inclination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaleb, Nathalie; Bouserhal, Joseph; Bassil-Nassif, Nayla

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate (1) the impact of maxillary incisor inclination on the aesthetics of the profile view of a smile, (2) to determine the most aesthetic inclination in the profile view of a smile and correlate it with facial features, and (3) to determine if dentists, orthodontists, and laypeople appreciate differently incisor inclination in smile aesthetics. A smiling profile photograph of a female subject (22 years of age) who fulfilled the criteria of soft tissue normative values and a balanced smile was obtained. The photograph was manipulated to simulate six lingual and labial inclinations at 5 degree increments to a maximum of 15 degrees. The seven photographs were randomly distributed in a binder to three groups of raters (30 dentists, 30 orthodontists, and 30 laypeople) who scored the attractiveness of the photographic variations using a visual analogue scale. Comparison of the mean scores was carried out by repeated analysis of variance, univariate tests, and multiple Bonferroni comparisons. The results showed a statistically significant interaction between the rater's profession and the aesthetic preference of incisor inclination (P = 0.013). The profile smile corresponding to an increase of 5 degrees in a labial direction had the highest score among all professions and among male and female raters. Orthodontists preferred labial crown torque; dentists and laypeople did not appreciate excessive incisor inclination in either the lingual or the labial directions. The most preferred smile matched with a maxillary incisor inclined 93 degrees to the horizontal line and +7 degrees to the lower facial third.

  10. Unbinding critics: psychoanalysis and aesthetic thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Dionisio

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to discuss the relationship between psychoanalysis and aesthetic thinking under the prism of the “unbinding” theory – earlier conceived by the psychoanalyst Andre Green –, linking it to some theories proposed by Hal Foster, art historian and art critic, where we can find the lacanian “real” as the linking concept. One could say, in this linkage made here, that both authors are dealing, in a very particular way, with a question that refers to the theory of the real (as it was conceived by Jacques Lacan, even in the case of Green it is not referred directly; Green’s theory, however, seems to discuss some kind of a regredience that could be linked to the death drive. Accessing the psychoanalytical dispositive, and using it as it is appropriated to the (art object to be interpreted, Foster, for example, advances in both the field of aesthetic reflection and in the more specific field of psychoanalysis. It should be noted that Foster’s reflection refers strictly to the post-pop images, observed mainly in the 1990’s photography. Thus, I think that this intersection between aesthetics and psychoanalysis might allow us to shed some light on a new art reading possibility towards a “non-applied” psychoanalytical paradigm, which, in my opinion, seems to be an appropriate way to understand some of the contemporary art production.

  11. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2002-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of SCK-CEN's Site Restoration Department for 2001 are described. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and the management of spent fuel and the flow of dismantled materials and the recycling of materials from decommissioning activities based on the smelting of metallic materials in specialised foundries. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations and performs R and D on new techniques including processes for the treatment of various waste components including the reprocessing of spent fuel, the treatment of tritium, the treatment of liquid alkali metals into cabonates through oxidation, the treatment of radioactive organic waste and the reconditioning of bituminised waste products.

  12. Esteetilise suhtumise mõiste Nõukogude Eesti esteetikas. The Concept of Aesthetic Approach in Soviet Estonian Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Volt

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This nostalgic yet analytic article discusses the topic of aesthetic approach in the aesthetic literature of Soviet Estonia (authors Borev, Kagan, Stolovich and others. Firstly, the aesthetic approach engages man’s creative/reshaping activities in relation to the world (following Marx’s slogan that ’man also produces in accordance with the laws of beauty’. Secondly, an artistic meaning can be distinguished, followed by a third, the subjective aesthetic meaning, which indicates the actual application of aesthetic categories (such as ’beauty’, ’sublimity’, etc.. Since the subjective aesthetic meaning is fundamental in relation to the other meanings, the article focuses on the specific characterisation of this category. The first important characteristic is the appraisability, which is born from the usage of the categories; the number of categories has been subject to historical change, reflecting the development of man’s aesthetic approach. Aesthetic approach was mainly defined through the five conditions (sensuousness, direct contact with the concrete object, selflessness, and the appraisal of the object in comparison with the ideal. Analysis of the aesthetic approach in a historical dialectic relation to theoretical, utilitarian and ethical approaches indicates that aesthetical feelings only arose towards the end of the Paleolithic era. Peoples on a lower developmental level didn’t know of aesthetic appraisal, or their aesthetic appraisals were still very closely connected with the utilitaristic. Even though all approaches at times are exhibited in their ‘pure’ forms, Soviet aesthetics generally held to the opinion that they arose simultaneously in daily practice and were intertwined with one another. The societal and practical meanings are what constitute the aesthetic approach – meaning that they define what man will begin to consider beautiful (in its more radical forms, this meant reducing the beauty of an object to

  13. Towards a Wittgensteinian Aesthetics. Wollheim and the Analysis of Aesthetic Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Matteucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the possibility to develop Wittgenstein's suggestions about aesthetics, this paper will focus on the organic perspective elaborated by Richard Wollheim in «Art and Its Objects». In this regard we will try to emphasize how the concept of art as a "form of live" - explicit in Wollheim - involves the analysis of the practices embodied in the experience of art starting from those of representation. The inception modes of such practices of representation need to be described in the use of specific anthropological abilities related to perception patterns that go beyond the mere statement of facts, in a fusion among aesthetic, cognitive and emotional levels. Deepening the relationships both between lived experience and expression, and expression and understanding, we will try to point out how Wollheim (and Wittgenstein places any rhetoric of the ineffable out of the game, even regarding the analysis of the aesthetic experience.

  14. Social Factors in Aesthetics: Social Conformity Pressure and a Sense of Being Watched Affect Aesthetic Judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesslinger, Vera M; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Hecht, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    The present study is a first attempt to experimentally test the impact of two specific social factors, namely social conformity pressure and a sense of being watched, on participants' judgments of the artistic quality of aesthetic objects. We manipulated conformity pressure with a test form in which a photograph of each stimulus was presented together with unanimously low (downward pressure) or high quality ratings (upward pressure) of three would-be previous raters. Participants' sense of being watched was manipulated by testing each of them in two settings, one of which contained an eyespots stimulus. Both social factors significantly affected the participants' judgments-unexpectedly, however, with conformity pressure only working in the downward direction and eyespots leading to an overall downward shift in participants' judgments. Our findings indicate the relevance of including explicit and implicit social factors in aesthetics research, thus also reminding us of the limitations of overly reductionist approaches to investigating aesthetic perception and experience.

  15. Comparison of aesthetic perception of smile between dentists and general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, H.A.; Qazi, F.U.R.; Jat, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    To compare aesthetic perception of smile between general population and dentists by varying lengths of maxillary lateral incisors. Introduction: Patient perception and expectation of their smile plays a very important role when providing an anterior tooth restoration. The aim of conducting the study was to compare the perception of esthetic smile between general population and dentists by varying length of maxillary lateral incisors. Design: Cross sectional study. Materials and Methods: A photograph of a female smile from frontal view was digitally altered to produce images with varying lengths of maxillary lateral incisor. These images were arranged in descending order; from most attractive to least attractive by the participants. The participants of the study included two groups; first group comprised of Dental Surgeons where as second group consisted of general population. Results: Evaluation of the results showed a significant difference in aesthetic perception of smile between the Dentist and general population. Conclusion: Perception of aesthetics is not similar between the dentists and the general population. (author)

  16. In vitro comparison of fracture load of implant-supported, zirconia-based, porcelain- and composite-layered restorations after artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Futoshi; Taguchi, Kohei; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Kamio, Shingo; Iwasaki, Taro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated fracture load of single-tooth, implant-supported, zirconia-based, porcelain- and indirect composite-layered restorations after artificial aging. Forty-four zirconia-based molar restorations were fabricated on implant abutments and divided into four groups, namely, zirconia-based all-ceramic restorations (ZAC group) and three types of zirconia-based composite-layered restorations (ZIC-P, ZIC-E, and ZIC groups). Before layering an indirect composite material, the zirconia copings in the ZIC-P and ZIC-E groups were primed with Clearfil Photo Bond and Estenia Opaque Primer, respectively. All restorations were cemented on the abutments with glass-ionomer cement and then subjected to thermal cycling and cyclic loading. All specimens survived thermal cycling and cyclic loading. The fracture load of the ZIC-P group (2.72 kN) was not significantly different from that of the ZAC group (3.05 kN). The fracture load of the zirconia-based composite-layered restoration primed with Clearfil Photo Bond (ZIC-P) was comparable to that of the zirconia-based all-ceramic restoration (ZAC) after artificial aging.

  17. Color related to ceramic and zirconia restorations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichi, Alessandro; Louca, Chris; Corciolani, Gabriele; Ferrari, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The requirement to achieve natural looking restorations is one of the most challenging aspects of dentistry, and the shade matching of dental restorations with the natural dentition is a difficult task due to the complex optical characteristics of natural teeth. Dental porcelain is considered the reference material for prosthetic rehabilitation, but it is not easy to handle and aesthetic excellence is quite difficult to obtain. For these reasons, shade matching with dental porcelain is often considered to be more artistic than scientific. Shade matching is considered unpredictable due to several variables that may influence the final appearance of a restoration. In order to improve this situation, over the last decade new shade guides and instruments have been developed and the aesthetic aspects of dental porcelain have been further investigated. In this review some aspects of color selection and color reproduction have been examined. Color selection has advanced through the development of new shade guides and electronic shade taking devices, although visual assessment has still not been entirely replaced by electronic instruments. Color reproduction with dental porcelain has improved thanks to advances in the performance and knowledge of dental porcelain, but is still not easy to achieve. The difficulties of achieving good aesthetics with PFM restorations and the desire for metal free solutions have resulted in the increased use of zirconia. The unique optical properties of zirconia have introduced new opportunities for achieving superior aesthetics, however further research is required with this material. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Values and imperfections of the English Restoration plays

    OpenAIRE

    Andrejević Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Although writers of the English Restoration tragedy were not able to continue the path of the magnificent Renaissance tragedy and to become the worthy heirs of Shakespeare, they were experimenting with the verse and themes leaving a few impressive tragic scenes. Therefore, the heroic tragedy, as a dramatic kind, did not achieve an enviable aesthetic value. On the other hand, writers of comedies have managed to adjust the traditional elements to the new literary trends and to the atmosphere of...

  19. A model of visual, aesthetic communication focusing on web sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2002-01-01

    Theory books and method books within the field of web design mainly focus on the technical and functional aspects of the construction of web design. There is a lack of a model which weighs the analysis of the visual and aesthetic aspects against the the functional and technical aspects of web...... design. With a point of departure in Roman Jakobson's linguistic communication model, the reader is introduced to a model which covers the communication aspects, the visual aspects, the aesthetic aspects and the net specific aspects of the analysis of media products. The aesthetic aspects rank low...... in the eyes of the media producers even though the most outstanding media products often obtained their success due to aesthetic phenomena. The formal aesthetic function and the inexpressible aesthetic function have therefore been prioritised in the model in regard to the construction and analysis of media...

  20. Art Appreciation and the Method of Aesthetic Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zupančič Tomaž

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The method of aesthetic transfer is a modern teaching method in art education. It emphasizes the pedagogic value of the aesthetic experience. It is a comprehensive method, as it encompasses different parameters of art didactics. It affects lesson time allocation and determines content, methods, and teaching modes. It also affects motivation and final evaluation. The essence of the method of aesthetic transfer lies in transferring aesthetic messages from the artwork to students. The foundation and condition for a successful implementation of the method of aesthetic transfer is a high-quality art appreciation. There are several ways and methods for successfully developing art appreciation, the common objective of all being to allow students to see, perceive, and enjoy a work of art. Thus they enrich their artistic and aesthetic development, and establish a positive attitude towards art, while this method at the same time encourages their own artistic exploration.

  1. Research on the Aesthetic Experiences of Tourists Visiting Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saime Oral

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the aesthetic value of tourism products provided by tour operators who are the wholesalers with in the tourism industry as well as revealing the impact of aesthetic valueson customer satisfaction. The research was applied to Far-East tourists who have been visiting Turkey in ever increasing numbersyear by year. Convenience sampling, a non-probability sampling method was used. Zhang (2008’s Aesthetic Value Scale was performed on Far-East tourist groups. Exploratory factor analysis and correlation analysis were applied to the data collected from the Far East tourists visiting Turkey. As aresult of the exploratory factor analysison the aesthetic experiences of the tourists within: asouvenir shop, museum, restaurant, hotel and tour bus aesthetic valueswere apparent throughout. At the end of the research apositive correlation was found between aesthetic value and customer satisfaction

  2. Sonic morphology: Aesthetic dimensional auditory spatial awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Martha M.

    The sound and ceramic sculpture installation, " Skirting the Edge: Experiences in Sound & Form," is an integration of art and science demonstrating the concept of sonic morphology. "Sonic morphology" is herein defined as aesthetic three-dimensional auditory spatial awareness. The exhibition explicates my empirical phenomenal observations that sound has a three-dimensional form. Composed of ceramic sculptures that allude to different social and physical situations, coupled with sound compositions that enhance and create a three-dimensional auditory and visual aesthetic experience (see accompanying DVD), the exhibition supports the research question, "What is the relationship between sound and form?" Precisely how people aurally experience three-dimensional space involves an integration of spatial properties, auditory perception, individual history, and cultural mores. People also utilize environmental sound events as a guide in social situations and in remembering their personal history, as well as a guide in moving through space. Aesthetically, sound affects the fascination, meaning, and attention one has within a particular space. Sonic morphology brings art forms such as a movie, video, sound composition, and musical performance into the cognitive scope by generating meaning from the link between the visual and auditory senses. This research examined sonic morphology as an extension of musique concrete, sound as object, originating in Pierre Schaeffer's work in the 1940s. Pointing, as John Cage did, to the corporeal three-dimensional experience of "all sound," I composed works that took their total form only through the perceiver-participant's participation in the exhibition. While contemporary artist Alvin Lucier creates artworks that draw attention to making sound visible, "Skirting the Edge" engages the perceiver-participant visually and aurally, leading to recognition of sonic morphology.

  3. Combining Aesthetic with Ecological Values for Landscape Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dewei; Luo, Tao; Lin, Tao; Qiu, Quanyi; Luo, Yunjian

    2014-01-01

    Humans receive multiple benefits from various landscapes that foster ecological services and aesthetic attractiveness. In this study, a hybrid framework was proposed to evaluate ecological and aesthetic values of five landscape types in Houguanhu Region of central China. Data from the public aesthetic survey and professional ecological assessment were converted into a two-dimensional coordinate system and distribution maps of landscape values. Results showed that natural landscapes (i.e. wate...

  4. Stability and Variability in Aesthetic Experience: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, Thomas; Beudt, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Based on psychophysics’ pragmatic dualism, we trace the cognitive neuroscience of stability and variability in aesthetic experience. With regard to different domains of aesthetic processing, we touch upon the relevance of cognitive schemata for aesthetic preference. Attitudes and preferences are explored in detail. Evolutionary constraints on attitude formation or schema generation are elucidated, just as the often seemingly arbitrary influences of social, societal, and cultural nature are. A...

  5. An inquiry - aesthetics of art in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Jillian

    2008-09-01

    Historically, art has served a significant purpose within hospital waiting rooms. However, in recent times we have experienced cuts in funding and less interest in improving the aesthetic of art displayed in Australian hospitals. This article briefly discusses the history of art in hospitals and explores a methodology for researching the preference of Australian patients today. Potentially, Australians waiting in hospitals and medical clinics could benefit from art works that reflect their preferences; this may help to ease the pain, anxiety, and boredom of waiting.

  6. Aesthetic considerations in algorithmic and generative composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Kerry L.

    Models of chance operations, random equations, stochastic processes, and chaos systems have inspired composers as historical as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. As these models advance and new processes are discovered or defined, composers continue to find new inspirations for musical composition. Yet, the relative artistic merits of some of these works are limited. This paper explores the application of extra-musical processes to the sonic arts and proposes aesthetic considerations from the point of view of the artist. Musical examples demonstrate possibilities for working successfully with algorithmic and generative processes in sound, from formal decisions to synthesis.

  7. The Aesthetics of Social Movements in Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Oscar Garcia

    2017-01-01

    , deploy aesthetic practices in urban spaces in order to make inequality visible and enhance a new sense of community. This is illustrated through three cases: Platform for People Affected by Mortgages (PAH), Invisibles, and “We Are Not Crime.” Three types of subjectivization are developed as a consequence...... of interrupting the dominant order in specific settings (i.e., the streets as public spaces): the part which has no justice, the part which has no visibility, and the part which has no voice....

  8. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force generators (muscle fibres) and noisy

  9. A Scandinavian View on the Aesthetics as a Learning Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austring, Bennyé D.; Sørensen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    As the aesthetic learning process is always relational and developed in interaction with the surrounding culture, the participants in the aesthetic activities can develop cultural identity and social skills. Add to this that the individual can share its inner world with others through aesthetic...... activities in the potential space and in this way create a balance in its inner and outer world, realize itself and develop individual and collective identity. last but not least aesthetic activities strengthen the joy of life, and they are an arena for development of imagination and creativity - society...

  10. Using virtual reality to estimate aesthetic values of coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Sam; Caley, M. Julian; Pearse, Alan R.; Brown, Ross; James, Allan; Christensen, Bryce; Bednarz, Tomasz; Anthony, Ken; González-Rivero, Manuel; Mengersen, Kerrie; Peterson, Erin E.

    2018-01-01

    Aesthetic value, or beauty, is important to the relationship between humans and natural environments and is, therefore, a fundamental socio-economic attribute of conservation alongside other ecosystem services. However, beauty is difficult to quantify and is not estimated well using traditional approaches to monitoring coral-reef aesthetics. To improve the estimation of ecosystem aesthetic values, we developed and implemented a novel framework used to quantify features of coral-reef aesthetics based on people's perceptions of beauty. Three observer groups with different experience to reef environments (Marine Scientist, Experienced Diver and Citizen) were virtually immersed in Australian's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) using 360° images. Perceptions of beauty and observations were used to assess the importance of eight potential attributes of reef-aesthetic value. Among these, heterogeneity, defined by structural complexity and colour diversity, was positively associated with coral-reef-aesthetic values. There were no group-level differences in the way the observer groups perceived reef aesthetics suggesting that past experiences with coral reefs do not necessarily influence the perception of beauty by the observer. The framework developed here provides a generic tool to help identify indicators of aesthetic value applicable to a wide variety of natural systems. The ability to estimate aesthetic values robustly adds an important dimension to the holistic conservation of the GBR, coral reefs worldwide and other natural ecosystems. PMID:29765676

  11. The Aesthetic Actualisation of Learning Potential with Media and ICT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2006-01-01

    The article discusses the possibilities for using aesthetics as a concept for potentialities that are actualised with respect to education and learning with media and IT. In order to realise this, a new understanding of the concept of aesthetics as a reflexive framing of performative choice...... by an evolutionary model based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory: when the concept of art changes, the concept of aesthetics also changes. This complex forms the basis for a discussion of how learning potential with media and IT can be actualised aesthetically....

  12. Aesthetics and Humean Aesthetic Norms in the Novels of Jane Austen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadlez, Eva M.

    2008-01-01

    During the eighteenth century, amateurs as well as philosophers ventured critical commentary on the arts. Talk concerning taste or beauty or the sublime was so much a part of general discourse that even novelists of that era incorporated such subjects in their work. So it would not be surprising to find that perspectives on aesthetics are…

  13. Shaping and reshaping the aesthetic brain: Emerging perspectives on the neurobiology of embodied aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Louise P; Urgesi, Cosimo; Cross, Emily S

    2016-03-01

    Less than two decades after its inception, the burgeoning field of neuroaesthetics continues to grow in interest and momentum. Despite the biological and social importance of the human body and the attention people pay to its appearance in daily life, only recently has neuroaesthetic inquiry turned its attention to questions concerning the aesthetic appraisal of the human body. We review evidence illustrating that the complexity of aesthetic experience is reflected by dynamic interplay between brain systems involved in reward, perceptual and motor processing, with a focus on aesthetic perception involving the human body. We then evaluate work demonstrating how these systems are modulated by beholders' expertise or familiarity. Finally, we discuss seminal studies revealing the plasticity of behavioural and neural responses to beauty after perceptual and motor training. This research highlights the rich potential for neuroaesthetic inquiry to extend beyond its typical realm of the fine arts to address important questions regarding the relationship between embodiment, aesthetics and performing arts. We conclude by considering some of the criticisms and limitations of neuroaesthetics, and highlight several outstanding issues for future inquiry. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. [Multiple agenesis and prosthetic restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, P

    1990-03-01

    Cases of multiple agenesia present some difficulties in the treatment planing. Three situations may be encountered: limited agenesia, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia without remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis or the partial adjacent prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia with remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by means of a supra-dental prosthesis. The first two situations have been described in dental literature and are relatively easy to treat. The same is not true for the third situation, where the decision to keep the temporary teeth considerably increases the difficulty of prosthetic restoration. This subject will be illustrated by the presentation of a clinical case of multiple bi-maxillary agenesia. The patient has: on the maxilla: an absence of 9 permanent teeth (18, 15, 14, 12, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28) and the presence of 4 deciduous teeth (62, 63, 64, 65), on the mandible: an absence of all permanent teeth, with the exception of 36 and 46, and the remaining of 4 deciduous teeth (75, 73, 83, 84). The remaining of deciduous teeth and the presence of a very high inter-arch space led to opting for dental coverage so as to keep the deciduous teeth and a proper vertical dimension. The patient wished to solve his "problem" in the maxilla first, and is not wanting to undergo the extraction of his deciduous teeth. The following therapeutic proposal was adapted: On the maxilla, a three-step procedure: first step: building of metal copings on 13, 16 and 26 and metal-ceramic crowns on 11 and 21, second step: building of telescop crowns on 16 and 26 and clasps on 13, 11 and 21, third step: casting of the removable partial denture framework and soldering to the telescop crowns and clasps. On the mandible, a provisional restoration using a supra-dental resin removable partial denture with ceramic occlusal surfaces was adopted. The aesthetic and functional

  15. Visual website aesthetics : the relationship between dimensions of visual website aesthetics, website trust and consumers' intention to visit the website

    OpenAIRE

    Dalen, Mie Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    A review of previous research about visual aesthetics revealed inconsistencies and contradicting views. Due to the important role of visual aesthetics in the online environment, a more thorough understanding of the construct was beneficial. Therefore, the first aim of this thesis was to develop a new structural framework of the dimensions of visual website aesthetics based on a review of previous research findings and theories. This conceptualisation process revealed that visua...

  16. Implant replacement of the maxillary central incisor utilizing a modified ceramic abutment (Thommen SPI ART) and ceramic restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The prosthetic restoration of a missing anterior tooth with a dental implant is a challenge. Treatment coordination with a multidisciplinary team is critical in the successful outcome of this type of patient treatment. Newer surgical treatment modalities in the management of hard and soft tissues are becoming common, with very good predictability and long-term stability. Additionally, the use of advanced dental technology and materials such as sintered zirconium allows the restorative practitioner the opportunity to fabricate an esthetic, precise-fitting, biocompatible, and strong definitive prosthesis for the patient, with good longevity. The use of an all-ceramic abutment and restoration is described, along with the "soft tissue sculpting" procedure through the use of a custom provisional restoration. The relative ease and convenience of the procedure is also illustrated.

  17. Local Community Perceptions of Mine Site Restoration Using Phytoremediation in Abitibi-Temiscamingue (Quebec).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodouhe, Fifanou G; Khasa, Damase P

    2015-01-01

    This work explores factors supporting people perception about mine site restoration and phytoremediation. Phytoremediation is one of the most eco-friendly restoration strategy emerged since the last two decades but studies on local people perception on this restoration strategy are scarce. To fill in this gap, data were collected from mining stakeholders using a structured questionnaire administered through snowball sampling method. We used Multiple Correspondence Analysis as implemented in the software XLSTAT to visualize relationship between participants' characteristics, their view on mine site restoration and phytoremediation. Results clearly show out that people perception on mine site restoration is influenced by mining activities effects on health and region attractiveness. Phytoremediation (65.21%) was rated positively with regard to its environment potential, aesthetic and consideration for future generation followed by fillings and excavating. Restoration strategy costs have no effect on people choice and participants prefer use of shrubs as vegetation component of phytoremediation to reach their restoration objective.

  18. A discerning approach to simple aesthetic orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, J H; Sharma, S; Roberts-Harry, D; Qureshi, T

    2015-02-16

    There is currently considerable interest from general dental practitioners (GDPs) in the use of simple orthodontics to treat adult malocclusions. There is controversy in this, particularly in relation to 'quick fixes', simple orthodontics and 'straight teeth in six months' as opposed to more conventional treatment where the whole malocclusion is treated. This article will present a case for the use of simple aesthetic adult orthodontics in a measured and planned way. It will discuss the processes, planning and the importance of consent. It will also highlight how digital technology is used to preview, consent and execute an aesthetic result. Many of the recent systems emerging, have been as a result of the demand and supply of cosmetic dentistry. This, to a degree, has not helped since the implication of a 'quick-fix' is associated with this field. There has also been discussion on what the limits of GDP orthodontics should be. There is variability in how GDPs approach orthodontics, their experience, skill and ability to treat to an acceptable standard. Short courses may be one way of delivering orthodontic training but some of these courses are not regulated and the amount of internal mentoring is variable. This article highlights some of the systems in use, and potential upsides and downsides of this approach.

  19. Concept of aesthetic and unity of mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Aleksandar M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present article author was investigated questions about subject and a concept of aesthetic in the constellation of a modern philosophy. The question is prepared on a historical view of matter, and in the bordering line of a sense of a essence of things. As a matter of a sense of substance we must have a hermeneutical preparing in a historical dimension, what it is, and after that make a judgment what is not possible to be. Investigations always take us back to the antique period of philosophical researches because there is substance considering without any commas dealing with a strange interests looking from the side of pure philosophy. Beauty, good and a truth still must be a comprehensive values or a super transcendental beings in the sort of lights of a thinking. Thinking is possible if we have adequate ideas on the mind, and that ideas must have a spiritual space for them existing in us, or in the continuing of a life of the history of philosophy as a matter of our aesthetical meanings and a habit of the spirit. By that sign in our awareness mind we take out duty to building self-consciousness, as a personal updating and also take to philosophy that what she asks from us today.

  20. [Aesthetic effect of wound repair with flaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qian; Zhou, Hong-Reng; Wang, Shu-Qin; Zheng, Dong-Feng; Xu, Peng; Wu, Jie; Ge, Hua-Qiang; Lin, Yue; Yan, Xin

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the aesthetic effect of wound repair with flaps. One thousand nine hundred and ninety-six patients with 2082 wounds hospitalized from January 2004 to December 2011. These wounds included 503 deep burn wounds, 268 pressure sores, 392 soft tissue defects caused by trauma, 479 soft tissue defects due to resection of skin cancer and mole removal, 314 soft tissue defects caused by scar excision, and 126 other wounds. Wound area ranged from 1.5 cm x 1.0 cm to 30.0 cm x 22.0 cm. Sliding flaps, expanded flaps, pedicle flaps, and free flaps were used to repair the wounds in accordance with the principle and timing of wound repair with flaps. Five flaps showed venous congestion within 48 hours post-operation, 2 flaps of them improved after local massage. One flap survived after local heparin wet packing and venous bloodletting. One flap survived after emergency surgical embolectomy and bridging with saphenous vein graft. One flap showed partial necrosis and healed after skin grafting. The other flaps survived well. One thousand three hundred and twenty-one patients were followed up for 3 months to 2 years, and flaps of them were satisfactory in shape, color, and elasticity, similar to that of normal skin. Some patients underwent scar revision later with good results. Application of suitable flaps in wound repair will result in quick wound healing, good function recovery, and satisfactory aesthetic effect.

  1. The Aesthetics of the Ambient Video Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Bizzocchi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambient Video is an emergent cultural phenomenon, with roots that go deeply into the history of experimental film and video art. Ambient Video, like Brian Eno's ambient music, is video that "must be as easy to ignore as notice" [9]. This minimalist description conceals the formidable aesthetic challenge that faces this new form. Ambient video art works will hang on the walls of our living rooms, corporate offices, and public spaces. They will play in the background of our lives, living video paintings framed by the new generation of elegant, high-resolution flat-panel display units. However, they cannot command attention like a film or television show. They will patiently play in the background of our lives, yet they must always be ready to justify our attention in any given moment. In this capacity, ambient video works need to be equally proficient at rewarding a fleeting glance, a more direct look, or a longer contemplative gaze. This paper connects a series of threads that collectively illuminate the aesthetics of this emergent form: its history as a popular culture phenomenon, its more substantive artistic roots in avant-garde cinema and video art, its relationship to new technologies, the analysis of the viewer's conditions of reception, and the work of current artists who practice within this form.

  2. Transnational Remakes: Industrial and Aesthetic Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel FERNÁNDEZ LABAYEN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the industrial and aesthetic dynamics of transnational film remakes. If by «transnational remake» we understand that which «consists in making again a film in a different national context from the original one» (Berthier, 2007, p. 338, this research analyses both the production and circulation strategies and the narrative adaptation tactics involved in the remake process from a transnational perspective. In order to do so, we will examine the films ¿Quién mató a Bambi? (Santi Amodeo, 2013, remake of the Mexican film Matando Cabos (Alejandro Lozano, 2004 and Kiki, love to love (Paco León, 2016, a version of the Australian The Little Death (Josh Lawson, 2014. These cases operate as examples of adaptation processes in the Spanish context as well as tokens of remake fluxes beyond Hollywood. Attention to these films allows us to consider the existence of a potential transnational model of producing film remakes, while attending to the complex network of agents at play in buying and selling remake rights. Finally, the article reflects on the importance of industrial and academic uses of concepts such as «auteur», «film genre» or «national cinema», all of them key categories within industrial and aesthetic dynamics of contemporary film remakes.

  3. The Aesthetics of Protest in UK Rave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzy Alwakeel

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Informed by the conceptualisation of an “aesthetic politics” around largely unlawful rave and dance scenes in Britain between the late-1980s and mid-1990s, this article explores negotiations between these EDMCs and the British Parliamentary and legal establishments. Two case studies will inform the argument that rave culture effects a “performative protest”. That is, Autechre’s response to the 1994 Criminal Justice and Public Order Act and the work of The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu in the late-1980s will be discussed in order to suggest that rave can be considered a speech-act that immediately communicates its own refusal to submit to authority. It will be suggested that rave’s responses to power structures derive from the internal dynamics of its own aesthetic politics. I shall conclude that rave has often functioned as a potent political vehicle on its own terms, but that the embrace of its own multiplicity safeguards it against exhaustion by any single agenda.

  4. Aesthetic activities and aesthetic attitudes: influences of education, background and personality on interest and involvement in the arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Furnham, A

    2006-11-01

    There have been few studies of why some people are frequently involved in aesthetic activities such as going to the theatre, reading or playing musical instruments, whereas others are less involved. This study assesses the broad roles of education, personality and demographic factors such as social class, age and sex. More aesthetic activity was associated with music and art education, whereas science education had a substantial negative relationship with aesthetic activity, both directly and also indirectly via reduced art education. More aesthetic activity was particularly related to higher scores on the personality factor of openness, and also to lower scores on agreeableness and conscientiousness. Higher parental social class was also associated with more aesthetic activity, as also was lower age. Sex had no relationship to aesthetic activity, as neither did masculinity-femininity. Positive aesthetic attitudes were also related moderately to aesthetic activity, but were particularly strongly related to openness to experience, and somewhat less to extraversion. Class, age and sex had no direct relationship to aesthetic attitudes.

  5. A pin-assisted retention technique for resin-bonded restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miara, P; Touati, B

    1992-09-01

    The value of pins for auxiliary retention has been demonstrated many times. The use of pins with resin-bonded restorations allows for improved aesthetics and less tooth reduction while increasing resistance to dislodging forces. Clinical and technical procedures for resin-bonded bridges with pin-assisted retention are presented.

  6. Aesthetic Closure of Maxillary and Mandibular Anterior Spaces Using Direct Composite Resin Build-Ups: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schick Simona-Georgiana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of multiple spaces in the anterior aesthetic zone can produce discomfort for patients and its treatment can be difficult for dental professionals. A variety of treatment options are available and these include orthodontic movement, prosthetic indirect restorations or direct composite resin build-ups. Among these, the closure of interdental spaces using composite build-ups combined with orthodontic treatment is considered to be most conservative. This type of treatment has several advantages like the maximum preservation of tooth substance (no tooth preparation, no need for anesthesia, no multiple time-consuming visits, no provisional restorations and also comparably low costs. Clinical Consideration: This case report describes the clinical restorative procedure of direct composite resin build-ups for the closure of multiple anterior spaces.

  7. Grace under fire: aesthetic leadership in clinical nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an online descriptive survey that sought to determine nurses' perceptions of aesthetic leadership among clinical leaders in nursing. Clinical leadership has been identified as an essential component to ensuring the delivery of safe, high-quality health care. Leadership has been increasingly linked in the literature to aesthetics. However, little consideration has been given to aesthetics in relation to clinical leadership in nursing. A mixed-method, online descriptive survey. Participants were recruited via e-learning platforms and social media. A total of 66 surveys were completed, including 31 written accounts of aesthetic leadership in practice. Aesthetic leadership characteristics in clinical leaders most valued are support, communication and the approach taken to colleagues. Taking risks and challenging processes were least likely to be evident among effective clinical leaders. Aesthetic leadership is multi-dimensional and a style of leadership to positively influence the clinical workplace. Support, effective communication and taking into consideration the feelings of colleagues are important dimensions of aesthetic leadership. Aesthetic leadership represents a way for clinical leaders to create and sustain a calm and positive clinical workplace. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Expression, Imagination, and Organic Unity: John Dewey's Aesthetics and Romanticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, David

    2003-01-01

    We are presently witnessing a renewed interest in the aesthetics of philosopher and educator John Dewey. And it would seem that this interest marks a significant intellectual reorientation and not simply a passing fad. The publications Educational Theory, Studies in Philosophy and Education, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, The Journal of…

  9. Aesthetics, Usefulness and Performance in User--Search-Engine Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Adi

    2010-01-01

    Issues of visual appeal have become an integral part of designing interactive systems. Interface aesthetics may form users' attitudes towards computer applications and information technology. Aesthetics can affect user satisfaction, and influence their willingness to buy or adopt a system. This study follows previous studies that found that users…

  10. "The Word I Would Use Is 'Aesthetic'": Reading David Hawkins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Helen; Featherstone, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the life of David Hawkins, one of the most influential educators involved in school reform in the 1960s. Focuses on the aesthetic as the center of Hawkins' vision of schooling. Compares Hawkins' perspective to Dewey's in terms of the aesthetic. (KHR)

  11. All ye need to know? : aesthetics from a design perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, H.A.; Lammers, I.S.; Weggeman, M.C.D.P.

    2004-01-01

    In support of the notion that the aesthetic side of organisations is as yet underdeveloped in organisation theory, we develop in this paper a research agenda for studying the impact of aesthetics on organizations. We take a design perspective (Romme, 2003; Van Aken, 2004) and structure the field of

  12. Satisfaction with Appearance and the Desired Treatment to Improve Aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Zarea, Bader K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To identify participants’ satisfaction with appearance and the desired treatment to improve aesthetics. Materials and Methods. 220 participants (127 males and 93 females, mean age = 21.4 ± 1.5 years) were recruited into the study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess patients’ satisfaction with appearance and what treatment they desire to improve aesthetics. Participants scored the level of ...

  13. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  14. Beyond the Call of Beauty : Everyday Aesthetic Demands under Patriarchy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archer, Alfred; Ware, Lauren

    This paper defends two claims. First, we will argue for the existence of aesthetic demands in the realm of everyday aesthetics, and that these demands are not reducible to moral demands. Second, we will argue that we must recognise the limits of these demands in order to combat a widespread form of

  15. Aesthetic Relationships and Ethics in "The Oh Fuck Moment"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breel, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the aesthetics and ethics of participatory performance through "The Oh Fuck Moment" by Hannah Jane Walker and Chris Thorpe, a performance that aesthetically explores ethically troubling material and manipulation. Ethical criticism of participatory art in recent years has focused on the way the audience member is…

  16. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Neerja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  17. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  18. The influence of different facial components on facial aesthetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faure, J.C.; Rieffe, C.; Maltha, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Facial aesthetics have an important influence on social behaviour and perception in our society. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of facial symmetry and inter-ocular distance on the assessment of facial aesthetics, factors that are often suggested as major contributors to

  19. Confronting "Difficult Knowledge": Critical Aesthetics and War in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heybach Vivirito, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative multi-site case study explores critical aesthetic experiences in teacher education classrooms, and advocates for the inclusion of theoretical and practical knowledge of "difficult knowledge," visual culture, and critical aesthetics in the classroom. Social reality consists of a perpetual stream of tragic and horrific…

  20. Forming Future Teachers' Aesthetic Culture in Foreign Educational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotska, Galyna

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with a theoretical analysis of foreign educational experience in solving scientific problems of forming future teachers' aesthetic culture. Given the current socio-cultural situation, it has been noted that a teacher who developed his/her aesthetic culture can make a direct contribution to the social and cultural challenges of a…

  1. Activating Aesthetics: Working with Heidegger and Bourdieu for Engaged Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to investigate art in public urban space via a process of activating aesthetics as a way of enhancing pedagogies of engagement. It does this firstly by addressing the question of aesthetics in Enlightenment and twentieth-century frames; then it seeks to understand how artworks may be approached ontologically and…

  2. From cultural aesthetic to perfor- mance technique: continuities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. A broad-based survey of Malawian dances that I undertook several years ago aimed rather ambitiously to identify persistent regional forms of these dances as well as their governing aesthetic(s). In the course of the field work, a recurrent ~estion emerged: how do we approach dance as cultural performance?

  3. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Curtis A; Butterworth, George; Roberts, Tony; Graupner, Lida; Hole, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face.

  4. [Aesthetic success in genioplasties procedures criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raberin, Monique

    2016-06-01

    Maxillomandibular dysmorphia may be associated with structural chin pathologies. Three-dimensional jaws displacements have limits. Specific genioplasty is an additional surgical mean for soft tissues profile normalization. Osteotomy line is examined according an incline angle and a possible lateral extension, as chin wing technique, improves facial shape. Cephalometric set-up with R line analyzes surgical chin movements and impact of lower incisors labial inclination on lower lip and mentolabial fold after advancement genioplasty. Micro-implant anchorage is a precious help to find lower incisors good position and optimum lower occlusal plane frontal shift in asymmetric facial pattern. Orthodontics criteria are essential factors to access an aesthetic success in genioplasties procedures. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  5. Kin-aesthetic Space-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2016-01-01

    -Francois Lyotard’s Gestus , discussing the work-of-art as a sensuously expressed ‘torsion’ of space/ time/ matter, producing its own space/ time/ matter. Erin Brannigan in Dancefilm uses the gesture-model as well, and points to a hybrid practice where dance and film work on each other. Likewise Shaun Gallagher...... as well as their production of meaning. Concurrently the practice questions presentation/ representation and creator/ spectator relations. Gesture-models call for an understanding of the work-of-art as creating affordance; affordance in the sense that effects generated between embodied-enactive perception......’s How the Body Shapes the Mind forms part of the theoretical approach to motile kin-aesthetical forces of art-making, underlying this paper. In my practice I work with body- and space gestures, interchanging through a ‘third’ material, featured on screens. The hybrid production includes animated 2 and 3...

  6. Emotions, Aesthetics and Wellbeing in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellocchi, Alberto; Cassie, Quigley; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    This internationally edited collection on emotions, aesthetics, and wellbeing emerged following an exploratory research workshop held in Luxembourg associated with the journal Cultural Studies of Science Education (CSSE). The workshop was entitled ‘Innovation and collaboration in cultural studies...... of science education: Towards an international research agenda.’ Authors were invited to articulate the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of their research, offering empirical elaborations to illustrate applications of these conceptual and methodological foundations. An outcome...... informing such research. Possibilities for future research are elaborated within the collection generating scope for further collaborative and international studies informed by perspectives represented in the collection. In the present chapter, we outline the origin of this edited collection against...

  7. Performing Perception - Staging Aesthetics of Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter; Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2008-01-01

    In interaction design for experience-oriented uses of technology, a central facet of aesthetics of interaction is rooted in the user's experience of herself “performing her perception.” By drawing on performance (theater) theory, phenomenology and sociology and with references to recent HCI...... experience. We argue that this 3-in-1 is always already shaping the user's understanding and perception of her interaction as it is staged through her experience of the object's form and expression. Through examples ranging from everyday technologies utilizing performances of interaction to spatial...... contemporary artworks, digital as well as analogue, we address the notion of the performative spectator and the spectating performer. We demonstrate how perception is also performative and how focus on this aspect seems to be crucial when designing experience-oriented products, systems and services....

  8. The Safety of Aesthetic Labiaplasty: A Plastic Surgery Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, Frank; Mistry, Bhavik D; Singh, Yashoda; Ahmad, Jamil

    2015-08-01

    The demand for female aesthetic labiaplasty surgery continues to rapidly increase. Several questions have been raised regarding the safety and effectiveness of female aesthetic genital surgery. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with aesthetic labiaplasty and describe the type and frequency of complications that have been experienced. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients who had primary aesthetic labia minora reduction surgery from August 2007 to April 2014. A chart review of the electronic medical record was performed to examine demographic, procedural, and outcome data. In the study period, 113 patients underwent aesthetic labiaplasty. Of these, 29 patients (25.6%) had labiaplasty performed in combination with another procedure. A total of 15 patients (13.3%) reported transient symptoms, including swelling, bruising, and pain. There was one patient (0.8%) that experienced bleeding. Four patients (3.5%) required revision surgery. All revisions were performed to excise further tissue to address persistent redundancy or asymmetry. No major complications were reported. In our experience, aesthetic surgery of the labia minora using an edge excision technique has a very low complication rate and provides satisfactory aesthetic outcomes for our patients. More studies examining the impact of labiaplasty on a woman's self-image and quality of life would add to our understanding of the motivations and expectations of women undergoing this aesthetic surgery. This information will allow us to help our patients make well-informed decisions when considering this aesthetic genital surgery. 4 Risk. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Urban greening: environmentalism or marketable aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Bowd

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, urban greening has been conceptualized, and subsequently marketed, as a way of making cities more sustainable. Urban greening has been actualized in large global cities, regional centers, and also in many cities in the Global South, where it has been touted as a potential solution to the urban heat island (UHI effect and as a way of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions. This involves planting street trees and installing curbside gardens, bioswales, green walls, green roofs, and the redevelopment of former industrial zones into urban parklands. This paper questions the assumption that this “greening” of the city must necessarily lead to positive environmental impacts. While such infrastructure itself might be constructed with environmental principles in mind, wider questions concerning the production of such landscapes, and the consumption-orientated lifestyles of those who inhabit these urban landscapes, are seldom considered. Moreover, green aesthetics and environmental sustainability are not always as mutually inclusive as the concepts might suggest, as aesthetics are often a dominating influence in the process of planning green urban environments. This review reorients the focus on the way in which the UHI effect and CO2 emissions have been framed by utilizing Foucault's (1980 “regimes of truth,” where environmental issues are contextualized within the “colonised lifeworld” of free-market forces. This review suggests that for sustainability to be achieved in urban contexts, the process of urban greening must move beyond quick techno-fixes through engagement in the co-production of knowledge.

  10. Drawing a baseline in aesthetic quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Fernando; Flores, M. Julia; Puerta, Jose M.

    2018-04-01

    Aesthetic classification of images is an inherently subjective task. There does not exist a validated collection of images/photographs labeled as having good or bad quality from experts. Nowadays, the closest approximation to that is to use databases of photos where a group of users rate each image. Hence, there is not a unique good/bad label but a rating distribution given by users voting. Due to this peculiarity, it is not possible to state the problem of binary aesthetic supervised classification in such a direct mode as other Computer Vision tasks. Recent literature follows an approach where researchers utilize the average rates from the users for each image, and they establish an arbitrary threshold to determine their class or label. In this way, images above the threshold are considered of good quality, while images below the threshold are seen as bad quality. This paper analyzes current literature, and it reviews those attributes able to represent an image, differentiating into three families: specific, general and deep features. Among those which have been proved more competitive, we have selected a representative subset, being our main goal to establish a clear experimental framework. Finally, once features were selected, we have used them for the full AVA dataset. We have to remark that to perform validation we report not only accuracy values, which is not that informative in this case, but also, metrics able to evaluate classification power within imbalanced datasets. We have conducted a series of experiments so that distinct well-known classifiers are learned from data. Like that, this paper provides what we could consider valuable and valid baseline results for the given problem.

  11. Global aesthetic surgery statistics: a closer look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidekrueger, Paul I; Juran, S; Ehrl, D; Aung, T; Tanna, N; Broer, P Niclas

    2017-08-01

    Obtaining quality global statistics about surgical procedures remains an important yet challenging task. The International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ISAPS) reports the total number of surgical and non-surgical procedures performed worldwide on a yearly basis. While providing valuable insight, ISAPS' statistics leave two important factors unaccounted for: (1) the underlying base population, and (2) the number of surgeons performing the procedures. Statistics of the published ISAPS' 'International Survey on Aesthetic/Cosmetic Surgery' were analysed by country, taking into account the underlying national base population according to the official United Nations population estimates. Further, the number of surgeons per country was used to calculate the number of surgeries performed per surgeon. In 2014, based on ISAPS statistics, national surgical procedures ranked in the following order: 1st USA, 2nd Brazil, 3rd South Korea, 4th Mexico, 5th Japan, 6th Germany, 7th Colombia, and 8th France. When considering the size of the underlying national populations, the demand for surgical procedures per 100,000 people changes the overall ranking substantially. It was also found that the rate of surgical procedures per surgeon shows great variation between the responding countries. While the US and Brazil are often quoted as the countries with the highest demand for plastic surgery, according to the presented analysis, other countries surpass these countries in surgical procedures per capita. While data acquisition and quality should be improved in the future, valuable insight regarding the demand for surgical procedures can be gained by taking specific demographic and geographic factors into consideration.

  12. Aesthetic Judgement of Orientation in Modern Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mather

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When creating an artwork, the artist makes a decision regarding the orientation at which the work is to be hung based on their aesthetic judgement and the message conveyed by the piece. Is the impact or aesthetic appeal of a work diminished when it is hung at an incorrect orientation? To investigate this question, Experiment 1 asked whether naïve observers can appreciate the correct orientation (as defined by the artist of 40 modern artworks, some of which are entirely abstract. Eighteen participants were shown 40 paintings in a series of trials. Each trial presented all four cardinal orientations on a computer screen, and the participant was asked to select the orientation that was most attractive or meaningful. Results showed that the correct orientation was selected in 48% of trials on average, significantly above the 25% chance level, but well below perfect performance. A second experiment investigated the extent to which the 40 paintings contained recognisable content, which may have mediated orientation judgements. Recognition rates varied from 0% for seven of the paintings to 100% for five paintings. Orientation judgements in Experiment 1 correlated significantly with “meaningful” content judgements in Experiment 2: 42% of the variance in orientation judgements in Experiment 1 was shared with recognition of meaningful content in Experiment 2. For the seven paintings in which no meaningful content at all was detected, 41% of the variance in orientation judgements was shared with variance in a physical measure of image content, Fourier amplitude spectrum slope. For some paintings, orientation judgements were quite consistent, despite a lack of meaningful content. The origin of these orientation judgements remains to be identified.

  13. A dual-process perspective on fluency-based aesthetics: the pleasure-interest model of aesthetic liking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Laura K M; Landwehr, Jan R

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we develop an account of how aesthetic preferences can be formed as a result of two hierarchical, fluency-based processes. Our model suggests that processing performed immediately upon encountering an aesthetic object is stimulus driven, and aesthetic preferences that accrue from this processing reflect aesthetic evaluations of pleasure or displeasure. When sufficient processing motivation is provided by a perceiver's need for cognitive enrichment and/or the stimulus' processing affordance, elaborate perceiver-driven processing can emerge, which gives rise to fluency-based aesthetic evaluations of interest, boredom, or confusion. Because the positive outcomes in our model are pleasure and interest, we call it the Pleasure-Interest Model of Aesthetic Liking (PIA Model). Theoretically, this model integrates a dual-process perspective and ideas from lay epistemology into processing fluency theory, and it provides a parsimonious framework to embed and unite a wealth of aesthetic phenomena, including contradictory preference patterns for easy versus difficult-to-process aesthetic stimuli. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  14. Dieting and body image in aesthetic sports: A comparison of Dutch female gymnasts and non-aesthetic sport participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, A.P.; Oudejans, R.R.D.; Bakker, F.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between dieting behavior and body image in female aesthetic athletes. Methods: Seventeen elite gymnasts, 51 non-elite gymnasts and a control group of 85 schoolgirls, participating in non-elite, merely recreational non-aesthetic sports, completed self-report

  15. Towards a Wittgensteinian Aesthetics. Wollheim and the Analysis of Aesthetic Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Matteucci

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the possibility to develop Wittgenstein's suggestions about aesthetics, this paper will focus on the organic perspective elaborated by Richard Wollheim in «Art and Its Objects». In this regard we will try to emphasize how the concept of art as a "form of live" - explicit in Wollheim - involves the analysis of the practices embodied in the experience of art starting from those of representation. The inception modes of such practices of representation need to be describe...

  16. Immediate loading of implants in the aesthetic zone: comparison between two placement timings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Fabrizio; Longoni, Salvatore; Pisapia, Valeria; Francesconi, Manuel; Saggese, Vito; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Implant rehabilitation delivered in accordance with the traditional protocol has proven to be highly predictable and acceptable (1). Nevertheless, the application of immediate loading on post-extraction implants, especially for aesthetic zones, has now considerably increased (2). The aim of this work is to illustrate the immediate loading of implants placed in the aesthetic zone through tapered design fixtures with microgeometry of a high degree of porosity inserted at the same time or 4-8 weeks from dental avulsion (TSA® Advance, Phibo®). A total of 15 implant fixtures of which 8 at an interval of 4-8 weeks from extraction (type 2) and the remaining according to the immediate post-extraction technique (type 1) were positioned. All implants were prosthesized within 24 hours from the placement. Definitive crowns replaced provisional restorations after 20-24 weeks. After 4 and 12 months from implant insertion, the following parameters were assessed: X-ray image, pain, mobility or suppuration, soft tissue condition and aesthetic appearance. Percentage of osseointegration was 93.75%, and 53.5% of the osseointegrated fixtures was type 2. No statistically significant difference between the mean ISQ values for implants of type 1 and 2 both in the post-operative period and after 12 months was evident, indicating that the timing of insertion did not affect the achievement of stability for the implant fixtures tested in our study. Immediate post-extraction implants showed a greater propensity for gingival recession and a peri-implant radiolucency greater than those placed at an interval of 4-8 weeks. The values obtained for the PES/WES and the subjective evaluation of the analyzed sample showed the considerable aesthetic value and the high level of satisfaction guaranteed by the implant technique illustrated. Although well-designed, high quality, randomized clinical trials are still needed as well as the requirement to establish a common, complete, and reproducible index

  17. Mastering aesthetics in post-extraction sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goené, R.J.; van Daelen, A.C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Patients increasingly seek implant-supported restorations that can be delivered as quickly and non-invasively as possible. Many also prefer to avoid wearing a removable prothesis after tooth extraction. Implants that are placed immediately in fresh extraction sockets and provisionalized immediately

  18. Information system analysis of an e-learning system used for dental restorations simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Crenguţa M; Popovici, Dorin M

    2012-09-01

    The goal of using virtual and augmented reality technologies in therapeutic interventions simulation, in the fixed prosthodontics (VirDenT) project, is to increase the quality of the educational process in dental faculties, by assisting students in learning how to prepare teeth for all-ceramic restorations. Its main component is an e-learning virtual reality-based software system that will be used for the developing skills in grinding teeth, needed in all-ceramic restorations. The complexity of the domain problem that the software system dealt with made the analysis of the information system supported by VirDenT necessary. The analysis contains the following activities: identification and classification of the system stakeholders, description of the business processes, formulation of the business rules, and modelling of business objects. During this stage, we constructed the context diagram, the business use case diagram, the activity diagrams and the class diagram of the domain model. These models are useful for the further development of the software system that implements the VirDenT information system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Computer-Aided Manufacturing Technology on Precision of Clinical Metal-Free Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Hong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the marginal fit of metal-free crowns made by three different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM systems. Materials and Methods. The maxillary left first premolar of a dentiform was prepared for all-ceramic crown restoration. Thirty all-ceramic premolar crowns were made, ten each manufactured by the Lava system, Cercon, and Cerec. Ten metal ceramic gold (MCG crowns served as control. The marginal gap of each sample was measured under a stereoscopic microscope at 75x magnification after cementation. One-way ANOVA and the Duncan’s post hoc test were used for data analysis at the significance level of 0.05. Results. The mean (standard deviation marginal gaps were 70.5 (34.4 μm for the MCG crowns, 87.2 (22.8 μm for Lava, 58.5 (17.6 μm for Cercon, and 72.3 (30.8 μm for Cerec. There were no significant differences in the marginal fit among the groups except that the Cercon crowns had significantly smaller marginal gaps than the Lava crowns (P<0.001.  Conclusions. Within the limitation of this study, all the metal-free restorations made by the digital CAD/CAM systems had clinically acceptable marginal accuracy.

  20. Effects of Computer-Aided Manufacturing Technology on Precision of Clinical Metal-Free Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Hong; Yeo, In-Sung; Wu, Benjamin M; Yang, Jae-Ho; Han, Jung-Suk; Kim, Sung-Hun; Yi, Yang-Jin; Kwon, Taek-Ka

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the marginal fit of metal-free crowns made by three different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems. The maxillary left first premolar of a dentiform was prepared for all-ceramic crown restoration. Thirty all-ceramic premolar crowns were made, ten each manufactured by the Lava system, Cercon, and Cerec. Ten metal ceramic gold (MCG) crowns served as control. The marginal gap of each sample was measured under a stereoscopic microscope at 75x magnification after cementation. One-way ANOVA and the Duncan's post hoc test were used for data analysis at the significance level of 0.05. The mean (standard deviation) marginal gaps were 70.5 (34.4) μm for the MCG crowns, 87.2 (22.8) μm for Lava, 58.5 (17.6) μm for Cercon, and 72.3 (30.8) μm for Cerec. There were no significant differences in the marginal fit among the groups except that the Cercon crowns had significantly smaller marginal gaps than the Lava crowns (P < 0.001). Within the limitation of this study, all the metal-free restorations made by the digital CAD/CAM systems had clinically acceptable marginal accuracy.

  1. Ceramic dental biomaterials and CAD/CAM technology: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Raymond Wai Kim; Chow, Tak Wah; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2014-10-01

    Ceramics are widely used as indirect restorative materials in dentistry because of their high biocompatibility and pleasing aesthetics. The objective is to review the state of the arts of CAD/CAM all-ceramic biomaterials. CAD/CAM all-ceramic biomaterials are highlighted and a subsequent literature search was conducted for the relevant subjects using PubMed followed by manual search. Developments in CAD/CAM technology have catalyzed researches in all-ceramic biomaterials and their applications. Feldspathic glass ceramic and glass infiltrated ceramic can be fabricated by traditional laboratory methods or CAD/CAM. The advent of polycrystalline ceramics is a direct result of CAD/CAM technology without which the fabrication would not have been possible. The clinical uses of these ceramics have met with variable clinical success. Multiple options are now available to the clinicians for the fabrication of aesthetic all ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Combining aesthetic with ecological values for landscape sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dewei; Luo, Tao; Lin, Tao; Qiu, Quanyi; Luo, Yunjian

    2014-01-01

    Humans receive multiple benefits from various landscapes that foster ecological services and aesthetic attractiveness. In this study, a hybrid framework was proposed to evaluate ecological and aesthetic values of five landscape types in Houguanhu Region of central China. Data from the public aesthetic survey and professional ecological assessment were converted into a two-dimensional coordinate system and distribution maps of landscape values. Results showed that natural landscapes (i.e. water body and forest) contributed positively more to both aesthetic and ecological values than semi-natural and human-dominated landscapes (i.e. farmland and non-ecological land). The distribution maps of landscape values indicated that the aesthetic, ecological and integrated landscape values were significantly associated with landscape attributes and human activity intensity. To combine aesthetic preferences with ecological services, the methods (i.e. field survey, landscape value coefficients, normalized method, a two-dimensional coordinate system, and landscape value distribution maps) were employed in landscape assessment. Our results could facilitate to identify the underlying structure-function-value chain, and also improve the understanding of multiple functions in landscape planning. The situation context could also be emphasized to bring ecological and aesthetic goals into better alignment.

  3. Disparities in Aesthetic Procedures Performed by Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Operative experience in aesthetic surgery is an important issue affecting plastic surgery residents. This study addresses the variability of aesthetic surgery experience during plastic surgery residency. National operative case logs of chief residents in independent/combined and integrated plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Fold differences between the bottom and top 10th percentiles of residents were calculated for each aesthetic procedure category and training model. The number of residents not achieving case minimums was also calculated. Case logs of 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed. There was marked variability in craniofacial (range, 6.0-15.0), breast (range, 2.4-5.9), trunk/extremity (range, 3.0-16.0), and miscellaneous (range, 2.7-22.0) procedure categories. In 2015, the bottom 10th percentile of integrated and independent/combined residents did not achieve case minimums for botulinum toxin and dermal fillers. Case minimums were achieved for the other aesthetic procedure categories for all graduating years. Significant variability persists for many aesthetic procedure categories during plastic surgery residency training. Greater efforts may be needed to improve the aesthetic surgery experience of plastic surgery residents. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. POI Summarization by Aesthetics Evaluation From Crowd Source Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xueming; Li, Cheng; Lan, Ke; Hou, Xingsong; Li, Zhetao; Han, Junwei

    2018-03-01

    Place-of-Interest (POI) summarization by aesthetics evaluation can recommend a set of POI images to the user and it is significant in image retrieval. In this paper, we propose a system that summarizes a collection of POI images regarding both aesthetics and diversity of the distribution of cameras. First, we generate visual albums by a coarse-to-fine POI clustering approach and then generate 3D models for each album by the collected images from social media. Second, based on the 3D to 2D projection relationship, we select candidate photos in terms of the proposed crowd source saliency model. Third, in order to improve the performance of aesthetic measurement model, we propose a crowd-sourced saliency detection approach by exploring the distribution of salient regions in the 3D model. Then, we measure the composition aesthetics of each image and we explore crowd source salient feature to yield saliency map, based on which, we propose an adaptive image adoption approach. Finally, we combine the diversity and the aesthetics to recommend aesthetic pictures. Experimental results show that the proposed POI summarization approach can return images with diverse camera distributions and aesthetics.

  5. Unified Photo Enhancement by Discovering Aesthetic Communities From Flickr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Richang; Zhang, Luming; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    Photo enhancement refers to the process of increasing the aesthetic appeal of a photo, such as changing the photo aspect ratio and spatial recomposition. It is a widely used technique in the printing industry, graphic design, and cinematography. In this paper, we propose a unified and socially aware photo enhancement framework which can leverage the experience of photographers with various aesthetic topics (e.g., portrait and landscape). We focus on photos from the image hosting site Flickr, which has 87 million users and to which more than 3.5 million photos are uploaded daily. First, a tagwise regularized topic model is proposed to describe the aesthetic topic of each Flickr user, and coherent and interpretable topics are discovered by leveraging both the visual features and tags of photos. Next, a graph is constructed to describe the similarities in aesthetic topics between the users. Noticeably, densely connected users have similar aesthetic topics, which are categorized into different communities by a dense subgraph mining algorithm. Finally, a probabilistic model is exploited to enhance the aesthetic attractiveness of a test photo by leveraging the photographic experiences of Flickr users from the corresponding communities of that photo. Paired-comparison-based user studies show that our method performs competitively on photo retargeting and recomposition. Moreover, our approach accurately detects aesthetic communities in a photo set crawled from nearly 100000 Flickr users.

  6. Aesthetics of movement with sight disabled children - pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Górny

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish the aesthetics of movement in people with vision defects. This knowledge will provide tools to improve the methodology of study in the area of assessment of movement aesthetics in people with disabilities. In order to establish its level a test was used which measured its selected elements such as precision, rhythm, harmony, fluidity and speed. The aesthetics of movement was assessed using exercise tests which were to represent the components of aesthetics of movement. Individual tests were carried out on blind and partially sighted children aged 6 to 15 years and on a group of healthy children of the same age. Using the test tasks a general indicator of movement aesthetics in blind children was obtained. The participants of the study were 145 children from four School and Education Centres for Blind Children in Poland and the control group consisted of 310 children from a primary school in Poznań. The studies confirmed a lower level of movement aesthetics in children with vision defects, but the differences in groups between the partially sighted children and children with correct vision were definitely smaller. A higher level of aesthetics of movement characterised children from older groups irrespective of their sex. The best developed property in blind and partially sighted children was precision.

  7. Teaching 5th grade science for aesthetic understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Mark A.

    Many scientists speak with great zeal about the role of aesthetics and beauty in their science and inquiry. Few systematic efforts have been made to teach science in ways that appeal directly to aesthetics and this research is designed to do just that. Drawing from the aesthetic theory of Dewey, I describe an analytic lens called learning for aesthetic understanding that finds power in the degree to which our perceptions of the world are transformed, our interests and enthusiasm piqued, and our actions changed as we seek further experiences in the world. This learning theory is contrasted against two other current and popular theories of science learning, that of learning for conceptual understanding via conceptual change theory and learning for a language-oriented or discourse-based understanding. After a lengthy articulation of the pedagogical strategies used to teach for aesthetic understanding the research is described in which comparisons are drawn between students in two 5th grade classrooms---one taught for the goal of conceptual understanding and the other taught for the goal of aesthetic understanding. Results of this comparison show that more students in the treatment classroom had aesthetic experiences with science ideas and came to an aesthetic understanding when studying weather, erosion, and structure of matter than students in the control group. Also statistically significant effects are shown on measures of interest, affect, and efficacy for students in the treatment class. On measures of conceptual understanding it appears that treatment class students learned more and forgot less over time than control class students. The effect of the treatment does not generally depend on gender, ethnicity, or prior achievement except in students' identity beliefs about themselves as science learners. In this case, a significant interaction for treatment class females on science identity beliefs did occur. A discussion of these results as well as elaboration and

  8. Restoration of Gooseberry Creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan W. Long

    2000-01-01

    Grazing exclusion and channel modifications were used to restore wet meadows along a stream on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation. The efforts are reestablishing functional processes to promote long-term restoration of wetland health and species conservation.

  9. Complications of aesthetic medicine procedures: five case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smędra, A; Szustowski, S; Klemm, J; Jurczyk, A; Zalewska-Janowska, A; Berent, J

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the cases of five patients who developed complications after aesthetic medicine procedures. Four of the cases involved women who reported to the Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, for a description and legal qualification of bodily injuries suffered as a result of aesthetic medicine procedures, whereas one was related to the assessment of accuracy of medical management at the request of the prosecutor handling the case. The reported cases concerned acid exfoliation treatments, photoepilation and cryotherapy. The authors attempt to discuss the most common complications that may occur after aesthetic medicine procedures, and measures to avoid them.

  10. Aesthetic dimension about tropical forest in ecology teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Seniciato

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The research analyzes the aesthetic dimension on teaching about natural environment on Ecology disciplines. The semiotics of Charles Sanders Peirce guided data analysis, regarding to suggested values on the answers of interviewees. The analysis has revealed that, in terms of methodological approaches, Ecology instructors tend to valorize scientific and objective criteria, demonstrating a certain embarrassment on including aesthetic dimension in their teaching, although they recognize the relevance of aesthetic dimension for ethic implications on teaching and for the conservation of natural environment.

  11. Global Ecosystem Restoration Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Miguel; Garcia, Monica; Fernandez, Nestor

    2015-01-01

    The Global ecosystem restoration index (GERI) is a composite index that integrates structural and functional aspects of the ecosystem restoration process. These elements are evaluated through a window that looks into a baseline for degraded ecosystems with the objective to assess restoration...

  12. [A case of restoration using IPS empress (staining technique) for upper central incisors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Utako

    2007-07-01

    The patient had esthetically unacceptable upper left central incisor crowns. The case was restored using Empress (staining technique) for the upper central incisors on both sides. In making all-ceramic crowns, it is necessary to reproduce the shape and color near to those of the natural tooth. We should not overlook the importance of diagnostic waxing-up, provisional restoration, tooth preparation, gingival retraction and others, to achieve excellent appearance, function and biocompatibility. It is effective to use the staining technique for an anterior tooth crown in order to obtain esthetically satisfactory results by the papilla being present in such cases as the distance from the base of the contact point to the crest of the bone is 5 mm or less.

  13. Clinical considerations in restorative dentistry - A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Tumkur Shivakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between periodontal health and the restoration of teeth is intimate and inseparable. Human teeth are designed in such a way that the individual tooth contributes significantly to their own support as well as collectively the teeth in the arch. Decay on the proximal surfaces occurs mainly due to the faulty interrelationship between the contact area, marginal ridge, the embrasures and the gingiva. An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure an adequate form, function, aesthetics and comfort of the dentition. For long-term survival of restoration, both functionally and esthetically, certain biological considerations are very critical to preserve the health of the periodontium and thus must be given due importance in clinical practice. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainly remains regarding specific concept such as biologic width and its maintainces.

  14. Aesthetic rehabilitation with multiple loop connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a missing tooth along with diastema have limited treatment options to restore the edentulous space. The use of a conventional fixed partial denture (FPD to replace the missing tooth may result in too wide anterior teeth leading to poor esthetics. The diastema resulting from the missing central incisors can be managed with implant-supported prosthesis or FPD with loop connectors. An old lady reported with chief complaints of missing upper anterior teeth due to trauma. Her past dental history revealed that she was having generalized spacing between her upper anterior teeth. Considering her esthetic requirement of maintaining the diastema between 12, 11, 22, and 21, the treatment option of 06 units porcelain fused to metal FPD from canine to canine with intermittent loop connectors between 21, 22, 11, 12 was planned. Connectors basically link different parts of FPDs. The modified FPD with loop connectors enhanced the natural appearance of the restoration, maintained the diastemas and the proper emergence profile, and preserve the remaining tooth structure of abutment teeth. This clinical report discussed a method for fabrication of a modified FPD with loop connectors to restore the wide span created by missing central incisors.

  15. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  16. Restoring Landform Geodiversity in Modified Rivers and Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ben; Clifford, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Extensive human modification and exploitation has created degraded and simplified systems lacking many of the landforms which would characterise healthy, geodiverse rivers. As awareness of geodiversity grows we must look to ways not only to conserve geodiversity but to also restore or create landforms which contribute to geodiverse environments. River restoration, with lessons learned over the last 30 years and across multiple continents, has much to offer as an exemplar of how to understand, restore or create geodiversity. Although not mentioned explicitly, there is an implicit emphasis in the Water Framework Directive on the importance of landforms and geodiversity, with landform units and assemblages at the reach scale assumed to provide the physical template for a healthy aquatic ecosystem. The focus on hydromorphology has increased the importance of geomorphology within river restoration programmes. The dominant paradigm is to restore landforms in order to increase habitat heterogeneity and improve biodiversity within rivers. However, the process of landform restoration is also a goal in its own right in the context of geodiversity, and extensive compilations of restoration experiences allow an inventory and pattern of landform (re-) creation to be assembled, and an assessment of landform function as well as landform presence/absence to be made. Accordingly, this paper outlines three principal research questions: Which landforms are commonly reinstated in river restoration activities? How do these landforms function compared to natural equivalents and thus contribute to 'functional' geodiversity as compared to the 'aesthetic' geodiversity? How does landform diversity scale from reach to catchment and contribute to larger-scale geodiversity? Data from the UK National River Restoration Inventory and the RHS are combined to assess the frequency and spatial distribution of commonly created landforms in relation to catchment type and more local context. Analysis is

  17. Ethical and legal issues in aesthetic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth and expansion of plastic surgery in general and aesthetic surgery in particular in the past decade has brought in its wake some confusions particularly raising questions for the surgeons conduct towards his colleagues and the patients in the light of ethical requirements. Some thoughts from eminent thinkers form a backdrop to consideration of theories of medical ethics. In this article raging and continuous debates on these subjects have been avoided to maintain the momentum. Apart from the western thoughts, directions from our old scriptures on ethical conduct have been included to accommodate prevelant Indian practices. The confusion created by specialists advertising their abilities directly to the lay public following removal of ethical bars by the American Courts as also latitudes allowed by the General Medical Council of Great Britain have been discussed. The medical fraternity however has its reservations. Unnecessary skirmishes with the law arose in cosmetic surgery from the freedom exercised by the police to file criminal proceedings against attending doctors in the event of a patient′s death with or without any evidence of wrong doing. This has now been curtailed in the judgement of the Supreme Court of India[1] where norms have been laid down for such prosecution. This has helped doctors to function without fear of harassment. An effort has been made to state a simple day-to-day routine for an ethical doctor-patient relationship.

  18. Response of Human Skin to Aesthetic Scarification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Vincent A.; McClellan, Elizabeth A.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate changes in RNA expression in previously healthy adult human skin following thermal injury induced by contact with hot metal that was undertaken as part of aesthetic scarification, a body modification practice. Subjects were recruited to have pre-injury skin and serial wound biopsies performed. 4 mm punch biopsies were taken prior to branding and 1 hour, 1 week, and 1, 2 and 3 months post injury. RNA was extracted and quality assured prior to the use of a whole-genome based bead array platform to describe expression changes in the samples using the pre-injury skin as a comparator. Analysis of the array data was performed using k-means clustering and a hypergeometric probability distribution without replacement and corrections for multiple comparisons were done. Confirmatory q-PCR was performed. Using a k of 10, several clusters of genes were shown to co-cluster together based on Gene Ontology classification with probabilities unlikely to occur by chance alone. OF particular interest were clusters relating to cell cycle, proteinaceous extracellular matrix and keratinization. Given the consistent expression changes at one week following injury in the cell cycle cluster, there is an opportunity to intervene early following burn injury to influence scar development. PMID:24582755

  19. What Can Synergetics Contribute to Embodied Aesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haken, Hermann

    2017-09-02

    I deal with perception and action (e.g., movements) using results from synergetics, a comprehensive mathematical theory of the self-organized formation (emergence) of spatial, temporal, or functional structures in complex systems. I illustrate basic concepts such as order parameters (OPs), enslavement, complexity reduction, circular causality first by examples of well-known collective, spontaneous modes of human behavior such as rhythmic clapping of hands, and so forth, and then by face recognition. The role played by OPs depends on context. In the case of face (or pattern) recognition an OP represents the concept of an individual face (action of mind) and it enslaves the action (firing rates) of neurons (body). This insight allows me to interpret syndromes as order parameters playing their mind/body double role. I present criteria for the identification of OPs and discuss their general properties including error correction and remedy of deficiencies. Contact is made with a recent paper by Sabine Koch on embodied aesthetics. My approach includes the saturation of attention at various time scales (ambiguous figures/fashion). Adopting a psychological perspective, I discuss some ingredients of beauty such as proportionality and symmetry, but also the importance of irregularities.

  20. Visually representing reality: aesthetics and accessibility aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nes, Floris L.

    2009-02-01

    This paper gives an overview of the visual representation of reality with three imaging technologies: painting, photography and electronic imaging. The contribution of the important image aspects, called dimensions hereafter, such as color, fine detail and total image size, to the degree of reality and aesthetic value of the rendered image are described for each of these technologies. Whereas quite a few of these dimensions - or approximations, or even only suggestions thereof - were already present in prehistoric paintings, apparent motion and true stereoscopic vision only recently were added - unfortunately also introducing accessibility and image safety issues. Efforts are made to reduce the incidence of undesirable biomedical effects such as photosensitive seizures (PSS), visually induced motion sickness (VIMS), and visual fatigue from stereoscopic images (VFSI) by international standardization of the image parameters to be avoided by image providers and display manufacturers. The history of this type of standardization, from an International Workshop Agreement to a strategy for accomplishing effective international standardization by ISO, is treated at some length. One of the difficulties to be mastered in this process is the reconciliation of the, sometimes opposing, interests of vulnerable persons, thrill-seeking viewers, creative video designers and the game industry.

  1. PROVOCATIVE PERFORMANCE, PROVOCATIVE THEATER: AESTHETIC INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROŞCA ANGELINA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The author directs her attention to an yet-understudied area of theatre science, namely the aesthetic interaction between the provocative performance and the provocative theatre. The article sheds light on the conceptual coordinates of the performance placed among such artistic trends as Actionism, Conceptualism, Fluxus and Happening. Elements of performing arts infiltrated into the theatre long ago. And it is not just a co-occurrence within an artistic act, but an interference indeed. The provocative performance dispossesses the alternative arts of their distinct codes. First in the USA, then in Europe and eventually in the former Socialist Camp and the territory of the ex-USSR, the performance conquered the theatrical territory. This process has been accelerating since the dramatic theatre began to yield its positions to the post-dramatic one. Some of the overlapping points, which unite the performance with the spectacle in contemporary art, are followed in: the strategy of idiocy in provocative practices; the ready made; the corporeality; the pictorial.

  2. Aesthetic Refinements in Patients with Prominent Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Dirk F; Schwaiger, Nina; Wiedner, Maria

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of prominent eyes is still a challenging task. As well as the surgery, proper preoperative diagnosis differentiating between patients with and without Graves ophthalmopathy plays an important role. In functionally asymptomatic patients with Graves disease suffering from the aesthetic impairment of prominent eyes, the transpalpebral decompression by intraorbital fat removal technique has been proved to be reliable, effective, safe, and easily performed by a trained and experienced oculoplastic surgeon. This technique provides long-lasting results, leading to improvement not only in visual function but also in personal well-being and in the patient's social life, with a high benefit-to-risk ratio. The most powerful tool to treat the lower lid deformity and malar bags in patients without Graves disease is the subperiosteal midface lift. It shortens the lid-cheek junction and blends the retaining periorbital ligaments. Furthermore, it adds volume to the lower lid and gives a stable support. By the nature of the procedure, it also turns a negative into a positive vector. In experienced hands, Olivari's orbital decompression and Hester's midface lift are ideal options for the treatment of prominent eyes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Aesthetic Study on English Advertising Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙重阳

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of economy as well as science and technology, advertisements have become a part of people's life, which can be seen at nearly every corner around the world, TV, bus, cinema, shop, or even the clothes we wear, from which we can see a variety of advertisements. Advertisements are adopted to attract customers' attention to a certain product, aiming to convince consumers and persuade them to spend their money on the goods. Advertisers are trying to gain more profits from customers, so they create some forms of advertising, like sound, video, and even in the movie or inviting some celebrity to do advertising through his or her influence on the public. Thus, there is no doubt that advertising is an essential factor for sales promotion in the modern society. So far, there have been a number of studies on advertising, such as, the cooperative principle in advertising, the perspective of semiotics in advertising, etc. However, this thesis focuses on the study of aesthetics on English advertising language.

  4. Aesthetic analysis of natural anterior teeth and their restoration with resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardu, S.

    2010-01-01

    In de hedendaagse tandheelkunde worden vulmaterialen op kunstharsbasis (composieten) veelvuldig gebruikt omwille van hun goede biocompatibiliteit, verwerkbaarheid en relatief lage kostprijs, vooral wanneer men ze vergelijkt met keramische materialen. Bovendien kan met deze vulmaterialen een minimaal

  5. Aesthetic possibilities in removable prosthodontics. Part 1: the aesthetic spectrum from perfect to personal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besford, J N; Sutton, A F

    2018-01-12

    Patients requiring dentures are getting older and as a result can be difficult to treat owing to various co-morbidities. This series of papers presents an overview of the processes involved in making removable dentures which the patient considers to be functionally and aesthetically successful. We hope not only to provide technical suggestions but also to address the issue of the clinician's, technician's and dental nurse's relationships with the dentally depleted patient. It is increasingly clear from defence organisation reports that this has a decisive effect on the success of this fundamentally difficult enterprise ('The only branch of dentistry in which you are trying to attach something to nothing' [Hubert Aïche]). It seems best to conduct the planning and the treatment itself as a co-production - the patient assuming responsibility for choosing between the treatment options offered and playing the leading role in making aesthetic decisions. Distinctions are drawn between the idealised whiter-than-white, 'nobody-in-particular', attention-seeking denture at one extreme, and the highly personalised, discreet and naturalistic denture at the other. Reproducing nature in this way is time consuming and therefore expensive, but many 'denture sufferers' see it as good value. Methods for creating the latter, which through its very normality switches off the social observer's attention, are explained in detail in papers two and three of this series. These papers are designed to help clinicians and technicians involved in providing removable prosthodontics improve the appearance of their dentures and increase their patients' aesthetic satisfaction. They are not scientific articles in the Popperian sense of advancing theories which are capable of being falsified. Instead, they are an amalgamation of 72 years of combined experience in providing removable dental prostheses. We have found this branch of dentistry immensely interesting and have on many occasions had the

  6. Musical training of coaches in aesthetic-oriented sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Belenkaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to justify theoretically the need for musical training of coaches in aesthetic-oriented sports. Material & Methods: theoretical analysis and generalization of scientific and methodological literature, pedagogical supervision. Results: the main directions of musical training of coaches in aesthetic-orientated sports were reviewed. It was discovered that in these types of sports coaches must have specific musical and rhythmic motor skills involving the use of musical accompaniment as a methodological technique for training sessions. The means of music and rhythmic education, which facilitate effective musical training of coaches in aesthetic-oriented sports, were determined. Conclusions: the necessity of improving the teaching methods of the subject "music and rhythmic education" as part of the musical training of coaches in aesthetic-orientated sports, was theoretically justified.

  7. REVIEW A SPACE FOR GRACE: TOWARDS AN AESTHETICS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    REVIEW. A SPACE FOR. GRACE: TOWARDS. AN AESTHETICS OF. PREACHING ... Cilliers' views of space and time are clearly post-Einstein and post-. Hawking. .... in the step-by-step, week-in-week-out process of sermon preparation. The.

  8. Visual service scape aesthetics and consumer response : a holistic model

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, DS; Purani, K; Sahadev, S

    2017-01-01

    The paper looks at the impact of visual servicescapes at consumer preferences. Using an experimental methodology, we try to understand the imapct of different servicescape aesthetic dimensions on emotional and congnitive responses of customers.

  9. High School Girls’ Everyday Aesthetics on Instagram: The Affordance Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jou-Chun Su

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores high school girls’ Instagram aesthetic practices based on the affordance theory. We conduct in-depth interviews and photo analyses of 10 subjects to reveal how these girls interact with the app’s interface, and what strategic practices they have developed to interact with the affordances preset by Instagram. The findings demonstrate that Instagram has become a realm for everyday aesthetics due to its design priority on photos. These high school girls navigate in plural art worlds as they share their reframed photos with a variety of social groups, of which each has its own discrete aesthetic convention. This indicates that Instagram’s interface design has successfully associated itself with taste and beauty, eliciting these girls to collect more reframing apps in order to achieve their own distinction. As a result, aesthetics takes shape in everyday life, but they take their own aestheticized life as the real one.

  10. ON BEAUTY AND THE BEAUTIFUL IN AESTHETIC EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borce Kostov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We titled our work “On Beauty and the Beautiful in Aesthetic Education” and we analyzed the category beautiful in function of better understanding the issues of aesthetic education.The basic point was the fact that the determination of the term beautiful is being different in both, time aspect and space aspect. Also, the authors involved in this matter have got different understanding on beautiful issue, on its essence, on its role in human development and on the development of the aesthetics and the aesthetic education.Therefore, within our work, there is an attempt to differ the approaches towards the category beautiful, to comment it, to compare it and finally to give our approach.

  11. Theses on Distributed Aesthetics. Or, What a Network is Not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert Lovink

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this essay Lovink and Munster set forward a number of proposals for a distributed aesthetics. If new media artistic practice and aesthetic experience were most often characterised by recourse to computational culture, then distributed aesthetics is dominated by networks. Networked media and technologies help to disperse experience so that we never seem to be having our experiences in the one place anymore. However, the authors suggest, most of the images and rhetoric attempting to characterise this distributed experience are drawn from the cartographic traditions of geographic information systems and/or conceptions of biological networking and growth. These do not assist in coming to terms with the specifically social aspects of online networking. The authors speculate that a distributed aesthetics must take into account the collective and personal 'aesthesia' of online networks - the experience of labouring towards new forms of social collectivity that produces not only euphoria but also boredom and frustration.

  12. Aesthetic Training for Plastic Surgeons: Are Residents Getting Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Athanasios; Montemurro, Paolo; Hedén, Per

    2018-02-01

    Plastic Surgery is one of the most competitive specialties in the field of medicine. However, this specialty has a unique particularity: the difficulties in Aesthetic Surgery training within the residency program. Despite the fact that the full title of the specialty is Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery and that Aesthetic Surgery is a part of the examination syllabus, the actual training in the specific area is limited. One of the solutions to this problem is Fellowships. The first author describes his personal experience with Aesthetic training and how it enhanced his knowledge in the area as well as the status of Fellowships in various training programs. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  13. Adapting models of visual aesthetics for personalized content creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Togelius, Julian

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a search-based approach to personalized content generation with respect to visual aesthetics. The approach is based on a two-step adaptation procedure where (1) the evaluation function that characterizes the content is adjusted to match the visual aesthetics of users and (2......) the content itself is optimized based on the personalized evaluation function. To test the efficacy of the approach we design fitness functions based on universal properties of visual perception, inspired by psychological and neurobiological research. Using these visual properties we generate aesthetically...... spaceships according to their visual taste: the impact of the various visual properties is adjusted based on player preferences and new content is generated online based on the updated computational model of visual aesthetics of the player. Results are presented which show the potential of the approach...

  14. Hollywood's Conversion to Color: The Technological, Economic and Aesthetic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindem, Forham A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the film industry's conversion to color cinematography in the period between the 1920s and 1960s. Cites economic considerations, technological modifications, and aesthetic preferences by audiences as factors in this development. (JMF)

  15. Aesthetic Band, Reception Theory and Sociology of Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Rychlewski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic band – in contrast to the bandwidth, i.e. the distribution channel – is a socially and historically conditioned cluster of aesthetic expectations presented by readers-buyers, represented by their majority, which in the egalitarian, post-modern, and free market society, determines the shape of the publishing market and the circuits it consists of. The author believes that the aesthetic band should be analyzed in the context of both individual and collective expectations of the reading audience in relation to the book content and its subject-matter, as well as in relation to the literary and non-literary production. In the last part of the paper, the author puts forward a proposition that the aesthetic band might be considered as a tool of ideology.

  16. Smell and Anosmia in the Aesthetic Appreciation of Gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tafalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In his Critique of the Power of Judgment, Kant defined the garden as a visual art and considered that smell plays no role in its aesthetic appreciation. If the Kantian thesis were right, then a person who has no sense of smell (who suffers from anosmia would not be impaired in his or her aesthetic appreciation of gardens. At the same time, a visually impaired person could not appreciate the beauty of gardens, although he or she could perceive them through hearing, smell, taste, and touch. In this paper I discuss the role of smell and anosmia in the aesthetic appreciation of gardens. I accept the Kantian idea that the appreciation of a garden is the appreciation of its form, but I also defend that, at least in some cases, smell can belong to the form of gardens and, consequently, the ability or inability to smell influences their aesthetic appreciation.

  17. Social Aesthetics in Learning Practices in the 21st Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Ejsing-Duun, Stine

    Social Aesthetics in Learning Practices in the 21st Century Due to the extensive reliance on media in our everyday perception of the surroundings we see a shift in relation to aesthetics from an individual focus to social negotiations around a situation. This article presents how individuals shape......, both, theoretically and through an explorative study: Theoretically we draw from visual culture (Buhl, 2012;Bourriaud, 2002; Mitchell, 2002), learning (Dohn, 2002) and digital media studies (Ejsing-Duun, 2011). The explorative case study is focused on the use of the mobile application Draw Something...... (Buhl and Ejsing-Duun, 2013), along with other current apps. In a case study we take them as examples of how technology facilitates our meeting with the world though the senses and how we decode and negotiate social aesthetic expressions. The intent of the article is to suggest and discuss an aesthetic...

  18. PHOG analysis of self-similarity in aesthetic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirshahi, Seyed Ali; Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, there have been efforts in defining the statistical properties of aesthetic photographs and artworks using computer vision techniques. However, it is still an open question how to distinguish aesthetic from non-aesthetic images with a high recognition rate. This is possibly because aesthetic perception is influenced also by a large number of cultural variables. Nevertheless, the search for statistical properties of aesthetic images has not been futile. For example, we have shown that the radially averaged power spectrum of monochrome artworks of Western and Eastern provenance falls off according to a power law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f2 characteristics). This finding implies that this particular subset of artworks possesses a Fourier power spectrum that is self-similar across different scales of spatial resolution. Other types of aesthetic images, such as cartoons, comics and mangas also display this type of self-similarity, as do photographs of complex natural scenes. Since the human visual system is adapted to encode images of natural scenes in a particular efficient way, we have argued that artists imitate these statistics in their artworks. In support of this notion, we presented results that artists portrait human faces with the self-similar Fourier statistics of complex natural scenes although real-world photographs of faces are not self-similar. In view of these previous findings, we investigated other statistical measures of self-similarity to characterize aesthetic and non-aesthetic images. In the present work, we propose a novel measure of self-similarity that is based on the Pyramid Histogram of Oriented Gradients (PHOG). For every image, we first calculate PHOG up to pyramid level 3. The similarity between the histograms of each section at a particular level is then calculated to the parent section at the previous level (or to the histogram at the ground level). The proposed approach is tested on datasets of aesthetic and

  19. Stable aesthetic standards delusion: changing 'artistic quality' by elaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Hesslinger, Vera M

    2014-01-01

    The present study challenges the notion that judgments of artistic quality are based on stable aesthetic standards. We propose that such standards are a delusion and that judgments of artistic quality are the combined result of exposure, elaboration, and discourse. We ran two experiments using elaboration tasks based on the repeated evaluation technique in which different versions of the Mona Lisa had to be elaborated deeply. During the initial task either the version known from the Louvre or an alternative version owned by the Prado was elaborated; during the second task both versions were elaborated in a comparative fashion. After both tasks multiple blends of the two versions had to be evaluated concerning several aesthetic key variables. Judgments of artistic quality of the blends were significantly different depending on the initially elaborated version of the Mona Lisa, indicating experience-based aesthetic processing, which contradicts the notion of stable aesthetic standards.

  20. British Idealist Aesthetics, Collingwood, Wollheim, And The Origins Of Analytic Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinatsu Kobayashi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Great Britain is the country of some of the earliest contributors to aesthetics as an independent philosophical discipline the subject attracted little interest in philosophical circles towards the turn of the twentieth century. In this paper, I shall focus on Bosanquet and Collingwood. In particular, as we shall see, Collingwood is often dismissed as having held an indefensible, outmoded ‘ideal’ theory, according to which the work of art is primarily ‘mental’, while his potential role in current debates is simply ignored. I will argue that this view is largely mistaken.

  1. Essential Requirements to Setting up an Aesthetic Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdev, Mukta; Britto, Gillian R

    2014-01-01

    Aesthetic dermatology is becoming a vital and popular branch of medicine. This article aims to guide dermatologists to set up a professional and ethical aesthetic practice. Dermatologists should have an integrated practice of clinical dermatology, dermatosurgery and cosmetic dermatology. Ethical practice is the gold standard for any medical field, especially with dermatologists, who should avoid doing unnecessary procedures. Proper patient counselling and addressing the patients′ concerns is ...

  2. Quality Enhancement of Environmental Aesthetics Experience Through Ecological Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Reza Sadeghi; Mohammadreza Pourjafar; Ali Akbar Taghvaee; Parviz Azadfallah

    2014-01-01

    In this article by reviewing the environmental aesthetics experience, natural towns cape, and ecological assessment related concepts, ecological assessment is known as a process that pave the way for achieving a positive (pleasant) experience of natural aesthetics in natural towns cape. In fact, it seems that ecological assessment and evaluation of the natural context should be the fundamental part in the process of urban design of large scale projects, which are developed to improve the qual...

  3. Menneskerettighedernes Æstetik /The Aesthetics of Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The idea of this thematic issue on "The Aesthetics of Human Rigths" of the journal "Academic Quarter" is to focus on the staging of human rights in popular culture and fine arts and in different media and genres.......The idea of this thematic issue on "The Aesthetics of Human Rigths" of the journal "Academic Quarter" is to focus on the staging of human rights in popular culture and fine arts and in different media and genres....

  4. Forming Future Teachers’ Aesthetic Culture in Foreign Educational Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sotska Galyna

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with a theoretical analysis of foreign educational experience in solving scientific problems of forming future teachers’ aesthetic culture. Given the current socio-cultural situation, it has been noted that a teacher who developed his/her aesthetic culture can make a direct contribution to the social and cultural challenges of a changing world. Based on the study of scientific and pedagogical literature, normative and legal support and the content of practical courses, the a...

  5. Critical Realism and Abay’s Aesthetic World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhandos Smagulov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with the oeuvre of the founder of the Kazakh realistic poetry Abay Kunanbayev and his critic and aesthetic views of the method of critical realism in the Kazakh literature, analyses the method of critical realism on the example of the Russian literature, examines aesthetic views of democrat poets and writers of realistic works of the early XX century, represented by Abay Kunanbayev

  6. Parotidectomy for benign parotid tumors: An aesthetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.; Mostafa, A.; Rifaat, M.; Shallan, M.; Rabie, A.; Elzohairy, M.; Nabawi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The sternocleidomastoid (SCM) partial thickness muscle flap is among the various methods described to correct parotidectomy defects, but its indications and limitations are not clearly demonstrated in several reports. This study was done to test the aesthetic outcome of this method, its indications and limitations. The technique was combined with a face lift incision to further improve the outcome. Patients and methods: At the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt, 23 patients presenting with benign tumors underwent parotidectomy, 19 had superficial parotidectomy and four had total parotidectomy done. The superiorly based (SCM) muscle flap was used to correct the contour deformity. The aesthetic result was evaluated by assessing arid scoring the overall appearance of the scar, the degree of symmetry of the reconstructed parotid region and the site of the donor muscle to their contralateral normal sides. The overall aesthetic appearance was then calculated by the summation of the scores of the latter three parameters. Patients' satisfaction was assessed by patients' questionnaire. Result: The overall aesthetic appearance was good in 17 patients, and moderate in six patients. 16/23 patients had an overall deep satisfaction with the result. The residual hollowness of the parotid following reconstruction of the total parotidectomy defect and the poor quality of scars were the main reasons affecting the aesthetic outcome. Conclusion: Superficial parotidectomy through facelift incision with immediate reconstruction with superiorly based partial thickness SCM flap allows adequate resection of most benign parotid tumors with a satisfactory aesthetic outcome and minimal donor site morbidity

  7. Aesthetic experience and the emotional content of paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Marković

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the relationship between aesthetic experience and other emotional qualities judged in paintings. Aesthetic experience was defined as an exceptional state of mind in which a person is focused on a particular object, transcending its everyday uses and meanings and losing the awareness of surroundings and even of himself/herself. In this state a person has an exceptional emotional experience, that is a feeling of unity with the object. Our basic idea is that aesthetic experience is not reducible to pleasure or a positive hedonic tone, but a person can equally be fascinated with both pleasant and unpleasant objects. In preliminary studies we specified the stimulus set of figural and semi-figural paintings, and a set of descriptors of emotions, feelings and aesthetic experience. Participants judged the paintings on descriptors (seven-point scales. Factor analysis revealed two large factors: the bipolar factor Affective Tone (descriptors on the positive pole: lovely, charming, cheerful, etc; descriptors on the negative pole: scary, disgusting, hateful etc. and Aesthetic Experience (descriptors: exceptional, profound, unique, etc.. Additional analyses have shown no significant correlation between the two factors. These findings confirmed our idea that aesthetic experience is independent of pleasure or affective attraction, and that it can be induced by both pleasant and unpleasant paintings.

  8. That is Cool: the Nature Of Aesthetics in Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Jean

    2013-11-01

    Aesthetics has historically been defined as the study of beauty and thus as a metric of art. More recently, psychologists are using the term to describe a spectrum of responses from ``I hate it'' to ``I love it.'' In the context of fluid physics, what is beautiful? What elicits a ``Wow! Awesome! Cool!'' response versus a snore? Can we use aesthetics to deepen or change students' or the public's perceptions of physics and/or the world around them? For example, students seem to appreciate the aesthetics of destruction: environmental fluid dynamics such as storms, tornadoes, floods and wildfires are often responsible for massive destruction, yet humans draw pleasure from watching such physics and the attendant destruction from a safe distance. Can this voyeurism be turned to our advantage in communicating science? Observations of student and Facebook Flow Visualization group choices for fluid physics that draw a positive aesthetic response are sorted into empirical categories; the aesthetics of beauty, power, destruction, and oddness. Each aesthetic will be illustrated with examples drawn from flow visualizations from both the Flow Visualization course (MCEN 4151) taught at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and sources on the web. This work is supported by NSF: EEC 1240294.

  9. Cognitive mechanisms for explaining dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2011-01-01

    For many domains aesthetic appreciation has proven to be highly reliable. Evaluations of facial attractiveness, for instance, show high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. This indicates general mechanisms underlying such evaluations. It is, however, also obvious that our taste for specific objects is not always stable—in some realms such stability is hardly conceivable at all since aesthetic domains such as fashion, design, or art are inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for psychologists as this will probably reveal essential mechanisms of aesthetic evaluations per se. The present paper develops a two-step model, dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy, and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders— aesthetic appreciation. PMID:23145254

  10. Truth comes into play: Adorno, Kant and Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta M. Pérez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper departs from the verification of the centrality that, in Adorno’s recognition of the aesthetic field, the rehabilitation of its bond to knowledge and truth has. Adorno’s criticism to the Kantian aesthetic theory is, this way, reconstructed starting from his dismissal of the separation, established by Kant, between the aesthetic and the epistemological fields. This criticism, which accuses the Kantian aesthetics of subjectivism, is finally taken back to Adorno’s dissatisfaction regarding the transcendental approach, for not being dialectic. At this point, the need of determining the specificity of his own understanding of the aesthetic and dialectics becomes apparent. Surprisingly it is then discovered an unexpected proximity between his position and the one represented by the Kantian aesthetics itself, a proximity that let recognize in the latter some features which go beyond the limits of the Critical System towards the Adornian approach. But this proximity proves also the immanence and legitimacy of the (ambiguous Adornian criticism to Kant, and, as a result of this, the unsatisfactory quality of the Kantian determination of knowledge and truth.

  11. [What is beauty? : Manifest for an aesthetic character medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, W

    2017-12-01

    Aesthetic medicine has in recent decades attained a growing social significance and firm place in the medical profession image. In a short time, a variety of technical procedures and processes have been developed and applied by specialized physicians. A further leading medical discussion regarding the central question "What is beauty" is missing compared with the technologically innovative progress. Beauty is characterized by an individual and subjective pleasure. Social media and fashion trends exert a central influence on common beauty ideals and aesthetic medicine. In practice, the artificial intervention must accord to the individual personality. Therefore, the professional term Aesthetic Medicine is insufficient and should be replaced by "Aesthetic Character Medicine". The particular purpose is the aim of graceful aging and a sustained adequate result which outlasts the zeitgeist. This requires medical know how and clear aesthetic self-conception of the physician. "Aesthetic Character Medicine" can be realized in a discourse, with the 10-step plan presented in this article.

  12. Restorative interventions for HIV facial lipoatrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Dianne; Liew, Steven; Emery, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Facial lipoatrophy is a common and distressing manifestation of HIV lipodystrophy. The changes in facial appearance can reduce quality of life, self esteem and antiretroviral adherence. Apart from the modest benefits of thymidine-based nucleoside analog cessation, there are no proven therapies for lipoatrophy. Management of established fat loss can be challenging as restoration of lost fat mass is extremely gradual. Plastic surgery and cosmetic procedures can restore lost facial volume. Both biodegradable and permanent filling agents have been investigated for HIV facial lipoatrophy. Biodegradable products offer a good safety profile, but maintenance of aesthetic benefits necessitates reinjection over time. Although permanent products offer longevity and lower treatment costs, adverse events should they occur can be serious and of long duration. Despite the substantial increase in options for soft-tissue augmentation in recent years, well-performed clinical studies in HIV-infected adults with facial lipoatrophy are scarce, and long-term clinical safety data are lacking. This review will summarize available efficacy and safety data of the biodegradable and permanent agents utilized for soft-tissue augmentation in this population. Difficulties associated with comparing treatment efficacy data, assessment of facial lipoatrophy presence and severity, and measurement of facial fat will be discussed. Available data indicate that in HIV-infected adults, most filling agents have short-term clinically safety, and can provide aesthetic improvement and improve well-being, social functioning and quality of life. However, well-designed studies with objectively assessed endpoints are needed to elucidate optimal treatments for this distressing condition.

  13. Defining the Aesthetic(s of Negation in El Techo de la Ballena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Nesselrode

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The radical artist collective El Techo de la Ballena (1961–1968 is primarily remembered as a scandalous, interdisciplinary pioneer of performative public interventions in Venezuela. Yet the group established a contradictory, pluralistic visual aesthetic(s that served as a refusal of the artistic and political hegemony of geometric and kinetic art. This paper examines several case studies to consider El Techo’s complex visual output, which variously draws upon medieval woodcuts, photography and photomontage, and a mode of gestural abstraction that came to be known as informalismo. The group looked to an alternative genealogy of Dada and Surrealist tactics as a means of introducing an arsenal of new artistic strategies that could be adapted to a specifically Venezuelan discourse of development and disillusion. By advancing a visual language of unpredictability and mutability, El Techo actively refused to achieve a singular identity, its deliberate dissonances complementing its guerrilla approach to artmaking and ultimately seeking to undo the perceived academicism of dominant visualities in Venezuelan art and politics.

  14. Can an "Aesthetic" Intervention (Braided Hair Coil) Cause Hair Loss After an Aesthetic Operation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionyssopoulos, Alexander; Papaconstantinou, Antony; Stoltidou, Alexandra; Spyropoulou, Georgia-Alexandra

    2014-07-01

    Postoperative pressure alopecia (PPA), defined as hair loss caused by prolonged pressure on the patient's scalp during surgery, is an uncommon condition after aesthetic surgery. Originally, it was described for patients who underwent lengthy cardiovascular and gynecologic operations. The authors present a rare case, in which hair loss occurred after secondary breast augmentation (replacement of breast implants). The PPA appeared in the occipitoparietal region of the patient's scalp approximately 2 weeks after surgery. The operation was completed in less than 3 hours, without any fluctuations in the patient's blood pressure or any unusual blood loss. There were no other precipitating factors such as anemia or coagulopathies. The probable cause of this unexpected result was the patient's braided hair coil, which had not been noted before the operation. The patient habitually, and on the day of her operation, combed her hair into a braided coil, which placed extra pressure on the occipitoparietal region. The hair loss was temporary, and hair regrowth was complete within 2 months. This incident may have been avoided if the braided hair coil had been noted by nursing or other medical staff preoperatively. Repositioning the head every 30 minutes and providing adequate head padding during surgery are advised to protect the patient and prevent such incidents. 5. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  15. Films, Affective Computing and Aesthetic Experience: Identifying Emotional and Aesthetic Highlights from Multimodal Signals in a Social Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Kostoulas, Theodoros; Chanel, Guillaume; Muszynski, Michal; Lombardo, Patrizia; Pun, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Over the last years, affective computing has been strengthening its ties with the humanities, exploring and building understanding of people’s responses to specific artistic multimedia stimuli. “Aesthetic experience” is acknowledged to be the subjective part of some artistic exposure, namely, the inner affective state of a person exposed to some artistic object. In this work, we describe ongoing research activities for studying the aesthetic experience of people when exposed to movie artistic...

  16. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) in Aesthetic Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytras, B.; Drozdowski, P.; Zub, K.

    2011-08-01

    Introduction. Newer and newer technologies have been widely developed in recent years due to increasing need for aesthetic medicine procedures. Less invasive methods of skin imperfection and time-related lesions removal, IPL (Intense Pulse Light) being one of them, are gaining more and more interest. The shorter the "downtime" for the patient is and the more efficient the procedure results, the more popular the method becomes. Materials and methods_Authors analyse the results of treatment of a 571 patients-group (501 women and 70 men) aged 5-72 years in the period: October 2006-August 2010. IPL™ Quantum (Lumenis Ltd.) device with 560 nm. cut-off filter was used. Results. The results were regarded as: very good, good or satisfying (%):Skin photoaging symptomes 37/40/23, Isolated facial dyschromia 30/55/25, Isolated facial erythema 62/34/4, Lower limbs teleangiectasia 12/36/52, Keratosis solaris on hands 100/-/-. Approximately half of the patients developed transitory erythema and 25%- transitory, mild, circumscribed oedema. Following undesirable effects were noted: skin thermal irritation (6,1% of the patients) and skin hypopigmentation (2% of the patients). Discussion. Results and post-treatment management proposed by authors are similar to those reported by other authors. Conclusions. Treatment results of the 571-patients group prove IPL to be a very efficient method of non-ablative skin rejuvenation. It turned out effective also in lower limbs teleangiectasia treatment. It presents low risk of transitory and mild side effects. Futhermore, with short or no downtime, it is well-tolerated by the patients.

  17. Towards compassionate care through aesthetic rationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Pamela; Freshwater, Dawn

    2014-12-01

    The Francis Report, which was based on the investigation of complaints regarding standards of care in the Staffordshire NHS Trust in the UK, was published in 2013. The Report revealed that while the Trust appeared to be compliant with the standards set by official regulating bodies, the quality of care provided to patients was often appalling. While the Report constituted a 'critical moment' in health care, its findings resonated with widespread concern in the UK and elsewhere that health care is sometimes characterised by a lack of compassion. The Francis Report partially attributed this lack of compassion to a task-based culture which tended to prioritise the meeting of targets over the quality of care provided to patients. Older patients, in particular, were identified as being vulnerable to neglect. This qualitative study of hospice volunteers responds to concerns regarding the quality of organisational forms of care by considering how motivations to care may be sustained and enhanced within organisational contexts. Charitable and third sector organisations, such as the hospice in this study, have been identified as potentially relevant to other health and social care contexts precisely because they emphasise values such as altruism and goodwill. Our sociological approach suggests that altruism or compassion can be encouraged within contexts that emphasise a sociability of care. We argue that a sociability of care may be encouraged in organisational contexts if dominant understandings of rationality are extended through the incorporation of aesthetic rationality, a feminist perspective taken from Roslyn Bologh. This, however, would require a degree of authentic emotional engagement on the part of formal caregivers, which is more typically associated with relationships in the private sphere. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. Aesthetic practitioner as a physician and businessperson – Is it achievable?

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Thomaidou

    2018-01-01

    Aesthetic medicine subspecialty is no longer limited to the fields of plastic surgery and dermatology, as many specialties are offering aesthetic medical procedures to better accommodate their patients’ aesthetic needs. During the last decade there is an enormous increase of cosmetic treatments worldwide and the absence of regulations in aesthetic practice has become more noticeable. This article illustrates the challenges that every aesthetic physician must overcome daily to maintain high et...

  19. Experiencing-in-the-World : Using Pragmatist Philosophy to Design for Aesthetic Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Dhaval; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Eliens, A.P.W.; Eliëns, A.; Nijholt, Antinus; Kames, J.M.; Novotny, M.

    2007-01-01

    With the growing use of personal and ubiquitous computing technology, an increase is seen in utilizing aesthetic aspects for designing interactive systems. The use of aesthetic interpretations, however, has differed in different applications, often lacking a coherent and holistic meaning of aesthetics. In this paper we provide an account on aesthetics, utilizing the pragmatist perspective, which can be used as a framework to design for aesthetic experience in interactive systems. We discuss s...

  20. Management of anterior teeth damage caused by complex caries through aesthetic endorestoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Zubaidah

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a microbiological disease that result in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. It is multifactorial, therefore prevention must be based on a multifactorial approach. The damage of anterior teeth due to complex caries, for certain person may interfere their performance and decrease their self confidence aesthetically. Restoration of tooth form and function, especially on anterior teeth is highly valuable. Purpose: To present a case of maxillary anterior teeth with complex caries, through endorestoration treatment for recovering its original function and aesthetic. Case: The 21 years old male patient with complex carries on maxillary anterior teeth number 12, 11, 21, 22 and 23. The patient felt bad about his performance and affect his self confidence. The patient visited the clinic to repair his teeth and to get its form and function aesthetically. Case management: The endorestoration treatment was performed for carious teeth through pulpectomy followed by insertion of post retention and porcelain fused to metal crowns. Conclusion: Anterior teeth with severed complex caries can be managed through endorestoration treatment to recover its performance and function aesthetically.Latar belakang: Dental karies adalah penyakit infeksi yang berakibat kerusakan jaringan kalsifikasi dan bersifat multifactorial. Oleh karena itu pencegahan dilakukan dengan pendekatan multifactorial. Kerusakan gigi anterior karena karies kompleks untuk orang-orang tertentu mungkin berdampak pada penampilan dan penurunan kepercayaan diri karena factor estetik. Perbaikan gigi anterior dari berbagai kerusakan baik dalam hal bentuk maupun fungsinya sangat besar nilainya. Tujuan: Untuk menunjukkan kasus gigi anterior rahang atas karena karies kompleks melalui perawatan endorestorasi untuk mengembalikan fungsi gigi asli dan estetik. Kasus: Laki-laki usia 21 tahun dengan karies kompleks pada gigi anterior rahang atas 12, 11, 21