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Sample records for aeschynite

  1. Photoluminescence properties of aeschynite-type LaNbTiO6:RE3+ (RE = Tb, Dy, Ho) down-converting phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Lu, Mengkai; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Aiyu; Cao, Yongqiang

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a series of LaNbTiO6:RE(3+) (RE = Tb, Dy, Ho) down-converting phosphors were synthesized using a modified sol-gel combustion method, and their photoluminescence (PL) properties were investigated as a function of activator concentration and annealing temperature. The resultant particles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and PL spectra. The highly crystalline LaNbTiO6:RE(3+) (RE = Tb, Dy, Ho) phosphors with an average size of 200-300 nm obtained at 1100°C have an orthorhombic aeschynite-type structure and exhibit the highest luminescent intensity in our study range. The emission spectra of LaNbTiO6:RE(3+) (RE = Tb, Dy, Ho) phosphors under excitations at UV/blue sources are mainly composed of characteristic peaks arising from the f-f transitions of RE(3+), including 489 nm ((5) D4 → (7) F6) and 545 nm ((5) D4 → (7) F5) for Tb(3+), 476 and 482 nm ((4) F9/2 → (6) H15/2) and 571 nm ((4) F9/2 → (6) H13/2) for Dy(3+), and 545 nm ((5) F4 + (5) S2 → (5) I8) for Ho(3+), respectively. The luminescent mechanisms were further investigated. It can be expected that these phosphors are of intense interest and potential importance for many optical applications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The origin of secondary heavy rare earth element enrichment in carbonatites: Constraints from the evolution of the Huanglongpu district, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.; Kynicky, J.; Xu, Cheng; Song, Wenlei; Spratt, J.; Jeffries, T.; Brtnicky, M.; Kopriva, A.; Cangelosi, D.

    2018-05-01

    The silico‑carbonatite dykes of the Huanglongpu area, Lesser Qinling, China, are unusual in that they are quartz-bearing, Mo-mineralised and enriched in the heavy rare earth elements (HREE) relative to typical carbonatites. The textures of REE minerals indicate crystallisation of monazite-(Ce), bastnäsite-(Ce), parisite-(Ce) and aeschynite-(Ce) as magmatic phases. Burbankite was also potentially an early crystallising phase. Monazite-(Ce) was subsequently altered to produce a second generation of apatite, which was in turn replaced and overgrown by britholite-(Ce), accompanied by the formation of allanite-(Ce). Bastnäsite and parisite where replaced by synchysite-(Ce) and röntgenite-(Ce). Aeschynite-(Ce) was altered to uranopyrochlore and then pyrochlore with uraninite inclusions. The mineralogical evolution reflects the evolution from magmatic carbonatite, to more silica-rich conditions during early hydrothermal processes, to fully hydrothermal conditions accompanied by the formation of sulphate minerals. Each alteration stage resulted in the preferential leaching of the LREE and enrichment in the HREE. Mass balance considerations indicate hydrothermal fluids must have contributed HREE to the mineralisation. The evolution of the fluorcarbonate mineral assemblage requires an increase in aCa2+ and aCO32- in the metasomatic fluid (where a is activity), and breakdown of HREE-enriched calcite may have been the HREE source. Leaching in the presence of strong, LREE-selective ligands (Cl-) may account for the depletion in late stage minerals in the LREE, but cannot account for subsequent preferential HREE addition. Fluid inclusion data indicate the presence of sulphate-rich brines during alteration, and hence sulphate complexation may have been important for preferential HREE transport. Alongside HREE-enriched magmatic sources, and enrichment during magmatic processes, late stage alteration with non-LREE-selective ligands may be critical in forming HREE

  3. Sedimentary carbonate-hosted giant Bayan Obo REE-Fe-Nb ore deposit of Inner Mongolia, China; a cornerstone example for giant polymetallic ore deposits of hydrothermal origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Tatsumoto, M.; Junwen, Wang; Conrad, J.E.; McKee, E.H.; Zonglin, Hou; Qingrun, Meng; Shengguang, Huang

    1997-01-01

    Detailed, integrative field and laboratory studies of the textures, structures, chemical characteristics, and isotopically determined ages and signatures of mineralization of the Bayan Obo deposit provided evidence for the origin and characteristics favorable for its formation and parameters necessary for defining giant polymetallic deposits of hydrothermal origin. Bayan Obo is an epigenetic, metasomatic, hydrothermal rare earth element (REE)-Fe-Nb ore deposit that is hosted in the metasedimentary H8 dolostone marble of the Middle Proterozoic Bayan Obo Group. The metasedimentary sequence was deposited on the northern continental slope of the North China craton. The mine area is about 100 km south of the suture marking Caledonian subduction of the Mongolian oceanic plate from the north beneath the North China craton. The mineralogy of the deposit is very complex, consisting of more than 120 different minerals, some of which are epigenetic minerals introduced by hydrothermal solutions, and some of which are primary and secondary metamorphic minerals. The major REE minerals are monazite and bastnaesite, whereas magnetite and hematite are the dominant Fe-ore minerals, and columbite is the most abundant Nb mineral. Dolomite, alkali amphibole, fluorite, barite, aegirine augite, apatite, phlogopite, albite, and microcline are the most widespread gangue minerals. Three general types of ores occur at Bayan Obo: disseminated, banded, and massive ores. Broad zoning of these ore types occurs in the Main and East Orebodies. Disseminated ores are in the outermost zone, banded ores are in the intermediate zone, and massive ores are in the cores of the orebodies. On the basis of field relations, host rocks, textures, structures, and mineral assemblages, many varieties of these three types of ores have been recognized and mapped. Isotopic dating of monazite, bastnaesite, aeschynite, and metamorphic and metasomatic alkali amphiboles associated with the deposit provides constraints

  4. Origin of heavy REE mineralisation in carbonatites: Constraints form the Huanglongpu Mo-HREE deposit, Qinling, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin; Cheng, Xu; Kynicky, Jindrich; Cangelosi, Delia; Wenlei, Song

    2017-04-01

    The carbonatite dykes of the Huanglongpu area, Lesser Qinling, China, are unusual in that they are quartz-bearing, Mo-mineralised and enriched in the heavy rare earth elements (HREE) relative to typical carbonatites. Carbonatite monazite (208.9±4.6 Ma to 213.6±4.0; Song et al., 2016) gives a comparable U-Pb radiometric age to molybdenite (220Ma; Stein et al., 1997), confirming interpretations that Mo is derived from the carbonatite, and not a subsequent overprint from regional porphyry-style mineralisation ( 141Ma). The sulphides in the carbonatites have mantle-like 34S ( 1‰) and low δ26Mg values (-1.89 to -1.07‰), similar to sedimentary carbonates, suggesting a recycled sediment contribution in their mantle sources that may be responsible for the Mo and HREE enrichment (Song et al., 2016). The textures of REE minerals indicate crystallisation of monazite-(Ce), bastnäsite-(Ce), parisite-(Ce) and aeschynite-(Ce) as magmatic phases. Monazite-(Ce) was subsequently altered to produce apatite, which was in turn replaced by britholite-(Ce), accompanied by the formation of allanite-(Ce). The REE-fluorcarbonates where replaced by synchysite-(Ce) and röntgenite-(Ce). Aeschynite-(Ce) was altered initially to uranopyrochlore and then pyrochlore with uraninite inclusions. The mineralogical evolution reflects the evolution from magmatic carbonatite, through to more silica-rich conditions during the magmatic-hydrothermal transition, to fully hydrothermal conditions accompanied by the formation of sulphate minerals. Each alteration stage resulted in the preferential leaching of the LREE and enrichment in the HREE. Mass balance considerations indicate that the HREE enrichment could not be a passive process, and that hydrothermal fluids must have contributed HREE to the system. The evolution of the fluorcarbonate mineral assemblage requires an increase in aCa2+ and aCO32- in the metasomatic fluid, and so breakdown of HREE-enriched calcite may have been the HREE source

  5. Geochemistry and mineralogy of the radioactive minerals associated with some pegmatite veins of the Ukma-Nawahatu Hursi sector, Purulia district, W.B., in the Precambrian Chhotanagpur Gneissic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baidya, Tapan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Some barite-bearing pegmatites in the Ukma-Nawahatu-Hursi sector (23° 25 min - 26 sec N, 86° 02 min - 04 sec E) in Purulia dist., West Bengal, have association of radioactive minerals in the form of coarse-grained pitchblack lumps and irregular patches. The present author and his associates first reported the occurrence of this radioactive belt along a ENE-WSW shearzone during their fieldwork in November, 1978. Groundborne radiometric survey and isorad mapping has established a radioactive high zone of about 15 km length running through Ukma, Nawahatu and Hursi areas. Mineralogical studies of the radioactive minerals have revealed the occurrence of Chevkinite, Aeschynite, Brannerite, Allanite, Uraninite, Tyuyamunite, Davidite, Euxenite, Samarskite, Thorutite, Autunite, Cerianite, in association with quartz, barite, microcline as the principal minerals and various minor minerals like biotite, vermiculite, hornblende, augite, orthoclase, celsian, muscovite, calcite, epidote, zoisite, ilmenite, sphene, rutile, hematite, magnetite, anatase, galena and sodic plagioclase. The barite-bearing pegmatites occur as lenses or lenticular veins hosted by garnetiferous sillimanite-biotite-quartz-schist or occasionally by migmatite. Near Nawahatu the radioactive barite-pegmatite vein occurs at or near the junction between the footwall amphibolite and hangingwall garnetiferous schist. The pegmatite veins have followed mainly schistosity of the host rock and dip at 70°-80° towards south. Chemical analyses of individual radioactive minerals by SEM-EDX and also of the bulk radioactive lumps by ICP-MS have shown significant concentration of U, Tb and Rare earths. Minor and trace element analyses also record notable contents of Zr, Ga, Sc, Pb, Zn, Nb, Cu, Ni, V, Cr, As, W, Pd, Ag and TI. Details of chemical analytical data are presented here. Chemically active fluids generated during metamorphism, metasomatism and granitic activity appear to have played a significant role in the

  6. Geophysical interpretation of U, Th, and rare earth element mineralization of the Bokan Mountain peralkaline granite complex, Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Stoeser, Douglas B.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    A prospectivity map for rare earth element (REE) mineralization at the Bokan Mountain peralkaline granite complex, Prince of Wales Island, southeastern Alaska, was calculated from high-resolution airborne gamma-ray data. The map displays areas with similar radioelement concentrations as those over the Dotson REE-vein-dike system, which is characterized by moderately high %K, eU, and eTh (%K, percent potassium; eU, equivalent parts per million uranium; and eTh, equivalent parts per million thorium). Gamma-ray concentrations of rocks that share a similar range as those over the Dotson zone are inferred to locate high concentrations of REE-bearing minerals. An approximately 1300-m-long prospective tract corresponds to shallowly exposed locations of the Dotson zone. Prospective areas of REE mineralization also occur in continuous swaths along the outer edge of the pluton, over known but undeveloped REE occurrences, and within discrete regions in the older Paleozoic country rocks. Detailed mineralogical examinations of samples from the Dotson zone provide a means to understand the possible causes of the airborne Th and U anomalies and their relation to REE minerals. Thorium is sited primarily in thorite. Uranium also occurs in thorite and in a complex suite of ±Ti±Nb±Y oxide minerals, which include fergusonite, polycrase, and aeschynite. These oxides, along with Y-silicates, are the chief heavy REE (HREE)-bearing minerals. Hence, the eU anomalies, in particular, may indicate other occurrences of similar HREE-enrichment. Uranium and Th chemistry along the Dotson zone showed elevated U and total REEs east of the Camp Creek fault, which suggested the potential for increased HREEs based on their association with U-oxide minerals. A uranium prospectivity map, based on signatures present over the Ross-Adams mine area, was characterized by extremely high radioelement values. Known uranium deposits were identified in the U-prospectivity map, but the largest tract occurs