WorldWideScience

Sample records for aeruginosa pyochelin-iron uptake

  1. Rhamnolipid stimulates uptake of hydrophobic compounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Noordman, WH; Janssen, DB

    2002-01-01

    The biodegradation of hexadecane by five biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG1, Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43066, R. erythropolis ATCC 19558, and strain BCG112) was determined in the presence and absence of exogenously added biosurfactants. The degradation of hexadecane by P. aeruginosa was stimulated only by the rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by the same organism. This rhamnolipid did not stimulate the biodegradation of ...

  2. Rhamnolipid Stimulates Uptake of Hydrophobic Compounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Noordman, Wouter H.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2002-01-01

    The biodegradation of hexadecane by five biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG1, Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43066, R. erythropolis ATCC 19558, and strain BCG112) was determined in the presence and absence of exogenously added biosurfactants. The degradation of hexadecane by P. aeruginosa was stimulated only by the rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by the same organism. This rhamnolipid did not stimulate the biodegradation of ...

  3. Computer simulation of uranyl uptake by the rough lipopolysaccharide membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Roberto D; Vorpagel, Erich R; Guglielmi, Matteo; Straatsma, T P

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal environmental contaminants cannot be destroyed but require containment, preferably in concentrated form, in a solid or immobile form for recycling or final disposal. Microorganisms are able to take up and deposit high levels of contaminant metals, including radioactive metals such as uranium and plutonium, into their cell wall. Consequently, these microbial systems are of great interest as the basis for potential environmental bioremediation technologies. The outer membranes of Gram-negative microbes are highly nonsymmetric and exhibit a significant electrostatic potential gradient across the membrane. This gradient has a significant effect on the uptake and transport of charged and dipolar compounds. However, the effectiveness of microbial systems for environmental remediation will depend strongly on specific properties that determine the uptake of targeted contaminants by a particular cell wall. To aid in the design of microbial remediation technologies, knowledge of the factors that determine the affinity of a particular bacterial outer membrane for the most common ionic species found in contaminated soils and groundwater is of great importance. Using our previously developed model for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, this work presents the potentials of mean force as the estimate of the free energy profile for uptake of sodium, calcium, chloride, uranyl ions, and a water molecule by the bacterial LPS membrane. A compatible classical parameter set for uranyl has been developed and validated. Results show that the uptake of uranyl is energetically a favorable process relative to the other ions studied. At neutral pH, this nuclide is shown to be retained on the surface of the LPS membrane through chelation with the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups located in the outer core. PMID:18067253

  4. Effect of Cl- on photosynthetic bicarbonate uptake in two cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and Synechocystis PCC6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen; CHENG HuiMin; CHEN XiongWen

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthetic inorganic carbon utilization was investigated in two cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and Synechocystis PCC6803 grown in standing culture. Photosynthetic rates for the two algae reached about 10 times the theoretical CO2 supply rate at low dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of 100 μmol/L, and the rates were unaffected by the addition of 20 mmol/L Na+, indicating that the two algae possessed Na+-independent HCO3- utilization for photosynthesis under low DIC. Their photo-synthetic rates at low DIC were inhibited by higher Cl-and the degrees of inhibition were increased with the rise of Cl- concentration, and in the presence of Diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC), a reported Cl-channel inhibitor, the rates decreased by 74%-82%, implying that putative DPC-sensitive Cl- channels participate In Na+-indepandent HCO3- uptake for photosynthesis. The experiment of intracellular 14C-DIC accumulation for photosynthesis showed that internal DIC pools decreased by about 80% with 200 pmol/L DPC and by 64%-70% with 100 mmol/L Cl-. The experiment of chlorophyll a fluorescence quenching showed that initial rates and extents of fluorescence quenching obviously decreased with 200 μmol/L DPC or 100 mmol/L Cl-. The two experiments gave further evidence that putative DPC-sen-sitive Cl- channels participate in Na+-independent HCO3- uptake for photosynthesis in the two algae grown in standing culture.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapts its iron uptake strategies in function of the type of infections

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelis, Pierre; Dingemans, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative γ-Proteobacterium which is known for its capacity to colonize various niches, including some invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, making it one of the most frequent bacteria causing opportunistic infections. P. aeruginosa is able to cause acute as well as chronic infections and it uses different colonization and virulence factors to do so. Infections range from septicemia, urinary infections, burn wound colonization, and chronic colonization of the lung...

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF PB2+ UPTAKE AND SEQUESTRATION IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA CHL004

    Science.gov (United States)

    In laboratory studies, the soil isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa CHL004 (Vesper et al 1996) has been found to concentrated Pb2+ in the cytoplasm by formation of particles that contain Pb2+ and phosphorus. Upon examination of the washed lyophilized cells grown in the presence of lea...

  7. Temperature and irradiance influences on cadmium and zinc uptake and toxicity in a freshwater cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → This study is the first to study the influences of temperature and light irradiance, two critical factors for the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms, on metal uptake, subcellular distribution, and toxicity in a freshwater cyanobacterium commonly blooming in eutrophic lakes. → With increasing metal exposure, both cellular growth rate and photosynthesis became more sensitive to metal toxicity under elevated irradiance and temperature, primarily as a result of increased uptake and accumulation. → Cd in the metal rich granule faction increased under Cd exposure, suggesting that MRG may partially detoxify Cd in the cyanobacterial cells. → This study implies that temperature and irradiance may influence the chemical cycling of metals during cyanobacterial blooming in eutrophic freshwater ecosystems. - Abstract: Temperature and light irradiance are important factors affecting the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms. In this study, we examined the influences of different temperatures (15, 24, and 30°C ) and irradiances (18, 32, and 55 μmol photons m-2 s-1) on the uptake and toxicity of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) in a freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. The subcellular distribution of Cd and Zn was analyzed. Enhanced growth rates were observed for the cyanobacterial cells incubated at higher temperature or irradiance conditions with lower metal concentrations. With increasing ambient Cd or Zn concentrations, both cellular growth rate and photosynthesis were significantly inhibited at elevated irradiance conditions. The observed increase in Cd and Zn toxicity might be attributed to the enhanced metal uptake and accumulation in Microcystis. Based on the intracellular Cd concentration, the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values were higher at the higher temperature or irradiance treatment. The subcellular distribution demonstrated that Cd in the metal rich granule (MRG) faction increased with elevated [Cd2+] concentration, suggesting

  8. Temperature and irradiance influences on cadmium and zinc uptake and toxicity in a freshwater cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Jin [State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, East Beijing Road 73, Nanjing 210008 (China); Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} This study is the first to study the influences of temperature and light irradiance, two critical factors for the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms, on metal uptake, subcellular distribution, and toxicity in a freshwater cyanobacterium commonly blooming in eutrophic lakes. {yields} With increasing metal exposure, both cellular growth rate and photosynthesis became more sensitive to metal toxicity under elevated irradiance and temperature, primarily as a result of increased uptake and accumulation. {yields} Cd in the metal rich granule faction increased under Cd exposure, suggesting that MRG may partially detoxify Cd in the cyanobacterial cells. {yields} This study implies that temperature and irradiance may influence the chemical cycling of metals during cyanobacterial blooming in eutrophic freshwater ecosystems. - Abstract: Temperature and light irradiance are important factors affecting the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms. In this study, we examined the influences of different temperatures (15, 24, and 30{sup Degree-Sign }C ) and irradiances (18, 32, and 55 {mu}mol photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) on the uptake and toxicity of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) in a freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. The subcellular distribution of Cd and Zn was analyzed. Enhanced growth rates were observed for the cyanobacterial cells incubated at higher temperature or irradiance conditions with lower metal concentrations. With increasing ambient Cd or Zn concentrations, both cellular growth rate and photosynthesis were significantly inhibited at elevated irradiance conditions. The observed increase in Cd and Zn toxicity might be attributed to the enhanced metal uptake and accumulation in Microcystis. Based on the intracellular Cd concentration, the 50% inhibition concentration (IC{sub 50}) values were higher at the higher temperature or irradiance treatment. The subcellular distribution demonstrated that Cd in the metal rich granule (MRG) faction

  9. Structural studies of bacterioferritin B from Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggest a gating mechanism for iron uptake via the ferroxidase center .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeratunga, Saroja K; Lovell, Scott; Yao, Huili; Battaile, Kevin P; Fischer, Christopher J; Gee, Casey E; Rivera, Mario

    2010-02-16

    The structure of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin B (Pa BfrB) has been determined from crystals grown from protein devoid of core mineral iron (as-isolated) and from protein mineralized with approximately 600 iron atoms (mineralized). Structures were also obtained from crystals grown from mineralized BfrB after they had been soaked in an FeSO(4) solution (Fe soak) and in separate experiments after they had been soaked in an FeSO(4) solution followed by a soak in a crystallization solution (double soak). Although the structures consist of a typical bacterioferritin fold comprised of a nearly spherical 24-mer assembly that binds 12 heme molecules, comparison of microenvironments observed in the distinct structures provided interesting insights. The ferroxidase center in the as-isolated, mineralized, and double-soak structures is empty. The ferroxidase ligands (except His130) are poised to bind iron with minimal conformational changes. The His130 side chain, on the other hand, must rotate toward the ferroxidase center to coordinate iron. In comparison, the structure obtained from crystals soaked in an FeSO(4) solution displays a fully occupied ferroxidase center and iron bound to the internal, Fe((in)), and external, Fe((out)), surfaces of Pa BfrB. The conformation of His130 in this structure is rotated toward the ferroxidase center and coordinates an iron ion. The structures also revealed a pore on the surface of Pa BfrB that likely serves as a port of entry for Fe(2+) to the ferroxidase center. On its opposite end, the pore is capped by the side chain of His130 when it adopts its "gate-closed" conformation that enables coordination to a ferroxidase iron. A change to its "gate-open", noncoordinative conformation creates a path for the translocation of iron from the ferroxidase center to the interior cavity. These structural observations, together with findings obtained from iron incorporation measurements in solution, suggest that the ferroxidase

  10. Structural Studies of Bacterioferritin B from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Suggest a Gating Mechanism for Iron Uptake via the Ferroxidase Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeratunga, Saroja K.; Lovell, Scott; Yao, Huili; Battaile, Kevin P.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Gee, Casey E.; Rivera, Mario (Kansas); (HWMRI)

    2010-03-16

    The structure of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin B (Pa BfrB) has been determined from crystals grown from protein devoid of core mineral iron (as-isolated) and from protein mineralized with {approx}600 iron atoms (mineralized). Structures were also obtained from crystals grown from mineralized BfrB after they had been soaked in an FeSO{sub 4} solution (Fe soak) and in separate experiments after they had been soaked in an FeSO{sub 4} solution followed by a soak in a crystallization solution (double soak). Although the structures consist of a typical bacterioferritin fold comprised of a nearly spherical 24-mer assembly that binds 12 heme molecules, comparison of microenvironments observed in the distinct structures provided interesting insights. The ferroxidase center in the as-isolated, mineralized, and double-soak structures is empty. The ferroxidase ligands (except His130) are poised to bind iron with minimal conformational changes. The His130 side chain, on the other hand, must rotate toward the ferroxidase center to coordinate iron. In comparison, the structure obtained from crystals soaked in an FeSO{sub 4} solution displays a fully occupied ferroxidase center and iron bound to the internal, Fe{sub (in)}, and external, Fe{sub (out)}, surfaces of Pa BfrB. The conformation of His130 in this structure is rotated toward the ferroxidase center and coordinates an iron ion. The structures also revealed a pore on the surface of Pa BfrB that likely serves as a port of entry for Fe{sup 2+} to the ferroxidase center. On its opposite end, the pore is capped by the side chain of His130 when it adopts its 'gate-closed' conformation that enables coordination to a ferroxidase iron. A change to its 'gate-open', noncoordinative conformation creates a path for the translocation of iron from the ferroxidase center to the interior cavity. These structural observations, together with findings obtained from iron incorporation measurements in

  11. The P. aeruginosa Heme Binding Protein PhuS is a Heme Oxygenase Titratable Regulator of Heme Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    O’Neill, Maura J.; Wilks, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme utilization (Phu) system encodes several proteins involved in the acquisition of heme as an iron source. Once internalized heme is degraded by the iron-regulated heme oxygenase, HemO to biliverdin (BV) IXδ and β. In vitro studies have shown holo-PhuS transfers heme to the iron-regulated HemO. This protein-protein interaction is specific for HemO as PhuS does not interact with the α-regioselective heme oxygenase, BphO. Bacterial genetics and isotopic labeling...

  12. Antimicrobial evaluation of new metallic complexes with xylitol active against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans: MIC determination, post-agent effect and Zn-uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, E; Facchin, G; Faccio, R; Barroso, R P; Costa-Filho, A J; Borthagaray, G; Torre, M H

    2016-02-01

    Xylitol (xylH5) is metabolized via the pentose pathway in humans, but it is unsuitable as an energy source for many microorganisms where it produces a xylitol-induced growth inhibition and disturbance in protein synthesis. For this reason, xylitol is used in the prophylaxis of several infections. In the search of better antimicrobial agents, new copper and zinc complexes with xylitol were synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectrosco pic methods: Na2[Cu3(xylH−4)2]·NaCl·4.5H2O (Cu-xyl) and [Zn4(xylH−4)2(H2O)2]·NaCl·3H2O (Zn-xyl). Both copper and zinc complexes presented higher MIC against Pseudomona aeruginosa than the free xylitol while two different behaviors were found against Candida albicans depending on the complex. The growth curves showed that Cu-xyl presented lower activity than the free ligand during all the studied period. In the case of Znxyl the growth curves showed that the inhibition of the microorganism growth in the first stage was equivalent to that of xylitol but in the second stage (after 18 h) Zn-xyl inhibited more. Besides, the PAE (post agent effect)obtained for Zn-xyl and xyl showed that the recovery from the damage of microbial cells had a delay of 14 and 13 h respectively. This behavior could be useful in prophylaxis treatments for infectious diseases where it is important that the antimicrobial effect lasts longer. With the aim to understand the microbiological activities the analysis of the particle size, lipophilicity and Zn uptake was performed. PMID:26619097

  13. Structural Studies of Bacterioferritin B (BfrB) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Suggest a Gating Mechanism for Iron Uptake via the Ferroxidase Center¥

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeratunga, Saroja K.; Lovell, Scott; Yao, Huili; Battaile, Kevin P.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Gee, Casey E.; Rivera, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The structure of recombinant P. aeruginosa bacterioferritin B (Pa BfrB) has been solved from crystals grown from protein devoid of core mineral iron (as-isolated) and from protein mineralized with ~ 600 iron atoms (mineralized). Structures were also obtained from crystals grown from mineralized BfrB after soaking them in FeSO4 solution (Fe soak) and in separate experiments after soaking them in FeSO4 solution followed by soaking in crystallization solution (double soak). Although the structures consist of a typical bacterioferritin fold comprised of a nearly spherical 24-mer assembly that binds 12 heme molecules, comparison of microenvironments observed in the distinct structures provided interesting insights: The ferroxidase center in the as-isolated, mineralized and double soak structures is empty. The ferroxidase ligands (except His130) are poised to bind iron with minimal conformational changes. The His130 side chain, on the other hand, must rotate toward the ferroxidase center to coordinate iron. In comparison, the structure obtained from crystals soaked in an FeSO4 solution display a fully occupied ferroxidase center and iron bound to the internal, Fe(in), and external, Fe(out), surfaces of Pa BfrB. The conformation of His130 in this structure is rotated toward the ferroxidase center and coordinates an iron ion. The structures also revealed a pore on the surface of Pa BfrB that likely serves as an entry port for Fe2+ to the ferroxidase center. On its opposite end the pore is capped by the side chain of His130 when it adopts its “gate closed” conformation that enables coordination to a ferroxidase iron. A change to its “gate-open”, non-coordinative conformation, creates a path for the translocation of iron from the ferroxidase center to the interior cavity. These structural observations, together with findings obtained from iron incorporation measurements in solution suggest that the ferroxidase pore is the dominant entry route for the uptake of iron

  14. Inability of Pseudomonas stutzeri denitrification mutants with the phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to grow in nitrous oxide.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 reduced nitrous oxide to dinitrogen but did not grow anaerobically in nitrous oxide. Two transposon insertion Nos- mutants of Pseudomonas stutzeri exhibited the P. aeruginosa phenotype. Growth yield studies demonstrated that nitrous oxide produced in vivo was productively respired, but nitrous oxide supplied exogenously was not. The defect may be in electron transport or in nitrous oxide uptake.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  16. Quinolone accumulation in Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    McCaffrey, C; Bertasso, A; Pace, J.; Georgopapadakou, N H

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of quinolones by Escherichia coli JF568, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 was measured by a modified fluorometric assay (J. S. Chapman and N. H. Georgopapadakou, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 33:27-29, 1989). The quinolones examined were fleroxacin, pefloxacin, norfloxacin, difloxacin, A56620, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and Ro 09-1168. In all three organisms, uptake was complete in less than 5 min and was proportional to extracellular quinolone...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display a...... remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because the...... use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) Share Compartir Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings On this Page What ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  19. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505.

    OpenAIRE

    Cervantes, C.; Ohtake, H; Chu, L.; Misra, T K; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    The chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 was cloned into broad-host-range vector pSUP104. The hybrid plasmid containing an 11.1-kilobase insert conferred chromate resistance and reduced uptake of chromate in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Resistance to chromate was not expressed in Escherichia coli. Contiguous 1.6- and 6.3-kilobase HindIII fragments from this plasmid hybridized to pUM505 but not to P. aeruginosa chromosomal DNA and only weakly to chromate resistance p...

  20. Effect of fluid motion on colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin LI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis aeruginosa, generally occurring in large colonies under natural conditions, mainly exists as single cells in laboratory cultures. The mechanisms involved in colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa and their roles in algal blooms remain unknown. In this study, based on previous research findings that fluid motion may stimulate the colony formation in green algae, culture experiments were conducted under axenic conditions in a circular water chamber where the flow rate, temperature, light, and nutrients were controlled. The number of cells of Microcystis aeruginosa, the number of cells per colony, and the colonial characteristics in various growth phases were observed and measured. The results indicated that the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa, which was not observed under stagnant conditions, was evident when there was fluid motion, with the number of cells per largest colony reaching 120 and the proportion of the number of cells in colonial form to the total number of cells and the mean number of cells per colony reaching their peak values at a flow rate of 35 cm/s. Based on the analysis of colony formation process, fluid motion stimulates the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa in the lag growth phase, while flushes and disaggregates the colonies in the exponential growth phase. The stimulation effect in the lag growth phase may be attributable to the involvement of fluid motion in a series of physiological processes, including the uptake of trace elements and the synthesis and secretion of polysaccharides. In addition, the experimental groups exhibiting typical colonial characteristics in the lag growth phase were found to have higher cell biomass in the later phase.

  1. Microbial uptake of uranium, cesium, and radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of diverse microbial species to concentrate uranium, cesium, and radium was examined. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium to 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight. Only a fraction of the cells in a given population had visible uranium deposits in electron micrographs. While metabolism was not required for uranium uptake, mechanistic differences in the metal uptake process were indicated. Uranium accumulated slowly (hours) on the surface of S. cerevisiae and was subject to environmental factors (i.e., temperature, pH, interfering cations and anions). In contrast, P. aeruginosa and the mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense, apparently random, intracellular deposits. This very rapid accumulation has prevented us from determining whether the uptake rate during the transient between the initial and equilibrium distribution of uranium is affected by environmental conditions. However, the final equilibrium distributions are not affected by those conditions which affect uptake by S. cerevisiae. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several microbial species tested. The potential utility of microorganisms for the removal and concentration of these metals from nuclear processing wastes and several bioreactor designs for contacting microorganisms with contaminated waste streams will be discussed

  2. Bioadsorption characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kőnig-Péter Anikó

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of Cd(II and Pb(II ions from aqueous solution using lyophilized Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAOI cells were observed under various experimental conditions. The effect of pH, initial metal concentration, equilibration time and temperature on bioadsorption was investigated. The optimum pH value for Pb(II adsorption was found to be 5.0, and for Cd(II 5.0 − 6.0. The Pb(II and Cd(II bioadsorption equilibrium were analyzed by using Freundlich and Langmuir model using nonlinear least-squares estimation. The experimental maximum uptake capacity of Pb(II and Cd(II was estimated to be 164 mg g-1 and 113 mg g-1, respectively. For biosorption kinetic study the pseudo second-order kinetic model was applied at various temperatures. The temperature had no significant effect on Pb(II bioadsorption. In case of Cd(II bioadsorption the adsorbed amount decreased with increasing temperature.

  3. The effects of temperature on oxygen uptake and nutrient flux in sediment inhabited by molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Benthic invertebrates play important roles in oxygen uptake and nutrient cycling in the benthic boundary layer. Temperature is an important factor that influences both invertebrate activity and the effects of the bioturbation on biogeochemistry. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of temperature on the sediment oxygen uptake and nutrient flux across the sediment-water interface in sediment inhabited by molluscs, animals that often dominate the benthic community. A microcosm was constructed using sediment, lake water, and molluscs from Lake Taihu, China. The clam Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae and the snail Bellamya aeruginosa (Gastropoda: Viviparidae were selected for the experiment because they dominate the benthic community in the lake. The effect of C. fluminea and B. aeruginosa on sediment oxygen uptake and nutrient flux was simultaneously examined at both 15 and 25℃. The results indicated that C. fluminea significantly increased the sediment oxygen uptake and release of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP and ammonium from the sediment to the overlying water at both temperatures, and the net sediment oxygen uptake, and the net SRP and ammonium fluxes caused by the clams were significantly higher at 25℃ than at 15℃. Moreover, B. aeruginosa significantly increased the sediment oxygen uptake at the two experimental temperatures, however the net sediment oxygen uptake induced by the snail did not differ significantly between 15 and 25℃. The SRP released from the sediment was stimulated significantly by B. aeruginosa at 25℃, and B. aeruginosa also produced significantly more net SRP release at 25℃ than that at 15℃. In contrast, the influence of B. aeruginosa on the net ammonium flux at each temperature was not statistically significant.

  4. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.;

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa, but that the...... silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...... planktonic bacteria. These observations strongly indicate that the concentration of silver in currently available wound dressings is much too low for treatment of chronic biofilm wounds. It is suggested that clinicians and manufacturers of the said wound dressings consider whether they are treating wounds...

  5. Phosphate taxis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, J.; Ito, A.; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be attracted to phosphate. The chemotactic response was induced by phosphate starvation. The specificity of chemoreceptors for phosphate was high so that no other tested phosphorus compounds elicited a chemotactic response as strong as that elicited by phosphate. Competition experiments showed that the chemoreceptors for phosphate appeared to be different from those for the common amino acids. Mutants constitutive for alkaline phosphatase showed the chemota...

  6. Microbial cells as biosorbents for heavy metals: accumulation of Uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium accumulated extracellularly on the surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The rate and extent of accumulation were subject to environmental parameters, such as pH, temperature, and interference by certain anions and cations. Uranium accumulation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred intracellularly and was extremely rapid (<10 s), and no response to environmental parameters could be detected. Metabolism was not required for metal uptake by either organism. Cell-bound uranium reached a concentration of 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight, but only 32% of the S. cerevisiae cells and 44% of the P. aeruginosa cells within a given population possessed visible uranium deposits when examined by electron microscopy. Rates of uranium uptake by S. cerevisiae were increased by chemical pretreatment of the cells. Uranium could be removed chemically from S. cerevisiae cells, and the cells could then be reused as a biosorbent

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ... the Thyroid Scan and Uptake? What is a Thyroid Scan and Uptake? A thyroid scan is a ...

  8. Biosynthesis of pyocyanin pigment by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. El-Fouly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty-three isolates belonging to the genus Pseudomonas were isolated from different environmental sources including; soil, water and clinical specimens. Twenty out of them were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and individually screened for pyocyanin production. P. aeruginosa R1; isolated from rice-cultivated soil and P. aeruginosa U3 selected from clinical specimen (Urinary tract infection were the highest pyocyanin producers; pyocyanin production reached 9.3 and 5.9 μg/ml, respectively on synthetic glucose supplemented nutrient medium (GSNB. The identification of both selected strains (P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 was confirmed by 16S rRNA, the similarity with other strains available in database was 97% (with P. aeruginosa FPVC 14 and 94% (with P. aeruginosa 13.A, respectively. P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 are accessed at gene bank with accession numbers KM924432 and KM603511, in the same order. Pyocyanin was extracted by standard methods, purified by column chromatography and characterized by UV-Vis absorption, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The antimicrobial activity of purified pyocyanin against multi-drug resistant microbes was investigated; the efficiency of pyocyanin was more obvious in Gram +ve bacteria than Gram−ve bacteria and yeast. To reduce the cost of pyocyanin production, a new conventional medium based on cotton seed meal supplemented with peptone was designed. The pyocyanin production of both selected strains P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 using the new medium is increased by 30.1% and 17.2%, respectively in comparison with synthetic GSNB medium, while the cost of production process is reduced by 56.7%.

  9. Innate immune responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    OpenAIRE

    Lavoie, Elise G.; Wangdi, Tamding; Kazmierczak, Barbara I.

    2011-01-01

    Innate immune responses play a critical role in controlling acute infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both mice and in humans. In this review we focus on innate immune recognition and clearance mechanisms that are important for controlling P. aeruginosa in the mammalian lung, with particular attention to those that influence the outcome of in vivo infection in murine models.

  10. Uptake of plutonium by immobilized bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of plastic-immobilized bacteria as a system for the concentration of plutonium from aqueous media is investigated. Previous research is reviewed quantifying free cell bacterial concentration of plutonium from solution or suspension. Our research indicates that the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be induced to attach firmly to a polymer substrate, while retaining its ability to concentrate plutonium. Melt-blown, filamentous polypropylene is shown to foster cell embedment and uptake capabilities surpassing various other substrates. Oxygen plasma treatment, used to enhance polypropylene wettability, is found to increase the rate of cell embedment significantly. Both embedment and uptake phenomena are found to be dependent upon cell viability. Potential applications for the cell/polymer system are discussed

  11. Early events of lethal action by tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immediate activities of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, tobramycin, were investigated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The influence of carbon growth substate and the antibiotic exposure environment in the magnitude of activity were examined. Lethality by 8 μg/ml tobramycin occurred rapidly (1 to 3 minutes). The release of specific cellular components into the supernatant was associated with lethality. This material was initially detected as an increase in UV-absorbance. Magnesium in the reaction mixture provided protection against lethality and leakage, but did not reverse lethal damage after a 3 minute tobramycin treatment. Also, uptake of 3H-tobramycin was reduced in the presence of magnesium. Cells grown with glucose as a carbon source were more susceptible than organic acid grown cells as was the rapidity and amount of cell damage. Analyses of the leakage material revealed a 2-fold increase of protein in the supernatant after a 1-3 minute treatment which paralleled lethality. A prominent 29 kDa protein was observed by SDS-PAGE in the released material, which has been identified as the periplasmic enzyme, β-lactamase. The immediate activities of tobramycin did not involve (i) release of overall cell protein, (ii) massive loss of total pool amino acids, (iii) cell lysis, (iv) inhibition of proline uptake, (v) release of lipopolysaccharide, or (vi) leakage of ATP. Electron microscopy showed no apparent damage after a 3 minute exposure. 40% inhibition of protein synthesis had occurred by 3 minutes of exposure, while release of UV-absorbing material and lethality were detectable after only 1 minute. Resistant cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa did not leak under the same experimental conditions, but one of two susceptible strains examined did show increased UV-absorbance following treatment

  12. Versatile cloning vector for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, D O; Hollinger, M F; Tindol, M B

    1981-01-01

    A pBR322:RSF1010 composite plasmid, constructed in vitro, was used as a cloning vector in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This nonamplifiable plasmid, pMW79, has a molecular weight of 8.4 X 10(6) and exists as a multicopy plasmid in both P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. In P. aeruginosa strain PAO2003, pMW79 conferred resistance to carbenicillin and tetracycline. Characterization of pMW79 with restriction enzymes revealed that four enzymes (BamHI, SalI, HindIII, and HpaI) cleaved the plasmid at un...

  13. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib;

    suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and E. nidulans. HPLC and LC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa in the contact area of Aspergillus. Different quinolones were also identified......, here among 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS). An unidentified green pseudomonas compound was also observed. Interestingly the P. aeruginosa mutant rpoN was unable to suppress A. fumigatus, but suppressed A. flavus, A. oryzae and A. niger. However several other P. aeruginosa mutants suppressed A...

  14. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  15. Biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, many researchers have written numerous articles about microbial biofilms. Biofilm is a complex community of microorganisms and an example of bacterial group behavior. Biofilm is usually considered a sessile mode of life derived from the attached growth of microbes to surfaces, and most biofilms are embedded in self-produced extracellular matrix composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), such as polysaccharides, extracellular DNAs (eDNA), and proteins. Dispersal, a mode of biofilm detachment indicates active mechanisms that cause individual cells to separate from the biofilm and return to planktonic life. Since biofilm cells are cemented and surrounded by EPSs, dispersal is not simple to do and many researchers are now paying more attention to this active detachment process. Unlike other modes of biofilm detachment such as erosion or sloughing, which are generally considered passive processes, dispersal occurs as a result of complex spatial differentiation and molecular events in biofilm cells in response to various environmental cues, and there are many biological reasons that force bacterial cells to disperse from the biofilms. In this review, we mainly focus on the spatial differentiation of biofilm that is a prerequisite for dispersal, as well as environmental cues and molecular events related to the biofilm dispersal. More specifically, we discuss the dispersal-related phenomena and mechanisms observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic human pathogen and representative model organism for biofilm study. PMID:26832663

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  17. Clonal complex Pseudomonas aeruginosa in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Timothy J; Gibson, Justine S; Moss, Susan; Greer, Ristan M; Cobbold, Rowland N; Wright, John D; Ramsay, Kay A; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with infectious endometritis in horses. Although infectious endometritis is often considered a venereal infection, there is relatively limited genotypic-based evidence to support this mode of transmission. The study sought to determine the relatedness between genital P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a limited geographical region using molecular strain typing. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR typing was performed on 93 isolates collected between 2005 and 2009 from 2058 thoroughbred horses (including 18 stallions) at 66 studs. While P. aeruginosa was not detected in the stallions, 53/93 (57%) mares harbouring P. aeruginosa had clonally related strains, which included a single dominant genotype detected in 42 (45%) mares from 13 different studs. These novel findings suggest that most equine genital P. aeruginosa infections in this region may have been acquired from mechanisms other than direct horse to horse transmission. Instead, other potential acquisition pathways, as well as strain specific adaptation to the equine genital tract, should be investigated. PMID:21183294

  18. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  19. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.;

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com......During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic...

  20. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P;

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  1. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib;

    Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen, commonly infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Aspergilli, especially Aspergillus fumigatus, are also frequently isolated from CF patients. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different...... the contact area of A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, but not A. fumigatus. In addition, other metabolites with UV chromophores similar to the phenazines were only found in the contact zone between Aspergillus and Pseudomonas. No change in secondary metabolite profiles were seen for the Aspergilli, when...... comparing with or without the presence of Pseudomonas. Conclusion: All Aspergilli tested, with the exception of A. fumigatus, triggered the upregulation of phenazine-1-carboxamide and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production by P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly no changes in secondary metabolite profiles were...

  2. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory tract epithelium is a critical environmental interface that regulates inflammation. In chronic infectious airway diseases, pathogens may permanently colonize normally sterile luminal environments. Host-pathogen interactions determine the intensity of inflammation and thus, rates of tissue injury. Although many cells become refractory to stimulation by pathogen products, it is unknown whether the airway epithelium becomes either tolerant or hypersensitive in the setting of chronic infection. Our goals were to characterize the response of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to understand whether repeated exposure induced tolerance and, if so, to explore the mechanism(s. Methods The apical surface of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cell cultures was repetitively challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates or the bacterial media control. Toxicity, cytokine production, signal transduction events and specific effects of dominant negative forms of signaling molecules were examined. Additional experiments included using IL-1β and TNFα as challenge agents, and performing comparative studies with a novel airway epithelial cell line. Results An initial challenge of the apical surface of polarized human airway epithelial cells with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates induced phosphorylation of IRAK1, JNK, p38, and ERK, caused degradation of IκBα, generation of NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factor activity, and resulted in IL-8 secretion, consistent with activation of the Toll-like receptor signal transduction pathway. These responses were strongly attenuated following a second Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or IL-1β, but not TNFα, challenge. Tolerance was associated with decreased IRAK1 protein content and kinase activity and dominant negative IRAK1 inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa -stimulated NF-κB transcriptional

  3. Biogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili and regulation of their function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Tiffany L; Buensuceso, Ryan N C; Howell, P Lynne; Burrows, Lori L

    2015-11-01

    Type IV pili (T4P) are bacterial virulence factors involved in a wide variety of functions including deoxyribonucleic acid uptake, surface attachment, biofilm formation and twitching motility. While T4P are common surface appendages, the systems that assemble them and the regulation of their function differ between species. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Neisseria spp. and Myxococcus xanthus are common model systems used to study T4P biology. This review focuses on recent advances in P. aeruginosa T4P structural biology, and the regulatory pathways controlling T4P biogenesis and function. PMID:25808785

  4. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionactive iodine uptakes for 131 iodine were carried out in two groups assumed to be normal. In one group, comprising 61 cases, early uptakes were done (6 hours); In the other, with 122 cases, late uptakes were proceded (24 hours). The results were compared with the international ones, published up to 1969. (M.A.C.)

  5. BIOSORPTION OF TEXTILE DYE USING IMMOBILIZED BACTERIAL (PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND FUNGAL (PHANEROCHATE CHRYSOSPORIUM CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Saravanan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater containing dyes presents a serious problem due to its high toxicity which leads to creating enormous environmental pollution and ecological hazards. Therefore the removal of the high stable dyes from the textile effluents is of major importance. The purpose of this study is to remove the reactive dye Procion Blue 2G from textile dye solution by biosorption process using immobilized cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Phanerochate chrysosporium. It was found that maximum dye uptake is 1.648 mg g-1 of bead for P. aeruginosa and it is 1.242 mg g-1 of bead for P. chrysosporium. Both the results are derived from higher initial dye concentration (100 mg L-1 and high cell concentration (in terms of volume of inoculum 20 mL and at low mass of biosorbent (5 g of bead. Comparatively better results are produced by the beads having the cells of P. aeruginosa than P. chrysosporium. Further, due to the cell immobilization, both the cell beads can be utilized repeatedly in continuous reactors by selecting suitable eluent in industrial scale with the advantage of avoiding wash out of cells.

  6. Spaceflight Effects on Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, S.; Goins, T.; Crandell, C.; Richards, C.; Patel, M.; Pyle, B.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen found in the environment. It is known to infect the immunocompromised. The organism has about 25 virulence genes that play different roles in disease processes. Several exotoxin proteins may be produced, including ExoA, ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, and other virulence factors. In spaceflight, possible increased expression of P. aeruginosa virulence proteins could increase health risks for spaceflight crews who experience decreased immunity. Cultures of P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA103 grown on orbit on Shuttle Endeavour flight STS-123 vs. static ground controls were used for analysis. The production of ETA was quantitated using an ELISA procedure. Results showed that while flight cultures of PA103 produced slightly more ETA than corresponding ground controls, the opposite was found for PA01. While it appears that spaceflight has little effect on ETA, stimulation of other virulence factors could cause increased virulence of this organism in space flight. Similar increased virulence in spaceflight has been observed for other bacteria. This is important because astronauts may be more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and...

  8. Standardized chemical synthesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Cheluvappa

    2014-01-01

    As we have extracted pyocyanin both from P. aeruginosa cultures, and via chemical synthesis; we know the procedural and product-quality differences. We endorse the relative ease, safety, and convenience of using the chemical synthesis described here. Crucially, our “naturally endotoxin-free” pyocyanin can be extracted easily without using infectious bacteria.

  9. [Macrolides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, M; Amiour, M; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Paris, C

    2006-10-01

    Long-term low dose azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is safe and reduces the decline in lung function, the number of acute exacerbations and improves nutritional status; underlying efficacy mechanisms are multiple and synergistic. PMID:17370396

  10. Chromate Efflux by Means of the ChrA Chromate Resistance Protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Angel H.; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Cervantes, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    Everted membrane vesicles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 harboring plasmid pCRO616, expressing the ChrA chromate resistance protein, accumulated four times more 51CrO42− than vesicles from plasmidless cells, indicating that a chromate efflux system functions in the resistant strain. Chromate uptake showed saturation kinetics with an apparent Km of 0.12 mM chromate and a Vmax of 0.5 nmol of chromate/min per mg of protein. Uptake of chromate by vesicles was dependent on NADH oxidation and was abolished by energy inhibitors and by the chromate analog sulfate. The mechanism of resistance to chromate determined by ChrA appears to be based on the active efflux of chromate driven by the membrane potential. PMID:10572148

  11. N-acetylcysteine inhibit biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Youning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in chronic respiratory tract infections. It typically makes a biofilm, which makes treatment of these infections difficult. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC on biofilms produced by P. aeruginosa. Results We found that minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of NAC for most isolates of P. aeruginosa were 10 to 40 mg/ml, the combination of NAC and ciprofloxacin (CIP demonstrated either synergy (50% or no interaction (50% against the P. aeruginosa strains. NAC at 0.5 mg/ml could detach mature P. aeruginosa biofilms. Disruption was proportional to NAC concentrations, and biofilms were completely disrupted at 10 mg/ml NAC. Analysis using COMSTAT software also showed that PAO1 biofilm biomass decreased and its heterogeneity increased as NAC concentration increased. NAC and ciprofloxacin showed significant killing of P. aeruginosa in biofilms at 2.5 mg/ml and > 2 MIC, respectively (p p P. aeruginosa also decreased by 27.64% and 44.59% at NAC concentrations of 0.5 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml. Conclusions NAC has anti-bacterial properties against P. aeruginosa and may detach P. aeruginosa biofilms. Use of NAC may be a new strategy for the treatment of biofilm-associated chronic respiratory infections due to P. aeruginosa, although it would be appropriate to conduct clinical studies to confirm this.

  12. Thyroid uptake test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of radioiodine by the thyroid gland is altered by the iodine content of diet or drugs. American diet has a high iodine content because each slice of the white bread contains nearly 150μg of iodine due to the bleaching process employed in the production of the bread. This carrier content of iodine reduces the uptake so much, that the normal American uptakes are usually three to four times lower than the uptakes in the developing countries. The other drawback of the thyroid uptake test is that it is affected by the iodine containing drugs. Anti-diarrhoea medications are quire common in the developing countries and many of them contain iodine moiety. Without a reliable drug history, a low thyroid uptake value may lead to a misleading conclusion

  13. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming of...... P. aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.25%. Oral administration of ginseng extracts in mice promoted phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by airway phagocytes, but did not affect phagocytosis of a PAO1-filM mutant. Our study suggests that ginseng treatment may help to eradicate the biofilm...

  14. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.;

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Badami Nagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  16. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich were awarded the Nobel price in 1908. Since then, numerous studies have unraveled a multitude of mechanistically different immune responses to intruding microorganisms. However, in the vast majority of these studies, the underlying infectious agents have appeared....... Although the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  17. Proteolytic inactivation of cytokines by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Parmely, M; Gale, A; Clabaugh, M.; Horvat, R; Zhou, W W

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease and elastase are thought to contribute to bacterial invasiveness, tissue damage, and immune suppression in animals and patients infected with the bacterium. This study examined the ability of the two proteases to inactivate a number of cytokines that mediate immune and inflammatory responses. Human recombinant gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) and human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha were inactivated by both proteases. Murine rIFN-gamma was relati...

  18. Iron and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, Ehud; Vasil, Michael L.; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2005-01-01

    Iron serves as a signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development. We examined the influence of mutations in known and putative iron acquisition-signaling genes on biofilm morphology. In iron-sufficient medium, mutants that cannot obtain iron through the high-affinity pyoverdine iron acquisition system form thin biofilms similar to those formed by the parent under low iron conditions. If an iron source for a different iron acquisition system is provided to a pyoverdine mutant, normal biof...

  19. Interaction between biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin.

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuda, H; Ajiki, Y; Koga, T.; Kawada, H; Yokota, T.

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between bacterial biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin, a macrolide having no anti-P. aeruginosa activity, were investigated. P. aeruginosa incubated for 10 days on membrane filters formed biofilms on the surfaces of the filters. The biofilms were characterized by dense colonizations of bacteria and thick membranous structures that covered the colonies. Treatment of the biofilms with a relatively low concentration of clarithromycin for 5 days resulted in a...

  20. Interleukin-23-Mediated Inflammation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pulmonary Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Dubin, Patricia J.; Martz, Ashley; Eisenstatt, Jessica R.; Fox, Michael D.; Logar, Alison; Kolls, Jay K.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is capable of causing acute and chronic pulmonary infection in the immunocompromised host. In the case of cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic P. aeruginosa infection causes increased mortality by promoting overly exuberant airway inflammation and cumulative lung damage. Identifying the key regulators of this inflammation may lead to the development of new therapies that improve P. aeruginosa-related mortality. We report here that interleukin-...

  1. Fecal isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Agnarsson, U; Glass, S; Govan, J R

    1989-01-01

    Fecal isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was observed in 8 of 10 patients with cystic fibrosis who at the time of sampling also exhibited colonization of the respiratory tract. In contrast, P. aeruginosa cells were isolated at low frequency (9.1%) from the stools of 44 patients with cystic fibrosis with no previous history of chronic colonization. The results of this study suggest that the gastrointestinal tract is not a significant chronic reservoir of P. aeruginosa prior to pulmonary colon...

  2. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  3. Uptake As Language Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the sincerity and validity of uptake as a measure of language learning by comparing the words students report they have learned after completing a listening task with the words they score correctly on a translation test. Results indicate that whereas uptake may have construct validity, its concurrent validity is uncertain. (16…

  4. Switching between apparently redundant iron-uptake mechanisms benefits bacteria in changeable environments

    OpenAIRE

    Dumas, Z; Ross-Gillespie, A; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria often possess multiple siderophore-based iron uptake systems for scavenging this vital resource from their environment. However, some siderophores seem redundant, because they have limited iron-binding efficiency and are seldom expressed under iron limitation. Here, we investigate the conundrum of why selection does not eliminate this apparent redundancy. We focus on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that can produce two siderophores— the highly efficient but metabolically expensiv...

  5. BIOSORPTION OF TEXTILE DYE USING IMMOBILIZED BACTERIAL (PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA) AND FUNGAL (PHANEROCHATE CHRYSOSPORIUM) CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan Saravanan; Tiruvenkadam Kannadasan; Chiya Ahmed Basha; Veerasamy Manivasagan

    2013-01-01

    Wastewater containing dyes presents a serious problem due to its high toxicity which leads to creating enormous environmental pollution and ecological hazards. Therefore the removal of the high stable dyes from the textile effluents is of major importance. The purpose of this study is to remove the reactive dye Procion Blue 2G from textile dye solution by biosorption process using immobilized cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Phanerochate chrysosporium. It was found that maximum dye uptake ...

  6. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in normal and athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Espersen, F; Pedersen, S S;

    1993-01-01

    We have compared a chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in alginate beads in normal and athymic rats with an acute infection with free live P. aeruginosa bacteria. The following parameters were observed and described: mortality, macroscopic and microscopic pathologic changes...

  7. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  8. Outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia in a haematology department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack; Christensen, Nikolas; Sørensen, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. In Denmark, an increase in P. aeruginosa isolates from blood cultures from a haematology department prompted a hygienic audit in 2007. METHODS: Blood cultures that...

  9. Occurrence of pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection. Results: Out of the 60 bacterial isolates found in post-operative wound infection, 20 (33.3%) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Staphylococcus aureus 13(21.7%), Klebsiella species 10(16.7%), Escherichia coli 7(11.7%), Atypical coliform 4(6.7%), Proteus species 4(6.7%), Streptococcus pyogenes 1(1.7%) and Enterococcus faecalis 1(1.7%) in the order. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was higher in female than male, ratio 3:2 and was found more among young and elderly debilitated patients. The in vitro sensitivity pattern of 20 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed colistin (100%), gentamicin (75%), streptomycin (30%), and tetracycline (10%). Conclusion: The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an agent of nosocomial infection is re-emphasised. (author)

  10. Antibacterial activity of five Peruvian medicinal plants against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriela; Ulloa-Urizar; Miguel; Angel; Aguilar-Luis; María; del; Carmen; De; Lama-Odría; José; Camarena-Lizarzaburu; Juana; del; Valle; Mendoza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa(P. aeruginosa)in vitro to the ethanolic extracts obtained from five different Peruvian medicinal plants.Methods: The plants were chopped and soaked in absolute ethanol(1:2, w/v). The antibacterial activity of compounds against P. aeruginosa was evaluated using the cupplate agar diffusion method.Results: The extracts from Maytenus macrocarpa("Chuchuhuasi"), Dracontium loretense Krause("Jergon Sacha"), Tabebuia impetiginosa("Tahuari"), Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn(eucalyptus), Uncaria tomentosa("U?a de gato") exhibited favorable antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. The inhibitory effect of the extracts on the strains of P. aeruginosa tested demonstrated that Tabebuia impetiginosa and Maytenus macrocarpa possess higher antibacterial activity.Conclusions: The results of the present study scientifically validate the inhibitory capacity of the five medicinal plants attributed by their common use in folk medicine and contribute towards the development of new treatment options based on natural products.

  11. Antibacterial activity of ifve Peruvian medicinal plants against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriela Ulloa-Urizar; Miguel Angel Aguilar-Luis; Mara del Carmen De Lama-Odra; Jos Camarena-Lizarzaburu; Juana del Valle Mendoza

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) in vitro to the ethanolic extracts obtained from five different Peruvian medicinal plants. Methods:The plants were chopped and soaked in absolute ethanol (1:2, w/v). The antibacterial activity of compounds against P. aeruginosa was evaluated using the cup-plate agar diffusion method. Results:The extracts from Maytenus macrocarpa (“Chuchuhuasi”), Dracontium loretense Krause (“Jergon Sacha”), Tabebuia impetiginosa (“Tahuari”), Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn (eucalyptus), Uncaria tomentosa (“Uña de gato”) exhibited favorable antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. The inhibitory effect of the extracts on the strains of P. aeruginosa tested demonstrated that Tabebuia impetiginosa and Maytenus macrocarpa possess higher antibacterial activity. Conclusions:The results of the present study scientifically validate the inhibitory capacity of the five medicinal plants attributed by their common use in folk medicine and contribute towards the development of new treatment options based on natural products.

  12. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics combined with an increasing acknowledgement of the role of biofilms in chronic infections has led to a growing interest in new antimicrobial strategies that target the biofilm mode of growth. In the aggregated biofilm mode, cell-to-cell communication...... alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  13. Imported PER-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PER-1 producing Acinetobacter baumanii and VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Károly

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii are important nosocomial pathogens with wide intrinsic resistance. However, due to the dissemination of the acquired resistance mechanisms, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL and metallo beta-lactamase (MBL production, multidrug resistant strains have been isolated more often. Case presentation We report a case of a Hungarian tourist, who was initially hospitalized in Egypt and later transferred to Hungary. On the day of admission PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa, PER-1 producing A. baumannii, SHV-5-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were subcultured from the patient's samples in Hungary. Comparing the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE patterns of the P. aeruginosa strains from the patient to the P. aeruginosa strains occurring in this hospital, we can state that the PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa had external origin. Conclusion This is the first report of PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa,and PER-1-producing A. baumanii strains in Hungary. This case highlights the importance of spreading of the beta-lactamase-mediated resistance mechanisms between countries and continents, showing the importance of careful screening and the isolation of patients arriving from a different country.

  14. Genetically and Phenotypically Distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Share a Core Proteomic Signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahit Penesyan

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the main colonizers of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. We have isolated and sequenced several P. aeruginosa isolates from the sputum of CF patients and compared them with each other and with the model strain PAO1. Phenotypic analysis of CF isolates showed significant variability in colonization and virulence-related traits suggesting different strategies for adaptation to the CF lung. Genomic analysis indicated these strains shared a large set of core genes with the standard laboratory strain PAO1, and identified the genetic basis for some of the observed phenotypic differences. Proteomics revealed that in a conventional laboratory medium PAO1 expressed 827 proteins that were absent in the CF isolates while the CF isolates shared a distinctive signature set of 703 proteins not detected in PAO1. PAO1 expressed many transporters for the uptake of organic nutrients and relatively few biosynthetic pathways. Conversely, the CF isolates expressed a narrower range of transporters and a broader set of metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and polyamines. The proteomic data suggests that in a common laboratory medium PAO1 may transport a diverse set of "ready-made" nutrients from the rich medium, whereas the CF isolates may only utilize a limited number of nutrients from the medium relying mainly on their own metabolism for synthesis of essential nutrients. These variations indicate significant differences between the metabolism and physiology of P. aeruginosa CF isolates and PAO1 that cannot be detected at the genome level alone. The widening gap between the increasing genomic data and the lack of phenotypic data means that researchers are increasingly reliant on extrapolating from genomic comparisons using experimentally characterized model organisms such as PAO1. While comparative genomics can provide valuable information, our data

  15. Contributions of efflux pumps to high level resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ciprofloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dan-dan; SUN Tie-ying; HU Yun-jian

    2007-01-01

    @@ Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is one of the leading pathogens involved in nosocomial pneumonia. In addition, P. aeruginosa infection is associated with significant morbidity and mortality.1 A major problem in P. aeruginosa infection is that this organism exhibits natural and acquired resistance to many structurally and functionally diverse antibiotics.

  16. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Elham

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, ultraviolet (UV analysis, gas chromatography (GC, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0% and α-terpineol (7.7% and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5% and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%, with a total yield of 88.8%.

  17. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, C; Ohtake, H; Chu, L; Misra, T K; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    The chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 was cloned into broad-host-range vector pSUP104. The hybrid plasmid containing an 11.1-kilobase insert conferred chromate resistance and reduced uptake of chromate in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Resistance to chromate was not expressed in Escherichia coli. Contiguous 1.6- and 6.3-kilobase HindIII fragments from this plasmid hybridized to pUM505 but not to P. aeruginosa chromosomal DNA and only weakly to chromate resistance plasmids pLHB1 and pMG6. Further subcloning produced a plasmid with an insert of 2,145 base pairs, which was sequenced. Analysis of deletions revealed that a single open reading frame was sufficient to determine chromate resistance. This open reading frame encodes a highly hydrophobic polypeptide, ChrA, of 416 amino acid residues that appeared to be expressed in E. coli under control of the T7 promoter. No significant homology was found between ChrA and proteins in the amino acid sequence libraries, but 29% amino acid identity was found with the ChrA amino acid sequence for another chromate resistance determinant sequenced in this laboratory from an Alcaligenes eutrophus plasmid (A. Nies, D. Nies, and S. Silver, submitted for publication). Images FIG. 3 FIG. 5 PMID:2152903

  18. Binding of protegrin-1 to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrer Robert I

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia infections of cystic fibrosis patients' lungs are often resistant to conventional antibiotic therapy. Protegrins are antimicrobial peptides with potent activity against many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa. The present study evaluates the correlation between protegrin-1 (PG-1 sensitivity/resistance and protegrin binding in P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia. Methods The PG-1 sensitivity/resistance and PG-1 binding properties of P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia were assessed using radial diffusion assays, radioiodinated PG-1, and surface plasmon resonance (BiaCore. Results The six P. aeruginosa strains examined were very sensitive to PG-1, exhibiting minimal active concentrations from 0.0625–0.5 μg/ml in radial diffusion assays. In contrast, all five B. cepacia strains examined were greater than 10-fold to 100-fold more resistant, with minimal active concentrations ranging from 6–10 μg/ml. When incubated with a radioiodinated variant of PG-1, a sensitive P. aeruginosa strain bound considerably more protegrin molecules per cell than a resistant B. cepacia strain. Binding/diffusion and surface plasmon resonance assays revealed that isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipid A from the sensitive P. aeruginosa strains bound PG-1 more effectively than LPS and lipid A from resistant B. cepacia strains. Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that the relative resistance of B. cepacia to protegrin is due to a reduced number of PG-1 binding sites on the lipid A moiety of its LPS.

  19. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  20. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.;

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... synthesis was restricted to a narrow band in the part of the biofilm adjacent to the source of oxygen. The zone of active GFP expression was approximately 60 Am wide in colony biofilms and 30 Am wide in flow cell biofilms. The region of the biofilm in which cells were capable of elongation was mapped by...... treating colony biofilms with carbenicillin, which blocks cell division, and then measuring individual cell lengths by transmission electron microscopy. Cell elongation was localized at the air interface of the biofilm. The heterogeneous anabolic patterns measured inside these biofilms were likely a result...

  1. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. PMID:20580207

  2. Capture of endogenously biotinylated proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays unexpected downregulation of LiuD upon iron nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschani, Farnusch; Wei, Qing; Dingemans, Jozef; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Cornelis, Pierre; Kaiser, Markus

    2016-08-01

    The uptake and storage but also removal of excess iron are of utmost importance to microorganisms since surplus levels of iron may lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, iron homeostasis is generally tightly regulated by the ferric uptake regulator (Fur), a global iron regulator acting as a transcriptional repressor. While detecting biotinylated proteins in labelling experiments, we discovered that the endogenously biotinylated protein LiuD differentially accumulated upon iron treatment. LiuD represents the α-subunit of the methylcrotonyl-CoA-carboxylase (MCCase), an enzyme from the leucine/isovalerate utilization pathway. Real-time PCR transcription analysis revealed that the observed lower levels of LiuD biotinylation could be traced back to lower LiuD protein levels via a transcriptional repression of liuABCDE expression that however does not seem to be mediated by Fur. In accordance with LiuD's role for the leucine/isovalerate utilization pathway and its protein level regulation by nutritional iron levels, we found that wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa did not grow in the presence of iron if the medium contained only leucine as a carbon source. Conversely, iron stimulated the growth when glucose was used as a carbon source. Our study thus demonstrates the complexities of iron-regulated bacterial growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:27160053

  3. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND...... cystic fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected...

  4. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  5. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.; Heydorn, Arne; Molin, Søren; Givskov, Michael Christian; Parsek, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com......During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic...... abiotic surface. Biofilms formed by an alginate- overproducing strain exhibit a highly structured architecture and are significantly more resistant to the antibiotic tobramycin than a biofilm formed by an isogenic nonmucoid strain. These results suggest that an important consequence of the conversion to...... mucoidy is an altered biofilm architecture that shows increasing resistance to antimicrobial treatments....

  6. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation conferri

  7. Isolation of chlorhexidine-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, H; Kozukue, H

    1982-01-01

    The chlorhexidine resistance of 317 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospital patients was determined. The distribution pattern of their susceptibility to chlorhexidine clearly revealed two peaks, and the frequency of resistance to chlorhexidine was 84.2%.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa diversity in distinct paediatric patient groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G.A.; Ent, C.K. van der; Wolfs, T.F.;

    2008-01-01

    -CF patients and whether clonality of isolates occurs in other patient groups. The aim of this study was to investigate P. aeruginosa diversity and the occurrence of clones within five distinct paediatric patient groups susceptible to P. aeruginosa infection. P. aeruginosa isolates were cultured from 157...... patients (CF first infection (CF-1 group) (29); CF chronic infection (CF-chronic group) (27); urinary tract infection (34); chronic suppurative otitis media (43); and intensive-care hospitalization/immunodeficiency (24)). All 202 phenotypically different isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance...... and further typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Simpson's diversity index was calculated for the five groups. CF-chronic patients carried the highest number of distinct P. aeruginosa phenotypes and genotypes per culture. Isolates from the CF-chronic group were significantly less diverse than those from...

  9. Membrane-bound respiratory chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown aerobically.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, K; M. Yamada; Shinagawa, E; Adachi, O; Ameyama, M

    1980-01-01

    The electron transport chain of the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, grown aerobically, contained a number of primary dehydrogenases and respiratory components (soluble flavin, bound flavin, coenzyme Q9, heme b, heme c, and cytochrome o) in membrane particles of the organism. Cytochrome o, about 50% of the b-type cytochrome, seemed to function as a terminal oxidase in the respiratory chain. The electron transport chain of P. aeruginosa grown aerobically was suggested to be line...

  10. The use of bacteriophages for P. aeruginosa biofilm control

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant opportunistic pathogen frequently associated with several nosocomial infections and, worryingly, this bacterium shows a low antibiotic susceptibility. One of its virulence factors is related with the ability to adhere to surfaces and also human epithelium and form virulent biofllms. This work describes the isolation and characterization of lytic phages capable to infect antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa strains. It is also described herein the potential o...

  11. Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Risk Factors and Clinical Impact†

    OpenAIRE

    Aloush, Valerie; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Seigman-Igra, Yardena; Cabili, Shaltiel; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading nosocomial pathogen, may become multidrug resistant (MDR). Its rate of occurrence, the individual risk factors among affected patients, and the clinical impact of infection are undetermined. We conducted an epidemiologic evaluation and molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of 36 isolates for 82 patients with MDR P. aeruginosa and 82 controls matched by ward, length of hospital stay, and calendar time. A matched case-control study iden...

  12. Serum antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Brett, M M; Ghoneim, A T; Littlewood, J M

    1986-01-01

    Serum IgG antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell surface antigens were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Titres in patients without cystic fibrosis were low (140-235). Those in patients with cystic fibrosis who were chronically infected by P. aeruginosa were very high (1100-20,500), while patients who grew the organism intermittently had lower titres (160-4400). Longitudinal studies showed that raised titres were observed at a very early stage of infection. High titres were ...

  13. Suppression of fungal growth exhibited by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Three surgery patients were monitored postoperatively, with particular reference to lung infection. In each case there was a clinical impression that Pseudomonas aeruginosa suppressed the growth of Candida albicans in patients with clinically significant lung infections from whom both of these organisms were isolated from serial sputum samples. Regrowth of C. albicans after P. aeruginosa eradication occurred in two patients, despite fluconazole therapy, to which both C. albicans isolates were...

  14. Isolation of lytic phages for clinical antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna; Faustino, A.; Azeredo, Joana

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant opportunist pathogen involved in noso-comial infections. P. aeruginosa uses an arsenal of virulence factors to cause serious infections and one of the most worrying characteristics of this bacte-rium is its low antibiotic susceptibility. The low susceptibility to antibiotics can be attributed to a concerted action of multidrug efflux pumps with chromo-somally-encoded antibiotic resistance genes and the low permeability of the bacterial cellular envelopes. ...

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to acute right leg cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Wahab, Asrul; Rahman, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacillus that causes wide spectrum clinical infections. However, it is most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infection. In this case a 58-year-old male with underlying hypertension and dyslipidaemia was admitted for acute right leg cellulitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was identified from the case, though it was not a usual suspected organism. It might be due to community-acquired infection.

  16. Resistant patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Malaysian teaching hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zaidah AR; Siti SMN; Zahiruddin WM; Zeehaida M

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and the leading cause of nosocomial infec-tions.Currently a notable increase in the prevalence of multidrug-resistant P.aeruginosa worldwide has been reported in hospitalized patients and was associated with high morbidity and mortality.Methods:A retrospec-tive laboratory based analysis regarding the spectrum and distribution of P.aeruginosa from a wide range of clinical samples in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia since January 2003 to December 2007 was done.Re-sults:Altogether,there were 2 308 clinical isolates analyzed.The main sources of P.aeruginosa were from swab,respiratory,urine and blood specimens which accounted for 28.2 %,21.8 %,13.2 % and 12.8 %respectively.Results showed significant reduction in percentage of resistant towards three antibiotic namely ciprofloxacin,ceftazidime and imipenem.However the percentage of pan-resistant P.aeruginosa increased steadily over these years.Conclusion:This data is helpful to the clinician in guiding the choice of appropriate antibiotic to treat P.aeruginosa infection.At the same time,it warrants a more aggressive infection control ac-tivity to be implemented to control the spread of pan resistant strain in this centre.

  17. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pure Exotoxin A on Mice WBC in Comparison with Human WBC Contaminated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    M Naghmachi; A Sharifi; J Kohanteb

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction & Objective: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram negative bacterial. This bacterium is resistant to many antibiotics and chemical disinfectants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacteria and caused infection in skin, external ear, upper respiratory tract, large intestine and is an important bacteria in nosocomial infections. It causes acute infection in burn disease. This bacterium can produce exotoxin A and effect on elongation factor II and can stop protein ...

  18. Exosomes: Mechanisms of Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    McKelvey, Kelly J.; Katie L. Powell; Ashton, Anthony W.; Morris, Jonathan M.; McCracken, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are 30–100 nm microvesicles which contain complex cellular signals of RNA, protein and lipids. Because of this, exosomes are implicated as having limitless therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer, pregnancy complications, infections, and autoimmune diseases. To date we know a considerable amount about exosome biogenesis and secretion, but there is a paucity of data regarding the uptake of exosomes by immune and non- immune cell types (e.g., cancer cells) and the internal si...

  19. Different roles for anti-sigma factors in siderophore signalling pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettrick, Karla A; Lamont, Iain L

    2009-12-01

    Group IV (extracytoplasmic function) sigma factors direct the expression of a large number of regulons in bacteria. The activities of many Group IV sigma factors are inhibited by members of a family of anti-sigma factor proteins, with appropriate environmental signals causing the sigma factor to be released for interaction with core RNA polymerase and consequent transcription of target genes. One subgroup of Group IV sigmas directs expression of genes for uptake of siderophores (iron-chelating compounds) by Gram-negative bacteria. The activities of these sigma factors are controlled by anti-sigma factors that span the cytoplasmic membrane. Binding of siderophore by a receptor protein in the outer membrane results in signal transduction from the periplasmic portion to the cytoplasmic portion of the appropriate anti-sigma factor, with consequent activity of the cognate sigma factor and upregulation of the gene encoding the receptor protein. We have investigated receptor/anti-sigma/sigma factor signalling pathways for uptake of the siderophores ferrichrome and desferrioxamine by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In these pathways the 'anti-sigma' proteins are normally required for sigma factor activity and the cytoplasmic parts of the 'anti-sigmas' have 'pro-sigma' activity. We suggest that the family of anti-sigma factor proteins may be better considered as 'sigma regulators'. PMID:19889096

  20. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens

  1. Putrescine uptake in saintpaulia petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagni, N; Pistocchi, R

    1985-02-01

    Putrescine uptake and the kinetics of this uptake were studied in petals of Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl. Uptake experiments of [(3)H] or [(14)C] putrescine were done on single petals at room temperature at various pH values. The results show that putrescine uptake occurs against a concentration gradient at low external putrescine concentration (0.5-100 micromolar) and follows a concentration gradient at higher external putrescine concentrations (100 micromolar to 100 millimolar). 2,4-Dinitrophenol and carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone, two uncouplers, had no effect on putrescine uptake. Uptake rates were constant for 2 hours, reaching a maximum after 3 to 4 hours. Putrescine uptake depended markedly on the external pH and two maxima were observed: at low external concentrations of putrescine, the optimum was at pH 5 to 5.5; at higher concentrations the optimum was at pH 8. PMID:16664065

  2. N-Terminal Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-Motif Repeats Enhance Membrane Interaction and Increase the Antimicrobial Activity of Apidaecins against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Martina E. C.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Schäfer, Ingo; Piantavigna, Stefania; Goldbach, Tina; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter; Martin, Lisandra L.; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening nosocomial pathogen due to its generally low susceptibility toward antibiotics. Furthermore, many strains have acquired resistance mechanisms requiring new antimicrobials with novel mechanisms to enhance treatment options. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides, such as the apidaecin analog Api137, are highly efficient against various Enterobacteriaceae infections in mice, but less active against P. aeruginosa in vitro. Here, we extended our recent work by optimizing lead peptides Api755 (gu-OIORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH; gu = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylguanidino, O = L-ornithine) and Api760 (gu-OWORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) by incorporation of Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-motifs, respectively. Api795 (gu-O(IO)2RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) and Api794 (gu-O(WO)3RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) were highly active against P. aeruginosa with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8–16 and 8–32 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance, these peptides inserted into a membrane layer and the surface activity increased gradually from Api137, over Api795, to Api794. This mode of action was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy indicating some membrane damage only at the high peptide concentrations. Api794 and Api795 were highly stable against serum proteases (half-life times >5 h) and non-hemolytic to human erythrocytes at peptide concentrations of 0.6 g/L. At this concentration, Api795 reduced the cell viability of HeLa cells only slightly, whereas the IC50 of Api794 was 0.23 ± 0.09 g/L. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed no colocalization of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labeled Api794 or Api795 with the mitochondria, excluding interactions with the mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, Api795 was localized in endosomes, whereas Api794 was present in endosomes and the cytosol. This was verified using flow cytometry showing a 50% higher uptake of Api794 in HeLa cells compared

  3. Molecular detection of an atypical, highly resistant, clonal Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate in cystic fibrosis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Deirdre

    2013-03-01

    The identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates in sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can be challenging due to the multitude of phenotypic changes isolates undergo during adaptation to the microenvironment of the CF lung.

  4. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs. PMID:27149698

  5. Detection and characterization of metallo beta lactamases producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoharan A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate phenotypic and genotypic methods for detection of Metallo-Beta-Lactamases (MBLs among nosocomial Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Sixty one among 176 P. aeruginosa isolates, collected as part of a multicentric study (2005-2007, were evaluated for carbapenem resistance (CARB-R; resistant to either imipenem/meropenem and screened for MBL by Combination Disk Diffusion Test (CDDT using imipenem (IMP, meropenem (MER and ceftazidime (CAZ with EDTA. MBL positives were further confirmed by IMP + EDTA Etest. Twenty strains (42.6% were found to be MBL producers among the 61 P. aeruginosa. PCR for IMP and VIM MBL was performed on 48 of the 61, 15 were positive for VIM MBL type. CDDT using IMP + EDTA had the highest sensitivity and specificity of 87.8% and 84.4% when compared to Etest, which was higher than the values obtained for CAZ + EDTA and MER + EDTA. CDDT using IMP + EDTA also compared very well with the PCR (specificity = 90.9%, sensitivity = 93.3%. CARB-R among P. aeruginosa is mediated predominantly via MBL production. Clinical P. aeruginosa isolates can be screened routinely using the less expensive IMP + EDTA CDDT in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  6. METALLO-BETA-LACTAMASE PRODUCING PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN NEONATAL SEPTICEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence, selective multiplication & dissemination of antibacterial resistance is a serious global problem. This study was conducted with the objective to examine the incidence of metallo-beta-lactamase (MβL producing strains among multidrug resistant (MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the suspected cases of neonatal sepsis between January 2011 – December 2013. A total of 994 cases admitted with the suspicion of neonatal sepsis were investigated. 295 (29.7% isolates were obtained from the blood cultures of neonates. The isolates were identified and tested for the susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents. Pseudomonas aeruginosa with 116 (48.3% isolation among 240 Gram negative isolates, was the predominant pathogen in our study. All the 74 (63.8% multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were screened initially for Imipenem resistance, which were further tested for the presence of MβL by Imipenem-ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA disc method. MβL production was seen in 20 (71.4% of the 28 Imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. MβL producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as a potential threat in cases of neonatal septicemia and poses great therapeutic challenge for physicians treating such infections.

  7. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; San Millan, Alvaro; Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-05-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs. PMID:27149698

  8. Influence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Chawla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8% patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3% and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008, greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007, a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03, and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis.

  9. Cystic fibrosis-niche adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduces virulence in multiple infection hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Riva, Camilla; Juhas, Mario; Schwager, Stephan; Eberl, Leo; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to thrive in diverse ecological niches and to cause serious human infection. P. aeruginosa environmental strains are producing various virulence factors that are required for establishing acute infections in several host organisms; however, the P. aeruginosa phenotypic variants favour long-term persistence in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Whether P. aeruginosa strains, which have adapted to the CF-niche, have lost their competitive...

  10. Phenolic compounds affect production of pyocyanin, swarming motility and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin Ugurlu; Aysegul Karahasan Yagci; Seyhan Ulusoy; Burak Aksu; Gulgun Bosgelmez-Tinaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of plant-derived phenolic compounds (i.e. caffeic acid, cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and vanillic acid) on the production of quorum sensing regulated virulence factors such as pyocyanin, biofilm formation and swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates. Methods: Fourteen clinical P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from urine samples and P. aeruginosa PA01 strain were included in the study. The antibacterial effects of phenolic comp...

  11. Exosomes: Mechanisms of Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J. McKelvey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are 30–100 nm microvesicles which contain complex cellular signals of RNA, protein and lipids. Because of this, exosomes are implicated as having limitless therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer, pregnancy complications, infections, and autoimmune diseases. To date we know a considerable amount about exosome biogenesis and secretion, but there is a paucity of data regarding the uptake of exosomes by immune and non- immune cell types (e.g., cancer cells and the internal signalling pathways by which these exosomes elicit a cellular response. Answering these questions is of para‐ mount importance.

  12. A case of failed eradication of cystic fibrosis-related sinus colonisation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Linnane, Barry

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen associated with cystic fibrosis that has potential to decrease lung function and cause respiratory failure. Paranasal sinuses are increasingly recognised as potential reservoirs for intermittent colonisation by P. aeruginosa. This case documents investigation and outcome of P. aeruginosa recurrence in a male paediatric patient over an eight year period.

  13. Ambroxol inhibits mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenlei; Yu, Jialin; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli; Li, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals. Because it forms biofilms, which protect against host immune attack and increase resistance to conventional antibiotics, mucoid P. aeruginosa is nearly impossible to eradicate. Moreover, mucoid conversion of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to poor outcomes. This conversion is mainly due to mucA gene mutation, which is thought to be induced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the reactive oxygen species they release. Ambroxol, a mucolytic agent with antioxidant characteristics, is used clinically, and this compound has recently been demonstrated to possess anti-biofilm properties. In this study, we found that ambroxol inhibits the H2 O2 -mediated conversion of P. aeruginosa from a non-mucoid to a mucoid phenotype, an effect that is due to its antioxidant property against H2 O2 . Furthermore, the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms was increased in vitro when used in combination with ambroxol. PMID:27102839

  14. Sphingoid long chain bases prevent lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Tavakoli Tabazavareh, Shaghayegh; Grassmé, Heike; Becker, Katrin Anne; Japtok, Lukasz; Steinmann, Jörg; Joseph, Tammar; Lang, Stephan; Tuemmler, Burkhard; Schuchman, Edward H; Lentsch, Alex B; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J; Futerman, Anthony H; Gulbins, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, trauma, burn wound, or patients requiring ventilation are susceptible to severe pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physiological innate defense mechanisms against this pathogen, and their alterations in lung diseases, are for the most part unknown. We now demonstrate a role for the sphingoid long chain base, sphingosine, in determining susceptibility to lung infection by P. aeruginosa. Tracheal and bronchial sphingosine levels were significantly reduced in tissues from cystic fibrosis patients and from cystic fibrosis mouse models due to reduced activity of acid ceramidase, which generates sphingosine from ceramide. Inhalation of mice with sphingosine, with a sphingosine analog, FTY720, or with acid ceramidase rescued susceptible mice from infection. Our data suggest that luminal sphingosine in tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells prevents pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection in normal individuals, paving the way for novel therapeutic paradigms based on inhalation of acid ceramidase or of sphingoid long chain bases in lung infection. PMID:25085879

  15. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  16. Effects of antibiotics on quorum sensing in pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersø, Mette Elena; Alhede, Morten; Phipps, Richard Kerry;

    2008-01-01

    impeding QS, thereby reducing the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. This led us to investigate whether QS inhibition is a common feature of antibiotics. We present the results of a screening of 12 antibiotics for their QS-inhibitory activities using a previously described QS inhibitor selector 1 strain...... animal infection models. Treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa with the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) has been demonstrated to improve the clinical outcome. Several studies indicate that AZM may accomplish its beneficial action in CF patients by....... Three of the antibiotics tested, AZM, ceftazidime (CFT), and ciprofloxacin (CPR), were very active in the assay and were further examined for their effects on QS-regulated virulence factor production in P. aeruginosa. The effects of the three antibiotics administered at subinhibitory concentrations were...

  17. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-02-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ∆sprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms. PMID:24376018

  18. Thyroid Uptake Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NED-UP.M7 is a complete thyroid uptake and analysis system specifically designed for nuclear medicine. Capable of performing a full range of studies this system provides fast, accurate results for Uptake Studies. The heart of the NED-UP.M7 is a microprocessor-controlled 2048 channel Compact Multi-Channel Analyzer, coupled to a 2 inch x 2 inch NaI(Tl) detector with a USB personal computer interface. The system offers simple, straight-forward operation using pre-programmed isotopes, and menudriven prompts to guide the user step by step through each procedure. The pre-programmed radionuclides include I-123, I-125, I-131, Tc-99m and Cs-137. The user-defined radionuclides also allow for isotope identification while the printer provides hard copy printouts for patient and department record keeping. The included software program running on PC (Windows XP-based) is a user friendly program with menudriven and graphic interface for easy controlling the system and managing measurement results of patient on Excel standard form. (author)

  19. Synergic interaction between ascorbic acid and antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cursino

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out on in vitro combination of ascorbic acid (AA with six antibiotics against 12 multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Synergic activity was detected with AA chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin and tetracycline. Indifference was observed to any antibiotics and antagonism only for chloramphenicol. Results indicated that multiresistant P. aeruginosa was affected by combination of AA and antibiotics. Future research on ascorbic acid-antimicrobial interactions may find new methods to control strains of multiresistant P. aeruginosa.Investigou-se in vitro o efeito da combinação do ácido ascórbico (AA com seis antibióticos frente a 12 isolados multirresistentes de Pseudomonas aeruginosa. As concentrações inibitórias mínimas (CIM foram determinadas pelo método de diluição em caldo. Foi estudado o efeito do AA nas CIM pelo cálculo das concentrações inibitórias fracionais (CIF. Para quase todas as combinações AA-antibiótico foi detectado efeito sinérgico, exceto para ampicilina e tobramicina. Indiferença foi observada na interação com todos os antibióticos, porém antagonismo foi somente observado para cloranfenicol. Os resultados deste estudo indicam que o sinergismo contra P. aeruginosa resistentes pode ocorrer entre AA e cloranfenicol, canamicina, estreptomicina e tetraciclina, ainda que as linhagens sejam resistentes aos antibióticos individualmente. Além disso, estes resultados encorajam futuros trabalhos in vivo a respeito da interação AA-antimicrobianos na incessante busca de novas alternativas para o controle de linhagens multirresistentes de P.aeruginosa.

  20. Prevalence and analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chinchillas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoyama Naoki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger are popular as pets and are often used as laboratory animals for various studies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious agent that causes otitis media, pneumonia, septicaemia enteritis, and sudden death in chinchillas. This bacterium is also a leading cause of nosocomial infections in humans. To prevent propagation of P. aeruginosa infection among humans and animals, detailed characteristics of the isolates, including antibiotic susceptibility and genetic features, are needed. In this study, we surveyed P. aeruginosa distribution in chinchillas bred as pets or laboratory animals. We also characterized the isolates from these chinchillas by testing for antibiotic susceptibility and by gene analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41.8% of the 67 chinchillas included in the study. Slide agglutination and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discriminated 5 serotypes and 7 unique patterns, respectively. For the antibiotic susceptibility test, 40.9% of isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, 77.3% to ciprofloxacin, 77.3% to imipenem, and 72.7% to ceftazidime. DNA analyses confirmed that none of the isolates contained the gene encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases; however, 2 of the total 23 isolates were found to have a gene similar to the pilL gene that has been identified in the pathogenicity island of a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa. Conclusions P. aeruginosa is widely spread in chinchillas, including strains with reduced susceptibility to the antibiotics and highly virulent strains. The periodic monitoring should be performed to help prevent the propagation of this pathogen and reduce the risk of infection from chinchillas to humans.

  1. Identification of chemosensory proteins for trichloroethylene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Shitashiro, Maiko; Tanaka, Hirohide; Hong, Chang Soo; Kuroda, Akio; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao; Kato, Junichi

    2005-01-01

    The involvement of the chemotaxis gene cluster 1 (cheYZABW) and cheR in repellent responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to trichloroethylene (TCE) is described and three methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) for TCE are identified. TCE chemotaxis assays of a number of deletion-insertion mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 revealed that the chemotaxis gene cluster 1 and cheR are required for negative chemotaxis to TCE. Mutant strains which contained deletions in pctA, pctB and pctC showed decrea...

  2. Bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, M. A.; Irannajad, M.; Azadmehr, A. R.; Meshkini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Bioleaching is an environmentally friendly method for extraction of metal from ores. In this study, bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a heterotrophic bacterium that can produce various organic acids in an appropriate culture medium, and these acids can operate as leaching agents. The parameters, such as particle size, glucose percentage in the culture medium, bioleaching time, and solid/liquid ratio were optimized. Optimum bioleaching conditions were found as follows: particle size of 150-177 μm, glucose percentage of 6%, bioleaching time of 8 d, and solid/liquid ratio of 1:80. Under these conditions, 53% of copper was extracted.

  3. Ultraviolet-B lethal damage on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has shown an increased sensitivity compared with that of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae, when they were exposed to 0.4 kJ/m2 of ultraviolet-B radiation. The rapid decay in cell viability observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa after the irradiation was influenced by factors such as culture media and the presence of pyocyanine during the irradiation. The radioinduced lethal damage could be prevented by photoreactivating treatment, indicating that pyrimidine dimer formation was the mechanism causing bacterial death. The results indicate that several environmental conditions may act as protective agents against ultraviolet-B-induced damage

  4. [Structural components and peculiarities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, O B; Avdieieva, L V

    2010-01-01

    Peculiarities of the structural organization of bacterial biofilm during its formation and disintegration have been investigated on the model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCM B-900 (ATCC 9027). It was shown, that development of the biofilm in a stationary system on glass was a two-vector process with changes in time and space. P. aeruginosa UCM B-900 biofilm is formed from single cells, passes through the stages of base components, net structure, islands and comes to the end with integration into a complete monolayer. The biofilm degradation repeats the stages of its formation in the reverse sequence. PMID:20812507

  5. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Gao; Yuying Zhang; Yan Wang; Xinhua Qiao; Jing Zi; Chang Chen; Yi Wan

    2016-01-01

    Pyocyanin (PCN), a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60 μM SNP). Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN w...

  6. Colistin-Tobramycin Combinations Are Superior to Monotherapy Concerning the Killing of Biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, G.; Yang, Liang; Wu, H.;

    2010-01-01

    biofilms. Methods. P. aeruginosa biofilms were generated in vitro and in rat lungs. In a pilot study, 5 patients with cystic fibrosis inhaled colistin and then tobramycin for 4 weeks. The changes in P. aeruginosa counts and lung function were assessed before and after therapy. Results. Antibiotic...... combination therapy significantly reduced the number of P. aeruginosa cells in P. aeruginosa biofilm models in vitro. When rats were challenged with 1 x 10(7) cfu of P. aeruginosa, which was embedded in alginate beads, mortality rates, lung pathologic findings, and bacterial colony-forming unit counts were...

  7. Changes in gene expression, cell physiology and toxicity of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at elevated CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eSandrini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rising CO2 concentrations may have large effects on aquatic microorganisms. In this study, we investigated how elevated pCO2 affects the harmful freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. This species is capable of producing dense blooms and hepatotoxins called microcystins. Strain PCC 7806 was cultured in chemostats that were shifted from low to high pCO2 conditions. This resulted in a transition from a C-limited to a light-limited steady state, with a ~2.7 fold increase of the cyanobacterial biomass and ~2.5 fold more microcystin per cell. Cells increased their chlorophyll a and phycocyanin content, and raised their PSI/PSII ratio at high pCO2. Surprisingly, cells had a lower dry weight and contained less carbohydrates, which might be an adaptation to improve the buoyancy of Microcystis when light becomes more limiting at high pCO2. Only 234 of the 4,691 genes responded to elevated pCO2. For instance, expression of the carboxysome, RuBisCO, photosystem and C metabolism genes did not change significantly, and only a few N assimilation genes were expressed differently. The lack of large-scale changes in the transcriptome could suit a buoyant species that lives in eutrophic lakes with strong CO2 fluctuations very well. However, we found major responses in inorganic carbon uptake. At low pCO2, cells were mainly dependent on bicarbonate uptake, whereas at high pCO2 gene expression of the bicarbonate uptake systems was down-regulated and cells shifted to CO2 and low-affinity bicarbonate uptake. These results show that the need for high-affinity bicarbonate uptake systems ceases at elevated CO2. Moreover, the combination of an increased cyanobacterial abundance, improved buoyancy, and higher toxin content per cell indicates that rising atmospheric CO2 levels may increase the problems associated with the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis in eutrophic lakes.

  8. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  9. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Zhang, Yuying; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Xinhua; Zi, Jing; Chen, Chang; Wan, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Pyocyanin (PCN), a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60μM SNP). Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN was tested by constructing PAO1 nor (NO reductase gene) knockout mutants. Compared to the wild-type strain, the Δnor strain had a lower PCN (86% reduction in Δnor). To examine whether the results were universal with other P. aeruginosa strains, we collected 4 clinical strains from a hospital, tested their PCN levels after SNP treatment, and obtained similar results, i.e., PCN biosynthesis was inhibited by NO. These results suggest that NO treatment may be a new strategy to inhibit PCN biosynthesis and could provide novel insights into eliminating P. aeruginosa virulence as a clinical goal. PMID:26874276

  10. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (pproduction of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:25704369

  11. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N;

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...... between cystic fibrosis patients has occurred....

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa host-adaptation in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rau, Martin Holm

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of transition from an environmental lifestyle to a host-associated lifestyle, as exemplified in the life-long airway infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Long-term infection is associated with extensive genetic adaptation of P...

  13. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Gao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyocyanin (PCN, a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60 μM SNP. Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN was tested by constructing PAO1 nor (NO reductase gene knockout mutants. Compared to the wild-type strain, the Δnor strain had a lower PCN (86% reduction in Δnor. To examine whether the results were universal with other P. aeruginosa strains, we collected 4 clinical strains from a hospital, tested their PCN levels after SNP treatment, and obtained similar results, i.e., PCN biosynthesis was inhibited by NO. These results suggest that NO treatment may be a new strategy to inhibit PCN biosynthesis and could provide novel insights into eliminating P. aeruginosa virulence as a clinical goal.

  14. Genetic characterization of Microcystis aeruginosa isolates from Portuguese freshwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are microorganisms that pose a serious threat to the aquatic waterways through the production of dense blooms under eutrophic conditions and the release of toxic secondary metabolites-cyanotoxins. Within cyanobacteria, the colonial planktonic Microcystis aeruginosa is widely distributed in both fresh and brackish aquatic environments throughout the world being frequently observed in the Portuguese water systems. Apart from the well-established distribution of M. aeruginosa in Portugal, knowledge of its genetic diversity and population structure is unknown. Therefore, in this study twenty-seven strains were obtained from the North, Centre and South regions of Portugal and were subjected to extensive phylogenetic analyses using simultaneously four distinct genetic markers (16S rRNA, 16S-23S ITS, DNA gyrase subunit ß and cell division protein (ftsZ)) encompassing in total 2834 bp. With this work we characterized the phylogenetic relationship among the Portuguese strains, with the southern strains showing higher genetic structure relatively to the North and Centre strains. A total of fifteen genotypes were determined for M. aeruginosa in Portuguese water systems revealing a high genetic diversity. This is also the first study to report geographic variation on the population structure of the Portuguese M. aeruginosa. PMID:27263013

  15. Structure of a putative acetyltransferase (PA1377) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Anna M.; Tata, Renée; Chauviac, François-Xavier; Sutton, Brian J; Brown, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of an acetyltransferase encoded by the gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Comparison with a related acetyltransferase revealed a structural difference in the active site that was taken to reflect a difference in substrate binding and/or specificity between the two enzymes.

  16. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Oligomers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Azurin Solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sokolová, L.; Williamson, H.; Sýkora, Jan; Hof, Martin; Gray, H. B.; Brutschy, B.; Vlček Jr., Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 16 (2011), s. 4790-4800. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10124; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : mass spectrometry * oligomers * pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin solutions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  17. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity of...

  18. Characterization of carbapenem nonsusceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Østergaard, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    From January 1st 2011 through June 30th 2011, 116 nonreplicate, noncystic fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with reduced carbapenem susceptibility were collected from 12 out of 13 Danish departments of clinical microbiology. The presence of acquired β-lactamases was assessed with...

  19. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna;

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P...

  20. Induction of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Jensen, E T; Høiby, N;

    1991-01-01

    Imipenem induced high levels of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Piperacillin also induced beta-lactamase production in these biofilms but to a lesser degree. The combination of beta-lactamase production with other protective properties of the biofilm mode of growth...

  1. Ciprofloxacin interactions with imipenem and amikacin against multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Giamarellou, H; Petrikkos, G

    1987-01-01

    In vitro interactions of ciprofloxacin with imipenem and amikacin were evaluated by the killing-curve technique against 26 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to amikacin and resistant or moderately susceptible to ciprofloxacin and imipenem. Imipenem enhanced killing by ciprofloxacin in tests with 11 strains, whereas amikacin enhanced killing in tests with only 4 strains.

  2. Uptake of nuclides by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greger, Maria [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Botany

    2004-04-01

    This review on plant uptake of elements has been prepared to demonstrate how plants take up different elements. The work discusses the nutrient elements, as well as the general uptake and translocation in plants, both via roots and by foliar absorption. Knowledge of the uptake by the various elements within the periodic system is then reviewed. The work also discusses transfer factors (TF) as well as difficulties using TF to understand the uptake by plants. The review also focuses on species differences. Knowledge necessary to understand and calculate plant influence on radionuclide recirculation in the environment is discussed, in which the plant uptake of a specific nuclide and the fate of that nuclide in the plant must be understood. Plants themselves determine the uptake, the soil/sediment determines the availability of the nuclides and the nuclides themselves can interact with each other, which also influences the uptake. Consequently, it is not possible to predict the nuclide uptake in plants by only analysing the nuclide concentration of the soil/substrate.

  3. Uptake of nuclides by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review on plant uptake of elements has been prepared to demonstrate how plants take up different elements. The work discusses the nutrient elements, as well as the general uptake and translocation in plants, both via roots and by foliar absorption. Knowledge of the uptake by the various elements within the periodic system is then reviewed. The work also discusses transfer factors (TF) as well as difficulties using TF to understand the uptake by plants. The review also focuses on species differences. Knowledge necessary to understand and calculate plant influence on radionuclide recirculation in the environment is discussed, in which the plant uptake of a specific nuclide and the fate of that nuclide in the plant must be understood. Plants themselves determine the uptake, the soil/sediment determines the availability of the nuclides and the nuclides themselves can interact with each other, which also influences the uptake. Consequently, it is not possible to predict the nuclide uptake in plants by only analysing the nuclide concentration of the soil/substrate

  4. Cadmium uptake by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghiri, F.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption of /sup 115m/Cd by soybean (Gylcine max l.) plants via foliar and root systems and translocation into the seed was determined. The uptake of /sup 115m/Cd by soybeans via the root system was more efficient than that of the foliar placement. Growth and Cd concentrations of soybean and wheat (Triticum aestivum l.) tops were influenced by soil-applied Cd. In both crops, the Cd concentration of plant tops increased while yield decreased with increasing levels of applied Cd. Cadmium toxicitiy began to occur in both crops at the lowest level of soil applied Cd (2.5 ppM). With soybean plants, Cd toxicity symptoms resembled fe chlorosis. For wheat plants there were no visual symptoms other than the studied growth. The relative concentration of Cd found in several vegetable crops varied depending on the plant species. The relative Cd concentration in descending order for various vegetables was lettuce (Lactuca sativa l.) > radish top (Raphanus sativus l.) > celery stalk (Apium graveolens l.) > celery leaves greater than or equal to green pepper (Capsicum frutescens l.) > radish roots.

  5. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pure Exotoxin A on Mice WBC in Comparison with Human WBC Contaminated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Naghmachi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction & Objective: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram negative bacterial. This bacterium is resistant to many antibiotics and chemical disinfectants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacteria and caused infection in skin, external ear, upper respiratory tract, large intestine and is an important bacteria in nosocomial infections. It causes acute infection in burn disease. This bacterium can produce exotoxin A and effect on elongation factor II and can stop protein synthesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exotoxin A on mice WBC and comparison of the results with human WBC that contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials & Methods: This is an experimental study which was conducted in 1384 on burn disease patients referred to Shiraz Ghotbodin hospital. Sample that contaminated with PA was taken from these patients for WBC count and WBC differentiation. Sample was also taken from 100 burn patients without infection (50 male and 50 female. Toxigenic strain of PA103 was cultured on liquid media and used for purification of exotoxin A. This sample was injected to 50 mice (I.V and after different incubation time, WBC was counted. Ten normal mice was used as control. Collected data analyzed by SPSS. Results: WBC count decreased in mice that received Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A in comparison with normal mice (P<0.05. WBC count was significantly decreased in burn patients in comparison with normal individuals (P<0.029 and most decrease was belonged to PMN. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa that produce exotoxin induce WBC decrease in burn disease and also in mice that contaminated with exotoxin of this bacteria. It can be concluded that bacterial infection in burn patients is toxigenic strain of PA that produce exotoxin A.

  6. Glycan involvement in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautto, Liisa; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Everest-Dass, Arun; Leong, Andrea; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark D P; Packer, Nicolle H; Peterson, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    The human eye is constantly bathed by tears, which protect the ocular surface via a variety of mechanisms. The O-linked glycans of tear mucins have long been considered to play a role in binding to pathogens and facilitating their removal in the tear flow. Other conjugated glycans in tears could similarly contribute to pathogen binding and removal but have received less attention. In the work presented here we assessed the contribution of glycan moieties, in particular the protein attached N-glycans, presented by the broad complement of tear proteins to the adhesion of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of microbial keratitis and ulceration of the cornea. Our adhesion assay involved immobilising the macromolecular components of tears into the wells of a polyvinyl difluoride (PVDF) microtitre filter plate and probing the binding of fluorescently labelled bacteria. Three P. aeruginosa strains were studied: a cytotoxic strain (6206) and an invasive strain (6294) from eye infections, and an invasive strain (320) from a urinary tract infection (UTI). The ocular isolates adhered two to three times more to human tears than to human saliva or porcine gastric mucin, suggesting ocular niche-specific adaptation. Support for the role of the N-glycans carried by human tear proteins in the binding and removal of P. aeruginosa from the eye was shown by: 1) pre-incubation of the bacteria with free component sugars, galactose, mannose, fucose and sialyl lactose (or combination thereof) inhibiting adhesion of all the P. aeruginosa strains to the immobilised tear proteins, with the greatest inhibition of binding of the ocular cytotoxic 6206 and least for the invasive 6294 strain; 2) pre-incubation of the bacteria with N-glycans released from the commercially available human milk lactoferrin, an abundant protein that carries N-linked glycans in tears, inhibiting the adhesion to tears of the ocular bacteria by up to 70%, which was significantly more

  7. The specific uptake size index for quantifying radiopharmaceutical uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, John S [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bolt, Livia [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Stratford, Jennifer S [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Kemp, Paul M [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-21

    Quantitative indices of radionuclide uptake in an object of interest provide a useful adjunct to qualitative interpretation in the diagnostic application of radionuclide imaging. This note describes a new measure of total uptake of an organ, the specific uptake size index (SUSI). It can either be related in absolute terms to the total activity injected or to the specific activity in a reference region. As it depends on the total activity in the object, the value obtained will not depend on the resolution of the imaging process, as is the case with some other similar quantitative indices. This has been demonstrated in an experiment using simulated images. The application of the index to quantification of dopamine receptor SPECT imaging and parathyroid-thyroid subtraction planar scintigraphy is described. The index is considered to be of potential value in reducing variation in quantitative assessment of uptake in objects with applications in all areas of radionuclide imaging. (note)

  8. NOTE: The specific uptake size index for quantifying radiopharmaceutical uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, John S.; Bolt, Livia; Stratford, Jennifer S.; Kemp, Paul M.

    2004-07-01

    Quantitative indices of radionuclide uptake in an object of interest provide a useful adjunct to qualitative interpretation in the diagnostic application of radionuclide imaging. This note describes a new measure of total uptake of an organ, the specific uptake size index (SUSI). It can either be related in absolute terms to the total activity injected or to the specific activity in a reference region. As it depends on the total activity in the object, the value obtained will not depend on the resolution of the imaging process, as is the case with some other similar quantitative indices. This has been demonstrated in an experiment using simulated images. The application of the index to quantification of dopamine receptor SPECT imaging and parathyroid thyroid subtraction planar scintigraphy is described. The index is considered to be of potential value in reducing variation in quantitative assessment of uptake in objects with applications in all areas of radionuclide imaging.

  9. Macrophage dysfunction and susceptibility to pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in surfactant protein C-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Stephan W; Senft, Albert P; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Maxfield, Melissa D; Ross, Gary F; Richardson, Theresa R; Prows, Daniel R; Xu, Yan; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2008-07-01

    To determine the role of surfactant protein C (SP-C) in host defense, SP-C-deficient (Sftpc-/-) mice were infected with the pulmonary pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by intratracheal injection. Survival of young, postnatal day 14 Sftpc-/- mice was decreased in comparison to Sftpc+/+ mice. The sensitivity to Pseudomonas bacteria was specific to the 129S6 strain of Sftpc-/- mice, a strain that spontaneously develops interstitial lung disease-like lung pathology with age. Pulmonary bacterial load and leukocyte infiltration were increased in the lungs of Sftpc-/- mice 24 h after infection. Early influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the lungs of uninfected newborn Sftpc-/- mice relative to Sftpc+/+ mice indicate that the lack of SP-C promotes proinflammatory responses in the lung. Mucin expression, as indicated by Alcian blue staining, was increased in the airways of Sftpc-/- mice following infection. Phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages from Sftpc-/- mice was reduced. The uptake of fluorescent beads in vitro and the number of bacteria phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages in vivo was decreased in the Sftpc-/- mice. Alveolar macrophages from Sftpc-/- mice expressed markers of alternative activation that are associated with diminished pathogen response and advancing pulmonary fibrosis. These findings implicate SP-C as a modifier of alveolar homeostasis. SP-C plays an important role in innate host defense of the lung, enhancing macrophage-mediated Pseudomonas phagocytosis, clearance and limiting pulmonary inflammatory responses. PMID:18566429

  10. The Effect of Small Scale Turbulence on the Physiology of Microcystis aeruginosa cyanobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Anne; Hondzo, Miki; Guala, Michele

    2014-11-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is a single-celled blue-green alga, or cyanobacterium, that is responsible for poor water quality and microcystin production, which in high concentrations can be harmful to humans and animals. These harmful effects arise during cyanobacterium blooms. Blooms occur mainly in the summer when the algae grow uncontrollably and bond together to form colonies which accumulate on the surface of freshwater ecosystems. The relationship between fluid motion generated by wind and internal waves in stratified aquatic ecosystems and Microcystis can help explain the mechanisms of such blooms. We investigated the effect of small scale fluid motion on the physiology of Microcystis in a reactor with two underwater speakers. Different turbulent intensities were achieved by systematically changing the input signal frequency (30-50 Hz) and magnitude (0.1-0.2V) to the speakers. The role of turbulence is quantified by relating energy dissipation rates with the cell number, chlorophyll amount, dissolved oxygen production/uptake, and pH. The results suggest that turbulence mediates the physiology of Microcystis. The findings could be instrumental in designing restoration strategies that can minimize Microcystis blooms. This work was supported by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and University of Minnesota start-up funding.

  11. Antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase inpatients with cystic fibrosis are markers of the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to beta-lactams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Walter-Rasmussen, J; Pressler, T; Pedersen, S S; Høiby, N

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal beta-lactamase production is considered to be the most important resistance mechanism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against beta-lactams. Recently we have detected serum and sputum antibodies against P. aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase (a beta ab), using immunoblotting techniques. In...

  12. Toxicogenomic response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ortho-phenylphenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toghrol Freshteh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is the most common opportunistic pathogen implicated in nosocomial infections and in chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP is an antimicrobial agent used as an active ingredient in several EPA registered disinfectants. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of information on its target molecular pathways and the cellular responses that it elucidates in bacteria in general and in P. aeruginosa in particular. An understanding of the OPP-driven gene regulation and cellular response it elicits will facilitate more effective utilization of this antimicrobial and possibly lead to the development of more effective disinfectant treatments. Results Herein, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the cellular responses of P. aeruginosa exposed to 0.82 mM OPP for 20 and 60 minutes. Our data indicated that OPP upregulated the transcription of genes encoding ribosomal, virulence and membrane transport proteins after both treatment times. After 20 minutes of exposure to 0.82 mM OPP, genes involved in the exhibition of swarming motility and anaerobic respiration were upregulated. After 60 minutes of OPP treatment, the transcription of genes involved in amino acid and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were upregulated. Further, the transcription of the ribosome modulation factor (rmf and an alternative sigma factor (rpoS of RNA polymerase were downregulated after both treatment times. Conclusion Results from this study indicate that after 20 minutes of exposure to OPP, genes that have been linked to the exhibition of anaerobic respiration and swarming motility were upregulated. This study also suggests that the downregulation of the rmf and rpoS genes may be indicative of the mechanism by which OPP causes decreases in cell viability in P. aeruginosa. Consequently, a protective response involving the upregulation of translation leading to the

  13. Octreotide Uptake in Parathyroid Adenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seyhan Karaçavuş; Mustafa Kula; Züleyha Cihan Karaca; Kürşad Ünlühızarcı; Ahmet Tutuş; Fahri Bayram; Ganime Çoban

    2012-01-01

    The patient with a history of bone pain and muscle weakness, was thought to have oncogenic osteomalacia as a result of biochemical investigations and directed to Nuclear Medicine Department for a whole-body bone scintigraphy and 111In-octreotide scintigraphy. There was no focal pathologic tracer uptake, but generalized marked increase in skeletal uptake on bone scintigraphy. Octreotide scintigraphy showed accumulation of octreotide in the region of the left lobe of the thyroid gland in the ne...

  14. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, H.; Andersen, Jens Bo;

    2003-01-01

    afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate of...... systems and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune......Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has...

  15. The Psl economy in early P. aeruginosa biofilm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Tseng, Boo Shan; Jin, Fan; Gibiansky, Max; Harrison, Joe; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    Psl from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is a mannose- and galactose-rich exopolysaccharide (EPS). It has been shown that Psl plays an important role in bacterial surface adhesion. Here, we examine role of Psl in controlling motility and microcolony formation during early biofilm development, by translating video microscopy movies into searchable databases of bacterial trajectories. We use a massively-parallel cell tracking algorithm to extract the full motility history of every cell in a large community. We find that at early stages of growth, P. aeruginosa motility is guided by Psl and self-organize in a manner analogous to a capitalist economic system, resulting in a power law bacterial distribution where a small number of bacteria are extremely ``rich'' in communally produced Psl. By comparing overproducers and underproducers of Psl, we find that local Psl levels determine post-division cell fates: High local Psl levels drive the formation of sessile microcolonies that grow exponentially.

  16. Structure of a putative acetyltransferase (PA1377) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of an acetyltransferase encoded by the gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Comparison with a related acetyltransferase revealed a structural difference in the active site that was taken to reflect a difference in substrate binding and/or specificity between the two enzymes. Gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a 177-amino-acid conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function. The structure of this protein (termed pitax) has been solved in space group I222 to 2.25 Å resolution. Pitax belongs to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase family and contains all four sequence motifs conserved among family members. The β-strand structure in one of these motifs (motif A) is disrupted, which is believed to affect binding of the substrate that accepts the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA

  17. Improved production of rhamno lipids by a pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant derived by random mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, producing high level of the rhamno lipid bio surfactants was selected on Sigmund Wagner plates. The mutant designated P. aeruginosa Persian Type Culture Collection 1637 produces rhamno lipids at concentration 10 times more than present strain. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis and surface tension measurement showed that the bio surfactants produced by the mutant were identical to those produced by the wild type strain. The bio surfactants exhibited a low surface tension of 28.0 mn m-1 and a low critical micelle concentration of 9 mg l-1. Similar to the wild type strain, the mutant produced bio surfactants at the stationary phase

  18. Hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark

    hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa and E. coli in diagnostic material. The distribution of the two pathogens is visualized using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two histological patterns were observed in the work presented in Article II; one was very hemorrhagic with few bacteria while...... pneumonia associated with E. coli infection. The perivascular localization, tendency for a higher frequency of a very hemorrhagic response and alveolar edema were the only differences noted between hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa compared to E. coli. Article III describes an infectious dose...... the interviews with farmers experiencing outbreaks of hemorrhagic pneumonia among their mink was that the disease always started in the mink kits, never in the adults. Furthermore, 39% reported that most deaths occurred in the male mink. The results presented in this thesis suggest that factors of the...

  19. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jensen, Peter Ø; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael Christian; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity of...... extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host. The...... immune response leading to this chronic inflammation is described. Finally, novel treatment strategies againstP. aeruginosa are described including, quorum-sensing inhibition and induced biofilm-dispersion. The tolerance towards currently available antimicrobials calls for development of alternative...

  20. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity is...... controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  1. In vitro inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by Xylitol

    OpenAIRE

    Letícia Pinheiro de Sousa; Annelisa Farah da Silva; Natalia Oliveira Calil; Murilo Gomes Oliveira; Silvio Silvério da Silva; Nádia Rezende Barbosa Raposo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the antimicrobial activity and the anti-adherent property of xylitol (0.5, 2.5 and 5.0%, w/v) on two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (ATCC 9027 and clinical). The assay of antimicrobial activity was performed to determine a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the adhesion test was performed, by which the parameters regarding, growth in the culture medium, number of colony forming units (CFUs) released and slide evaluation by scanning electron microscopy (...

  2. Hydrocarbon assimilation and biosurfactant production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, A K; Käppeli, O; Fiechter, A; Reiser, J.

    1991-01-01

    We isolated transposon Tn5-GM-induced mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG201 that were unable to grow in minimal media containing hexadecane as a carbon source. Some of these mutants lacked extracellular rhamnolipids, as shown by measuring the surface and interfacial tensions of the cell culture supernatants. Furthermore, the concentrated culture media of the mutant strains were tested for the presence of rhamnolipids by thin-layer chromatography and for rhamnolipid activities, including hem...

  3. The action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in intrinsic drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi; JIA Wen-xiang; ZENG Wei; YANG Wei-qing; CHENG Xi; LI Xue-ru; WANG Lan-lan; KANG Mei; ZHANG Zai-rong

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in studying the relationship between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance to drugs. However, the relationship still remains unclear in the macroscopic bacterial growth. Our study is to illuminate the change of bacterial drug resistance of gyrA mutant and active efflux pump during the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilms. Methods The strains of type Ⅱ topoisomerase gene mutant (gyrA mutant) and multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pump were clinical isolates and detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The process of bacterial biofilms development was observed by scanning electron microscope. Triparental mating experiments were performed to transfer report gene of green fluorescent protein (GFP) into P. aeruginosa biofilms strains and followed by analysis of bacterial survival rate between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance.Results The fluorescent strains with pGFPuv could develop mature biofilms on Teflon surface. Before a period of 72 hours, the survival rate of biofilms bacteria and intrinsic resistance strains in ciprofloxacin solution was significantly different (P0.05). The carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and azithromycin could significantly reduce the drug resistance of biofilm strains and efflux pump strains.Conclusions In the development of P. aeruginosa biofilms, the strains of gyrA mutation and MDR efflux could be conferred with new level of drug resistance. When co-cultured mutated strains with biofilm strains, biofilms may play a major role in bacterial resistance. But after 72 hours incubation (a mature biofilms had been developed), there was no clearly difference between the number of mutant strains and biofilm strains.

  4. [Phlegmonous gastritis. Report of a case induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Jiménez, F A; Arocena Cedrón, M G; Goikoetxea Artola, J M; Lázaro Aramburu, S; Múgica Barreiros, P

    1992-06-01

    The authors present a case of phlegmonous gastritis in a 65 year old patient. The diagnosis was made in the operating room and the treatment was conservative; no gastric resection was done. This clinical entity is interesting because it is a least frequent pathology, the pathogenic bacteria which was the cause (Pseudomona aeruginosa) has at this time not been reported in the literature, including the favorable outcome of the patient without gastric resection. PMID:1633018

  5. Nanoscale Adhesion Forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pili

    OpenAIRE

    Beaussart, Audrey; Baker, Amy E.; Kuchma, Sherry L.; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; O’Toole, George A; Yves F Dufrêne

    2014-01-01

    A variety of bacterial pathogens use nanoscale protein fibers called type IV pili to mediate cell adhesion, a primary step leading to infection. Currently, how these nanofibers respond to mechanical stimuli and how this response is used to control adhesion is poorly understood. Here, we use atomic force microscopy techniques to quantify the forces guiding the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili to surfaces. Using chemical force microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy, we sho...

  6. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    OpenAIRE

    Luyan Ma; Matthew Conover; Haiping Lu; Parsek, Matthew R.; Kenneth Bayles; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organis...

  7. Variability in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide Expression during Crude Oil Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, R. Sean; Frontera-Suau, Roberto; Morris, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial utilization of crude oil components, such as the n-alkanes, requires complex cell surface adaptation to allow adherence to oil. To better understand microbial cell surface adaptation to growth on crude oil, the cell surface characteristics of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, U1 and U3, both isolated from the same crude oil-degrading microbial community enriched on Bonny Light crude oil (BLC), were compared. Analysis of growth rates demonstrated an increased lag time for U1 cells ...

  8. Fosfomycin Enhances the Active Transport of Tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    MacLeod, David L.; Velayudhan, Jyoti; Kenney, Thomas F.; Therrien, Joseph H.; Sutherland, Jennifer L.; Barker, Lynn M.; Baker, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of mucins present in bronchiectatic airways predispose patients to bacterial infections and reduce the effectiveness of antibiotic therapies by directly inactivating antibiotics. Consequently, new antibiotics that are not inhibited by mucins are needed to treat chronic respiratory infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. In these studies, we demonstrate that fosfomycin synergistically enhances the activity of tobramycin in the presence of mucin. T...

  9. Identification of genes required for Pseudomonas aeruginosa carnitine catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wargo, Matthew J.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine is a quaternary amine compound prevalent in animal tissues, and a potential carbon, nitrogen and energy source for pathogens during infection. Characterization of activities in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell lysates has previously shown that carnitine is converted to 3-dehydrocarnitine (3-dhc) which is in turn metabolized to glycine betaine (GB), an intermediate metabolite in the catabolism of carnitine to glycine. However, the identities of the enzymes required for carnitine catabolis...

  10. Characterization of the Polymyxin B Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, L.; Alvarez-Ortega, C.; Wiegand, I.; Olivares, J.; Kocincova, D.; Lam, J S; Martinez, J.L.; Hancock, R. E. W.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is increasingly becoming a threat for human health. Indeed, some strains are resistant to almost all currently available antibiotics, leaving very limited choices for antimicrobial therapy. In many such cases, polymyxins are the only available option, although as their utilization increases so does the isolation of resistant strains. In this study, we screened a comprehensive PA14 mutant library to identify genes involved in changes of susceptibi...

  11. Emergence of colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Tabriz hospitals, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Goli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The prevalence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main reason of new drugs resurgence such as colistin. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and the rate of colistin resistance along with its correlation with overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps among P. aeruginosa isolates.Materials and Methods: Hundred clinical isolates were collected from 100 patients during 6 months in 2014. Susceptibility to the eight antibiotics was investigated using Kirby-Bauer and agar dilution methods. The Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of efflux genes.Results: Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: ticarcillin (73%, ciprofloxacin (65%, aztreonam (60%, ceftazidime (55%, gentamicin (55%, imipenem (49%, piperacillin/tazobactam (34% and colistin (2%. In disk diffusion method, only two isolates were non susceptible to colistin, however in agar dilution method the two isolates were confirmed as resistant and two others were intermediate resistant. Sixty eight (68% isolates were multi-drug resistant and 10 isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Both colistin resistant isolates showed overexpression of both efflux pumps, but two intermediate resistant isolates exhibited reduction of efflux genes expression.Conclusions: Emergence of colistin resistance is increasing in P. aeruginosa indicating great challenge in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains of this organism in Iran. ParRS may promote either induced or constitutive resistance to colistin through the activation of distinct mechanisms such as MDR efflux pumps, and LPS modification. Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Multi drug resistant, Colistin, MexAB-OprM, MexXY-OprM

  12. Development of potent inhibitors of pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Laura C.; O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Zhang, Zinan; Siryaporn, Albert; Silpe, Justin E.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new approaches for the treatment of antimicrobial-resistant infections is an urgent public health priority. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogen, in particular, is a leading source of infection in hospital settings, with few available treatment options. In the context of an effort to develop antivirulence strategies to combat bacterial infection, we identified a series of highly effective small molecules that inhibit the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence fact...

  13. Polysaccharide of the slime glycolipoprotein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Koepp, L H; Orr, T.; Bartell, P F

    1981-01-01

    The polysaccharide moiety was isolated by mild acid hydrolysis from the slime glycolipoprotein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BI. After gel filtration, the polysaccharide obtained from the Carbohydrate peak fractions was found to be lipid- and protein-free. Analyses indicated that the polysaccharide contained the carbohydrate components of the parent glycolipoprotein. Molecular size of the polysaccharide was estimated by gel filtration as 70,000 to 100,000. The polysaccharide showed no indi...

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Early Childhood: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Braga de CarvalhoVianna; Rodolfo de Almeida Lima Castro; Marta Lua Pimentel Winz Almeida; Andréa Gonçalves Antonio; Flávia dos Santos Moraes

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium that usually affects immunocompromised patients, causing infections whose signals and symptoms are related to the affected organ. The patient presented in this article was infected when he was 9 months old. Such condition led to certain alterations like dental improperly positioned teeth, retained deciduous teeth, hipodonty of permanent teeth, atrophy of the upper jaw and dental crowding. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to report ...

  15. Secretion of Elastinolytic Enzymes and Their Propeptides by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Peter; de Groot, Arjan; Bitter, Wilbert; Tommassen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is synthesized as a preproenzyme. The signal sequence is cleaved off during transport across the inner membrane and, in the periplasm, proelastase is further processed. We demonstrate that the propeptide and the mature elastase are both secreted but that the propeptide is degraded extracellularly. In addition, reduction of the extracellular proteolytic activity led to the accumulation of unprocessed forms of LasA and LasD in the extracellular medium, which s...

  16. Biofilm Formation by Hyperpiliated Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Poney; Burrows, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Under static growth conditions, hyperpiliated, nontwitching pilT and pilU mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa formed dense biofilms, showing that adhesion, not twitching motility, is necessary for biofilm initiation. Under flow conditions, the pilT mutant formed mushroom-like structures larger than those of the wild type but the pilU mutant was defective in biofilm formation. Therefore, twitching motility affects the development of biofilm structure, possibly through modulation of detachment.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Displays Multiple Phenotypes during Development as a Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Karin; Anne K. Camper; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Costerton, J. William; Davies, David G

    2002-01-01

    Complementary approaches were employed to characterize transitional episodes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development using direct observation and whole-cell protein analysis. Microscopy and in situ reporter gene analysis were used to directly observe changes in biofilm physiology and to act as signposts to standardize protein collection for two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and protein identification in chemostat and continuous-culture biofilm-grown populations. Using these appro...

  18. Characterization of Temporal Protein Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms†

    OpenAIRE

    Southey-Pillig, Christopher J.; Davies, David G; Sauer, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Phenotypic and genetic evidence supporting the notion of biofilm formation as a developmental process is growing. In the present work, we provide additional support for this hypothesis by identifying the onset of accumulation of biofilm-stage specific proteins during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maturation and by tracking the abundance of these proteins in planktonic and three biofilm developmental stages. The onset of protein production was found to correlate with the progression of biofil...

  19. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi Elham; Esmaeili Akbar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  20. Cloning and surface expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O antigen in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, J B; Hatano, K; Meluleni, G S; Pier, G B

    1992-01-01

    As a step toward developing recombinant oral vaccines, we have explored the feasibility of expression of O polysaccharide antigens from Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Escherichia coli. We cloned in E. coli HB101 a 26.2-kilobase DNA fragment from P. aeruginosa strain PA103 that specifies the production of the O polysaccharide of Fisher immunotype 2 (IT-2) strains. The recombinant organism incorporated the P. aeruginosa IT-2 O polysaccharide onto the core of the E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Tra...

  1. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    suggest that addition of oral ciprofloxacin to inhaled tobramycin may reduce lung inflammation. Clinical trials with new formulations of old antibiotics for inhalation therapy (aztreonam lysine) against chronic P. aeruginosa infection improved patient-reported outcome, lung function, time to acute...... patients without P. aeruginosa infection did not improve lung function. Here I review the recent advances in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections with a focus on inhalation treatments targeted at prophylaxis and chronic suppressive therapy....

  2. Within-host microevolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Italian cystic fibrosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Dolce, Daniela; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Petersen, Bent; Ciofu, Oana; Campana, Silvia; Molin, Søren; Taccetti, Giovanni; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and a more complete understanding of P. aeruginosa within-host genomic evolution, transmission, and population genomics may provide a basis for improving intervention strategies. Here, we report the first genomic analysis of P. aeruginosa isolates sampled from Italian CF patients. By genome sequencing of 26 isolates sampled over 19 years from four patients, we elucidated...

  3. Burn Patients Infected With Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Japoni, Aziz; Rafaatpour, Noroddin; Mardaneh, Jalal; Abbasi, Pejman; Amin Shahidi, Maneli; Dehyadegari, Mohammad Ali; Alipour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the burn patients is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and remains a serious health concern among the clinicians. Objectives: The aim of this study was to detect MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in burn patients and determine multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, and respective resistance patterns. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 270 strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from the burn patients ...

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasion of and multiplication within corneal epithelial cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Fleiszig, S M; Zaidi, T S; Pier, G.B. (G.B.)

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is usually considered an extracellular pathogen. Using assays to determine intracellular survival in the presence of gentamicin, we have previously demonstrated that P. aeruginosa is able to invade corneal cells during infectious keratitis in mice. In vitro, P. aeruginosa was found to enter the following cells: human corneal cells removed by irrigation; epithelial cells in the cornea of rats, mice, and rabbits; and primary corneal epithelial cells cultured from rat and ...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae on the perinea of males with spinal cord injuries.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmore, D S; Schick, D G; Montgomerie, J Z

    1982-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization is found in a high percentage of males with spinal cord injury. The perineum is the body site most frequently colonized, and specific serotypes may persist for weeks. We examined patients for the presence of P. aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae on the perineum and adjacent body sites by using contact plates. P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, or both were cultured from perineal swabs of 22 male patients. Wells (2.5 cm2) containing agar medium selective for th...

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivett, Brock A.; Ream, Dave C.; Fiester, Steven E.; Kidane, Destaalem

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  7. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase and Pseudomonas keratitis using a thiol-based peptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, F R; Paterson, C. A.; Gray, R. D.; Wells, J T

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase is a zinc metalloproteinase which is released during P. aeruginosa infections. Pseudomonas keratitis, which occurs following contact lens-induced corneal trauma, can lead to rapid, liquefactive necrosis of the cornea. This destruction has been attributed to the release of both host-derived enzymes and the bacterial products P. aeruginosa elastase, alkaline protease, exotoxin A, and lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor, HSCH2 (DL...

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  9. High genetic diversity among Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated in a public hospital in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Lúcia Dias Siqueira; Rosilene Fressatti Cardoso; Rubia Andreia Falleiros de Pádua; Katiany Rizzieri Caleffi-Ferracioli; Cesar Helbel; Adolfo Carlos Barreto Santos; Elisabeth Eyko Aoki; Celso Vataru Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    In Brazil and other regions of the world, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. have emerged as important agents of nosocomial infection and are commonly involved in outbreaks. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the genetic relationship among P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated from patients in a public university hospital in northwestern Paraná, Brazil, and report their antimicrobial resistance profile. A total of 75 P. aeruginosa and 94 Acinetobacter s...

  10. Inhibitory activity of Iranian plant extracts on growth and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    S Mansouri; Safa, A.; Najar, S. G.; Najar, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a drug resistance opportunistic bacterium. Biofilm formation is key factor for survivalof P. aeruginosa in various environments. Polysaccharides may be involved in biofilm formation. The purpose of thisstudy was to evaluate antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities of seven plant extracts with known alpha-glucosidaseinhibitory activities on different strains of P. aeruginosa.Methodology and results: Plants were extracted with methanol by the maceration method. ...

  11. Characterization of antibody-mediated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, M; Reen, D J

    1992-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system was developed and used to study adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to human epithelial cells and the abilities of specific antibodies to inhibit this process. Human buccal epithelial cells coated onto microtiter plates were incubated with P. aeruginosa suspensions, and adherent bacteria were detected by using anti-P. aeruginosa serum and a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antiserum. Adhesion, quantitated as an increase in A405, varied lin...

  12. Molecular identification and detection of virulence genes among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different infectious origins

    OpenAIRE

    Vajiheh Sadat Nikbin; Mohammad Mehdi Aslani; Marjan Hashemipour; Zeinab Sharafi; Fereshteh Shahcheraghi; Gholamhossein Ebrahimipour

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses a variety of virulence factors that may contribute to its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate oprI, oprL and toxA genes for PCR identification of clinical P. aeruginosa. In order to find out any relation between special virulence factors and special manifestation of P. aeruginosa infections, we detected virulence factors among these isolates by PCR. Ribotyping was used to evaluate the clonal relationship between stra...

  13. Synthesis of rhamnolipid biosurfactant and mode of hexadecane uptake by Pseudomonas species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Pooja

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microorganisms have devised ways by which they increase the bioavailability of many water immiscible substrates whose degradation rates are limited by their low water solubility. Hexadecane is one such water immiscible hydrocarbon substrate which forms an important constituent of oil. One major mechanism employed by hydrocarbon degrading organisms to utilize such substrates is the production of biosurfactants. However, much of the overall mechanism by which such organisms utilize hydrocarbon substrate still remains a mystery. Results With an aim to gain more insight into hydrocarbon uptake mechanism, an efficient biosurfactant producing and n-hexadecane utilizing Pseudomonas sp was isolated from oil contaminated soil which was found to produce rhamnolipid type of biosurfactant containing a total of 13 congeners. Biosurfactant action brought about the dispersion of hexadecane to droplets smaller than 0.22 μm increasing the availability of the hydrocarbon to the degrading organism. Involvement of biosurfactant was further confirmed by electron microscopic studies. Biosurfactant formed an emulsion with hexadecane thereby facilitating increased contact between hydrocarbon and the degrading bacteria. Interestingly, it was observed that "internalization" of "biosurfactant layered hydrocarbon droplet" was taking place suggesting a mechanism similar in appearance to active pinocytosis, a fact not earlier visually reported in bacterial systems for hydrocarbon uptake. Conclusion This study throws more light on the uptake mechanism of hydrocarbon by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We report here a new and exciting line of research for hydrocarbon uptake involving internalization of biosurfactant covered hydrocarbon inside cell for subsequent breakdown.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia in two UK district hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Enoch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively studied the epidemiology of bacteraemia due to P. aeruginosa in two UK district hospitals so as to determine prevention strategies and assess the efficacy and compliance with local hospital antibiotic guidelines. Eighty six episodes occurred in 85 patients over the 3 year period. There was a year on year increase in bacteraemias, due predominantly to an increased proportion of community-onset episodes. Urinary catheterisation was a significant risk factor, along with anaemia, renal disease, malignancy and diabetes. The antibiotic guidelines were adequate for 92.8% of episodes but only 73.8% of patients received adequate therapy. Failure to follow the guidelines was principally due to unwillingness to use gentamicin due to concerns about nephrotoxicity. The antibiotic guidelines may need reviewing to accommodate this problem and further work is required to address urinary catheter care in both the hospital and community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa should be considered a significant pathogen when patients are admitted with features of sepsis.

  15. INHIBITION OF VIRULENCE FACTORS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BY DICLOFENAC SODIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hisham A

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is a major problem. Targeting virulence factors is an alternative option to avoid the emergence of resistance to antibiotics. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentration of diclofenac sodium on the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa was investigated. The virulence factors included protease, haemolysin, pyocyanin and pyoverdin, in addition to pathogenic behaviors such as swimming and twitching motilities and biofilm formation. Diclofenac sodium showed significant inhibition of virulence factors as compared to the control. Diclofenac sodium decreased twitching and swimming motilities by 29.27% and 45.36%, respectively. The percentage of inhibition of pyocyanin by diclofenac sodium was 42.32%. On the other hand, pyoverdin was inhibited to a lesser extent (36.72%). Diclofenac sodium reduced protease by 52.58% and biofilm formation by 58.37%. Moreover, haemolytic activity in the presence of diclofenac sodium was 15.64% as compared to the control (100% haemolytic activity). The inhibitory activities may be due to inhibition of quorum sensing that regulates the expression of virulence factors. This study suggests the potential for the use of diclofenac sodium as an anti-virulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. PMID:27328521

  16. Arsenic efflux from Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yan

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton plays an important role in arsenic speciation, distribution, and cycling in freshwater environments. Little information, however, is available on arsenic efflux from the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes. This study investigated M. aeruginosa arsenic efflux and speciation by pre-exposing it to 10 µM arsenate or arsenite for 24 h during limited (12 h and extended (13 d depuration periods under phosphate enriched (+P and phosphate depleted (-P treatments. Arsenate was the predominant species detected in algal cells throughout the depuration period while arsenite only accounted for no greater than 45% of intracellular arsenic. During the limited depuration period, arsenic efflux occurred rapidly and only arsenate was detected in solutions. During the extended depuration period, however, arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA were found to be the two predominant arsenic species detected in solutions under -P treatments, but arsenate was the only species detected under +P treatments. Experimental results also suggest that phosphorus has a significant effect in accelerating arsenic efflux and promoting arsenite bio-oxidation in M. aeruginosa. Furthermore, phosphorus depletion can reduce arsenic efflux from algal cells as well as accelerate arsenic reduction and methylation. These findings can contribute to our understanding of arsenic biogeochemistry in aquatic environments and its potential environmental risks under different phosphorus levels.

  17. Inquisition of Microcystis aeruginosa and Synechocystis nanowires: characterization and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sure, Sandeep; Torriero, Angel A J; Gaur, Aditya; Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Ackland, M Leigh; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-11-01

    Identification of extracellular conductive pilus-like structures (PLS) i.e. microbial nanowires has spurred great interest among scientists due to their potential applications in the fields of biogeochemistry, bioelectronics, bioremediation etc. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we identified microbial nanowires in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 which is an aerobic, photosynthetic microorganism. We also confirmed the earlier finding that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 produces microbial nanowires. In contrast to the use of highly instrumented continuous flow reactors for Synechocystis reported earlier, we identified simple and optimum culture conditions which allow increased production of nanowires in both test cyanobacteria. Production of these nanowires in Synechocystis and Microcystis were found to be sensitive to the availability of carbon source and light intensity. These structures seem to be proteinaceous in nature and their diameter was found to be 4.5-7 and 8.5-11 nm in Synechocystis and M. aeruginosa, respectively. Characterization of Synechocystis nanowires by transmission electron microscopy and biochemical techniques confirmed that they are type IV pili (TFP) while nanowires in M. aeruginosa were found to be similar to an unnamed protein (GenBank : CAO90693.1). Modelling studies of the Synechocystis TFP subunit i.e. PilA1 indicated that strategically placed aromatic amino acids may be involved in electron transfer through these nanowires. This study identifies PLS from Microcystis which can act as nanowires and supports the earlier hypothesis that microbial nanowires are widespread in nature and play diverse roles. PMID:26319534

  18. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl, pellicle Formation (Pel and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  19. Functional study of elafin cleaved by Pseudomonas aeruginosa metalloproteinases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guyot, Nicolas

    2010-06-01

    Elafin is a 6-kDa innate immune protein present at several epithelial surfaces including the pulmonary epithelium. It is a canonical protease inhibitor of two neutrophil serine proteases [neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3] with the capacity to covalently bind extracellular matrix proteins by transglutamination. In addition to these properties, elafin also possesses antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases on elafin function. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO1-conditioned medium and two purified Pseudomonas metalloproteases, pseudolysin (elastase) and aeruginolysin (alkaline protease), are able to cleave recombinant elafin. Pseudolysin was shown to inactivate the anti-NE activity of elafin by cleaving its protease-binding loop. Interestingly, antibacterial properties of elafin against PAO1 were found to be unaffected after pseudolysin treatment. In contrast to pseudolysin, aeruginolysin failed to inactivate the inhibitory properties of elafin against NE. Aeruginolysin cleaves elafin at the amino-terminal Lys6-Gly7 peptide bond, resulting in a decreased ability to covalently bind purified fibronectin following transglutaminase activity. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that elafin is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage at alternative sites by P. aeruginosa metalloproteinases, which can affect different biological functions of elafin.

  20. Light intensity adaptation and phycobilisome composition of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raps, S.; Kycia, J.H.; Ledbetter, M.C.; Siegelman, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    Phycobilisomes isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa grown to midlog at high light (270 microeinsteins per square meter per second) or at low light intensities (40 microeinsteins per square meter per second) were found to be identical. Electron micrographs established that they have a triangular central core apparently consisting of three allophycocyanin trimers surrounded by six rods, each composed of two hexameric phycocyanin molecules. The apparent mass of a phycobilisome obtained by gel filtration is 2.96 x 10/sup 6/ daltons. The molar ratio of the phycobiliproteins per phycobilisome is 12 phycocyanin hexamers:9 allophycocyanin trimers. The electron microscopic observations combined with the phycobilisome apparent mass and the phycobiliprotein stoichiometry data indicate that M. aeruginosa phycobilisomes are composed of a triangular central core of three stacks of three allophycocyanin trimers and six rods each containing two phycocyanin hexamers. Adaptation of M. aeruginosa to high light intensity results in a decrease in the number of phycobilisomes per cell with no alteration in phycobilisome composition or structure.

  1. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hao; Zhang, Lu; Weng, Yuding; Chen, Ronghao; Zhu, Feng; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here, we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM. PMID:27014238

  2. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao eTan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis (CF patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM.

  3. Continued transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a wash hand basin tap in a critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M I; Bradley, C W; Tracey, J; Oppenheim, B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen, colonizing hospital water supplies including taps and sinks. We report a cluster of P. aeruginosa acquisitions during a period of five months from tap water to patients occupying the same burns single room in a critical care unit. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured from clinical isolates from four different patients was indistinguishable from water strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Water outlets in critical care may be a source of P. aeruginosa despite following the national guidance, and updated guidance and improved control measures are needed to reduce the risks of transmission to patients. PMID:27249962

  4. Inhibitory effects of sanguinarine against the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843 and possible mechanisms of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Jihai [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Liu, Deming [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Crop Germplasm Innovation and Resource Utilization, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gong, Daoxin; Zeng, Qingru; Yan, Zhiyong [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gu, Ji-Dong, E-mail: jdgu@hku.hk [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Toxicology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Sanguinarine was found as a strong algicidal biologically derived substance. •Sanguinarine can induce oxidative stress in the cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. •Photosystem is a target of toxicity of sanguinarine on M. aeruginosa. •Sanguinarine can induce DNA damage and inhibit cell division. -- Abstract: Sanguinarine showed strong inhibitory effect against Microcystis aeruginosa, a typical water bloom-forming and microcystins-producing cyanobacterium. The EC50 of sanguinarine against the growth of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 was 34.54 ± 1.17 μg/L. Results of chlorophyll fluorescence transient analysis indicated that all the electron donating side, accepting side, and the reaction center of the Photosystem II (PS II) were the targets of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 upon exposure indicated that sanguinarine induced oxidative stress in the active growing cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843. Further results of gene expression analysis indicated that DNA damage and cell division inhibition were also involved in the inhibitory action mechanism of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The inhibitory characteristics of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa suggest that the ecological- and public health-risks need to be evaluated before its application in cyanobacterial bloom control to avoid devastating events irreversibly.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  6. Secretory IgA as a diagnostic tool for Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanaes, Kasper; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Pressler, Tacjana; Buchwald, Christian; Høiby, Niels

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa sinusitis may be the focus for intermittent lung colonization in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The sinusitis may induce elevated IgA levels in nasal secretion and saliva against P. aeruginosa. METHODS: 120 CF patients chronically infected, intermittently...... colonized or without P. aeruginosa in the lungs participated in this cross-sectional study. IgA and IgG against P. aeruginosa sonicate and alginate were measured in nasal secretions, saliva, and in serum by ELISA. RESULTS: The intermittently colonized patients had significantly higher IgA levels in nasal...

  7. Antibiogram of Multidrug-Resistant Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa after Biofield Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, prevalence of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) has been noticed with high morbidity and mortality. Aim of the present study was to determine the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment on MDR clinical lab isolates (LS) of P. aeruginosa. Five MDR clinical lab isolates (LS 22, LS 23, LS 38, LS 47, and LS 58) of P. aeruginosa were taken and divided into two groups i.e. control and biofield treated. Control and treated group were analy...

  8. MECANISMOS DE RESISTENCIA EN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA: ENTENDIENDO A UN PELIGROSO ENEMIGO Resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: understanding a dangerous enemy

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Andrés Gómez Álvarez; Aura Lucía Leal Castro; María de Jesús Pérez de Gonzalez; Myriam Lucía Navarrete Jiménez

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa es un bacilo Gram negativo no fermentador, ampliamente relacionado con la infección nosocomial. Este tipo de infecciones se presentan en pacientes severamente comprometidos, hospitalizados especialmente en unidades de cuidado intensivo, donde existe una alta presión de selección de resistencia por parte de los antibióticos. Estas infecciones nosocomiales tienen implicaciones en el pronóstico del paciente, los costos del tratamiento, la estancia hospitalaria, la morbilid...

  9. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Manuel R; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai; Perron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound

  10. Lactate, Glucose and Oxygen Uptake in Human Brain During Recovery from Maximal Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kojiro, I.; Schmalbruch, I.K.; Quistorff, B.; Horn, A.; Secher, Niels Henry

    Skeletal muscle, brain lactate uptake, brain oxygen uptake, energy metabolism, brain glucose uptake......Skeletal muscle, brain lactate uptake, brain oxygen uptake, energy metabolism, brain glucose uptake...

  11. Pulmonary uptake of morphine (M)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously the authors reported less than 5% of M was taken up during the first pass through the human lung. The low uptake of this basic lipophilic amine was further investigated in a single pass isolated perfused rat lung (IPL) in comparison to uptake of radiolabelled H2O, antipyrine (A), aminopyrine (AM), nicotine (N) and phenylethylamine (P). The IPL was perfused for 5 min with each drug (5nmol/ml) and effluent collected in 10 sec fractions. Pulmonary extraction was calculated using indocyanine green dye as a non-extractable reference indicator. Accumulation of all compounds in the IPL reached an apparent equilibrium within 4 min. At equilibrium lung/perfusate conc. ratios for H2O, A, AM, N, P and M were 1.04, 0.84, 0.85, 1.44, 2.57 and 1.13 respectively. The time course of M uptake differed from the other compounds since initial extraction of M was low (23%) compared to 75%, 53%, 35%, 82% and 86% for H2O, A, AM, N and P respectively. Also, the half time to equilibrium for M was longer (50 sec) compared to 18, 21, 26, 19 and 22 sec for H2O, A, AM, N and P respectively. The low initial pulmonary extraction of M compared to these compounds followed by greater M extraction during the remainder of drug infusion suggests uptake mechanisms for M different than the flow limited uptake for water and other basic amine drugs

  12. Uptake of Glyphosate by an Arthrobacter sp

    OpenAIRE

    Pipke, Rüdiger; Schulz, Arno; Amrhein, Nikolaus

    1987-01-01

    The uptake of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl]glycine) by an Arthrobacter sp. which can utilize this herbicide as its sole source of phosphorus was investigated. Orthophosphate suppressed the expression of the uptake system for glyphosate and also competed with glyphosate for uptake. The Km for glyphosate uptake was 125 μM, and the Ki for orthophosphate was 24 μM. Organophosphonates as well as organophosphates inhibited glyphosate uptake, but only organophosphates and orthophosphate suppressed...

  13. The phenotypic evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations changes in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassermann, Tina; Meinike Jørgensen, Karin; Ivanyshyn, Karolina;

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a widely used antibiotic, in the class of quinolones, for treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The immediate response of P. aeruginosa to subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin has been investigated previously. However, the long-term phenotypic adaptation, which...

  14. Analysis of integrons and associated gene cassettes in clinical isolates of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Southwest Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Odumosu, Bamidele T; Adeniyi, Bolanle A.; Chandra, Ram

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa harbours integrons and other mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and transposons, which easily disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinical strains of P. aeruginosa. Methodology Plasmid extraction of 54 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa was carried out by alkaline lysis method; and plasmid size estimation was done by using E. coli V517 standard plasmid marker. Fifty-four clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from ...

  15. Positive signature-tagged mutagenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Tracking patho-adaptive mutations promoting airways chronic infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bianconi, Irene; Milani, Andrea; Cigana, Cristina; Paroni, Moira; Levesque, Roger C.; Bertoni, Giovanni; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long chronic infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent lifestyle is established with P. aeruginosa patho-adaptive variants, which are clonal with the initially-acquired strains. Several reports indicated that P. aeruginosa adapts by loss-of-function mutations which enhance fitness in CF airways and sustain its clonal expansion during chronic infection. To validate this model of P. aeruginosa adap...

  16. Detection of AmpC-β-lactamases producing isolates among carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from burn patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Akbar Mirsalehian; Davood Kalantar-Neyestanaki; Keramat Nourijelyani; Kheirollah Asadollahi; Morovat Taherikalani; Mohammad Emaneini; Fereshteh Jabalameli

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for devastating nosocomial infections among severely burn patients. Class C of cephalosporinase (AmpC-β-lactamases) is important cause of multiple β-lactam resistance in P. aeruginosa. The aim of this study was to detect the AmpC-β-lactamases producing isolates among carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from burn patient. Material and Methods a total of 100 isolates of carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolates from diffe...

  17. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies augment bacterial clearance in a murine pneumonia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K; Christophersen, L; Bjarnsholt, T;

    2016-01-01

    -P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies on bacterial eradication in a murine pneumonia model. METHODS: P. aeruginosa pneumonia was established in Balb/c mice and the effects of prophylactic IgY administration on lung bacteriology, clinical parameters and subsequent inflammation were compared to controls. RESULTS...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular products inhibit staphylococcal growth, and disrupt established biofilms produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Yang, Liang; Qu, Di;

    2009-01-01

    in overnight cultures had no effect on established P. aeruginosa biofilms and planktonic growth. These findings reveal that P. aeruginosa extracellular products are important microbial competition factors that overcome competition with S. epidermidis, and the results may provide clues for the development...

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasl and rhll quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian;

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared...

  20. Polysaccharides serve as scaffold of biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lung infection by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major pathologic features in patients with cystic fibrosis. Mucoid P. aeruginosa is notorious for its biofilm forming capability and resistance to immune attacks. In this study, the roles of extracellular polymeric substances f...

  1. Evolutionary insight from whole-genome sequencing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Jelsbak, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic airway infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and it is directly associated with the morbidity and mortality connected with this disease. The ability of P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF patients is sugg...

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Burmølle, Mette; Hentzer, Morten; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hougen, Hans Petter; Calum, Henrik; Madsen, Kit G; Moser, Claus; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael Christian

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant to...

  3. Glutathione exhibits antibacterial activity and increases tetracycline efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YaNi; DUAN KangMin

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays important roles in pulmonary diseases, and inhaled GSH therapy has been used to treat cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in clinical trials. The results in this report revealed that GSH altered the sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to different antibiotics through pathways unrelated to the oxidative stress as generally perceived. In addition, GSH and its oxidized form inhibited the growth of P. Aeruginosa.

  4. Mutations in 23S rRNA Confer Resistance against Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Søndergaard, Mette S. R.; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær;

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important concern in the treatment of long-term airway infections in cystic fibrosis patients. In this study, we report the occurrence of azithromycin resistance among clinical P. aeruginosa DK2 isolates. We demonstrate that...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis: insights into pathogenic processes and treatment strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassett, Daniel J; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Irvin, Randall T;

    2010-01-01

    CF airway mucus can be infected by opportunistic microorganisms, notably Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Once organisms are established as biofilms, even the most potent antibiotics have little effect on their viability, especially during late-stage chronic infections. Better understanding of the mechani...... mechanisms used by P. aeruginosa to circumvent host defenses and therapeutic intervention strategies is critical for advancing novel treatment strategies....

  6. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lo Sciuto

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery.

  7. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Bertuccini, Lucia; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery. PMID:25093328

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Fiandaca, Mark J; Pedersen, Jette; Hansen, Christine Rønne; Andersen, Claus Bøgelund; Pressler, Tacjana; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels

    2009-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the appearance and location of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung and in sputum. Samples include preserved tissues of CF patients who died due to chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection prior to the advent of intensive antibiotic...

  9. Epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis and the possible role of contamination by dental equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Giwercman, B; Ojeniyi, B; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Hansen, A; Koch, C; Fiehn, N E; Høiby, N

    1997-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often suffer from Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection yet the source of this organism is not known. In order to determine whether CF patients might be contaminated with P. aeruginosa from dental equipment, a total of 103 water samples from 25 dental sessions in...

  10. Effects of Microcystis aeruginosa on life history of water flea Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Li, Kang; Chen, Taoying; Dai, Xilin; Jiang, Min; Diana, James S.

    2011-07-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic freshwater systems are a worldwide problem, creating adverse effects for many aquatic organisms by producing toxic microcystins and deteriorating water quality. In this study, microcystins (MCs) in Microcystis aeruginosa, and Daphnia magna exposed to M. aeruginosa, were analyzed by HPLC-MS, and the effects of M. aeruginosa on D. magna were investigated. When D. magna was exposed to M. aeruginosa for more than 2 h, Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) was detected. When exposed to 1.5 × 106, 3 × 106, 0.75 × 107, and 1.5 × 107 cell/mL of M. aeruginosa for 96 h, average survival of D. magna for treatments were 23.33%, 33.33%, 13.33%, 16.67%, respectively, which were significantly lower than the average 100% survival in the control group ( P < 0.05). The adverse effects of M. aeruginosa on body length, time for the first brood, brood numbers, gross fecundity, lifespan, and population growth of D. magna were density-dependent. These results suggest that the occurrence of M. aeruginosa blooms could strongly inhibit the population growth of D. magna through depression of survival, individual growth and gross fecundity. In the most serious situations, M. aeruginosa blooms could undermine the food web by eliminating filter-feeding zooplankton, which would destroy the ecological balance of aquaculture water bodies.

  11. Rhamnolipids Are Virulence Factors That Promote Early Infiltration of Primary Human Airway Epithelia by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Zulianello, Laurence; Canard, Coralie; Köhler, Thilo; Caille, Dorothée; Lacroix, Jean-Silvain; Meda, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised individuals. Bacterial adherence to the basolateral domain of the host cells and internalization are thought to participate in P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. However, the mechanism by which the pathogen initially modulates the paracellular permeability of polarized respiratory epithelia remains to be understood. To investigate this mechanism, we have searched for vir...

  12. Evaluation of a FRET-peptide substrate to predict virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy E Kaman

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a number of proteases that are associated with virulence and disease progression. A substrate able to detect P. aeruginosa-specific proteolytic activity could help to rapidly alert clinicians to the virulence potential of individual P. aeruginosa strains. For this purpose we designed a set of P. aeruginosa-specific fluorogenic substrates, comprising fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-labeled peptides, and evaluated their applicability to P. aeruginosa virulence in a range of clinical isolates. A FRET-peptide comprising three glycines (3xGly was found to be specific for the detection of P. aeruginosa proteases. Further screening of 97 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates showed a wide variation in 3xGly cleavage activity. The absence of 3xGly degradation by a lasI knock out strain indicated that 3xGly cleavage by P. aeruginosa could be quorum sensing (QS-related, a hypothesis strengthened by the observation of a strong correlation between 3xGly cleavage, LasA staphylolytic activity and pyocyanin production. Additionally, isolates able to cleave 3xGly were more susceptible to the QS inhibiting antibiotic azithromycin (AZM. In conclusion, we designed and evaluated a 3xGly substrate possibly useful as a simple tool to predict virulence and AZM susceptibility.

  13. Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in sputum headspace through volatile organic compound analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goeminne Pieter C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic pulmonary infection is the hallmark of Cystic Fibrosis lung disease. Searching for faster and easier screening may lead to faster diagnosis and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa. Our aim was to analyze and build a model to predict the presence of P. aeruginosa in sputa. Methods Sputa from 28 bronchiectatic patients were used for bacterial culturing and analysis of volatile compounds by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Data analysis and model building were done by Partial Least Squares Regression Discriminant analysis (PLS-DA. Two analysis were performed: one comparing P. aeruginosa positive with negative cultures at study visit (PA model and one comparing chronic colonization according to the Leeds criteria with P. aeruginosa negative patients (PACC model. Results The PA model prediction of P. aeruginosa presence was rather poor, with a high number of false positives and false negatives. On the other hand, the PACC model was stable and explained chronic P. aeruginosa presence for 95% with 4 PLS-DA factors, with a sensitivity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 86% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Conclusion Our study shows the potential for building a prediction model for the presence of chronic P. aeruginosa based on volatiles from sputum.

  14. Epistatic Mutations And Unpredictable Phenotypes In Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Eva Kammer; Abou Hachem, Maher; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, able to adapt to stressful environments such as the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the CF environment is associated with phenotypic changes, such as switch in mucoidy, antibiotic resistance and loss of virulence...

  15. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  16. Genome‐wide identification of novel small RNAs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    44 sRNAs in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, RNA sequencing (RNA‐seq) is used to identify novel transcripts in P. aeruginosa involving a combination of three different sequencing libraries. Almost all known sRNAs and over 500 novel intergenic sRNAs are identified...

  17. The role of quorum sensing in the pathogenicity of the cunning aggressor Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2007-01-01

    , and, particularly, higher organisms We have focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen producing more than 30 QS-regulated virulence factors. P. aeruginosa causes several types of nosocomial infection, and lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We review the role of QS in...

  18. Multiple roles of biosurfactants in structural biofilm development by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2007-01-01

    . aeruginosa rhl4 mutants were defective in migration-dependent development of mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in the later phase of biofilm formation. Experiments involving three-color-coded mixed-strain P. aeruginosa biofilms demonstrated that the wild-type and rhl4 and pil4 mutant strains formed...

  19. Distinct roles of extracellular polymeric substances in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yang;

    2011-01-01

    polysaccharides are also essential for subpopulation interactions and macrocolony formation in the later stages of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation. Pel and Psl polysaccharides have different impacts on Pseudomonas quinolone signal‐mediated extracellular DNA release in P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Psl...

  20. Effects of sulfate on microcystin production, photosynthesis, and oxidative stress in Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Gin, Karina Y H; He, Yiliang

    2016-02-01

    Increasing sulfate in freshwater systems, caused by human activities and climate change, may have negative effects on aquatic organisms. Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) is both a major primary producer and a common toxic cyanobacterium, playing an important role in the aquatic environment. This study first investigated the effects of sulfate on M. aeruginosa. The experiment presented here aims at analyzing the effects of sulfate on physiological indices, molecular levels, and its influencing mechanism. The results of our experiment showed that sulfate (at 40, 80, and 300 mg L(-1)) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth, increased both intracellular and extracellular toxin contents, and enhanced the mcyD transcript level. Sulfate inhibited the photosynthesis of M. aeruginosa, based on the decrease in pigment content and the down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes after sulfate exposure. Furthermore, sulfate decreased the maximum electron transport rate, causing the cell to accumulate surplus electrons and form reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sulfate also increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, which showed that sulfate damaged the cytomembrane. This damage contributed to the release of intracellular toxin to the culture medium. Although sulfate increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, expression of sod, and total antioxidant capacity in M. aeruginosa, it still overwhelmed the antioxidant system since the ROS level simultaneously increased, and finally caused oxidative stress. Our results indicate that sulfate has direct effects on M. aeruginosa, inhibits photosynthesis, causes oxidative stress, increases toxin production, and affects the related genes expression in M. aeruginosa. PMID:26490939

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3

    OpenAIRE

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Konrad H Paszkiewicz; Studholme, David J.; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Venturi, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3.

  2. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A S; Jørgensen, Bo; Bjarnsholt, T;

    2010-01-01

    PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa DeltalasR rhlR (DeltaRR) QS-deficient mutant in different concentrations. Maggots were killed in the...

  3. Paerucumarin, a new metabolite produced by the pvc gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke-Pearson, Michael F; Brady, Sean F

    2008-10-01

    The pvc gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been linked to the biosynthesis of both the pyoverdine chromophore and pseudoverdine. Our reinvestigation of the role this gene cluster plays in P. aeruginosa secondary metabolite biosynthesis shows that its major product is actually paerucumarin, a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin. PMID:18689486

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Bacterial Components Influence the Cytokine Response in Thymocytes and Splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Andreas; Zimmermann, Corinna; Mausberg, Anne K; Dehmel, Thomas; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hofstetter, Harald H

    2016-05-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause many different diseases. The spectrum of such infections in general includes inflammation and bacterial sepsis. Hospital-acquired pneumonia, naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, is associated with a particularly high mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa is complex and mediated by several virulence factors, as well as cell-associated factors. We have previously demonstrated that stimulation with different bacteria triggers the cytokine response of thymocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of P. aeruginosa and its different components on the cytokine production of immature and mature immune cells. We found that the induced cytokine pattern in the thymus and the spleen after infections with P. aeruginosa is primarily mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer cell membrane, but other components of the bacterium can influence the cytokine secretion as well. Stimulation with heat-killed P. aeruginosa and LPS does not influence the amount of cytokine-producing CD4(+) T cells but instead suppresses the emergence of Th17 cells. However, stimulation with P. aeruginosa or its components triggers the interleukin-17 (IL-17) response both in thymocytes and in splenocytes. We conclude that infections with P. aeruginosa affect the cytokine secretion of immature and mature cells and that IL-17 and Th17 cells play only a minor role in the development of pathological systemic inflammatory disease conditions during P. aeruginosa infections. Therefore, other inflammatory immune responses must be responsible for septic reactions of the host. PMID:26902726

  5. Heterogeneity of biofilms formed by nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Baoleri; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Ciofu, O.; Andersen, Jens Bo; Hoiby, N.; Molin, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Biofilms are thought to play a key role in the occurrence of lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, 20 nonmucoid P. aeruginosa isolates collected during different periods of chronic infection from eight CF patients were assessed with respect...

  6. Octreotide Uptake in Parathyroid Adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyhan Karaçavuş

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The patient with a history of bone pain and muscle weakness, was thought to have oncogenic osteomalacia as a result of biochemical investigations and directed to Nuclear Medicine Department for a whole-body bone scintigraphy and 111In-octreotide scintigraphy. There was no focal pathologic tracer uptake, but generalized marked increase in skeletal uptake on bone scintigraphy. Octreotide scintigraphy showed accumulation of octreotide in the region of the left lobe of the thyroid gland in the neck. Thereafter, parathyroid scintigraphy was performed with technetium-99m labeled metroxy-isobutyl-isonitryl (99mTc-MIB and MIBI scan demonstrated radiotracer uptake at the same location with octreotide scintigraphy. The patient underwent left inferior parathyroidectomy and histopathology confirmed a parathyroid adenoma. Somatostatin receptor positive parathyroid adenoma may show octreotide uptake. Octreotide scintigraphy may be promising and indicate a possibility of using somatostatin analogues for the medical treatment of somatostatin receptor positive parathyroid tumors. (MIRT 2012;21:77-79

  7. Uptake of ciprofloxacin by macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Easmon, C. S.; Crane, J P

    1985-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin was concentrated within mouse peritoneal macrophages to between two and three times extracellular values. Uptake was rapid, occurred equally well with dead cells, and was not affected by lowering the pH or by prior ingestion of Staphylococcus aureus. Intracellular staphylococci were killed by extracellular concentrations of ciprofloxacin as low as 0.5 mg/l.

  8. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Ma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organism for the study of biofilms. The extracellular polymeric substance of P. aeruginosa biofilms is an ill-defined mix of polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Here, we directly visualize the product of the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl exopolysaccharide at different stages of biofilm development. During attachment, Psl is anchored on the cell surface in a helical pattern. This promotes cell-cell interactions and assembly of a matrix, which holds bacteria in the biofilm and on the surface. Chemical dissociation of Psl from the bacterial surface disrupted the Psl matrix as well as the biofilm structure. During biofilm maturation, Psl accumulates on the periphery of 3-D-structured microcolonies, resulting in a Psl matrix-free cavity in the microcolony center. At the dispersion stage, swimming cells appear in this matrix cavity. Dead cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA are also concentrated in the Psl matrix-free area. Deletion of genes that control cell death and autolysis affects the formation of the matrix cavity and microcolony dispersion. These data provide a mechanism for how P. aeruginosa builds a matrix and subsequently a cavity to free a portion of cells for seeding dispersal. Direct visualization reveals that Psl is a key scaffolding matrix component and opens up avenues for therapeutics of biofilm-related complications.

  9. Antibiofilm activities of certain biocides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gharavi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can produce biofilm. Biofilm is a complex, three dimensional structure in which microorganisms are attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix made of extracellular polymers. Due to high resistance to antimicrobial agents, biofilms create difficulties in various situations in healthcare. In this study, antibiofilm activities of some biocides in P. aeruginosa were studied."nMaterials and methods: The biofilm production ability of P. aeruginosa strain 214 (a clinical isolate was determined in the presence of six biocides including of ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA, silver nitrate (AgNO3, bismuth ethanedithiol (BisEDT, bismuth dimercaprol (BisBAL, bismuth-2-mercaptoethanol (BisMEO and bismuth propanedithiol (BisPDT using the modified microtiter plate method. Bactericidal activity of the biocides against biofilm and planktonic cells was investigated. In this study, permeation of biocides through alginate layer was evaluated with a sandwich cup method."nResults: The results demonstrated that in the presence of bismuth thiols, biofilm production in MIC and sub MIC concentrations was considerably inhibited. Bismuththiols had lower antibiofilm bactericidal activity than EDTA and silver nitrate. One possible mechanism of biofilm resistance is exopolysaccharide production which prevents the access of antimicrobial agents to cells inside the biofilm. Bismuth thiols could not penetrate, while EDTA and silver nitrate had high penetration rate."nConclusions: Due to the frequent use of silver nitrate and EDTA in various applications, low efficacy in the inhibition of biofilm production, unstudied toxicity of BTs for humans and high efficacy in the inhibition of biofilm production, it is suggested that combinatory effect of BTs with silver nitrate or EDTA on biofilms and biofilm production be investigated.

  10. Ocean carbon uptake and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The ocean contains about 95% of the carbon in the atmosphere, ocean and land biosphere system, and is of fundamental importance in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In the 1990s an international research effort involving Australia was established to determine the uptake and storage of anthropogenic C02 for all major ocean basins. The research showed that about 118 of the 244 + 20 billion tons of the anthropogenic carbon emitted through fossil fuel burning and cement production has been stored in the ocean since preindustrial times, thus helping reduce the rate of increase in atmospheric C02. The research also showed the terrestrial biosphere has been a small net source of C02 (39 ± 28 billion tons carbon) to the atmosphere over the same period. About 60% of the total ocean inventory of the anthropogenic C02 was found in the Southern Hemisphere, with most in the 300S to 500S latitude band. This mid-latitude band is where surface waters are subducted as Mode and Intermediate waters, which is a major pathway controlling ocean C02 uptake. High storage (23% of the total) also occurs in the North Atlantic, associated with deep water formation in that basin. The ocean uptake and storage is expected to increase in the coming decades as atmospheric C02 concentrations rise. However, a number of feedback mechanisms associated with surface warming, changes in circulation, and biological effects are likely to impact on the uptake capacity. The accumulation or storage-of the C02 in the ocean is also the major driver of ocean acidification with potential to disrupt marine ecosystems. This talk will describe the current understanding of the ocean C02 uptake and storage and a new international research strategy to detect how the ocean uptake and storage will evolve on interannual through decadal scales. Understanding the ocean response to increasing atmospheric C02 will be a key element in managing future C02 increases and establishing stabilisation

  11. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  12. Ginseng treatment reduces bacterial load and lung pathology in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Z; Johansen, H K; Faber, V;

    1997-01-01

    The predominant pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which results in a chronic lung infection associated with progressive pulmonary insufficiency. In a rat model of chronic P. aeruginosa pneumonia mimicking that in patients with CF, we studied whether the...... inflammation and antibody responses could be changed by treatment with the Chinese herbal medicine ginseng. An aqueous extract of ginseng was injected subcutaneously, and cortisone and saline were used as controls. Two weeks after challenge with P. aeruginosa, the ginseng-treated group showed a significantly...... against P. aeruginosa sonicate and a shift from an acute type to a chronic type of lung inflammation compared to those in the control and cortisone-treated groups were observed. These findings indicate that ginseng treatment of an experimental P. aeruginosa pneumonia in rats promotes a cellular response...

  13. Dynamics and spatial distribution of beta-lactamase expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N.; Hentzer, Morten; Andersen, Jens Bo; Ciofu, O.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Høiby, N.

    2004-01-01

    The development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics is a problem in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. The main resistance mechanism is high-level expression of the chromosomally encoded AmpC beta-lactamase of P. aeruginosa...... cells growing in biofilms. Several genes have been shown to influence the level of ampC expression, but little is known about the regulation of ampC expression in P. aeruginosa biofilms. To study the expression of ampC in P. aeruginosa biofilms, we constructed a reporter that consisted of the fusion of...... the ampC promoter to gfp(ASV) encoding an unstable version of the green fluorescent protein. In vitro biofilms of P. aeruginosa were exposed to the beta-lactam antibiotics imipenem and ceftazidime. Sub-MICs of imipenem significantly induced the monitor system of the biofilm bacteria in the peripheries...

  14. Pattern differentiation in co-culture biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Markussen, Trine;

    2011-01-01

    -culture biofilms. By growing co-culture biofilms of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa mutants in a flow-chamber system and observing them using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 facilitates S. aureus microcolony formation. In contrast, P. aeruginosa mucA and rpoN mutants do...... not facilitate S. aureus microcolony formation and tend to outcompete S. aureus in co-culture biofilms. Further investigations reveal that extracellular DNA (eDNA) plays an important role in S. aureus microcolony formation and that P. aeruginosa type IV pili are required for this process, probably through...... their ability to bind to eDNA. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa is able to protect S. aureus against Dictyostelium discoideum phagocytosis in co-culture biofilms....

  15. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Molin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP reductase (ENR from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent. EGCG treatment was further shown to be able to attenuate the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa.

  16. [Surviving Forms in Antibiotic-Treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyukin, A L; Kozlova, A N; Sorokin, V V; Suzina, N E; Cherdyntseva, T A; Kotova, I B; Gaponov, A M; Tutel'yan, A V; El'-Registan, G I

    2015-01-01

    Survival of bacterial populations treated with lethal doses of antibiotics is ensured by the presence of very small numbers of persister cells. Unlike antibiotic-resistant cells, antibiotic tolerance of persisters is not inheritable and reversible. The present work provides evidence supporting the hypothesis of transformation (maturation) of persisters of an opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed by ciprofloxacin (CF) treatment (25-100 μg/mL) into dormant cystlike cells (CLC) and non-culturable cells (NC), as was described previously for a number. of non-spore-forming bacteria. Subpopulations of type 1 and type 2 persisters, which survived antibiotic treatment and developed into dormant forms, were heterogeneous in their capacity to form colonies or microcolonies upon germination, in resistance to heating at 70 degrees C, and in cell morphology Type 1 persisters, which were formed after 1-month incubation in the stationary-phase cultures in the medium with decreased C and N concentrations, developed in several types of surviving cells, including those similar to CLC in cell morphology. In the course of 1-month incubation of type 2 persisters, which were formed in exponentially growing cultures, other types of surviving cells developed: immature CLC and L-forms. Unlike P. aeruginosa CLC formed in the control post-stationary phase cultures without antibiotic treatment, most of 1-month persisters, especially type 2 ones, were characterized by the loss of colony-forming capacity, probably due to transition into an uncultured state with relatively high numbers of live intact cells (Live/Dead test). Another survival strategy of P. aeruginosa populations was ensured by a minor subpopulation of CF-tolerant and CF-resistant cells able to grow in the form of microcolonies or regular colonies of decreased size in the presence of the antibiotic. The described P. aeruginosa dormant forms may be responsible for persistent forms in bacteria carriers and latent

  17. Protective role of murine norovirus against Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Hober, Didier; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bortolotti, Perrine; Faure, Karine; Dessein, Rodrigue; Kipnis, Eric; Guery, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered mouse pathogen, representing the most common contaminant in laboratory mouse colonies. Nevertheless, the effects of MNV infection on biomedical research are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection could alter immune response in mice with acute lung infection. Here we report that co-infection with MNV increases survival of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute lung injury and decreases in vivo production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that MNV infection can deeply modify the parameters studied in conventional models of infection and lead to false conclusions in experimental models. PMID:26338794

  18. Functional analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer PAI.

    OpenAIRE

    Passador, L; Tucker, K D; Guertin, K R; Journet, M P; Kende, A S; Iglewski, B H

    1996-01-01

    A series of structural analogs of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer [PAI, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone] were obtained and tested for their ability to act as autoinducers in stimulating the expression of the gene for elastase (lasB) by measuring beta-galactosidase production from a lasB-lacZ gene fusion in the presence of the transcriptional activator LasR. The data suggest that the length of the acyl side chain of the autoinducer molecule is the most critical factor for activity...

  19. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Gandee, Leah; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Zimmern, Philippe; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model.

  20. Genetic studies of the murine corneal response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, R S; Beisel, K; Hazlett, L D

    1981-01-01

    The murine genetic control of resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection previously has been demonstrated to be regulated by two complementing dominant genes, PsCR1 and PsCR2. The PsCR1 locus apparently is not associated with the H-2 complex, whereas the PsCR2 locus could not definitively be associated with H-2. In this study we attempted to demonstrate a possible H-2 linkage of the PsCR2 locus. A panel of inbred congenic strains varying with either the H-2 haplotype or genetic backgr...

  1. Infectious conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a bathroom

    OpenAIRE

    Eguchi, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Tatsuro; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Mitamura, Sayaka; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Background The elucidation of the routes of transmission of a pathogen is crucial for the prevention of infectious diseases caused by bacteria that are not a resident in human tissue. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of suture-related conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for which we identified the transmission route using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Case presentation A 38-year-old man, who had undergone surgery for glaucoma 2 years ago previously, pres...

  2. Biosurfactant Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Renewable Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Thavasi, R.; Subramanyam Nambaru, V. R. M.; Jayalakshmi, S.; Balasubramanian, T.; Banat, Ibrahim M.

    2011-01-01

    This study deals with production and characterization of biosurfactant from renewable resources by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Biosurfactant production was carried out in 3L fermentor using waste motor lubricant oil and peanut oil cake. Maximum biomass (11.6 mg/ml) and biosurfactant production (8.6 mg/ml) occurred with peanut oil cake at 120 and 132 h respectively. Characterization of the biosurfactant revealed that, it is a lipopeptide with chemical composition of protein (50.2%) and lipid (49.8...

  3. An unusual presentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa blebitis following combined surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabana Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of blebitis that occurred 3 years later following a combined glaucoma and cataract surgery. It was an atypical presentation, as patient had no classical fiery looking signs of blebitis despite the isolated organism being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Improvized surgical techniques like use of Mitomycin C, releasable flap sutures though considered as part of the recommended procedure for better surgical outcomes, their role as potential risk factors for visually blinding complications like endophthalmitis are often overlooked. This case report throws light on such risk factors for bleb associated infections and recommends removal or trimming of all releasable sutures and the need for a regular postoperative follow-up.

  4. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model. (paper)

  5. Electron Flow through Nitrotyrosinate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Azurin

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Herrera, Nadia; Hill, Michael G.; Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed ruthenium-modified Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurins that incorporate 3-nitrotyrosine (NO_(2)YOH) between Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)_2(imidazole)(histidine) and Cu redox centers in electron transfer (ET) pathways. We investigated the structures and reactivities of three different systems: RuH107NO_(2)YOH109, RuH124NO_(2)YOH122, and RuH126NO_(2)YOH122. RuH107NO_(2)YOH109, unlabeled H124NO_(2)YOH122, and unlabeled H126NO_(2)YOH122 were structurally characterized. The pKa’s of NO_(2)YOH a...

  6. Antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Jamaica Resistencia a antibióticos en cepas clínicas de Pseudomonas aeruginosa en Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Paul D.; Anicetus Izundu

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Jamaica, and to obtain baseline information on the presence of this important pathogen. METHODS: A total of 51 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, obtained from 162 clinical specimens from major hospitals and laboratories in seven parishes in Jamaica, were analyzed between May and August 2002. Isolates were tested against 18 different antibiotics by a disk diffusion method. RESULTS: Organisms were cul...

  7. Pulmonary uptake of morphine (M)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roerig, D.L.; Bunke, S.S.; Kotrly, K.J.; Dawson, C.A.; Kampine, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    Previously the authors reported less than 5% of M was taken up during the first pass through the human lung. The low uptake of this basic lipophilic amine was further investigated in a single pass isolated perfused rat lung (IPL) in comparison to uptake of radiolabelled H/sub 2/O, antipyrine (A), aminopyrine (AM), nicotine (N) and phenylethylamine (P). The IPL was perfused for 5 min with each drug (5nmol/ml) and effluent collected in 10 sec fractions. Pulmonary extraction was calculated using indocyanine green dye as a non-extractable reference indicator. Accumulation of all compounds in the IPL reached an apparent equilibrium within 4 min. At equilibrium lung/perfusate conc. ratios for H/sub 2/O, A, AM, N, P and M were 1.04, 0.84, 0.85, 1.44, 2.57 and 1.13 respectively. The time course of M uptake differed from the other compounds since initial extraction of M was low (23%) compared to 75%, 53%, 35%, 82% and 86% for H/sub 2/O, A, AM, N and P respectively. Also, the half time to equilibrium for M was longer (50 sec) compared to 18, 21, 26, 19 and 22 sec for H/sub 2/O, A, AM, N and P respectively. The low initial pulmonary extraction of M compared to these compounds followed by greater M extraction during the remainder of drug infusion suggests uptake mechanisms for M different than the flow limited uptake for water and other basic amine drugs.

  8. Cystic fibrosis-niche adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduces virulence in multiple infection hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Riva, Camilla; Juhas, Mario; Schwager, Stephan; Eberl, Leo; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to thrive in diverse ecological niches and to cause serious human infection. P. aeruginosa environmental strains are producing various virulence factors that are required for establishing acute infections in several host organisms; however, the P. aeruginosa phenotypic variants favour long-term persistence in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Whether P. aeruginosa strains, which have adapted to the CF-niche, have lost their competitive fitness in the other environment remains to be investigated. In this paper, three P. aeruginosa clonal lineages, including early strains isolated at the onset of infection, and late strains, isolated after several years of chronic lung infection from patients with CF, were analysed in multi-host model systems of acute infection. P. aeruginosa early isolates caused lethality in the three non-mammalian hosts, namely Caenorhabditis elegans, Galleria mellonella, and Drosophila melanogaster, while late adapted clonal isolates were attenuated in acute virulence. When two different mouse genetic background strains, namely C57Bl/6NCrl and Balb/cAnNCrl, were used as acute infection models, early P. aeruginosa CF isolates were lethal, while late isolates exhibited reduced or abolished acute virulence. Severe histopathological lesions, including high leukocytes recruitment and bacterial load, were detected in the lungs of mice infected with P. aeruginosa CF early isolates, while late isolates were progressively cleared. In addition, systemic bacterial spread and invasion of epithelial cells, which were detected for P. aeruginosa CF early strains, were not observed with late strains. Our findings indicate that niche-specific selection in P. aeruginosa reduced its ability to cause acute infections across a broad range of hosts while maintaining the capacity for chronic infection in the CF host. PMID:22558188

  9. Cystic fibrosis-niche adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduces virulence in multiple infection hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ivan Lorè

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to thrive in diverse ecological niches and to cause serious human infection. P. aeruginosa environmental strains are producing various virulence factors that are required for establishing acute infections in several host organisms; however, the P. aeruginosa phenotypic variants favour long-term persistence in the cystic fibrosis (CF airways. Whether P. aeruginosa strains, which have adapted to the CF-niche, have lost their competitive fitness in the other environment remains to be investigated. In this paper, three P. aeruginosa clonal lineages, including early strains isolated at the onset of infection, and late strains, isolated after several years of chronic lung infection from patients with CF, were analysed in multi-host model systems of acute infection. P. aeruginosa early isolates caused lethality in the three non-mammalian hosts, namely Caenorhabditis elegans, Galleria mellonella, and Drosophila melanogaster, while late adapted clonal isolates were attenuated in acute virulence. When two different mouse genetic background strains, namely C57Bl/6NCrl and Balb/cAnNCrl, were used as acute infection models, early P. aeruginosa CF isolates were lethal, while late isolates exhibited reduced or abolished acute virulence. Severe histopathological lesions, including high leukocytes recruitment and bacterial load, were detected in the lungs of mice infected with P. aeruginosa CF early isolates, while late isolates were progressively cleared. In addition, systemic bacterial spread and invasion of epithelial cells, which were detected for P. aeruginosa CF early strains, were not observed with late strains. Our findings indicate that niche-specific selection in P. aeruginosa reduced its ability to cause acute infections across a broad range of hosts while maintaining the capacity for chronic infection in the CF host.

  10. MECANISMOS DE RESISTENCIA EN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA: ENTENDIENDO A UN PELIGROSO ENEMIGO Resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: understanding a dangerous enemy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Gómez Álvarez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa es un bacilo Gram negativo no fermentador, ampliamente relacionado con la infección nosocomial. Este tipo de infecciones se presentan en pacientes severamente comprometidos, hospitalizados especialmente en unidades de cuidado intensivo, donde existe una alta presión de selección de resistencia por parte de los antibióticos. Estas infecciones nosocomiales tienen implicaciones en el pronóstico del paciente, los costos del tratamiento, la estancia hospitalaria, la morbilidad y la mortalidad. Es importante que en cada institución hospitalaria se mantenga una estrecha vigilancia de los perfiles de resistencia de esta bacteria, con el fin de reconocer sus mecanismos de resistencia, su evolución y la forma de transferencia. En este sentido, un concepto como "la lectura interpretativa del antibiograma" se impone y ayuda al clínico a inferir los posibles mecanismos de resistencia que exhibe la bacteria para de esta manera orientar el uso de la terapia antibiótica y avanzar en el gran desafío que implica enfrentar las consecuencias de la infección por P. aeruginosa.Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative fermentative bacilli related with nosocomial infections. This kind of infections is more frequent in critical ill patients, specially in intensive care units, where a high pressure selection is ejerxed. Nosocomial infections are associated with poor prognosis, increased treatment cost, cubed length, morbidity and mortality. Each health care institution might establish antimicrobial resistance surveillance in order to recognize antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and transference of resistance of this pathogen. In the other hand, concepts as "interpretative reading" help the clinician to infer the possible mechanisms involved and in this way guide the antimicrobial therapy in order to boarding the challenge of this kind of infections.

  11. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies of hemin acquisition in the hemophore HasAp from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukl, Erik T; Jepkorir, Grace; Alontaga, Aileen Y; Pautsch, Lawrence; Rodriguez, Juan C; Rivera, Mario; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre

    2010-08-10

    The extreme limitation of free iron has driven various pathogens to acquire iron from the host in the form of heme. Specifically, several Gram-negative pathogens secrete a heme binding protein known as HasA to scavenge heme from the extracellular environment and to transfer it to the receptor protein HasR for import into the bacterial cell. Structures of heme-bound and apo-HasA homologues show that the heme iron(III) ligands, His32 and Tyr75, reside on loops extending from the core of the protein and that a significant conformational change must occur at the His32 loop upon heme binding. Here, we investigate the kinetics of heme acquisition by HasA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (HasAp). The rate of heme acquisition from human met-hemoglobin (met-Hb) closely matches that of heme dissociation which suggests a passive mode of heme uptake from this source. The binding of free hemin is characterized by an initial rapid phase forming an intermediate before further conversion to the final complex. Analysis of this same reaction using an H32A variant lacking the His heme ligand shows only the rapid phase to form a heme-protein complex spectroscopically equivalent to that of the wild-type intermediate. Further characterization of these reactions using electron paramagnetic resonance and resonance Raman spectroscopy of rapid freeze quench samples provides support for a model in which heme is initially bound by the Tyr75 to form a high-spin heme-protein complex before slower coordination of the His32 ligand upon closing of the His loop over the heme. The slow rate of this loop closure implies that the induced-fit mechanism of heme uptake in HasAp is not based on a rapid sampling of the H32 loop between open and closed configurations but, rather, that the H32 loop motions are triggered by the formation of the high-spin heme-HasAp intermediate complex. PMID:20586423

  12. Phosphate uptake kinetics by Acinetobacter isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, A S; Kaitala, S

    1997-02-01

    Acinetobacter isolates from activated sludge treatment plants of forest industry were used as model organisms for polyphosphate accumulating bacteria to study excess phosphate uptake by the overplus phenomenon as well as luxury uptake of phosphate during growth. The initial, rapid phosphate uptake by the phosphorus-starved Acinetobacter isolates (the overplus phenomenon) followed the Michaelis-Menten model (maximum initial phosphate uptake rate 29 mg P g(-1) dry mass (DM) h(-1), half-saturation constant for excess phosphate uptake 17 mg P L(-1)). During the rapid uptake no growth was observed, but most cells contained polyphosphate granules. Also growth and luxury uptake of phosphate could be modeled with the Michaelis-Menten equation (maximum phosphate uptake rate 3.7-12 mg P g(-1) DM h(-1), half-saturation constant for growth 0.47-6.0 mg P L(-1), maximum specific growth rate 0.15-0.55 h(-1)). PMID:18633985

  13. Rapid Necrotic Killing of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Is Caused by Quorum-Sensing-Controlled Production of Rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P. Ø.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Phipps, Richard Kerry;

    2007-01-01

    . aeruginosa induced rapid necrosis of the PMNs. This mechanism was also observed in mouse lungs infected with P. aeruginosa, and in sputum obtained from P.-aeruginosa-infected patients with cystic fibrosis. Evidence is presented that the necrotic effect was caused by rhamnolipids, production of which is QS...... controlled. The results demonstrate the potential of the QS system to facilitate infections with P. aeruginosa by disabling the PMNs, which are a major first line of defence of the host. Furthermore, the study emphasizes the inhibition of QS as a target for the treatment of infections with P. aeruginosa....

  14. Cadmium and Chromium Toxicity to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzelei Rodgher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of cadmium and chromium to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Microcystis aeruginosa was evaluated through algal growth rate during 96h exposure bioassays. Free metal ion concentrations were obtained using MINEQL+ 4.61 and used for IC50 determination. Metal accumulations by the microorganisms were determined and they were found to be dependent on the concentration of Cd2+ and Cr6+. IC50 for P. subcapitata were 0.60 µmol L-1 free Cd2+ and 20 µmol L-1 free Cr6+, while the IC50 values for M. aeruginosa were 0.01 µmol L-1 Cd2+ and 11.07 µmol L-1 Cr6+ . P. subcapitata accumulated higher metal concentrations (0.001 -0.05 µmol Cd mg-1 dry wt. and 0.001 -0.04 µmol Cr mg-1 dry wt than the cyanobacteria (0.001 -0.01 µmol Cd mg-1 dry wt and 0.001 -0.02 µmol Cr mg-1 dry wt. Cadmium was more toxic than chromium to both the microorganisms.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Type IV Pili in P. Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shun; Touhami, Ahmed; Scheurwater, Edie; Harvey, Hanjeong; Burrows, Lori; Dutcher, John

    2009-03-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are thin flexible protein filaments that extend from the cell membrane of bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The mechanical properties of Tfp are of great importance since they allow bacteria to interact with and colonize various surfaces. In the present study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) for both imaging and pulling on Tfp from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) and from its PilA, PilT, and FliC mutants. A single pilus filament was mechanically stretched and the resulting force-extension profiles were fitted using the worm-like-chain (WLC) model. The statistical distributions obtained for contour length, persistence length, and number of pili per bacteria pole, were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of a single pilus and the biogenesis functions of different proteins (PilA, PilT) involved in its assembly and disassembly. Importantly, the persistence length value of ˜ 1 μm measured in the present study, which is consistent with the curvature of the pili observed in our AFM images, is significantly lower than the value of 5 μm reported earlier by Skerker et al. (1). Our results shed new light on the role of mechanical forces that mediate bacteria-surface interactions and biofilm formation. 1- J.M. Skerker and H.C. Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 98, 6901-6904 (2001).

  16. Labeling of pseudomonas aeruginosa with In-111-oxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeling of live bacteria with gamma emitting radioisotope provides a useful tool for the experimental in vivo tracking of bacteria in various body organs of animals. The authors labeled a serum resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC number27853) with In-111-oxine. P. aeruginosa streaked heavily on ten blood agar plates, was grown overnight, and suspended in 50 ml of saline using sterile cotton swabs. The suspension was sonicated for 3 minutes at 40 watts with a small probe, 500 μCi of commercially prepared In-111-oxine added and the bacteria incubated at 370C for 2.5 hours. The labeled bacteria were centrifuged and washed once with saline and resuspended to a final volume of 50 ml in saline. The labeled Pseudomonas, 10/sup 9/-10/sup 10/ cfu/ml, retained 120-190 μCi of cell-bound In-111. In vitro studies showed good retention of the In-111 label in saline at 370C (75-85% cell-bound radioactivity at 1 hour) and in canine blood at 370C (30-55% cell-bound radioactivity at 1 hour). The loss of cell-associated radioactivity in blood, with a corresponding decrease in the number of viable organisms, is probably a result of phagocyte-mediated killing of the organisms and subsequent release of the label. The labeled bacteria have been used successfully for sequential imaging in experimental animals to track bacteria injected into blood and the biliary tree

  17. Phage selection restores antibiotic sensitivity in MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benjamin K; Sistrom, Mark; Wertz, John E; Kortright, Kaitlyn E; Narayan, Deepak; Turner, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Increasing prevalence and severity of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections has necessitated novel antibacterial strategies. Ideally, new approaches would target bacterial pathogens while exerting selection for reduced pathogenesis when these bacteria inevitably evolve resistance to therapeutic intervention. As an example of such a management strategy, we isolated a lytic bacteriophage, OMKO1, (family Myoviridae) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that utilizes the outer membrane porin M (OprM) of the multidrug efflux systems MexAB and MexXY as a receptor-binding site. Results show that phage selection produces an evolutionary trade-off in MDR P. aeruginosa, whereby the evolution of bacterial resistance to phage attack changes the efflux pump mechanism, causing increased sensitivity to drugs from several antibiotic classes. Although modern phage therapy is still in its infancy, we conclude that phages, such as OMKO1, represent a new approach to phage therapy where bacteriophages exert selection for MDR bacteria to become increasingly sensitive to traditional antibiotics. This approach, using phages as targeted antibacterials, could extend the lifetime of our current antibiotics and potentially reduce the incidence of antibiotic resistant infections. PMID:27225966

  18. PARTIAL PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ALKALOPHILIC PROTEASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Satheeskumar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial purification and characterization of alkalophilic protease production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the gut of marine and coastal waters shrimp Penaeus monodon. The protease production was assayed in submerged fermentation to produce maximum protease activity (423 ± 0.09 U/ml. The enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulphate and partially purified by ion exchange chromatography through DEAE Sephadex A-50 column. In 10th fraction showed maximum protease activity (734 ± 0.18 U/ml with increase in purification fold. The molecular weight of protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was recorded as 60 kDa. The stability of protease was tested at various pH and temperature; it showed maximum protease activity at pH-9 and temperature 50ºC. Among the various surfactants tested for enzyme stability, maximum activity was retained in poly ethylene glycol. The compatibility of protease enzyme with various commercial detergents; the enzyme retained maximum protease activity in tide. The results are indicated that all these properties make the bacterial proteases are most suitable for wide industrial applications.

  19. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genes associated with antibiotic susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in humans and these infections are difficult to treat due to the bacteria’s high-level of intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibiotics. To address this problem, it is crucial to investigate the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in this organism. In this study, a P. aeruginosa transposon insertion library of 17000 clones was constructed and screened for altered susceptibility to seven antibiotics. Colonies grown on agar plates con- taining antibiotics at minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and those unable to grow at ? MIC were collected. The transposon-disrupted genes in 43 confirmed mutants that showed at least a three-fold increase or a two-fold decrease in suscep- tibility to at least one antibiotic were determined by semi-random PCR and subsequent sequencing analysis. In addition to nine genes known to be associated with antibiotic resistance, including mexI, mexB and mexR, 24 new antibiotic resis- tance-associated genes were identified, including a fimbrial biogenesis gene pilY1 whose disruption resulted in a 128-fold in- crease in the MIC of carbenicillin. Twelve of the 43 genes identified were of unknown function. These genes could serve as targets to control or reverse antibiotic resistance in this important human pathogen.

  20. Mechanical destruction of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by ultrasound exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Halverson, Larry J.; Middendorf, Jill; Rusk, Ben

    2012-10-01

    Medical implants are prone to colonization by bacterial biofilms, which are highly resistant to antibiotics. Normally, surgery is required to replace the infected implant. One promising non-invasive treatment option is to destroy the biofilm with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. In our study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms were grown on graphite disks in a flow chamber for three days prior to exposing them to ultrasound pulses of varying duration or burst period. The pulses were 20 cycles in duration at a frequency of 1.1 MHz from a spherically focused transducer (f/1, 63 mm focal length), creating peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the disk surface of 30 and 13 MPa, respectively. P. aeruginosa were tagged with GFP and cells killed by HIFU were visualized using propidium iodide, which permeates membranes of dead cells, to aid determining the extent of biofilm destruction and whether cells are alive or dead. Our results indicate that a 30-s exposure and 6-ms pulse period or those combinations with the same number of pulses, were sufficient to destroy the biofilm and to kill the remaining cells. Reducing the number of pulses decreased biofilm destruction, leaving more dead and live bacteria on the surface.

  1. Effect of methylglyoxal on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KunihikoNishino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Honey has a complex chemistry, and its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity varies with floral source, climate, and harvesting conditions. Methylglyoxal was identified as the dominant antibacterial component of manuka honey. Although it has been known that methylglyoxal has antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, there is not much information describing its activity against gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we report the effect of methylglyoxal against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP using 53 clinically isolated strains. We also assessed the effect of deleting the five multidrug efflux systems in P. aeruginosa, as well as the efflux systems in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, on MICs of methylglyoxal. Our results indicate that methylglyoxal inhibits the growth of MDRP at concentrations of 128–512 µg/ml (1.7–7.1 mM and is not recognized by drug efflux systems.

  2. Platinum uptake from chloride solutions using biosorbents

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Hakan Morcali; Bihter Zeytuncu; Onuralp Yucel

    2013-01-01

    Present work investigates platinum uptake from synthetically prepared, dilute platinum-bearing solutions using biomass residues, i.e. pistachio nut shell and rice husk, which are abundant in Turkey, and provides a comparison between these two biosorbents. Effects of the different uptake parameters, sorbent dosage, contact time, temperature and pH of solution on platinum uptake (%) were studied in detail on a batch sorption. Before the pistachio nut shell was activated, platinum uptake (%) was...

  3. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  5. Interactions between the antimicrobial agent triclosan and the bloom-forming cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolong; Tu, Yenan; Song, Chaofeng; Li, Tiancui; Lin, Juan; Wu, Yonghong; Liu, Jiantong; Wu, Chenxi

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria can co-exist in eutrophic waters with chemicals or other substances derived from personal care products discharged in wastewater. In this work, we investigate the interactions between the antimicrobial agent triclosan (TCS) and the bloom-forming cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa. M. aeruginosa was very sensitive to TCS with the 96h lowest observed effect concentration of 1.0 and 10μg/L for inhibition of growth and photosynthetic activity, respectively. Exposure to TCS at environmentally relevant levels (0.1-2.0μg/L) also affected the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the generation of reduced glutathione (GSH), while microcystin production was not affected. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination showed the destruction of M. aeruginosa cell ultrastructure during TCS exposure. TCS however, can be biotransformed by M. aeruginosa with methylation as a major biotransformation pathway. Furthermore, the presence of M. aeruginosa in solution promoted the photodegradation of TCS. Overall, our results demonstrate that M. aeruginosa plays an important role in the dissipation of TCS in aquatic environments but high residual TCS can exert toxic effects on M. aeruginosa. PMID:26800489

  6. Enhanced Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Brahmchetna; Yuan, Zhihong; Joo, Myungsoo; Zughaier, Susu M; Goldberg, Joanna B; Arbiser, Jack L; Hart, C Michael; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2016-07-01

    The pathogenic profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is related to its ability to secrete a variety of virulence factors. Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism wherein small diffusible molecules, specifically acyl-homoserine lactones, are produced by P. aeruginosa to promote virulence. We show here that macrophage clearance of P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is enhanced by activation of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Macrophages treated with a PPARγ agonist (pioglitazone) showed enhanced phagocytosis and bacterial killing of PAO1. It is known that PAO1 QS molecules are inactivated by PON-2. QS molecules are also known to inhibit activation of PPARγ by competitively binding PPARγ receptors. In accord with this observation, we found that infection of macrophages with PAO1 inhibited expression of PPARγ and PON-2. Mechanistically, we show that PPARγ induces macrophage paraoxonase 2 (PON-2), an enzyme that degrades QS molecules produced by P. aeruginosa Gene silencing studies confirmed that enhanced clearance of PAO1 in macrophages by PPARγ is PON-2 dependent. Further, we show that PPARγ agonists also enhance clearance of P. aeruginosa from lungs of mice infected with PAO1. Together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa impairs the ability of host cells to mount an immune response by inhibiting PPARγ through secretion of QS molecules. These studies define a novel mechanism by which PPARγ contributes to the host immunoprotective effects during bacterial infection and suggest a role for PPARγ immunotherapy for P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:27091928

  7. Solar disinfection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in harvested rainwater: a step towards potability of rainwater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad T Amin

    Full Text Available Efficiency of solar based disinfection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa in rooftop harvested rainwater was evaluated aiming the potability of rainwater. The rainwater samples were exposed to direct sunlight for about 8-9 hours and the effects of water temperature (°C, sunlight irradiance (W/m2, different rear surfaces of polyethylene terephthalate bottles, variable microbial concentrations, pH and turbidity were observed on P. aeruginosa inactivation at different weathers. In simple solar disinfection (SODIS, the complete inactivation of P. aeruginosa was obtained only under sunny weather conditions (>50°C and >700 W/m2 with absorptive rear surface. Solar collector disinfection (SOCODIS system, used to improve the efficiency of simple SODIS under mild and weak weather, completely inactivated the P. aeruginosa by enhancing the disinfection efficiency of about 20% only at mild weather. Both SODIS and SOCODIS systems, however, were found inefficient at weak weather. Different initial concentrations of P. aeruginosa and/or Escherichia coli had little effects on the disinfection efficiency except for the SODIS with highest initial concentrations. The inactivation of P. aeruginosa increased by about 10-15% by lowering the initial pH values from 10 to 3. A high initial turbidity, adjusted by adding kaolin, adversely affected the efficiency of both systems and a decrease, about 15-25%; in inactivation of P. aeruginosa was observed. The kinetics of this study was investigated by Geeraerd Model for highlighting the best disinfection system based on reaction rate constant. The unique detailed investigation of P. aeruginosa disinfection with sunlight based disinfection systems under different weather conditions and variable parameters will help researchers to understand and further improve the newly invented SOCODIS system.

  8. Strontium Uptake by Cementitious Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland,E.; Tits, J.; Kunz, D.; Dahn, R.

    2008-01-01

    Wet chemistry experiments and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements were carried out to investigate the immobilization of nonradioactive Sr and 85Sr in calcite-free and calcite-containing Portland cement. The partitioning of pristine Sr between hardened cement paste (HCP) and pore solution, and the uptake of 85Sr and nonradioactive Sr were investigated in batch-type sorption/desorption experiments. Sr uptake by HCP was found to be fast and nearly linear for both cements, indicating that differences in the compositions of the two cements have no influence on Sr binding. The partitioning of pristine Sr bound in the cement matrix and 85Sr between HCP and pore solution could be modeled in terms of a reversible sorption process using similar Kd values. These findings allow 85Sr uptake to be interpreted in terms of an isotopic exchange process with pristine Sr. Sr K-edge EXAFS measurements on Sr doped HCP and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) samples reveal no significant differences in the local coordination environments of pristine Sr and Sr bound to the cement matrix upon sorption. The first coordination sphere consists of five to six oxygen atoms located at a distance of about 2.6 Angstroms, which corresponds to Sr-O distances in the hydration sphere of Sr2+ in alkaline solution. Sr binds to the cement matrix via two bridging oxygen atoms located at a distance of about 3.6 Angstroms. No further neighboring atoms could be detected, indicating that Sr is taken up as a partially hydrated species by HCP. Wet chemistry and spectroscopic data further indicate that Sr binding to C-S-H phases is likely to be the controlling uptake mechanism in the cement matrix, which allows Sr uptake by HCP to be predicted based on a Ca-Sr ion exchange model previously developed for Sr binding to C-S-H phases. The latter finding suggests that long-term predictions of Sr immobilization in the cementitious near field of repositories for radioactive waste can be based on a

  9. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, A S; Joergensen, B.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Johansen, H; Karlsmark, T.; Givskov, M; Krogfelt, K A

    2010-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is widely used for debridement of chronic infected wounds; however, for wounds harbouring specific bacteria limited effect or failure of the treatment has been described. Here we studied the survival of Lucilia sericata maggots encountering Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa ΔlasR ...

  10. Characterization of a novel extended-spectrum beta-lactamase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Nordmann, P.; Ronco, E; Naas, T.; Duport, C; Michel-Briand, Y.; Labia, R

    1993-01-01

    A clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa RNL-1 showed resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins which was inhibited by clavulanic acid. Although this strain contained three plasmids ca. 80, 20, and 4 kb long, the resistance could not be transferred by mating-out assays with P. aeruginosa or Escherichia coli. Cloning of a 2.1-kb Sau3A fragment from P. aeruginosa RNL-1 into plasmid pACYC184 produced pPZ1, a recombinant plasmid that encodes a beta-lactamase. This beta-lactamase (PER-1) ...

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of the recA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO has been isolated and introduced into Escherichia coli K-12. Resistance to killing by UV irradiation was restored in several RecA-E. coli K-12 hosts by the P. aeruginosa gene, as was resistance to methyl methanesulfonate. Recombination proficiency was also restored, as measured by HfrH-mediated conjugation and by the ability to propagate Fec-phage lambda derivatives. The cloned P. aeruginosa recA gene restored both spontaneous and mitomycin C-stimulated induction of lambda prophage in lysogens of a recA strain of E. coli K-12

  12. Post-translational modifications in Pseudomonas aeruginosa revolutionized by proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Jouenne, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe infections in vulnerable individuals. It is known that post-translational modifications (PTMs) play a key role in bacterial physiology. Their characterization is still challenging and the recent advances in proteomics allow large-scale and high-throughput analyses of PTMs. Here, we provide an overview of proteomic data about the modified proteins in P. aeruginosa. We emphasize the significant contribution of proteomics in knowledge enhancement of PTMs (phosphorylation, N-acetylation and glycosylation) and we discuss their importance in P. aeruginosa physiology. PMID:26952777

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente em unidade de cuidados intensivos: desafios que procedem? Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente en una unidad de cuidados intensivos: desafíos que proceden? Multi-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa among patients from an intensive care unit: persistent challenge?

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Verônica Guilherme Ferrareze; Vanessa Cristina Leopoldo; Denise de Andrade; Magda Fabbri Issac Silva; Vanderlei José Haas

    2007-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a ocorrência de infecção hospitalar por Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente em pacientes hospitalizados em uma unidade de cuidados intensivos. MÉTODO: estudo retrospectivo realizado de outubro de 2003 a setembro de 2004 em um hospital de emergências. RESULTADOS: Totalizou-se 68 portadores de bactérias multiresistentes sendo 10 (14,7%) de P. aeruginosa. Destes, 8 pacientes eram do sexo masculino, as médias de idade e de internação foram respectivamente de 57 anos a média ...

  14. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials, assessed them and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS: Six trials were identified. Two trials were excluded since they were not randomised and one old, small trial because it was not possible to assess whether is was randomised....... The three included trials comprised 483, 476 and 37 patients, respectively. No data have been published from one of the large trials, but the company stated in a press release that the trial failed to confirm the results from an earlier study and that further clinical development was suspended. In the...

  15. In vitro inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by Xylitol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Pinheiro de Sousa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, the antimicrobial activity and the anti-adherent property of xylitol (0.5, 2.5 and 5.0%, w/v on two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (ATCC 9027 and clinical. The assay of antimicrobial activity was performed to determine a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the adhesion test was performed, by which the parameters regarding, growth in the culture medium, number of colony forming units (CFUs released and slide evaluation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM were analyzed. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS was employed for statistical analysis. Results showed that xylitol had no antimicrobial activity on these strains; however, the inhibition of bacterial adherence was observed in microphotographs obtained by SEM. These results indicated that xylitol could be a future alternative to combat bacterial colonization.

  16. Production of biopolymers by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from marine source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Jamil

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMG607w and CMG1421 produce commercially important biopolymers. CMG607w isolated from the sediments of Lyari outfall to Arabian Sea synthesize the mcl-polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources. The production of PHAs was directly proportional to the incubation periods. Other strain CMG1421, a dry soil isolate, produced high viscous water absorbing extracellular acidic polysaccharide when it was grown aerobically in the minimal medium containing glucose or fructose or sucrose as sole source of carbon. The biopolymer had the ability to absorb water 400 times more than its dry weight. This property was superior to that of currently used non-degradable synthetic water absorbents. It acted as salt filter and had rheological and stabilizing activity as well.

  17. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Resistance Phenotypes and Phenotypic Highlighting Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    BĂLĂŞOIU, MARIA; BĂLĂŞOIU, A.T.; MĂNESCU, RODICA; AVRAMESCU, CARMEN; IONETE, OANA

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa genus bacteria are well known for their increased drug resistance (phenotypic ang genotypic resistance). The most important resistance mechanisms are: enzyme production, reduction of pore expression, reduction of the external membrane proteins expression, efflux systems, topoisomerase mutations. These mechanisms often accumulate and lead to multidrug ressitance strains emergence. The most frequent acquired resistance mechanisms are betalactamase-type enzyme production (ESBLs, AmpC, carbapenemases), which determine variable phenotypes of betalactamines resistance, phenotypes which are associated with aminoglycosides and quinolones resistance. The nonenzymatic drug resistance mechanisms are caused by efflux systems, pore reduction and penicillin-binding proteins (PBP) modification, which are often associated to other resistance mechanisms. Phenotypic methods used for testing these mechanisms are based on highlighting these phenotypes using Kirby Bauer antibiogram, clinical breakpoints, and “cut off” values recommended by EUCAST 2013 standard, version 3.1. PMID:25729587

  18. Degradation characteristics of two Bacillus strains on the Microcystis aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Hai-yan; HU Wen-rong; QU Yin-bo; MU Rui-min; LI Xiao-cai

    2005-01-01

    The degradation kinetics of strains P05 and P07 and the degradation effects of mixed strain on Microcystis aeruginosa were studied. The results showed that: ( 1 ) The degradation processes of strains P05 and P07 on Microcystis aeruginosa accorded with the first-order reaction model when the range of Chl- a concentration was from 0 to 1500 μg/L. (2) The initial bacterium densities had a strong influence on the degradation velocity. The greater the initial bacterium density was, the faster the degradation was. The degradation velocity constants of P05 were 0.1913, 0.2175 and 0.3092 respectively, when bacterium densities were 4.8×105 , 4.8 × 106, 2.4 × 107 cells/ml. For strain P07, they were 0.1509, 0.1647 and 0.2708. The degradation velocity constant of strain P05 was higher than that of P07 when the bacterium density was under 4.8 × 105 cells/ml, but the constant increasing of P07 was quicker than that of P05. (3) The degradation effects of P05 and P07 strains did not antagonize. When the concentration of Chl-a was high, the degradation effects of mixed strain excelled that of any single strains. But with the decrease of the Chl-a concentration, this advantage was not clear. When the concentration was less than 180 μg/L, the degradation effects of mixed were consistent with that of strain P07.

  19. Structural Characterization of Novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pilins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Y.; Jackson, S; Aidoo, F; Junop, M; Burrows, L

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili, composed of PilA subunits, are used for attachment and twitching motility on surfaces. P. aeruginosa strains express one of five phylogenetically distinct PilA proteins, four of which are associated with accessory proteins that are involved either in pilin posttranslational modification or in modulation of pilus retraction dynamics. Full understanding of pilin diversity is crucial for the development of a broadly protective pilus-based vaccine. Here, we report the 1.6-{angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of an N-terminally truncated form of the novel PilA from strain Pa110594 (group V), which represents the first non-group II pilin structure solved. Although it maintains the typical T4a pilin fold, with a long N-terminal {alpha}-helix and four-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet connected to the C-terminus by a disulfide-bonded loop, the presence of an extra helix in the {alpha}{beta}-loop and a disulfide-bonded loop with helical character gives the structure T4b pilin characteristics. Despite the presence of T4b features, the structure of PilA from strain Pa110594 is most similar to the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin and is also predicted to assemble into a fiber similar to the GC pilus, based on our comparative pilus modeling. Interactions between surface-exposed areas of the pilin are suggested to contribute to pilus fiber stability. The non-synonymous sequence changes between group III and V pilins are clustered in the same surface-exposed areas, possibly having an effect on accessory protein interactions. However, based on our high-confidence model of group III PilA{sub PA14}, compensatory changes allow for maintenance of a similar shape.

  20. Phosphorylcholine Phosphatase: A Peculiar Enzyme of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Domenech

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa synthesizes phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP when grown on choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. In the presence of Mg2+ or Zn2+, PchP catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP or phosphorylcholine (Pcho. The regulation of pchP gene expression is under the control of GbdR and NtrC; dimethylglycine is likely the metabolite directly involved in the induction of PchP. Therefore, the regulation of choline metabolism and consequently PchP synthesis may reflect an adaptive response of P. aeruginosa to environmental conditions. Bioinformatic and biochemistry studies shown that PchP contains two sites for alkylammonium compounds (AACs: one in the catalytic site near the metal ion-phosphoester pocket, and another in an inhibitory site responsible for the binding of the alkylammonium moiety. Both sites could be close to each other and interact through the residues 42E, 43E and 82YYY84. Zn2+ is better activator than Mg2+ at pH 5.0 and it is more effective at alleviating the inhibition produced by the entry of Pcho or different AACs in the inhibitory site. We postulate that Zn2+ induces at pH 5.0 a conformational change in the active center that is communicated to the inhibitory site, producing a compact or closed structure. However, at pH 7.4, this effect is not observed because to the hydrolysis of the [Zn2+L2−1L20(H2O2] complex, which causes a change from octahedral to tetrahedral in the metal coordination geometry. This enzyme is also present in P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. syringae, and other organisms. We have recently crystallized PchP and solved its structure.

  1. Fructooligosacharides reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pathogenicity through distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Ortega-González

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed.

  2. Fructooligosacharides reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pathogenicity through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-González, Mercedes; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; López-Posadas, Rocío; Pacheco, Daniel; Krell, Tino; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Abdelali, Daddaoua

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages) FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed. PMID:24465697

  3. DNA UPTAKE BY TRANSFORMABLE BACTERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LACKS,S.A.

    1999-09-07

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  4. DNA Uptake by Transformable Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1999-03-31

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  5. Study on the release routes of allelochemicals from Pistia stratiotes Linn., and its anti-cyanobacteria mechanisms on Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Wu, Hao; Ye, Jinyun; Zhong, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Allelochemicals in Pistia stratiotes Linn. have a strong anti-cyanobacteria effect on Microcystis aeruginosa. To further determine the release routes of allelochemicals in P. stratiotes and understand their anti-cyanobacteria mechanisms, we aimed to systematically investigate the allelopathic effects of leaf leachates, leaf volatilization, root exudates, and residue decomposition of P. stratiotes on M. aeruginosa. The influences of P. stratiotes allelochemicals on the physiological properties of M. aeruginosa were also studied. Root exudates of P. stratiotes exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect on M. aeruginosa growth. The residue decomposition and leaf leachates exhibited a relatively strong inhibitory effect on M. aeruginosa growth. By contrast, the leaf volatilization stimulated M. aeruginosa growth. Therefore, root exudation was determined to be the main release route of allelochemicals from P. stratiotes. The mixed culture experiment of P. stratiotes root exudates and M. aeruginosa showed that the allelochemicals released from root exudation had no effect on the electron transfer of M. aeruginosa photosynthetic system II. However, it reduced the phycocyanin (PC) content and phycocyanin to allophycocyanin (PC/APC) ratio in the photosynthetic system. As the root exudates concentration increased, the electrical conductivity (EC) and superoxide anion radical (O2(*-)) values in the M. aeruginosa culture fluid increased significantly, indicating that the allelochemicals released from the root of P. stratiotes inhibited algae growth by affecting the PC and PC/APC levels in photosynthesis, destroying the cell membrane, and increasing O2(*-) content to result in oxidative damage of M. aeruginosa. PMID:26233747

  6. Characterization of Imipenem Unsusceptible Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolates from Inpatients without Carbapenem Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-hai Gu; Xiao Zhu; Jing-yun Li; Jun Zhang; Qing-yuan Zhou; Yue Ma; Chang-qin Hu; Shao-hong Jin; and Sheng-hui Cui

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the risk factors for imipenem resistance development and transmission of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods Thirty-seven imipenem unsusceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected from patients in absence of carbapenem treatment were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility test, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and carbapenem resistant mechanism analysis. Results Before the collection of imipenem unsusceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, the average time of patients treated with more than one antimicrobial (20.0 ± 9.5 days, n=16) was signiifcantly longer than those treated with only one antimicrobial (12.6 ± 4.4 days, n=21;t-test, Welch, t=-2.9004, P Conclusions Our data demonstrated that exposure to non-carbapenem drug classes, especially lfuoroquinolones andβ-lactams, may be important risk factors for the spread of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  7. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B;

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant...... garlic-treated biofilm. Garlic extract was administered as treatment for a mouse pulmonary infection model. Mice were treated with garlic extract or placebo for 7 days, with the initial 2 days being prophylactic before P. aeruginosa was instilled in the left lung of the mice. Bacteriology, mortality......, histopathology and cytokine production were used as indicators. The garlic treatment initially provoked a higher degree of inflammation, and significantly improved clearing of the infecting bacteria. The results indicate that a QS-inhibitory extract of garlic renders P. aeruginosa sensitive to tobramycin...

  8. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: characteristics of eradicated and persistent isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G. A.; van der Ent, C. K.; Molin, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    were analysed that were either eradicated rapidly or persisted despite multiple antimicrobial treatments. Eighty-six early infection episodes were studied. First P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with eradication (36) or persistent infection (16) were included; isolates from patients with...

  9. Investigating the Antibacterial Effects of Plant Extracts on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Scientists are seeking an appropriate alternative method for curing infections caused by resistant bacteria, since drug resistance is continually increasing. Objectives This research aims to discover the function of some medicine plants on pestiferous Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli in humans. Materials and Methods Bacterial strains were obtained from a standard laboratory. The strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 and E.coli ATCC25922 bacteria were used for antimicrobial testing of the extractions. Results Our results showed that Teucrium polium extracts have the minimum density of inhibitory for Escherichia coli, 25 ppm, whereas the maximum of this is for Peganum harmala and Prangos ferulaceae with 100 ppm. The lowest minimum concentration inhibitory value of extracts P. harmala, T. polium, T. pratensis and Rumex was found in 25 ppm against P.aeruginosa. Conclusions The results of our study showed that plant extracts have good antibacterial properties against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli.

  10. Inhibition of human monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H

    1991-01-01

    The in vitro effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase on human monocyte function was examined. Mononuclear cells isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy individuals were incubated with various concentrations of elastase, and the chemotactic activity and chemiluminescence response of these ...

  11. Impact of new water systems on healthcare-associated colonization or infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Annick; Quantin, Catherine; Vanhems, Philippe; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Bertrand, Xavier; Astruc, Karine; Chavanet, Pascal; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to study the impact of new water systems, which were less contaminated with P. aeruginosa, on the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases (colonizations or infections) in care units that moved to a different building between 2005 and 2014. Methods: Generalized Estimated Equations were used to compare the incidence of P. aeruginosa healthcare-associated cases according to the building. Results: Twenty-nine units moved during the study period and 2,759 cases occurred in these units. No difference was observed when the new building was compared with older buildings overall. Conclusion: Our results did not support our hypothesis of a positive association between water system contamination and the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases. These results must be confirmed by linking results of water samples and patients’ data.

  12. Effect of irradiation of electron beam on protein and antioxidized enzyme activity of microcystis aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microcystis aeruginosa often threatens human health and safety for its microcystin and bad smell. Its large number and hardness of removal are difficulty for water treatment. In this study, electron beam generated by an accelerator was applied to irradiate Microcystis aeruginosa by dose of l, 2, 3, 4 and 5 kGy. The effect of irradiation on Microcystis aeruginosa characteristic and mechanism was studied by surveying the changing of protein, enzyme activity and photosynthesis rate. The data show that irradiation of 1 kGy has little effect on dissoluble protein, POD and SOD activity. Irradiation of 25 kGy can decrease protein content and destroy the antioxidant system, also the photosynthesis rate decreases obviously, which makes Microcystis aeruginosa lose activity in short time. The result proves that a certain dose of electron beam irradiation can control algae growth and affect its life characteristic efficiently. (authors)

  13. Within-host microevolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Italian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Dolce, Daniela; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Petersen, Bent; Ciofu, Oana; Campana, Silvia; Molin, Søren; Taccetti, Giovanni; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and a more complete understanding of P. aeruginosa within-host genomic evolution, transmission, and population genomics may provide a basis for improving intervention...... strategies. Here, we report the first genomic analysis of P. aeruginosa isolates sampled from Italian CF patients. By genome sequencing of 26 isolates sampled over 19 years from four patients, we elucidated the within-host evolution of clonal lineages in each individual patient. Many of the identified...... understanding of P. aeruginosa within-host genomic evolution, transmission, and population genomics. We conclude that the evolution of the Italian lineages resembles what has been found in other countries....

  14. Flavonoids from Rhizophora conjugata fruit extract blocks virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, D.; Tilvi, S.; DeSouza, L.

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major nosocomial pathogen which causes hospital acquired infections and recently has gained importance as a model to study antibiotic resistance. In the present study, we investigated the effect of methanol and methanol...

  15. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  16. IN-VITRO COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CEFOPERAZONE, CEFTAZIDIME, CEFTIZOXIME, CEFOTAXIME, CEFTRIAXONE AND CEFIXIME AGAINST PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humza Ahmad Ullah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prime intention of this study was the evaluation & accumulation of epidemiological data on the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and to compare the activity of different third generation cephalosporins against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For this purpose Modified Kirby-Bauer Method was used for the determination of sensitivity of antibacterial agents using strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 as control. Total 250 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were collected from different public and private hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan. In-vitro qualities (i.e. sensitive, resistant and intermediate of six members of third generation cephalosporins (Cefoperazone, Ceftazidime, Ceftizoxime, Cefotaxime, Ceftriaxone and Cefixime were reviewed. Results showed that Cefoperazone was the most effective antibacterial agent (80% sensitive, while the second most effective antibacterial agent was Ceftazidime (70% sensitive. Cefotaxime and Ceftizoxime also showed intermediate activity. Cefixime and Ceftriaxone didn’t show any supportive activity i.e. 0% sensitive at all.

  17. Regulation of pqs quorum sensing via catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Gao, Qingguo; Chen, Wanying;

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolite repression control protein regulates the Pseudomonas quinolone signal quorum sensing, which further controls synthesis of virulence factor pyocyanin, biofilm formation and survival during infection models. Our study suggests that deregulation of the catabolite repression by P...

  18. Detection of N-acylhomoserine lactones in lung tissues of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Hentzer, Morten;

    2000-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with expression of virulence factors, many of which are controlled by two N:-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum-sensing systems. Escherichia coli strains equipped with a luxR-based monitor system expressing green fluorescent protein...... (GFP) in the presence of exogenous AHL molecules were used to detect the production of AHLs from P. aeruginosa in vivo. Mice were challenged intratracheally with alginate beads containing P. aeruginosa and E. coli and killed on different days after the challenge. By means of confocal scanning laser...... microscopy, GFP-expressing E. coli bacteria could be detected in the lung tissues, indicating production and excretion of AHL molecules in vivo by the infecting P. aeruginosa. AHL signals were detected mainly in lung tissues exhibiting severe pathological changes. These findings support the view that...

  19. INCIDENCE OF FLUOROQUINOLONE RESISTANCE IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA FROM URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Poiata

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of 105 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected from patients with urinary tract infectionswas assessed by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs using agar dilution method against thefollowing agents: norfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin.Resistance rates of P. aeruginosa to tested fluoroquinolones was fairly uniformly distributed between compounds asfollowed: norfloxacin - 52.4%, ofloxacin- 49.5%, ciprofloxacin - 51.4%, pefloxacin - 49.5%. Analysis of cross-resistancein P. aeruginosa showed a correlated magnitude of resistance between fluoroquinolones. Among the P.aeruginosa strainsthe number of those showing simultaneously resistance to all tested agents is high (n=50.The significant increase in fluoroquinolone resistance probably reflects the widspread use of this agent and the clinicaluse of these compunds should be carefully monitored since most bacterial strains shows cross-resitance.

  20. The Impact of Membrane Lipid Composition on Macrophage Activation in the Immune Defense against Rhodococcus equi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schumann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional fatty acids are known to have an impact on membrane lipid composition of body cells, including cells of the immune system, thus providing a link between dietary fatty acid uptake, inflammation and immunity. In this study we reveal the significance of macrophage membrane lipid composition on gene expression and cytokine synthesis thereby highlighting signal transduction processes, macrophage activation as well as macrophage defense mechanisms. Using RAW264.7 macrophages as a model system, we identified polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA of both the n-3 and the n-6 family to down-regulate the synthesis of: (i the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α; (ii the co-stimulatory molecule CD86; as well as (iii the antimicrobial polypeptide lysozyme. The action of the fatty acids partially depended on the activation status of the macrophages. It is particularly important to note that the anti-inflammatory action of the PUFA could also be seen in case of infection of RAW264.7 with viable microorganisms of the genera R. equi and P. aeruginosa. In summary, our data provide strong evidence that PUFA from both the n-3 and the n-6 family down-regulate inflammation processes in context of chronic infections caused by persistent pathogens.

  1. Organic and inorganic nitrogen uptake in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlman, Lena; Persson, Jörgen; Palmqvist, Kristin; Näsholm, Torgny

    2004-07-01

    In order to learn more about nitrogen (N) acquisition in lichens, and to see whether different lichens differ in their affinity to various N sources, N uptake was measured in 14 various lichen associations ("species"). These species represented various morphologies (fruticose or foliose), contrasting microhabitat preferences (epiphytic or terricolous), and had green algal, cyanobacterial or both forms of photobionts. N was supplied under non-limiting conditions as an amino acid mixture, ammonium, or nitrate, using 15N to quantify uptake. Carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was used to separate active and passive uptake. Thallus N, amino acids, soluble polyol concentrations, and the biont-specific markers chlorophyll a and ergosterol were quantified, aiming to test if these metabolites or markers were correlated with N uptake capacity. Ammonium uptake was significantly greater and to a higher extent passive, relative to the other two N sources. Nitrate uptake differed among lichen photobiont groups, cyanobacterial lichens having a lower uptake rate. All lichens had the capacity to assimilate amino acids, in many species at rates equal to nitrate uptake or even higher, suggesting that organic N compounds could potentially have an important role in the N nutrition of these organisms. There were no clear correlations between N uptake rates and any of the measured metabolites or markers. The relative uptake rates of ammonium, nitrate and amino acids were not related to morphology or microhabitat. PMID:15060826

  2. IgG antibodies in early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cordon, S M; Elborn, J. S.; Rayner, R J; Hiller, E. J.; Shale, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between IgG antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its isolation from sputum was determined in 100 patients with cystic fibrosis observed at intervals of two months for a median period of one year. Only one patient had a raised antibody titre (greater than 22.9 ELISA units) before isolation of P aeruginosa. Initially 65 patients were antibody negative, of whom 48 were also culture negative. Of 24 patients with positive sputum culture and negative antibodies, seven became an...

  3. Phagocytosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes: effect of cystic fibrosis serum.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomassen, M J; Demko, C A; Wood, R E; Sherman, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown previously that serum from chronically infected patients with cystic fibrosis inhibits the phagocytosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by both normal and cystic fibrosis alveolar macrophages. In the present study, the ability of peripheral monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes from normal volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients to phagocytize P. aeruginosa was shown not to be inhibited in the presence of serum from cystic fibrosis patients.

  4. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Zoe A.; Seviour, Robert J.; Tucci, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA. PMID:27313312

  5. Environmental and molecular characterization of systems which affect genome alteration in pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is used as a model organism to study genome alteration in freshwater microbial populations and horizontal gene transmission by both transduction and conjugation has been demonstrated. The studies have also provided data which suggest that intracellular genome instability may be increased in the aquatic environment as a result of stresses encountered by the cell in this habitat. The role of the P. aeruginosa recA analog in regulating genome instability is also addressed

  6. The Effect of Strict Segregation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mansfeld, Rosa; de Vrankrijker, Angelica; Brimicombe, Roland; Heijerman, Harry; Teding van Berkhout, Ferdinand; Spitoni, Cristian; Grave, Sanne; van der Ent, Cornelis; Wolfs, Tom; Willems, Rob; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Segregation of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) was implemented to prevent chronic infection with epidemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with presumed detrimental clinical effects, but its effectiveness has not been carefully evaluated. Methods The effect of strict segregation on the incidence of P. aeruginosa infection in CF patients was investigated through longitudinal protocolized follow-up of respiratory tract infection before and after segregation. In two nested cross-sectional studies in 2007 and 2011 the P. aeruginosa population structure was investigated and clinical parameters were determined in patients with and without infection with the Dutch epidemic P. aeruginosa clone (ST406). Results Of 784 included patients 315 and 382 were at risk for acquiring chronic P. aeruginosa infection before and after segregation. Acquisition rates were, respectively, 0.14 and 0.05 per 1,000 days at risk (HR: 0.66, 95% CI [0.2548–1.541]; p = 0.28). An exploratory subgroup analysis indicated lower acquisition after segregation in children < 15 years of age (HR: 0.43, 95% CI[0.21–0.95]; p = 0.04). P. aeruginosa population structure did not change after segregation and ST406 was not associated with lung function decline, death or lung transplantation. Conclusions Strict segregation was not associated with a statistically significant lower acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and ST406 was not associated with adverse clinical outcome. After segregation there were no new acquisitions of ST406. In an unplanned exploratory analysis chronic acquisition of P. aeruginosa was lower after implementation of segregation in patients under 15 years of age. PMID:27280467

  7. Nitrosoglutathione generating nitric oxide nanoparticles as an improved strategy for combating Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouake, Jason; Schairer, David; Kutner, Allison; Sanchez, David A; Makdisi, Joy; Blecher-Paz, Karin; Nacharaju, Parimala; Tuckman-Vernon, Chaim; Gialanella, Phil; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2012-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a community-acquired, nosocomial pathogen that is an important cause of human morbidity and mortality; it is intrinsically resistant to several antibiotics and is capable of developing resistance to newly developed drugs via a variety of mechanisms. P aeruginosa's ubiquity and multidrug resistance (MDR) warrants the development of innovative methods that overcome its ability to develop resistance. We have previously described a nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticle (NO-np) platform that effectively kills gram-positive and gram-negative organisms in vitro and accelerates clinical recovery in vivo in murine wound and abscess infection models. We have also demonstrated that when glutathione (GSH) is added to NO-np, the nitroso intermediate S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is formed, which has greater activity against P aeruginosa and other gram-negative organisms compared with NO-np alone. In the current study, we evaluate the potential of NO-np to generate GSNO both in vitro and in vivo in a murine excisional wound model infected with an MDR clinical isolate of P aeruginosa. Whereas NO-np alone inhibited P aeruginosa growth in vitro for up to 8 hours, NO-np+GSH completely inhibited P aeruginosa growth for 24 hours. Percent survival in the NO-np+GSH-treated isolates was significantly lower than in the NO-np (36.1% vs 8.3%; P=.004). In addition, NO-np+GSH accelerated wound closure in P aeruginosa-infected wounds, and NO-np+GSH-treated wounds had significantly lower bacterial burden when compared to NO-np-treated wounds (P<.001). We conclude that GSNO is easily generated from our NO-np platform and has the potential to be used as an antimicrobial agent against MDR organisms such as P aeruginosa. PMID:23377518

  8. High Therapeutic Index of Factor C Sushi Peptides: Potent Antimicrobials against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, Yin Hoe; Ho, Bow; Tan, Nguan Soon; Ng, Miang Lon; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2001-01-01

    Factor C protein isolated from the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, has endotoxin binding capability. Synthetic peptides of 34 amino acids based on the sequence of two regions of factor C (Sushi 1 and Sushi 3) as well as their corresponding mutants exhibited activities against 30 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Collectively, all four peptides demonstrated exceptionally effective bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa with 90% minimal bactericidal concentrations ...

  9. The enhancement by surfactants of hexadecane degradation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa varies with substrate availability

    OpenAIRE

    Noordman, WH; Wachter, JHJ; Boer, GJ; Janssen, DB; Boer, Geert J. de

    2002-01-01

    The rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa influences various processes related to hydrocarbon degradation. However, degradation can only be enhanced by the surfactant when it stimulates a process that is rate limiting under the applied conditions. Therefore we determined how rhamnolipid influences hexadecane degradation by P. aeruginosa UG2 under conditions differing in hexadecane availability. The rate of hexadecane degradation in shake flask cultures was lower for hex...

  10. Glutathione exhibits antibacterial activity and increases tetracycline efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione(GSH) plays important roles in pulmonary diseases,and inhaled GSH therapy has been used to treat cystic fibrosis(CF) patients in clinical trials.The results in this report revealed that GSH altered the sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to different antibiotics through pathways unrelated to the oxidative stress as generally perceived.In addition,GSH and its oxidized form inhibited the growth of P.aeruginosa.

  11. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Lo Sciuto; Regina Fernández-Piñar; Lucia Bertuccini; Francesca Iosi; Fabiana Superti; Francesco Imperi

    2014-01-01

    International audience The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we ...

  12. Control of Candida albicans Metabolism and Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phenazines

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Diana K.; Grahl, Nora; Okegbe, Chinweike; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Jacobs, Nicholas J.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans has developmental programs that govern transitions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and between unattached and biofilm lifestyles. Here, we report that filamentation, intercellular adherence, and biofilm development were inhibited during interactions between Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through the action of P. aeruginosa-produced phenazines. While phenazines are toxic to C. albicans at millimolar concentrations, we found that lower concentra...

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Forms Biofilms in Acute Infection Independent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 h of infection in thermally injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections as well. Using light, electron, and confocal scanning laser microscopy, P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burn...

  14. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Manash C.; Padmani Sandhu; Priya Gupta; Prasenjit Rudrapaul; Utpal C. De; Prosun Tribedi; Yusuf Akhter; Surajit Bhattacharjee

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combin...

  15. Evolved resistance to colistin and its loss due to genetic reversion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Young; Park, Young Kyoung; Chung, Eun Seon; Na, In Young; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2016-01-01

    The increased reliance on colistin for treating multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections has resulted in the emergence of colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We attempted to identify genetic contributors to colistin resistance in vitro evolved isogenic colistin-resistant and -susceptible strains of two P. aeruginosa lineages (P5 and P155). Their evolutionary paths to acquisition and loss of colistin resistance were also tracked. Comparative genomic analysis revealed 13 an...

  16. In vitro and in vivo screening for novel essential cell-envelope proteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Fernández-Piñar; Alessandra Lo Sciuto; Alice Rossi; Serena Ranucci; Alessandra Bragonzi; Francesco Imperi

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant opportunistic pathogens for which novel therapeutic options are urgently required. In order to identify new candidates as potential drug targets, we combined large-scale transposon mutagenesis data analysis and bioinformatics predictions to retrieve a set of putative essential genes which are conserved in P. aeruginosa and predicted to encode cell envelope or secreted proteins. By generating unma...

  17. Effects of azithromycin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhi-Gang; Gao, Yu; He, Jian-Guo; Xu, Wei-Feng; Jiang, Mei; JIN, HUAN-SHENG

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogenic bacterium in urinary tract infections (UTIs), particularly catheter-associated UTIs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of azithromycin (AZM) on P. aeruginosa isolated from UTIs. Isolates were identified by biochemical assays and the Vitek system. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the disk diffusion assay. Biofilm formation and adhesion were assayed using a crystal violet staining method. The swimming motility was ...

  18. Antibiotic Resistance Profiles and Quorum Sensing-Dependent Virulence Factors in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huafu; Tu, Faping; Gui, Zhihong; Lu, Xianghong; Chu, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces multiple virulence factors that have been associated with quorum sensing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of drug resistant profiles and quorum sensing related virulence factors. Pseudomonas aeruginosa were collected from different patients hospitalized in China, the isolates were tested for their susceptibility to different common antimicrobial drugs and detected QS-related virulence factors. We identified 170 isolates displaying impaired ...

  19. Clustering of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptomes from planktonic cultures, developing and mature biofilms reveals distinct expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Saqi Mansoor; Hurst Jacob M; Papakonstantinopoulou Anastasia; Paccanaro Alberto; Waite Richard D; Littler Eddie; Curtis Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a genetically complex bacterium which can adopt and switch between a free-living or biofilm lifestyle, a versatility that enables it to thrive in many different environments and contributes to its success as a human pathogen. Results Transcriptomes derived from growth states relevant to the lifestyle of P. aeruginosa were clustered using three different methods (K-means, K-means spectral and hierarchical clustering). The culture conditions used fo...

  20. Local imipenem activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa decreases in vivo in the presence of siliconized latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, C; Conejo, M C; Docobo-Pérez, F; Velasco, C; López-Rojas, R; García, I; Pachón-Ibáñez, M E; Rodríguez, J M; Pachón, J; Pascual, A

    2011-02-01

    Zinc eluted from siliconized latex (SL) increases resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to imipenem in vitro. A foreign body peritonitis model was used to evaluate the activity of imipenem using SL or silicone (S) implants. No differences were observed in mortality, positive blood cultures and tissue bacterial counts between SL and S implants. Implant-associated counts, however, were significantly higher in the SL group. It is concluded that SL decreases the activity of imipenem against P. aeruginosa. PMID:20936490

  1. Synergistic effect of fosfomycin and fluoroquinolones against Pseudomonas aeruginosa growing in a biofilm.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikuniya, Takeshi; Kato, Yoshihisa; Kariyama, Reiko; Monden, Koichi; Hikida, Muneo; Kumon, Hiromi

    2005-01-01

    Ulifloxacin is the active form of the prodrug prulifloxacin and shows a highly potent antipseudomonal activity. In this study, we examined the combined effect of fosfomycin and ulifloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) growing in a biofilm using a modified Robbins device with artificial urine, and compared it to that of the combination of fosfomycin and ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin. An ATP bioluminescence assay was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the agents ag...

  2. Role of Interleukin-17 in defense against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xilin; Shao, Bing; Wang, Ran; ZHOU, SIJING; Tang, Zhongzhi; Lu, Weihua; XIONG, SHENGDAO

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause severe or even fatal infection in hosts with immunodeficiency. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a newly discovered pro-inflammatory cytokine, which promotes the recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the respiratory tract by inducing release of chemokine C-X-C. Objective: This study was conducted to explore the role of IL-17 in host defense against acute pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in lungs. Methods: The expression of IL-17 and its downstream e...

  3. [The protective activity of 2 normal immunoglobulin preparations for intravenous administration in experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilev, Ch L; Veleva, K V; Tekelieva, R Kh; Pencheva, P I

    1991-02-01

    The antibody levels in 18 batches of the preparations of human immunoglobulin, Immunovenin and Immunovenin-Intact, for intravenous injection were determined in the enzyme immunoassay with the use of the mixture of P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide antigens of seven immunotypes. The average antibody titers in these preparations were identical. The preparations were found to have protective action against P. aeruginosa experimental infection in mice. PMID:1907793

  4. An examination of potential differences in biofilm production among different genotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiljević Zorica; Jovčić B.; Ćirković Ivana; Đukić Slobodanka

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we have examined if there is any difference in biofilm production among different genotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The study investigated 526 non-duplicate P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical specimens and from a hospital environment. Isolates were grouped into thirty-five genotypes based on an identical ERIC2-band pattern. Biofilm formation was quantified by the microtiter plate test and all strains were classified into the follo...

  5. Class 1 integron and Imipenem Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Prevalence and Antibiotic Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Milani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important causative agents of nosocomial infections especially in ICU and burn units. P. aeruginosa infections are normally difficult to eradicate due to acquired resistance to many antibiotics. Recent appearance of carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolates is considered a major healthcare problem. The present study was conducted to detect class 1 integron and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of imipenem-sensitive and resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa."nMaterials and Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility profiles and minimum inhibitory concentration against imipenem was studied in 160 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa by disk agar diffusion method and Etest, respectively. Detection of class 1 integron was performed by the PCR method. Demographic and microbiological data were compared between imipenem susceptible and non-susceptible isolates by the SPSS software."nResults: PCR results showed that 90 (56.3% of P. aeruginosa isolates carried class 1 integron. Antibiotic susceptibility results revealed that 93 (58.1% were susceptible and 67 (41.9% were non-susceptible to imipenem. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility patterns showed high level of drug resistance among imipenem non-susceptible isolates. We found that MDR phenotype, presence of class 1 integron and hospitalization in ICU and burn units were significantly associated with imipenem non-susceptible isolates."nConclusion: The high frequency of imipenem resistance was seen among our P. aeruginosa isolates. Since carbapenems are considered as the last drugs used for treatment of P. aeruginosa infections, it is crucial to screen imipenem non-susceptible isolates in infection control and optimal therapy.

  6. Dissemination of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Dortet, Laurent; Flonta, Mirela; Boudehen, Yves-Marie; Creton, Elodie; Bernabeu, Sandrine; Vogel, Anaïs; Naas, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates and 12 carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were recovered from patients hospitalized between August 2011 and March 2013 at the Hospital of Infectious Disease, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. One KPC-, nine NDM-1-, four OXA-48-, and one VIM-4-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates along with 11 VIM-2-producing and one IMP-13-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from clinical samples. All carbapenemase genes were lo...

  7. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients Referring to Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Zeynab Golshani; Ali Mohammad Ahadi; Ali Sharifzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this article as: Golshani Z, Ahadi AM, Sharifzadeh A. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients Referring to Hospitals. Arch Hyg Sci 2012;1(2):48-53. Abstract: Background & Aims of the Study: The aim of this study was to detect and survey the antibiotic resistance pattern of Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa isolated from patients in Isfahan (located in central Iran) hospitals. Materials & Methods : A Total of 50 clinical isola...

  8. Phylogenetic Distribution of CRISPR-Cas Systems in Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    van Belkum, Alex; Soriaga, Leah B.; LaFave, Matthew C.; Akella, Srividya; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Barbu, E. Magda; Shortridge, Dee; Blanc, Bernadette; Hannum, Gregory; Zambardi, Gilles; Miller, Kristofer; Enright, Mark C; Mugnier, Nathalie; Brami, Daniel; Schicklin, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an antibiotic-refractory pathogen with a large genome and extensive genotypic diversity. Historically, P. aeruginosa has been a major model system for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying type I clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein (CRISPR-Cas)-based bacterial immune system function. However, little information on the phylogenetic distribution and potential role of these CRISPR-Cas syste...

  9. Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O.; Lafrenie, Robert M.; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of...

  10. A quorum-sensing inhibitor blocks Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Miller, Laura C.; Siryaporn, Albert; Drescher, Knut; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we prepare synthetic molecules and analyze them for inhibition of the Pseudomonas quorum-sensing receptors LasR and RhlR. Our most effective compound, meta-bromo-thiolactone, not only prevents virulence factor expression and biofilm formation but also protects Caenorhabditis elegans and human A549 lung epithelial cells from quorum-sensing–mediated killing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This anti–quorum-sensing molecule is capable of influencing P. aeruginosa virulence in tissue cul...

  11. Prospective study of serum antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoproteins in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hollsing, A E; Granström, M; Vasil, M L; Wretlind, B; Strandvik, B

    1987-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin G to four purified antigens from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, phospholipase C, alkaline protease, exotoxin A, and elastase, were determined in 62 patients with cystic fibrosis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The patients were followed for 12 to 24 months in a prospective study. Increased titers, i.e., titers more than 2 standard deviations above those of normal controls, were exclusively found in patients chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa and not in patients harbo...

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease degrades human gamma interferon and inhibits its bioactivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Horvat, R T; Parmely, M J

    1988-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production by antigen-stimulated human T-cell clones. Crude bacterial filtrates prepared from certain strains of P. aeruginosa inhibited IFN-gamma production by T cells and reduced the antiviral activity of preformed IFN-gamma. Bacterial filtrates prepared from mutant strains that did not produce the exoenzyme alkaline protease (AP) did not inhibit IFN-gamma activity. The inhibitory acti...

  13. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzymes in lung infections of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Döring, G; Goldstein, W; A. Röll; Schiøtz, P O; Høiby, N; Botzenhart, K.

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzymes in cystic fibrosis lung infection in the presence and absence of specific serum antibodies. In sputa of 21 cystic fibrosis patients, concentrations of P. aeruginosa proteases and exotoxin A were determined by sensitive radioimmunoassays. In all sputa, detection of exoenzymes was negative (less than or equal to 10 ng). Positive serum antibody titers to bacterial exoenzymes were found in the majority of patients. Purified immunoglobu...

  14. Specific cleavage of human type III and IV collagens by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    OpenAIRE

    Heck, L W; Morihara, K; McRae, W B; Miller, E J

    1986-01-01

    Purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaved human type III and IV collagens with the formation of specific cleavage products. Furthermore, type I collagen appeared to be slowly cleaved by both P. aeruginosa elastase and alkaline protease. These cleavage fragments from type III and IV collagens were separated from the intact collagen chains by SDS polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis run under reducing conditions, and they were detected by their characteristic Coomassie blue staini...

  15. Selective Sweeps and Parallel Pathoadaptation Drive Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolution in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz Caballero, Julio; Clark, Shawn T.; Coburn, Bryan; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Pauline W.; Donaldson, Sylva L.; Tullis, D Elizabeth; Yau, Yvonne C. W.; Waters, Valerie J; Hwang, David M.; Guttman, David S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pulmonary infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a recalcitrant problem in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. While the clinical implications and long-term evolutionary patterns of these infections are well studied, we know little about the short-term population dynamics that enable this pathogen to persist despite aggressive antimicrobial therapy. Here, we describe a short-term population genomic analysis of 233 P. aeruginosa isolates collected from 12 sputum specimens obtained...

  16. Production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Intercellular Small Signaling Molecules in Human Burn Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Yok-Ai Que; Ronen Hazan; Ryan, Colleen M.; Sylvain Milot; François Lépine; Martha Lydon; Rahme, Laurence G

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a complex cell-to-cell communication system that relies on low-molecular weight excreted molecules to control the production of its virulence factors. We previously characterized the transcriptional regulator MvfR, that controls a major network of acute virulence functions in P. aeruginosa through the control of its ligands, the 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs)—4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ) and 3,4-dihydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (PQS). Though HHQ and PQ...

  17. Effects of proteases on the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A.

    OpenAIRE

    Morihara, K; Sanai, Y; Tsuzuki, H; Jyoyama, H; Hirose, K; Homma, J Y; Kato, I

    1981-01-01

    The effects of various proteases on the enzymatic or biological activity and structure of exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were systematically studied. The toxin was extremely resistant to treatment with various enzymes. The lethality of the toxin disappeared upon treatment with P. aeruginosa protease and elastase, thermolysin, and trypsin with a long incubation time (5h) in the presence of a high enzyme concentration (molar concentration of enzyme to toxin, 1:10 or 1:20), but was littl...

  18. Growth of genetically engineered Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in soil and rhizosphere.

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, K H; Schell, M A; Hartel, P. G.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the addition of a recombinant plasmid containing the pglA gene encoding an alpha-1,4-endopolygalacturonase from Pseudomonas solanacearum on the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in soil and rhizosphere was determined. Despite a high level of polygalacturonase production by genetically engineered P. putida and P. aeruginosa, the results suggest that polygalacturonase production had little effect on the growth of these strains in soil or rhizosphere.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to acute right leg cellulitis: case of community-acquired infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wahab, Asrul Abdul; Rahman, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacillus that causes wide spectrum clinical infections. However, it is most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infection. In this case a 58-year-old male with underlying hypertension and dyslipidaemia was admitted for acute right leg cellulitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was identified from the case, though it was not a usual suspected organism. It might be due to community-acquired infection.

  20. Extracellular Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylated proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Jarnier, Frédérique; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie

    2014-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation on serine, threonine, and tyrosine is known to be involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, signal transduction, and bacterial virulence. We characterized, for the first time, the extracellular phosphoproteins of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 strain. We identified 28 phosphoproteins (59 phosphosites) including enzymes, with various phosphorylation sites, known as potent secreted virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The high phosphorylation level of these virulence factors might reflect a relationship between Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation and virulence. PMID:24965220

  1. Use of In-Biofilm Expression Technology To Identify Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development†

    OpenAIRE

    Finelli, Antonio; Gallant, Claude V.; Jarvi, Keith; Burrows, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms form complex three-dimensional architecture and are tolerant of antibiotics and other antimicrobial compounds. In this work, an in vivo expression technology system, originally designed to study virulence-associated genes in complex mammalian environments, was used to identify genes up-regulated in P. aeruginosa grown to a mature (5-day) biofilm. Five unique cloned promoters unable to promote in vitro growth in the absence of purines after recovery from ...

  2. Swimming Behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Studied by Holographic 3D Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Vater, Svenja M.; Weiße, Sebastian; Maleschlijski, Stojan; Lotz, Carmen; Koschitzki, Florian; Schwartz, Thomas; Obst, Ursula; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Holographic 3D tracking was applied to record and analyze the swimming behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The obtained trajectories allow to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the free swimming behavior of the bacterium. This can be classified into five distinct swimming patterns. In addition to the previously reported smooth and oscillatory swimming motions, three additional patterns are distinguished. We show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa performs helical movements which were so far on...

  3. Antimicrobial activity of the crude ethanol extract and fractions from Eugenia uniflora leaves against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana S. Fiuza; Sabóia Morais, Simone M.T.; José R. Paula; Leonice M.F. Tresvenzol; Carmo Filho, José R.; Fabiana C Pimenta

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of the crude ethanol extract and fractions from Eugenia uniflora L. leaves against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 72 P. aeruginosa isolated from patients of three hospitals in Goiânia and 8 standard strains were selected to test antimicrobial activity. The bacteria susceptibility profile against 15 antimicrobial agents was determined using the disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the crude ethanol extract and the et...

  4. Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected orthopedic prostheses with ceftazidime-ciprofloxacin antibiotic combination.

    OpenAIRE

    Brouqui, P; Rousseau, M C; Stein, A.; Drancourt, M; D. Raoult

    1995-01-01

    Indwelling device infections are associated with considerable morbidity and extremely high cost. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequent gram-negative etiologic agent associated with infections of indwelling catheters and foreign body implants. It is generally agreed that eradication of infection in the presence of a foreign body requires removal of the foreign body. Using a combination of ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, we cured nine of nine patients with P. aeruginosa-infected osteosynth...

  5. Chromosomal beta-lactamase is packaged into membrane vesicles and secreted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Beveridge, T J; Kadurugamuwa, J; Walther-Rasmussen, J; Høiby, N

    2000-01-01

    Membrane vesicles were isolated from one beta-lactam-sensitive and three beta-lactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis. The presence of the chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase in the membrane vesicles was shown by electron microscopy and...... enzymatic studies. This is the first report of extracellular secretion of beta-lactamase in P. aeruginosa and it seems that the enzyme is packaged into membrane vesicles....

  6. Comparison of Antiseptics’ Efficacy on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, StaphylococcusEpidermidis and Enterobacter Aeruginosa in Hospital of Imam Khomeini (Urmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahim Amini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Background and Objectives: Nosocomial infection is the cause of deaths, morbidity, higher costs and increased length of stay in hospitals. Correct and appropriate use of antiseptic and disinfectants play an important role in reducing infections. In this study the efficacy of antiseptics on bacteria causing hospital infections has been studied.Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in the laboratory of Imam Khomeini Hospital of Uremia. In this study the Antimicrobial activity of Descocid, Korsolex basic, Mikrobac forte and persidin 1% was studied against bacteria causing hospital infections such as Enterobacter aeruginosa 1221 (NCTC 10006, Staphylococcus epidermidis (PTCC: 1435 (Cip81.55 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PAO1. Sensitivities of bacteria were determined by Minimum inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum bactericidal Concentration (MBC antiseptics. In the second stage, the concentration of antiseptics was prepared according to the manufacturer's suggested protocol and the effect of antimicrobial agents were studied at the certain concentration and contact time.Result: All disinfectants (Descocid, Korsolex basic, Mikrobac forte concentration and contact time, Accordance with the manufacturer's brochure, had inhibitory effect on all bacteria. That this is consistent with the manufacturer's brochure. Persidin one percent in concentration of from 2 and 4 V/V % and exposure time 5 minutes could not inhibit the growth of bacterial. But at concentrations of 10 and 20% respectively 15 and 30 minutes exposure time, all three types of bacteria can be inhibited, which is consistent with the manufacturer's claims.Conclusion: In this study, the efficacy of antiseptics was determined with the Micro-dilution method recommended by the NCCLS. Korsolex basic, weakest antiseptics (the highest MIC for the inhibition of three bacteria was determined

  7. Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C02 include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO2 and total concentration of dissolved C02, sea-air pCO2 difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these processes is given and models of ocean-atmosphere system based on our understanding of these regulating processes axe used to estimate the magnitude of C02 uptake by the ocean. We conclude that the ocean can absorb up to 35% of the fossil fuel emission. Direct measurements show that 55% Of C02 from fossil fuel burning remains in the atmosphere. The remaining 10% is not accounted for by atmospheric increases and ocean uptake. In addition, it is estimated that an amount equivalent to 30% of recent annual fossil fuel emissions is released into the atmosphere as a result of deforestation and farming. To balance global carbon budget, a sizable carbon sink besides the ocean is needed. Storage of carbon in terrestrial biosphere as a result of C02 fertilization is a potential candidate for such missing carbon sinks

  8. Lessons Learned from Surveillance of Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a Large Academic Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett H. Heintz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This research report assessed the differences in resistance rates and antimicrobial usage-versus-susceptibility relationships of Pseudomonas aeruginosa found in various hospital patient care areas. A simplified case control study was also performed to identify patient-specific risk factors associated with cefepime-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. Last, we determined the consequence of combining mucoid and non-mucoid derived antimicrobial susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa into hospital antibiograms. Overall, susceptibility rates remained lower in the intensive care units (ICUs compared to the non-ICU patient care areas, except for cefepime over the last time period. Cefepime utilization and antimicrobial-resistance rates among P. aeruginosa isolates had a significant relationship. Decreased meropenem exposure was associated with lower resistance rates relative to cefepime. Risk factors independently associated with cefepime-resistant P. aeruginosa were structural lung disease, ICU admission, recent third generation cephalosporin use, frequent hospital admission and non-urine isolates. Large and statistically significant differences were observed between non-mucoid and combined percent susceptibility data for aminoglycosides. To control antimicrobial resistance and optimize initial empiric antimicrobial therapy, antimicrobial susceptibility and utilization patterns in specific patient care areas should be monitored and risk factors for antimicrobial resistance should be assessed. Mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa should not be included into antimicrobial susceptibility data as this may underestimate activity of most antipseudomonal agents.

  9. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy to inhibit pseudomonas aeruginosa of corneal isolates (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Heather A.; Relhan, Nidhi; Arboleda, Alejandro; Halili, Francisco; De Freitas, Carolina; Alawa, Karam; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Amescua, Guillermo; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Keratitis associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is difficult to manage. Treatment includes antibiotic eye drops, however, some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are resistant. Current research efforts are focused on finding alternative and adjunct therapies to treat multi-drug resistant bacteria. One promising alternate technique is photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of riboflavin- and rose bengal-mediated PDT on Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis isolates in vitro. Two isolates (S+U- and S-U+) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were derived from keratitis patients and exposed to five experimental groups: (1) Control (dark, UV-A irradiation, 525nm irradiation); (2) 0.1% riboflavin (dark, UV-A irradiation); and (3) 0.1% rose bengal, (4) 0.05% rose bengal and (5) 0.01% rose bengal (dark, 525nm irradiation). Three days after treatment, in dark conditions of all concentration of riboflavin and rose bengal showed no inhibition in both S+U- and S-U+ strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In 0.1% and 0.05% rose bengal irradiated groups, for both S+U- and S-U+ strains, there was complete inhibition of bacterial growth in the central 50mm zone corresponding to the diameter of the green light source. These in vitro results suggest that rose bengal photodynamic therapy may be an effective adjunct treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

  10. Evolved resistance to colistin and its loss due to genetic reversion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Young; Park, Young Kyoung; Chung, Eun Seon; Na, In Young; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2016-01-01

    The increased reliance on colistin for treating multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections has resulted in the emergence of colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We attempted to identify genetic contributors to colistin resistance in vitro evolved isogenic colistin-resistant and -susceptible strains of two P. aeruginosa lineages (P5 and P155). Their evolutionary paths to acquisition and loss of colistin resistance were also tracked. Comparative genomic analysis revealed 13 and five colistin resistance determinants in the P5 and P155 lineages, respectively. Lipid A in colistin-resistant mutants was modified through the addition of 4-amino-L-arabinose; this modification was absent in colistin-susceptible revertant strains. Many amino acid substitutions that emerged during the acquisition of colistin resistance were reversed in colistin-susceptible revertants. We demonstrated that evolved colistin resistance in P. aeruginosa was mediated by a complicated regulatory network that likely emerges through diverse genetic alterations. Colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa became susceptible to the colistin upon its withdrawal because of genetic reversion. The mechanisms through which P. aeruginosa acquires and loses colistin resistance have implications on the treatment options that can be applied against P. aeruginosa infections, with respect to improving bactericidal efficacy and preventing further resistance to antibiotics. PMID:27150578

  11. Evolution and adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms driven by mismatch repair system-deficient mutators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela M Luján

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen causing chronic airway infections, especially in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. The majority of the CF patients acquire P. aeruginosa during early childhood, and most of them develop chronic infections resulting in severe lung disease, which are rarely eradicated despite intensive antibiotic therapy. Current knowledge indicates that three major adaptive strategies, biofilm development, phenotypic diversification, and mutator phenotypes [driven by a defective mismatch repair system (MRS], play important roles in P. aeruginosa chronic infections, but the relationship between these strategies is still poorly understood. We have used the flow-cell biofilm model system to investigate the impact of the mutS associated mutator phenotype on development, dynamics, diversification and adaptation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Through competition experiments we demonstrate for the first time that P. aeruginosa MRS-deficient mutators had enhanced adaptability over wild-type strains when grown in structured biofilms but not as planktonic cells. This advantage was associated with enhanced micro-colony development and increased rates of phenotypic diversification, evidenced by biofilm architecture features and by a wider range and proportion of morphotypic colony variants, respectively. Additionally, morphotypic variants generated in mutator biofilms showed increased competitiveness, providing further evidence for mutator-driven adaptive evolution in the biofilm mode of growth. This work helps to understand the basis for the specific high proportion and role of mutators in chronic infections, where P. aeruginosa develops in biofilm communities.

  12. Pseudomonas cepacia adherence to respiratory epithelial cells is enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas cepacia are both opportunistic pathogens of patients with cystic fibrosis. The binding characteristics of these two species were compared to determine if they use similar mechanisms to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. P. cepacia 249 was shown to be piliated, but there was no detectable homology between P. aeruginosa pilin gene probes and P. cepacia genomic DNA. P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa did not appear to compete for epithelial receptors. In the presence of purified P. aeruginosa pili, the adherence of 35S-labeled strain 249 to respiratory epithelial monolayers was unaffected, while that of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was decreased by 55%. The binding of P. cepacia 249 and 715j was increased by 2.4-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, in the presence of an equal inoculum of PAO1. Interbacterial agglutination contributed to the increased adherence of P. cepacia, as the binding of 249 was increased twofold in the presence of irradiated PAO1. PAO1 exoproducts had a marked effect in enhancing the ability of the P. cepacia strains to adhere to the epithelial monolayers. A PAO1 supernatant increased the binding of 249 by eightfold and that of 715j by fourfold. Thus, there appears to be a synergistic relationship between P. aeruginosa and P. cepacia in which PAO1 exoproducts modify the epithelial cell surface, exposing receptors and facilitating increased P. cepacia attachment

  13. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF TRADITIONAL HERBS AND STANDARD ANTIBIOTICS AGAINST POULTRY ASSOCIATED PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affia Rafique

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Present study aims to access the antibacterial activity of medicinal plants and antibiotics against poultry associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa is the most widespread avian pathogen and it produces a range of toxins and enzymes that may contribute to pathogenicity. P. aeruginosa was isolated from the chicken liver and identified through biochemical methods. The antibacterial activity of extracts of medicinal herbs and various antibiotics were analyzed against P. aeruginosa through agar disc diffusion method. P. aeruginosa was susceptible against Norfloxacin, Chloramphenicol, Streptomycin, Gentamicin, Tobramycin, and Ciprofloxacin. Whereas, moderately susceptible in case of Oxytetracycline, Neomycin, Lincomycin, and Sulfomethoxyzol. It was also analyzed that Ampicillin, Tetracycline, Penicillin G and Trimethoprim had no effect. Among the plants tested C. zylanicum, C. cyminum, T. ammi, S. aromaticum and green part of M. charantia were most active. The maximum antibacterial activity was calculated by the extracts of isoamylalcohol of C. zylanicum, C. cyminum, T. ammi, S. aromaticum, and ethanolic and methanol extract of green part of M. charantia against P. aeruginosa. This study indicated that these medicinal plants could be the potential source for antimicrobial agents. Hence, these medicinal plants can be further subjected to isolation of the therapeutic antimicrobials and further pharmacological evaluation.

  14. Interactions between Microcystis aeruginosa and coexisting amoxicillin contaminant at different phosphorus levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Shi; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Baoyu

    2015-10-30

    Microcystis aeruginosa was cultured with 0.05-5 mg L(-1) of phosphorus and exposed to 200-500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin for seven days. Amoxicillin presented no significant effect (p>0.05) on the growth of M. aeruginosa at phosphorus levels of 0.05 and 0.2 mg L(-1), but stimulated algal growth as a hormesis effect at phosphorus levels of 1 and 5 mg L(-1). Phosphorus and amoxicillin affected the contents of chlorophyll-a, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and malondialdehyde, the expression of psbA and rbcL, as well as the activities of adenosinetriphosphatase and glutathione S-transferase in similar manners, but regulated the production and release of microcystins and the activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in different ways. Increased photosynthesis activity was related with the ATP consumption for the stress response to amoxicillin, and the stress response was enhanced as the phosphorus concentration increased. The biodegradation of amoxicillin by M. aeruginosa increased from 11.5% to 28.2% as the phosphorus concentration increased. Coexisting amoxicillin aggravated M. aeruginosa pollution by increasing cell density and concentration of microcystins, while M. aeruginosa alleviated amoxicillin pollution via biodegradation. The interactions between M. aeruginosa and amoxicillin were significantly regulated by phosphorus (p<0.05) and led to a complicated situation of combined pollution. PMID:25956638

  15. Ibuprofen modifies the inflammatory response of the murine lung to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordelli, D O; Cerquetti, M C; el-Tawil, G; Ramwell, P W; Hooke, A M; Bellanti, J A

    1985-08-01

    In chronic P. aeruginosa infection, lung tissue damage is induced by either the microorganism or the inflammatory response. We investigated, in an animal model, whether a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, ibuprofen, reduced lung inflammation produced by P. aeruginosa. Lung lavages, pulmonary clearance of P. aeruginosa and lung pathology were studied in CD-1 mice injected with sodium ibuprofenate. A single dose of the drug, injected immediately after 30 min exposure to the P. aeruginosa aerosol, decreased the recruitment of granulocytes into airways in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with 2 doses of the drug 18 and 6 h before the P. aeruginosa challenge was even more effective. The kinetics of changes in prostaglandin E2, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2 concentrations in lung lavage fluids after P. aeruginosa aerosol were also modified by ibuprofen. Moreover, ibuprofen treatment did not impair lung clearance of the challenge microorganisms, and the animals had less inflammation of the lungs. PMID:3863757

  16. Virus-Induced Type I Interferon Deteriorates Control of Systemic Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Merches

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type I interferon (IFN-I predisposes to bacterial superinfections, an important problem during viral infection or treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-α. IFN-I-induced neutropenia is one reason for the impaired bacterial control; however there is evidence that more frequent bacterial infections during IFN-α-treatment occur independently of neutropenia. Methods: We analyzed in a mouse model, whether Pseudomonas aeruginosa control is influenced by co-infection with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. Bacterial titers, numbers of neutrophils and the gene-expression of liver-lysozyme-2 were determined during a 24 hours systemic infection with P. aeruginosa in wild-type and Ifnar-/- mice under the influence of LCMV or poly(I:C. Results: Virus-induced IFN-I impaired the control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was associated with neutropenia and loss of lysozyme-2-expression in the liver, which had captured P. aeruginosa. A lower release of IFN-I by poly(I:C-injection also impaired the bacterial control in the liver and reduced the expression of liver-lysozyme-2. Low concentration of IFN-I after infection with a virulent strain of P. aeruginosa alone impaired the bacterial control and reduced lysozyme-2-expression in the liver as well. Conclusion: We found that during systemic infection with P. aeruginosa Kupffer cells quickly controlled the bacteria in cooperation with neutrophils. Upon LCMV-infection this cooperation was disturbed.

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26729873

  18. Growth inhibition and oxidative damage of Microcystis aeruginosa induced by crude extract of Sagittaria trifolia tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Yunguo; Zhang, Pingyang; Zeng, Guangming; Cai, Xiaoxi; Liu, Shaobo; Yin, Yicheng; Hu, Xinjiang; Hu, Xi; Tan, Xiaofei

    2016-05-01

    Aquatic macrophytes are considered to be promising in controlling harmful cyanobacterial blooms. In this research, an aqueous extract of Sagittaria trifolia tubers was prepared to study its inhibitory effect on Microcystis aeruginosa in the laboratory. Several physiological indices of M. aeruginosa, in response to the environmental stress, were analyzed. Results showed that S. trifolia tuber aqueous extract significantly inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa in a concentration-dependent way. The highest inhibition rate reached 90% after 6 day treatment. The Chlorophyll-a concentration of M. aeruginosa cells decreased from 343.1 to 314.2μg/L in the treatment group. The activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase and the content of reduced glutathione in M. aeruginosa cells initially increased as a response to the oxidative stress posed by S. trifolia tuber aqueous extract, but then decreased as time prolonged. The lipid peroxidation damage of the cyanobacterial cell membranes was reflected by the malondialdehyde level, which was notably higher in the treatment group compared with the controls. It was concluded that the oxidative damage of M. aeruginosa induced by S. trifolia tuber aqueous extract might be one of the mechanisms for the inhibitory effects. PMID:27155407

  19. Increased muscle glucose uptake during contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Thorkil; Galbo, H; Richter, E A

    1984-01-01

    We reinvestigated the prevailing concept that muscle contractions only elicit increased muscle glucose uptake in the presence of a so-called "permissive" concentration of insulin (Berger et al., Biochem. J. 146: 231-238, 1975; Vranic and Berger, Diabetes 28: 147-163, 1979). Hindquarters from rats...... in severe ketoacidosis were perfused with a perfusate containing insulin antiserum. After 60 min perfusion, electrical stimulation increased glucose uptake of the contracting muscles fivefold. Also, subsequent contractions increased glucose uptake in hindquarters from nondiabetic rats perfused for 1...... Berger et al., 3-O-methylglucose uptake increased during contractions and glucose uptake was negative at rest and zero during contractions. An increase in muscle transport and uptake of glucose during contractions does not require the presence of insulin. Furthermore, glucose transport in contracting...

  20. Explaining variation in Down's syndrome screening uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crombag, Neeltje M T H; Vellinga, Ynke E; Kluijfhout, Sandra A;

    2014-01-01

    relatively high uptake rates in Denmark. CONCLUSIONS: This paper makes an important contribution to understanding how macro-level demographic, social and healthcare delivery factors may have an impact on national uptake rates for Down's syndrome screening. It has suggested a number of policy level and system......BACKGROUND: The offer of prenatal Down's syndrome screening is part of routine antenatal care in most of Europe; however screening uptake varies significantly across countries. Although a decision to accept or reject screening is a personal choice, it is unlikely that the widely differing uptake...... rates across countries can be explained by variation in individual values alone.The aim of this study was to compare Down's syndrome screening policies and programmes in the Netherlands, where uptake is relatively low (<30%) with England and Denmark where uptake is higher (74 and > 90% respectively), in...

  1. Uptake of aluminium ion by the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific uptake by the rat liver of 28Al was shown. There was specific uptake of 28Al by liver cell nuclei and DNA. This uptake was blocked by prior treatment with stable aluminium. It is concluded that aluminium enters the liver cell by some specific mechanism and that the reaction of aluminium with DNA inside the hepatocyte nucleus could be a mechanism responsible for the development of aluminium-induced experimental porphyria in the rat

  2. Gastric gallium-67 uptake in gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even though Ga-67 imaging has been used widely in the diagnosis of malignant as well as inflammatory lesions, its uptake in the stomach has been reported in the literature mainly in gastric lymphoma and carcinoma. As shown in this case, intense gastric uptake of the radionuclide may be seen in common gastritis without malignancy. Perhaps the benign gastric uptake of Ga-67 deserves more emphasis

  3. Uptake of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid by Haemophilus.

    OpenAIRE

    Gromkova, R; Goodgal, S

    1981-01-01

    The uptake of circular and linear plasmid RSF0885 deoxyribonucleic acids, (DNAs) obtained from Haemophilus parainfluenzae 14, in both homologous and heterologous recipients was studied and compared with that of chromosomal DNA. High concentrations of divalent cations stimulated the uptake of either circular or linear plasmid DNA in H. parainfluenzae 14 competent cells but did not affect the uptake of chromosomal DNA. The biological activity of linear plasmid DNA was similar to that of circula...

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Alters Growth Activity, Autolysis, and Antibiotic Tolerance in a Human Host-Adapted Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Christensen, Anne-Mette; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph;

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among members of polymicrobial infections or between pathogens and the commensal flora may determine disease outcomes. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are important opportunistic human pathogens and are both part of the polymicrobial infection communities in human...... hosts. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro interaction between S. aureus and a collection of P. aeruginosa isolates representing different evolutionary steps of a dominant lineage, DK2, that have evolved through decades of growth in chronically infected patients. While the early adapted P....... aeruginosa DK2 strains outcompeted S. aureus during coculture on agar plates, we found that later P. aeruginosa DK2 strains showed a commensal-like interaction, where S. aureus was not inhibited by P. aeruginosa and the growth activity of P. aeruginosa was enhanced in the presence of S. aureus. This effect...

  5. Cadmium uptake by rat red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat red blood cells were employed to study the uptake of cadmium (109Cd). Suspensions of red blood cells were exposed to Cd concentrations (both bound and free) observed following in vivo Cd administration. Cd uptake was biphasic with an initial rapid phase (0C was one-fourth of that at 370C. The metabolic inhibitors: sodium fluoride (1mM), potassium cyanide (1mM) and carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (2μM) and the Na+-K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain (1mM) did not reduce Cd (50μM) uptake into red blood cells. This suggests that the uptake of Cd into red blood cells was not an active process. Incubation of Cd (10μM) with an equimolar concentration of Zn did not alter uptake of Cd into red blood cells, but at 5 and 10 times higher concentrations of Zn, Cd uptake was enhanced 5-fold. Mercury at one-tenth and equimolar concentrations of Cd increased Cd uptake by red blood cells 2-fold. N-Ethylmaleimide (0.5-5mM), which irreversibly inactivates membrane sulfhydryl groups, decreased Cd uptake. The data indicate that Cd uptake into rat red blood cells occurs by passive transport and that alterations of sulfhydryls of red blood cell membrane may modulate the process. (author)

  6. Radioiodine uptake in inactive pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection. We have seen such accumulation in six thyroid cancer patients with a history of previously treated pulmonary tuberculosis. We also review the causes of false-positive radioiodine uptake in lung infection/inflammation. Eight foci of radioiodine uptake were seen on six iodine-123 diagnostic scans. In three foci, the uptake was focal and indistinguishable from thyroid cancer pulmonary metastases from thyroid cancer. In the remaining foci, the uptake appeared nonsegmental, linear or lobar, suggesting a false-positive finding. The uptake was unchanged, variable in appearance or non-persistent on follow-up scans and less extensive than the fibrocystic changes seen on chest radiographs. In the two patients studied, thyroid hormone level did not affect the radioiodine lung uptake and there was congruent gallium-67 uptake. None of the patients had any evidence of thyroid cancer recurrence or of reactivation of tuberculosis and only two patients had chronic intermittent chest symptoms. Severe bronchiectasis, active tuberculosis, acute bronchitis, respiratory bronchiolitis, rheumatoid arthritis-associated lung disease and fungal infection such as Allescheria boydii and aspergillosis can lead to different patterns of radioiodine chest uptake mimicking pulmonary metastases. Pulmonary scarring secondary to tuberculosis may predispose to localized radioiodine accumulation even in the absence of clinically evident active infection. False-positive radioiodine uptake due to pulmonary infection/inflammation should be considered in thyroid cancer patients prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary metastases. (orig.)

  7. A comparison of two informative SNP-based strategies for typing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Syrmis, Melanie W.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Moser, Ralf J.; Kay A Ramsay; Gibson, Kristen M; Anuj, Snehal; Bell, Scott C.; Wainwright, Claire E.; Grimwood, Keith; Nissen, Michael,; Sloots, Theo P.; Whiley, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular typing is integral for identifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that may be shared between patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We conducted a side-by-side comparison of two P. aeruginosa genotyping methods utilising informative-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) methods; one targeting 10 P. aeruginosa SNPs and using real-time polymerase chain reaction technology (HRM10SNP) and the other targeting 20 SNPs and based on the Sequenom MassARRAY platform (iPLEX20SNP). Metho...

  8. Alginate is not a significant component of the extracellular polysaccharide matrix of PA14 and PAO1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak, Daniel J.; Wyckoff, Timna J. O.; Starkey, Melissa; Keyser, Rebecca; Azadi, Parastoo; O'Toole, George A.; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2003-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Such infections are extremely difficult to control because the bacteria exhibit a biofilm-mode of growth, rendering P. aeruginosa resistant to antibiotics and phagocytic cells. During the course of infection, P. aeruginosa usually undergoes a phenotypic switch to a mucoid colony, which is characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Alginate overproducti...

  9. Manuka honey treatment of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa results in the emergence of isolates with increased honey resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Camplin, Aimee L; Maddocks, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical grade manuka honeys are well known to be efficacious against Pseudomonas aeruginosa being bactericidal and inhibiting the development of biofilms; moreover manuka honey effectively kills P. aeruginosa embedded within an established biofilm. Sustained honey resistance has not been previously documented for planktonic or biofilm P. aeruginosa. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentrations for manuka honey and antibiotics were determined using broth micro-dilution methods. Minimum...

  10. Retrospective analysis of antibiotic susceptibility patterns of respiratory isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Turkish University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Akkurt Ibrahim; Ozdemir Levent; Bakici Mustafa; Gonlugur Ugur; Icagasioglu Serhat; Gultekin Fusun

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Lower respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa have a high mortality rate. Antibacterial activity of various antibiotics against P. aeruginosa isolated from each hospital depends on the variety or amount of antibiotics used in each hospital. Method A total of 249 respiratory isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Sivas (Turkey) were included between January-1999 and January-2002. Isolates were tested against 14 different antibiotics by a disc diffusion met...

  11. Trappin-2 Promotes Early Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through CD14-Dependent Macrophage Activation and Neutrophil Recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, TS; Dhaliwal, K; Hamilton, TW; Lipka, AF; Farrell, L.; Davidson, DJ; Duffin, R.; Morris, AC; Haslett, C; Govan, JRW; Gregory, CD; Sallenave, J-M; Simpson, AJ

    2009-01-01

    Microaspiration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to the pathogenesis of nosocomial pneumonia. Trappin-2 is a host defense peptide that assists with the clearance of P. aeruginosa through undefined mechanisms. A model of macrophage interactions with replicating P. aeruginosa (strain PA01) in serum-free conditions was developed, and the influence of subantimicrobial concentrations of trappin-2 was subsequently studied. PA01 that was pre-incubated with trappin-2 (...

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outbreak in a pediatric oncology care unit caused by an errant water jet into contaminated siphons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Henriette; Geginat, Gernot; Hogardt, Michael; Kramer, Alexandra; Dürken, Matthias; Schroten, Horst; Tenenbaum, Tobias

    2012-06-01

    We analyzed an outbreak of invasive infections with an exotoxin U positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain within a pediatric oncology care unit. Environmental sampling and molecular characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains led to identification of the outbreak source. An errant water jet into the sink within patient rooms was observed. Optimized outbreak management resulted in an abundance of further Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections within the pediatric oncology care unit. PMID:22333699

  13. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Burn Patients Using PCR- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolaziz Rastegar Lari; Bagher Yakhchali; Parviz Owlia; Hassan Salimi

    2010-01-01

    One of the major opportunistic pathogens in patients with burninjuries is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which causes severe infectionsin burned patients. The objective of the study was to examinethe molecular epidemiology of P. aeruginosa colonization inthe burn unit of Shahid Motahari Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Restrictionfragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and random amplifiedpolymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis were employed tostudy 127 clinical and two environmental P. aeruginosa isolatescollected fr...

  14. Swarming of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Controlled by a Broad Spectrum of Transcriptional Regulators, Including MetR ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, Amy T. Y.; Torfs, Ellen C. W.; Jamshidi, Farzad; Bains, Manjeet; Wiegand, Irith; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Overhage, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits swarming motility on semisolid surfaces (0.5 to 0.7% agar). Swarming is a more than just a form of locomotion and represents a complex adaptation resulting in changes in virulence gene expression and antibiotic resistance. In this study, we used a comprehensive P. aeruginosa PA14 transposon mutant library to investigate how the complex swarming adaptation process is regulated. A total of 233 P. aeruginosa PA14 transposon mutants were verified to have alteration...

  15. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Decreases Mortality in a Murine Model of Burn-Wound Sepsis Involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Liu; Qin Zhou; Yunchuan Wang; Zhengcai Liu; Maolong Dong; Yaojun Wang; Xiao Li; Dahai Hu

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The colonization of burn wounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can lead to septic shock, organ injuries, and high mortality rates. We hypothesized that negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) would decrease invasion and proliferation of P. aeruginosa within the burn wound and reduce mortality. METHODS: Thermal injuries were induced in anesthetized mice, and P. aeruginosa was applied to the wound surface for 24 h. After removing the burn eschar and debridement, the animals were subjected...

  16. The crystal structure of SdsA1, an alkylsulfatase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, defines a third class of sulfatases

    OpenAIRE

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Adams, Thorsten M.; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Widow, Ute; Kolmar, Harald; Tümmler, Burkhard; Heinz, Dirk W.; Schubert, Wolf-Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is both a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and an opportunistic human pathogen. A remarkable metabolic versatility allows it to occupy a multitude of ecological niches, including wastewater treatment plants and such hostile environments as the human respiratory tract. P. aeruginosa is able to degrade and metabolize biocidic SDS, the detergent of most commercial personal hygiene products. We identify SdsA1 of P. aeruginosa as a secreted SDS hydrolase that allows the ba...

  17. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Genome Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Head, Nathan E.; Yu, Hongwei

    2004-01-01

    Chronic lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms are associated with refractory and fatal pneumonia in cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, a group of genomically diverse P. aeruginosa isolates were compared with the reference strain PAO1 to assess the roles of motility, twitching, growth rate, and overproduction of a capsular polysaccharide (alginate) in biofilm formation. In an in vitro biofilm assay system, P. aeruginosa displayed strain-specific biofilm formation that was not ...

  18. Phenotypic and genetic diversities are not correlated in strains of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa isolated in SW Spain

    OpenAIRE

    López Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo; Flores Moya, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic and genetic diversities are not correlated in strains of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa isolated in SW Spain. The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa (Kützing) Kützing is notorious for forming extensive and toxic blooms but the genetic structure of natural populations, and in particular during blooms, remains to be explored. In order to add more knowledge about the genetic structure of M. aeruginosa, we compared phenotypic and genetic variabilities in seventeen strains...

  19. Development and antimicrobial susceptibility studies of in vitro monomicrobial and polymicrobial biofilm models with Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Manavathu, Elias K.; Vager, Dora L; Vazquez, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixed microbial infections of the respiratory tracts with P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus capable of producing biofilms are commonly found in cystic fibrosis patients. The primary objective of this study was to develop an in vitro model for P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus polymicrobial biofilm to study the efficacy of various antimicrobial drugs alone and in combinations against biofilm-embedded cells. Simultaneous static cocultures of P. aeruginosa and sporelings were used for the d...

  20. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kübra Çevik

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods:The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acidonbiofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa  PAK01,P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03 were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results:The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84% and kojic acid (68% presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation.

  1. Actividad antimicrobiana del OLEOZON® sobre Staphylococcus aureus y Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    V. Curtiellas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La actividad antimicrobiana de los aceites vegetales ozonizados suele atribuirse a la acción de los compuestos peroxídicos presentes en los mismos sobre las biomoléculas más sensibles al ataque oxidante, como son los lípidos insaturados y las proteínas que presentan grupos sulfidrilos (SH. Con el objetivo de caracterizar la actividad in vitro del aceite de girasol ozonizado, OLEOZON®, se realizó un estudio empleando las cepas S. aureus ATCC 25923 y P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853. Se determinaron las concentraciones inhibitorias mínimas y las concentraciones bactericidas mínimas de acuerdo a lo establecido por el comité nacional para normas de laboratorio clínico (EE.UU, 2000. Se aplicó Tween 80 y ultrasonido para lograr una emulsión estable entre el aceite y el medio de cultivo. Se realizó un estudio cinético de inactivación empleando una concentración del agente antimicrobiano de 89 mg/mL y tiempos de contacto de 1, 3, 10 y 30 minutos. En paralelo a estos estudios se determinaron las variaciones en la concentración de los grupos sulfidrilos totales mediante lectura a 412 nm del compuesto cromógeno resultante de la reacción con DTNB, (5,5'- ditiobis (2- ácido nitro benzoico. Los valores de las concentraciones inhibitorias mínimas y bactericidas mínimas resultaron menores en S. aureus que en P. Aeruginosa, Mientras que las curvas de inactivación siguieron en ambos casos una cinética de primer orden respecto al número de viables. La determinación de la concentración de los grupos SH totales muestra una disminución significativa para ambos microorganismos desde el primer minuto de contacto con el OLEOZON®, la que es más acentuada en el caso de S. aureus, lo que demuestra que la oxidación de los grupos SH constituye uno de los daños primarios asociados al efecto letal de este medicamento.

  2. Normal cerebral FDG uptake during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, Kevin [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Disciplines of Imaging and Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Current understanding of cerebral FDG uptake during childhood originates from a small number of studies in patients with neurological abnormalities. Our aim was to describe cerebral FDG uptake in a dataset of FDG PET scans in children more likely to represent a normal population. We reviewed cerebral FDG PET scans in children up to 16 years of age with suspected/proven extracranial malignancies and the following exclusions: central nervous system metastases, previous malignancies, previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy, development of cerebral metastases during therapy, neurological conditions, taking antiepileptic medication or medications likely to interfere with cerebral metabolism, and general anaesthesia within 24 h. White matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and the cerebellar cortex were analysed using regional SUV{sub max}, and the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum were analysed using a regional relative uptake analysis in comparison to maximal cortical uptake. Scans from 30 patients (age range 11 months to 16 years, mean age 10 years 5 months) were included. All regions showed increasing SUV{sub max} with age. The parietal, occipital, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobes showed lower rates of increasing FDG uptake causing changing patterns of regional FDG uptake during childhood. The cortical regions showing the most intense uptake in early childhood were the parietal and occipital lobes. At approximately 7 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the frontal lobes and at approximately 10 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the thalamus. Relative FDG uptake in the brain has not reached an adult pattern by 1 year of age, but continues to change up to 16 years of age. The changing pattern is due to different regional rates of increasing cortical FDG uptake, which is less rapid in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes than in the frontal lobes. (orig.)

  3. Normal cerebral FDG uptake during childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current understanding of cerebral FDG uptake during childhood originates from a small number of studies in patients with neurological abnormalities. Our aim was to describe cerebral FDG uptake in a dataset of FDG PET scans in children more likely to represent a normal population. We reviewed cerebral FDG PET scans in children up to 16 years of age with suspected/proven extracranial malignancies and the following exclusions: central nervous system metastases, previous malignancies, previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy, development of cerebral metastases during therapy, neurological conditions, taking antiepileptic medication or medications likely to interfere with cerebral metabolism, and general anaesthesia within 24 h. White matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and the cerebellar cortex were analysed using regional SUVmax, and the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum were analysed using a regional relative uptake analysis in comparison to maximal cortical uptake. Scans from 30 patients (age range 11 months to 16 years, mean age 10 years 5 months) were included. All regions showed increasing SUVmax with age. The parietal, occipital, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobes showed lower rates of increasing FDG uptake causing changing patterns of regional FDG uptake during childhood. The cortical regions showing the most intense uptake in early childhood were the parietal and occipital lobes. At approximately 7 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the frontal lobes and at approximately 10 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the thalamus. Relative FDG uptake in the brain has not reached an adult pattern by 1 year of age, but continues to change up to 16 years of age. The changing pattern is due to different regional rates of increasing cortical FDG uptake, which is less rapid in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes than in the frontal lobes. (orig.)

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa RRALC3 Enhances the Biomass, Nutrient and Carbon Contents of Pongamia pinnata Seedlings in Degraded Forest Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathy Radhapriya

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at assessing the effects of indigenous Plant Growth Promoting Bacterium (PGPB on the legume Pongamia pinnata in the degraded soil of the Nanmangalam Reserve Forest (NRF under nursery conditions. In total, 160 diazotrophs were isolated from three different nitrogen-free semi-solid media (LGI, Nfb, and JMV. Amongst these isolates, Pseudomonas aeruginosa RRALC3 exhibited the maximum ammonia production and hence was selected for further studies. RRALC3 was found to possess multiple plant growth promoting traits such as nitrogen accumulation (120.6ppm; it yielded a positive amplicon with nifH specific primers, tested positive for Indole Acetic Acid (IAA; 18.3μg/ml and siderophore production, tested negative for HCN production and was observed to promote solubilization of phosphate, silicate and zinc in the plate assay. The 16S rDNA sequence of RRALC3 exhibited 99% sequence similarity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa JCM5962. Absence of virulence genes and non-hemolytic activity indicated that RRALC3 is unlikely to be a human pathogen. When the effects of RRALC3 on promotion of plant growth was tested in Pongamia pinnata, it was observed that in Pongamia seedlings treated with a combination of RRALC3 and chemical fertilizer, the dry matter increased by 30.75%. Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium uptake increased by 34.1%, 27.08%, and 31.84%, respectively, when compared to control. Significant enhancement of total sugar, amino acids and organic acids content, by 23.4%, 29.39%, and 26.53% respectively, was seen in the root exudates of P. pinnata. The carbon content appreciated by 4-fold, when fertilized seedlings were treated with RRALC3. From the logistic equation, the rapid C accumulation time of Pongamia was computed as 43 days longer than the control when a combination of native PGPB and inorganic fertilizer was applied. The rapid accumulation time of N, P and K in Pongamia when treated with the same combination as above was 15, 40 and

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa RRALC3 Enhances the Biomass, Nutrient and Carbon Contents of Pongamia pinnata Seedlings in Degraded Forest Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhapriya, Parthasarathy; Ramachandran, Andimuthu; Anandham, Rangasamy; Mahalingam, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the effects of indigenous Plant Growth Promoting Bacterium (PGPB) on the legume Pongamia pinnata in the degraded soil of the Nanmangalam Reserve Forest (NRF) under nursery conditions. In total, 160 diazotrophs were isolated from three different nitrogen-free semi-solid media (LGI, Nfb, and JMV). Amongst these isolates, Pseudomonas aeruginosa RRALC3 exhibited the maximum ammonia production and hence was selected for further studies. RRALC3 was found to possess multiple plant growth promoting traits such as nitrogen accumulation (120.6ppm); it yielded a positive amplicon with nifH specific primers, tested positive for Indole Acetic Acid (IAA; 18.3μg/ml) and siderophore production, tested negative for HCN production and was observed to promote solubilization of phosphate, silicate and zinc in the plate assay. The 16S rDNA sequence of RRALC3 exhibited 99% sequence similarity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa JCM5962. Absence of virulence genes and non-hemolytic activity indicated that RRALC3 is unlikely to be a human pathogen. When the effects of RRALC3 on promotion of plant growth was tested in Pongamia pinnata, it was observed that in Pongamia seedlings treated with a combination of RRALC3 and chemical fertilizer, the dry matter increased by 30.75%. Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium uptake increased by 34.1%, 27.08%, and 31.84%, respectively, when compared to control. Significant enhancement of total sugar, amino acids and organic acids content, by 23.4%, 29.39%, and 26.53% respectively, was seen in the root exudates of P. pinnata. The carbon content appreciated by 4-fold, when fertilized seedlings were treated with RRALC3. From the logistic equation, the rapid C accumulation time of Pongamia was computed as 43 days longer than the control when a combination of native PGPB and inorganic fertilizer was applied. The rapid accumulation time of N, P and K in Pongamia when treated with the same combination as above was 15, 40 and 33 days longer

  6. Tracking down antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a wastewater network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Slekovec

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56 and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54 were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5% contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×10(6 CFU/l or/kg. Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and bacteriological characteristics of bovine Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens isolates from mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Mamoru; Sawada, Takuo; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Sato, Reiichiro; Hayashimoto, Mizuki; Hata, Eiji; Yonezawa, Chizuko; Kato, Hajime

    2011-12-29

    The presence of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP) strains among bovine isolates of Gram-negative bacilli, and O-serotypes of bovine Serratia marcescens and P. aeruginosa isolates have been reported rarely. The aims of this study were to (1) elucidate antimicrobial susceptibilities and O-serotypes of P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens isolates from bovine mastitis and the presence of MBL-producers and MDRP strains among them and (2) evaluate their relationships to human isolates. We investigated the MICs of 24 antimicrobials and O-serotypes for 116 P. aeruginosa and 55 S. marcescens isolates in Japan, primarily in 2006. A total of 171 isolates exhibited high antimicrobial susceptibilities with the exception of a partial drug. P. aeruginosa isolates exhibited high susceptibilities of ≥ 95.7% to ciprofloxacin, imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin, ceftazidime, cefepime, cefoperazone/sulbactam, amikacin, tobramycin, and gentamicin; however, they exhibited a susceptibility of only 69.8% to aztreonam. They exhibited substantial resistances to ceftriaxone, enrofloxacin, cefotaxime, and moxalactam. S. marcescens isolates exhibited high susceptibilities of ≥ 90.9% to kanamycin, ceftiofur, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and the 15 aforementioned drugs, but exhibited resistance to minocycline. Neither MBL-producers nor MDRP strains were detected among the 171 strains. The dominant serotypes of P. aeruginosa isolates were OG, OA, OB, OI, OF, OE, and OK; those of S. marcescens isolates were O6 and O5. Every S. marcescens isolate was pigmented. These findings suggest that bovine P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens isolates differ from human isolates from both antibiogram and phenotypic perspectives, and could help to evaluate differences in bacteriological characteristics between bovine and human isolates. PMID:21783330

  8. Molecular identification and detection of virulence genes among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different infectious origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajiheh Sadat Nikbin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses a variety of virulence factors that may contribute to its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to rapid identification of clinical P. aeruginosa based on PCR amplification oprI and oprL. In order to find out any relation between special virulence factors and special manifestation of P. aeruginosa infections we detected virulence factors among these isolates by PCR. Ribotyping was used to evaluate the clonal relationship between strains with the same genetic patterns of the genes studied.Material and Methods: In this study, 268 isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from burn, wound and pulmonary tract infections. PCR of oprI, oprL, toxA, lasB, exoS and nan1 genes was performed. One hundred and four isolates were selected randomly to investigate clonal diversity of the isolates using ribotyping using SmaI.Results and Conclusions: All P. aeruginosa isolates in this study carried oprI, oprL and lasB genes. Difference between exoS prevalence in isolates from pulmonary tract and burn or wound isolates was statistically significant (P<0.05. Prevalence of nan1 and toxA gene was significantly higher in burn and pulmonary tract isolates, respectively. Ribotyping showed that Most of the isolates (87% belonged to clone A and B.PCR of oprI, oprL and toxA genes is recommended for molecular identification of P. aeruginosa. Determination of different virulence genes of P. aeruginosa isolates suggests that they are associated with different levels of intrinsic virulence and pathogenicity. Ribotyping showed that strains with similar virulence genes don’t necessarily have similar ribotype patterns.

  9. Survival, recovery and microcystin release of Microcystis aeruginosa in cold or dark condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Gan, Nanqin; Liu, Jin; Zheng, Lingling; Li, Lin; Song, Lirong

    2016-05-01

    Microcystis often dominates phytoplankton in eutrophic lakes and must survive a long period of cold or dark conditions. However, the survival strategies of Microcystis to withstand cold or dark stress are less well known. In this study, we conducted experiments on the responses of two toxic Microcystis aeruginosa strains (FACHB-905 and FACHB-915) and their microcystin release in conditions of low temperature (15°C or 4°C, with illumination) or darkness, and subsequent recovery in standard conditions (25°C with illumination). On exposure to 15°C, a small decrease in cell viability was observed, but the cell number increased gradually, suggesting that M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 cells seem in general tolerant in 15°C. Interestingly, our results show that a higher carotenoid content and microcystin release potentially enhance the fi tness of surviving cells at 15°C. M. aeruginosa cells exposed to lower temperature light stress (4°C) did not completely lose viability and retained the ability to reinitiate growth. In darkness, the maximum quantum yield (F v/F m) and the maximum electron transport rate (ETRmax) values and cell viability of M. aeruginosa cells gradually decreased with time. During the recovery period, the photosynthetic effi ciency of M. aeruginosa reverted to the normal level. Additionally, M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 exposed to low temperature had increased caspase-3-like activity and DNA fragmentation, which suggests the occurrence of a type of cell death in M. aeruginosa cells under cold stress similar to programmed cell death. Overall, our fi ndings could confer certain advantages on the Microcystis for surviving cold or dark conditions encountered in the annual cycle, and help explain its repeated occurrence in water blooms in large and shallow lakes.

  10. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy. PMID:26785289

  11. Tracking Down Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates in a Wastewater Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slekovec, Céline; Plantin, Julie; Cholley, Pascal; Thouverez, Michelle; Talon, Daniel; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA) from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge) of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant). Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56) and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54) were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5%) contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×106 CFU/l or/kg). Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination. PMID:23284623

  12. Molecular Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UPM P3 from Oil Palm Rhizosphere

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    Badri F. Azadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been used in agriculture as biological agents. It has shown substantial control of a variety of soil-borne plant pathogens including Macrophomina phaseolina, Botrytis cinerea, Rhizoctonia solani, Colletotrichum truncatum, Pythium, Fusarium and others. Species aggregate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UPM P3 was shown to have potential as a biocontrol agent against Ganoderma boninense, the causal agent of Basal Stem Rot (BSR of oil palm. However, P. aeruginosa is also an opportunistic pathogen. It typically infects the pulmonary tract, urinary tract, burns, wounds and also causes other blood infections. The objective of this study was to carry out DNA fingerprinting for strain differentiation to differentiate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic forms of P. aeruginosa strain UPM P3. Approach: Genotype characterization was carried out by amplification of the recA gene using specific primers, purified using QIA Quick PCR purification Kit and sent for sequencing. Multiple sequence alignments were performed on the selected closely related sequence accessions using CLUSTAL W software. The recA gene was used for phylogenetic and PCR-RFLP studies. Results: From the phylogenetic tree, UPM P3 has more than 90% similarity with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: PAM7, PAO1, UCBPP-PA14 and PA7. UPM P3 was further digested with restriction enzymes; PvuII, BsrI, ZraI, FokI and SgrAI. RFLP results showed that strain UPM P3 has close similarity with strain PAO1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion: Strain PAO1 is commonly associated with strains of medical, human or plant pathogens and agricultural environment. Common habitats include soil, hosts, aquatic environment and wastewater and also a common contaminant of public places. Thus the use of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UPMP3 as a biological control candidate in agriculture has to be monitored.

  13. Regulation and function of versatile aerobic and anaerobic respiratory metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Hiroyuki eArai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitously distributed opportunistic pathogen that inhabits soil and water as well as animal-, human-, and plant-host-associated environments. The ubiquity would be attributed to its very versatile energy metabolism. P. aeruginosa has a highly branched respiratory chain terminated by multiple terminal oxidases and denitrification enzymes. Five terminal oxidases for aerobic respiration have been identified in the P. aeruginosa cells. Three of them, the cbb3-1 oxidase, the cbb3-2 oxidase, and the aa3 oxidase, are cytochrome c oxidases and the other two, the bo3 oxidase and the cyanide-insensitive oxidase, are quinol oxidases. Each oxidase has a specific affinity for oxygen, efficiency of energy coupling, and tolerance to various stresses such as cyanide and reactive nitrogen species. These terminal oxidases are used differentially according to the environmental conditions. P. aeruginosa also has a complete set of the denitrification enzymes that reduce nitrate to molecular nitrogen via nitrite, nitric oxide (NO, and nitrous oxide. These nitrogen oxides function as alternative electron acceptors and enable P. aeruginosa to grow under anaerobic conditions. One of the denitrification enzymes, NO reductase, is also expected to function for detoxification of NO produced by the host immune defense system. The control of the expression of these aerobic and anaerobic respiratory enzymes would contribute to the adaptation of P. aeruginosa to a wide range of environmental conditions including in the infected hosts. Characteristics of these respiratory enzymes and the regulatory system that controls the expression of the respiratory genes in the P. aeruginosa cells are overviewed in this article.

  14. Effective removal of Microcystis aeruginosa and microcystin-LR using nanosilicate platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Chi; Li, Cheng-Hao; Lin, Jiang-Jen; Li, Yen-Hsien; Lee, Maw-Rong

    2014-03-01

    Drinking water safety has been threatened by increasing harmful algal blooms (HABs) in water sources. HABs are closely associated with eutrophication in freshwater lakes, e.g. Lake Tai in China, and marine environments as well, e.g. Baltic Sea in Europe. Among all HABs, Microcystis aeruginosa attracted much attention due to its easy proliferation and potent toxins, microcystins. Most of the current control technologies can result in immediate release of microcystins which are hard to remove by drinking water treatment processes. Here we propose to simultaneously remove M. aeruginosa and its toxin, microcystin-LR (MC-LR), using nanosilicate platelet (NSP) derived from natural clay mineral. In this study, NSP showed strong selective growth inhibition and good settling enhancing effects on M. aeruginosa and highly efficient removal of MC-LR. NSP can inhibit the growth of M. aeruginosa (initial cell concentration at 3.00×10(6)cellmL(-1)) with a LC50 at 0.28ppm after 12h exposure. At the dosage of 100ppm, NSP can enhance settling of suspended M. aeruginosa. Bacterial growth inhibition tests showed NSP had very mild growth inhibition effects on Escherichia coli at high dosage but promoted the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus halodurans. For MC-LR removal, at an initial concentration of 100μgL(-1), NSP achieved higher than 99% removal. Thus, the results suggest that NSP could be an excellent candidate for controlling M. aeruginosa-related HABs in water bodies. PMID:24268348

  15. Learner Uptake in Communicative ESL Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod; Basturkmen, Helen; Loewen, Shawn

    2001-01-01

    Examines incidental and transitory focus on form. Learner uptake was studied in focus-on-form episodes occurring in 12 hours of communicative English-as-a-Second-Language teaching. Learner uptake was generally high and successful--to a much greater extent than has been reported for immersion classrooms. (Author/VWL)

  16. Radio-active iodine uptake in vitiligo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, V.; Shankar, V.; Chaudhary, S.; Bhatia, K.K.; Mehta, L.K.; Arora, D.R. (Medical College and Hospital, Rohtak-124001 (India))

    1990-01-01

    Vitiligo and thyroid disease are commonly associated disorders. Twenty-two clinically euthyroid vitiligo patients were studied for functional assessment of thyroid by radioactive iodine uptake assay. Half of them showed abnormal uptake values at 24 hours. Of these patients, 90% had lower values indicating a tendency towards developing hypothyroid state. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction in vitiligo appears to be an adaptive change. (author).

  17. Functional analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer PAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passador, L; Tucker, K D; Guertin, K R; Journet, M P; Kende, A S; Iglewski, B H

    1996-10-01

    A series of structural analogs of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer [PAI, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone] were obtained and tested for their ability to act as autoinducers in stimulating the expression of the gene for elastase (lasB) by measuring beta-galactosidase production from a lasB-lacZ gene fusion in the presence of the transcriptional activator LasR. The data suggest that the length of the acyl side chain of the autoinducer molecule is the most critical factor for activity. Replacement of the ring O by S in the homoserine lactone moiety can be tolerated. Tritium-labelled PAI ([3H]PAI) was synthesized and used to demonstrate the association of [3H]PAI with cells overexpressing LasR. The PAI analogs were also tested for their ability to compete with [3H]PAI for binding of LasR. Results from the competition assays suggest that once again the length of the acyl side chain appears to be crucial for antagonist activity. The presence of the 3-oxo moiety also plays a significant role in binding since analogs which lacked this moiety were much less effective in blocking binding of [3H]PAI. All analogs demonstrating competition with PAI in binding to LasR also exhibited the ability to activate lasB expression, suggesting that they are functional analogs of PAI. PMID:8830697

  18. Global genotype-phenotype correlations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Claudia Pommerenke

    Full Text Available Once the genome sequence of an organism is obtained, attention turns from identifying genes to understanding their function, their organization and control of metabolic pathways and networks that determine its physiology. Recent technical advances in acquiring genome-wide data have led to substantial progress in identifying gene functions. However, we still do not know the function of a large number of genes and, even when a gene product has been assigned to a functional class, we cannot normally predict its contribution to the phenotypic behaviour of the cell or organism--the phenome. In this study, we assessed bacterial growth parameters of 4030 non-redundant PA14 transposon mutants in the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The genome-wide simultaneous analysis of 119 distinct growth-related phenotypes uncovered a comprehensive phenome and provided evidence that most genotypes are not phenotypically isolated but rather define specific complex phenotypic clusters of genotypes. Since phenotypic overlap was demonstrated to reflect the relatedness of genotypes on a global scale, knowledge of an organism's phenome might significantly contribute to the advancement of functional genomics.

  19. Physicochemical properties of elastase isolated from clinical Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified elastase was obtained from clinical Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P.A.-283). The enzyme showed not only elasto lytic activity, but also a broad proteolytic activity against various proteins. The activity of the enzyme on collagen and gelatin was also observed. The optimum pH for elastase was 7.8 to 8.0 for both the proteolytic and elasto lytic activities. The elastase was stable in a pH range from 6.6 to 9.0. Optimum temperature for proteolytic and elasto lytic activities was 40 and inhibition of elastase occurs at 80 . The D10 value of the P.A-283 was found to be 0.11 kGy. Increasing the dose level value of gamma-irradiation decrease the proteolytic activity in the culture filtrate reaching only 16% at the dose level 0.5 kGy. Chelating agents and some metal ions inhibited both proteolytic and elasto lytic activities. Selective inhibition of elasto lytic activity was observed in high concentrations of sodium and ammonium salts without concurrent decrease in the proteolytic activity of the enzyme.4 fig., 3 tab

  20. Electrical conductivity measurements of bacterial nanowires from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthupandy, Muthusamy; Anand, Muthusamy; Maduraiveeran, Govindhan; Sait Hameedha Beevi, Akbar; Jeeva Priya, Radhakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    The extracellular appendages of bacteria (flagella) that transfer electrons to electrodes are called bacterial nanowires. This study focuses on the isolation and separation of nanowires that are attached via Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial culture. The size and roughness of separated nanowires were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The obtained bacterial nanowires indicated a clear image of bacterial nanowires measuring 16 nm in diameter. The formation of bacterial nanowires was confirmed by microscopic studies (AFM and TEM) and the conductivity nature of bacterial nanowire was investigated by electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which are nondestructive voltammetry techniques, suggest that bacterial nanowires could be the source of electrons—which may be used in various applications, for example, microbial fuel cells, biosensors, organic solar cells, and bioelectronic devices. Routine analysis of electron transfer between bacterial nanowires and the electrode was performed, providing insight into the extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the electrode. CV revealed the catalytic electron transferability of bacterial nanowires and electrodes and showed excellent redox activities. CV and EIS studies showed that bacterial nanowires can charge the surface by producing and storing sufficient electrons, behave as a capacitor, and have features consistent with EET. Finally, electrochemical studies confirmed the development of bacterial nanowires with EET. This study suggests that bacterial nanowires can be used to fabricate biomolecular sensors and nanoelectronic devices.

  1. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  2. Transcriptome Profiling of Antimicrobial Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaledi, Ariane; Schniederjans, Monika; Pohl, Sarah; Rainer, Roman; Bodenhofer, Ulrich; Xia, Boyang; Klawonn, Frank; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Preusse, Matthias; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Dötsch, Andreas; Häussler, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    Emerging resistance to antimicrobials and the lack of new antibiotic drug candidates underscore the need for optimization of current diagnostics and therapies to diminish the evolution and spread of multidrug resistance. As the antibiotic resistance status of a bacterial pathogen is defined by its genome, resistance profiling by applying next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies may in the future accomplish pathogen identification, prompt initiation of targeted individualized treatment, and the implementation of optimized infection control measures. In this study, qualitative RNA sequencing was used to identify key genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance in 135 clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from diverse geographic and infection site origins. By applying transcriptome-wide association studies, adaptive variations associated with resistance to the antibiotic classes fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams were identified. Besides potential novel biomarkers with a direct correlation to resistance, global patterns of phenotype-associated gene expression and sequence variations were identified by predictive machine learning approaches. Our research serves to establish genotype-based molecular diagnostic tools for the identification of the current resistance profiles of bacterial pathogens and paves the way for faster diagnostics for more efficient, targeted treatment strategies to also mitigate the future potential for resistance evolution. PMID:27216077

  3. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  4. Cellular responses of A549 alveolar epithelial cells to serially collected Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients at different stages of pulmonary infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawdon, Nicole A; Aval, Pouya Sadeghi; Barnes, Rebecca J;

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major cause of chronic pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa lose certain virulence factors, transform into a mucoid phenotype, and develop antibiotic resistance. We hypothesized that these genetic and phenotypic...

  5. The susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients to bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Essoh

    Full Text Available Phage therapy may become a complement to antibiotics in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. To design efficient therapeutic cocktails, the genetic diversity of the species and the spectrum of susceptibility to bacteriophages must be investigated. Bacterial strains showing high levels of phage resistance need to be identified in order to decipher the underlying mechanisms. Here we have selected genetically diverse P. aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients and tested their susceptibility to a large collection of phages. Based on plaque morphology and restriction profiles, six different phages were purified from "pyophage", a commercial cocktail directed against five different bacterial species, including P. aeruginosa. Characterization of these phages by electron microscopy and sequencing of genome fragments showed that they belong to 4 different genera. Among 47 P. aeruginosa strains, 13 were not lysed by any of the isolated phages individually or by pyophage. We isolated two new phages that could lyse some of these strains, and their genomes were sequenced. The presence/absence of a CRISPR-Cas system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and Crisper associated genes was investigated to evaluate the role of the system in phage resistance. Altogether, the results show that some P. aeruginosa strains cannot support the growth of any of the tested phages belonging to 5 different genera, and suggest that the CRISPR-Cas system is not a major defence mechanism against these lytic phages.

  6. Community-based interference against integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into human salivary microbial biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X; Hu, W; He, J; Guo, L; Lux, R; Shi, W

    2011-12-01

    As part of the human gastrointestinal tract, the oral cavity represents a complex biological system and harbors diverse bacterial species. Unlike the gut microbiota, which is often considered a health asset, studies of the oral commensal microbiota have been largely limited to their implication in oral conditions such as dental caries and periodontal disease. Less emphasis has been given to their potential beneficial roles, especially the protective effects against oral colonization by foreign or pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we used salivary microbiota derived from healthy human subjects to investigate protective effects against colonization and integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, into developing or pre-formed salivary biofilms. When co-cultivated in saliva medium, P. aeruginosa persisted in the planktonic phase, but failed to integrate into the salivary microbial community during biofilm formation. Furthermore, in saliva medium supplemented with sucrose, the oral microbiota inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa by producing lactic acid. More interestingly, while pre-formed salivary biofilms were able to prevent P. aeruginosa colonization, the same biofilms recovered from mild chlorhexidine gluconate treatment displayed a shift in microbial composition and showed a drastic reduction in protection. Our study indicates that normal oral communities with balanced microbial compositions could be important in effectively preventing the integration of foreign or pathogenic bacterial species, such as P. aeruginosa. PMID:22053962

  7. Occurrence of Microcystis aeruginosa and microcystins in Río de la Plata river (Argentina

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    Darío Andrinolo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first report on microcystins producer blooms of Microcystis aeruginosa in the Argentinean coast of the Río de la Plata river, the most important drinking water supply of Argentina. The distribution of toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis cf. aeruginosa blooms in the Argentinean coast of the Rio de la Plata river was studied from December 2003 and January 2006. Microcystis aeruginosa persisted in the river with values ranged between 0 - 7.8 10(4 cells ml-1. Samples of two Microcystis aeruginosa water blooms were collected at La Plata river and were analyzed by the mouse bioassay and by high-performance liquid chromatography with Diode-array and MS detector. The samples showed high hepatotoxicity in mouse bioassay and, in accordance, important amount of microcystins. The bloom samples contained microcystins LR and a variant of microcystin with a molecular ion [M+H]+= 1037.8 m/z as major components. The total toxin content found in these samples was 0.94μg/mg and 0.69μg/mg of lyophilised cells. We conclude that the presence of toxic clones of Microcystis aeruginosa in the Argentinean coast of the Río de la Plata is an actual sanitary and environmental problem and that further studies are necessary to make the risk assessment.

  8. Interclonal gradient of virulence in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pangenome from disease and environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilker, Rolf; Munder, Antje; Klockgether, Jens; Losada, Patricia Moran; Chouvarine, Philippe; Cramer, Nina; Davenport, Colin F; Dethlefsen, Sarah; Fischer, Sebastian; Peng, Huiming; Schönfelder, Torben; Türk, Oliver; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Wölbeling, Florian; Gulbins, Erich; Goesmann, Alexander; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    The population genomics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was analysed by genome sequencing of representative strains of the 15 most frequent clonal complexes in the P. aeruginosa population and of the five most common clones from the environment of which so far no isolate from a human infection has been detected. Gene annotation identified 5892-7187 open reading frame (ORFs; median 6381 ORFs) in the 20 6.4-7.4 Mbp large genomes. The P. aeruginosa pangenome consists of a conserved core of at least 4000 genes, a combinatorial accessory genome of a further 10 000 genes and 30 000 or more rare genes that are present in only a few strains or clonal complexes. Whole genome comparisons of single nucleotide polymorphism synteny indicated unrestricted gene flow between clonal complexes by recombination. Using standardized acute lettuce, Galleria mellonella and murine airway infection models the full spectrum of possible host responses to P. aeruginosa was observed with the 20 strains ranging from unimpaired health following infection to 100% lethality. Genome comparisons indicate that the differential genetic repertoire of clones maintains a habitat-independent gradient of virulence in the P. aeruginosa population. PMID:25156090

  9. Inflammatory Markers in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Lung Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Pukhalsky

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic endobronchial inflammation and bacterial infection are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder associated with improper function of chloride channels. Inflammation in CF lung is greatly amplified after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. In this study the relationship between P. aeruginosa status and inflammatory markers has been investigated. Seventeen CF children in acute lung exacerbation were examined. CF patients without P. aeruginosa infection were characterized by elevated activity of sputum elastase, reduced response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and significant resistance to the antiproliferative action of glucocorticoids. These parameters were normalized after antibiotic treatment. The patients with prolonged P. aeruginosa infection demonstrated extremely high levels of elastase activity and elevated amounts of sputum IL-8 and TNF-α. Although antibiotic treatment resulted in clinical improvement, it failed to suppress excessive immune response in the lung. The data indicate that CF patients with prolonged P. aeruginosa need the modified treatment, which should include immunomodulating drugs and protease inhibitors as well as antibacterial therapy.

  10. Divergence of a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during an outbreak of ovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Elli A; Di Lorenzo, Valeria; Trappetti, Claudia; Liciardi, Manuele; Orru, Germano; Viti, Carlo; Bronowski, Christina; Hall, Amanda J; Darby, Alistair C; Oggioni, Marco R; Winstanley, Craig

    2015-01-30

    Bacterial infections causing mastitis in sheep can result in severe economic losses for farmers. A large survey of milk samples from ewes with mastitis in Sardinia, Italy, indicated an increasing prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. It has been shown previously that during chronic, biofilm-associated infections P. aeruginosa populations diversify. We report the phenotypic and genomic characterisation of two clonal P. aeruginosa isolates (PSE305 and PSE306) from a mastitis infection outbreak, representing distinct colony morphology variants. In addition to pigment production, PSE305 and PSE306 differed in phenotypic characteristics including biofilm formation, utilisation of various carbon and nitrogen sources, twitching motility. We found higher levels of expression of genes associated with biofilm formation (pelB) and twitching motility (flgD) in PSE305, compared to the biofilm and twitching-defective PSE306. Comparative genomics analysis revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and minor insertion/deletion variations between PSE305 and PSE306, including a SNP mutation in the pilP gene of PSE306. By introducing a wild-type pilP gene we were able to partially complement the defective twitching motility of PSE306. There were also three larger regions of difference between the two genomes, indicating genomic instability. Hence, we have demonstrated that P. aeruginosa population divergence can occur during an outbreak of mastitis, leading to significant variations in phenotype and genotype, and resembling the behaviour of P. aeruginosa during chronic biofilm-associated infections. PMID:25475851

  11. Development and evaluation of a new PCR assay for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa D genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lødeng, A G G; Ahlén, C; Lysvand, H; Mandal, L H; Iversen, O J

    2006-08-01

    This report describes a new PCR-based assay for the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotype D in occupational saturation diving systems in the North Sea. This genotype has persisted in these systems for 11 years (1993-2003) and represents 18% of isolates from infections analysed during this period. The new PCR assay was based on sequences obtained after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis of a group of isolates related to diving that had been identified previously by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The primer set for the D genotype targets a gene that codes for a hypothetical class 4 protein in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. A primer set able to detect P. aeruginosa at the species level was also designed, based on the 23S-5S rDNA spacer region. The two assays produced 382-bp and 192-bp amplicons, respectively. The PCR assay was evaluated by analysing 100 P. aeruginosa isolates related to diving, representing 28 PFGE genotypes, and 38 clinical and community P. aeruginosa isolates and strains from other species. The assay identified all of the genotype D isolates tested. Two additional diving-relevant genotypes (TP2 and TP27) were also identified, as well as three isolates of non-diving origin. It was concluded that the new PCR assay is a useful tool for early detection and prevention of infections with the D genotype. PMID:16842571

  12. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Species Isolated at a Tertiary Care Hospital, Ahmadabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Rakesh M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps.aeruginosa is one of the important bacterial pathogens isolated from various samples. Despite advances in medical and surgical care and introduction of wide variety of antimicrobial agents against having anti-pseudomonal activities, life threatening infection caused by Ps. aeruginosa continues to cause complications in hospital acquired infections. Several different epidemiological studies indicate that antibiotic resistance is increasing in clinical isolates. Material and Method: This study was conducted during April 2009 to april 2010. During this period total of 630 samples were tested, in which 321 samples showed growth of bacteria. Out of 321 samples, 100 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated. The samples were selected on the basis of their growth on routine MacConkey medium which showed lactose Non-fermenting pale colonies which were oxidase test positive and on Nutrient agar pigmented and non-pigmented colonies with oxidase positive. Antimicrobial susceptibility of all the isolates was performed by the disc-diffusion (Modified-Kirby Baur disc diffusion method according to CLSIs guidelines. Result: In present study, maximum isolates of Ps. aeruginosa isolated from various samples are resistant to tobramycin (68% followed by gentamycin (63%, piperacillin (50%, ciprofloxacin (49% and ceftazidime (43%. Conclusion: To prevent the spread of the resistant bacteria, it is critically important to have strict antibiotic policies while surveillance programmes for multidrug resistant organisms and infection control procedures need to be implemented. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(2.000: 156-159

  13. In vitro efficacy of doripenem against pseudomonas aeruginosa and acinetobacter baumannii by e-test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the in vitro efficacy of doripenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii using Epsilometer strips. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad, from May 2014 to September 2014. Methodology: A total of 60 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected from various clinical samples received from Military Hospital were included in the study. The specimens were inoculated onto blood, MacConkey and chocolate agars. The isolates were identified using Gram staining, motility, catalase test, oxidase test and API 20NE (Biomeriux, France). Organisms identified as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were included in the study. Bacterial suspensions equivalent to 0.5 McFarland turbidity standard of the isolates were prepared and applied on Mueller Hinton agar. Epsilometer strip was placed in the center of the plate and incubated for 18-24 hours. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was taken to be the point where the epsilon intersected the E-strip. MIC of all the isolates was noted. Results: For Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, MIC50 was 12 micro g/mL and MIC90 was 32 micro g/mL. For Acinetobacter baumannii MIC 50 and MIC90 was 32 micro g/mL. Conclusion: Doripenem is no more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in our setting. (author)

  14. Comparison of high-resolution computed tomography findings between Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and Cytomegalovirus pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare pulmonary high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia to HRCT findings in patients with Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia. We studied 124 patients (77 men, 47 women; age range, 20-89 years; mean age, 65.4 years) with P. aeruginosa pneumonia and 44 patients (22 men, 22 women; age range, 36-86 years; mean age, 63.2 years) with CMV pneumonia. CT findings of consolidation (p < 0.005), bronchial wall thickening (p < 0.001), cavity (p < 0.05), and pleural effusion (p < 0.001) were significantly more frequent in patients with P. aeruginosa pneumonia than in those with CMV pneumonia. Centrilobular nodules, a crazy-paving appearance, and nodules were significantly more frequent in patients with CMV pneumonia than in those with P. aeruginosa pneumonia (all p < 0.001). Pulmonary HRCT findings, such as bronchial wall thickening, crazy-paving appearance, and nodules may be useful in distinguishing between P. aeruginosa pneumonia and CMV pneumonia. (orig.)

  15. Sensitivity patterns of pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates obtained from clinical specimens in peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a highly virulent opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections.Affected patients are often hospitalized in an intensive care unit, and are immuno-compromised as a result of disease and treatment. Suspected P. aeruginosa require timely, adequate and empirical antibiotic therapy to ensure improved outcomes. The purpose of the study was to find the sensitivity and resistance pattern of P. aeruginosa to various groups of drugs, in clinical isolates collected from two major tertiary care hospitals of Peshawar. Methods: Different clinical isolate were taken from patients admitted in various wards of Khyber Teaching Hospital and Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar. Results: A total of 258 clinical isolates were positive for P. aeruginosa out of 2058 clinical isolates. Pseudomonas showed high degree of resistance to third generation Cephalosporins (Ceftazidime, and Ceftriaxone) and moderate degree of resistance to Quinolones and Aminoglycosides (Ofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin and Amikacin). Low resistance was observed to different combinations (Cefoperazone + Sulbactum, Piperacillin + Tazobactum). Meropenem and Imipenem had negligible resistance. Conclusion: There is growing resistance to different classes of antibiotics. Combination drugs are useful approach for empirical treatment in suspected Pseudomonas infection. Imipenem and Meropenem are extremely effective but should be in reserve. (author)

  16. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høiby Niels

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. New results from one small trial suggest that addition of oral ciprofloxacin to inhaled tobramycin may reduce lung inflammation. Clinical trials with new formulations of old antibiotics for inhalation therapy (aztreonam lysine against chronic P. aeruginosa infection improved patient-reported outcome, lung function, time to acute exacerbations and sputum density of P. aeruginosa. Other drugs such as quinolones are currently under investigation for inhalation therapy. A trial of the use of anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics for long-term prophylaxis showed no effect in patients who were not already infected. Use of azithromycin to treat CF patients without P. aeruginosa infection did not improve lung function. Here I review the recent advances in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections with a focus on inhalation treatments targeted at prophylaxis and chronic suppressive therapy.

  17. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason W; Cheung, Melissa; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-09-01

    Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra), microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) and the microcystin-producing (mcyA) gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p < 0.01), suggesting toxin-producing M. aeruginosa populations may significantly contribute to microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p < 0.001), which was higher at Euclid (p < 0.05), possibly contributing to higher microcystin concentrations at Euclid. PMID:26378564

  18. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheonghoon Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra, microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS and the microcystin-producing (mcyA gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p < 0.01, suggesting toxin-producing M. aeruginosa populations may significantly contribute to microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p < 0.001, which was higher at Euclid (p < 0.05, possibly contributing to higher microcystin concentrations at Euclid.

  19. Screening of Molecular Virulence Markers in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Clinical Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Lazar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus (S. aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps. aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts. The frequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains has determined the development of new strategies in order to elucidate the different mechanisms used by these bacteria at different stages of the infectious process, providing the scientists with new procedures for preventing, or at least improving, the control of S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa infections. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens. We used multiplex and uniplex PCR assays to detect the genes encoding different cell-wall associated and extracellular virulence factors, in order to evaluate potential associations between the presence of putative virulence genes and the outcome of infections caused by these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections.

  20. Role of small colony variants in persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone JG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jacob G Malone1,21John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK; 2School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UKAbstract: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that predominates during the later stages of cystic fibrosis (CF lung infections. Over many years of chronic lung colonization, P. aeruginosa undergoes extensive adaptation to the lung environment, evolving both toward a persistent, low virulence state and simultaneously diversifying to produce a number of phenotypically distinct morphs. These lung-adapted P. aeruginosa strains include the small colony variants (SCVs, small, autoaggregative isolates that show enhanced biofilm formation, strong attachment to surfaces, and increased production of exopolysaccharides. Their appearance in the sputum of CF patients correlates with increased resistance to antibiotics, poor lung function, and prolonged persistence of infection, increasing their relevance as a subject for clinical investigation. The evolution of SCVs in the CF lung is associated with overproduction of the ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP, with increased cyclic-di-GMP levels shown to be responsible for the SCV phenotype in a number of different CF lung isolates. Here, we review the current state of research in clinical P. aeruginosa SCVs. We will discuss the phenotypic characteristics underpinning the SCV morphotype, the clinical implications of lung colonization with SCVs, and the molecular basis and clinical evolution of the SCV phenotype in the CF lung environment.Keywords: small colony variants, cystic fibrosis, cyclic-di-GMP, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, RsmA, antibiotics

  1. Platelet 3H-serotonin releasing immune complexes induced by pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro formation of immune complexes was studied by 3H-serotonin release from human platelets by P. aeruginosa antigens in the presence of serum from 22 cyctic fibrosis patients, chronically infected with mucoid P. aeruginosa (CF+P) and with a pronounced antibody response against these bacteria, and in 24 patients without P. aeruginosa (CF-P). All CF+P patients responded with 3H-serotonin release (16-34%), whereas CF-P patients released less than 15%. In the group of CF+P patients the number of P. aeruginosa precipitins was correlated to the serotonin titer. Time courses indicated that 3H-serotonin release was maximal between 2 and 5 min, and that no further release was observed up to 20 min. There was a gradual increase in 3H-serotonin release with higher platelet concentrations. The response was not changed by complement inactivation, and fractionation of serum demonstrated that the serotonin release was dependent on the presence of the immunoglobulin fraction. These experiments support the suggestion of a type III reaction being involved in the lung damage in CF+P patients and also suggest a possible involvement of serotonin in the inflammatory reaction during chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection. (author)

  2. Identification of Novel Genomic Islands in Liverpool Epidemic Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Using Segmentation and Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Mehul; Mathee, Kalai; Azad, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen implicated in a myriad of infections and a leading pathogen responsible for mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Horizontal transfers of genes among the microorganisms living within CF patients have led to highly virulent and multi-drug resistant strains such as the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, namely the LESB58 strain that has the propensity to acquire virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. Often these genes are acquired in large clusters, referred to as “genomic islands (GIs).” To decipher GIs and understand their contributions to the evolution of virulence and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa LESB58, we utilized a recursive segmentation and clustering procedure, presented here as a genome-mining tool, “GEMINI.” GEMINI was validated on experimentally verified islands in the LESB58 strain before examining its potential to decipher novel islands. Of the 6062 genes in P. aeruginosa LESB58, 596 genes were identified to be resident on 20 GIs of which 12 have not been previously reported. Comparative genomics provided evidence in support of our novel predictions. Furthermore, GEMINI unraveled the mosaic structure of islands that are composed of segments of likely different evolutionary origins, and demonstrated its ability to identify potential strain biomarkers. These newly found islands likely have contributed to the hyper-virulence and multidrug resistance of the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa.

  3. LED array designing and its bactericidal effect researching on Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Xing, Jin; Gao, Liucun; Shen, Benjian; Kang, Hongxiang; Jie, Liang; Peng, Chen

    2015-10-01

    Lights with some special waveband and output power density have a bactericidal effect to some special bacteria. In this paper, the bactericidal effect of light at wavelength of 470 nm on P. aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) is researched with different irradiation dose. The light source is a LED array which is obtained by incoherent combine of 36 LEDs with emitting wavelength of 470 nm. The P. aeruginosa suspension is exposed with the LED array at the light power density of 100 mW/cm2 with exposures time of 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 min, respectively. The numbers of CFU are then determined by serial dilutions on LB agar plates. The bactericidal effect research results of 470 nm LED on P. aeruginosa show that the killing ratio increases with increasing of the exposure time. For the 80 min irradiation, as much as 92.4% reduction of P. aeruginosa is achieved. The results indicate that, in vitro, 470-nm lights produce dose dependent bactericidal effects on P. aeruginosa.

  4. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from positive blood cultures by quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cattoir Vincent

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for numerous bloodstream infections associated with severe adverse outcomes in case of inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy. The present study was aimed to develop a novel quantitative PCR (qPCR assay, using ecfX as the specific target gene, for the rapid and accurate identification of P. aeruginosa from positive blood cultures (BCs. Methods Over the period August 2008 to June 2009, 100 BC bottles positive for gram-negative bacilli were tested in order to evaluate performances of the qPCR technique with conventional methods as gold standard (i.e. culture and phenotypic identification. Results Thirty-three strains of P. aeruginosa, 53 strains of Enterobactericaeae, nine strains of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and two other gram-negative species were isolated while 3 BCs were polymicrobial including one mixture containing P. aeruginosa. All P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were detected by qPCR except a single strain in mixed culture. Performances of the qPCR technique were: specificity, 100%; positive predictive value, 100%; negative predictive value, 98.5%; and sensitivity, 97%. Conclusions This reliable technique may offer a rapid (

  5. Comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from mink by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne Sofie; Pedersen, Karl; Andersen, Thomas Holmen;

    2003-01-01

    Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical infections in mink were subjected to serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SpeI. A total of 212 isolates of P aeruginosa from the year 1998 to 2001 were included in this study: 168 isolates from mink obtained from 74 farm out...... pathogenic strains of R aeruginosa spread between farms and animals either mechanically, or through feed or water from a common source, rather than by random nosocomial infections with strains from the farm environment.......Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical infections in mink were subjected to serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SpeI. A total of 212 isolates of P aeruginosa from the year 1998 to 2001 were included in this study: 168 isolates from mink obtained from 74 farm...... outbreaks of haemorrhagic pneumonia. Isolates from mink were separated into 34 distinct clones by PFGE subtyping. All isolates from mink infected during the same farm outbreak were identical, except in one case where two different strains were isolated from mink obtained from the same farm outbreak. R...

  6. Comparison of high-resolution computed tomography findings between Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and Cytomegalovirus pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Okada, Fumito; Takata, Shoko; Ono, Asami; Sato, Haruka; Mori, Hiromu [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yufu, Oita (Japan); Nakayama, Tomoko [Oita Red Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oita (Japan); Ando, Yumiko [Oita Nishibeppu National Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oita (Japan); Hiramatsu, Kazufumi [Oita University Hospital, Hospital Infection Control Center, Oita (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    To compare pulmonary high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia to HRCT findings in patients with Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia. We studied 124 patients (77 men, 47 women; age range, 20-89 years; mean age, 65.4 years) with P. aeruginosa pneumonia and 44 patients (22 men, 22 women; age range, 36-86 years; mean age, 63.2 years) with CMV pneumonia. CT findings of consolidation (p < 0.005), bronchial wall thickening (p < 0.001), cavity (p < 0.05), and pleural effusion (p < 0.001) were significantly more frequent in patients with P. aeruginosa pneumonia than in those with CMV pneumonia. Centrilobular nodules, a crazy-paving appearance, and nodules were significantly more frequent in patients with CMV pneumonia than in those with P. aeruginosa pneumonia (all p < 0.001). Pulmonary HRCT findings, such as bronchial wall thickening, crazy-paving appearance, and nodules may be useful in distinguishing between P. aeruginosa pneumonia and CMV pneumonia. (orig.)

  7. A comparative study of coastal and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anusree V.; Joseph, Neetha; Krishna, Kiran; Sneha, K. G.; Tom, Neenu; Jangid, Kamlesh; Nair, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium having a versatile metabolic potential and great ecological and clinical significance. The geographical distribution of P. aeruginosahas revealed the existence of an unbiased genetic arrangement in terrestrial isolates. In contrast, there are very few reports about P. aeruginosa strains from marine environments. The present work was aimed at studying the distribution of P. aeruginosa in coastal waters along the Indian Peninsula and understanding the environmental influence on genotypic, metabolic and phenotypic characteristics by comparing marine and clinical isolates. Of the 785 marine isolates obtained on selective media, only 32 (~4.1%) were identified as P. aeruginosa, based on their fatty acid methyl ester profiles. A low Euclidian distance value (< 2.5) obtained from chemotaxonomic analysis suggested that all the environmental (coastal and marine) isolates originated from a single species. While UPGMA analyses of AP-PCR and phenotypic profiles separated the environmental and clinical isolates, fatty acid biotyping showed overlapping between most clinical and environmental isolates. Our study revealed the genetic diversity among different environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa. While biogeographical separation was not evident based solely on phenotypic and metabolic typing, genomic and metatranscriptomic studies are more likely to show differences between these isolates. Thus, newer and more insightful methods are required to understand the ecological distribution of this complex group of bacteria. PMID:26413053

  8. A bioluminescent assay for measuring glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, Michael P; Karassina, Natasha; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Cali, James J; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2016-07-15

    Identifying activators and inhibitors of glucose uptake is critical for both diabetes management and anticancer therapy. To facilitate such studies, easy-to-use nonradioactive assays are desired. Here we describe a bioluminescent glucose uptake assay for measuring glucose transport in cells. The assay is based on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and the enzymatic detection of the 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate that accumulates. Uptake can be measured from a variety of cell types, it can be inhibited by known glucose transporter inhibitors, and the bioluminescent assay yields similar results when compared with the radioactive method. With HCT 116 cells, glucose uptake can be detected in as little as 5000 cells and remains linear up to 50,000 cells with signal-to-background values ranging from 5 to 45. The assay can be used to screen for glucose transporter inhibitors, or by multiplexing with viability readouts, changes in glucose uptake can be differentiated from overall effects on cell health. The assay also can provide a relevant end point for measuring insulin sensitivity. With adipocytes and myotubes, insulin-dependent increases in glucose uptake have been measured with 10- and 2-fold assay windows, respectively. Significant assay signals of 2-fold or more have also been measured with human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and skeletal myoblasts. PMID:27130501

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente em unidade de cuidados intensivos: desafios que procedem? Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente en una unidad de cuidados intensivos: desafíos que proceden? Multi-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa among patients from an intensive care unit: persistent challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Verônica Guilherme Ferrareze

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a ocorrência de infecção hospitalar por Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente em pacientes hospitalizados em uma unidade de cuidados intensivos. MÉTODO: estudo retrospectivo realizado de outubro de 2003 a setembro de 2004 em um hospital de emergências. RESULTADOS: Totalizou-se 68 portadores de bactérias multiresistentes sendo 10 (14,7% de P. aeruginosa. Destes, 8 pacientes eram do sexo masculino, as médias de idade e de internação foram respectivamente de 57 anos a média de idade, 43,7 a média de dias de internação e 7 pacientes morreram. Isolaram-se 8 cepas no sangue, cinco na urina, duas em cateteres venosos e uma no líquor, das quais sete sensíveis somente a polimixina e três ao imipenem. CONCLUSÃO: O perfil microbiológico deve ser avaliado periodicamente visto que é específico de uma unidade ou instituição, e demanda ações correlatas.OBJETIVOS: Evaluar la ocurrencia de infección hospitalaria por Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente en pacientes hospitalizados en una unidad de cuidados intensivos. MÉTODO: estudio retrospectivo realizado de octubre del 2003 a setiembre del 2004 en un hospital de emergencias. RESULTADOS: Se tuvo un total de 68 portadores de bacterias multiresistentes de las cuales 10 (14,7% de P. aeruginosa. De éstos, 8 pacientes eran del sexo masculino, los promedios de edad y de internamiento fueron respectivamente de 57 años y 43,7 de días de internamiento y 7 pacientes murieron. Se aislaron 8 cepas en la sangre, cinco en la orina, dos en catéteres venosos y una en el licor, de ellas siete eran sensibles sólo a la polimixina y tres al imipenem. CONCLUSIÓN: El perfil microbiológico debe ser evaluado periódicamente dado que es específico de una unidad o institución, y demanda acciones correlatas.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence of multi-resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa infection among patients from an Intensive Care Unit. METHODS: This retrospective study was

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasI and rhlI quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Givskov, Michael;

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared...

  11. The clonal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa heat shock protein is highly diverse in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulanova, M; Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O;

    1997-01-01

    The GroEL protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the bacterial 60-65 kDa heat shock protein family. A strong antibody response to GroEL has been found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic pulmonary infection caused by P. aeruginosa. Clonotypes of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies against Gro...

  12. Life history responses of Daphnia magna feeding on toxic Microcystis aeruginosa alone and mixed with a mixotrophic Poterioochromonas species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xue; Warming, Trine Perlt; Hu, Hong-Ying;

    2009-01-01

    The toxic effects of a mixotrophic golden alga (Poterioochromonas sp. strain ZX1) and a cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa grazed by Poterioochromonas to a cladoceran were investigated through life history experiments using Daphnia magna. Poterioochromonas cultured in two ways (fed M. aeruginosa...

  13. Cis-2-dodecenoic acid signal modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing systems and T3SS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF) is well known for its important functions in intraspecies signaling in Burkholderia cenocepacia. Previous work has also established an important role of BDSF in interspecies and inter-kingdom communications. It was identified that BDSF modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, how BDSF interferes with virulence of P. aeruginosa is still not clear. Results We report here that BDSF mediates the cross-talk between B. cenocepacia and P. aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing (QS) systems and type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. aeruginosa. Bioassay results revealed that exogenous addition of BDSF not only reduced the transcriptional expression of the regulator encoding gene of QS systems, i.e., lasR, pqsR, and rhlR, but also simultaneously decreased the production of QS signals including 3-oxo-C12-HSL, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and C4-HSL, consequently resulting in the down-regulation of biofilm formation and virulence factor production of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, BDSF and some of its derivatives are also capable of inhibiting T3SS of P. aeruginosa at a micromolar level. Treatment with BDSF obviously reduced the virulence of P. aeruginosa in both HeLa cell and zebrafish infection models. Conclusions These results depict that BDSF modulates virulence of P. aeruginosa through interference with QS systems and T3SS. PMID:24134835

  14. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with increased mutation frequency due to inactivation of the DNA oxidative repair system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandsberg, Lotte F; Ciofu, Oana; Kirkby, N;

    2009-01-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by the biofilm mode of growth and chronic inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A high percentage of P. aeruginosa strains show high frequencies of mutations (hyper...

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of PA3885 (TpbA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wen; Li, Kan; Bai, Yuwei; Zhou, Ruimin; Zhou, Weihong; Bartlam, Mark

    2010-01-01

    PA3885 (TpbA), a tyrosine phosphatase, may function as a balancing factor between biofilm formation and motility in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of PA3885 from P. aeruginosa PAO1 are reported.

  16. Growth behavior prediction of fresh catfish fillet with Pseudomonas aeruginosa under stresses of allyl isothiocyanate, temperature and modified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common spoilage microorganism in fish, grows rapidly when temperature rises above 4 degree C. The combination of allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) and modified atmosphere (MA) was applied and proved to be effective to retard the growth of P. aeruginosa. The objective of this resea...

  17. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular secondary metabolite, Paerucumarin, chelates iron and is not localized to extracellular membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Uzma; Kruczek, Cassandra J; Azeem, Muhammed; Javaid, Nasir; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2016-08-01

    Proteins encoded by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pvcA-D operon synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin termed paerucumarin. The pvcA-D operon enhances the expression of the P. aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes and this effect is mediated through paerucumarin. Whether pvcA-D and/or paerucumarin affect the expression of other P. aeruginosa genes is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of a mutation in pvcA-D operon the global transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1-UW. The mutation reduced the expression of several ironcontrolled genes including pvdS, which is essential for the expression of the pyoverdine genes. Additional transcriptional studies showed that the pvcA-D operon is not regulated by iron. Exogenously added paerucumarin enhanced pyoverdine production and pvdS expression in PAO1-UW. Iron-chelation experiments revealed that purified paerucumarin chelates iron. However, exogenously added paerucumarin significantly reduced the growth of a P. aeruginosa mutant defective in pyoverdine and pyochelin production. In contrast to other secondary metabolite, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), paerucumarin is not localized to the P. aeruginosa membrane vesicles. These results suggest that paerucumarin enhances the expression of iron-controlled genes by chelating iron within the P. aeruginosa extracellular environment. Although paerucumarin chelates iron, it does not function as a siderophore. Unlike PQS, paerucumarin is not associated with the P. aeruginosa cell envelope. PMID:27480638

  18. Identification of outer membrane Porin D as a vitronectin-binding factor in cystic fibrosis clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Singh, Birendra; Al-Jubair, Tamim;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen that frequently colonizes patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several pathogens are known to bind vitronectin to increase their virulence. Vitronectin has been shown to enhance P. aeruginosa adhesion to...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya

    2014-03-27

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain, isolated from a bacterial keratitis patient in southern India.

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of Broad-Host-Range Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteriophages ΦR18 and ΦS12-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Takaaki; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Usui, Masaru; Maruyama, Fumito; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Yokota, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important cause of racehorse keratitis. Bacteriophage therapy has the potential to aid in the prevention and treatment of diseases caused by P. aeruginosa. We present here the complete genome sequences of two phages, ΦR18 and ΦS12-1, which exhibit infectivity for a broad range of P. aeruginosa isolates. PMID:27151780

  1. Cesium ion uptake by moss (Hypnum cupressiforme)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower land mosses uptake water and minerals from the atmosphere. They can collect metals polluting the air and radioactive fallout elements so they can be suitable for monitoring of these substances. Cesium ion uptake by Hypnum cupressiforme is studied by a radioactive tracer, 134Cs. The quantity of cesium ion in different celluar locations and the capacity of ion uptake is determined. The total capacity is found to be several times 10-3 mol g-1 and is therefore of the same order of magnitude as the cation exchange capacity of ion exchangers. The kinetics and reversibility of the process is studied as well. (orig.)

  2. Hydrogen uptake by Azolla-Anabaena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen uptake in the Azolla-Anabaena system is studied. Tritium is used as tracer. Plants are incubated under different atmosphere composition: a) Air + 3H2; b) Air + CO2 + 3H2 + CO; c) Air + 3H2 + CO; d) Air + CO2 + 3H2 + CO to study the pathway of absorbed hydrogen in the Azolla - Anabaena system. Azolla-Anabaena showed greater hydrogen uptake under argonium atmosphere than under air. Carbon monoxide decreased hydrogen uptake. There are evidences of recycling of the hydrogen evolved through notrogenease. (Author)

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation in the nasopharyngeal reservoir leads to migration and persistence in the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Joanne L; Neill, Daniel R; Loman, Nick; Winstanley, Craig; Kadioglu, Aras

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bacterial infections are a key feature of a variety of lung conditions. The opportunistic bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is extremely skilled at both colonizing and persisting in the airways of patients with lung damage. It has been suggested that the upper airways (including the paranasal sinuses and nasopharynx) play an important role as a silent reservoir of bacteria. Over time, P. aeruginosa can adapt to its niche, leading to increased resistance in the face of the immune system and intense therapy regimes. Here we describe a mouse inhalation model of P. aeruginosa chronic infection that can be studied for at least 28 days. We present evidence for adaptation in vivo, in terms of genotype and phenotype including antibiotic resistance. Our data suggest that there is persistence in the upper respiratory tract and that this is key in the establishment of lung infection. This model provides a unique platform for studying evolutionary dynamics and therapeutics. PMID:25179232

  4. Influence of glyphosate in planktonic and biofilm growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Schneider Lima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the impact of different concentrations of glyphosate (Rondup® on planktonic and biofilm growth of P. aeruginosa. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures of P. aeruginosa ATCC®15442 inoculated in MHB + glyphosate (0.845 ppm, 1.690 ppm, 8.45 ppm, 16.90 ppm, 84.50 ppm, 169 ppm, 845 ppm, and 1690 ppm and cultured in normoxia and anoxia, following their OD560nm every hour for 24 h. Biofilms of adapted cells were formed in the presence of glyphosate (0.845 to 1690 ppm in normoxia and anoxia for 36 h. Glyphosate at concentrations higher than 84.5 ppm reduces the cell density of planktonic aerobic cultures (p 0.05, and more pronounced over 169 ppm. Anaerobic biofilms have their growth more readily favored (p < 0.05, regardless of concentration. In a concentration-dependent manner, glyphosate interferes with the growth ability of P. aeruginosa ATCC®15442.

  5. Phage Therapy: a Step Forward in the Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Diana P.; Vilas Boas, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance constitutes one of the major worldwide public health concerns. Bacteria are becoming resistant to the vast majority of antibiotics, and nowadays, a common infection can be fatal. To address this situation, the use of phages for the treatment of bacterial infections has been extensively studied as an alternative therapeutic strategy. Since Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common causes of health care-associated infections, many studies have reported the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial efficacy of phage therapy against this bacterium. This review collects data of all the P. aeruginosa phages sequenced to date, providing a better understanding about their biodiversity. This review further addresses the in vitro and in vivo results obtained by using phages to treat or prevent P. aeruginosa infections as well as the major hurdles associated with this therapy. PMID:25972556

  6. Identification of KPC-Producing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Acinetobacter Baumanniiin a Burned Infant: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolaziz Rastegar Lari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the phenotypic characteristics of KPC-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. A case report study was performed at a tertiary burn care centre in Tehran, Iran. Nine isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii from a hospitalized case were isolated. The identity of isolates was confirmed and their antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed. Eight out of nine Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were resistant to Imipenem. Three out of 8 imipenem resistant isolates were also positive for KPC test. Findings of this study highlight the importance of implementation of an effective infection control strategy in order to prevent and reduce the emergence and spread of gram negative Carbapenemase-producing organisms in Iran.

  7. High genetic diversity among Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated in a public hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Dias Siqueira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil and other regions of the world, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. have emerged as important agents of nosocomial infection and are commonly involved in outbreaks. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the genetic relationship among P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated from patients in a public university hospital in northwestern Paraná, Brazil, and report their antimicrobial resistance profile. A total of 75 P. aeruginosa and 94 Acinetobacter spp. isolates were phenotypically identified and tested for antibiotic susceptibility using automated methodology. Polymyxin B was tested by disk diffusion for P. aeruginosa. Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL was detected using a disk approximation test. Genotyping was performed using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR. Approximately 55% of the P. aeruginosa isolates and 92% of the Acinetobacter spp. isolates were multiresistant, but none were MBL-producers. ERIC-PCR revealed the presence of small clusters of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp., most likely OXA-type carbapenemase producers. Furthermore, high genetic diversity in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. clinical isolates was observed, suggesting that cross-transmission is not very frequent in the studied hospital.No Brasil, bem como em outras regiões do mundo, Pseudomonas aeruginosa e Acinetobacter spp. surgiram como importantes agentes de infecção nosocomial e são comumente envolvidos em surtos. O objetivo principal deste estudo foi descrever a relação genética de P. aeruginosa e Acinetobacter spp. isoladas de pacientes internados em hospital universitário público do noroeste do Paraná - Brasil e reportar o perfil de resistência dessas bactérias. Um total de 75 P. aeruginosa e 94 Acinetobacter spp. isolados foi fenotipicamente identificado e testado para a suscetibilidade aos antibióticos por metodologia automatizada. A polimixina B foi

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolutionary Adaptation and Diversification in Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Lung Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Craig; O'Brien, Siobhan; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations undergo a characteristic evolutionary adaptation during chronic infection of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, including reduced production of virulence factors, transition to a biofilm-associated lifestyle, and evolution of high-level antibiotic resistance. Populations of P. aeruginosa in chronic CF lung infections typically exhibit high phenotypic diversity, including for clinically important traits such as antibiotic resistance and toxin production, and this diversity is dynamic over time, making accurate diagnosis and treatment challenging. Population genomics studies reveal extensive genetic diversity within patients, including for transmissible strains the coexistence of highly divergent lineages acquired by patient-to-patient transmission. The inherent spatial structure and spatial heterogeneity of selection in the CF lung appears to play a key role in driving P. aeruginosa diversification. PMID:26946977

  9. Production of Biosurfactant by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Grown on Cashew Apple Juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Maria V. P.; Souza, Maria C. M.; Benedicto, Sofia C. L.; Bezerra, Márcio S.; Macedo, Gorete R.; Saavedra Pinto, Gustavo A.; Gonçalves, Luciana R. B.

    In this work, the ability of biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in batch cultivation using cashew apple juice (CAJ) and mineral media was evaluated. P. aeruginosa was cultivated in CAJ, which was supplemented with peptone (5.0 g/L) and nutritive broth. All fermentation assays were performed in Erlenmeyer flasks containing 300 mL, incubated at 30°C and 150 rpm. Cell growth (biomass and cell density), pH, and superficial tension were monitored vs time. Surface tension was reduced by 10.58 and 41% when P. aeruginosa was cultivated in nutrient broth and CAJ supplemented with peptone, respectively. These results indicated that CAJ is an adequate medium for growth and biosurfactant production. Best results of biosurfactant production were obtained when CAJ was supplemented with peptone.

  10. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation......Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause......, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose...

  11. Survival trends of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Clostridium perfringens in a sandy South Florida beach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for alternative indicators of disease-risk from non-enteric pathogens at the beach revealed high densities of targeted bacteria. To explain the high numbers of potential non-enteric pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in beach sand, we investigated factors affecting their survival and distribution, as well as those of a potential fecal indicator, Clostridium perfringens. Results indicated greater S. aureus and P. aeruginosa survival and proliferation in sterile beach sand, than seawater, with diminished numbers upon exposure to natural micro-predators. C. perfringens remained relatively consistent with initial numbers. Intermediate sand particles (850 μm–2 mm) constituted the major micro-niche; creating implications for beach classification programs. Colonization of sterile sand boxes at the beach by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa confirmed the filtering action (>100×) of beach sand. The use of these potential pathogens in periodic sanitary evaluation of beach sand quality is indicated, regardless of the factors influencing their abundance.

  12. Prevalence of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in high complexity hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Milda Karsten Baumgart

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii are Gram-negative bacilli that in the last decades have become prevalent agents of hospital infection due to high antimicrobial resistance developed by these microorganisms. The present study is a retrospective analysis of all positive cultures for these microorganisms in the period of January 2004 to December 2008. Resistance levels of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa to carbapenems was high and showed a trend to increase during the period of study. In recent years the increasing incidence and resistance levels of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa to the antimicrobials used for their treatment in the hospital setting underscores the relevance of infections caused by these bacteria. The selective pressure caused by indiscriminated use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in empirical hospital infections is probably the main reason for such an increase with the consequent impact upon patient morbidity and mortality

  13. HD-GYP domain proteins regulate biofilm formation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, Robert P.; Lucey, Jean; O'Donovan, Karen;

    2009-01-01

    residues (YN-GYP). Here we have investigated the role of these proteins in biofilm formation, virulence factor synthesis and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Mutation of PA4108 and PA4781 led to an increase in the level of cyclic-di-GMP in P. aeruginosa, consistent with the predicted activity of the encoded...... proteins as cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterases. Mutation of both genes led to reduced swarming motility but had differing effects on production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, pyoverdin and ExoS. Mutation of PA2572 had no effect on cyclic-di-GMP levels and did not influence swarming motility. However, PA......2572 had a negative influence on swarming that was cryptic and was revealed only after removal of an uncharacterized C-terminal domain. Mutation of PA4108, PA4781 and PA2572 had distinct effects on biofilm formation and architecture of P. aeruginosa. All three proteins contributed to virulence of P...

  14. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    , on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose......Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause...... skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation...

  15. Nonrandom distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus;

    2009-01-01

    by the use of peptide nucleic acid-based fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). We acquired CLSM images of multiple regions in multiple sections cut from five wounds containing P. aeruginosa and five wounds containing S. aureus and measured the distance...... of the bacterial aggregates to the wound surface. The distance of the P. aeruginosa aggregates to the wound surface was significantly greater than that of the S. aureus aggregates, suggesting that the distribution of the bacteria in the chronic wounds was nonrandom. The results are discussed in relation to our......The spatial organization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in chronic wounds was investigated in the present study. Wound biopsy specimens were obtained from patients diagnosed as having chronic venous leg ulcers, and bacterial aggregates in these wounds were detected and located...

  16. Structure of the T6SS lipoprotein TssJ1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of the type VI secretion-system protein TssJ1 from P. aeruginosa was solved by iodide SAD at a resolution of 1.4 Å. The type VI secretion system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been shown to be responsible for the translocation of bacteriolytic effectors into competing bacteria. A mechanistic understanding of this widely distributed secretion system is developing and structural studies of its components are ongoing. Two representative structures of one highly conserved component, TssJ, from Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens have been published. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of TssJ1 from P. aeruginosa is presented at 1.4 Å resolution. The overall structure is conserved among the three proteins. This finding suggests that the homologues function in a similar manner and bolsters the understanding of the structure of this family of proteins

  17. Involvement of bacterial migration in the development of complex multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Mikkel; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the developmental process from single cells scattered on a surface to complex multicellular biofilm structures is essential in order to create strategies to control biofilm development. In order to study bacterial migration patterns during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm...... development, we have performed an investigation with time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms formed by various combinations of colour-coded P. aeruginosa wild type and motility mutants. We show that mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms can form in a sequential...... process involving a non-motile bacterial subpopulation and a migrating bacterial subpopulation. The non-motile bacteria form the mushroom stalks by growth in certain foci of the biofilm. The migrating bacteria form the mushroom caps by climbing the stalks and aggregating on the tops in a process which is...

  18. Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Heydorn, Arne; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Lambertsen, Lotte Munch; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    for P. aeruginosa initial attachment or biofilm formation, but the cell appendages had roles in biofilm development, as wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants formed biofilms with different structures. Dynamics and selection during biofilm formation were investigated by tagging the wild type and...... flagella/type IV mutants with Yfp and Cfp and performing time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy in mixed colour biofilms. The initial microcolony formation occurred by clonal growth, after which wild-type P. aeruginosa bacteria spread over the substratum by means of twitching motility. The wild......-type biofilms were dynamic compositions with extensive motility, competition and selection occurring during development. Bacterial migration prevented the formation of larger microcolonial structures in the wild-type biofilms. The results are discussed in relation to the current model for P. aeruginosa biofilm...

  19. Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected orthopedic prostheses with ceftazidime-ciprofloxacin antibiotic combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouqui, P; Rousseau, M C; Stein, A; Drancourt, M; Raoult, D

    1995-11-01

    Indwelling device infections are associated with considerable morbidity and extremely high cost. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequent gram-negative etiologic agent associated with infections of indwelling catheters and foreign body implants. It is generally agreed that eradication of infection in the presence of a foreign body requires removal of the foreign body. Using a combination of ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, we cured nine of nine patients with P. aeruginosa-infected osteosynthetic material and four of five patients with hip and knee prostheses without removing the foreign material. Follow-up was for a mean of 21 months (range, 6 to 60 months). Some patients experienced minor side effects (arthralgia in one patient and rash in another patient). We conclude that this combination is effective and safe and should be useful in the treatment of P. aeruginosa-infected orthopedic implants. PMID:8585720

  20. Reexamining intra and extracellular metabolites produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Maria Shuja

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate, screen and analyze bacteria from different areas of Pakistan for the production of antimicrobial compounds, zinc solubilization and bioplastic production. Methods: Isolation and purification was proceeding with streak plate method. Antagonistic assay was completed with well diffusion and thin-layer chromatography. In vivo analysis of bioplastic was analyzed with Nile blue fluorescence under UV and Sudan staining. Results: A total of 18 bacterial strains purified from soil samples while 148 strains form stock cultures were used. Out of 166 only 94 showed antimicrobial activity against each of Grampositive and Gram-negative; cocci and rods. In case of heavy metal (ZnO and Zn3(PO42.4H2O solubilization, 54 strains solubilized ZnO and 23 strains solubilized Zn3(PO42.4H2O, while 127 strains grown on polyhydroxyalkanoate detection meedia supplemented with Nile blue medium showed bioplastic production by producing fluorescence under UV light. Four bacterial strains (coded as 100, 101, 104 and 111 were selected for further characterization. Induction time assay showed that strains 101, 104, and 111 showed inhibitory activity after 4 h of incubation while strain 100 showed after 8 h. All four strains were tolerable to the maximum concentration of ZnO. Amplified products of both 16S rRNA and PhaC gene fragments of strain 111 were sequenced and submitted to GenBank as accession numbers EU781525 and EU781526. Conclusions: Bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa-111 has potential to utilize as biofertilize and bioplastic producer.

  1. Reexamining intra and extracellular metabolites produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Shuja; Nazia Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To isolate, screen and analyze bacteria from different areas of Pakistan for the production of antimicrobial compounds, zinc solubilization and bioplastic production. Methods: Isolation and purification was proceeding with streak plate method. Antagonistic assay was completed with well diffusion and thin-layer chromatography. In vivo analysis of bioplastic was analyzed with Nile blue fluorescence under UV and Sudan staining. Results: A total of 18 bacterial strains purified from soil samples while 148 strains form stock cultures were used. Out of 166 only 94 showed antimicrobial activity against each of Gram-positive and Gram-negative; cocci and rods. In case of heavy metal (ZnO and Zn3(PO4)2.4H2O) solubilization, 54 strains solubilized ZnO and 23 strains solubilized Zn3(PO4)2.4H2O, while 127 strains grown on polyhydroxyalkanoate detection meedia supplemented with Nile blue medium showed bioplastic production by producing fluorescence under UV light. Four bacterial strains (coded as 100, 101, 104 and 111) were selected for further characterization. Induction time assay showed that strains 101, 104, and 111 showed inhibitory activity after 4 h of incubation while strain 100 showed after 8 h. All four strains were tolerable to the maximum concentration of ZnO. Amplified products of both 16S rRNA and PhaC gene fragments of strain 111 were sequenced and submitted to GenBank as accession numbers EU781525 and EU781526. Conclusions: Bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa-111 has potential to utilize as biofertilize and bioplastic producer.

  2. Recombinant Expression Screening of P. aeruginosa Bacterial Inner Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery Constance J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane proteins (TM proteins make up 25% of all proteins and play key roles in many diseases and normal physiological processes. However, much less is known about their structures and molecular mechanisms than for soluble proteins. Problems in expression, solubilization, purification, and crystallization cause bottlenecks in the characterization of TM proteins. This project addressed the need for improved methods for obtaining sufficient amounts of TM proteins for determining their structures and molecular mechanisms. Results Plasmid clones were obtained that encode eighty-seven transmembrane proteins with varying physical characteristics, for example, the number of predicted transmembrane helices, molecular weight, and grand average hydrophobicity (GRAVY. All the target proteins were from P. aeruginosa, a gram negative bacterial opportunistic pathogen that causes serious lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis. The relative expression levels of the transmembrane proteins were measured under several culture growth conditions. The use of E. coli strains, a T7 promoter, and a 6-histidine C-terminal affinity tag resulted in the expression of 61 out of 87 test proteins (70%. In this study, proteins with a higher grand average hydrophobicity and more transmembrane helices were expressed less well than less hydrophobic proteins with fewer transmembrane helices. Conclusions In this study, factors related to overall hydrophobicity and the number of predicted transmembrane helices correlated with the relative expression levels of the target proteins. Identifying physical characteristics that correlate with protein expression might aid in selecting the "low hanging fruit", or proteins that can be expressed to sufficient levels using an E. coli expression system. The use of other expression strategies or host species might be needed for sufficient levels of expression of transmembrane proteins with other physical

  3. Formation of THMs and HANs during bromination of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunzhu Pu; Lingzhao Kong; Xin Huang; Guoji Ding; Naiyun Gao

    2013-01-01

    Bromine-contained disinfectants and biocides are widely used in swimming pools,recreational waters and cooling towers.The objective of this study was to evaluate the formation of thrihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) and their cytotoxicity in algae solutions during free bromine disinfection.Disinfection by-products formation potential experiments were conducted using modelsolutions containing 7mg/L (as total organic carbon) Microcystis aeruginosa cells.Effects of free bromine dosage,pH and ammonia were investigated.The results showed that brominated disinfection by-products were the major products when free bromine was applied.The total THMs formed during bromination was much as that formed during chlorination,whereas HANs were elevated by using bromination instead of chlorination.Dibromoacetonitrice (C2H2NBr2) and bromoform (CHBr3) were the only detected species during free bromine disinfection.The production of C2H2NBr2 and CHBr3 increased with disinfectant dosage but decreased with dosing ammonia.CHBr3 increased with the pH changing from 5 to 9.However,C2H2NBr2 achieved the highest production at neutral pH,which was due to a joint effect of variation in hydrolysis rate and free bromine reactivity.The hydrolysis of C2H2NBr2 was basecatalytic and nearly unaffected by disinfectant.Finally,estimation of cytotoxicity of the disinfected algae solutions showed that HANs formation was responsible for the majority of toxicity.Considering its highest toxicity among the measured disinfection by-products,the elevated C2H2NBr2 should be considered when using bromine-related algaecide.

  4. Kinetic characterisation of arylamine N-acetyltransferase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Sim Edith

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs are important drug- and carcinogen-metabolising enzymes that catalyse the transfer of an acetyl group from a donor, such as acetyl coenzyme A, to an aromatic or heterocyclic amine, hydrazine, hydrazide or N-hydroxylamine acceptor substrate. NATs are found in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and they may also have an endogenous function in addition to drug metabolism. For example, NAT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been proposed to have a role in cell wall lipid biosynthesis, and is therefore of interest as a potential drug target. To date there have been no studies investigating the kinetic mechanism of a bacterial NAT enzyme. Results We have determined that NAT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which has been described as a model for NAT from M. tuberculosis, follows a Ping Pong Bi Bi kinetic mechanism. We also describe substrate inhibition by 5-aminosalicylic acid, in which the substrate binds both to the free form of the enzyme and the acetyl coenzyme A-enzyme complex in non-productive reaction pathways. The true kinetic parameters for the NAT-catalysed acetylation of 5-aminosalicylic acid with acetyl coenzyme A as the co-factor have been established, validating earlier approximations. Conclusion This is the first reported study investigating the kinetic mechanism of a bacterial NAT enzyme. Additionally, the methods used herein can be applied to investigations of the interactions of NAT enzymes with new chemical entities which are NAT ligands. This is likely to be useful in the design of novel potential anti-tubercular agents.

  5. The effect of light supply on microalgal growth, CO2 uptake and nutrient removal from wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effect of irradiance and light:dark ratio on microalgal growth was analysed. • Microalgal growth, CO2 capture, nitrogen and phosphorus uptake were evaluated. • Higher irradiances and light periods supported higher growth and CO2 uptake rates. • All the studied microalgal strains have shown high nitrogen removal efficiencies. • The highest phosphorus removal efficiency was 67.6%. - Abstract: Microalgal based biofuels have been reported as an attractive alternative for fossil fuels, since they constitute a renewable energy source that reduces greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. However, producing biofuels from microalgae is still not economically viable. Therefore, the integration of biofuel production with other microalgal applications, such as CO2 capture and nutrient removal from wastewaters, would reduce the microalgal production costs (and the environmental impact of cultures), increasing the economic viability of the whole process. Additionally, producing biofuels from microalgae strongly depends on microalgal strain and culture conditions. This study evaluates the effect of culture conditions, namely light irradiance (36, 60, 120 and 180 μE m−2 s−1) and light:dark ratio (10:14, 14:10 and 24:0), on microalgal growth, atmospheric CO2 uptake and nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorous) removal from culture medium. Four different microalgal strains, Chlorella vulgaris, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Synechocystis salina and Microcystis aeruginosa, were studied to ascertain the most advantageous regarding the referred applications. This study has shown that higher light irradiance values and light periods resulted in higher specific growth rates and CO2 uptake rates. C. vulgaris presented the highest specific growth rate and CO2 uptake rate: 1.190 ± 0.041 d−1 and 0.471 ± 0.047 gCO2 L−1 d−1, respectively. All the strains have shown high nitrogen removal efficiencies, reaching 100% removal percentages in cultures with higher

  6. The Formation of Biofilms by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A Review of the Natural and Synthetic Compounds Interfering with Control Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiry Rasamiravaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium responsible for both acute and chronic infections. Beyond its natural resistance to many drugs, its ability to form biofilm, a complex biological system, renders ineffective the clearance by immune defense systems and antibiotherapy. The objective of this report is to provide an overview (i on P. aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle cycle, (ii on the main key actors relevant in the regulation of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa including QS systems, GacS/GacA and RetS/LadS two-component systems and C-di-GMP-dependent polysaccharides biosynthesis, and (iii finally on reported natural and synthetic products that interfere with control mechanisms of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa without affecting directly bacterial viability. Concluding remarks focus on perspectives to consider biofilm lifestyle as a target for eradication of resistant infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  7. Ocorrência de Pseudomonas aeruginosa em água potável = Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Ueda-Nakamura

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas 413 amostras de água potável do sistema principal e do sistema secundário em Bandeirantes, Estado do Paraná, através de membrana filtrante para P. aeruginosa e bactérias heterotróficas em ágar Plate Count. Coliformes totais e fecais foram determinados pelo método dos tubos múltiplos. A qualidade físico-química da água foideterminada em termos de turbidez, pH, cloro, flúor, alcalinidade, cor, oxigênio dissolvido, dureza e matéria orgânica. Das amostras examinadas, 10,41% estavam contaminadas por P. aeruginosa, incluindo 23,53% das amostras do sistema de água secundário, e 8,56% das amostras do sistema de água principal. Somente uma amostra apresentou contagem de bactérias heterotróficas acima do nível máximo recomendado. P. aeruginosa isoladas foram testadas para sensibilidade ao cloro livre e sobreviveram a uma concentração de cloro trêsvezes acima da concentração mínima usada. É recomendada a determinação periódica de Pseudomonas em adição aos dados rotineiramente coletados na maioria dos sistemas de abastecimento.A total of 413 samples of drinking water, taken from principal and secondary water systems in the municipality of Bandeirantes, state of Paraná, southern Brazil, were analyzed through membrane filtration for P. aeruginosa and on Plate Count agar for heterotrophic bacteria.Total and fecal coliforms were determined by multiple dilution tube methods. Turbidity, pH, chlorine, fluoride, alkalinity, color, dissolved oxygen, hardness and organic matter were also measured. Of the 413 samples examined, 10.41% were contaminated by P. aeruginosa,including 23,53% of the water from secondary water system, 8,56% of the water from principal water system. No coliform was found in any of the samples. One sample counted above the maximum heterotrophic bacteria level permitted. P. aeruginosa isolated from the water samples were tested for chlorine sensitivity and survived up to three times the

  8. Metallo‐beta‐lactamases among imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a brazilian university hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Maria Renata Gomes; Caiaffa‐Filho, Hélio Hehl; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento; Rossi, Flávia

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa resulting from metallo‐β‐lactamases has been reported to be an important cause of nosocomial infection and is a critical therapeutic problem worldwide, especially in the case of bacteremia. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of metallo‐β‐lactamases among imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and to compare methods of phenotypic and molecular detection. METHODS: During 2006, 69 imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa samples were isolated from blood and tested for metallo‐β‐lactamase production using phenotypic methods. Minimal Inhibitory Concentratrions (MIC) (µg/mL) was determined with commercial microdilution panels. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed among metallo‐β‐lactamase producers. RESULTS: Of all the blood isolates, 34.5% were found to be imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Positive phenotypic tests for metallo‐β‐lactamases ranged from 28%‐77%, and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) were positive in 30% (of note, 81% of those samples were blaSPM‐1 and 19% were blaVIM‐2). Ethylenediamine tetracetic acid (EDTA) combinations for the detected enzymes had low kappa values; thus, care should be taken when use it as a phenotypic indicator of MBL. Despite a very resistant antibiogram, four isolates demonstrated the worrisome finding of a colistin MIC in the resistant range. PFGE showed a clonal pattern. CONCLUSION: Metallo‐β‐lactamases among imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected in 30.4% of imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. This number might have been higher if other genes were included. SPM‐1 was the predominant enzyme found. Phenotypic tests with low kappa values could be misleading when testing for metallo‐β‐lactamases. Polymerase Chain Reaction detection remains the gold standard. PMID:21049207

  9. Metallo-beta-lactamases among imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Brazilian university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Renata Gomes Franco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa resulting from metallo-β-lactamases has been reported to be an important cause of nosocomial infection and is a critical therapeutic problem worldwide, especially in the case of bacteremia. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of metallo-β-lactamases among imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and to compare methods of phenotypic and molecular detection. METHODS: During 2006, 69 imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa samples were isolated from blood and tested for metallo-β-lactamase production using both phenotypic methods. Minimal Inhibitory Concentratrions (MIC (μg/mL was determined with commercial microdilution panels. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE was performed among metallo-β-lactamase producers. RESULTS: Of all the blood isolates, 34.5% were found to be imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Positive phenotypic tests for metallo-β-lactamases ranged from 28%-77%, and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR were positive in 30% (of note, 81% of those samples were blaSPM-1 and 19% were blaVIM-2. Ethylenediamine tetracetic acid (EDTA combinations for the detected enzymes had low kappa values; thus, care should be taken when use it as a phenotypic indicator of MBL. Despite a very resistant antibiogram, four isolates demonstrated the worrisome finding of a colistin MIC in the resistant range. PFGE showed a clonal pattern. CONCLUSION: Metallo-β-lactamases among imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected in 30.4% of imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. This number might have been higher if other genes were included. SPM-1 was the predominant enzyme found. Phenotypic tests with low kappa values could be misleading when testing for metallo-β-lactamases. Polymerase Chain Reaction detection remains the gold standard.

  10. Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

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    Mette Kolpen

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major severe complication in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, where P. aeruginosa persists and grows in biofilms in the endobronchial mucus under hypoxic conditions. Numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs surround the biofilms and create local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O, an intermediate in the denitrification pathway. We measured N2O and O2 with electrochemical microsensors in 8 freshly expectorated sputum samples from 7 CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection. The concentrations of NO3(- and NO2(- in sputum were estimated by the Griess reagent. We found a maximum median concentration of 41.8 µM N2O (range 1.4-157.9 µM N2O. The concentration of N2O in the sputum was higher below the oxygenated layers. In 4 samples the N2O concentration increased during the initial 6 h of measurements before decreasing for approximately 6 h. Concomitantly, the concentration of NO3(- decreased in sputum during 24 hours of incubation. We demonstrate for the first time production of N2O in clinical material from infected human airways indicating pathogenic metabolism based on denitrification. Therefore, P. aeruginosa may acquire energy for growth by denitrification in anoxic endobronchial mucus in CF patients. Such ability for anaerobic growth may be a hitherto ignored key aspect of chronic P. aeruginosa infections that can inform new strategies for treatment and prevention.

  11. Fate and effects of octylphenol in a Microcystis aeruginosa culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Octylphenol (OP) is a xenobiotic with endocrine disrupting properties found in freshwaters worldwide. Its effects have been studied in organisms with nuclear receptors but effects on phytoplankton communities are poorly characterized, despite the fact that these organisms are constantly exposed to this compound. For this reason fate and effects of OP in the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa were assessed from 10 nM to 5 μM OP concentration. Up to a test concentration of 250 nM, OP removal increased significantly in the presence of cyanobacteria, the compound half-life in the absence of cells being 15 days against 9 days in the presence of the cells. Only 4% of the total OP removed was found bound to the cells, indicating an active metabolization of the compound. Moreover, the role of the exudates produced by M. aeruginosa, in the OP removal from culture medium, was assessed. Culture medium with exudates, resulting from a 7-day growth of M. aeruginosa, spiked with 50 nM OP, showed a higher half-life (22 days). Compared to culture medium without exudates, it can be hypothesized that higher organic matter concentrations make the hydrolysis or photolysis of OP more difficult. In culture media, the cells of M. aeruginosa could compensate and even counteract this, as OP half-life was shortened. At higher OP levels (1.25 and 5 μM) M. aeruginosa growth was impaired, indicating toxic effects. This shortage of biomass prevented the M. aeruginosa-assisted OP withdrawal from the culture media

  12. Phase II studies of nebulised Arikace in CF patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, J P; Dupont, L; Konstan, M W; Billings, J; Fustik, S; Goss, C H; Lymp, J; Minic, P; Quittner, A L; Rubenstein, R C; Young, K R; Saiman, L; Burns, J L; Govan, J R W; Ramsey, B; Gupta, R

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Arikace is a liposomal amikacin preparation for aerosol delivery with potent Pseudomonas aeruginosa killing and prolonged lung deposition. Objectives To examine the safety and efficacy of 28 days of once-daily Arikace in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with P aeruginosa. Methods 105 subjects were evaluated in double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Subjects were randomised to once-daily Arikace (70, 140, 280 and 560 mg; n=7, 5, 21 and 36 subjects) or placebo (n=36) for 28 days. Primary outcomes included safety and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included lung function (forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1)), P aeruginosa density in sputum, and the Cystic Fibrosis Quality of Life Questionnaire—Revised (CFQ-R). Results The adverse event profile was similar among Arikace and placebo subjects. The relative change in FEV1 was higher in the 560 mg dose group at day 28 (p=0.033) and at day 56 (28 days post-treatment, 0.093L±0.203 vs −0.032L±0.119; p=0.003) versus placebo. Sputum P aeruginosa density decreased >1 log in the 560 mg group versus placebo (days 14, 28 and 35; p=0.021). The Respiratory Domain of the CFQ-R increased by the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) in 67% of Arikace subjects (560 mg) versus 36% of placebo (p=0.006), and correlated with FEV1 improvements at days 14, 28 and 42 (p<0.05). An open-label extension (560 mg Arikace) for 28 days followed by 56 days off over six cycles confirmed durable improvements in lung function and sputum P aeruginosa density (n=49). Conclusions Once-daily Arikace demonstrated acute tolerability, safety, biologic activity and efficacy in patients with CF with P aeruginosa infection. PMID:23749840

  13. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biomarkers in biological fluids using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yiping; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major infection not only in Cystic Fibrosis patients but also in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in critically ill patients in intensive care units. Successful antibiotic treatment of the infection relies on accurate and rapid identification of the infectious agents. Conventional microbiological detection methods usually take more than 3 days to obtain accurate results. We have developed a rapid diagnostic technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering to directly identify PA from biological fluids. P. aeruginosa strains, PAO1 and PA14, are cultured in lysogeny broth, and the SERS spectra of the broth show the signature Raman peaks from pyocyanin and pyoverdine, two major biomarkers that P. aeruginosa secretes during its growth, as well as lipopolysaccharides. This provides the evidence that the presence of these biomarkers can be used to indicate P. aeruginosa infection. A total of 22 clinical exhaled breath condensates (EBC) samples were obtained from subjects with CF disease and from non-CF healthy donors. SERS spectra of these EBC samples were obtained and further analyzed by both principle component analysis and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PLS-DA can discriminate the samples with P. aeruginosa infection and the ones without P. aeruginosa infection at 99.3% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity. In addition, this technique can also discriminate samples from subject with CF disease and healthy donor with 97.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results demonstrate the potential of using SERS of EBC samples as a rapid diagnostic tool to detect PA infection.

  14. A STUDY OF METALLO-BETA-LACTAMASE PRODUCING PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN BLOOD SAMPLES OF BURNED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyali

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Septicaemia is a life threatening complication of severely burned patients. Among many organisms invading blood stream Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known for its powerful antibiotic resistance mechanisms which increasingly limit the choices for treatment. Among many such resistance mechanisms it is the metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL which confers resistance to Carbapenem group of antibiotics, one of the final resorts to fight them. The present study was undertaken to detect MBL producing P. aeruginosa using phenotypic method from blood samples of burned patients as well as to know their drug sensitivity pattern. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For this purpose 67 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from blood samples of admitted burned patients were subjected to susceptibility testing to antipseudomonal drugs by disc diffusion test and those found to be Carbapenem resistant were subjected to Imipenem - EDTA combined disk synergy test for MBL detection. RESULT: Out of 67 isolates of P.aeruginosa, 19 (28.4% were found to be Carbapenem resistant and 11 (16.4% were MBL producers. A particularly important feature was that the MBL producers were highly resistant to the antibiotics tested than the non-producers. However all of them were susceptible to Colistin and Polymixin B. CONCLUSION: This study has made us to think that a constant vigil and careful selection of antibiotics are necessary to keep prevalence of MBL producing P.aeruginosa in check. The accurate identification and reporting of MBL producing P. aeruginosa will aid infection control practitioners in preventing the spread of these multidrug-resistant isolates

  15. Mechanism of enhanced activity of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O; Lafrenie, Robert M; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of both free and liposomal drugs were evaluated. To define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, lipid mixing assay, and immunocytochemistry were employed. Encapsulation of aminoglycosides into liposomes significantly increased their antibacterial activity against the resistant strains used in this study (MICs of > or =32 versus < or =8 microg/ml). TEM observations showed that liposomes interact intimately with the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, leading to the membrane deformation. The flow cytometry and lipid mixing assays confirmed liposome-bacterial membrane fusion, which increased as a function of incubation time. The maximum fusion rate was 54.3% +/- 1.5% for an antibiotic-sensitive strain of P. aeruginosa and 57.8% +/- 1.9% for a drug-resistant strain. The fusion between liposomes and P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced the antibiotics' penetration into the bacterial cells (3.2 +/- 2.3 versus 24.2 +/- 6.2 gold particles/bacterium, P < or = 0.001). Our data suggest that liposome-entrapped antibiotics could successfully resolve infections caused by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa through an enhanced mechanism of drug entry into the bacterial cells. PMID:16723560

  16. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute burn and chronic surgical wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith H Turner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in most P. aeruginosa strains. To investigate the genetic requirements for acute and chronic pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa infections, we combined high-throughput sequencing-mediated transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq and genome-wide insertion mutant fitness profiling (Tn-seq to characterize gene expression and fitness determinants in murine models of burn and non-diabetic chronic wound infection. Generally we discovered that expression of a gene in vivo is not correlated with its importance for fitness, with the exception of metabolic genes. By combining metabolic models generated from in vivo gene expression data with mutant fitness profiles, we determined the nutritional requirements for colonization and persistence in these infections. Specifically, we found that long-chain fatty acids represent a major carbon source in both chronic and acute wounds, and P. aeruginosa must biosynthesize purines, several amino acids, and most cofactors during infection. In addition, we determined that P. aeruginosa requires chemotactic flagellar motility for fitness and virulence in acute burn wound infections, but not in non-diabetic chronic wound infections. Our results provide novel insight into the genetic requirements for acute and chronic P. aeruginosa wound infections and demonstrate the power of using both gene expression and fitness profiling for probing bacterial virulence.

  17. Copper uptake across rainbow trout gills: mechanisms of apical entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosell, Martin Hautopp; Wood, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Copper, Homeostasis, sodium uptake, copper/sodium interactions, gill, rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss......Copper, Homeostasis, sodium uptake, copper/sodium interactions, gill, rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss...

  18. Analysis of AmpC β-lactamase Gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Ming; ZHANG Dongshen; QI Junying

    2005-01-01

    The gene and the amino acid sequence of the structural and regulatory region of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa with different resistance patterns were analyzed. Six strains with different resistance patterns were selected and the AmpC β-lactamase was identified. The objective gene fragment was amplified by colonies PCR. The sequences of the PCR-products were analyzed. The DNA sequence of the structural gene ampC and the regulatory genes ampR, ampD and ampE was detected. The 6 strains and the wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa are highly homogeneous in structural and regulatory region. Some new mutant points were found.

  19. In vitro efficacy of octenidine and polihexanide against biofilms composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebert, Jörg

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The removal and inactivation of biofilms through wound cleansing solutions with and without antimicrobial supplements (octenidine dihydrochloride, polihexanide have been investigated in a laboratory model with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plastic slides of polycarbonate grown over with P. aeruginosa for 1 week were incubated with the cleansing solutions for 60 min. Removal and inactivation of the biofilm were determined by staining with crystal violet and by plating, respectively. No inhibition occurred by supplementing the cleansing solutions with octenidine or polyhexanide. By using octenidine and polihexanide a pronounced decrease in colony numbers of the biofilm was achieved compared to pure salt solutions (NaCl, Ringer.

  20. Spread of colistin resistant non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa among chronically infected Danish cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Ciofu, Oana;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa have rarely been reported in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. METHODS: We performed a 17-year prospective study on colistin susceptibility and compared our findings with clinical variables. RESULTS: The first outbreak started in 1995 and lasted 5...... the first outbreak. Most resistant isolates belonged to two major clones that had similar genotypes in the two outbreaks. The P. aeruginosa isolates were all non-mucoid and they appeared in a group of chronically infected patients that had been admitted to the same ward for antibiotic treatment and...