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Sample records for aeruginosa pao1 preferentially

  1. Fructooligosacharides reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pathogenicity through distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Ortega-González

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed.

  2. Fructooligosacharides reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pathogenicity through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-González, Mercedes; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; López-Posadas, Rocío; Pacheco, Daniel; Krell, Tino; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Abdelali, Daddaoua

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages) FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed. PMID:24465697

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Pyocin Production Affects Population Dynamics within Mixed-Culture Biofilms▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Waite, Richard D.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptomic and phenotypic studies showed that pyocins are produced in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 aerobic and anaerobic biofilms. Pyocin activity was found to be high in slow-growing anaerobic biofilms but transient in aerobic biofilms. Biofilm coculture of strain PAO1 and a pyocin-sensitive isolate showed that pyocin production had a significant impact on bacterial population dynamics, particularly under anaerobic conditions.

  4. Group X Aldehyde Dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Degrade Hydrazones

    OpenAIRE

    Taniyama, Kosuke; Itoh, Hideomi; Takuwa, Atsushi; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Shunsuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Takaya, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Hydrazones are natural and synthetic compounds containing a C=N-N moiety. Here we found that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produced NAD+- or NADP+-dependent hydrazone dehydrogenase (HDH), which converts hydrazones to the corresponding hydrazides and acids rather than to the simple hydrolytic product aldehydes. Gene cloning indicated that the HDH is part of the group X aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family, which is distributed among bacteria, although the physiological...

  5. Determining Multiple Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to an Antimicrobial Agent, Free Nitrous Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shu-Hong; Fan, Lu; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Agulló-Barceló, Míriam; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L

    2016-05-17

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) has recently been demonstrated as an antimicrobial agent on a range of micro-organisms, especially in wastewater-treatment systems. However, the antimicrobial mechanism of FNA is largely unknown. Here, we report that the antimicrobial effects of FNA are multitargeted. The response of a model denitrifier, Pseudomnas aeruginosa PAO1 (PAO1), common in wastewater treatment, was investigated in the absence and presence of inhibitory level of FNA (0.1 mg N/L) under anaerobic denitrifying conditions. This was achieved through coupling gene expression analysis, by RNA sequencing, and with a suite of physiological analyses. Various transcripts exhibited significant changes in abundance in the presence of FNA. Respiration was likely inhibited because denitrification activity was severely depleted, and decreased transcript levels of most denitrification genes occurred. As a consequence, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was inhibited due to the lowered cellular redox state in the FNA-exposed cultures. Meanwhile, during FNA exposure, PAO1 rerouted its carbon metabolic pathway from the TCA cycle to pyruvate fermentation with acetate as the end product as a possible survival mechanism. Additionally, protein synthesis was significantly decreased, and ribosome preservation was evident. These findings improve our understanding of PAO1 in response to FNA and contribute toward the potential application for use of FNA as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:27116299

  6. Differential modification of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 outer membrane under hydrogen peroxide and gamma ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is causes opportunistic infections in humans. Studies with animals suggest that an adaptive mechanism is important for the ability of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The adaptive mechanism is protective mechanism against oxidative stress. This mechanism is aimed at preventing by reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species can induce and modulate a variety of biological responses including gene expression. Materials and Methods: Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1(a wild-type strain) was grown aerobically with vigorous shaking at 30 deg C in LB broth (Difco). When the optical cells density at 600 nm reached 0.4 that exposed to 0.5-50 mM H2O2 for 30 min and 30-100 Gy Gamma irradiation (60Co, ca.150 TBq of capacity, AECL) for 30 min. For the recovery, the cultures were immediately exchanged fresh media and incubation for 30 min. then, cells were prefixed with 2.5% glutaraldehyde for 30 min at 4 deg C. After two washes by centrifugation at 15,000 X g for 5 min each, the cells were postfixed with 1% osmium tetroxide for 16 h at 24 deg C. The sample was dehydrated with absolute ethanol, stained with 2% uracyl acetate, embedded in Epon resin. Thin sections were stained with lead citrate and uranyl acetate and observed with a electron microscope. Expression level of candidate genes were analyzed using real-time PCR. The amplification program was consist of one cycle at 94 deg C for 30 sec, followed 40 cycles of 94 deg C (5 sec) - 60 deg C (31 sec). Results and Conclusion: In the present study, we have observed differential membrane damage to P. aeruginosa PAO1 cells when exposed to different oxidative stresses such as hydrogen peroxide 0.5-50 mM for 30 min and gamma radiation 30-100 Gy for 30 min using TEM. In order to understand its behaviour, we isolated 3 genes which are related to membrane maintaining. Its transcription level was identified using Real-Time PCR. Each gene was differently expressed under

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of PA3885 (TpbA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wen; Li, Kan; Bai, Yuwei; Zhou, Ruimin; Zhou, Weihong; Bartlam, Mark

    2010-01-01

    PA3885 (TpbA), a tyrosine phosphatase, may function as a balancing factor between biofilm formation and motility in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of PA3885 from P. aeruginosa PAO1 are reported.

  8. Effect of nitrofurans and NO generators on biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Julia; Granik, Vladimir; Belik, Alexandr; Koksharova, Olga; Khmel, Inessa

    2009-06-01

    Antibacterial drugs in the nitrofuran series, such as nitrofurazone, furazidin, nitrofurantoin and nifuroxazide, as well as the nitric oxide generators sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide mononitrate in concentrations that do not suppress bacterial growth, were shown to increase the capacity of pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370 to form biofilms. At 25-100microg/ml, nitrofurans 2-2.5-fold enhanced biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1, and NO donors 3-6-fold. For B. cenocepacia 370, the enhancement was 2-5-fold (nitrofurans) and 4.5-fold (sodium nitroprusside), respectively. PMID:19460431

  9. Feeding behaviour of Caenorhabditis elegans is an indicator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence

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    Shawn Lewenza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans is commonly used as an infection model for pathogenesis studies in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The standard virulence assays rely on the slow and fast killing or paralysis of nematodes but here we developed a behaviour assay to monitor the preferred bacterial food sources of C. elegans. We monitored the food preferences of nematodes fed the wild type PAO1 and mutants in the type III secretion (T3S system, which is a conserved mechanism to inject secreted effectors into the host cell cytosol. A ΔexsEΔpscD mutant defective for type III secretion served as a preferred food source, while an ΔexsE mutant that overexpresses the T3S effectors was avoided. Both food sources were ingested and observed in the gastrointestinal tract. Using the slow killing assay, we showed that the ΔexsEΔpscD had reduced virulence and thus confirmed that preferred food sources are less virulent than the wild type. Next we developed a high throughput feeding behaviour assay with 48 possible food colonies in order to screen a transposon mutant library and identify potential virulence genes. C. elegans identified and consumed preferred food colonies from a grid of 48 choices. The mutants identified as preferred food sources included known virulence genes, as well as novel genes not identified in previous C. elegans infection studies. Slow killing assays were performed and confirmed that several preferred food sources also showed reduced virulence. We propose that C. elegans feeding behaviour can be used as a sensitive indicator of virulence for P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  10. Dictyostelium transcriptional responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa: common and specific effects from PAO1 and PA14 strains

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    Martinez José L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most relevant human opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Two strains (PAO1 and PA14 have been mainly used as models for studying virulence of P. aeruginosa. The strain PA14 is more virulent than PAO1 in a wide range of hosts including insects, nematodes and plants. Whereas some of the differences might be attributable to concerted action of determinants encoded in pathogenicity islands present in the genome of PA14, a global analysis of the differential host responses to these P. aeruginosa strains has not been addressed. Little is known about the host response to infection with P. aeruginosa and whether or not the global host transcription is being affected as a defense mechanism or altered in the benefit of the pathogen. Since the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a suitable host to study virulence of P. aeruginosa and other pathogens, we used available genomic tools in this model system to study the transcriptional host response to P. aeruginosa infection. Results We have compared the virulence of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PA14 using D. discoideum and studied the transcriptional response of the amoeba upon infection. Our results showed that PA14 is more virulent in Dictyostelium than PA01using different plating assays. For studying the differential response of the host to infection by these model strains, D. discoideum cells were exposed to either P. aeruginosa PAO1 or P. aeruginosa PA14 (mixed with an excess of the non-pathogenic bacterium Klebsiella aerogenes as food supply and after 4 hours, cellular RNA extracted. A three-way comparison was made using whole-genome D. discoideum microarrays between RNA samples from cells treated with the two different strains and control cells exposed only to K. aerogenes. The transcriptomic analyses have shown the existence of common and specific responses to infection. The expression of 364 genes changed in a similar way upon infection with

  11. Cell aggregation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 as an energy-dependent stress response during growth sodium dodecyl sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Klebensberger, Janosch; Rui, Oliver; Fritz, Eva; Schink, Bernhard; Philipp, Bodo

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 grew with the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The growth started with the formation of macroscopic cell aggregates which consisted of respiring cells embedded in an extracellular matrix composed of acidic polysaccharides and DNA. Damaged and uncultivable cells accumulated in these aggregates compared to those cells that remained suspended. We investigated the response of suspended cells to SDS under different conditions. At high energy supply, the ce...

  12. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of PA3885 (TpbA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PA3885 (TpbA), a tyrosine phosphatase, may function as a balancing factor between biofilm formation and motility in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of PA3885 from P. aeruginosa PAO1 are reported. Biofilms are important in cell communication and growth in most bacteria and are also responsible for most human clinical infections and diseases. Quorum-sensing systems have been identified to be crucial for biofilm formation and regulation. PA3885 (TpbA), a tyrosine phosphatase, is reported to convert extracellular quorum-sensing signals into internal gene-cascade reactions that result in reduced biofilm formation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, PA3885 from P. aeruginosa PAO1 was expressed, purified and crystallized. Single crystals were studied by X-ray crystallography and native diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution. These crystals were determined to belong to space group C2. It was not possible to conclusively determine the number of proteins in the asymmetric unit from the preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis alone and attempts to determine the crystal structure of PA3885 are currently under way

  13. Back to the future: evolving bacteriophages to increase their effectiveness against the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

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    Betts, Alex; Vasse, Marie; Kaltz, Oliver; Hochberg, Michael E

    2013-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is becoming increasingly problematic for the treatment of infectious disease in both humans and livestock. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics and causes high patient mortality in hospitals. Bacteriophages represent a potential option to combat pathogenic bacteria through their application in phage therapy. Here, we capitalize on previous studies showing how evolution may increase phage infection capacity relative to ancestral genotypes. We passaged four different phage isolates (podoviridae, myoviridae) through six serial transfers on the ancestral strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. We first demonstrate that repeated serial passage on ancestral bacteria increases infection capacity of bacteriophage on ancestral hosts and on those evolved for one transfer. This result is confirmed when examining the ability of evolved phage to reduce ancestral host population sizes. Second, through interaction with a single bacteriophage for 24 h, P. aeruginosa can evolve resistance to the ancestor of that bacteriophage; this also provides these evolved bacteria with cross-resistance to the other three bacteriophages. We discuss how the evolutionary training of phages could be employed as effective means of combatting bacterial infections or disinfecting surfaces in hospital settings, with reduced risk of bacterial resistance compared with conventional methods. PMID:24187587

  14. Antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effect of a novel BODIPY photosensitizer against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlandi, Viviana Teresa; Rybtke, Morten; Caruso, Enrico;

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) combines the use of organic dyes (photosensitizers, PSs) and visible light in order to elicit a photo-oxidative stress which causes bacterial death. GD11, a recently synthesized PS belonging to the boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) class, was demonstrated to be efficient...... against planktonic cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, causing a 7 log unit reduction of viable cells when administered at 2.5 μM. The effectiveness of GD11 against P. aeruginosa biofilms grown in flow-cells and microtiter trays was also demonstrated. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of flow...

  15. Dictyostelium discoideum as a surrogate host-microbe model for antivirulence screening in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

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    Bravo-Toncio, Catalina; Álvarez, Javiera A; Campos, Francisca; Ortíz-Severín, Javiera; Varas, Macarena; Cabrera, Ricardo; Lagos, Carlos F; Chávez, Francisco P

    2016-05-01

    The interest of the pharmaceutical industry in developing new antibiotics is decreasing, as established screening systems which identify compounds that kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria can no longer be used. Consequently, antimicrobial screening using classical minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurements is becoming obsolete. The discovery of antimicrobial agents that specifically target a bacterial pathogen without affecting the host and its beneficial bacteria is a promising strategy. However, few host-microbe models are available for in vivo screening of novel antivirulence molecules. Here we designed high-throughput developmental assays in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum to measure Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and to screen for novel antivirulence molecules without side effects to the host and its beneficial bacteria Klebsiella aerogenes. Thirty compounds were evaluated that had been previously selected by virtual screening for inhibitors of P. aeruginosa PAO1 polyphosphate kinase 1 (PaPPK1) and diverse compounds with combined PPK1 inhibitory and antivirulence activities were identified. This approach demonstrates that D. discoideum is a suitable surrogate host for preliminary high-throughput screening of antivirulence agents and that PPK1 is a suitable target for developing novel antivirulence compounds that can be further validated in mammalian models. PMID:27066943

  16. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

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    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution. PMID:26957519

  17. Outer membrane protein shifts in biocide-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, C L; Al-Adham, I S; Abdel Malek, S M; Buultjens, T E; Horrocks, A J; Collier, P J

    2000-08-01

    Benzisothiazolone (BIT), N-methylisothiazolone (MIT) and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT) are highly effective biocidal agents and are used as preservatives in a variety of cosmetic preparations. The isothiazolones have proven efficacy against many fungal and bacterial species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, some species are beginning to exhibit resistance towards this group of compounds after extended exposure. This experiment induced resistance in cultures of Ps. aeruginosa exposed to incrementally increasing sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the isothiazolones in their pure chemical forms. The induced resistance was observed as a gradual increase in MIC with each new passage. The MICs for all three test isothiazolones and a thiol-interactive control compound (thiomersal) increased by approximately twofold during the course of the experiment. The onset of resistance was also observed by reference to the altered presence of an outer membrane protein, designated the T-OMP, in SDS-PAGE preparations. T-OMP was observed to disappear from the biocide-exposed preparations and reappear when the resistance-induced cultures were passaged in the absence of biocide. This reappearance of T-OMP was not accompanied by a complete reversal of induced resistance, but by a small decrease in MIC. The induction of resistance towards one biocide resulted in the development of cross-resistance towards other members of the group and the control, thiomersal. It has been suggested that the disappearance of T-OMP from these preparations is associated with the onset of resistance to the isothiazolones in their Kathon form (CMIT and MIT). PMID:10971761

  18. Identifizierung zweier Gencluster (atuABCDEFGH, liuRABCDE) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 und deren funktionelle Analyse im Metabolismus methylverzweigter Verbindungen

    OpenAIRE

    Höschle, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    Azyklische Terpene wie Citronellol und Geraniol sind in der Natur weit verbreitete Geruchsstoffe, die aufgrund ihrer β-methylverzweigten Struktur von Mikroorganismen nur schwer metabolisiert werden können. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde der Abbau azyklischer Terpene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 untersucht. 1. Durch Insertionsmutagenesen wurden zwei Gencluster identifiziert, die für die meisten der in früheren biochemischen Beiträgen postulierten Abbauschritte codieren. Das erste ...

  19. Molecular Characterization of PauR and Its Role in Control of Putrescine and Cadaverine Catabolism through the γ-Glutamylation Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Han Ting; Li, Jeng-Yi; Peng, Yu-Chih; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 grows on a variety of polyamines as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Catabolism of polyamines is mediated by the γ-glutamylation pathway, which is complicated by the existence of multiple homologous enzymes with redundant specificities toward different polyamines for a more diverse metabolic capacity in this organism. Through a series of markerless gene knockout mutants and complementation tests, specific combinations of pauABCD (polyamine utilization) genes...

  20. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of Tyrosine Phosphatase Related to Biofilm Formation A (TpbA) from the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Kun Xu; Shanshan Li; Wen Yang; Kan Li; Yuwei Bai; Yueyang Xu; Jin Jin; Yingying Wang; Mark Bartlam

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are important for cell communication and growth in most bacteria, and are responsible for a number of human clinical infections and diseases. TpbA (PA3885) is a dual specific tyrosine phosphatase (DUSP) that negatively regulates biofilm formation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by converting extracellular quorum sensing signals into internal gene cascade reactions that result in reduced biofilm formation. We have determined the three-dimensional crystal stru...

  1. Triclosan Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Is Due to FabV, a Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Lin, Jinshui; Ma, Jincheng; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    Triclosan, a very widely used biocide, specifically inhibits fatty acid synthesis by inhibition of enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase. Escherichia coli FabI is the prototypical triclosan-sensitive enoyl-ACP reductase, and E. coli is extremely sensitive to the biocide. However, other bacteria are resistant to triclosan, because they encode triclosan-resistant enoyl-ACP reductase isozymes. In contrast, the triclosan resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has been attributed to active...

  2. Antipathogenic potential of marine Bacillus sp. SS4 on N-acyl-homoserine-lactone-mediated virulence factors production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Syed Musthafa; V Saroja; S Karutha Pandian; A Veera Ravi

    2011-03-01

    Antipathogenic therapy is an outcome of the quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI) mechanism, which targets autoinducer-dependent virulent gene expression in bacterial pathogens. -acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) acts as a key regulator in the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and violacein pigment production in Chromobacterium violaceum. In the present study, the marine bacterial strain SS4 showed potential QSI activity in a concentration-dependent manner (0.5–2 mg/ml) against the AHL-mediated violacein production in C. violaceum (33–86%) and biofilm formation (33–88%), total protease (20–65%), LasA protease (59–68%), LasB elastase (36–68%), pyocyanin (17–86%) and pyoverdin productions in PAO1. The light and confocal laser scanning microscopic analyses confirmed the reduction of the biofilm-forming ability of PAO1 when treated with SS4 extract. Furthermore, the antibiofilm potential was confirmed through static biofilm ring assay, in which ethyl acetate extract of SS4 showed concentration-dependent reduction in the biofilm-forming ability of PAO1. Thus, the result of this study clearly reveals the antipathogenic and antibiofilm properties of the bacterial isolate SS4. Through 16S rDNA analysis, the strain SS4 was identified as Bacillus sp. (GenBank Accession Number: GU471751).

  3. Ellagic acid derivatives from Terminalia chebula Retz. downregulate the expression of quorum sensing genes to attenuate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence.

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    Sajal Sarabhai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burgeoning antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has necessitated the development of anti pathogenic agents that can quench acylhomoserine lactone (AHL mediated QS with least risk of resistance. This study explores the anti quorum sensing potential of T. chebula Retz. and identification of probable compounds(s showing anti QS activity and the mechanism of attenuation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: Methanol extract of T. chebula Retz. fruit showed anti QS activity using Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. Bioactive fraction (F7, obtained by fractionation of methanol extract using Sephadex LH20, showed significant reduction (p<0.001 in QS regulated production of extracellular virulence factors in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Biofilm formation and alginate were significantly (p<0.05 reduced with enhanced (20% susceptibility to tobramycin. Real Time PCR of F7 treated P. aeruginosa showed down regulation of autoinducer synthase (lasI and rhlI and their cognate receptor (lasR and rhlR genes by 89, 90, 90 and 93%, respectively. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry also showed 90 and 64% reduction in the production of 3-oxo-C(12HSL and C(4HSL after treatment. Decrease in AHLs as one of the mechanisms of quorum quenching by F7 was supported by the reversal of inhibited swarming motility in F7-treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 on addition of C(4HSL. F7 also showed antagonistic activity against 3-oxo-C(12HSL-dependent QS in E. coli bioreporter. C. elegans fed on F7-treated P. aeruginosa showed enhanced survival with LT50 increasing from 24 to 72 h. LC-ESI-MS of F7 revealed the presence of ellagic acid derivatives responsible for anti QS activity in T. chebula extract. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report on anti QS activity of T. chebula fruit linked to EADs which down regulate the expression of lasIR and rhlIR genes with concomitant decrease in AHLs in P. aeruginosa PAO1 causing attenuation of its virulence factors

  4. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Ling; Shen, Lunda; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Bhuwan, Manish; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Hwan-You

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c)-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA), a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27175902

  5. Alginate is not a significant component of the extracellular polysaccharide matrix of PA14 and PAO1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak, Daniel J.; Wyckoff, Timna J. O.; Starkey, Melissa; Keyser, Rebecca; Azadi, Parastoo; O'Toole, George A.; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2003-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Such infections are extremely difficult to control because the bacteria exhibit a biofilm-mode of growth, rendering P. aeruginosa resistant to antibiotics and phagocytic cells. During the course of infection, P. aeruginosa usually undergoes a phenotypic switch to a mucoid colony, which is characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Alginate overproducti...

  6. Influence of O Polysaccharides on Biofilm Development and Outer Membrane Vesicle Biogenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Kathleen; Park, Amber J.; Hao, Youai; Brewer, Dyanne; Lam, Joseph S.; Khursigara, Cezar M.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic human pathogen known for its ability to adapt to changes in its environment during the course of infection. These adaptations include changes in the expression of cell surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS), biofilm development, and the production of a protective extracellular exopolysaccharide matrix. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been identified as an important component of the extracellular matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms and are thought to...

  7. Cross-Regulation between the phz1 and phz2 Operons Maintain a Balanced Level of Phenazine Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinna Cui

    Full Text Available Gene duplication often provides selective advantages for the survival of microorganisms in adapting to varying environmental conditions. P. aeruginosa PAO1 possesses two seven-gene operons [phz1 (phzA1B1C1D1E1F1G1 and phz2 (phzA2B2C2D2E2F2G2] that are involved in the biosynthesis of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and its derivatives. Although the two operons are highly homologous and their functions are well known, it is unclear how the two phz operons coordinate their expressions to maintain the phenazine biosynthesis. By constructing single and double deletion mutants of the two phz operons, we found that the phz1-deletion mutant produced the same or less amount of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin in GA medium than the phz2-knockout mutant while the phz1-phz2 double knockout mutant did not produce any phenazines. By generating phzA1 and phzA2 translational and transcriptional fusions with a truncated lacZ reporter, we found that the expression of the phz1 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and did not alter at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz2 operon. Surprisingly, the expression the phz2 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and only moderately at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz1 operon. Our findings suggested that a complex cross-regulation existed between the phz1 and phz2 operons. By mediating the upregulation of one phz operon expression while the other was deleted, this crosstalk would maintain the homeostatic balance of phenazine biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  8. Structural Analysis of WbpE from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: A Nucleotide Sugar Aminotransferase Involved in O-Antigen Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkin, A.; Olivier, N; Imperiali, B

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as a major source of hospital-acquired infections. Effective treatment has proven increasingly difficult due to the spread of multidrug resistant strains and thus requires a deeper understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of pathogenicity. The central carbohydrate of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 (O5) B-band O-antigen, ManNAc(3NAc)A, has been shown to be critical for virulence and is produced in a stepwise manner by five enzymes in the Wbp pathway (WbpA, WbpB, WbpE, WbpD, and WbpI). Herein, we present the crystal structure of the aminotransferase WbpE from P. aeruginosa PAO1 in complex with the cofactor pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (PLP) and product UDP-GlcNAc(3NH{sub 2})A as the external aldimine at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. We also report the structures of WbpE in complex with PMP alone as well as the PLP internal aldimine and show that the dimeric structure of WbpE observed in the crystal structure is confirmed by analytical ultracentrifugation. Analysis of these structures reveals that the active site of the enzyme is composed of residues from both subunits. In particular, we show that a key residue (Arg229), which has previously been implicated in direct interactions with the {alpha}-carboxylate moiety of {alpha}-ketoglutarate, is also uniquely positioned to bestow specificity for the 6{double_prime}-carboxyl group of GlcNAc(3NH2)A through a salt bridge. This finding is intriguing because while an analogous basic residue is present in WbpE homologues that do not process 6{double_prime}-carboxyl-modified saccharides, recent structural studies reveal that this side chain is retracted to accommodate a neutral C6{double_prime} atom. This work represents the first structural analysis of a nucleotide sugar aminotransferase with a bound product modified at the C2{double_prime}, C3{double_prime}, and C6{double_prime} positions and provides insight into a novel target for treatment of P

  9. Regulation of ornithine utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) is mediated by a transcriptional regulator, OruR.

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, M.D.; Houghton, J E

    1997-01-01

    We have used transpositional mutagenesis of a proline auxotroph (PAO951) to isolate an ornithine utilization (oru) mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO951-4) that was unable to use ornithine efficiently as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. DNA sequence analysis of the inactivated locus confirmed that the transposon had inserted into a locus whose product demonstrated significant primary sequence homology to members of the AraC family of transcriptional activators. DNA mobility shift assay...

  10. Back to the future: evolving bacteriophages to increase their effectiveness against the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Betts, Alex; Vasse, Marie; Kaltz, Oliver; Hochberg, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is becoming increasingly problematic for the treatment of infectious disease in both humans and livestock. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics and causes high patient mortality in hospitals. Bacteriophages represent a potential option to combat pathogenic bacteria through their application in phage therapy. Here, we capitalize on previous studies showing how evolution may increase phage infection capacity relative t...

  11. Conserved-residue mutations in Wzy affect O-antigen polymerization and Wzz-mediated chain-length regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Salim T.; Huszczynski, Steven M.; Nugent, Timothy; Gold, Alexander C.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2013-12-01

    O antigen (O-Ag) in many bacteria is synthesized via the Wzx/Wzy-dependent pathway in which Wzy polymerizes lipid-linked O-Ag subunits to modal lengths regulated by Wzz. Characterization of 83 site-directed mutants of Wzy from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (WzyPa) in topologically-mapped periplasmic (PL) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) verified the functional importance of PL3 and PL5, with the former shown to require overall cationic properties. Essential Arg residues in the RX10G motifs of PL3 and PL5 were found to be conserved in putative homologues of WzyPa, as was the overall sequence homology between these two periplasmic loops in each protein. Amino acid substitutions in CL6 were found to alter Wzz-mediated O-antigen modality, with evidence suggesting that these changes may perturb the C-terminal WzyPa tertiary structure. Together, these data suggest that the catch-and-release mechanism of O-Ag polymerization is widespread among bacteria and that regulation of polymer length is affected by interaction of Wzz with Wzy.

  12. Regulation and characterization of the dadRAX locus for D-amino acid catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weiqing; Li, Congran; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2011-05-01

    D-amino acids are essential components for bacterial peptidoglycan, and these natural compounds are also involved in cell wall remodeling and biofilm disassembling. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the dadAX operon, encoding the D-amino acid dehydrogenase DadA and the amino acid racemase DadX, is essential for D- and L-Ala catabolism, and its expression requires a transcriptional regulator, DadR. In this study, purified recombinant DadA alone was sufficient to demonstrate the proposed enzymatic activity with very broad substrate specificity; it utilizes all D-amino acids tested as substrates except D-Glu and D-Gln. DadA also showed comparable k(cat) and K(m) values on D-Ala and several D-amino acids. dadRAX knockout mutants were constructed and subjected to analysis of their growth phenotypes on amino acids. The results revealed that utilization of L-Ala, L-Trp, D-Ala, and a specific set of D-amino acids as sole nitrogen sources was abolished in the dadA mutant and/or severely hampered in the dadR mutant while growth yield on D-amino acids was surprisingly improved in the dadX mutant. The dadA promoter was induced by several L-amino acids, most strongly by Ala, and only by D-Ala among all tested D-amino acids. Enhanced growth of the dadX mutant on D-amino acids is consistent with the finding that the dadA promoter was constitutively induced in the dadX mutant, where exogenous D-Ala but not L-Ala reduced the expression. Binding of DadR to the dadA regulatory region was demonstrated by electromobility shift assays, and the presence of L-Ala but not D-Ala increased affinity by 3-fold. The presence of multiple DadR-DNA complexes in the dadA regulatory region was demonstrated in vitro, and the formation of these nucleoprotein complexes exerted a complicated impact on promoter activation in vivo. In summary, the results from this study clearly demonstrate DadA to be the enzyme solely responsible for the proposed D-amino acid dehydrogenase activity of broad substrate

  13. Quorum quenching activity in cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria isolated from Pterocarpus santalinus Linn., and its effect on quorum sensing regulated biofilm in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P S; Ravishankar Rai, V

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing mechanism allows the microorganisms to resist the antibiotic treatment by forming biofilms. Quorum quenching is one of the mechanisms to control the development of drug resistance in microbes. Endophyte bacteria are beneficial to plant growth as they support the immune system against the pathogen attack. The endophytic bacteria present in Pterocarpus santalinus were screened for the presence of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) degrading bacteria using biosensor strains and further confirmed by quantifying the violacein production. Cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria, Bacillus firmus PT18 and Enterobacter asburiae PT39 exhibited potent AHL degrading ability by inhibiting about 80% violacein production in biosensor strain. Furthermore, when the cell-free lysate was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PAO1-JP2 biofilm it resulted in significant (p<0.01) inhibition of biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition was confirmed by visualization of biofilm slides under fluorescence microscopy, which showed decrease in total biomass formation in treated slides. Isolation and amplification of the gene (aiiA) indicated that the presence of AHL lactonase in cell-free lysate and sequence alignment indicated that AiiA contains a "HXHXDH" zinc-binding motif that is being conserved in several groups of metallohydrolases. Therefore, the study shows the potential of AHLs degradation by AHL lactonase present in cell-free lysate of isolated endophytic bacteria and inhibition of quorum sensing regulated biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:24268182

  14. Organization and transcription of the principal sigma gene (rpoDA) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: involvement of a sigma 32-like RNA polymerase in rpoDA gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, M.; Tanaka, K; Takahashi, H; Amemura, A

    1993-01-01

    S1 nuclease mapping and Northern (RNA) hybridization revealed that the rpoDA gene encoding the principal sigma subunit of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is transcribed as a monocistronic mRNA of 2 kb and that the transcription from the rpoDA promoter (PC) starts 32 bases upstream from the first nucleotide of the initiation codon during the steady-state growth condition at a low temperature (30 degrees C). The transcript terminates 31 bases downstream from the last nucleotide of the termination c...

  15. Osmoprotectant-dependent expression of plcH, encoding the hemolytic phospholipase C, is subject to novel catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    OpenAIRE

    Sage, A E; Vasil, M L

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the hemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is induced under phosphate starvation conditions or in the presence of the osmoprotectants choline and glycine betaine. Because choline and glycine betaine may serve as carbon and energy sources in addition to conferring osmoprotection to P. aeruginosa, it seemed possible that induction of plcH is subject to catabolite repression control (CRC) by tricarboxylic cycle intermediates such as succinate. Total phospholipas...

  16. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factor Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by Ayurveda Spice Clove (Syzygium Aromaticum Bud Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing controls the virulence determinants in most proteobacteria. In this work, the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of an Ayurveda spice, namely clove (Syzygium aromaticum, shown anti-quorum sensing activity. Hexane and methanol extracts of clove inhibited the response of C. violaceum CV026 to exogenously supplied N‑hexanoylhomoserine lactone, in turn preventing violacein production. Chloroform and methanol extracts of clove significantly reduced bioluminescence production by E. coli [pSB1075] grown in the presence of N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. We demonstrated that clove extract inhibited quorum sensing-regulated phenotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, including expression of lecA::lux (by hexane extract, swarming (maximum inhibition by methanol extract, pyocyanin (maximum inhibition by hexane extract. This study shows that the presence of natural compounds that exhibit anti-quorum sensing activity in the clove extracts may be useful as the lead of anti-infective drugs.

  17. The Influence of Maggot Excretions on PAO1 Biofilm Formation on Different Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; van Veen, Kiril E. B.; Bouwman, Lee H.; Bernards, Alexandra T.; Jukema, Gerrolt N.

    2008-01-01

    Biofilm formation in wounds and on biomaterials is increasingly recognized as a problem. It therefore is important to focus on new strategies for eradicating severe biofilm-associated infections. The beneficial effects of maggots (Lucilia sericata) in wounds have been known for centuries. We hypothesized sterile maggot excretions and secretions (ES) could prevent, inhibit, and break down biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) on different biomaterials. Therefore, we investigated biofilm fo...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasl and rhll quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian;

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared...

  19. Distinct roles of extracellular polymeric substances in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yang;

    2011-01-01

    polysaccharides are also essential for subpopulation interactions and macrocolony formation in the later stages of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation. Pel and Psl polysaccharides have different impacts on Pseudomonas quinolone signal‐mediated extracellular DNA release in P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Psl...

  20. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A S; Jørgensen, Bo; Bjarnsholt, T;

    2010-01-01

    PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa DeltalasR rhlR (DeltaRR) QS-deficient mutant in different concentrations. Maggots were killed in the...

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasI and rhlI quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Givskov, Michael;

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared...

  2. Enhanced Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Brahmchetna; Yuan, Zhihong; Joo, Myungsoo; Zughaier, Susu M; Goldberg, Joanna B; Arbiser, Jack L; Hart, C Michael; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2016-07-01

    The pathogenic profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is related to its ability to secrete a variety of virulence factors. Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism wherein small diffusible molecules, specifically acyl-homoserine lactones, are produced by P. aeruginosa to promote virulence. We show here that macrophage clearance of P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is enhanced by activation of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Macrophages treated with a PPARγ agonist (pioglitazone) showed enhanced phagocytosis and bacterial killing of PAO1. It is known that PAO1 QS molecules are inactivated by PON-2. QS molecules are also known to inhibit activation of PPARγ by competitively binding PPARγ receptors. In accord with this observation, we found that infection of macrophages with PAO1 inhibited expression of PPARγ and PON-2. Mechanistically, we show that PPARγ induces macrophage paraoxonase 2 (PON-2), an enzyme that degrades QS molecules produced by P. aeruginosa Gene silencing studies confirmed that enhanced clearance of PAO1 in macrophages by PPARγ is PON-2 dependent. Further, we show that PPARγ agonists also enhance clearance of P. aeruginosa from lungs of mice infected with PAO1. Together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa impairs the ability of host cells to mount an immune response by inhibiting PPARγ through secretion of QS molecules. These studies define a novel mechanism by which PPARγ contributes to the host immunoprotective effects during bacterial infection and suggest a role for PPARγ immunotherapy for P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:27091928

  3. Pseudomonas cepacia adherence to respiratory epithelial cells is enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas cepacia are both opportunistic pathogens of patients with cystic fibrosis. The binding characteristics of these two species were compared to determine if they use similar mechanisms to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. P. cepacia 249 was shown to be piliated, but there was no detectable homology between P. aeruginosa pilin gene probes and P. cepacia genomic DNA. P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa did not appear to compete for epithelial receptors. In the presence of purified P. aeruginosa pili, the adherence of 35S-labeled strain 249 to respiratory epithelial monolayers was unaffected, while that of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was decreased by 55%. The binding of P. cepacia 249 and 715j was increased by 2.4-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, in the presence of an equal inoculum of PAO1. Interbacterial agglutination contributed to the increased adherence of P. cepacia, as the binding of 249 was increased twofold in the presence of irradiated PAO1. PAO1 exoproducts had a marked effect in enhancing the ability of the P. cepacia strains to adhere to the epithelial monolayers. A PAO1 supernatant increased the binding of 249 by eightfold and that of 715j by fourfold. Thus, there appears to be a synergistic relationship between P. aeruginosa and P. cepacia in which PAO1 exoproducts modify the epithelial cell surface, exposing receptors and facilitating increased P. cepacia attachment

  4. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming of...... P. aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.25%. Oral administration of ginseng extracts in mice promoted phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by airway phagocytes, but did not affect phagocytosis of a PAO1-filM mutant. Our study suggests that ginseng treatment may help to eradicate the biofilm...

  5. Experimental evidence of a xylose-catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Mihasan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pAO1 megaplasmid of A. nicotinovorans consists of 165 ORF's related mainly to nicotine degradation, uptake and utilization of carbohydrates, amino acids and sarcosine. A putative sugar catabolic pathway consisting of 11 ORF's organized as a single operon were previously described. The current work brings experimental data supporting the existence of a D-Xylose catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid. When grown on D-xylose containing media, the cells harboring the pAO1 megaplasmid grow to higher cell densities and also express the OxRe protein coded by the megaplasmid. A putative pathway similar to Weimberg pentose pathway is postulated, in which D-xylose is transported in the cell by the ABC-type transport system and then transformed using the putative sugar-dehidrogenase OxRe to D-xylonate, which is further degrated to 2-ketoglutarate and integrated into the general metabolism of the cell

  6. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, A S; Joergensen, B.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Johansen, H; Karlsmark, T.; Givskov, M; Krogfelt, K A

    2010-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is widely used for debridement of chronic infected wounds; however, for wounds harbouring specific bacteria limited effect or failure of the treatment has been described. Here we studied the survival of Lucilia sericata maggots encountering Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa ΔlasR ...

  7. Formation of hydroxyl radicals contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ø.; Briales, Alejandra; Brochmann, Rikke Prejh;

    2014-01-01

    induction of cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals (OH˙) during antibiotic treatment of planktonically grown cells may contribute to action of the commonly used antibiotic ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa biofilms. For this purpose, WT PAO1, a catalase deficient ΔkatA and a ciprofloxacin resistant mutant of PAO1 (gyr......A), were grown as biofilms in microtiter plates and treated with ciprofloxacin. Formation of OH˙ and total amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and viability was estimated. Formation of OH˙ and total ROS in PAO1 biofilms treated with ciprofloxacin was shown but higher levels were measured...... in ΔkatA biofilms, and no ROS production was seen in the gyrA biofilms. Treatment with ciprofloxacin decreased the viability of PAO1 and ΔkatA biofilms but not of gyrA biofilms. Addition of thiourea, a OH˙ scavenger, decreased the OH˙ levels and killing of PAO1 biofilm. Our study shows that OH˙ is...

  8. Overproduction of pyoverdins by Fur mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains PAO1 and Fe10 in stirred bioreactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Johnová, Andrea; Dobišová, Marie; Abdallah, M.; Kyslík, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2001), s. 1759-1763. ISSN 0141-5492 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : bioreactor * fur mutant * production Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.915, year: 2001

  9. Inhibition of a Putative Dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by Flavonoids and Substrates of Cyclic Amidohydrolases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yang Huang

    Full Text Available Dihydropyrimidinase is a member of the cyclic amidohydrolase family, which also includes allantoinase, dihydroorotase, hydantoinase, and imidase. These metalloenzymes possess very similar active sites and may use a similar mechanism for catalysis. However, whether the substrates and inhibitors of other cyclic amidohydrolases can inhibit dihydropyrimidinase remains unclear. This study investigated the inhibition of dihydropyrimidinase by flavonoids and substrates of other cyclic amidohydrolases. Allantoin, dihydroorotate, 5-hydantoin acetic acid, acetohydroxamate, orotic acid, and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole could slightly inhibit dihydropyrimidinase, and the IC50 values of these compounds were within the millimolar range. The inhibition of dihydropyrimidinase by flavonoids, such as myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol, galangin, dihydromyricetin, and myricitrin, was also investigated. Some of these compounds are known as inhibitors of allantoinase and dihydroorotase. Although the inhibitory effects of these flavonoids on dihydropyrimidinase were substrate-dependent, dihydromyricetin significantly inhibited dihydropyrimidinase with IC50 values of 48 and 40 μM for the substrates dihydrouracil and 5-propyl-hydantoin, respectively. The results from the Lineweaver-Burk plot indicated that dihydromyricetin was a competitive inhibitor. Results from fluorescence quenching analysis indicated that dihydromyricetin could form a stable complex with dihydropyrimidinase with the K(d value of 22.6 μM. A structural study using PatchDock showed that dihydromyricetin was docked in the active site pocket of dihydropyrimidinase, which was consistent with the findings from kinetic and fluorescence studies. This study was the first to demonstrate that naturally occurring product dihydromyricetin inhibited dihydropyrimidinase, even more than the substrate analogs (>3 orders of magnitude. These flavonols, particularly myricetin, may serve as drug leads and dirty drugs (for multiple targets for designing compounds that target several cyclic amidohydrolases.

  10. Genetically and Phenotypically Distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Share a Core Proteomic Signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahit Penesyan

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the main colonizers of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. We have isolated and sequenced several P. aeruginosa isolates from the sputum of CF patients and compared them with each other and with the model strain PAO1. Phenotypic analysis of CF isolates showed significant variability in colonization and virulence-related traits suggesting different strategies for adaptation to the CF lung. Genomic analysis indicated these strains shared a large set of core genes with the standard laboratory strain PAO1, and identified the genetic basis for some of the observed phenotypic differences. Proteomics revealed that in a conventional laboratory medium PAO1 expressed 827 proteins that were absent in the CF isolates while the CF isolates shared a distinctive signature set of 703 proteins not detected in PAO1. PAO1 expressed many transporters for the uptake of organic nutrients and relatively few biosynthetic pathways. Conversely, the CF isolates expressed a narrower range of transporters and a broader set of metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and polyamines. The proteomic data suggests that in a common laboratory medium PAO1 may transport a diverse set of "ready-made" nutrients from the rich medium, whereas the CF isolates may only utilize a limited number of nutrients from the medium relying mainly on their own metabolism for synthesis of essential nutrients. These variations indicate significant differences between the metabolism and physiology of P. aeruginosa CF isolates and PAO1 that cannot be detected at the genome level alone. The widening gap between the increasing genomic data and the lack of phenotypic data means that researchers are increasingly reliant on extrapolating from genomic comparisons using experimentally characterized model organisms such as PAO1. While comparative genomics can provide valuable information, our data

  11. Inability of Pseudomonas stutzeri denitrification mutants with the phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to grow in nitrous oxide.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 reduced nitrous oxide to dinitrogen but did not grow anaerobically in nitrous oxide. Two transposon insertion Nos- mutants of Pseudomonas stutzeri exhibited the P. aeruginosa phenotype. Growth yield studies demonstrated that nitrous oxide produced in vivo was productively respired, but nitrous oxide supplied exogenously was not. The defect may be in electron transport or in nitrous oxide uptake.

  12. TIME DEPENDENT ACCUMULATION OF NICOTINE DERIVATIVES IN THE CULTURE MEDIUM OF ARTHROBACTER NICOTINOVORANS pAO1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Ștefan Boiangiu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the metabolic intermediate 6-hidroxy-D-nicotine (6HNic found in the Arthrobacter nicotinovorans pAO1+ nicotine catabolic pathway has the ability to bind nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and to sustain spatial memory in rats. These properties make 6HNic a valuable compound with some potential for medical applications, thereby a suitable, simple and efficient method for producing 6-hidroxy-D-nicotine is necessary. Here, we focus on identifying the best moment for harvesting A. nicotinovorans cells in order to directly convert nicotine to 6HNic with the best yield.  The growth of  A. nicotinovorans pAO1+ was monitored and the correlation between the growth phases and nicotine metabolism was established. After about 5 hours of lag,the strain entered the log phase and was fully grown after 10 hours. The nicotine concentration began to drop dramatically as the pAO1+ culture reached saturation and was depleted in 5 hours. As the nicotine concentration dropped, 6HNic began to accumulate, reaching the maximum levels after about 11 hours of growth. Two other products could be detected by HPLC, one which was identified as the nicotine-blue (NB pigment and a second a still unknown end-product. 

  13. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Genome Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Head, Nathan E.; Yu, Hongwei

    2004-01-01

    Chronic lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms are associated with refractory and fatal pneumonia in cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, a group of genomically diverse P. aeruginosa isolates were compared with the reference strain PAO1 to assess the roles of motility, twitching, growth rate, and overproduction of a capsular polysaccharide (alginate) in biofilm formation. In an in vitro biofilm assay system, P. aeruginosa displayed strain-specific biofilm formation that was not ...

  14. Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Heydorn, Arne; Ragas, Paula Cornelia;

    2003-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Gfp-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants in flow chambers irrigated with citrate minimal medium was characterized by the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy and comstat image analysis. Flagella and type IV pili were not necessary...

  15. In vivo studies with two phospholipase C fractions from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, R S; Brown, D.; Coutinho, I; Meyers, D

    1987-01-01

    Two phospholipase C fractions were detected in culture supernatants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 19660, PAO1, and D10C by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both hemolytic fractions from strain ATCC 19660 were isolated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were found to cause paralysis, death, dermonecrosis, footpad swelling, and vascular permeability in mice. In vivo toxicity was directly associated with enzymatic activity.

  16. Quinolone accumulation in Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    McCaffrey, C; Bertasso, A; Pace, J.; Georgopapadakou, N H

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of quinolones by Escherichia coli JF568, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 was measured by a modified fluorometric assay (J. S. Chapman and N. H. Georgopapadakou, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 33:27-29, 1989). The quinolones examined were fleroxacin, pefloxacin, norfloxacin, difloxacin, A56620, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and Ro 09-1168. In all three organisms, uptake was complete in less than 5 min and was proportional to extracellular quinolone...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm aggravates skin inflammatory response in BALB/c mice in a novel chronic wound model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars J;

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds are presumed to persist in the inflammatory state, preventing healing. Emerging evidence indicates a clinical impact of bacterial biofilms in soft tissues, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilms. To further investigate this, we developed a chronic PA biofilm wound infection...... model in C3H/HeN and BALB/c mice. The chronic wound was established by an injection of seaweed alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa PAO1 beneath a third-degree thermal lesion providing full thickness skin necrosis, as in human chronic wounds. Cultures revealed growth of PA, and both alginate with or without...... PAO1 generated a polymorphonuclear-dominated inflammation early after infection. However, both at days 4 and 7, there were a more acute polymorphonuclear-dominated and higher degree of inflammation in the PAO1 containing group (p <0.05). Furthermore, PNA-FISH and supplemented DAPI staining showed...

  18. PA0305 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a quorum quenching acylhomoserine lactone acylase belonging to the Ntn hydrolase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahjudi, Mariana; Papaioannou, Evelina; Hendrawati, Oktavia; van Assen, Aart H. G.; van Merkerk, Ronald; Cool, Robbert H.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Quax, Wim

    2011-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome has at least two genes, pvdQ and quiP, encoding acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) acylases. Two additional genes, pa 1893 and pa0305, have been predicted to encode penicillin acylase proteins, but have not been characterized. Initial studies on a pa0305 transposon i

  19. Identification of chemosensory proteins for trichloroethylene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Shitashiro, Maiko; Tanaka, Hirohide; Hong, Chang Soo; Kuroda, Akio; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao; Kato, Junichi

    2005-01-01

    The involvement of the chemotaxis gene cluster 1 (cheYZABW) and cheR in repellent responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to trichloroethylene (TCE) is described and three methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) for TCE are identified. TCE chemotaxis assays of a number of deletion-insertion mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 revealed that the chemotaxis gene cluster 1 and cheR are required for negative chemotaxis to TCE. Mutant strains which contained deletions in pctA, pctB and pctC showed decrea...

  20. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Gao; Yuying Zhang; Yan Wang; Xinhua Qiao; Jing Zi; Chang Chen; Yi Wan

    2016-01-01

    Pyocyanin (PCN), a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60 μM SNP). Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN w...

  1. N-acetylcysteine inhibit biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Youning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in chronic respiratory tract infections. It typically makes a biofilm, which makes treatment of these infections difficult. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC on biofilms produced by P. aeruginosa. Results We found that minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of NAC for most isolates of P. aeruginosa were 10 to 40 mg/ml, the combination of NAC and ciprofloxacin (CIP demonstrated either synergy (50% or no interaction (50% against the P. aeruginosa strains. NAC at 0.5 mg/ml could detach mature P. aeruginosa biofilms. Disruption was proportional to NAC concentrations, and biofilms were completely disrupted at 10 mg/ml NAC. Analysis using COMSTAT software also showed that PAO1 biofilm biomass decreased and its heterogeneity increased as NAC concentration increased. NAC and ciprofloxacin showed significant killing of P. aeruginosa in biofilms at 2.5 mg/ml and > 2 MIC, respectively (p p P. aeruginosa also decreased by 27.64% and 44.59% at NAC concentrations of 0.5 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml. Conclusions NAC has anti-bacterial properties against P. aeruginosa and may detach P. aeruginosa biofilms. Use of NAC may be a new strategy for the treatment of biofilm-associated chronic respiratory infections due to P. aeruginosa, although it would be appropriate to conduct clinical studies to confirm this.

  2. Effects of quorum sensing autoinducer degradation gene on virulence and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The aiiA gene from Bacillus thuringiensis was cloned into the Pseudomonas/E. coli shuttle vector and transformed into Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1. Western blotting showed that the AiiA protein was expressed in PAO1. After induction by IPTG for 6 h and 18 h, expression of the aiiA gene in PAO1 completely degraded the quorum sensing autoinducers N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs): N-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL) and N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (BHL). The re- duced amount of AHLs in PAO1 was also correlated with decreased expression and production of several virulence factors such as elastase and pyocyanin. AiiA expression also influenced bacterial swarming motility. Most importantly, our studies indicated that aiiA played significant roles in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and dispersion, as observed by the differences of the biofilm formation on liquid and solid surfaces, and biofilm structures under a scanning electron microscope.

  3. Effects of quorum sensing autoinducer degradation gene on virulence and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yao; DAI Yue; ZHANG Yong; HU YangBo; YANG BaoYu; CHEN ShiYun

    2007-01-01

    The aiiA gene from Bacillus thuringiensis was cloned into the Pseudomonas/E. coli shuttle vector and transformed into Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1. Western blotting showed that the AiiA protein was expressed in PAO1. After induction by IPTG for 6 h and 18 h, expression of the aiiA gene in PAO1completely degraded the quorum sensing autoinducers N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs):N-oxododecanoyI-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL) and N-butyryI-L-homoserine lactone (BHL). The reduced amount of AHLs in PAO1 was also correlated with decreased expression and production of several virulence factors such as elastase and pyocyanin. AiiA expression also influenced bacterial swarming motility. Most importantly, our studies indicated that aiiA played significant roles in P.aeruginosa biofilm formation and dispersion, as observed by the differences of the biofilm formation on liquid and solid surfaces, and biofilm structures under a scanning electron microscope.

  4. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Zhang, Yuying; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Xinhua; Zi, Jing; Chen, Chang; Wan, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Pyocyanin (PCN), a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60μM SNP). Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN was tested by constructing PAO1 nor (NO reductase gene) knockout mutants. Compared to the wild-type strain, the Δnor strain had a lower PCN (86% reduction in Δnor). To examine whether the results were universal with other P. aeruginosa strains, we collected 4 clinical strains from a hospital, tested their PCN levels after SNP treatment, and obtained similar results, i.e., PCN biosynthesis was inhibited by NO. These results suggest that NO treatment may be a new strategy to inhibit PCN biosynthesis and could provide novel insights into eliminating P. aeruginosa virulence as a clinical goal. PMID:26874276

  5. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Gao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyocyanin (PCN, a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60 μM SNP. Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN was tested by constructing PAO1 nor (NO reductase gene knockout mutants. Compared to the wild-type strain, the Δnor strain had a lower PCN (86% reduction in Δnor. To examine whether the results were universal with other P. aeruginosa strains, we collected 4 clinical strains from a hospital, tested their PCN levels after SNP treatment, and obtained similar results, i.e., PCN biosynthesis was inhibited by NO. These results suggest that NO treatment may be a new strategy to inhibit PCN biosynthesis and could provide novel insights into eliminating P. aeruginosa virulence as a clinical goal.

  6. Molecular Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UPM P3 from Oil Palm Rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badri F. Azadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been used in agriculture as biological agents. It has shown substantial control of a variety of soil-borne plant pathogens including Macrophomina phaseolina, Botrytis cinerea, Rhizoctonia solani, Colletotrichum truncatum, Pythium, Fusarium and others. Species aggregate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UPM P3 was shown to have potential as a biocontrol agent against Ganoderma boninense, the causal agent of Basal Stem Rot (BSR of oil palm. However, P. aeruginosa is also an opportunistic pathogen. It typically infects the pulmonary tract, urinary tract, burns, wounds and also causes other blood infections. The objective of this study was to carry out DNA fingerprinting for strain differentiation to differentiate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic forms of P. aeruginosa strain UPM P3. Approach: Genotype characterization was carried out by amplification of the recA gene using specific primers, purified using QIA Quick PCR purification Kit and sent for sequencing. Multiple sequence alignments were performed on the selected closely related sequence accessions using CLUSTAL W software. The recA gene was used for phylogenetic and PCR-RFLP studies. Results: From the phylogenetic tree, UPM P3 has more than 90% similarity with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: PAM7, PAO1, UCBPP-PA14 and PA7. UPM P3 was further digested with restriction enzymes; PvuII, BsrI, ZraI, FokI and SgrAI. RFLP results showed that strain UPM P3 has close similarity with strain PAO1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion: Strain PAO1 is commonly associated with strains of medical, human or plant pathogens and agricultural environment. Common habitats include soil, hosts, aquatic environment and wastewater and also a common contaminant of public places. Thus the use of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UPMP3 as a biological control candidate in agriculture has to be monitored.

  7. Role of energy metabolism in conversion of nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the mucoid phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, J M; Piña, S E; Mattingly, S J

    1992-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine, the major component of lung surfactant, when supplied as the sole source of phosphate for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, resulted in conversion of as much as 2% of the population to the mucoid phenotype under continuous culture conditions over a 24-day culture period. In addition, growth in phosphatidylcholine resulted in the highest yields of extracellular alginate compared with other environmental conditions. Iron limitation, another environmental condition relevant to th...

  8. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular secondary metabolite, Paerucumarin, chelates iron and is not localized to extracellular membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Uzma; Kruczek, Cassandra J; Azeem, Muhammed; Javaid, Nasir; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2016-08-01

    Proteins encoded by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pvcA-D operon synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin termed paerucumarin. The pvcA-D operon enhances the expression of the P. aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes and this effect is mediated through paerucumarin. Whether pvcA-D and/or paerucumarin affect the expression of other P. aeruginosa genes is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of a mutation in pvcA-D operon the global transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1-UW. The mutation reduced the expression of several ironcontrolled genes including pvdS, which is essential for the expression of the pyoverdine genes. Additional transcriptional studies showed that the pvcA-D operon is not regulated by iron. Exogenously added paerucumarin enhanced pyoverdine production and pvdS expression in PAO1-UW. Iron-chelation experiments revealed that purified paerucumarin chelates iron. However, exogenously added paerucumarin significantly reduced the growth of a P. aeruginosa mutant defective in pyoverdine and pyochelin production. In contrast to other secondary metabolite, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), paerucumarin is not localized to the P. aeruginosa membrane vesicles. These results suggest that paerucumarin enhances the expression of iron-controlled genes by chelating iron within the P. aeruginosa extracellular environment. Although paerucumarin chelates iron, it does not function as a siderophore. Unlike PQS, paerucumarin is not associated with the P. aeruginosa cell envelope. PMID:27480638

  9. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505.

    OpenAIRE

    Cervantes, C.; Ohtake, H; Chu, L.; Misra, T K; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    The chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 was cloned into broad-host-range vector pSUP104. The hybrid plasmid containing an 11.1-kilobase insert conferred chromate resistance and reduced uptake of chromate in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Resistance to chromate was not expressed in Escherichia coli. Contiguous 1.6- and 6.3-kilobase HindIII fragments from this plasmid hybridized to pUM505 but not to P. aeruginosa chromosomal DNA and only weakly to chromate resistance p...

  10. Effect of plant phenolic compounds on biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyuta, Vladimir; Zaitseva, Julia; Lobakova, Elena; Zagoskina, Natalia; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Khmel, Inessa

    2013-11-01

    In the natural environment, bacteria predominantly exist in matrix-enclosed multicellular communities associated with various surfaces, referred to as biofilms. Bacteria in biofilms are extremely resistant to antibacterial agents thus causing serious problems for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, we showed that different plant phenolic compounds, at concentrations that did not or weakly suppressed bacterial growth, increased the capacity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to form biofilms. Biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was enhanced 3- to 7-fold under the action of vanillin and epicatechin, and 2- to 2.5-fold in the presence of 4-hydroxybenzoic, gallic, cinnamic, sinapic, ferulic, and chlorogenic acids. At higher concentrations, these compounds displayed an inhibiting effect. Similar experiments carried out for comparison with Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 showed the same pattern. Vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzoic, and gallic acids at concentrations within the range of 40 to 400 μg/mL increased the production of N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone in P. aeruginosa PAO1 which suggests a possible relationship between stimulation of biofilm formation and Las Quorum Sensing system of this bacterium. Using biosensors to detect N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL), we demonstrated that the plant phenolics studied did not mimic AHLs. PMID:23594262

  11. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-02-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ∆sprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms. PMID:24376018

  12. Pattern differentiation in co-culture biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Markussen, Trine;

    2011-01-01

    -culture biofilms. By growing co-culture biofilms of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa mutants in a flow-chamber system and observing them using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 facilitates S. aureus microcolony formation. In contrast, P. aeruginosa mucA and rpoN mutants do...... not facilitate S. aureus microcolony formation and tend to outcompete S. aureus in co-culture biofilms. Further investigations reveal that extracellular DNA (eDNA) plays an important role in S. aureus microcolony formation and that P. aeruginosa type IV pili are required for this process, probably through...... their ability to bind to eDNA. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa is able to protect S. aureus against Dictyostelium discoideum phagocytosis in co-culture biofilms....

  13. Marine-Derived Quorum-Sensing Inhibitory Activities Enhance the Antibacterial Efficacy of Tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Busetti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial epiphytes isolated from marine eukaryotes were screened for the production of quorum sensing inhibitory compounds (QSIs. Marine isolate KS8, identified as a Pseudoalteromonas sp., was found to display strong quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI activity against acyl homoserine lactone (AHL-based reporter strains Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 and CV026. KS8 supernatant significantly reduced biofilm biomass during biofilm formation (−63% and in pre-established, mature P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms (−33%. KS8 supernatant also caused a 0.97-log reduction (−89% and a 2-log reduction (−99% in PAO1 biofilm viable counts in the biofilm formation assay and the biofilm eradication assay respectively. The crude organic extract of KS8 had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 2 mg/mL against PAO1 but no minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC was observed over the concentration range tested (MBC > 16 mg/mL. Sub-MIC concentrations (1 mg/mL of KS8 crude organic extract significantly reduced the quorum sensing (QS-dependent production of both pyoverdin and pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 without affecting growth. A combinatorial approach using tobramycin and the crude organic extract at 1 mg/mL against planktonic P. aeruginosa PAO1 was found to increase the efficacy of tobramycin ten-fold, decreasing the MIC from 0.75 to 0.075 µg/mL. These data support the validity of approaches combining conventional antibiotic therapy with non-antibiotic compounds to improve the efficacy of current treatments.

  14. Rhamnolipid but not motility is associated with the initiation of biofilm seeding dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA17

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jingjing Wang; Bing Yu; Deying Tian; Ming Ni

    2013-03-01

    Seeding dispersal is an active detachment exhibit in aging Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. Yet, effect factors of this process in the biofilm of clinical isolated mucoid P. aeruginosa strain remain to be better characterized. In our previous work, one mucoid P. earuginosa strain PA17 was isolated from a patient with recurrent pulmonary infection. In this study, confocal scanning laser microscope combined with LIVE/DEAD viability staining revealed that PA17 biofilm exhibited earlier seeding dispersal than non-mucoid PAO1. We further compared the motility and the expression of motility-associated gene during biofilm development between PA17 and PAO1. PA17 was found to be impaired in all three kinds of motility compared to PAO1. Moreover, we investigated the expression of rhamnolipid-associated genes in PA17 and PAO1 biofilm. The expression of these genes was in accordance with the process of seeding dispersal. Our results indicated that rhamnolipid but not motility is associated with the initiation of seeding dispersal of PA17 biofilm.

  15. Functional study of elafin cleaved by Pseudomonas aeruginosa metalloproteinases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guyot, Nicolas

    2010-06-01

    Elafin is a 6-kDa innate immune protein present at several epithelial surfaces including the pulmonary epithelium. It is a canonical protease inhibitor of two neutrophil serine proteases [neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3] with the capacity to covalently bind extracellular matrix proteins by transglutamination. In addition to these properties, elafin also possesses antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases on elafin function. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO1-conditioned medium and two purified Pseudomonas metalloproteases, pseudolysin (elastase) and aeruginolysin (alkaline protease), are able to cleave recombinant elafin. Pseudolysin was shown to inactivate the anti-NE activity of elafin by cleaving its protease-binding loop. Interestingly, antibacterial properties of elafin against PAO1 were found to be unaffected after pseudolysin treatment. In contrast to pseudolysin, aeruginolysin failed to inactivate the inhibitory properties of elafin against NE. Aeruginolysin cleaves elafin at the amino-terminal Lys6-Gly7 peptide bond, resulting in a decreased ability to covalently bind purified fibronectin following transglutaminase activity. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that elafin is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage at alternative sites by P. aeruginosa metalloproteinases, which can affect different biological functions of elafin.

  16. Chemotaxis and Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Scratch-Wounded Human Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schwarzer

    Full Text Available Confocal imaging was used to characterize interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA, expressing GFP or labeled with Syto 11 with CF airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o-, grown as confluent monolayers with unknown polarity on coverglasses in control conditions and following scratch wounding. Epithelia and PAO1-GFP or PAK-GFP (2 MOI were incubated with Ringer containing typical extracellular salts, pH and glucose and propidium iodide (PI, to identify dead cells. PAO1 and PAK swam randomly over and did not bind to nonwounded CFBE41o- cells. PA migrated rapidly (began within 20 sec, maximum by 5 mins and massively (10-80 fold increase, termed "swarming", but transiently (random swimming after 15 mins, to wounds, particularly near cells that took up PI. Some PA remained immobilized on cells near the wound. PA swam randomly over intact CFBE41o- monolayers and wounded monolayers that had been incubated with medium for 1 hr. Expression of CFTR and altered pH of the media did not affect PA interactions with CFBE41o- wounds. In contrast, PAO1 swarming and immobilization along wounds was abolished in PAO1 (PAO1ΔcheYZABW, no expression of chemotaxis regulatory components cheY, cheZ, cheA, cheB and cheW and greatly reduced in PAO1 that did not express amino acid receptors pctA, B and C (PAO1ΔpctABC and in PAO1 incubated in Ringer containing a high concentration of mixed amino acids. Non-piliated PAKΔpilA swarmed normally towards wounded areas but bound infrequently to CFBE41o- cells. In contrast, both swarming and binding of PA to CFBE41o- cells near wounds were prevented in non-flagellated PAKΔfliC. Data are consistent with the idea that (i PA use amino acid sensor-driven chemotaxis and flagella-driven swimming to swarm to CF airway epithelial cells near wounds and (ii PA use pili to bind to epithelial cells near wounds.

  17. Comparison of the transport and deposition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huixin; Zeng, Hongbo; Ulrich, Ania C.; Liu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory-scale columns were employed to study the effect of oxygen and ionic strength on the transport of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in porous media. In anaerobic experiments, cells were grown and transport experiments were conducted in a well-controlled anaerobic chamber. Cell surface electrokinetic potentials were measured and surface elemental composition was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Transport experimental results showed reduced travel distance of PAO1 with increased ionic strength under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, consistent with calculated Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The deposition rates of PAO1 were significantly higher in aerobic than in anaerobic condition at higher ionic strength (10 and 100 mM), although the electrokinetic potentials were similar throughout the tested ionic strength (1, 10, and 100 mM). No difference in PAO1 deposition rate was observed at 1 mM. XPS analysis showed that variation in cell surface composition due to different growth conditions played a primary role in determining the different deposition behaviors.

  18. High beta-Lactamase Levels Change the Pharmacodynamics of beta-Lactam Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hengzhuang; Ciofu, Oana; Yang, Liang;

    2013-01-01

    , microtiter plates, and on alginate beads were treated with different concentrations of ceftazidime and imipenem. The kinetics of antibiotics on the biofilms was investigated in vitro by time-kill methods. Time-dependent killing of ceftazidime was observed in PAO1 biofilms, but concentration-dependent killing......Resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics is a frequent problem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This resistance is mainly due to the hyperproduction of chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase and biofilm formation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the...... activity of ceftazidime was observed for beta-lactamase-overproducing biofilms of P. aeruginosa in all three models. Ceftazidime showed time-dependent killing on planktonic PAO1 and PA Delta DDh2Dh3. This difference is probably due to the special distribution and accumulation in the biofilm matrix of beta...

  19. Impact of Bolus Dosing versus Continuous Infusion of Piperacillin and Tazobactam on the Development of Antimicrobial Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Felton, T. W.; Goodwin, J.; O'Connor, L; Sharp, A.; Gregson, L.; Livermore, J.; Howard, S. J.; Neely, M. N.; Hope, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    Management of nosocomial pneumonia is frequently complicated by bacterial resistance. Extended infusions of beta-lactams are increasingly being used to improve clinical outcomes. However, the impact of this strategy on the emergence of antimicrobial resistance is not known. A hollow-fiber infection model with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) was used. Pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of piperacillin-tazobactam similar to those in humans were simulated over 5 days. Three dosages of piperacillin-tazo...

  20. The transcriptional regulator AlgR is essential for Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizewski, Stephen E; Lundberg, Derek S; Schurr, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. One P. aeruginosa virulence factor unique to CF isolates is overproduction of alginate, phenotypically termed mucoidy. Mucoidy is the result of increased transcription from the algD gene and is activated by the transcriptional regulator AlgR. Mutations in algR result in a nonmucoid phenotype and loss of twitching motility. Additionally, AlgR controls transcription of algC, encoding a dual-function enzyme necessary for both lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and alginate production. Therefore, to determine the effect of algR on P. aeruginosa virulence, an algR mutant was examined for sensitivity to reactive oxygen intermediates, killing by phagocytes, systemic virulence, and the ability to maintain a murine lung infection. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO700 (algR::Gm(r)) was less lethal than PAO1, as tested in an acute septicemia infection mouse model, and was cleared more efficiently in a mouse pneumonia model. Additionally, the algR mutant (PAO700) was more sensitive to hypochlorite. However, PAO700 was more resistant to hydrogen peroxide and killed less readily in an acellular myeloperoxidase assay than PAO1. There was little difference in killing between PAO1 and PAO700 with macrophage-like J774 cells and human polymorhonuclear leukocytes. Two-dimensional gel analysis of P. aeruginosa algR mutant and wild-type protein extracts revealed 47 differentially regulated proteins, suggesting that AlgR plays both a positive role and a negative role in gene expression. Together, these results imply that AlgR is necessary for virulence and regulates genes in addition to the genes associated with alginate and LPS production and pilus function. PMID:12379685

  1. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. PMID:20580207

  2. Influence of clove oil on certain quorum-sensing-regulated functions and biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fohad Mabood Husain; Iqbal Ahmad; Mohammad Asif; Qudsia Tahseen

    2013-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence, biofilm formation and survival of many pathogenic bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This signalling pathway is considered as novel and promising target for anti-infective agents. In the present investigation, effect of the Sub-MICs of clove oil on QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation was evaluated against P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF-38 strain. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of the clove oil demonstrated statistically significant reduction of las- and rhl-regulated virulence factors such as LasB, total protease, chitinase and pyocyanin production, swimming motility and exopolysaccharide production. The biofilm forming capability of PAO1 and A. hydrophila WAF-38 was also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner at all tested sub-MIC values. Further, the PAO1-preinfected Caenorhabditis elegans displayed an enhanced survival when treated with 1.6% v/v of clove oil. The above findings highlight the promising anti-QS-dependent therapeutic function of clove oil against P. aeruginosa.

  3. Multiple virulence factors regulated by quorum sensing may help in establishment and colonisation of urinary tract by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during experimental urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Damage caused by an organism during infection is attributed to production of virulence factors. Different virulence factors produced by the organism contribute to its pathogenicity, individually. During infectious conditions, role of virulence factors produced by the pathogen is different, depending upon the site of involvement. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen known to cause infections of the respiratory tract, burn wound, urinary tract and eye. Importance of virulence factors produced by P. Aeruginosa during infections such as keratitis, burn wound and respiratory tract is known. The present study was designed to understand the importance of different virulence factors of P. aeruginosa in urinary tract infection in vivo. Materials and methods: An ascending urinary tract infection model was established in mice using standard parent strain PAO1 and its isogenic mutant, JP2. Mice were sacrificed at different time intervals and renal tissue homogenates were used for estimation of renal bacterial load and virulence factors. Results: Both parent and mutant strains were able to reach the renal tissue. PAO 1 PAO1was isolated from renal tissue till day 5 post-infection. However, the mutant strain was unable to colonise the renal tissue. Failure of mutant strain to colonise was attributed to its inability to produce protease, elastase and rhamnolipid. Conclusion: This study suggests that protease, elastase and rhamnolipid contribute to pathogenesis and survival of P. aeruginosa during urinary tract infection.

  4. Effect of Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine with Antiquorum Sensing Activity on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Weihua Chu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese herbal medicines (TCHMs were tested for their ability of antiquorum sensing. Water extracts of Rhubarb, Fructus gardeniae, and Andrographis paniculata show antiquorumsensing activity when using Chromobacterium violaceum CV12472 as reporter; the sub-MIC concentrations of these TCHMs were tested against AHL-dependent phenotypic expressions of PAO1. Results showed significant reduction in pyocyanin pigment, protease, elastase production, and biofilm formation in PAO1 without inhibiting the bacterial growth, revealing that the QSI by the extracts is not related to static or killing effects on the bacteria. The results indicate a potential modulation of bacterial cell-cell communication, P. aeruginosa biofilm, and virulence factors by traditional Chinese herbal medicine. This study introduces not only a new mode of action for traditional Chinese herbal medicines, but also a potential new therapeutic direction for the treatment of bacterial infections, which have QSI activity and might be important in reducing virulence and pathogenicity of pathogenic bacteria.

  5. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, H.; Andersen, Jens Bo;

    2003-01-01

    afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate of...... systems and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune......Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has...

  6. The Psl economy in early P. aeruginosa biofilm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Tseng, Boo Shan; Jin, Fan; Gibiansky, Max; Harrison, Joe; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    Psl from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is a mannose- and galactose-rich exopolysaccharide (EPS). It has been shown that Psl plays an important role in bacterial surface adhesion. Here, we examine role of Psl in controlling motility and microcolony formation during early biofilm development, by translating video microscopy movies into searchable databases of bacterial trajectories. We use a massively-parallel cell tracking algorithm to extract the full motility history of every cell in a large community. We find that at early stages of growth, P. aeruginosa motility is guided by Psl and self-organize in a manner analogous to a capitalist economic system, resulting in a power law bacterial distribution where a small number of bacteria are extremely ``rich'' in communally produced Psl. By comparing overproducers and underproducers of Psl, we find that local Psl levels determine post-division cell fates: High local Psl levels drive the formation of sessile microcolonies that grow exponentially.

  7. Characterization of biofilm-like structures formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a synthetic mucus medium

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    Haley Cecily L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accumulation of thick stagnant mucus provides a suitable environment for the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus within the lung alveoli of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. These infections cause significant lung damage, leading to respiratory failure and death. In an artificial mucin containing medium ASM+, P. aeruginosa forms structures that resemble typical biofilms but are not attached to any surface. We refer to these structures as biofilm like structures (BLS. Using ASM+ in a static microtiter plate culture system, we examined the roles of mucin, extracellular DNA, environmental oxygen (EO2, and quorum sensing (QS in the development of biofilm-like structures (BLS by P. aeruginosa; and the effect of EO2 and P. aeruginosa on S. aureus BLS. Results Under 20% EO2, P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 produced BLS that resemble typical biofilms but are confined to the ASM+ and not attached to the surface. Levels of mucin and extracellular DNA within the ASM+ were optimized to produce robust well developed BLS. At 10% EO2, PAO1 produced thicker, more developed BLS, while under 0% EO2, BLS production was diminished. In contrast, the S. aureus strain AH133 produced well-developed BLS only under 20% EO2. In PAO1, loss of the QS system genes rhlI and rhlR affected the formation of BLS in ASM+ in terms of both structure and architecture. Whether co-inoculated into ASM+ with AH133, or added to established AH133 BLS, PAO1 eliminated AH133 within 48–56 h. Conclusions The thick, viscous ASM+, which contains mucin and extracellular DNA levels similar to those found in the CF lung, supports the formation of biofilm-like structures similar to the aggregates described within CF airways. Alterations in environmental conditions or in the QS genes of P. aeruginosa, as occurs naturally during the progression of CF lung infection, affect the architecture and quantitative structural features of these BLS. Thus, ASM+ provides an

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa vesicles associate with and are internalized by human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehn Meta J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogen associated with chronic and ultimately fatal lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. To investigate how P. aeruginosa-derived vesicles may contribute to lung disease, we explored their ability to associate with human lung cells. Results Purified vesicles associated with lung cells and were internalized in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Vesicles from a CF isolate exhibited a 3- to 4-fold greater association with lung cells than vesicles from the lab strain PAO1. Vesicle internalization was temperature-dependent and was inhibited by hypertonic sucrose and cyclodextrins. Surface-bound vesicles rarely colocalized with clathrin. Internalized vesicles colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER marker, TRAPα, as well as with ER-localized pools of cholera toxin and transferrin. CF isolates of P. aeruginosa abundantly secrete PaAP (PA2939, an aminopeptidase that associates with the surface of vesicles. Vesicles from a PaAP knockout strain exhibited a 40% decrease in cell association. Likewise, vesicles from PAO1 overexpressing PaAP displayed a significant increase in cell association. Conclusion These data reveal that PaAP promotes the association of vesicles with lung cells. Taken together, these results suggest that P. aeruginosa vesicles can interact with and be internalized by lung epithelial cells and contribute to the inflammatory response during infection.

  9. Utility of in vivo transcription profiling for identifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa genes needed for gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koh, Andrew Y; Mikkelsen, Per J; Smith, Roger S;

    2010-01-01

    mutants and WT P. aeruginosa PA14. To evaluate T3SS factors, we tested GI colonization and neutropenia-induced dissemination of both deletional (PAO1 and PAK) and insertional (PA14) mutants in four genes in the P. aeruginosa T3SS, exoS or exoU, exoT, and popB. There were no significant differences in GI......, increased transcription of genes during in vivo murine GI colonization is not predictive of an essential role for the gene product in either colonization or overall survival following induction of neutropenia....

  10. Differential infection properties of three inducible prophages from an epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    James Chloe E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common bacterial pathogen infecting the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The Liverpool Epidemic Strain (LES is transmissible, capable of superseding other P. aeruginosa populations and is associated with increased morbidity. Previously, multiple inducible prophages have been found to coexist in the LES chromosome and to constitute a major component of the accessory genome not found in other sequenced P. aerugionosa strains. LES phages confer a competitive advantage in a rat model of chronic lung infection and may, therefore underpin LES prevalence. Here the infective properties of three LES phages were characterised. Results This study focuses on three of the five active prophages (LESφ2, LESφ3 and LESφ4 that are members of the Siphoviridae. All were induced from LESB58 by norfloxacin. Lytic production of LESφ2 was considerably higher than that of LESφ3 and LESφ4. Each phage was capable of both lytic and lysogenic infection of the susceptible P. aeruginosa host, PAO1, producing phage-specific plaque morphologies. In the PAO1 host background, the LESφ2 prophage conferred immunity against LESφ3 infection and reduced susceptibility to LESφ4 infection. Each prophage was less stable in the PAO1 chromosome with substantially higher rates of spontaneous phage production than when residing in the native LESB58 host. We show that LES phages are capable of horizontal gene transfer by infecting P. aeruginosa strains from different sources and that type IV pili are required for infection by all three phages. Conclusions Multiple inducible prophages with diverse infection properties have been maintained in the LES genome. Our data suggest that LESφ2 is more sensitive to induction into the lytic cycle or has a more efficient replicative cycle than the other LES phages.

  11. Physiological levels of nitrate support anoxic growth by denitrification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at growth rates reported in cystic fibrosis lungs and sputum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitten, Laura Line; Alhede, Morten; Kolpen, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    reported that O2 is mainly consumed by the activated PMNs, while O2 consumption by aerobic respiration is diminutive and nitrous oxide (N2O) is produced in infected CF sputum. This suggests that the reported growth rates of P. aeruginosa in lungs and sputum may result from anaerobic respiration using...... denitrification. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa achieved by denitrification at physiological levels (~400 μM) of nitrate (NO(-) 3) is however, not known. Therefore, we have measured growth rates of anoxic cultures of PAO1 and clinical isolates (n = 12) in LB media supplemented with NO(-) 3 and found a...... significant increase of growth when supplementing PAO1 and clinical isolates with ≥150 μM NO(-) 3 and 100 μM NO(-) 3, respectively. An essential contribution to growth by denitrification was demonstrated by the inability to establish a significantly increased growth rate by a denitrification deficient Δnir...

  12. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  13. Evolution of metabolic divergence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term infection facilitates a proto-cooperative interspecies interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Hossein Khademi, Seyed Mohammad; Krogh Johansen, Helle; Ingmer, Hanne; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Jelsbak, Lars

    2016-06-01

    The effect of polymicrobial interactions on pathogen physiology and how it can act either to limit pathogen colonization or to potentiate pathogen expansion and virulence are not well understood. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are opportunistic pathogens commonly found together in polymicrobial human infections. However, we have previously shown that the interactions between these two bacterial species are strain dependent. Whereas P. aeruginosa PAO1, a commonly used laboratory strain, effectively suppressed S. aureus growth, we observed a commensal-like interaction between the human host-adapted strain, DK2-P2M24-2003, and S. aureus. In this study, characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectral (MS) molecular networking revealed a significant metabolic divergence between P. aeruginosa PAO1 and DK2-P2M24-2003, which comprised several virulence factors and signaling 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline (HAQ) molecules. Strikingly, a further modulation of the HAQ profile was observed in DK2-P2M24-2003 during interaction with S. aureus, resulting in an area with thickened colony morphology at the P. aeruginosa-S. aureus interface. In addition, we found an HAQ-mediated protection of S. aureus by DK2-P2M24-2003 from the killing effect of tobramycin. Our findings suggest a model where the metabolic divergence manifested in human host-adapted P. aeruginosa is further modulated during interaction with S. aureus and facilitate a proto-cooperative P. aeruginosa-S. aureus relationship. PMID:26684729

  14. Isolation of the Autoinducer-Quenching Strain that Inhibits LasR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Lixing Weng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS has been recognized as a general phenomenon in microorganisms and plays an important role in many pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we used the Agrobacterium tumefaciens biosensor strain NT1 to rapidly screen for autoinducer-quenching inhibitors from bacteria. After initial screening 5389 isolates obtained from land and beach soil, 53 putative positive strains were identified. A confirmatory bioassay was carried out after concentrating the putative positive culture supernatant, and 22 strains were confirmed to have anti-LasR activity. Finally, we determined the strain JM2, which could completely inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, belonged to the genus Pseudomonas by analysis of 16S rDNA. Partially purified inhibitor factor(s F5 derived from culture supernatants specifically inhibited LasR-controlled elastase and protease in wild type P. aeruginosa PAO1 by 68% and 73%, respectively, without significantly affecting growth; the rhl-controlled pyocyanin and rhamnolipids were inhibited by 54% and 52% in the presence of 100 µg/mL of F5. The swarming motility and biofilm of PAO1 were also inhibited by F5. Real time RT-PCR on samples from 100 µg/mL F5-treated P. aeruginosa showed downregulation of autoinducer synthase (LasRI and rhlI and cognate receptor (lasR and rhlR genes by 50%, 28%, 48%, and 29%, respectively. These results provide compelling evidence that the F5 inhibitor(s interferes with the las system and significantly inhibits biofilm formation.

  15. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

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    Kübra Çevik

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods:The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acidonbiofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa  PAK01,P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03 were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results:The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84% and kojic acid (68% presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation.

  16. Effects of Chlorine Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm and Analysis of Related Gene Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekeç, Özge; Gökalsın, Barış; Karaltı, İskender; Kayhan, Figen Esin; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine is deployed worldwide to clean waters and prevent water-originated illnesses. However, chlorine has a limited disinfection capacity against biofilms. Microorganisms form biofilms to protect themselves from biological threats such as disinfectant chemicals. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and its biofilm form attaches to surfaces, living buried into exopolysaccharides, can be present in all watery environments including tap water and drinking water. This research aimed to study the biofilm trigger mechanism of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, which is known to form biofilm in water supply systems and human body, under chlorine stress levels. In addition to biofilm staining, certain genes that are relevant to the stress condition were selected for gene expression analysis. The bacteria cultures were grown under chlorine stress with concentrations of 0.5, 0.7 and 1 mg/l. Six gene regions were determined related to biofilm and stress response: rpoS, bifA, migA, katB, soxR, and algC. Biofilm formation was analyzed by basic fuchsin staining, and gene expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. According to the results, highest biofilm production was observed in P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild strain under no stress conditions. Higher biofilm amounts were observed for bacteria under 0.5 and 0.7 mg/l chlorine stress compared to 1 mg/l chlorine stress. PMID:27146505

  17. Antibiofilm and anti-infection of a marine bacterial exopolysaccharide against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Shimei eWu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides shows that EPS273 primarily consists of glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. Further investigation demonstrates that EPS273 reduces the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, exoprotease and rhamnolipid, and the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to human lung cells A549 and zebrafish embryos is also obviously attenuated by EPS273. In addition, EPS273 also greatly reduces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and extracellular DNA (eDNA, which are important factors for biofilm formation. Furthermore, EPS273 exhibits strong antioxidant potential by quenching hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. Notably, the antibiofouling activity of EPS273 is observed in the marine environment up to two weeks according to the amounts of bacteria and diatoms in the glass slides submerged in the ocean. Taken together, the properties of EPS273 indicate that it has a promising prospect in combating bacterial biofilm-associated infection, food-processing contamination and marine biofouling.

  18. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (pproduction of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:25704369

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relA Contributes to Virulence in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, David L.; Lines, J. Louise; Pesci, Everett C.; Venturi, Vittorio; Storey, Douglas G.

    2004-01-01

    The stringent response is a mechanism by which bacteria adapt to nutritional deficiencies through the production of the guanine nucleotides ppGpp and pppGpp, produced by the RelA enzyme. We investigated the role of the relA gene in the ability of an extracellular pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to cause infection. Strains lacking the relA gene were created from the prototypical laboratory strain PAO1 as well as the mucoid cystic fibrosis isolate 6106, which lacks functional quorum-sensing s...

  20. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Found in the migA and wbpX Glycosyltransferase Genes Account for the Intrinsic Lipopolysaccharide Defects Exhibited by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Youai; Murphy, Kathleen; Lo, Reggie Y.; Khursigara, Cezar M.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 is widely used by researchers in many laboratories because of its enhanced virulence over strain PAO1 in a wide range of hosts. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important virulence factor of all P. aeruginosa strains, the LPS of PA14 has not been characterized fully. A recent study showed that the structure of its O-specific antigen (OSA) belongs to serotype O19. We found that the OSA gene cluster of PA14 shares ∼99% identity with those of the O10/O19 group....

  1. Dynamics of Mutator and Antibiotic-Resistant Populations in a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macià, María D.; Pérez, José L.; Molin, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm growth, antibiotic resistance, and mutator phenotypes are key components of chronic respiratory infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. We examined the dynamics of mutator and antibiotic-resistant populations in P. aeruginosa flow-cell biofilms, using fluorescently...... monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the numbers of viable cells and resistant mutants (4- and 16-fold MICs) were determined. Despite optimized pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters, CIP treatment did not suppress resistance development in P. aeruginosa biofilms. One.......01 proportion, took over the whole biofilm after only 2 days of CIP treatment outnumbering PAO1 by 3 log at t4. Our results show that mutational mechanisms play a major role in biofilm antibiotic resistance and that theoretically optimized PK/PD parameters fail to suppress resistance development, suggesting...

  2. Pseudolysogeny and sequential mutations build multiresistance to virulent bacteriophages in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latino, Libera; Midoux, Cédric; Hauck, Yolande; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Coevolution between bacteriophages (phages) and their prey is the result of mutualistic interactions. Here, we show that pseudolysogeny is a frequent outcome of infection by virulent phages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and that selection of resistant bacterial mutants is favoured by continuous production of phages. We investigated the frequency and characteristics of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 variants resisting infection by different combinations of virulent phages belonging to four genera. The frequency of resistant bacteria was 10- 5 for single phage infection and 10- 6 for infections with combinations of two or four phages. The genome of 27 variants was sequenced and the comparison with the genome of the parental PAO1 strain allowed the identification of point mutations or small indels. Four additional variants were characterized by a candidate gene approach. In total, 27 independent mutations were observed affecting 14 genes and a regulatory region. The mutations affected genes involved in biosynthesis of type IV pilus, alginate, LPS and O-antigen. Half of the variants possessed changes in homopolymer tracts responsible for frameshift mutations and these phase variation mutants were shown to be unstable. Eleven double mutants were detected. The presence of free phage DNA was observed in association with exclusion of superinfection in half of the variants and no chromosomal mutation could be found in three of them. Upon further growth of these pseudolysogens, some variants with new chromosomal mutations were recovered, presumably due to continuous evolutionary pressure. PMID:26921273

  3. Reinforcement of the bactericidal effect of ciprofloxacin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by hyperbaric oxygen treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Mousavi, Nabi; Sams, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    diffusive supply for aerobic respiration during ciprofloxacin treatment. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates that biofilm reoxygenation by HBOT can significantly enhance the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa. Combining ciprofloxacin treatment with HBOT thus clearly has potential...... mechanisms affecting antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms remain unclear, accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of several bactericidal antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin is enhanced by stimulation of the aerobic respiration of pathogens, and that lack of O2 increases their tolerance. Reoxygenation...... of O2-depleted biofilms may thus improve susceptibility to ciprofloxacin possibly by restoring aerobic respiration. We tested such a strategy using reoxygenation of O2-depleted P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 agarose-embedded biofilms by hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) (100% O2, 2.8bar), enhancing the...

  4. Increased bactericidal activity of colistin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mette, Kolpen; Appeldorff, Cecilie F; Brandt, Sarah;

    2016-01-01

    polymorphonuclear leukocytic activity. In contrast to the main types of bactericidal antibiotics, it has not been possible to establish an association between the bactericidal effects of colistin and the production of detectable levels of OH⋅ on several strains of planktonic P. aeruginosa. Therefore we propose that...... production of OH⋅ may not contribute significantly to the bactericidal activity of colistin on P. aeruginosa biofilm. Thus, we investigated the effect of colistin treatment on biofilm of wildtype PAO1, a catalase deficient mutant (ΔkatA) and a colistin resistant CF isolate cultured in microtiter plates in...... normoxic- or anoxic atmosphere with 1 mM nitrate. The killing of bacteria during colistin treatment was measured by CFU counts and the OH⋅ formation was measured by 3'-(p-hydroxylphenyl fluorescein) fluorescein (HPF) fluorescence. Validation of the assay was done by hydrogenperoxide treatment. OH...

  5. Degradation of Uniquely Glycosylated Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Tears From Patients With Pseudomonas aeruginosa Keratitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Jeanet Andersen; Kilian, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate the integrity of secretory IgA (S-IgA) in tear fluid during bacterial keratitis and to evaluate the significance of specific Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular proteases in the observed degradation of S-IgA. METHODS. The integrity of component chains of S-IgA in tear fluid...... strains and an extent closely correlated with their expression and activity of individual proteases. Experiments using isogenic mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 lacking either elastase or alkaline protease indicate that several proteases work in concert. CONCLUSIONS. Surprisingly, SC of tear S-IgA is more...... abundantly glycosylated than SC of S-IgA in other secretions, a difference of potentially great functional significance. Primarily SC and alpha-chains are partially degraded in vivo during pseudomonas keratitis by the concerted action of several proteases including elastase and alkaline protease....

  6. Cloning and characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa lasR gene, a transcriptional activator of elastase expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Gambello, M J; Iglewski, B H

    1991-01-01

    We report the discovery of the lasR gene, which positively regulates elastase expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The lasR gene was cloned by its ability to restore a positive elastase phenotype in strain PA103, a strain which possesses the elastase structural gene (lasB) but fails to synthesize the enzyme. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 716 nucleotides encoding a protein of approximately 27 kDa. A labeled LasR protein of 27 kDa was detected in Escherich...

  7. Constitutive high expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by a new insertion sequence (IS1669) located in ampD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N.; Ciofu, O.; Hentzer, Morten; Campbell, J.I.A.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Høiby, N.

    2002-01-01

    The expression of chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is negatively regulated by the activity of an amidase, AmpD. In the present study we examined resistant clinical P. aeruginosa strains and several resistant variants isolated from in vivo and in vitro biofilms for mutations...... in ampD to find evidence for the genetic changes leading to high-level expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase. A new insertion sequence, IS1669, was found located in the ampD genes of two clinical P. aeruginosa isolates and several biofilm-isolated variants. The presence of IS1669 in ampD resulted...... in the expression of high levels of AmpC beta-lactamase. Complementation of these isolates with ampD from the reference P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 caused a dramatic decrease in the expression of AmpC beta-lactamase and a parallel decrease of the MIC of ceftazidime to a level comparable to that of PAO1...

  8. Fitness of isogenic colony morphology variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in murine airway infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Rakhimova

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are associated with the diversification of the persisting clone into niche specialists and morphotypes, a phenomenon called 'dissociative behaviour'. To explore the potential of P. aeruginosa to change its morphotype by single step loss-of-function mutagenesis, a signature-tagged mini-Tn5 plasposon library of the cystic fibrosis airway isolate TBCF10839 was screened for colony morphology variants under nine different conditions in vitro. Transposon insertion into 1% of the genome changed colony morphology into eight discernable morphotypes. Half of the 55 targets encode features of primary or secondary metabolism whereby quinolone production was frequently affected. In the other half the transposon had inserted into genes of the functional categories transport, regulation or motility/chemotaxis. To mimic dissociative behaviour of isogenic strains in lungs, pools of 25 colony morphology variants were tested for competitive fitness in an acute murine airway infection model. Six of the 55 mutants either grew better or worse in vivo than in vitro, respectively. Metabolic proficiency of the colony morphology variant was a key determinant for survival in murine airways. The most common morphotype of self-destructive autolysis did unexpectedly not impair fitness. Transposon insertions into homologous genes of strain PAO1 did not reproduce the TBCF10839 mutant morphotypes for 16 of 19 examined loci pointing to an important role of the genetic background on colony morphology. Depending on the chosen P. aeruginosa strain, functional genome scans will explore other areas of the evolutionary landscape. Based on our discordant findings of mutant phenotypes in P. aeruginosa strains PAO1, PA14 and TBCF10839, we conclude that the current focus on few reference strains may miss modes of niche adaptation and dissociative behaviour that are relevant for the microevolution of complex traits in the wild.

  9. Development and evaluation of a new PCR assay for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa D genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lødeng, A G G; Ahlén, C; Lysvand, H; Mandal, L H; Iversen, O J

    2006-08-01

    This report describes a new PCR-based assay for the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotype D in occupational saturation diving systems in the North Sea. This genotype has persisted in these systems for 11 years (1993-2003) and represents 18% of isolates from infections analysed during this period. The new PCR assay was based on sequences obtained after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis of a group of isolates related to diving that had been identified previously by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The primer set for the D genotype targets a gene that codes for a hypothetical class 4 protein in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. A primer set able to detect P. aeruginosa at the species level was also designed, based on the 23S-5S rDNA spacer region. The two assays produced 382-bp and 192-bp amplicons, respectively. The PCR assay was evaluated by analysing 100 P. aeruginosa isolates related to diving, representing 28 PFGE genotypes, and 38 clinical and community P. aeruginosa isolates and strains from other species. The assay identified all of the genotype D isolates tested. Two additional diving-relevant genotypes (TP2 and TP27) were also identified, as well as three isolates of non-diving origin. It was concluded that the new PCR assay is a useful tool for early detection and prevention of infections with the D genotype. PMID:16842571

  10. Nitrite reductase is critical for Pseudomonas aeruginosa survival during co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus parasanguinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffield, Jessica A; Wu, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major aetiological agent of chronic pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, recent evidence suggests that the polymicrobial community of the CF lung may also harbour oral streptococci, and colonization by these micro-organisms may have a negative impact on P. aeruginosa within the CF lung. Our previous studies demonstrated that nitrite abundance plays an important role in P. aeruginosa survival during co-infection with oral streptococci. Nitrite reductase is a key enzyme involved in nitrite metabolism. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the role nitrite reductase (gene nirS) plays in P. aeruginosa survival during co-infection with an oral streptococcus, Streptococcus parasanguinis. Inactivation of nirS in both the chronic CF isolate FRD1 and acute wound isolate PAO1 reduced the survival rate of P. aeruginosa when co-cultured with S. parasanguinis. Growth of both mutants was restored when co-cultured with S. parasanguinis that was defective for H2O2 production. Furthermore, the nitrite reductase mutant was unable to kill Drosophila melanogaster during co-infection with S. parasanguinis. Taken together, these results suggest that nitrite reductase plays an important role for survival of P. aeruginosa during co-infection with S. parasanguinis. PMID:26673783

  11. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J Q; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D; Lewenza, Shawn; Dong, Tao G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg(2+) or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities. PMID:27271742

  12. What is preferential to preferential attachment?

    CERN Document Server

    Small, Michael; Stemler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Preferential attachment --- where new nodes are added and attached to existing nodes with probability proportional to the existing nodes' degree --- has become the standard growth model for scale-free networks, where the asymptotic probability of a node having degree $k$ is proportional to $k^{-\\gamma}$. However, the motivation for this model is entirely {\\em ad hoc}. We use exact likelihood arguments and show that the optimal way to build a scale-free network is to preferentially attach to low degree nodes. Asymptotically, the optimal strategy is to attach the new node to one of the nodes of degree $k$ (in a network with $N$ nodes) with probability proportional to $\\frac{1}{N+\\zeta(\\gamma)(k+1)^\\gamma}$. The algorithm we propose to do this can be employed to generate optimally scale-free networks (maximum likelihood realisations) as well as a random sampling of the space of all scale-free networks with a given degree exponent $\\gamma$. While we focus on scale free networks, these methods can be applied to a ...

  13. Proteomics of the oxidative stress response induced by hydrogen peroxide and paraquat reveals a novel AhpC-like protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Nathan J; Scott, Nichollas E; Shin, Eun Hye H;

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen most typically associated with wound infections, but also the main cause of mortality in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). The ability to adapt to oxidative stress associated with host immune defense may be one mechanism by which P....... aeruginosa establishes infection in the cystic fibrosis lung and eventually out-competes other pathogenic bacteria to persist into chronic infection. We utilized a proteomics approach to identify the proteins associated with the oxidative stress response of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to hydrogen peroxide...... by hypothetical protein PA3529 following treatment with 10 mM H(2) O(2) . AhpC belongs to the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family and is a redox enzyme responsible for removing peroxides in bacterial cells. MS analysis showed that PA3529 was altered by the formation of a dimer via a disulfide bond in a manner analogous...

  14. Mechanical Properties of Type IV Pili in P. Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shun; Touhami, Ahmed; Scheurwater, Edie; Harvey, Hanjeong; Burrows, Lori; Dutcher, John

    2009-03-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are thin flexible protein filaments that extend from the cell membrane of bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The mechanical properties of Tfp are of great importance since they allow bacteria to interact with and colonize various surfaces. In the present study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) for both imaging and pulling on Tfp from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) and from its PilA, PilT, and FliC mutants. A single pilus filament was mechanically stretched and the resulting force-extension profiles were fitted using the worm-like-chain (WLC) model. The statistical distributions obtained for contour length, persistence length, and number of pili per bacteria pole, were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of a single pilus and the biogenesis functions of different proteins (PilA, PilT) involved in its assembly and disassembly. Importantly, the persistence length value of ˜ 1 μm measured in the present study, which is consistent with the curvature of the pili observed in our AFM images, is significantly lower than the value of 5 μm reported earlier by Skerker et al. (1). Our results shed new light on the role of mechanical forces that mediate bacteria-surface interactions and biofilm formation. 1- J.M. Skerker and H.C. Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 98, 6901-6904 (2001).

  15. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy. PMID:26785289

  16. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further...... increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to...... TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth....

  17. Constitutive high expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by a new insertion sequence (IS1669) located in ampD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Hentzer, Morten; Campbell, Joan I A; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels

    2002-01-01

    The expression of chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is negatively regulated by the activity of an amidase, AmpD. In the present study we examined resistant clinical P. aeruginosa strains and several resistant variants isolated from in vivo and in vitro biofilms for mutations...... in the expression of high levels of AmpC beta-lactamase. Complementation of these isolates with ampD from the reference P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 caused a dramatic decrease in the expression of AmpC beta-lactamase and a parallel decrease of the MIC of ceftazidime to a level comparable to that of PAO1....... One highly resistant, constitutive beta-lactamase-producing variant contained no mutations in ampD, but a point mutation was observed in ampR, resulting in an Asp-135-->Asn change. An identical mutation of AmpR in Enterobacter cloacae has been reported to cause a 450-fold higher AmpC expression...

  18. Effect of Cinnamomum burmannii Nees ex Bl. and Massoia aromatica Becc. Essential Oils on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Utami Tunjung Pratiwi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that can be found in almost every habitat. They can be attached to a surface and protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules that substantially protect microorganisms from environmental effects. The aim of this research is to explore the potency of essential oils from Cinnamomum burmannii Nees ex Bl. and Massoia aromatica Becc. against planktonic growth and biofilm formation of, two opportunistic pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I. Essential oil from C. burmannii  and M. aromatica showed a 50% inhibition of  P. aeruginosa and S. aureus planktonic growth (PMIC50 at concentration of 0.12 % v/v. Essential oil from C. burmannii and M.  aromatica showed capability to inhibit 50% (MBIC50 of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus biofilm formation at concentration of 0.03 % v/v, whereas higher concentration (0.12 % v/v was needed by C. burmannii and M. aromatica oil to disrupt 50% of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus established biofilm. The analysis by GC-MS showed cinnamic aldehyde (92.02 % to be the major component of C. burmannii essential oil, whereas Massoialactone (92.05 % was the main constituent of M. aromatica essential oil. The results obtained in this study have made the oil of C. burmannii and M. aromatica oil as an interesting source for antibiofilm agents in the development of new strategies to treat infections caused by P. aeruginosa and  S. aureus biofilm.Industrial Relevance. Instead of freely swimming in solution (planktonic, in nature microbial tends to adhere to surfaces, and develop microbial biofilms. Microbial biofilms are exhibits resistance to both antimicrobial drugs and the host defence systems, which often results in persistent and difficult-to-treat infections. This makes the discovery of anti-infective agents which are active against planktonic and biofilm microbial represents an important goal. Plant is an interesting source for finding

  19. Photodynamic therapy for the eradication of biofilms formed by catheter associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Teresa Orlandi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as a major opportunistic pathogen causing catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs associated with high mortality and morbidity. In this study 18 P. aeruginosa isolates from urine of catheterized patients were evaluated for in vitro biofilm formation.All the tested strains showed the ability to form biofilm more thicker than those formed by a cohort of 29 blood culture strains belonging to the same species. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT is a novel antimicrobial treatment that exploits a photosensitizer (PS and visible light to induce lethal oxidative damages in bacterial cells and could be used as local antimicrobial approach in CA-UTIs. Here we tested the susceptibility of planktonic and sessile cultures of P. aeruginosa strains, the model strain PAO1 and CA-UTI isolates, to photodynamic inactivation with a di cationic porphyrinic photosensitizer, the 5, 15-di (N-benzyl-4-pyridynium-porphyrin di chloride.Although Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regarded as a difficult target for antimicrobial chemotherapy, satisfactory bactericidal activities on both planktonic and biofilm cultures were observed.

  20. Hydnophytum formicarum Jack ethanol extract modulates quorum sensing-controlled pathogenicity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertiani, Triana; Pratiwi, Sylvia Utami Tunjung

    2015-09-01

    The discovery of new mechanism to control microbial pathogenicity by quorum sensing modulation has generated the search for quorum sensing inhibitor from natural resources. The objective of this research was to evaluate the ability of Hydnophytum formicarum Jack (Rubiaceae) ethanol extract to antagonize cell-to cell communication. Pulverized H. formicarum tuber was macerated in ethyl alcohol 96% and evaporated to yield ethanol extract. A dillution technique using Luria-Bertani (LB) medium was used to observe the capability of the extract to reduce the violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum. Samples in two-fold dilution were prepared to obtain 2 - 0.0625 mg/mL concentration. The effects on swimming, swarming and twitching motility as well as the formation of biofilm towards Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 were recorded over control. All experiments were done in triplicate. The architecture of Ps. aeruginosa biofilm treated with samples was examined by CLSM (Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy) . Our results suggested that the ethanol extract of H. formicarum caused violacein production inhibition. Furthermore, inhibition of Ps. aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation were recorded to be significant over control in a concentration dependent manner. H. formicarum serves as a potential source for new QS-based antibacterial drugs towards Ps. aeruginosa. PMID:26408889

  1. Expression of Fap amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, and P. putida results in aggregation and increased biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten S.; Søndergaard, Mads T; Nilsson, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    The fap operon, encoding functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap), is present in most pseudomonads, but so far the expression and importance for biofilm formation has only been investigated for P. fluorescens strain UK4. In this study, we demonstrate the capacity of P. aeruginosa PAO1, P. fluorescens...... Pf-5, and P. putida F1 to express Fap fibrils, and investigated the effect of Fap expression on aggregation and biofilm formation. The fap operon in all three Pseudomonas species conferred the ability to express Fap fibrils as shown using a recombinant approach. This Fap overexpression consistently...

  2. Sublethal Ciprofloxacin Treatment Leads to Rapid Development of High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance during Long-Term Experimental Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Hengzuang, Wang; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of occurrence and the genetic basis of ciprofloxacin resistance were studied in a long-term evolution experiment (940 generations) in wild-type, reference strain (PAO1) and hypermutable (PAOΔmutS and PAOMY-Mgm) P. aeruginosa populations continuously exposed to sub-MICs (1/4) of ciprofloxacin. A rapid occurrence of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants (MIC of ≥12 μg/ml, representing 100 times the MIC of the original population) were observed in all ciprofloxacin-exposed lineages of PAO...

  3. Visualization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O antigens by using a protein A-dextran-colloidal gold conjugate with both immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, J S; Lam, M. Y.; MacDonald, L A; Hancock, R E

    1987-01-01

    Two lipopolysaccharide O-antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies, MA1-8 (an immunoglobulin G1 [IgG1]) and MF15-4 (an IgM), were used to localize the O antigen of the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. A protein A-dextran-gold conjugate with an average particle diameter of 12.5 nm was used to label bacterial cells treated with MA1-8, while a second antibody (goat anti-mouse IgM) was required before the same probe could interact with cells treated with the IgM antibody MF15-4. Bo...

  4. Herbs, Spices and Medicinal Plants Used In Hispanic Traditional Medicine Can Decrease Quorum Sensing Dependent Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Huerta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Inhibition of quorum sensing (QS, a cell density dependent regulation of bacterial virulent gene expression by autoinducers (AI is an attractive strategy for the discovery of novel antimicrobials and overcome antibiotic resistance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1, an opportunistic pathogen in immune compromised patients is under the regulation of the LasR-RhlR system for its QS mediated development of virulence. Natural products have recently become a promising source for deriving molecules that can potentially inhibit quorum sensing.  Herbs, Spices and Medicinal Plants (HSMP used in Hispanic cultures have been used for treating common ailments for many centuries. However, few studies have investigated its QS related antivirulent activities. Our objective was to determine the ability of 25 popular Hispanic HSMP on the expression of QS regulated virulence factors in PAO1. Effect of these extracts on QS mediated PAO1 virulent factors pyocyanin, elastase, and total proteolytic activity were quantified by standard protocols. Results indicated that several extracts reduced pyocyanin synthesis, with some extracts completely inhibiting its formation and secretion. The extracts that decreased the pyocyanin formation also decreased the expression and activity of elastase and other proteolytic enzymes important for the virulence. We observed that HSMP from Central/South American countries can inhibit QS dependent and independent virulent processes in PA-O1. Further research into the exact mechanism of action can lead to better understanding and discovery of new category of drugs and strategies for the management of PAO1 infections and antimicrobial resistance.   Industrial relevance: Quorum sensing is an important process involved in bacterial survival and infections, recent research has focused on the development of therapeutic agents which prevent or manage bacterial pathogenesis by inhibiting bacterial QS. Inhibition of quorum sensing offers an

  5. An investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth on novel nanocellulose fibre dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Lydia C; Khan, Saira; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Wright, Chris J; Hill, Katja E; Thomas, David W

    2016-02-10

    Nanocellulose from wood is a novel biomaterial, which is highly fibrillated at the nanoscale. This affords the material a number of advantages, including self-assembly, biodegradability and the ability to absorb and retain moisture, which highlights its potential usefulness in clinical wound-dressing applications. In these in vitro studies, the wound pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was used to assess the ability of two nanocellulose materials to impair bacterial growth (nanocelluloses had a relatively small fraction of residual fibres (nanocellulose films and increased cell death when compared to a commercial control wound dressing, Aquacel(®). Nanocellulose suspensions inhibited bacterial growth, whilst UV-vis spectrophotometry and laser profilometry also revealed the ability of nanocellulose to form smooth, translucent films. Atomic force microscopy studies of the surface properties of nanocellulose demonstrated that PAO1 exhibited markedly contrasting morphology when grown on the nanocellulose film surfaces compared to an Aquacel(®) control dressing (p<0.05). This study highlights the potential utility of these biodegradable materials, from a renewable source, for wound dressing applications in the prevention and treatment of biofilm development. PMID:26686120

  6. Agaricus Blazei Hot Water Extract Shows Anti Quorum Sensing Activity in the Nosocomial Human Pathogen Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Soković

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The edible mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill is known to induce protective immunomodulatory action against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study we report potential anti-quorum sensing properties of A. blazei hot water extract. Quorum sensing (QS plays an important role in virulence, biofilm formation and survival of many pathogenic bacteria, including the Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and is considered as a novel and promising target for anti-infectious agents. In this study, the effect of the sub-MICs of Agaricus blazei water extract on QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation was evaluated against P. aeruginosa PAO1. Sub-MIC concentrations of the extract which did not kill P. aeruginosa nor inhibited its growth, demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa, such as pyocyanin production, twitching and swimming motility. The biofilm forming capability of P. aeruginosa was also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner at sub-MIC values. Water extract of A. blazei is a promising source of antiquorum sensing and antibacterial compounds.

  7. Effects of quorum sensing system lasR/rhlR gene on the expression of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in tracheal intubation model rat with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-qing XIANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of lasR/rhlR gene on Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in rat tracheal intubation model with biofilm infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. aer wild strain (PAO1 and quorum sensing (QS deficient strain (ΔlasRΔrhlR. Methods  Twenty-one SD rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (7 each: ΔlasRΔrhlR-treated group, PAO1-treated group and sterile control group. Biofilms (BF were cultured in vitro, and the BF coated tube (infected respectively with Ps. aer PAO1 strain, ΔlasRΔrhlR strain, or with asepsis was inserted into the trachea to establish the rat model. The rats were sacrificed on the 7th day after intubation. Colony count of lung tissue homogenate (cfu and lung HE staining were performed, and IL-10 content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, TGF-β1 in lung tissue, and the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in lung cells were determined. Results  The bacterial counts were significantly higher in PAO1 and ΔlasRΔrhlR groups than that in sterile control group, and the counts were obviously higher in PAO1 group (10 400.00±6313.70/g lung tissue than that in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (975.00±559.97/g lung tissue, P<0.05. There was no significant pathological changes in lung tissue in sterile control group, while the bronchi and blood vessels in PAO1 group were infiltrated by a large number of inflammatory cells and complicated with alveolar septum thickening and local abscess and necrosis. The pathological changes were milder in ΔlasRΔrhlR group than in PAO1 group; the expression of Foxp3 mRNA was higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than that in sterile control group (0.65±0.32, and it was significantly higher in PAO1 group (4.62±1.07 than in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (2.15±1.43, P<0.05. The accumulated optical density value of TGF-β1 was significantly higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than in sterile control group (3721.66±1412.95, and significantly higher in PAO1 group (65 090.56±33

  8. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biomarkers in biological fluids using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yiping; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major infection not only in Cystic Fibrosis patients but also in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in critically ill patients in intensive care units. Successful antibiotic treatment of the infection relies on accurate and rapid identification of the infectious agents. Conventional microbiological detection methods usually take more than 3 days to obtain accurate results. We have developed a rapid diagnostic technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering to directly identify PA from biological fluids. P. aeruginosa strains, PAO1 and PA14, are cultured in lysogeny broth, and the SERS spectra of the broth show the signature Raman peaks from pyocyanin and pyoverdine, two major biomarkers that P. aeruginosa secretes during its growth, as well as lipopolysaccharides. This provides the evidence that the presence of these biomarkers can be used to indicate P. aeruginosa infection. A total of 22 clinical exhaled breath condensates (EBC) samples were obtained from subjects with CF disease and from non-CF healthy donors. SERS spectra of these EBC samples were obtained and further analyzed by both principle component analysis and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PLS-DA can discriminate the samples with P. aeruginosa infection and the ones without P. aeruginosa infection at 99.3% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity. In addition, this technique can also discriminate samples from subject with CF disease and healthy donor with 97.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results demonstrate the potential of using SERS of EBC samples as a rapid diagnostic tool to detect PA infection.

  9. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.;

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular polymers can facilitate the non-specific attachment of bacteria to surfaces and hold together developing biofilms. This study was undertaken to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the architecture of biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 and its alginate...... biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...... that the production of alginate is not critical for biofilm formation. Observation over a period of 5 days indicated a three-stage development pattern consisting of initiation, establishment and maturation. Furthermore, this study showed that phenotypically distinguishable biofilms can be...

  10. Chromate Efflux by Means of the ChrA Chromate Resistance Protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Angel H.; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Cervantes, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    Everted membrane vesicles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 harboring plasmid pCRO616, expressing the ChrA chromate resistance protein, accumulated four times more 51CrO42− than vesicles from plasmidless cells, indicating that a chromate efflux system functions in the resistant strain. Chromate uptake showed saturation kinetics with an apparent Km of 0.12 mM chromate and a Vmax of 0.5 nmol of chromate/min per mg of protein. Uptake of chromate by vesicles was dependent on NADH oxidation and was abolished by energy inhibitors and by the chromate analog sulfate. The mechanism of resistance to chromate determined by ChrA appears to be based on the active efflux of chromate driven by the membrane potential. PMID:10572148

  11. The effects of nickel(II) complexes with imidazole derivatives on pyocyanin and pyoverdine production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałczyńska, Katarzyna; Kurdziel, Krystyna; Adamus-Białek, Wioletta; Wąsik, Sławomir; Szary, Karol; Drabik, Marcin; Węgierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Lankoff, Anna; Arabski, Michał

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is problematic in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). P. aeruginosa secretes a diversity of pigments, such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of complexes of nickel(II) ([Ni(iaa)2(H2O)2]·H2O (iaa = imidazole-4-acetate anion), [Ni(1-allim)6](NO3)2 (1-allim = 1-allylimidazole) and NiCl2 on pyocyanin and pyoverdine production by 23 strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis under growth conditions specific for the CF respiratory system. The antibacterial effects and biophysical properties of the tested substances were measured by spectrofluorometric techniques, as well as by laser interferometry, confocal and atomic force microscopy. The cytotoxic properties of all compounds were measured by Annexin/IP assay against A549 cells. All tested compounds have no effect on pyocyanin production and decrease the pyoverdine secretion in about 40% of tested P. aeruginosa strains at non-cytotoxic range of concentrations. Imidazole-4-acetate anion and 1-allylimidazole have good diffusion properties in the mature P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm. In conclusion, the tested nickel(II) complexes do not have clinical implications in P. aeruginosa eradication in cystic fibrosis. The diffusion properties of 1-allylimidazole and imidazole-4-acetate and their lack of effect on A549 cells suggest that they might be considered for chemical synthesis with other transition metals. PMID:26645324

  12. Cloning and expression of the immunogenic moiety of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A

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    Sahar Nouri Gharajelar *

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as an opportunistic microorganism, is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Exotoxin A (ETA is an extracellular enzyme that is produced by most clinical strains of P. aeruginosa. Although the pathogenesis of the diseases due to Pseudomonas are complex, clinical and experimental data linking ETA with the morbid and lethal consequences of Pseudomonas infection are accumulating.Materials and methods: An immunogenic 490–bp DNA segment including translocation domain plus 1b domain of the ETA from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 were reproduced by PCR. The PCR product was cloned in E.coli DH5α and expressed in E.coli BL21 using recombinant pET28a vector. The cloned polypeptide was found to have an electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyle sulfate- polyacrylamide gels (SDS -PAGE of 18kDa.Results: PCR and colony PCR results approved the cloning of immunogenic moiety of exotoxin A. Analysis of the location of cloned polypeptide by SDS- PAGE electrophoresis revealed that it was exported by E.coli into the bacterial periplasmic space.Discussion and conclusion: Since the whole toxin is not necessary for enhancing the immune responses and this recombinant polypeptide has antigenic qualities, so it may serve as a useful vaccine to prevent Pseudomonas infections.

  13. Structure and fate of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa population originating from a combined sewer and colonizing a wastewater treatment lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavenir, Raphaël; Petit, Stéphanie M-C; Alliot, Nolwenn; Ribun, Sébastien; Loiseau, Laurence; Marjolet, Laurence; Briolay, Jérôme; Nazaret, Sylvie; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2014-04-01

    The efficacy of a wastewater treatment lagoon (WWTL) at preventing the spread of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into natural aquatic habitats was investigated. A WWTL and its connected combined sewer and brook were exhaustively sampled. Physico-chemical analyses showed a stratification of the first pond according to pH, temperature and oxygen content. The P. aeruginosa counts partially matched this stratification with higher values among the bottom anaerobic waters of the first half of this pond. Genotyping of 494 WWTL P. aeruginosa strains was performed and led to the definition of 85 lineages. Dominant lineages were observed, with some being found all over the WWTL including the connected brook. IS5 was used as an indicator of genomic changes, and 1 to 12 elements were detected among 16 % of the strains. IS-driven lasR (genetic regulator) disruptions were detected among nine strains that were not part of the dominant lineages. These insertional mutants did not show significant elastase activities but showed better growth than the PAO1 reference strain in WWTL waters. Differences in growth patterns were related to a better survival of these mutants at an alkaline pH and a better ability at using some C-sources such as alanine. The opportunistic colonization of a WWTL by P. aeruginosa can involve several metabolic strategies which appeared lineage specific. Some clones appeared more successful than others at disseminating from a combined sewer toward the overflow of a WWTL. PMID:24407782

  14. Effect of Shear Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Jozef; Monsieurs, Pieter; Yu, Sung-Huan; Crabbé, Aurélie; Förstner, Konrad U.; Malfroot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic colonization of the lungs by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To gain insights into the characteristic biofilm phenotype of P. aeruginosa in the CF lungs, mimicking the CF lung environment is critical. We previously showed that growth of the non-CF-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in a rotating wall vessel, a device that simulates the low fluid shear (LS) conditions present in the CF lung, leads to the formation of in-suspension, self-aggregating biofilms. In the present study, we determined the phenotypic and transcriptomic changes associated with the growth of a highly adapted, transmissible P. aeruginosa CF strain in artificial sputum medium under LS conditions. Robust self-aggregating biofilms were observed only under LS conditions. Growth under LS conditions resulted in the upregulation of genes involved in stress response, alginate biosynthesis, denitrification, glycine betaine biosynthesis, glycerol metabolism, and cell shape maintenance, while genes involved in phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion, and multidrug efflux were downregulated. In addition, a number of small RNAs appeared to be involved in the response to shear stress. Finally, quorum sensing was found to be slightly but significantly affected by shear stress, resulting in higher production of autoinducer molecules during growth under high fluid shear (HS) conditions. In summary, our study revealed a way to modulate the behavior of a highly adapted P. aeruginosa CF strain by means of introducing shear stress, driving it from a biofilm lifestyle to a more planktonic lifestyle. PMID:27486191

  15. The synergistic effect of visible light and gentamycin on Pseudomona aeruginosa microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznick, Yana; Banin, Ehud; Lipovsky, Anat; Lubart, Rachel; Polak, Pazit; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Recently there were several publications on the bactericidal effect of visible light, most of them claiming that blue part of the spectrum (400 nm-500 nm) is responsible for killing various pathogens(1-5). The phototoxic effect of blue light was suggested to be a result of light-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation by endogenous bacterial photosensitizers which mostly absorb light in the blue region(4,6,7). There are also reports of biocidal effect of red and near infra red(8) as well as green light(9). In the present study, we developed a method that allowed us to characterize the effect of high power green (wavelength of 532 nm) continuous (CW) and pulsed Q-switched (Q-S) light on Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Using this method we also studied the effect of green light combined with antibiotic treatment (gentamycin) on the bacteria viability. P. aeruginosa is a common noscomial opportunistic pathogen causing various diseases. The strain is fairly resistant to various antibiotics and contains many predicted AcrB/Mex-type RND multidrug efflux systems(10). The method utilized free-living stationary phase Gram-negative bacteria (P. aeruginosa strain PAO1), grown in Luria Broth (LB) medium exposed to Q-switched and/or CW lasers with and without the addition of the antibiotic gentamycin. Cell viability was determined at different time points. The obtained results showed that laser treatment alone did not reduce cell viability compared to untreated control and that gentamycin treatment alone only resulted in a 0.5 log reduction in the viable count for P. aeruginosa. The combined laser and gentamycin treatment, however, resulted in a synergistic effect and the viability of P. aeruginosa was reduced by 8 log's. The proposed method can further be implemented via the development of catheter like device capable of injecting an antibiotic solution into the infected organ while simultaneously illuminating the area with light. PMID:23852319

  16. The effects of D-Tyrosine combined with amikacin on the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Pengfei; Chen, Lihua; Liu, Hongbo; Zou, Yaru; Luo, Zhen; Koronfel, Asmaa; Wu, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The biofilm formation of microorganisms causes persistent tissue infections resistant to treatment with antimicrobial agents. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly isolated from the airways of patients with chronic fibrosis (CF) and often forms biofilms, which are extremely hard to eradicate and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Recent studies have shown that D-amino acids (D-AAs) inhibited and disrupted biofilm formation by causing the release of the protein component of the polymeric matrix. However, the effects of D-AAs combined with common antibiotics on biofilms have rarely been studied. The current study first determined whether D-AAs disrupted the biofilms of PAO1 and the clinical airway isolates of P. aeruginosa. It was then determined whether combinations of D-Tyr (the most effective one) and the antibiotic amikacin (AMK) enhanced the activity against these biofilms. The results of the current study showed that D-Tyr is the most effective among those that disassemble the D-amino acids (D-leucine, D-methionine, D-Tyrptophan, and D-tryptophan), and D-Tyr at concentrations higher than 5 mM significantly reduced the biofilm biomass of P. aeruginosa (p < 0.05) without influencing bacterial growth. It was also revealed that D-Tyr improved the efficacy of AMK to combat P. aeruginosa biofilms, as indicated by a reduction in the minimal biofilm-inhibiting concentration (MBIC50 and MBIC90) without a change in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of planktonic bacteria. Thus, the findings indicated that D-Tyr supplementation overcame the resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to AMK, which might be helpful for preventing AMK overuse when this specific D-Tyr is recommended for combatting these biofilms. Also, toxicity of the liver and kidney from AMK could be potentially mitigated by co-delivery with D-Tyr. PMID:26188263

  17. Tetrahydrodipicolinate N-succinyltransferase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: structure analysis and gene deletion.

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    Robert Schnell

    Full Text Available The diaminopimelic acid pathway of lysine biosynthesis has been suggested to provide attractive targets for the development of novel antibacterial drugs. Here we report the characterization of two enzymes from this pathway in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, utilizing structural biology, biochemistry and genetics. We show that tetrahydrodipicolinate N-succinyltransferase (DapD from P. aeruginosa is specific for the L-stereoisomer of the amino substrate L-2-aminopimelate, and its D-enantiomer acts as a weak inhibitor. The crystal structures of this enzyme with L-2-aminopimelate and D-2-aminopimelate, respectively, reveal that both compounds bind at the same site of the enzyme. Comparison of the binding interactions of these ligands in the enzyme active site suggests misalignment of the amino group of D-2-aminopimelate for nucleophilic attack on the succinate moiety of the co-substrate succinyl-CoA as the structural basis of specificity and inhibition. P. aeruginosa mutants where the dapA gene had been deleted were viable and able to grow in a mouse lung infection model, suggesting that DapA is not an optimal target for drug development against this organism. Structure-based sequence alignments, based on the DapA crystal structure determined to 1.6 Å resolution revealed the presence of two homologues, PA0223 and PA4188, in P. aeruginosa that could substitute for DapA in the P. aeruginosa PAO1ΔdapA mutant. In vitro experiments using recombinant PA0223 protein could however not detect any DapA activity.

  18. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pfpI gene plays an antimutator role and provides general stress protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2009-02-01

    Hypermutator Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, characterized by an increased spontaneous-mutation rate, are found at high frequencies in chronic lung infections. Hypermutability is associated with the loss of antimutator genes related to DNA repair or damage avoidance systems. Only a few antimutator genes have been described in P. aeruginosa, although there is some evidence that additional genes may be involved in naturally occurring hypermutability. In order to find new P. aeruginosa antimutator genes, we constructed and screened a library of random insertions in the PA14 strain. Some previously described P. aeruginosa and/or Escherichia coli antimutator genes, such as mutS, mutL, uvrD, mutT, ung, and mutY, were detected, indicating a good coverage of our insertional library. One additional mutant contained an insertion in the P. aeruginosa PA14-04650 (pfpI) gene, putatively encoding a member of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily, which includes chaperones, peptidases, and the Parkinson's disease protein DJ-1a. The pfpI-defective mutants in both PAO1 and PA14 showed higher spontaneous mutation rates than the wild-type strains, suggesting that PfpI plays a key role in DNA protection under nonstress conditions. Moreover, the inactivation of pfpI resulted in a dramatic increase in the H(2)O(2)-induced mutant frequency. Global transcription studies showed the induction of bacteriophage Pf1 genes and the repression of genes related to iron metabolism, suggesting that the increased spontaneous-mutant frequency may be due to reduced protection against the basal level of reactive oxygen species. Finally, pfpI mutants are more sensitive to different types of stress and are affected in biofilm formation. PMID:19028889

  19. Differential proteomic study about Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to Levofloxacin%铜绿假单胞菌对左氧氟沙星耐药相关差异蛋白质组学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡双启; 陈一强; 孔晋亮; 朱莲娜; 廖明; 陈海荣

    2015-01-01

    目的:筛选铜绿假单胞菌野生型菌株PAO1对左氧氟沙星耐药前后的差异蛋白质,探讨这些蛋白质与铜绿假单胞菌对左氧氟沙星耐药的关系。方法采用亚抑菌浓度梯度递增法体外诱导PAO1对左氧氟沙星耐药,并设置同步对照组,应用表面增强激光解析电离飞行时间质谱(SELDI)技术和CM10蛋白质芯片检测PAO1对左氧氟沙星耐药株和同步对照菌株的菌体蛋白,采用Biomarker Wizard软件进行分析。结果左氧氟沙星耐药株与同步对照菌株间有8个差异蛋白( P<0.05),5个差异蛋白高表达,分子量分别为1004、1007、1918、5175 Da和5454 Da;有3个蛋白质低表达,分子量分别为1012、1629、2004 Da。结论用蛋白质芯片和SELDI技术对PAO1的左氧氟沙星耐药菌株与同步对照菌株进行蛋白质组学研究,可以筛选出与PAO1对左氧氟沙星耐药可能相关的差异蛋白质。%OBJECTIVE To discover different proteins between wide‐type P .aeruginosa PAO1 and its levofloxacin resistant strains ,so as to investigate the relationship between these different proteins and the resistance of P . aeruginosa to levofloxacin .METHODS PAO1 was reduced to be resistant to levofloxacin by the method of increas‐ing sub‐inhibitory concentration (1/2 minimum inhibitory concentration) by degrees in vitro ,and a control‐group of in‐synchronism was set ,and the protein mass spectra of the levofloxacin resistant strains and control‐group strains were detected by CM10 protein chip on surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI) .T Biomarker Wizard software was explored for statistical analysis .RESULTS Eight differ‐ent proteins were found between levofloxacin resistant strains and control‐group strains(P<0 .05) .Five different proteins with molecular weight of 1 004 Da ,1 007 Da ,1 918 Da ,5 175 Da were up‐regulated while three different proteins with

  20. Early events of lethal action by tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immediate activities of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, tobramycin, were investigated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The influence of carbon growth substate and the antibiotic exposure environment in the magnitude of activity were examined. Lethality by 8 μg/ml tobramycin occurred rapidly (1 to 3 minutes). The release of specific cellular components into the supernatant was associated with lethality. This material was initially detected as an increase in UV-absorbance. Magnesium in the reaction mixture provided protection against lethality and leakage, but did not reverse lethal damage after a 3 minute tobramycin treatment. Also, uptake of 3H-tobramycin was reduced in the presence of magnesium. Cells grown with glucose as a carbon source were more susceptible than organic acid grown cells as was the rapidity and amount of cell damage. Analyses of the leakage material revealed a 2-fold increase of protein in the supernatant after a 1-3 minute treatment which paralleled lethality. A prominent 29 kDa protein was observed by SDS-PAGE in the released material, which has been identified as the periplasmic enzyme, β-lactamase. The immediate activities of tobramycin did not involve (i) release of overall cell protein, (ii) massive loss of total pool amino acids, (iii) cell lysis, (iv) inhibition of proline uptake, (v) release of lipopolysaccharide, or (vi) leakage of ATP. Electron microscopy showed no apparent damage after a 3 minute exposure. 40% inhibition of protein synthesis had occurred by 3 minutes of exposure, while release of UV-absorbing material and lethality were detectable after only 1 minute. Resistant cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa did not leak under the same experimental conditions, but one of two susceptible strains examined did show increased UV-absorbance following treatment

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reduces VX-809 Stimulated F508del-CFTR Chloride Secretion by Airway Epithelial Cells.

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    Bruce A Stanton

    Full Text Available P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the lungs of 85% of adult patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Previously, we demonstrated that P. aeruginosa reduced wt-CFTR Cl secretion by airway epithelial cells. Recently, a new investigational drug VX-809 has been shown to increase F508del-CFTR Cl secretion in human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells, and, in combination with VX-770, to increase FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second by an average of 3-5% in CF patients homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation. We propose that P. aeruginosa infection of CF lungs reduces VX-809 + VX-770- stimulated F508del-CFTR Cl secretion, and thereby reduces the clinical efficacy of VX-809 + VX-770.F508del-CFBE cells and primary cultures of CF-HBE cells (F508del/F508del were exposed to VX-809 alone or a combination of VX-809 + VX-770 for 48 hours and the effect of P. aeruginosa on F508del-CFTR Cl secretion was measured in Ussing chambers. The effect of VX-809 on F508del-CFTR abundance was measured by cell surface biotinylation and western blot analysis. PAO1, PA14, PAK and 6 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa (3 mucoid and 3 non-mucoid significantly reduced drug stimulated F508del-CFTR Cl secretion, and plasma membrane F508del-CFTR.The observation that P. aeruginosa reduces VX-809 and VX-809 + VX-770 stimulated F508del CFTR Cl secretion may explain, in part, why VX-809 + VX-770 has modest efficacy in clinical trials.

  2. Genomic rearrangements and functional diversification of lecA and lecB lectin-coding regions impacting the efficacy of glycomimetics directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Amine M Boukerb

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewisa rather than Lewisx. Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewisa showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands

  3. Genomic Rearrangements and Functional Diversification of lecA and lecB Lectin-Coding Regions Impacting the Efficacy of Glycomimetics Directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukerb, Amine M.; Decor, Aude; Ribun, Sébastien; Tabaroni, Rachel; Rousset, Audric; Commin, Loris; Buff, Samuel; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island) integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewisa rather than Lewisx. Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewisa showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands. Great variations

  4. Genomic Rearrangements and Functional Diversification of lecA and lecB Lectin-Coding Regions Impacting the Efficacy of Glycomimetics Directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukerb, Amine M; Decor, Aude; Ribun, Sébastien; Tabaroni, Rachel; Rousset, Audric; Commin, Loris; Buff, Samuel; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island) integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewis(a) rather than Lewis(x). Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewis(a) showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands. Great

  5. The galactophilic lectin, LecA, contributes to biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggle, Stephen P; Stacey, Rachael E; Dodd, Christine; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Winzer, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    LecA (PA-IL) is a cytotoxic lectin and adhesin produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa which binds hydrophobic galactosides with high specificity and affinity. By using a lecA-egfp translation fusion and immunoblot analysis of the biofilm extracellular matrix, we show that lecA is expressed in biofilm-grown cells. In static biofilm assays on both polystyrene and stainless steel, biofilm depth and surface coverage was reduced by mutation of lecA and enhanced in the LecA-overproducing strain PAO-P47. Biofilm surface coverage by the parent strain, PAO-P47 but not the lecA mutant on steel coupons was also inhibited by growth in the presence of either isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) or p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-galactoside (NPG). Furthermore, mature wild-type biofilms formed in the absence of these hydrophobic galactosides could be dispersed by the addition of IPTG. In contrast, addition of p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-fucose (NPF) which has a high affinity for the P. aeruginosa LecB (PA-IIL) lectin had no effect on biofilm formation or dispersal. Planktonic growth of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was unaffected by the presence of IPTG, NPG or NPF, nor was the strain able to utilize these sugars as carbon sources, suggesting that the observed effects on biofilm formation were due to the competitive inhibition of LecA-ligand binding. Similar results were also obtained for biofilms grown under dynamic flow conditions on steel coupons, suggesting that LecA contributes to P. aeruginosa biofilm architecture under different environmental conditions. PMID:16689730

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Genome Evolution in Patients and under the Hospital Environment

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    Céline Lucchetti-Miganeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative environmental species and an opportunistic microorganism, establishing itself in vulnerable patients, such as those with cystic fibrosis (CF or those hospitalized in intensive care units (ICU. It has become a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide and a serious threat to Public Health because of overuse and misuse of antibiotics that have selected highly resistant strains against which very few therapeutic options exist. Herein is illustrated the intraclonal evolution of the genome of sequential isolates collected in a single CF patient from the early phase of pulmonary colonization to the fatal outcome. We also examined at the whole genome scale a pair of genotypically-related strains made of a drug susceptible, environmental isolate recovered from an ICU sink and of its multidrug resistant counterpart found to infect an ICU patient. Multiple genetic changes accumulated in the CF isolates over the disease time course including SNPs, deletion events and reduction of whole genome size. The strain isolated from the ICU patient displayed an increase in the genome size of 4.8% with major genetic rearrangements as compared to the initial environmental strain. The annotated genomes are given in free access in an interactive web application WallGene  designed to facilitate large-scale comparative analysis and thus allowing investigators to explore homologies and syntenies between P. aeruginosa strains, here PAO1 and the five clinical strains described.

  7. Co-Cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Roseobacter denitrificans Reveal Shifts in Gene Expression Levels Compared to Solo Cultures

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    Crystal A. Conway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent biosynthesis of desired secondary metabolites (SMs from pure microbial cultures is often unreliable. In a proof-of-principle study to induce SM gene expression and production, we describe mixed “co-culturing” conditions and monitoring of messages via quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. Gene expression of model bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Roseobacter denitrificans Och114 was analyzed in pure solo and mixed cocultures to infer the effects of interspecies interactions on gene expression in vitro, Two P. aeruginosa genes (PhzH coding for portions of the phenazine antibiotic pathway leading to pyocyanin (PCN and the RhdA gene for thiosulfate: cyanide sulfurtransferase (Rhodanese and two R. denitrificans genes (BetaLact for metallo-beta-lactamase and the DMSP gene for dimethylpropiothetin dethiomethylase were assessed for differential expression. Results showed that R. denitrificans DMSP and BetaLact gene expression became elevated in a mixed culture. In contrast, P. aeruginosa co-cultures with R. denitrificans or a third species did not increase target gene expression above control levels. This paper provides insight for better control of target SM gene expression in vitro and bypass complex genetic engineering manipulations.

  8. Protective effect of DNA vaccine encoding pseudomonas exotoxin A and PcrV against acute pulmonary P. aeruginosa Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzi Jiang

    Full Text Available Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been a long-standing challenge for clinical therapy because of complex pathogenesis and resistance to antibiotics, thus attaching importance to explore effective vaccines for prevention and treatment. In the present study, we constructed a novel DNA vaccine by inserting mutated gene toxAm encoding Pseudomonas Exotoxin A and gene pcrV encoding tip protein of the type III secretion system into respective sites of a eukaryotic plasmid pIRES, named pIRES-toxAm-pcrV, and next evaluated the efficacy of the vaccine in murine acute Pseudomonas pneumonia models. Compared to DNA vaccines encoding single antigen, mice vaccinated with pIRES-toxAm-pcrV elicited higher levels of antigen-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG, enhanced splenic cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens, additionally PAO1 challenge in mice airway resulted in reduced bacteria burden and milder pathologic changes in lungs. Besides, it was observed that immunogenicity and protection could be promoted by the CpG ODN 1826 adjuvant. Taken together, it's revealed that recombinant DNA vaccine pIRES-toxAm-pcrV was a potential candidate for immunotherapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and the CpG ODN 1826 a potent stimulatory adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  9. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, C; Ohtake, H; Chu, L; Misra, T K; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    The chromate resistance determinant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 was cloned into broad-host-range vector pSUP104. The hybrid plasmid containing an 11.1-kilobase insert conferred chromate resistance and reduced uptake of chromate in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Resistance to chromate was not expressed in Escherichia coli. Contiguous 1.6- and 6.3-kilobase HindIII fragments from this plasmid hybridized to pUM505 but not to P. aeruginosa chromosomal DNA and only weakly to chromate resistance plasmids pLHB1 and pMG6. Further subcloning produced a plasmid with an insert of 2,145 base pairs, which was sequenced. Analysis of deletions revealed that a single open reading frame was sufficient to determine chromate resistance. This open reading frame encodes a highly hydrophobic polypeptide, ChrA, of 416 amino acid residues that appeared to be expressed in E. coli under control of the T7 promoter. No significant homology was found between ChrA and proteins in the amino acid sequence libraries, but 29% amino acid identity was found with the ChrA amino acid sequence for another chromate resistance determinant sequenced in this laboratory from an Alcaligenes eutrophus plasmid (A. Nies, D. Nies, and S. Silver, submitted for publication). Images FIG. 3 FIG. 5 PMID:2152903

  10. The Study of Synergistic Effects of n.butanolic Cyclamen coum Extract and Ciprofloxacin on inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ahya abdi ali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm are the major causes of death in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. Some studies revealed that biofilms are resistant to several antibiotics because of their impermeable structures. In order to re-sensitize bacteria to different antibiotics, biofilm formation should be inhibited. In this research, evaluation of antibiofilm activity of n-butanolic Cyclamen coum extract as a medici­nal plant from Myrsinaceae family, in combination with ciprofloxacin was carried out.   Materials and method s: The biofilm formation ability by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and one clinically isolated P. aeruginosa (PA214 was confirmed by microtiter plate method. Extraction of the tubers of Cyclamen coum was done by fractionation method . The antibiofilm and antibacterial properties of n-butanolic C. coum extract (which includes saponin compounds alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin by using microdilution and crystal violet methods were examined. The cytotoxicity effect of the n-butanolic extract on HT-29 cells was assayed by MTT (3- (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl -2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide test.   Results : The biofilm formation ability by P. aeruginosa strains was quantitatively confirmed. Saponin content of the n-butanolic C.coum extract was 156 µg/mL. The extract revealed antibacterial activity against the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa strains. The combination of n-butanolic C.coum extract and ciprofloxacin significantly inhibited P.aeruginosa biofilm formation (ΣFBIC = 0.5. The n-butanolic C.coum extract showed insignificant cytotoxic effect against HT-29 human cancer cell line after 48 hours and 72 hours incubation .   Discussion and conclusion : It can be concluded that n-butanolic C.coum extract in combination with ciprofloxacin significantly revealed antibiofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilm however, further clinical investigations are required.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles triggered by human mucosal fluid and lysozyme can prime host tissue surfaces for bacterial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Maria Emiliano Metruccio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to PBS controls (~100 fold. TEM and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (~4-fold, P < 0.01. Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections.

  12. Immunogenicity comparison of conjugate vaccines composed of alginate and lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bound to diphtheria toxoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Najafzadeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections is greatly hampered by innate and acquired antibiotic resistance. The goal of this study was to compure the immunogenicity of conjugates of P. aeruginosa depolymerized alginate-diphtheria toxoid (D-ALGDT and P. aeruginosa detoxified lipopolysaccharidediphtheria toxoid (D-LPSDT in mouse model.Alginate and LPS were purified from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The resulting depolymerized alginate (D-ALG and detoxified LPS (D-LPS were covalently coupled to diphtheria toxoid (DT as a carrier protein with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH as a spacer molecule and carbodiimide as a linker. Sterility, safety and pyrogenicity tests were performed. 30 mice in two groups were immunized intraperitoneally on days 0, 14 and 28 with 10 μg of D-ALGDT and D-LPSDT. Conjugates specific antibody levels were also determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.The conjugates were non-toxic and non-pyrogenic. Conjugates of D-ALGDT and D-LPSDT were shown to be safe and to elicit total IgG, IgM, IgA, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3 antibodies in mice. ELISA results indicated that antibodies titer of D-ALGDT was more than D-LPSDT.Immunization with D-ALGDT showed significant increase in all types of antibodies titers in versus D-LPSDT, suggesting D-ALGDT as a vaccine candidate against P. aeruginosa infections.

  13. Transcriptional Analysis of MexAB-OprM Efflux Pumps System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Role in Carbapenem Resistance in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in India.

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    Debarati Choudhury

    Full Text Available Carbapenem resistance presents severe threat to the treatment of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The study was undertaken to investigate the role of efflux pumps in conferring meropenem resistance and effect of single dose exposure of meropenem on transcription level of mexA gene in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of India. Further, in this investigation an effort was made to assess whether different components of MexAB-OprM operon expresses in the same manner and the extent of contributions of those components in meropenem resistance in its natural host (P. aeruginosa and in a heterologous host (E. coli. Out of 83 meropenem nonsusceptible isolates, 22 isolates were found to possess efflux pump activity phenotypically. Modified hodge test and multiplex PCR confirmed the absence of carbapenemase genes in those isolates. All of them were of multidrug resistant phenotype and were resistant to all the carbepenem drug tested. MexAB-OprM efflux pump was found to be overexpressed in all the study isolates. It could be observed that single dose exposure meropenem could give rise to trivial increase in transcription of mexA gene. Different constructs of MexAB-OprM (mexR-mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB could be expressed in both its natural (P. aeruginosa PAO1 and heterologous host (E. coli JM107 but transcription level of mexA gene varied in both the hosts before and after single dose exposure of meropenem. Different components of the operon failed to enhance meropenem resistance in E. coli JM107 and P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study could prove that MexAB-OprM efflux pump can significantly contribute to meropenem resistance in hospital isolates of P. aeruginosa where an acquired resistant mechanism is absent. Thus, equal importance should be given for diagnosis of intrinsic resistance mechanism so as to minimize treatment failure. As meropenem could not enhance mexA transcriptions

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  15. Sublethal Ciprofloxacin Treatment Leads to Rapid Development of High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance during Long-Term Experimental Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of occurrence and the genetic basis of ciprofloxacin resistance were studied in a long-term evolution experiment (940 generations) in wild-type, reference strain (PAO1) and hypermutable (PAOΔmutS and PAOMY-Mgm) P. aeruginosa populations continuously exposed to sub-MICs (1/4) of...... ciprofloxacin. A rapid occurrence of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants (MIC of ≥12 μg/ml, representing 100 times the MIC of the original population) were observed in all ciprofloxacin-exposed lineages of PAOΔmutS and PAOMY-Mgm populations after 100 and 170 generations, respectively, and in one of the PAO1...... lineages after 240 generations. The genetic basis of resistance was mutations in gyrA (C248T and G259T) and gyrB (C1397A). Cross-resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics was observed in the bacterial populations that evolved during exposure to sublethal concentrations of ciprofloxacin. Our study shows that...

  16. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Preferential Attachment

    CERN Document Server

    Zuev, Konstantin; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Prediction and control of network dynamics are grand-challenge problems in network science. The lack of understanding of fundamental laws driving the dynamics of networks is among the reasons why many practical problems of great significance remain unsolved for decades. Here we study the dynamics of networks evolving according to preferential attachment, known to approximate well the large-scale growth dynamics of a variety of real networks. We show that this dynamics is Hamiltonian, thus casting the study of complex networks dynamics to the powerful canonical formalism, in which the time evolution of a dynamical system is described by Hamilton's equations. We derive the explicit form of the Hamiltonian that governs network growth in preferential attachment. This Hamiltonian turns out to be nearly identical to graph energy in the configuration model, which shows that the ensemble of random graphs generated by preferential attachment is nearly identical to the ensemble of random graphs with scale-free degree d...

  17. Synergistic effect of membrane-active peptides polymyxin B and gramicidin S on multidrug-resistant strains and biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berditsch, Marina; Jäger, Thomas; Strempel, Nikola; Schwartz, Thomas; Overhage, Jörg; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of severe hospital-acquired infections. Currently, polymyxin B (PMB) is a last-resort antibiotic for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, despite its undesirable side effects. The delivery of drug combinations has been shown to reduce the required therapeutic doses of antibacterial agents and thereby their toxicity if a synergistic effect is present. In this study, we investigated the synergy between two cyclic antimicrobial peptides, PMB and gramicidin S (GS), against different P. aeruginosa isolates, using a quantitative checkerboard assay with resazurin as a growth indicator. Among the 28 strains that we studied, 20 strains showed a distinct synergistic effect, represented by a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of ≤0.5. Remarkably, several clinical P. aeruginosa isolates that grew as small-colony variants revealed a nonsynergistic effect, as indicated by FICIs between >0.5 and ≤0.70. In addition to inhibiting the growth of planktonic bacteria, the peptide combinations significantly decreased static biofilm growth compared with treatment with the individual peptides. There was also a faster and more prolonged effect when the combination of PMB and GS was used compared with single-peptide treatments on the metabolic activity of pregrown biofilms. The results of the present study define a synergistic interaction between two cyclic membrane-active peptides toward 17 multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa and biofilms of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. Thus, the application of PMB and GS in combination is a promising option for a topical medication and in the prevention of acute and chronic infections caused by multidrug-resistant or biofilm-forming P. aeruginosa. PMID:26077259

  18. Diameters in preferential attachment models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommers, S.; Van der Hofstad, R.; Hooghiemstra, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the diameter in preferential attachment (PA-) models, thus quantifying the statement that these models are small worlds. The models studied here are such that edges are attached to older vertices proportional to the degree plus a constant, i.e., we consider affine PA-mo

  19. Transition probability and preferential gauge

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C.Y.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is concerned with whether or not the preferential gauge can ensure the uniqueness and correctness of results obtained from the standard time-dependent perturbation theory, in which the transition probability is formulated in terms of matrix elements of Hamiltonian.

  20. From the environment to the host: re-wiring of the transcriptome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 22°C to 37°C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette Barbier

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly versatile opportunistic pathogen capable of colonizing multiple ecological niches. This bacterium is responsible for a wide range of both acute and chronic infections in a variety of hosts. The success of this microorganism relies on its ability to adapt to environmental changes and re-program its regulatory and metabolic networks. The study of P. aeruginosa adaptation to temperature is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis upon infection of its mammalian host. We examined the effects of growth temperature on the transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analysis of PAO1 grown in Lysogeny broth at mid-exponential phase at 22°C and 37°C revealed that temperature changes are responsible for the differential transcriptional regulation of 6.4% of the genome. Major alterations were observed in bacterial metabolism, replication, and nutrient acquisition. Quorum-sensing and exoproteins secreted by type I, II, and III secretion systems, involved in the adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the mammalian host during infection, were up-regulated at 37°C compared to 22°C. Genes encoding arginine degradation enzymes were highly up-regulated at 22°C, together with the genes involved in the synthesis of pyoverdine. However, genes involved in pyochelin biosynthesis were up-regulated at 37°C. We observed that the changes in expression of P. aeruginosa siderophores correlated to an overall increase in Fe²⁺ extracellular concentration at 37°C and a peak in Fe³⁺ extracellular concentration at 22°C. This suggests a distinct change in iron acquisition strategies when the bacterium switches from the external environment to the host. Our work identifies global changes in bacterial metabolism and nutrient acquisition induced by growth at different temperatures. Overall, this study identifies factors that are regulated in genome-wide adaptation processes and discusses how this life-threatening pathogen responds to

  1. 铜绿假单胞菌pfm基因对三型分泌系统效应蛋白的影响%Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene pfm affects the expression levels of type Ⅲ secretion system effectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟锐; 杜星; 王雪涵; 徐海津; 张秀明; 白艳玲; 乔明强

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] Detect the effect of gene pfn on type Ⅲ secretion system effectors.[Methods] Complementary strain pfmC was constructed.Total RNA was extracted from the wild type strain PAO1,mutant strain Δpfm and complementary strain pfmC respectively and real-time PCR was performed to detect the transcription levels of exoS,exoT and exoY.Further more,both total intracellular proteins and secreted proteins of strains PAO1,Δpfm and pfmC were collected,and detected against the representative effector ExoS by western blot.[Results] The results showed that transcription levels of exoS,exoT and exoY were significantly decreased in Δpfm compared to PAO1,and recovered in pfmC.Western blot showed that both total intracellular and secreted ExoS of Δpfm were significantly lower than that of PAO1 and recovered in pfmC.[Conclusion] In conclusion,gene pfm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa can af fect type Ⅲ secretion system effectors.%[目的]检测铜绿假单胞菌基因pfm对三型分泌系统效应蛋白的影响.[方法]构建pfm基因互补菌株pfmC.提取野生株PAO1、敲除株Δpfm和互补株pfmC的RNA,利用Real-time PCR从转录水平检测效应蛋白ExoS、ExoT和ExoY转录水平的变化.以ExoS为代表,检测细胞内和分泌到细胞外效应蛋白的含量.收集铜绿假单胞菌PAO1、Δpfm和pfmC菌体内和分泌到细胞外的总蛋白,利用ExoS多克隆抗体进行Western杂交,特异检测ExoS的蛋白水平.[结果]与野生型相比,Δpfm中exoS、exoT和exoY转录水平明显降低,而pfmC中这3个蛋白的转录水平得到回补.Δpfm菌体内和分泌到细胞外的ExoS量均明显低于野生株PAO1,pfmC细胞内和细胞外分泌的ExoS蛋白量均得到恢复.[结论]铜绿假单胞菌基因pfm会影响三型分泌系统效应蛋白的水平.

  2. Prevention of catheter-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by levofloxacin-impregnated catheters in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ping; Liu Wei; Kong Jinliang; Wu Hong; Chen Yiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Implanted medical catheter-related infections are increasing,hence a need for developing catheter polymers bonded to antimicrobials.We evaluated preventive effects of levofloxacin-impregnated catheters in catheterrelated Psuedomonas aeruginosa (strain PAO1) infection.Methods Drug release from levofloxacin-impregnated catheters was measured in vitro.Levofloxacin-impregnated catheters and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) catheters were immersed in 5 ml 50% Luria Bertani medium containing 108 CFU/ml Pseudomonas aeruginosa then incubated for 6,12,24 or 48 hours at 37℃ when bacteria adhering to the catheters and bacteria in the growth culture medium were determined.Impregnated and PVC catheters were singly implanted subcutaneously in mice,50 μl (107CFU) of PAO1 was injected into catheters.After the first and fifth days challenge,bacterial counts on implanted catheters and in surrounding tissues were determined microbiologically.Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on implanted catheters were assessed by scanning electron microscopy.Results Drug release from levofloxacin-impregnated catheters was rapid.Levofloxacin-impregnated catheters had significantly fewer bacteria compared to PVC in vitro.After first and fifth day of challenge,no or significantly fewer bacteria adhered to impregnated catheters or in surrounding tissues compared to PVC.Scanning electron microscopical images after first day displayed from none to significantly fewer bacteria adhering to impregnated implanted catheters,compared to bacteria and microcolonies adhering to PVC catheters.After the fifth day,no bacteria were found on impregnated catheters,compared to clusters surrounding mucus-like substance and coral-shaped biofilms with polymorphonuclear leukocyte on PVC catheters.After the first day of challenge,secretion occurred in all implanted catheters with surrounding tissues mildly hyperaemic and swollen.After the fifth day,minute secretions inside impregnated catheters and no

  3. Comparison of Antiseptics’ Efficacy on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, StaphylococcusEpidermidis and Enterobacter Aeruginosa in Hospital of Imam Khomeini (Urmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahim Amini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Background and Objectives: Nosocomial infection is the cause of deaths, morbidity, higher costs and increased length of stay in hospitals. Correct and appropriate use of antiseptic and disinfectants play an important role in reducing infections. In this study the efficacy of antiseptics on bacteria causing hospital infections has been studied.Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in the laboratory of Imam Khomeini Hospital of Uremia. In this study the Antimicrobial activity of Descocid, Korsolex basic, Mikrobac forte and persidin 1% was studied against bacteria causing hospital infections such as Enterobacter aeruginosa 1221 (NCTC 10006, Staphylococcus epidermidis (PTCC: 1435 (Cip81.55 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PAO1. Sensitivities of bacteria were determined by Minimum inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum bactericidal Concentration (MBC antiseptics. In the second stage, the concentration of antiseptics was prepared according to the manufacturer's suggested protocol and the effect of antimicrobial agents were studied at the certain concentration and contact time.Result: All disinfectants (Descocid, Korsolex basic, Mikrobac forte concentration and contact time, Accordance with the manufacturer's brochure, had inhibitory effect on all bacteria. That this is consistent with the manufacturer's brochure. Persidin one percent in concentration of from 2 and 4 V/V % and exposure time 5 minutes could not inhibit the growth of bacterial. But at concentrations of 10 and 20% respectively 15 and 30 minutes exposure time, all three types of bacteria can be inhibited, which is consistent with the manufacturer's claims.Conclusion: In this study, the efficacy of antiseptics was determined with the Micro-dilution method recommended by the NCCLS. Korsolex basic, weakest antiseptics (the highest MIC for the inhibition of three bacteria was determined

  4. Diameters in preferential attachment models

    OpenAIRE

    Dommers, S.; van der Hofstad, R.; Hooghiemstra, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the diameter in preferential attachment (PA-) models, thus quantifying the statement that these models are small worlds. The models studied here are such that edges are attached to older vertices proportional to the degree plus a constant, i.e., we consider affine PA-models. There is a substantial amount of literature proving that, quite generally, PA-graphs possess power-law degree sequences with a power-law exponent \\tau>2. We prove that the diameter of the PA-...

  5. Bifunctional silica nanoparticles for the exploration of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauline, L; Gressier, M; Roques, C; Hammer, P; Ribeiro, S J L; Caiut, J M A; Menu, M-J

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent silica nanoparticles are frequently employed for biotechnology applications mainly because of their easy functionalization, photo-stability, and biocompatibility. Bifunctional silica nanoparticles (BSNPs) are described here as new efficient tools for investigating complex biological systems such as biofilms. Photoluminescence is brought about by the incorporation of a silylated ruthenium(II) complex. The surface properties of the silica particles were designed by reaction with amino-organosilanes, quaternary ammonium-organosilanes, carboxylate-organosilanes and hexamethyldisilazane. BSNPs were characterized extensively by DRIFT, (13)C and (29)Si solid state NMR, XPS, and photoluminescence. Zeta potential and contact angle measurements exhibited various surface properties (hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance and electric charge) according to the functional groups. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) measurements showed that the spatial distribution of these nanoparticles inside a biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 depends more on their hydrophilic/hydrophobic characteristics than on their size. CLSM observations using two nanosized particles (25 and 68 nm) suggest that narrow diffusion paths exist through the extracellular polymeric substances matrix. PMID:23805884

  6. Genome analysis of environmental and clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from sequence type-1146.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sánchez

    Full Text Available The genomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates of the new sequence type ST-1146, three environmental (P37, P47 and P49 and one clinical (SD9 isolates, with differences in their antibiotic susceptibility profiles have been sequenced and analysed. The genomes were mapped against P. aeruginosa PAO1-UW and UCBPP-PA14. The allelic profiles showed that the highest number of differences were in "Related to phage, transposon or plasmid" and "Secreted factors" categories. The clinical isolate showed a number of exclusive alleles greater than that for the environmental isolates. The phage Pf1 region in isolate SD9 accumulated the highest number of nucleotide substitutions. The ORF analysis of the four genomes assembled de novo indicated that the number of isolate-specific genes was higher in isolate SD9 (132 genes than in isolates P37 (24 genes, P47 (16 genes and P49 (21 genes. CRISPR elements were found in all isolates and SD9 showed differences in the spacer region. Genes related to bacteriophages F116 and H66 were found only in isolate SD9. Genome comparisons indicated that the isolates of ST-1146 are close related, and most genes implicated in pathogenicity are highly conserved, suggesting a genetic potential for infectivity in the environmental isolates similar to the clinical one. Phage-related genes are responsible of the main differences among the genomes of ST-1146 isolates. The role of bacteriophages has to be considered in the adaptation processes of isolates to the host and in microevolution studies.

  7. Activation of human pro-urokinase by unrelated proteases secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort, Nathalie; Seweryn, Paulina; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Tang, Aihua; Kellermann, Josef; Grebenchtchikov, Nicolai; Schmitt, Manfred; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Pidard, Dominique; Magdolen, Viktor

    2010-06-15

    Pathogenic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, interact with and engage the host plasminogen (Plg) activation system, which encompasses the urokinase (uPA)-type Plg activator, and is involved in extracellular proteolysis, including matrilysis and fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that secreted bacterial proteases might contribute to the activation of this major extracellular proteolytic system, thereby participating in bacterial dissemination. We report that LasB, a thermolysin-like metalloprotease secreted by Ps. aeruginosa, converts the human uPA zymogen into its active form (kcat=4.9 s-1, Km=8.9 microM). Accordingly, whereas the extracellular secretome from the LasB-expressing pseudomonal strain PAO1 efficiently activates pro-uPA, the secretome from the isogenic LasB-deficient strain PDO240 is markedly less potent in pro-uPA activation. Still, both secretomes induce some metalloprotease-independent activation of the human zymogen. The latter involves a serine protease, which we identified via both recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli and purification from pseudomonal cultures as protease IV (PIV; kcat=0.73 s-1, Km=6.2 microM). In contrast, neither secretomes nor the pure proteases activate Plg. Along with this, LasB converts Plg into mini-Plg and angiostatin, whereas, as reported previously, it processes the uPA receptor, inactivates the plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, and activates pro-matrix metalloproteinase 2. PIV does not target these factors at all. To conclude, LasB and PIV, although belonging to different protease families and displaying quite different substrate specificities, both activate the urokinase-type precursor of the Plg activation cascade. Direct pro-uPA activation, as also reported for other bacterial proteases, might be a frequent phenomenon that contributes to bacterial virulence. PMID:20337595

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display a...... remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because the...... use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) Share Compartir Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings On this Page What ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  10. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily F A van 't Wout

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA. Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded protein response" (UPR. Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host.

  11. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Wout, Emily F A; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Boxtel, Ria; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Tommassen, Jan; Marciniak, Stefan J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2015-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded protein response" (UPR). Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR) which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host. PMID:26083346

  12. Antimicrobial targets localize to the extracellular vesicle-associated proteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in a biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CezarMKhursigara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are particularly resistant to antimicrobial therapies. These surface-attached communities are protected against host defenses’ and pharmacotherapy by a self-produced matrix that surrounds and fortifies them. Recent proteomic evidence also suggests that some bacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, undergo modifications within a biofilm that make them uniquely resistant compared to their planktonic (free-living counterparts. This study examines 50 proteins in the resistance subproteome of both surface-associated and free-living P. aeruginosa PAO1 over three time points. Proteins were grouped into categories based on their roles in antimicrobial: i binding, ii efflux, iii resistance, and iv susceptibility. In addition, the extracellular outer membrane vesicle-associated proteome is examined and compared between the two growth modes. We show that in whole cells between 12-24% of the proteins are present at significantly different abundance levels over time, with some proteins being unique to a specific growth mode; however, the total abundance levels in the four categories remain consistent. In contrast, marked differences are seen in the protein content of the outer membrane vesicles, which contain a greater number of drug-binding proteins in vesicles purified from late-stage biofilms. These results show how the method of analysis can impact the interpretation of proteomic data (i.e. individual proteins vs. systems, and highlight the advantage of using protein-based methods to identify potential antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in extracellular sample components. Furthermore, this information has the potential to inform the development of specific antipseudomonal therapies that quench possible drug-sequestering vesicle proteins. This strategy could serve as a novel approach for combating the high-level of antimicrobial resistance in P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  13. Emergence of tempered preferential attachment from optimization

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, Raissa M.; Borgs, Christian; Chayes, Jennifer T.; Berger, Noam; Kleinberg, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    We show how preferential attachment can emerge in an optimization framework, resolving a long-standing theoretical controversy. We also show that the preferential attachment model so obtained has two novel features, saturation and viability, which have natural interpretations in the underlying network and lead to a power-law degree distribution with exponential cutoff. Moreover, we consider a generalized version of this preferential attachment model with independent saturation and viability, ...

  14. Hamiltonian dynamics of preferential attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Konstantin; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2016-03-01

    Prediction and control of network dynamics are grand-challenge problems in network science. The lack of understanding of fundamental laws driving the dynamics of networks is among the reasons why many practical problems of great significance remain unsolved for decades. Here we study the dynamics of networks evolving according to preferential attachment (PA), known to approximate well the large-scale growth dynamics of a variety of real networks. We show that this dynamics is Hamiltonian, thus casting the study of complex networks dynamics to the powerful canonical formalism, in which the time evolution of a dynamical system is described by Hamilton’s equations. We derive the explicit form of the Hamiltonian that governs network growth in PA. This Hamiltonian turns out to be nearly identical to graph energy in the configuration model, which shows that the ensemble of random graphs generated by PA is nearly identical to the ensemble of random graphs with scale-free degree distributions. In other words, PA generates nothing but random graphs with power-law degree distribution. The extension of the developed canonical formalism for network analysis to richer geometric network models with non-degenerate groups of symmetries may eventually lead to a system of equations describing network dynamics at small scales.

  15. Hamiltonian dynamics of preferential attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prediction and control of network dynamics are grand-challenge problems in network science. The lack of understanding of fundamental laws driving the dynamics of networks is among the reasons why many practical problems of great significance remain unsolved for decades. Here we study the dynamics of networks evolving according to preferential attachment (PA), known to approximate well the large-scale growth dynamics of a variety of real networks. We show that this dynamics is Hamiltonian, thus casting the study of complex networks dynamics to the powerful canonical formalism, in which the time evolution of a dynamical system is described by Hamilton’s equations. We derive the explicit form of the Hamiltonian that governs network growth in PA. This Hamiltonian turns out to be nearly identical to graph energy in the configuration model, which shows that the ensemble of random graphs generated by PA is nearly identical to the ensemble of random graphs with scale-free degree distributions. In other words, PA generates nothing but random graphs with power-law degree distribution. The extension of the developed canonical formalism for network analysis to richer geometric network models with non-degenerate groups of symmetries may eventually lead to a system of equations describing network dynamics at small scales. (paper)

  16. Coexistence in preferential attachment networks

    CERN Document Server

    Antunović, Tonći; Racz, Miklos Z

    2013-01-01

    Competition in markets is ubiquitous: cell-phone providers, computer manufacturers, and sport gear brands all vie for customers. Though several coexisting competitors are often observed in empirical data, many current theoretical models of competition on small-world networks predict a single winner taking over the majority of the network. We introduce a new model of product adoption that focuses on word-of-mouth recommendations to provide an explanation for this coexistence of competitors. The key property of our model is that customer choices evolve simultaneously with the network of customers. When a new node joins the network, it chooses neighbors according to preferential attachment, and then chooses its type based on the number of initial neighbors of each type. This can model a new cell-phone user choosing a cell-phone provider, a new student choosing a laptop, or a new athletic team member choosing a gear provider. We provide a detailed analysis of the new model; in particular, we determine the possibl...

  17. 15 CFR 700.14 - Preferential scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preferential scheduling. 700.14 Section 700.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities § 700.14 Preferential scheduling. (a)...

  18. A generalized theory of preferential linking

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Haibo; Liu, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    There are diverse mechanisms driving the evolution of social networks. A key open question dealing with understanding their evolution is: How various preferential linking mechanisms produce networks with different features? In this paper we first empirically study preferential linking phenomena in an evolving online social network, find and validate the linear preference. We propose an analyzable model which captures the real growth process of the network and reveals the underlying mechanism dominating its evolution. Furthermore based on preferential linking we propose a generalized model reproducing the evolution of online social networks, present unified analytical results describing network characteristics for 27 preference scenarios, and explore the relation between preferential linking mechanism and network features. We find that within the framework of preferential linking analytical degree distributions can only be the combinations of finite kinds of functions which are related to rational, logarithmic...

  19. Antimicrobial and antifouling efficacy of urinary catheters impregnated with a combination of macrolide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Hina; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) is increasing worldwide. This study was designed to modify a biomaterial by impregnating a silicone urinary catheter with combination of a macrolide, azithromycin (AZM) and a fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin (CIP). Drug release profiles showed slow yet continuous release of antibiotics from catheters for one month. In vitro efficacy testing showed that group B catheters [3% (w v(-1)) CIP + 6% (w v(-1)) AZM] outperformed group A catheters [2% (w v(-1)) CIP + 5% (w v(-1)) AZM] by (1) showing larger zones of inhibition (>31 mm) compared to group A (<28 mm) for up to 30 days against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1; (2) killing adhered bacteria in 24 h compared to 24-48 h in group A; (3) showing longer antimicrobial durability for four weeks; and (4) exhibiting a stable real-time shelf life of one year, suggesting that these catheters can be explored in clinical settings, especially in long-term CAUTI. PMID:26982572

  20. Reactive preferential structures and nonmonotonic consequence

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov

    2008-01-01

    We introduce information bearing systems (IBRS) as an abstraction of many logical systems. We define a general semantics for IBRS, and show that IBRS generalize in a natural way preferential semantics and solve open representation problems.

  1. Emergence of cooperation induced by preferential learning

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, J; Wang, W X; Yan, G; Ren, Jie; Wang, Bing-Hong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Yan, Gang

    2006-01-01

    The evolutionary Prisoner's Dilemma Game (PDG) and the Snowdrift Game (SG) with preferential learning mechanism are studied in the Barab\\'asi-Albert network. Simulation results demonstrate that the preferential learning of individuals remarkably promotes the cooperative behavior for both two games over a wide range of payoffs. To understand the effect of preferential learning on the evolution of the systems, we investigate the time series of the cooperator density for different preferential strength and payoffs. It is found that in some specific cases two games both show the $1/f$-scaling behaviors, which indicate the existence of long range correlation. We also figure out that when the large degree nodes have high probability to be selected, the PDG displays a punctuated equilibrium-type behavior. On the contrary, the SG exhibits a sudden increase feature. These temporary instable behaviors are ascribed to the strategy shift of the large degree nodes.

  2. Correlations in Networks associated to Preferential Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Gronlund, Andreas; Sneppen, Kim; Minnhagen, Petter

    2004-01-01

    Combinations of random and preferential growth for both on-growing and stationary networks are studied and a hierarchical topology is observed. Thus for real world scale-free networks which do not exhibit hierarchical features preferential growth is probably not the main ingredient in the growth process. An example of such real world networks includes the protein-protein interaction network in yeast, which exhibits pronounced anti-hierarchical features.

  3. The gnyRDBHAL Cluster Is Involved in Acyclic Isoprenoid Degradation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pérez, A. L.; Zavala-Hernández, A. N.; Cervantes, C.; Campos-García, J.

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 mutants affected in the ability to degrade acyclic isoprenoids were isolated with transposon mutagenesis. The gny cluster (for geranoyl), which encodes the enzymes involved in the lower pathway of acyclic isoprenoid degradation, was identified. The gny cluster is constituted by five probable structural genes, gnyDBHAL, and a possible regulatory gene, gnyR. Mutations in the gnyD, gnyB, gnyA, or gnyL gene caused inability to assimilate acyclic isoprenoids of the citronellol family of compounds. Transcriptional analysis showed that expression of the gnyB gene was induced by citronellol and repressed by glucose, whereas expression of the gnyR gene had the opposite behavior. Western blot analysis of citronellol-grown cultures showed induction of biotinylated proteins of 70 and 73 kDa, which probably correspond to 3-methylcrotonoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase and geranoyl-CoA carboxylase (GCCase) alpha subunits, respectively. The 73-kDa biotinylated protein, identified as the α-GCCase subunit, is encoded by gnyA. Intermediary metabolites of the isoprenoid pathway, citronellic and geranic acids, were shown to accumulate in gnyB and gnyA mutants. Our data suggest that the protein products encoded in the gny cluster are the β and α subunits of geranoyl-CoA carboxylase (GnyB and GnyA), the citronelloyl-CoA dehydrogenase (GnyD), the γ-carboxygeranoyl-CoA hydratase (GnyH), and the 3-hydroxy-γ-carboxygeranoyl-CoA lyase (GnyL). We conclude that the gnyRDBHAL cluster is involved in isoprenoid catabolism. PMID:15345388

  4. Homogentisate 1-2-Dioxygenase Downregulation in the Chronic Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian Epidemic Strain-1 in the CF Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Christopher J; Wynn, Matthew; Pinto, Rachel; Cordwell, Stuart; Rose, Barbara R; Harbour, Colin; Triccas, James A; Manos, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Some Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains including Australian Epidemic Strain-1 (AES-1 or AUS-01) cause persistent chronic infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with greater morbidity and mortality. Factors conferring persistence are largely unknown. Previously we analysed the transcriptomes of AES-1 grown in Luria broth, nematode growth medium for Caenorhabditis elegans assay (both aerobic) and artificial sputum medium (mainly hypoxic). Transcriptional comparisons included chronic AES-1 strains against PAO1 and acute AES-1 (AES-1R) against its chronic isogen (AES-1M), isolated 10.5 years apart from a CF patient and not eradicated in the meantime. Prominent amongst genes downregulated in AES-1M in all comparisons was homogentisate-1-2-dioxygenase (hmgA); an oxygen-dependent gene known to be mutationally deactivated in many chronic infection strains of P. aeruginosa. To investigate if hmgA downregulation and deactivation gave similar virulence persistence profiles, a hmgA mutant made in UCBPP-PA14 utilising RedS-recombinase and AES-1M were assessed in the C. elegans virulence assay, and the C57BL/6 mouse for pulmonary colonisation and TNF-α response. In C. elegans, hmgA deactivation resulted in significantly increased PA14 virulence while hmgA downregulation reduced AES-1M virulence. AES-1M was significantly more persistent in mouse lung and showed a significant increase in TNF-α (p<0.0001), sustained even with no detectable bacteria. PA14ΔhmgA did not show increased TNF-α. This study suggests that hmgA may have a role in P. aeruginosa persistence in chronic infection and the results provide a starting point for clarifying the role of hmgA in chronic AES-1. PMID:26252386

  5. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.;

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa, but that the...... silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...... planktonic bacteria. These observations strongly indicate that the concentration of silver in currently available wound dressings is much too low for treatment of chronic biofilm wounds. It is suggested that clinicians and manufacturers of the said wound dressings consider whether they are treating wounds...

  6. Phosphate taxis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, J.; Ito, A.; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be attracted to phosphate. The chemotactic response was induced by phosphate starvation. The specificity of chemoreceptors for phosphate was high so that no other tested phosphorus compounds elicited a chemotactic response as strong as that elicited by phosphate. Competition experiments showed that the chemoreceptors for phosphate appeared to be different from those for the common amino acids. Mutants constitutive for alkaline phosphatase showed the chemota...

  7. A generalized theory of preferential linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haibo; Guo, Jinli; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Xiaofan

    2014-12-01

    There are diverse mechanisms driving the evolution of social networks. A key open question dealing with understanding their evolution is: How do various preferential linking mechanisms produce networks with different features? In this paper we first empirically study preferential linking phenomena in an evolving online social network, find and validate the linear preference. We propose an analyzable model which captures the real growth process of the network and reveals the underlying mechanism dominating its evolution. Furthermore based on preferential linking we propose a generalized model reproducing the evolution of online social networks, and present unified analytical results describing network characteristics for 27 preference scenarios. We study the mathematical structure of degree distributions and find that within the framework of preferential linking analytical degree distributions can only be the combinations of finite kinds of functions which are related to rational, logarithmic and inverse tangent functions, and extremely complex network structure will emerge even for very simple sublinear preferential linking. This work not only provides a verifiable origin for the emergence of various network characteristics in social networks, but bridges the micro individuals' behaviors and the global organization of social networks.

  8. Preferential sampling in veterinary parasitological surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Lorenzo; Biggeri, Annibale; Grisotto, Laura; Berrocal, Veronica; Rinaldi, Laura; Musella, Vincenzo; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Catelan, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    In parasitological surveillance of livestock, prevalence surveys are conducted on a sample of farms using several sampling designs. For example, opportunistic surveys or informative sampling designs are very common. Preferential sampling refers to any situation in which the spatial process and the sampling locations are not independent. Most examples of preferential sampling in the spatial statistics literature are in environmental statistics with focus on pollutant monitors, and it has been shown that, if preferential sampling is present and is not accounted for in the statistical modelling and data analysis, statistical inference can be misleading. In this paper, working in the context of veterinary parasitology, we propose and use geostatistical models to predict the continuous and spatially-varying risk of a parasite infection. Specifically, breaking with the common practice in veterinary parasitological surveillance to ignore preferential sampling even though informative or opportunistic samples are very common, we specify a two-stage hierarchical Bayesian model that adjusts for preferential sampling and we apply it to data on Fasciola hepatica infection in sheep farms in Campania region (Southern Italy) in the years 2013-2014. PMID:27087037

  9. Preferential sampling in veterinary parasitological surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Cecconi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In parasitological surveillance of livestock, prevalence surveys are conducted on a sample of farms using several sampling designs. For example, opportunistic surveys or informative sampling designs are very common. Preferential sampling refers to any situation in which the spatial process and the sampling locations are not independent. Most examples of preferential sampling in the spatial statistics literature are in environmental statistics with focus on pollutant monitors, and it has been shown that, if preferential sampling is present and is not accounted for in the statistical modelling and data analysis, statistical inference can be misleading. In this paper, working in the context of veterinary parasitology, we propose and use geostatistical models to predict the continuous and spatially-varying risk of a parasite infection. Specifically, breaking with the common practice in veterinary parasitological surveillance to ignore preferential sampling even though informative or opportunistic samples are very common, we specify a two-stage hierarchical Bayesian model that adjusts for preferential sampling and we apply it to data on Fasciola hepatica infection in sheep farms in Campania region (Southern Italy in the years 2013-2014.

  10. Development of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during two decades of antipseudomonal treatment at the Danish CF Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Pedersen, S S;

    1994-01-01

    At the Danish CF Center patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection were treated 3-4 times a year (from 1976) with a 2-week intravenous antipseudomonal course which included preferentially an aminoglycoside and a beta-lactam antibiotic. We investigated the development of antibiotic...... 1991 (100 strains). All the strains were screened and assayed semiquantitatively for beta-lactamase activity by use of nitrocefin. We found a significant (p < 0.005) increase in the MIC values of the P. aeruginosa strains against piperacillin and ceftazidime. However, no significant correlation was...... found between the MIC and the number of antipseudomonal courses of antibiotics. The proportion of resistant in vivo selected P. aeruginosa strains, presumed to be stably derepressed producers of chromosomal beta-lactamase, also increased significantly during the period studied. Our results confirm that...

  11. Biosynthesis of pyocyanin pigment by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. El-Fouly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty-three isolates belonging to the genus Pseudomonas were isolated from different environmental sources including; soil, water and clinical specimens. Twenty out of them were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and individually screened for pyocyanin production. P. aeruginosa R1; isolated from rice-cultivated soil and P. aeruginosa U3 selected from clinical specimen (Urinary tract infection were the highest pyocyanin producers; pyocyanin production reached 9.3 and 5.9 μg/ml, respectively on synthetic glucose supplemented nutrient medium (GSNB. The identification of both selected strains (P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 was confirmed by 16S rRNA, the similarity with other strains available in database was 97% (with P. aeruginosa FPVC 14 and 94% (with P. aeruginosa 13.A, respectively. P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 are accessed at gene bank with accession numbers KM924432 and KM603511, in the same order. Pyocyanin was extracted by standard methods, purified by column chromatography and characterized by UV-Vis absorption, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The antimicrobial activity of purified pyocyanin against multi-drug resistant microbes was investigated; the efficiency of pyocyanin was more obvious in Gram +ve bacteria than Gram−ve bacteria and yeast. To reduce the cost of pyocyanin production, a new conventional medium based on cotton seed meal supplemented with peptone was designed. The pyocyanin production of both selected strains P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 using the new medium is increased by 30.1% and 17.2%, respectively in comparison with synthetic GSNB medium, while the cost of production process is reduced by 56.7%.

  12. Innate immune responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    OpenAIRE

    Lavoie, Elise G.; Wangdi, Tamding; Kazmierczak, Barbara I.

    2011-01-01

    Innate immune responses play a critical role in controlling acute infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both mice and in humans. In this review we focus on innate immune recognition and clearance mechanisms that are important for controlling P. aeruginosa in the mammalian lung, with particular attention to those that influence the outcome of in vivo infection in murine models.

  13. The Probabilistic Nature of Preferential Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieskamp, Jorg

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has developed a variety of theories explaining when and why people's decisions under risk deviate from the standard economic view of expected utility maximization. These theories are limited in their predictive accuracy in that they do not explain the probabilistic nature of preferential choice, that is, why an individual makes…

  14. Preferential attachment in randomly grown networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Iain S.

    2015-12-01

    We reintroduce the model of Callaway et al. (2001) as a special case of a more general model for random network growth. Vertices are added to the graph at a rate of 1, while edges are introduced at rate δ. Rather than edges being introduced at random, we allow for a degree of preferential attachment with a linear attachment kernel, parametrised by m. The original model is recovered in the limit of no preferential attachment, m → ∞. As expected, even weak preferential attachment introduces a power-law tail to the degree distribution. Additionally, this generalisation retains a great deal of the tractability of the original along with a surprising range of behaviour, although key mathematical features are modified for finite m. In particular, the critical edge density, δc which marks the onset of a giant network component is reduced with increasing tendency for preferential attachment. The positive degree-degree correlation introduced by the unbiased growth process is offset by the skewed degree distribution, reducing the network assortativity.

  15. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of β-carbonic anhydrase psCA3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two crystal forms of β-carbonic anhydrase psCA3 from P. aeruginosa were grown. Crystal form A belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.9, b = 84.9, c = 124.2 Å, and diffracted X-rays to 2.9 Å resolution; crystal form B belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.9, b = 77.7, c = 88.5 Å, and diffracted X-rays to 3.0 Å resolution. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes life-threatening infections in susceptible individuals and is resistant to most clinically available antimicrobials. Genomic and proteomic studies have identified three genes, pa0102, pa2053 and pa4676, in P. aeruginosa PAO1 encoding three functional β-carbonic anhydrases (β-CAs): psCA1, psCA2 and psCA3, respectively. These β-CAs could serve as novel antimicrobial drug targets for this pathogen. X-ray crystallographic structural studies have been initiated to characterize the structure and function of these proteins. This communication describes the production of two crystal forms (A and B) of β-CA psCA3. Form A diffracted to a resolution of 2.9 Å; it belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.9, b = 84.9, c = 124.2 Å, and had a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.23 Å3 Da−1 assuming four molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Form B diffracted to a resolution of 3.0 Å; it belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.9, b = 77.7, c = 88.5 Å, and had a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.48 Å3 Da−1 assuming two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Preliminary molecular-replacement solutions have been determined with the PHENIX AutoMR wizard and refinement of both crystal forms is currently in progress

  16. Multicellular self-organization of P. aeruginosa due to interactions with secreted trails

    CERN Document Server

    Gelimson, Anatolij; Lee, Calvin K; Kranz, W Till; Wong, Gerard C L; Golestanian, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Guided movement in response to slowly diffusing polymeric trails provides a unique mechanism for self-organization of some microorganisms. To elucidate how this signaling route leads to microcolony formation, we experimentally probe the trajectory and orientation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that propel themselves on a surface using type IV pili motility appendages, which preferentially attach to deposited exopolysaccharides. We construct a stochastic model by analyzing single-bacterium trajectories, and show that the resulting theoretical prediction for the many-body behavior of the bacteria is in quantitative agreement with our experimental characterization of how cells explore the surface via a power law strategy.

  17. Experimental study on effect of mesna on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm%巯乙磺酸钠对铜绿假单胞菌生物被膜作用的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈盛; 余加林; 罗则佳; 何念海; 孙凤军

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of mesna on the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm, and study the effect of mesna on P. aeruginosa biofilm. METHODS The broth microdilution method was performed to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration of mesna to PAO1, then a biofilm model of Pseudo-monas aeruginosa in vitro was established , the appearance of biofilm was detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM ) to assess the effect of mesna on the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm; the bacteria colony counts in biofilm was measured by agar plate after the biofilm was treated by mesna, biofilm structure was observed under confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), and the parameters of biofilm structure were analyzed through pictures from CLSM with image structure analyzer (ISA) software. RESULTS The MIC value against PAO1 was 10mg/mL for mesna. In the process of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, scanning electron microscope showed that the mucoid materials among bacteria was significantly reduced and the thickness of biofilm was decreased in mesna group. In comparison with normal saline group, viable counts in biofilms in the mesna treatment group were less than those in the saline group, and the high-dose group (4. 06 ± 0. 12) had less positive effect than did the low-dose group(5. 84 ± 0. 24)(P<0. 05). Confocal laser scanning microscope showed that the biofilm was thinner and more scattered than the saline control group. The results of ISA showed that with the treatment of mesna, biofilm was decreased in thickness, average diffusion distance (ADD) and textual entropy (TE) in comparison with the saline control group(P<0. 05),however areal porosity(AP) was increased (P< 0. 05) , and the high-doses group was more significant than the low-doses group (P<0. 05). CONCLUSION Mesna can inhibit the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm and disrupt the structure of P. aeruginosa biofilm.%目的 研究巯乙磺酸钠(Mesna)对铜绿假单胞菌生物被

  18. Preferential attachment in the protein network evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Eli; Levanon, Erez Y.

    2003-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein-protein interaction map, as well as many natural and man-made networks, shares the scale-free topology. The preferential attachment model was suggested as a generic network evolution model that yields this universal topology. However, it is not clear that the model assumptions hold for the protein interaction network. Using a cross genome comparison we show that (a) the older a protein, the better connected it is, and (b) The number of interactions a prote...

  19. Network Non-Neutrality through Preferential Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Hanawal, Manjesh Kumar; Altman, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    One of the central issues in the debate on network neutrality has been whether one should allow or prevent preferential treatment by an internet service provider (ISP) of traffic according to its origin. This raised the question of whether to allow an ISP to have exclusive agreement with a content provider (CP). In this paper we consider discrimination in the opposite direction. We study the impact that a CP can have on the benefits of several competing ISPs by sharing private information con...

  20. Emergence of social structures via preferential selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowski, Adam; Lipowska, Dorota; Ferreira, Antonio Luis

    2014-09-01

    We examine a weighted-network multiagent model with preferential selection such that agents choose partners with probability p (w), where w is the number of their past selections. When p (w) increases sublinearly with the number of past selections [p(w)˜wα,α1), strong heterogeneities emerge and agents make selections mainly within small and sometimes asymmetric clusters. Even in a few-agent case, the formation of such clusters resembles phase transitions with spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  1. Fusion of Pedigreed Preferential Relations as Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Tojo, Satoshi

    Belief fusion, instead of AGM belief revision, was first proposed to solve the problem of inconsistency, that arised from repetitive application of the operation when agents' knowledge were amalgamated. In the preceding work of Maynard-Reid II and Shoham, the fusion operator is applied to belief states, which is total preorders over possible worlds which is based on the semantics of belief revision. Moreover, they introduced the pedigreed belief state, which represented multiple sources of belief states, ordered by a credibility ranking. However in the theory, all the sources must be totally ordered and thus applicable area is quite restrictive. In this paper, we realize the fusion operator of multiple agents for partially ordered sources. When we consider such a partial ranking over sources, there is no need to restrict that each agent has total preorders over possible worlds. The preferential model, based on the semantics on nonmonotonic reasoning, allows each agent to have strict partial orders over possible worlds. Especially, such an order is called a preferential relation, that prescribes a world is more plausible than the other. Therefore, we introduce an operation which combines multiple preferential relations of agents. In addition, we show that our operation can properly include the ordinary belief fusion.

  2. Versatile cloning vector for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, D O; Hollinger, M F; Tindol, M B

    1981-01-01

    A pBR322:RSF1010 composite plasmid, constructed in vitro, was used as a cloning vector in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This nonamplifiable plasmid, pMW79, has a molecular weight of 8.4 X 10(6) and exists as a multicopy plasmid in both P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. In P. aeruginosa strain PAO2003, pMW79 conferred resistance to carbenicillin and tetracycline. Characterization of pMW79 with restriction enzymes revealed that four enzymes (BamHI, SalI, HindIII, and HpaI) cleaved the plasmid at un...

  3. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib;

    suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and E. nidulans. HPLC and LC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa in the contact area of Aspergillus. Different quinolones were also identified......, here among 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS). An unidentified green pseudomonas compound was also observed. Interestingly the P. aeruginosa mutant rpoN was unable to suppress A. fumigatus, but suppressed A. flavus, A. oryzae and A. niger. However several other P. aeruginosa mutants suppressed A...

  4. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  5. PREFERENTIAL TRADE ARRANGEMENTS: IMPACTS ON AGRICULTURAL TRADE AND INCOME

    OpenAIRE

    Skripnitchenko, Anatoliy; Beladi, Hamid; Koo, Won W.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we focus on the effects of preferential trade arrangements on agricultural trade and agricultural income. Given the large number of preferential trade arrangements and complex interactions among them, we attempt to discover whether preferential trade arrangements are beneficial to agricultural trade and income, and are an effective tool to liberalize agricultural trade. The findings suggest that preferential trade arrangements with some exceptions tend to expand agricultural ...

  6. Preferential Flow in Fractured Welded Tuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To better understand preferential flow in fractured rock, we carried out an in situ field experiment in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This experiment involved the release of ∼ 22 m3 of ponded water (at a pressure head of ∼ 0.04 m) over a period of 7 months, directly onto a 12 m2 infiltration plot located on a fractured welded tuff surface. As water was released, changes in moisture content were monitored along horizontal boreholes located in the formation ∼ 19-22 m below. Distinct flow zones, varying in flow velocity, wetted cross-sectional area, and extent of lateral movement, intercepted the monitoring boreholes. There was also evidence of water being diverted above the ceiling of a cavity in the immediate vicinity of the monitoring boreholes. Observations from this field experiment suggest that isolated conduits, each encompassing a large number of fractures, develop within the fractured rock formation to form preferential flow paths that persist if there is a continuous supply of water. In addition, in fractured welded tuffs the propensity for fracture-matrix interactions is significantly greater than that suggested by existing conceptual models,in which flow occurs along a section of fracture surfaces. An overriding conclusion is that field investigations at spatial scales of tens of meters provide data critical to the fundamental understanding of flow in fractured rock

  7. Biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, many researchers have written numerous articles about microbial biofilms. Biofilm is a complex community of microorganisms and an example of bacterial group behavior. Biofilm is usually considered a sessile mode of life derived from the attached growth of microbes to surfaces, and most biofilms are embedded in self-produced extracellular matrix composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), such as polysaccharides, extracellular DNAs (eDNA), and proteins. Dispersal, a mode of biofilm detachment indicates active mechanisms that cause individual cells to separate from the biofilm and return to planktonic life. Since biofilm cells are cemented and surrounded by EPSs, dispersal is not simple to do and many researchers are now paying more attention to this active detachment process. Unlike other modes of biofilm detachment such as erosion or sloughing, which are generally considered passive processes, dispersal occurs as a result of complex spatial differentiation and molecular events in biofilm cells in response to various environmental cues, and there are many biological reasons that force bacterial cells to disperse from the biofilms. In this review, we mainly focus on the spatial differentiation of biofilm that is a prerequisite for dispersal, as well as environmental cues and molecular events related to the biofilm dispersal. More specifically, we discuss the dispersal-related phenomena and mechanisms observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic human pathogen and representative model organism for biofilm study. PMID:26832663

  8. Preferential treatment and exemption policy impacts energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the preferential treatment and exemption policy of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for State and State Agencies which creates an anticompetitive and restraint of trade attitude in California against the development of alternative energy resources by the private sector when such development competes directly with state owned power generation under the State Water and Central Valley Water Projects, particularly in the area of water and power supply. The existing state water policy fails to address the effects of global warming and the adverse potential of the greenhouse effect in California, i.e. rising tides can seriously impact sea water intrusion problems of the San Francisco Bay-Delta Area by not only flooding agricultural lands in the Delta and Central Valley, but impacting the supply of water to large population areas in Southern and Northern California, especially when coupled with drought conditions. The California investigative research results herein reported demonstrates the fallacy of a preferential treatment and exemption policy in a free market economy, especially when such policy creates the potential for excessive state budget burdens upon the public in the face of questionable subsidies to special interest, i.e., allowing the resulting windfall profits to be passed onto major utilities and commingled at the expense of public interest so as to undermine the financial means for development of alternative energy resources. The cited Congressional and State Legislative Laws which provide the ways and means to resolve any energy or water resource problems are only as good as the enforcement and the commitment by the executive branch of government and the lawmakers to up-hold existing laws

  9. Preferential occurrence of 1-2 microindels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen A; Gonzalez, Kelly D; Scaringe, William A; Wang, Ji-Cheng; Sommer, Steve S

    2006-01-01

    Microindels are unique, infrequent mutations that result in inserted and deleted sequences of different sizes (between one and 50 nucleotides) at the same nucleotide position. Little is known about the mutational mechanisms that are responsible for these mutations. From our database of 6,016 independent somatic mutational events in the lacI gene in Big Blue mice, we assembled the 30 microindels (0.5%) for analysis. Microindels with one nucleotide inserted and two nucleotides deleted (1-2 microindels) accounted for seven (23%) of the microindels observed, with the remaining microindels distributed among 21 other combinations of insertion and deletion sizes. A preferential occurrence of 1-2 microindels (20%) was also observed in human germline transmitted mutations in the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD). An examination of the sequence flanking the mouse 1-2 microindels did not reveal obvious site specificity or associated secondary structure. A detailed examination of 1-2 microindels did not reveal the features typical of pure microinsertion and microdeletion events, but rather suggested a unique mutational mechanism. The 1 bp insertion in 1-2 microinsertions, and pure 1 bp insertions show distinct features. The mechanism for 1-2 microindels is not obviously a simple combination of pure microinsertion and microdeletion events. The dramatic enhancement of 1-2 microindels requires explanation. We speculate that certain error-prone polymerases may be responsible for the preferential occurrence of 1-2 microindels in both somatic tissues and germ cells. It is estimated that a human adult carries roughly 400 billion somatic 1-2 microindels with the potential to predispose to cancer. PMID:16281281

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  11. Clonal complex Pseudomonas aeruginosa in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Timothy J; Gibson, Justine S; Moss, Susan; Greer, Ristan M; Cobbold, Rowland N; Wright, John D; Ramsay, Kay A; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with infectious endometritis in horses. Although infectious endometritis is often considered a venereal infection, there is relatively limited genotypic-based evidence to support this mode of transmission. The study sought to determine the relatedness between genital P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a limited geographical region using molecular strain typing. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR typing was performed on 93 isolates collected between 2005 and 2009 from 2058 thoroughbred horses (including 18 stallions) at 66 studs. While P. aeruginosa was not detected in the stallions, 53/93 (57%) mares harbouring P. aeruginosa had clonally related strains, which included a single dominant genotype detected in 42 (45%) mares from 13 different studs. These novel findings suggest that most equine genital P. aeruginosa infections in this region may have been acquired from mechanisms other than direct horse to horse transmission. Instead, other potential acquisition pathways, as well as strain specific adaptation to the equine genital tract, should be investigated. PMID:21183294

  12. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  13. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.;

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com......During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic...

  14. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P;

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  15. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib;

    Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen, commonly infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Aspergilli, especially Aspergillus fumigatus, are also frequently isolated from CF patients. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different...... the contact area of A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, but not A. fumigatus. In addition, other metabolites with UV chromophores similar to the phenazines were only found in the contact zone between Aspergillus and Pseudomonas. No change in secondary metabolite profiles were seen for the Aspergilli, when...... comparing with or without the presence of Pseudomonas. Conclusion: All Aspergilli tested, with the exception of A. fumigatus, triggered the upregulation of phenazine-1-carboxamide and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production by P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly no changes in secondary metabolite profiles were...

  16. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory tract epithelium is a critical environmental interface that regulates inflammation. In chronic infectious airway diseases, pathogens may permanently colonize normally sterile luminal environments. Host-pathogen interactions determine the intensity of inflammation and thus, rates of tissue injury. Although many cells become refractory to stimulation by pathogen products, it is unknown whether the airway epithelium becomes either tolerant or hypersensitive in the setting of chronic infection. Our goals were to characterize the response of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to understand whether repeated exposure induced tolerance and, if so, to explore the mechanism(s. Methods The apical surface of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cell cultures was repetitively challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates or the bacterial media control. Toxicity, cytokine production, signal transduction events and specific effects of dominant negative forms of signaling molecules were examined. Additional experiments included using IL-1β and TNFα as challenge agents, and performing comparative studies with a novel airway epithelial cell line. Results An initial challenge of the apical surface of polarized human airway epithelial cells with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates induced phosphorylation of IRAK1, JNK, p38, and ERK, caused degradation of IκBα, generation of NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factor activity, and resulted in IL-8 secretion, consistent with activation of the Toll-like receptor signal transduction pathway. These responses were strongly attenuated following a second Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or IL-1β, but not TNFα, challenge. Tolerance was associated with decreased IRAK1 protein content and kinase activity and dominant negative IRAK1 inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa -stimulated NF-κB transcriptional

  17. Modeling online social networks based on preferential linking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Hai-Bo; Guo Jin-Li; Chen Jun

    2012-01-01

    We study the phenomena of preferential linking in a large-scale evolving online social network and find that the linear preference holds for preferential creation,preferential acceptance,and preferential attachment.Based on the linear preference,we propose an analyzable model,which illustrates the mechanism of network growth and reproduces the process of network evolution.Our simulations demonstrate that the degree distribution of the network produced by the model is in good agreement with that of the real network.This work provides a possible bridge between the micro-mechanisms of network growth and the macrostructures of online social networks.

  18. Modeling online social networks based on preferential linking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the phenomena of preferential linking in a large-scale evolving online social network and find that the linear preference holds for preferential creation, preferential acceptance, and preferential attachment. Based on the linear preference, we propose an analyzable model, which illustrates the mechanism of network growth and reproduces the process of network evolution. Our simulations demonstrate that the degree distribution of the network produced by the model is in good agreement with that of the real network. This work provides a possible bridge between the micro-mechanisms of network growth and the macrostructures of online social networks

  19. Genome Analysis of a Transmissible Lineage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals Pathoadaptive Mutations and Distinct Evolutionary Paths of Hypermutators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Molin, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    . Here we perform a retrospective study of the DK2 clone type of P. aeruginosa isolated from Danish patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF), and analyze the genomes of 55 bacterial isolates collected from 21 infected individuals over 38 years. Our phylogenetic analysis of 8,530 mutations in the DK2...... likelihood to acquire mutations and identify two homopolymer-containing genes preferentially mutated in hypermutators. This homopolymer facilitated differential mutagenesis provides a novel genome-wide perspective on the different evolutionary trajectories of hypermutators, which may help explain their...

  20. Spaceflight Effects on Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, S.; Goins, T.; Crandell, C.; Richards, C.; Patel, M.; Pyle, B.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen found in the environment. It is known to infect the immunocompromised. The organism has about 25 virulence genes that play different roles in disease processes. Several exotoxin proteins may be produced, including ExoA, ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, and other virulence factors. In spaceflight, possible increased expression of P. aeruginosa virulence proteins could increase health risks for spaceflight crews who experience decreased immunity. Cultures of P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA103 grown on orbit on Shuttle Endeavour flight STS-123 vs. static ground controls were used for analysis. The production of ETA was quantitated using an ELISA procedure. Results showed that while flight cultures of PA103 produced slightly more ETA than corresponding ground controls, the opposite was found for PA01. While it appears that spaceflight has little effect on ETA, stimulation of other virulence factors could cause increased virulence of this organism in space flight. Similar increased virulence in spaceflight has been observed for other bacteria. This is important because astronauts may be more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and...

  2. Standardized chemical synthesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Cheluvappa

    2014-01-01

    As we have extracted pyocyanin both from P. aeruginosa cultures, and via chemical synthesis; we know the procedural and product-quality differences. We endorse the relative ease, safety, and convenience of using the chemical synthesis described here. Crucially, our “naturally endotoxin-free” pyocyanin can be extracted easily without using infectious bacteria.

  3. [Macrolides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, M; Amiour, M; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Paris, C

    2006-10-01

    Long-term low dose azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is safe and reduces the decline in lung function, the number of acute exacerbations and improves nutritional status; underlying efficacy mechanisms are multiple and synergistic. PMID:17370396

  4. 19 CFR 10.213 - Articles eligible for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles eligible for preferential treatment. 10...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Textile and Apparel Articles Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act § 10.213 Articles eligible for preferential...

  5. Preferential Option for the Poor: Making a Pedagogical Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirylo, James D.

    2006-01-01

    When children are sick, hurt, or in desperate need, parents/caregivers naturally make preferential options for them. Yet, as it relates to social justice, particularly when working with students from marginalized and poverty situations, the concept of making a preferential option in a school setting is not as clear. However, a school setting is a…

  6. Genetic adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis: strong and weak mutators with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds emerge in mucA and/or lasR mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Wassermann, Tina; Høiby, Niels

    2010-04-01

    During the chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods due to adaptive evolution mediated by genetic variation. Hypermutability is considered to play an important role in this adaptive evolution and it has been demonstrated that mutator populations are amplified in the CF lung by hitchhiking with adaptive mutations. Two of the genes that are frequently mutated in isolates from chronic infection are mucA and lasR. Loss-of-function mutations in these genes determine the phenotypic switch to mucoidy and loss of quorum sensing, which are considered hallmarks of chronic virulence. The aims of our study were to investigate (1) the genetic background of the P. aeruginosa subpopulations with non-mutator, weak or strong mutator phenotype and their dynamics during the chronic lung infection, and (2) the time sequence in which the hypermutable, mucoid and quorum-sensing-negative phenotypes emerge during chronic lung infection. For these purposes the sequences of mutS, mutL, uvrD, mutT, mutY and mutM anti-mutator genes as well as of mucA and lasR were analysed in 70 sequential P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from the respiratory secretions of 10 CF patients (one to three isolates per time point). Analysis of the genetic background of the mutator phenotype showed that mutS was the most commonly affected gene followed by mutL in isolates with strong mutator phenotype. The mutT, mutY, mutM genes were affected in isolates with low fold-changes in the mutation frequencies compared to the reference strain PAO1. Isolates with non-mutator, weak or strong mutator phenotype were represented at all time points showing co-existence of these subpopulations, which suggests parallel evolution of the various mutators in the different focal niches of infection in the CF lung. Mutations in mucA and lasR occurred earlier than mutations in the anti-mutator genes, showing that hypermutability is not a prerequisite for the

  7. Preferentially Cytotoxic Constituents of Andrographis paniculata and their Preferential Cytotoxicity against Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sullim; Morita, Hiroyuki; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-01

    In the course of our search for anticancer agents based on a novel anti-austerity strategy, we found that the 70% EtOH extract of the crude drug Andrographis Herba (aerial parts of Andrographis paniculata), used in Japanese Kampo medicines, killed PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells preferentially in nutrient-deprived medium (NDM). Phytochemical investigation of the 70% EtOH extract led to the isolation of 21 known compounds consisting of six labdane-type diterpenes (11, 15, 17-19, 21), six flavones (5, 7, 10, 12, 14, 20), three flavanones (2, 6, 16), two sterols (3, 8), a fatty acid (1), a phthalate (4), a triterpene (9), and a monoterpene (13). Among them, 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (17) displayed the most potent preferential cytotoxicity against PANC-1 and PSN-1 cells with PC50 values of 10.0 μM and 9.27 μM, respectively. Microscopical observation, double staining with ethidium bromide (EB) and acridine orange (AO), and flow cytometry with propidium iodide/annexin V double staining indicated that 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (17) triggered apoptosis-like cell death in NDM with an amino acids and/or serum-sensitive mode. PMID:26410998

  8. Preferential Interactions and the Effect of Protein PEGylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Stenstrup Holm

    Full Text Available PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation excipients that preferentially interact with the protein.The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000 and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose and preferentially bound guanine hydrochloride. Structural characterization by far- and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy was supplemented by investigation of protein thermal stability with the use of differential scanning calorimetry, far and near-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that PEGylated lysozyme was stabilized by the preferentially excluded excipient and destabilized by the preferentially bound excipient in a similar manner as lysozyme. However, compared to lysozyme in all cases the melting transition was lower by up to a few degrees and the calorimetric melting enthalpy was decreased to half the value for PEGylated lysozyme. The ratio between calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpy suggests that our PEGylated lysozyme is a dimer.The PEGylated model protein displayed similar stability responses to the addition of preferentially active excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins.

  9. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestel, J. K.; Luong, N. M.; Nørgaard, T.; Vendelboe, A. L.; Moldrup, P.; Jarvis, N. J.; Lamandé, M.; Iversen, B. V.; Wollesen de Jonge, L.

    2012-04-01

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness of the relevance of preferential flow was broadly re-established in the community by the early 1990s. However, since then, the notion remains widespread among soil scientists that the occurrence and strength of preferential flow cannot be predicted from measurable proxy variables such as soil properties or land management practices (e.g. Beven, K., 1991, Modeling preferential flow - an uncertain future, Preferential Flow, 1-11). In our study, we present evidence that disproves this notion. We evaluated breakthrough curve experiments under a constant irrigation rate of 1 cm/h conducted on 65 soil columns (20 cm diameter and 20 height) which had been sampled from an approximately 1 ha large loamy field-site in Silstrup, Denmark. We show that the holdback factor, which is an indicator for the strength of preferential transport, is strongly correlated to the bulk density, which in turn is correlated to the organic matter content. By applying multiple linear regression in a bootstrapping framework, we could estimate the holdback factor from the bulk density and the very fine sand fraction with a coefficient of determination of 0.65. Our results raise hopes that it is indeed possible to establish pedotransfer functions for soil susceptibility to preferential flow and transport.

  10. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.;

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Badami Nagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  12. Tracking the Dynamic Relationship between Cellular Systems and Extracellular Subproteomes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Amber J; Murphy, Kathleen; Surette, Matthew D; Bandoro, Christopher; Krieger, Jonathan R; Taylor, Paul; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2015-11-01

    The transition of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa from free-living bacteria into surface-associated biofilm communities represents a viable target for the prevention and treatment of chronic infectious disease. We have established a proteomics platform that identified 2443 and 1142 high-confidence proteins in P. aeruginosa whole cells and outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs), respectively, at three time points during biofilm development (ProteomeXchange identifier PXD002605). The analysis of cellular systems, specifically the phenazine biosynthetic pathway, demonstrates that whole-cell protein abundance correlates to end product (i.e., pyocyanin) concentrations in biofilm but not in planktonic cultures. Furthermore, increased cellular protein abundance in this pathway results in quantifiable pyocyanin in early biofilm OMVs and OMVs from both growth modes isolated at later time points. Overall, our data indicate that the OMVs being released from the surface of the biofilm whole cells have unique proteomes in comparison to their planktonic counterparts. The relative abundance of OMV proteins from various subcellular sources showed considerable differences between the two growth modes over time, supporting the existence and preferential activation of multiple OMV biogenesis mechanisms under different conditions. The consistent detection of cytoplasmic proteins in all of the OMV subproteomes challenges the notion that OMVs are composed of outer membrane and periplasmic proteins alone. Direct comparisons of outer-membrane protein abundance levels between OMVs and whole cells shows ratios that vary greatly from 1:1 and supports previous studies that advocate the specific inclusion, or "packaging", of proteins into OMVs. The quantitative analysis of packaged protein groups suggests biogenesis mechanisms that involve untethered, rather than absent, peptidoglycan-binding proteins. Collectively, individual protein and biological system analyses of biofilm OMVs

  13. Preferential Market Access, Foreign Aid and Economic Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afesorgbor, Sylvanus Kwaku; Abreha, Kaleb Girma

    contributed to the economic development of the beneficiary countries. Focusing on the ACP countries over the period 1970-2009, we show that only the EU preferential scheme is effective in promoting exports and that market access plays a significant and economically large role in the development of beneficiary......Several studies highlight that exporters in developing countries face substantial trade costs. To reduce these costs, a few developed countries mainly Canada, the EU, Japan and the USA granted preferential market access to these exporters. We assess whether these preferential accesses have...

  14. Preferential interactions and the effect of protein PEGylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation...... excipients that preferentially interact with the protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000) and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose and...... excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins....

  15. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J K; Minh, Luong Nhat; Nørgaard, Trine;

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness of the...... relevance of preferential flow was broadly re-established in the community by the early 1990s. However, since then, the notion remains widespread among soil scientists that the occurrence and strength of preferential flow cannot be predicted from measurable proxy variables such as soil properties or land...

  16. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich were awarded the Nobel price in 1908. Since then, numerous studies have unraveled a multitude of mechanistically different immune responses to intruding microorganisms. However, in the vast majority of these studies, the underlying infectious agents have appeared....... Although the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  17. Proteolytic inactivation of cytokines by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Parmely, M; Gale, A; Clabaugh, M.; Horvat, R; Zhou, W W

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease and elastase are thought to contribute to bacterial invasiveness, tissue damage, and immune suppression in animals and patients infected with the bacterium. This study examined the ability of the two proteases to inactivate a number of cytokines that mediate immune and inflammatory responses. Human recombinant gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) and human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha were inactivated by both proteases. Murine rIFN-gamma was relati...

  18. Iron and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, Ehud; Vasil, Michael L.; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2005-01-01

    Iron serves as a signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development. We examined the influence of mutations in known and putative iron acquisition-signaling genes on biofilm morphology. In iron-sufficient medium, mutants that cannot obtain iron through the high-affinity pyoverdine iron acquisition system form thin biofilms similar to those formed by the parent under low iron conditions. If an iron source for a different iron acquisition system is provided to a pyoverdine mutant, normal biof...

  19. Interaction between biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin.

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuda, H; Ajiki, Y; Koga, T.; Kawada, H; Yokota, T.

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between bacterial biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin, a macrolide having no anti-P. aeruginosa activity, were investigated. P. aeruginosa incubated for 10 days on membrane filters formed biofilms on the surfaces of the filters. The biofilms were characterized by dense colonizations of bacteria and thick membranous structures that covered the colonies. Treatment of the biofilms with a relatively low concentration of clarithromycin for 5 days resulted in a...

  20. Interleukin-23-Mediated Inflammation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pulmonary Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Dubin, Patricia J.; Martz, Ashley; Eisenstatt, Jessica R.; Fox, Michael D.; Logar, Alison; Kolls, Jay K.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is capable of causing acute and chronic pulmonary infection in the immunocompromised host. In the case of cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic P. aeruginosa infection causes increased mortality by promoting overly exuberant airway inflammation and cumulative lung damage. Identifying the key regulators of this inflammation may lead to the development of new therapies that improve P. aeruginosa-related mortality. We report here that interleukin-...

  1. Fecal isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Agnarsson, U; Glass, S; Govan, J R

    1989-01-01

    Fecal isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was observed in 8 of 10 patients with cystic fibrosis who at the time of sampling also exhibited colonization of the respiratory tract. In contrast, P. aeruginosa cells were isolated at low frequency (9.1%) from the stools of 44 patients with cystic fibrosis with no previous history of chronic colonization. The results of this study suggest that the gastrointestinal tract is not a significant chronic reservoir of P. aeruginosa prior to pulmonary colon...

  2. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  3. Nanocavity Shrinkage and Preferential Amorphization during Irradiation in Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xian-Fang; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2005-01-01

    @@ We model the recent experimental results and demonstrate that the internal shrinkage of nanocavities in silicon is intrinsically associated with preferential amorphization as induced by self-ion irradiation.

  4. Characteristics of Preferentially Attached Network Grown from Small World

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seungyoung

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a model for a preferentially attached network which has grown from a small world network. Here, the average path length and the clustering coefficient are estimated, and the topological properties of modeled networks are compared as the initial conditions are changed. As a result, it is shown that the topological properties of the initial network remain even after the network growth. However, the vulnerability of each to preferentially attached nodes being added is not the same. It is found that the average path length rapidly decreases as the ratio of preferentially attached nodes increases and that the characteristics of the initial network can be easily disappeared. On the other hand, the clustering coefficient of the initial network slowly decreases with the ratio of preferentially attached nodes and its clustering characteristic remains much longer.

  5. Emergence of global preferential attachment from local interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global degree/strength-based preferential attachment is widely used as an evolution mechanism of networks. But it is hard to believe that any individual can get global information and shape the network architecture based on it. In this paper, it is found that the global preferential attachment emerges from the local interaction models, including the distance-dependent preferential attachment (DDPA) evolving model of weighted networks (Li et al 2006 New J. Phys. 8 72), the acquaintance network model (Davidsen et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 128701) and the connecting nearest-neighbor (CNN) model (Vazquez 2003 Phys. Rev. E 67 056104). For the DDPA model and the CNN model, the attachment rate depends linearly on the degree or vertex strength, whereas for the acquaintance network model, the dependence follows a sublinear power law. It implies that for the evolution of social networks, local contact could be more fundamental than the presumed global preferential attachment.

  6. Preferential attachment in the evolution of metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elofsson Arne

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological networks show some characteristics of scale-free networks. Scale-free networks can evolve through preferential attachment where new nodes are preferentially attached to well connected nodes. In networks which have evolved through preferential attachment older nodes should have a higher average connectivity than younger nodes. Here we have investigated preferential attachment in the context of metabolic networks. Results The connectivities of the enzymes in the metabolic network of Escherichia coli were determined and representatives for these enzymes were located in 11 eukaryotes, 17 archaea and 46 bacteria. E. coli enzymes which have representatives in eukaryotes have a higher average connectivity while enzymes which are represented only in the prokaryotes, and especially the enzymes only present in βγ-proteobacteria, have lower connectivities than expected by chance. Interestingly, the enzymes which have been proposed as candidates for horizontal gene transfer have a higher average connectivity than the other enzymes. Furthermore, It was found that new edges are added to the highly connected enzymes at a faster rate than to enzymes with low connectivities which is consistent with preferential attachment. Conclusion Here, we have found indications of preferential attachment in the metabolic network of E. coli. A possible biological explanation for preferential attachment growth of metabolic networks is that novel enzymes created through gene duplication maintain some of the compounds involved in the original reaction, throughout its future evolution. In addition, we found that enzymes which are candidates for horizontal gene transfer have a higher average connectivity than other enzymes. This indicates that while new enzymes are attached preferentially to highly connected enzymes, these highly connected enzymes have sometimes been introduced into the E. coli genome by horizontal gene transfer. We speculate

  7. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in normal and athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Espersen, F; Pedersen, S S;

    1993-01-01

    We have compared a chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in alginate beads in normal and athymic rats with an acute infection with free live P. aeruginosa bacteria. The following parameters were observed and described: mortality, macroscopic and microscopic pathologic changes...

  8. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  9. Outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia in a haematology department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack; Christensen, Nikolas; Sørensen, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. In Denmark, an increase in P. aeruginosa isolates from blood cultures from a haematology department prompted a hygienic audit in 2007. METHODS: Blood cultures that...

  10. Occurrence of pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection. Results: Out of the 60 bacterial isolates found in post-operative wound infection, 20 (33.3%) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Staphylococcus aureus 13(21.7%), Klebsiella species 10(16.7%), Escherichia coli 7(11.7%), Atypical coliform 4(6.7%), Proteus species 4(6.7%), Streptococcus pyogenes 1(1.7%) and Enterococcus faecalis 1(1.7%) in the order. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was higher in female than male, ratio 3:2 and was found more among young and elderly debilitated patients. The in vitro sensitivity pattern of 20 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed colistin (100%), gentamicin (75%), streptomycin (30%), and tetracycline (10%). Conclusion: The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an agent of nosocomial infection is re-emphasised. (author)

  11. Antibacterial activity of five Peruvian medicinal plants against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriela; Ulloa-Urizar; Miguel; Angel; Aguilar-Luis; María; del; Carmen; De; Lama-Odría; José; Camarena-Lizarzaburu; Juana; del; Valle; Mendoza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa(P. aeruginosa)in vitro to the ethanolic extracts obtained from five different Peruvian medicinal plants.Methods: The plants were chopped and soaked in absolute ethanol(1:2, w/v). The antibacterial activity of compounds against P. aeruginosa was evaluated using the cupplate agar diffusion method.Results: The extracts from Maytenus macrocarpa("Chuchuhuasi"), Dracontium loretense Krause("Jergon Sacha"), Tabebuia impetiginosa("Tahuari"), Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn(eucalyptus), Uncaria tomentosa("U?a de gato") exhibited favorable antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. The inhibitory effect of the extracts on the strains of P. aeruginosa tested demonstrated that Tabebuia impetiginosa and Maytenus macrocarpa possess higher antibacterial activity.Conclusions: The results of the present study scientifically validate the inhibitory capacity of the five medicinal plants attributed by their common use in folk medicine and contribute towards the development of new treatment options based on natural products.

  12. Antibacterial activity of ifve Peruvian medicinal plants against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriela Ulloa-Urizar; Miguel Angel Aguilar-Luis; Mara del Carmen De Lama-Odra; Jos Camarena-Lizarzaburu; Juana del Valle Mendoza

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) in vitro to the ethanolic extracts obtained from five different Peruvian medicinal plants. Methods:The plants were chopped and soaked in absolute ethanol (1:2, w/v). The antibacterial activity of compounds against P. aeruginosa was evaluated using the cup-plate agar diffusion method. Results:The extracts from Maytenus macrocarpa (“Chuchuhuasi”), Dracontium loretense Krause (“Jergon Sacha”), Tabebuia impetiginosa (“Tahuari”), Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn (eucalyptus), Uncaria tomentosa (“Uña de gato”) exhibited favorable antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. The inhibitory effect of the extracts on the strains of P. aeruginosa tested demonstrated that Tabebuia impetiginosa and Maytenus macrocarpa possess higher antibacterial activity. Conclusions:The results of the present study scientifically validate the inhibitory capacity of the five medicinal plants attributed by their common use in folk medicine and contribute towards the development of new treatment options based on natural products.

  13. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics combined with an increasing acknowledgement of the role of biofilms in chronic infections has led to a growing interest in new antimicrobial strategies that target the biofilm mode of growth. In the aggregated biofilm mode, cell-to-cell communication...... alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  14. Imported PER-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PER-1 producing Acinetobacter baumanii and VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Károly

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii are important nosocomial pathogens with wide intrinsic resistance. However, due to the dissemination of the acquired resistance mechanisms, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL and metallo beta-lactamase (MBL production, multidrug resistant strains have been isolated more often. Case presentation We report a case of a Hungarian tourist, who was initially hospitalized in Egypt and later transferred to Hungary. On the day of admission PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa, PER-1 producing A. baumannii, SHV-5-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were subcultured from the patient's samples in Hungary. Comparing the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE patterns of the P. aeruginosa strains from the patient to the P. aeruginosa strains occurring in this hospital, we can state that the PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa had external origin. Conclusion This is the first report of PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa,and PER-1-producing A. baumanii strains in Hungary. This case highlights the importance of spreading of the beta-lactamase-mediated resistance mechanisms between countries and continents, showing the importance of careful screening and the isolation of patients arriving from a different country.

  15. Preferential Voting in Denmark: How, Why, and to What Effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, Jørgen

    The paper provides an overview of (1) the Danish system for casting a preferential – or personal – vote in a proportional list system and (2) how seats are subsequently allocated. Denmark differs from most (all?) preferential list PR systems by letting the parties themselves (actually the parties......’ multi-member constituency branches) decide which one of four possible preferential list options they want to employ in an upcoming election. The two dominant options are explained in some detail, to allow a full understanding of how they function. The paper then goes on to discuss how this system can be...... classified if one looks at the classification schemes proposed by in previous works in this field. The way forward is to understand that “Denmark” is not one, but at least two different – but simultaneously used – systems, which belong in different classification categories. The Danish PLPR system is then...

  16. Contributions of efflux pumps to high level resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ciprofloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dan-dan; SUN Tie-ying; HU Yun-jian

    2007-01-01

    @@ Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is one of the leading pathogens involved in nosocomial pneumonia. In addition, P. aeruginosa infection is associated with significant morbidity and mortality.1 A major problem in P. aeruginosa infection is that this organism exhibits natural and acquired resistance to many structurally and functionally diverse antibiotics.

  17. Inverse Simulation of Field Infiltration Experiment Counting Preferential Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumr, David; Snehota, Michal; Nemcova, Renata; Dohnal, Michal; Cislerova, Milena

    2010-05-01

    The field tension and ponded infiltration experiments were conducted to monitor and describe irregularities of moisture propagation and to estimate the soil hydraulic properties (Distric Cambisol, Korkusova Hut, Sumava). On these soils the preferential pathways have been observed in several scales with the use of dye tracers, MRI and CT imaging. Preferential behavior was detected also during laboratory infiltration experiments. The flow irregularities are credited to variable air entrapment at the beginning of infiltrations. The field infiltration experiment was carried out in a shallow pit for a period of one day. The upper boundary condition was controlled by the tension disk infiltrometer, the propagation of a water front was monitored by two tensiometers installed in two depths below the infiltration disk. The propagation of saline solution front during ponded infiltration was visualized with high resolution electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Infiltration experiments were monitored with TDR probes, tensiometers and ERT. Zones of preferential flow were determined through analyses of photographs taken during laboratory dye tracer infiltration experiments performed on undisturbed soil samples. Connectivity, volumetric ratio and spatial development of preferential pathways were evaluated as the necessary information for numerical simulations of flow using dual-permeability approach. 2D axisymetric numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate the results of the experiment. The parameter estimator PEST coupled with the simulation code S2D_DUAL (Vogel et al., 2000) were employed. Two different approaches were used: 1. Single-domain approach based on Richards' equation. 2. Dual-permeability approach based on two interacting water flow domains (matrix and preferential domains), each governed by one Richards' equation. Concerning the existence of preferential flow on investigated soil, the dual-permeability model gives a better picture of the flow regime. The

  18. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Elham

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, ultraviolet (UV analysis, gas chromatography (GC, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0% and α-terpineol (7.7% and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5% and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%, with a total yield of 88.8%.

  19. A Generalized Preferential Attachment Model for Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yamasaki, K; Fu, D; Buldyrev, S V; Pammolli, F; Riccaboni, M; Stanley, H E; Yamasaki, Kazuko; Matia, Kaushik; Fu, Dongfeng; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Pammolli, Fabio; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    Complex systems can be characterized by classes of equivalency of their elements defined according to system specific rules. We propose a generalized preferential attachment model to describe the class size distribution. The model postulates preferential growth of the existing classes and the steady influx of new classes. We investigate how the distribution depends on the initial conditions and changes from a pure exponential form for zero influx of new classes to a power law with an exponential cutoff form when the influx of new classes is substantial. We apply the model to study the growth dynamics of pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Binding of protegrin-1 to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrer Robert I

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia infections of cystic fibrosis patients' lungs are often resistant to conventional antibiotic therapy. Protegrins are antimicrobial peptides with potent activity against many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa. The present study evaluates the correlation between protegrin-1 (PG-1 sensitivity/resistance and protegrin binding in P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia. Methods The PG-1 sensitivity/resistance and PG-1 binding properties of P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia were assessed using radial diffusion assays, radioiodinated PG-1, and surface plasmon resonance (BiaCore. Results The six P. aeruginosa strains examined were very sensitive to PG-1, exhibiting minimal active concentrations from 0.0625–0.5 μg/ml in radial diffusion assays. In contrast, all five B. cepacia strains examined were greater than 10-fold to 100-fold more resistant, with minimal active concentrations ranging from 6–10 μg/ml. When incubated with a radioiodinated variant of PG-1, a sensitive P. aeruginosa strain bound considerably more protegrin molecules per cell than a resistant B. cepacia strain. Binding/diffusion and surface plasmon resonance assays revealed that isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipid A from the sensitive P. aeruginosa strains bound PG-1 more effectively than LPS and lipid A from resistant B. cepacia strains. Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that the relative resistance of B. cepacia to protegrin is due to a reduced number of PG-1 binding sites on the lipid A moiety of its LPS.

  1. 19 CFR 10.223 - Articles eligible for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles eligible for preferential treatment. 10...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act Textile and Apparel Articles Under the United States-Caribbean...

  2. Predicting Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use from Preferential Music Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Crystal D.; Garcia, Javier A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana may be predicted from preferential consumption of particular music genres. Undergraduates (257 women and 78 men) completed a questionnaire assessing these variables. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for sensation-seeking tendencies and behaviors, revealed that…

  3. Experimental detection and evaluation of preferential flow in soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Císlerová, M.; Vogel, T.; Sněhota, M.; Votrubová, Jana; Dohnal, M.

    Karlsruhe : Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 2005 - (Uhlmann, O.; Annokkée, G.; Arendt, F.). nestr. [ConSoil 2005. 03.10.2005-07.10.2005, Bordeaux] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : soils * preferential flow * evaluation Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology http://www.consoil.de

  4. Unified Model for Generation Complex Networks with Utility Preferential Attachment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian-Jun; GAO Zi-You; SUN Hui-Jun

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, based on the utility preferential attachment, we propose a new unified model to generate different network topologies such as scale-free, small-world and random networks. Moreover, a new network structure named super scale network is found, which has monopoly characteristic in our simulation experiments. Finally, the characteristics ofthis new network are given.

  5. Infants' Preferential Attention to Sung and Spoken Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Giomi, Eugenia; Ilari, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Caregivers and early childhood teachers all over the world use singing and speech to elicit and maintain infants' attention. Research comparing infants' preferential attention to music and speech is inconclusive regarding their responses to these two types of auditory stimuli, with one study showing a music bias and another one…

  6. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  7. 19 CFR 10.237 - Verification and justification of claim for preferential tariff treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... preferential tariff treatment. 10.237 Section 10.237 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... preferential tariff treatment. (a) Verification by Customs. A claim for preferential tariff treatment made... port director may deny the claim for preferential tariff treatment. A verification of a claim...

  8. Do Karstic Unsaturated Zones Have the Fastest Preferential Flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Perkins, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    There is strong evidence that unsaturated-zone travel times for preferential flow, unlike those for diffuse flow, mostly fall within a relatively small range, even for a wide variety of media and conditions [Nimmo, 2007, Water Resources Research]. We have calculated travel times for preferential flow observations published in the last seven years, finding a range of travel velocities with a greater maximum than was previously recognized. The instances of faster transport, however, are predominantly for karst or other materials in which water flow may strongly influence the creation and development of preferential flow paths. These findings motivate a hypothesis: in media where the matrix is soluble, erodible, or otherwise vulnerable to enlargement by flowing water, this flow acts to reduce flow impediments within a macropore network. This might be thought of as a sculpting process in which water carves its conduit into a smoother, larger, less constrictive shape, as discussed in connection with soil pipes [Jones, 2010, Hydrological Processes]. Known developmental processes of karst and epikarst are consistent with this hypothesis. Its acceptance would open doors to expanded use of optimality and thermodynamic principles to understand and predict preferential flow. It also could lead to new modes of hydraulic characterization of subsurface media with regard to unsaturated flow, which are much needed as the difficulty of measuring hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone is a major barrier to the advance of hydrologic science. In practical terms, a new guideline may be justified: in unsaturated karst or other materials in which flowing water may enhance flowpaths, preferential transport rates in general may be several times faster than through media without such pore-developmental processes.

  9. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.;

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... synthesis was restricted to a narrow band in the part of the biofilm adjacent to the source of oxygen. The zone of active GFP expression was approximately 60 Am wide in colony biofilms and 30 Am wide in flow cell biofilms. The region of the biofilm in which cells were capable of elongation was mapped by...... treating colony biofilms with carbenicillin, which blocks cell division, and then measuring individual cell lengths by transmission electron microscopy. Cell elongation was localized at the air interface of the biofilm. The heterogeneous anabolic patterns measured inside these biofilms were likely a result...

  10. Synthesis of the A-band polysaccharide sugar D-rhamnose requires Rmd and WbpW: identification of multiple AlgA homologues, WbpW and ORF488, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetta, H L; Pacan, J C; Lam, J S

    1998-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of producing various cell-surface polysaccharides including alginate, A-band and B-band lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The D-mannuronic acid residues of alginate and the D-rhamnose (D-Rha) residues of A-band polysaccharide are both derived from the common sugar nucleotide precursor GDP-D-mannose (D-Man). Three genes, rmd, gmd and wbpW, which encode proteins involved in the synthesis of GDP-D-Rha, have been localized to the 5' end of the A-band gene cluster. In this study, WbpW was found to be homologous to phosphomannose isomerases (PMIs) and GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylases (GMPs) involved in GDP-D-Man biosynthesis. To confirm the enzymatic activity of WbpW, Escherichia coli PMI and GMP mutants deficient in the K30 capsule were complemented with wbpW, and restoration of K30 capsule production was observed. This indicates that WbpW, like AlgA, is a bifunctional enzyme that possesses both PMI and GMP activities for the synthesis of GDP-D-Man. No gene encoding a phosphomannose mutase (PMM) enzyme could be identified within the A-band gene cluster. This suggests that the PMM activity of AlgC may be essential for synthesis of the precursor pool of GDP-D-Man, which is converted to GDP-D-Rha for A-band synthesis. Gmd, a previously reported A-band enzyme, and Rmd are predicted to perform the two-step conversion of GDP-D-Man to GDP-D-Rha. Chromosomal mutants were generated in both rmd and wbpW. The Rmd mutants do not produce A-band LPS, while the WbpW mutants synthesize very low amounts of A band after 18 h of growth. The latter observation was thought to result from the presence of the functional homologue AlgA, which may compensate for the WbpW deficiency in these mutants. Thus, WbpW AlgA double mutants were constructed. These mutants also produced low levels of A-band LPS. A search of the PAO1 genome sequence identified a second AlgA homologue, designated ORF488, which may be responsible for the synthesis of GDP-D-Man in the absence of Wbp

  11. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND...... cystic fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected...

  12. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  13. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.; Heydorn, Arne; Molin, Søren; Givskov, Michael Christian; Parsek, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com......During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic...... abiotic surface. Biofilms formed by an alginate- overproducing strain exhibit a highly structured architecture and are significantly more resistant to the antibiotic tobramycin than a biofilm formed by an isogenic nonmucoid strain. These results suggest that an important consequence of the conversion to...... mucoidy is an altered biofilm architecture that shows increasing resistance to antimicrobial treatments....

  14. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation conferri

  15. Isolation of chlorhexidine-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, H; Kozukue, H

    1982-01-01

    The chlorhexidine resistance of 317 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospital patients was determined. The distribution pattern of their susceptibility to chlorhexidine clearly revealed two peaks, and the frequency of resistance to chlorhexidine was 84.2%.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa diversity in distinct paediatric patient groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G.A.; Ent, C.K. van der; Wolfs, T.F.;

    2008-01-01

    -CF patients and whether clonality of isolates occurs in other patient groups. The aim of this study was to investigate P. aeruginosa diversity and the occurrence of clones within five distinct paediatric patient groups susceptible to P. aeruginosa infection. P. aeruginosa isolates were cultured from 157...... patients (CF first infection (CF-1 group) (29); CF chronic infection (CF-chronic group) (27); urinary tract infection (34); chronic suppurative otitis media (43); and intensive-care hospitalization/immunodeficiency (24)). All 202 phenotypically different isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance...... and further typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Simpson's diversity index was calculated for the five groups. CF-chronic patients carried the highest number of distinct P. aeruginosa phenotypes and genotypes per culture. Isolates from the CF-chronic group were significantly less diverse than those from...

  17. Membrane-bound respiratory chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown aerobically.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, K; M. Yamada; Shinagawa, E; Adachi, O; Ameyama, M

    1980-01-01

    The electron transport chain of the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, grown aerobically, contained a number of primary dehydrogenases and respiratory components (soluble flavin, bound flavin, coenzyme Q9, heme b, heme c, and cytochrome o) in membrane particles of the organism. Cytochrome o, about 50% of the b-type cytochrome, seemed to function as a terminal oxidase in the respiratory chain. The electron transport chain of P. aeruginosa grown aerobically was suggested to be line...

  18. Rhamnolipid stimulates uptake of hydrophobic compounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Noordman, WH; Janssen, DB

    2002-01-01

    The biodegradation of hexadecane by five biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG1, Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43066, R. erythropolis ATCC 19558, and strain BCG112) was determined in the presence and absence of exogenously added biosurfactants. The degradation of hexadecane by P. aeruginosa was stimulated only by the rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by the same organism. This rhamnolipid did not stimulate the biodegradation of ...

  19. Rhamnolipid Stimulates Uptake of Hydrophobic Compounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Noordman, Wouter H.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2002-01-01

    The biodegradation of hexadecane by five biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG1, Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43066, R. erythropolis ATCC 19558, and strain BCG112) was determined in the presence and absence of exogenously added biosurfactants. The degradation of hexadecane by P. aeruginosa was stimulated only by the rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by the same organism. This rhamnolipid did not stimulate the biodegradation of ...

  20. The use of bacteriophages for P. aeruginosa biofilm control

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant opportunistic pathogen frequently associated with several nosocomial infections and, worryingly, this bacterium shows a low antibiotic susceptibility. One of its virulence factors is related with the ability to adhere to surfaces and also human epithelium and form virulent biofllms. This work describes the isolation and characterization of lytic phages capable to infect antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa strains. It is also described herein the potential o...

  1. Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Risk Factors and Clinical Impact†

    OpenAIRE

    Aloush, Valerie; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Seigman-Igra, Yardena; Cabili, Shaltiel; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading nosocomial pathogen, may become multidrug resistant (MDR). Its rate of occurrence, the individual risk factors among affected patients, and the clinical impact of infection are undetermined. We conducted an epidemiologic evaluation and molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of 36 isolates for 82 patients with MDR P. aeruginosa and 82 controls matched by ward, length of hospital stay, and calendar time. A matched case-control study iden...

  2. Serum antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Brett, M M; Ghoneim, A T; Littlewood, J M

    1986-01-01

    Serum IgG antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell surface antigens were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Titres in patients without cystic fibrosis were low (140-235). Those in patients with cystic fibrosis who were chronically infected by P. aeruginosa were very high (1100-20,500), while patients who grew the organism intermittently had lower titres (160-4400). Longitudinal studies showed that raised titres were observed at a very early stage of infection. High titres were ...

  3. Suppression of fungal growth exhibited by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Three surgery patients were monitored postoperatively, with particular reference to lung infection. In each case there was a clinical impression that Pseudomonas aeruginosa suppressed the growth of Candida albicans in patients with clinically significant lung infections from whom both of these organisms were isolated from serial sputum samples. Regrowth of C. albicans after P. aeruginosa eradication occurred in two patients, despite fluconazole therapy, to which both C. albicans isolates were...

  4. Isolation of lytic phages for clinical antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna; Faustino, A.; Azeredo, Joana

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant opportunist pathogen involved in noso-comial infections. P. aeruginosa uses an arsenal of virulence factors to cause serious infections and one of the most worrying characteristics of this bacte-rium is its low antibiotic susceptibility. The low susceptibility to antibiotics can be attributed to a concerted action of multidrug efflux pumps with chromo-somally-encoded antibiotic resistance genes and the low permeability of the bacterial cellular envelopes. ...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to acute right leg cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Wahab, Asrul; Rahman, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacillus that causes wide spectrum clinical infections. However, it is most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infection. In this case a 58-year-old male with underlying hypertension and dyslipidaemia was admitted for acute right leg cellulitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was identified from the case, though it was not a usual suspected organism. It might be due to community-acquired infection.

  6. Resistant patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Malaysian teaching hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zaidah AR; Siti SMN; Zahiruddin WM; Zeehaida M

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and the leading cause of nosocomial infec-tions.Currently a notable increase in the prevalence of multidrug-resistant P.aeruginosa worldwide has been reported in hospitalized patients and was associated with high morbidity and mortality.Methods:A retrospec-tive laboratory based analysis regarding the spectrum and distribution of P.aeruginosa from a wide range of clinical samples in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia since January 2003 to December 2007 was done.Re-sults:Altogether,there were 2 308 clinical isolates analyzed.The main sources of P.aeruginosa were from swab,respiratory,urine and blood specimens which accounted for 28.2 %,21.8 %,13.2 % and 12.8 %respectively.Results showed significant reduction in percentage of resistant towards three antibiotic namely ciprofloxacin,ceftazidime and imipenem.However the percentage of pan-resistant P.aeruginosa increased steadily over these years.Conclusion:This data is helpful to the clinician in guiding the choice of appropriate antibiotic to treat P.aeruginosa infection.At the same time,it warrants a more aggressive infection control ac-tivity to be implemented to control the spread of pan resistant strain in this centre.

  7. Innovation and Nested Preferential Growth in Chess Playing Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Perotti, Juan I; Schaigorodsky, Ana L; Billoni, Orlando V

    2013-01-01

    We study innovation in chess by analyzing how different move sequences are played at the population level. It is found that the probability of exploring a new or innovative move decreases as a power law with the frequency in which the preceding move sequence is played. Chess players also exploit already known move sequences according to their frequencies, following a preferential growth mechanism. Furthermore, innovation in chess exhibits Heaps' law suggesting similarities with the process of vocabulary growth. We propose a robust generative mechanism based on nested Yule-Simon preferential growth processes that reproduces the empirical observations. These results, supporting the self-similar nature of innovations in chess, are important in the context of decision making in a competitive scenario.

  8. Link prediction based on local information considering preferential attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shan

    2016-02-01

    Link prediction in complex networks has attracted much attention in many fields. In this paper, a common neighbors plus preferential attachment index is presented to estimate the likelihood of the existence of a link between two nodes based on local information of the nearest neighbors. Numerical experiments on six real networks demonstrated the high effectiveness and efficiency of the new index compared with five well-known and widely accepted indices: the common neighbors, resource allocation index, preferential attachment index, local path index and Katz index. The new index provides competitively accurate prediction with local path index and Katz index while has less computational complexity and is more accurate than the other two indices.

  9. Premixed turbulent combustion modelling with FGM including preferential diffusion effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goey, L.P.H. de; Oijen, J.A. van; Bastiaans, R.J.M. [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    2009-07-01

    The FGM technique is a new method to reduce chemical kinetics. It has already proven to be accurate for modelling (partially-) premixed flames in DNS, LES and RANS settings. Previous research has focussed on flames with unit Lewis number transport models, thereby neglecting preferential diffusion effects. The method is extended in the present contribution by introducing an additional mixing parameter W in the manifold, describing the combined fluctuations in enthalpy and element mass fractions due to flame stretch and preferential diffusion. The resulting 2D FGM is used in 2D DNS of a circular flame and compared with detailed chemistry. The agreement is near perfect thereby opening the way to model 3D turbulent CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2}-air flames on a slot burner with realistic non-unit Lewis numbers. A significant increase in flame wrinkling occurs due to local changes in burning intensity. (orig.)

  10. Emergence of Soft Communities from Geometric Preferential Attachment

    CERN Document Server

    Zuev, Konstantin; Bianconi, Ginestra; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    All real networks are different, but many have some structural properties in common. There seems to be no consensus on what the most common properties are, but scale-free degree distributions, strong clustering, and community structure are frequently mentioned without question. Surprisingly, there exists no simple generative mechanism explaining all the three properties at once in growing networks. Here we show how latent network geometry coupled with preferential attachment of nodes to this geometry fills this gap. We call this mechanism geometric preferential attachment (GPA), and validate it against the Internet. GPA gives rise to soft communities that provide a different perspective on the community structure in networks. The connections between GPA and cosmological models, including inflation, are also discussed.

  11. Preferential Trade Agreements and Welfare: General Equilibrium Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Juyoung Cheong; Shino Takayama; Terence Yeo

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the welfare effects of a preferential trade agreement (PTA) within a general equilibrium framework following Eaton and Kortum (2002) and conducts a comparative statics analysis of the equilibrium. The paper provides a closed-form analysis with no assumption of balanced trade and analyzes how a PTA affects the price level, trade flows, and welfare of both member and nonmember countries. We show that a PTA decreases the price level of not only member but also nonmember countr...

  12. Services commitments in preferential trade agreements: An expanded dataset

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Preferential trade agreements (PTAs) on services have proliferated since 2000. This working paper briefly presents the expansion of the dataset initially developed in Marchetti and Roy (2008). The data permits to assess the extent to which market access commitments undertaken by WTO Members in PTAs go beyond GATS commitments and offers made in the context of the Doha Development Agenda. The dataset, which covers PTA commitments of 53 WTO Members (counting EU Members States as one), is availab...

  13. Diagnostic Features of Emotional Expressions Are Processed Preferentially

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Scheller; Christian Büchel; Matthias Gamer

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic features of emotional expressions are differentially distributed across the face. The current study examined whether these diagnostic features are preferentially attended to even when they are irrelevant for the task at hand or when faces appear at different locations in the visual field. To this aim, fearful, happy and neutral faces were presented to healthy individuals in two experiments while measuring eye movements. In Experiment 1, participants had to accomplish an emotion cla...

  14. Adult motor axons preferentially reinnervate predegenerated muscle nerve

    OpenAIRE

    M. Abdullah; O'Daly, A.; A Vyas; Rohde, C.; Brushart, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Preferential motor reinnervation (PMR) is the tendency for motor axons regenerating after repair of mixed nerve to reinnervate muscle nerve and/or muscle rather than cutaneous nerve or skin. PMR may occur in response to the peripheral nerve pathway alone in juvenile rats (Brushart, 1993; Redett et al., 2005), yet the ability to identify and respond to specific pathway markers is reportedly lost in adults (Uschold et al., 2007). The experiments reported here evaluate the relative roles of path...

  15. The Influence of Search Engines on Preferential Attachment

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    There is much current interest in the evolution of social networks, in particular, the World Wide Web graph, through time. ``Preferential attachment'' and the ``copying model'' are well-known models that explain the observed power-law degree distribution of the graph reasonably well. However, existing evolution models do not include the significant influence of search engines on how webpage authors find existing pages and create links to them. Recent applied work has raised the concern that h...

  16. Preferential surface oxidation of Gd in Gd5Ge4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gd oxidizes preferentially at the (0 1 0) surface of Gd5Ge4. This is consistent with thermodynamic data for the bulk oxides. Upon oxidation in vacuum, the gadolinium oxide displaces or covers the Ge. Oxidation is more extensive at 600 K than at 300 K, because more oxygen is incorporated into the surface and the shift of the Gd binding energy is larger.

  17. Network Evolution by Relevance and Importance Preferential Attachment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Weituo

    2014-01-01

    Relevance and importance are the main factors when humans build network connections. We propose an evolutionary network model based on preferential attachment(PA) considering these factors. We analyze and compute several important features of the network class generated by this algorithm including scale free degree distribution, high clustering coefficient, small world property and core-periphery structure. We then compare this model with other network models and empirical data such as inter-city road transportation and air traffic networks.

  18. Significance of tree roots for preferential infiltration in stagnic soils

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, B; Lüescher, P.; P. F. Germann

    2009-01-01

    It is generally recognized that roots have an effect on infiltration. In this study we analysed the relation between root length distributions from Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst), silver fir (Abies alba Miller), European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and preferential infiltration in stagnic soils in the northern Pre-Alps in Switzerland. We conducted irrigation experiments (1 m2) and recorded water content var...

  19. Dye staining and excavation of a lateral preferential flow network

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, A.E.; Weiler, M.; Alila, Y.; Hudson, R. O.

    2009-01-01

    International audience Preferential flow features have been found to be important for runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability in many areas around the world. Although many studies have identified the particular characteristics of individual features and measured the runoff generation and solute transport within hillslopes, no studies have determined how individual features are hydraulically connected at a hillslope scale. In this study, we used dye staining and excavation ...

  20. Preferential growth in FeCoV/Ti:N multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, D.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Boeni, P.; Horisberger, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The preferential growth in Fe{sub 0.50}Co{sub 0.48}V{sub 0.02}/Ti:N multilayers was studied by X-ray diffraction. X-ray specular reflectometry and subsequent simulation of the spectra was used to extract information about the thickness and interface roughness of individual layers. The investigation gives structural information about the material combination and its potential for the use of neutron polarizers. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs.

  1. Cascades with coupled map lattices in preferential attachment community networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Di; Gao Zi-You; Zhao Xiao-Mei

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,cascading failure is studied by coupled map lattice (CML) methods in preferential attachment community networks.It is found that external perturbation R is increasing with modularity Q growing by simulation.In particular,the large modularity Q can hold off the cascading failure dynamic process in community networks.Furthermore,different attack strategies also greatly affect the cascading failure dynamic process. It is particularly significant to control cascading failure process in real community networks.

  2. Preferential Trade Agreements, Unemployment, and the Informal Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Heid, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    What are the welfare and employment consequences of preferential trade agreements (PTAs) for developing and emerging countries? Standard quantitative models of international trade which are generally used to assess the impact of PTAs assume full employment and hence abstract from (net) employment effects. This paper presents a quantitative framework to study the welfare and employment effects of PTAs taking into account the key feature of labor markets in emerging economies: A large share of ...

  3. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pure Exotoxin A on Mice WBC in Comparison with Human WBC Contaminated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    M Naghmachi; A Sharifi; J Kohanteb

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction & Objective: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram negative bacterial. This bacterium is resistant to many antibiotics and chemical disinfectants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacteria and caused infection in skin, external ear, upper respiratory tract, large intestine and is an important bacteria in nosocomial infections. It causes acute infection in burn disease. This bacterium can produce exotoxin A and effect on elongation factor II and can stop protein ...

  4. Preferential adsorption of uranium ions in aqueous solutions by polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amidoxime fiber and triazine fiber were prepared by chemical modification of commercially available polyacrylonitril fiber. It was found that the Amidoxime fiber is efficient to adsorb uranium ions in the artificial sea water. The efficiency of the preferential adsorption decreases by treatment the material with an acid-or an alkaline-solution. The triazine fiber adsorbs uranium ions only in aqueous solutions of such uranyl acetate, in the absence of other ions. In the artificial sea water, it adsorbs other ions instead of uranium. The preferential adsorption of uranium ions was further investigated with a series of polystyrenesulfonamides. Among the polystyrene derivatives, those having carboxyl groups, derived from imino diacetic acid (PSt-Imi), β-alanine (PSt-Ala), glycine (PSt-Gly), and sarcosine (PSt-Sar) were qualified for further discussion. However, it was found that the amount of adsorption of uranium ions by PSt-Imi decreases with increasing the volume of the artificial sea water and/or the duration of the treatment. Taking into account the facts, the preferential adsorption of uranium ions by PSt-Imi in aqueous solution was discussed in detail. (author)

  5. Significance of tree roots for preferential infiltration in stagnic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lange

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that roots have an effect on infiltration. In this study we analysed the influence of tree roots from Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst, silver fir (Abies alba Miller and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. on preferential infiltration in stagnic soils in the northern pre-Alps in Switzerland. We conducted irrigation experiments (1 m2 and recorded water content variations with time domain reflectrometry (TDR. A rivulet approach was applied to characterise preferential infiltration. Roots were sampled down to a depth of 0.5 to 1 m at the same position where the TDR-probes had been inserted and digitally measured. The basic properties of preferential infiltration, film thickness of mobile water and the contact length between soil and mobile water in the horizontal plane are closely related to fine root densities. An increase in root density resulted in an increase in contact length, but a decrease in film thickness. We modelled water content waves based on fine root densities and identified a range of root densities that lead to a maximum volume flux density and infiltration capacity. These findings provide convincing evidence that tree roots improve soil structure and thus infiltration.

  6. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens

  7. Bioadsorption characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kőnig-Péter Anikó

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of Cd(II and Pb(II ions from aqueous solution using lyophilized Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAOI cells were observed under various experimental conditions. The effect of pH, initial metal concentration, equilibration time and temperature on bioadsorption was investigated. The optimum pH value for Pb(II adsorption was found to be 5.0, and for Cd(II 5.0 − 6.0. The Pb(II and Cd(II bioadsorption equilibrium were analyzed by using Freundlich and Langmuir model using nonlinear least-squares estimation. The experimental maximum uptake capacity of Pb(II and Cd(II was estimated to be 164 mg g-1 and 113 mg g-1, respectively. For biosorption kinetic study the pseudo second-order kinetic model was applied at various temperatures. The temperature had no significant effect on Pb(II bioadsorption. In case of Cd(II bioadsorption the adsorbed amount decreased with increasing temperature.

  8. Molecular detection of an atypical, highly resistant, clonal Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate in cystic fibrosis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Deirdre

    2013-03-01

    The identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates in sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can be challenging due to the multitude of phenotypic changes isolates undergo during adaptation to the microenvironment of the CF lung.

  9. Assessing preferential flow by simultaneously injecting nanoparticle and chemical tracers

    KAUST Repository

    Subramanian, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    The exact manner in which preferential (e.g., much faster than average) flow occurs in the subsurface through small fractures or permeable connected pathways of other kinds is important to many processes but is difficult to determine, because most chemical tracers diffuse quickly enough from small flow channels that they appear to move more uniformly through the rock than they actually do. We show how preferential flow can be assessed by injecting 2 to 5 nm carbon particles (C-Dots) and an inert KBr chemical tracer at different flow rates into a permeable core channel that is surrounded by a less permeable matrix in laboratory apparatus of three different designs. When the KBr tracer has a long enough transit through the system to diffuse into the matrix, but the C-Dot tracer does not, the C-Dot tracer arrives first and the KBr tracer later, and the separation measures the degree of preferential flow. Tracer sequestration in the matrix can be estimated with a Peclet number, and this is useful for experiment design. A model is used to determine the best fitting core and matrix dispersion parameters and refine estimates of the core and matrix porosities. Almost the same parameter values explain all experiments. The methods demonstrated in the laboratory can be applied to field tests. If nanoparticles can be designed that do not stick while flowing through the subsurface, the methods presented here could be used to determine the degree of fracture control in natural environments, and this capability would have very wide ranging value and applicability.

  10. Field investigation of preferential fissure flow paths with hydrochemical analysis of small-scale sprinkling experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzeminska, D.M.; Bogaard, T.A.; Debieche, T.-H.; Cervi, F.; Marc, V.; Malet, J.-P.

    2014-01-01

    The unsaturated zone largely controls groundwater recharge by buffering precipitation while at the same time providing preferential flow paths for infiltration. The importance of preferential flow on landslide hydrology is recognised in the literature; however, its monitoring and quantification rema

  11. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs. PMID:27149698

  12. Detection and characterization of metallo beta lactamases producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoharan A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate phenotypic and genotypic methods for detection of Metallo-Beta-Lactamases (MBLs among nosocomial Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Sixty one among 176 P. aeruginosa isolates, collected as part of a multicentric study (2005-2007, were evaluated for carbapenem resistance (CARB-R; resistant to either imipenem/meropenem and screened for MBL by Combination Disk Diffusion Test (CDDT using imipenem (IMP, meropenem (MER and ceftazidime (CAZ with EDTA. MBL positives were further confirmed by IMP + EDTA Etest. Twenty strains (42.6% were found to be MBL producers among the 61 P. aeruginosa. PCR for IMP and VIM MBL was performed on 48 of the 61, 15 were positive for VIM MBL type. CDDT using IMP + EDTA had the highest sensitivity and specificity of 87.8% and 84.4% when compared to Etest, which was higher than the values obtained for CAZ + EDTA and MER + EDTA. CDDT using IMP + EDTA also compared very well with the PCR (specificity = 90.9%, sensitivity = 93.3%. CARB-R among P. aeruginosa is mediated predominantly via MBL production. Clinical P. aeruginosa isolates can be screened routinely using the less expensive IMP + EDTA CDDT in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  13. METALLO-BETA-LACTAMASE PRODUCING PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN NEONATAL SEPTICEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence, selective multiplication & dissemination of antibacterial resistance is a serious global problem. This study was conducted with the objective to examine the incidence of metallo-beta-lactamase (MβL producing strains among multidrug resistant (MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the suspected cases of neonatal sepsis between January 2011 – December 2013. A total of 994 cases admitted with the suspicion of neonatal sepsis were investigated. 295 (29.7% isolates were obtained from the blood cultures of neonates. The isolates were identified and tested for the susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents. Pseudomonas aeruginosa with 116 (48.3% isolation among 240 Gram negative isolates, was the predominant pathogen in our study. All the 74 (63.8% multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were screened initially for Imipenem resistance, which were further tested for the presence of MβL by Imipenem-ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA disc method. MβL production was seen in 20 (71.4% of the 28 Imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. MβL producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as a potential threat in cases of neonatal septicemia and poses great therapeutic challenge for physicians treating such infections.

  14. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; San Millan, Alvaro; Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-05-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs. PMID:27149698

  15. Influence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Chawla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8% patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3% and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008, greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007, a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03, and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis.

  16. Vadose Zone Sampling Methods for Detection of Preferential Pesticides Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peranginangin, N.; Richards, B. K.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2003-12-01

    Leaching of agricultural applied chemicals through the vadose zone is a major cause for the occurrence of agrichemicals in groundwater. Accurate soil water sampling methods are needed to ensure meaningful monitoring results, especially for soils that have significant preferential flow paths. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability and the effectiveness of various soil water sampling methods in detecting preferential transport of pesticides in a strongly-structured silty clay loam (Hudson series) soil. Soil water sampling devices tested were wick pan and gravity pan lysimeters, tile lines, porous ceramic cups, and pipe lysimeters; all installed at 45 to105 cm depth below the ground surface. A reasonable worse-case scenario was tested by applying a simulated rain storm soon after pesticides were sprayed at agronomic rates. Herbicides atrazine (6-chloro-N2-ethyl-N4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and 2,4-D (2,4-dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid) were chosen as model compounds. Chloride (KCl) tracer was used to determine spatial and temporal distribution of non-reactive solute and water as well as a basis for determining the retardation in pesticides movement. Results show that observed pesticide mobility was much greater than would be predicted by uniform flow. Under relatively high soil moisture conditions, gravity and wick pan lysimeters had comparably good collection efficiencies, whereas the wick samplers had an advantage over gravity driven sampler when the soil moisture content was below field capacity. Pipe lysimeters had breakthrough patterns that were similar to pan samplers. At small plot scale, tile line samplers tended to underestimate solute concentration because of water dilution around the samplers. The use of porous cup samplers performed poorly because of their sensitivity to local profile characteristics: only by chance can they intercept and sample the preferential flow paths that are critical to transport. Wick sampler had the least

  17. Preferential diagonal penetration of vortices into square superconducting networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed vortex penetration into Nb thin films with square arrays of square holes with variable sizes and lattice constants. We find that when the lattice spacing is large and the width of superconducting line is narrow, vortices penetrate diagonally rather than parallel to the nearest neighbor direction. This phenomenon is also confirmed in NbTiN samples with the same geometry. We also confirm that the direction of edge relative to that of hole array is not relevant. Possible origin of such a preferential penetration is proposed.

  18. Preferential trade agreements and the structure of international trade

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Neil; Stehrer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we examine the impact of membership in preferential trade agreements (PTAs) on trade between PTA members. Rather than considering the impact of PTA membership on the volume of trade we consider the impact of membership on the structure of trade. For a large sample of countries over the period 1962?2000 we find that membership in a PTA is associated with an increase in the extent of intra-industry trade. Our results indicate that this is especially the case fo...

  19. Cystic fibrosis-niche adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduces virulence in multiple infection hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Riva, Camilla; Juhas, Mario; Schwager, Stephan; Eberl, Leo; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to thrive in diverse ecological niches and to cause serious human infection. P. aeruginosa environmental strains are producing various virulence factors that are required for establishing acute infections in several host organisms; however, the P. aeruginosa phenotypic variants favour long-term persistence in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Whether P. aeruginosa strains, which have adapted to the CF-niche, have lost their competitive...

  20. Phenolic compounds affect production of pyocyanin, swarming motility and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin Ugurlu; Aysegul Karahasan Yagci; Seyhan Ulusoy; Burak Aksu; Gulgun Bosgelmez-Tinaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of plant-derived phenolic compounds (i.e. caffeic acid, cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and vanillic acid) on the production of quorum sensing regulated virulence factors such as pyocyanin, biofilm formation and swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates. Methods: Fourteen clinical P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from urine samples and P. aeruginosa PA01 strain were included in the study. The antibacterial effects of phenolic comp...

  1. Simple sequence repeats and mucoid conversion: biased mucA mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro J Moyano

    Full Text Available In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, conversion to the mucoid phenotype marks the onset of an irreversible state of the infection in Cystic Fibrosis (CF patients. The main pathway for mucoid conversion is mutagenesis of the mucA gene, frequently due to -1 bp deletions in a simple sequence repeat (SSR of 5 Gs (G(5-SSR(426. We have recently observed that this mucA mutation is particularly accentuated in Mismatch Repair System (MRS-deficient cells grown in vitro. Interestingly, previous reports have shown a high prevalence of hypermutable MRS-deficient strains occurring naturally in CF chronic lung infections. Here, we used mucA as a forward mutation model to systematically evaluate the role of G(5-SSR(426 in conversion to mucoidy in a MRS-deficient background, with this being the first analysis combining SSR-dependent localized hypermutability and the acquisition of a particular virulence/persistence trait in P. aeruginosa. In this study, mucA alleles were engineered with different contents of G:C SSRs, and tested for their effect on the mucoid conversion frequency and mucA mutational spectra in a mutS-deficient strain of P. aeruginosa. Importantly, deletion of G(5-SSR(426 severely reduced the emergence frequency of mucoid variants, with no preferential site of mutagenesis within mucA. Moreover, although mutagenesis in mucA was not totally removed, this was no longer the main pathway for mucoid conversion, suggesting that G(5-SSR(426 biased mutations towards mucA. Mutagenesis in mucA was restored by the addition of a new SSR (C(6-SSR(431, and even synergistically increased when G(5-SSR(426 and C(6-SSR(431 were present simultaneously, with the mucA mutations being restricted to -1 bp deletions within any of both G:C SSRs. These results confirm a critical role for G(5-SSR(426 enhancing the mutagenic process of mucA in MRS-deficient cells, and shed light on another mechanism, the SSR- localized hypermutability, contributing to mucoid conversion in P

  2. 19 CFR 10.712 - Verification of claim for preferential tariff treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification of claim for preferential tariff... tariff treatment. A claim for preferential tariff treatment made under § 10.703 of this subpart... substantiate the claim, the port director may deny the claim for preferential tariff treatment....

  3. 19 CFR 10.703 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment... States-Jordan Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements § 10.703 Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment. An importer may make a claim for US-JFTA preferential tariff treatment by including on the...

  4. 19 CFR 10.235 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment... Trade Partnership Act § 10.235 Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment. (a) Declaration. In connection with a claim for preferential tariff treatment for an article described in § 10.233(a)(1)...

  5. 19 CFR 10.803 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment... RATE, ETC. United States-Bahrain Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements § 10.803 Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation. An importer may make a claim for BFTA preferential...

  6. 19 CFR 10.763 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment... RATE, ETC. United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements § 10.763 Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation. An importer may make a claim for MFTA preferential...

  7. A case of failed eradication of cystic fibrosis-related sinus colonisation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Linnane, Barry

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen associated with cystic fibrosis that has potential to decrease lung function and cause respiratory failure. Paranasal sinuses are increasingly recognised as potential reservoirs for intermittent colonisation by P. aeruginosa. This case documents investigation and outcome of P. aeruginosa recurrence in a male paediatric patient over an eight year period.

  8. Ambroxol inhibits mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenlei; Yu, Jialin; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli; Li, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals. Because it forms biofilms, which protect against host immune attack and increase resistance to conventional antibiotics, mucoid P. aeruginosa is nearly impossible to eradicate. Moreover, mucoid conversion of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to poor outcomes. This conversion is mainly due to mucA gene mutation, which is thought to be induced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the reactive oxygen species they release. Ambroxol, a mucolytic agent with antioxidant characteristics, is used clinically, and this compound has recently been demonstrated to possess anti-biofilm properties. In this study, we found that ambroxol inhibits the H2 O2 -mediated conversion of P. aeruginosa from a non-mucoid to a mucoid phenotype, an effect that is due to its antioxidant property against H2 O2 . Furthermore, the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms was increased in vitro when used in combination with ambroxol. PMID:27102839

  9. Sphingoid long chain bases prevent lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Tavakoli Tabazavareh, Shaghayegh; Grassmé, Heike; Becker, Katrin Anne; Japtok, Lukasz; Steinmann, Jörg; Joseph, Tammar; Lang, Stephan; Tuemmler, Burkhard; Schuchman, Edward H; Lentsch, Alex B; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J; Futerman, Anthony H; Gulbins, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, trauma, burn wound, or patients requiring ventilation are susceptible to severe pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physiological innate defense mechanisms against this pathogen, and their alterations in lung diseases, are for the most part unknown. We now demonstrate a role for the sphingoid long chain base, sphingosine, in determining susceptibility to lung infection by P. aeruginosa. Tracheal and bronchial sphingosine levels were significantly reduced in tissues from cystic fibrosis patients and from cystic fibrosis mouse models due to reduced activity of acid ceramidase, which generates sphingosine from ceramide. Inhalation of mice with sphingosine, with a sphingosine analog, FTY720, or with acid ceramidase rescued susceptible mice from infection. Our data suggest that luminal sphingosine in tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells prevents pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection in normal individuals, paving the way for novel therapeutic paradigms based on inhalation of acid ceramidase or of sphingoid long chain bases in lung infection. PMID:25085879

  10. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  11. Effects of antibiotics on quorum sensing in pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersø, Mette Elena; Alhede, Morten; Phipps, Richard Kerry;

    2008-01-01

    impeding QS, thereby reducing the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. This led us to investigate whether QS inhibition is a common feature of antibiotics. We present the results of a screening of 12 antibiotics for their QS-inhibitory activities using a previously described QS inhibitor selector 1 strain...... animal infection models. Treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa with the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) has been demonstrated to improve the clinical outcome. Several studies indicate that AZM may accomplish its beneficial action in CF patients by....... Three of the antibiotics tested, AZM, ceftazidime (CFT), and ciprofloxacin (CPR), were very active in the assay and were further examined for their effects on QS-regulated virulence factor production in P. aeruginosa. The effects of the three antibiotics administered at subinhibitory concentrations were...

  12. Innovation and nested preferential growth in chess playing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, J. I.; Jo, H.-H.; Schaigorodsky, A. L.; Billoni, O. V.

    2013-11-01

    Complexity develops via the incorporation of innovative properties. Chess is one of the most complex strategy games, where expert contenders exercise decision making by imitating old games or introducing innovations. In this work, we study innovation in chess by analyzing how different move sequences are played at the population level. It is found that the probability of exploring a new or innovative move decreases as a power law with the frequency of the preceding move sequence. Chess players also exploit already known move sequences according to their frequencies, following a preferential growth mechanism. Furthermore, innovation in chess exhibits Heaps' law suggesting similarities with the process of vocabulary growth. We propose a robust generative mechanism based on nested Yule-Simon preferential growth processes that reproduces the empirical observations. These results, supporting the self-similar nature of innovations in chess are important in the context of decision making in a competitive scenario, and extend the scope of relevant findings recently discovered regarding the emergence of Zipf's law in chess.

  13. Synergic interaction between ascorbic acid and antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cursino

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out on in vitro combination of ascorbic acid (AA with six antibiotics against 12 multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Synergic activity was detected with AA chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin and tetracycline. Indifference was observed to any antibiotics and antagonism only for chloramphenicol. Results indicated that multiresistant P. aeruginosa was affected by combination of AA and antibiotics. Future research on ascorbic acid-antimicrobial interactions may find new methods to control strains of multiresistant P. aeruginosa.Investigou-se in vitro o efeito da combinação do ácido ascórbico (AA com seis antibióticos frente a 12 isolados multirresistentes de Pseudomonas aeruginosa. As concentrações inibitórias mínimas (CIM foram determinadas pelo método de diluição em caldo. Foi estudado o efeito do AA nas CIM pelo cálculo das concentrações inibitórias fracionais (CIF. Para quase todas as combinações AA-antibiótico foi detectado efeito sinérgico, exceto para ampicilina e tobramicina. Indiferença foi observada na interação com todos os antibióticos, porém antagonismo foi somente observado para cloranfenicol. Os resultados deste estudo indicam que o sinergismo contra P. aeruginosa resistentes pode ocorrer entre AA e cloranfenicol, canamicina, estreptomicina e tetraciclina, ainda que as linhagens sejam resistentes aos antibióticos individualmente. Além disso, estes resultados encorajam futuros trabalhos in vivo a respeito da interação AA-antimicrobianos na incessante busca de novas alternativas para o controle de linhagens multirresistentes de P.aeruginosa.

  14. Prevalence and analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chinchillas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoyama Naoki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger are popular as pets and are often used as laboratory animals for various studies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious agent that causes otitis media, pneumonia, septicaemia enteritis, and sudden death in chinchillas. This bacterium is also a leading cause of nosocomial infections in humans. To prevent propagation of P. aeruginosa infection among humans and animals, detailed characteristics of the isolates, including antibiotic susceptibility and genetic features, are needed. In this study, we surveyed P. aeruginosa distribution in chinchillas bred as pets or laboratory animals. We also characterized the isolates from these chinchillas by testing for antibiotic susceptibility and by gene analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41.8% of the 67 chinchillas included in the study. Slide agglutination and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discriminated 5 serotypes and 7 unique patterns, respectively. For the antibiotic susceptibility test, 40.9% of isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, 77.3% to ciprofloxacin, 77.3% to imipenem, and 72.7% to ceftazidime. DNA analyses confirmed that none of the isolates contained the gene encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases; however, 2 of the total 23 isolates were found to have a gene similar to the pilL gene that has been identified in the pathogenicity island of a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa. Conclusions P. aeruginosa is widely spread in chinchillas, including strains with reduced susceptibility to the antibiotics and highly virulent strains. The periodic monitoring should be performed to help prevent the propagation of this pathogen and reduce the risk of infection from chinchillas to humans.

  15. Bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, M. A.; Irannajad, M.; Azadmehr, A. R.; Meshkini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Bioleaching is an environmentally friendly method for extraction of metal from ores. In this study, bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a heterotrophic bacterium that can produce various organic acids in an appropriate culture medium, and these acids can operate as leaching agents. The parameters, such as particle size, glucose percentage in the culture medium, bioleaching time, and solid/liquid ratio were optimized. Optimum bioleaching conditions were found as follows: particle size of 150-177 μm, glucose percentage of 6%, bioleaching time of 8 d, and solid/liquid ratio of 1:80. Under these conditions, 53% of copper was extracted.

  16. Ultraviolet-B lethal damage on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has shown an increased sensitivity compared with that of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae, when they were exposed to 0.4 kJ/m2 of ultraviolet-B radiation. The rapid decay in cell viability observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa after the irradiation was influenced by factors such as culture media and the presence of pyocyanine during the irradiation. The radioinduced lethal damage could be prevented by photoreactivating treatment, indicating that pyrimidine dimer formation was the mechanism causing bacterial death. The results indicate that several environmental conditions may act as protective agents against ultraviolet-B-induced damage

  17. [Structural components and peculiarities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, O B; Avdieieva, L V

    2010-01-01

    Peculiarities of the structural organization of bacterial biofilm during its formation and disintegration have been investigated on the model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCM B-900 (ATCC 9027). It was shown, that development of the biofilm in a stationary system on glass was a two-vector process with changes in time and space. P. aeruginosa UCM B-900 biofilm is formed from single cells, passes through the stages of base components, net structure, islands and comes to the end with integration into a complete monolayer. The biofilm degradation repeats the stages of its formation in the reverse sequence. PMID:20812507

  18. Colistin-Tobramycin Combinations Are Superior to Monotherapy Concerning the Killing of Biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, G.; Yang, Liang; Wu, H.;

    2010-01-01

    biofilms. Methods. P. aeruginosa biofilms were generated in vitro and in rat lungs. In a pilot study, 5 patients with cystic fibrosis inhaled colistin and then tobramycin for 4 weeks. The changes in P. aeruginosa counts and lung function were assessed before and after therapy. Results. Antibiotic...... combination therapy significantly reduced the number of P. aeruginosa cells in P. aeruginosa biofilm models in vitro. When rats were challenged with 1 x 10(7) cfu of P. aeruginosa, which was embedded in alginate beads, mortality rates, lung pathologic findings, and bacterial colony-forming unit counts were...

  19. Complex networks as an emerging property of hierarchical preferential attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Laurence, Edward; Allard, Antoine; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Dubé, Louis J

    2015-12-01

    Real complex systems are not rigidly structured; no clear rules or blueprints exist for their construction. Yet, amidst their apparent randomness, complex structural properties universally emerge. We propose that an important class of complex systems can be modeled as an organization of many embedded levels (potentially infinite in number), all of them following the same universal growth principle known as preferential attachment. We give examples of such hierarchy in real systems, for instance, in the pyramid of production entities of the film industry. More importantly, we show how real complex networks can be interpreted as a projection of our model, from which their scale independence, their clustering, their hierarchy, their fractality, and their navigability naturally emerge. Our results suggest that complex networks, viewed as growing systems, can be quite simple, and that the apparent complexity of their structure is largely a reflection of their unobserved hierarchical nature. PMID:26764746

  20. Choosy Cannibals Preferentially Consume Siblings with Relatively Low Fitness Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Matthew B; McCormack, Larkin; Gadau, Alice; Martin, Ryan A

    2016-07-01

    When an individual can selfishly cannibalize a relative or altruistically set it free, the benefits of altruism will be positively associated with the relative's fitness prospects (the benefits it receives from altruism). We tested the prediction that altruism should be preferentially directed toward high-quality relatives using larvae of the New Mexican spadefoot toad (Spea multiplicata), a species in which tadpoles plastically express omnivore and carnivore ecomorphs. In a no-choice design, we presented carnivores with sibling or nonsibling omnivores varying in developmental stage, which is positively associated with survival in this toad's ephemeral larval environment. There was a significant interaction between relatedness and developmental stage on the probability of cannibalism: carnivores were overall more likely to cannibalize less developed omnivores, but this effect was exaggerated when the potential victim was a sibling. This evidence that altruists favor relatives with high fitness prospects highlights the numerous factors shaping altruism's payoffs. PMID:27322127

  1. Growth mechanism of a preferentially oriented mordenite membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; LIN Rui-sen; KIKUCHI Eiichi; MATSUKATA Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    A preferentially oriented mordenite membrane was successfully prepared on a seeded porous α-alumina support.Characterization results of XRD (X-ray diffractometer) and FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscope) revealed that evolutionary selection might predominantly contribute to the formation of the sharply oriented mordenite membrane. The necessary conditions under which evolutionary selection occurs are: (a) the number density of nuclei on the support surface should be high enough at the early stage; (b) the crystals should grow fastest along one direction; and (c) the zeolite layer should proceed via the successive growth of the crystals nucleated on the support surface instead of the accumulation of the crystals formed in the bulk solution.

  2. Preferential partner selection in an evolutionary study of prisoner's dilemma

    CERN Document Server

    Ashlock, D; Stanley, E A; Tesfatsion, L; Ashlock, Dan; Smucker, Mark D; Stanley, E Ann; Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1994-01-01

    Partner selection is an important process in many social interactions, permitting individuals to decrease the risks associated with cooperation. In large populations, defectors may escape punishment by roving from partner to partner, but defectors in smaller populations risk social isolation. We investigate these possibilities for an evolutionary prisoner's dilemma in which agents use expected payoffs to choose and refuse partners. In comparison to random or round-robin partner matching, we find that the average payoffs attained with preferential partner selection tend to be more narrowly confined to a few isolated payoff regions. Most ecologies evolve to essentially full cooperative behavior, but when agents are intolerant of defections, or when the costs of refusal and social isolation are small, we also see the emergence of wallflower ecologies in which all agents are socially isolated. In between these two extremes, we see the emergence of ecologies whose agents tend to engage in a small number of defecti...

  3. An algorithm for preferential selection of spectroscopic targets in LEGUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a general target selection algorithm that is applicable to any survey in which the number of available candidates is much larger than the number of objects to be observed. This routine aims to achieve a balance between a smoothly-varying, well-understood selection function and the desire to preferentially select certain types of targets. Some target-selection examples are shown that illustrate different possibilities of emphasis functions. Although it is generally applicable, the algorithm was developed specifically for the LAMOST Experiment for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (LEGUE) survey that will be carried out using the Chinese Guo Shou Jing Telescope. In particular, this algorithm was designed for the portion of LEGUE targeting the Galactic halo, in which we attempt to balance a variety of science goals that require stars at fainter magnitudes than can be completely sampled by LAMOST. This algorithm has been implemented for the halo portion of the LAMOST pilot survey, which began in October 2011.

  4. Preferential emission into epsilon-near-zero metamaterial [Invited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the use of epsilon near zero (ENZ) metamaterial to control spontaneous emission from Zinc-Oxide (ZnO) excitons. The ENZ material consists of alternating layers of silver and alumina with subwavelength thicknesses, resulting in an effective medium where one of the components of the dielectric constant approach zero between 370nm-440nm wavelength range. Bulk ZnO with photoluminescence maximum in the ENZ regime was deposited via atomic layer deposition to obtain a smooth film with near field coupling to the ENZ metamaterial. Preferential emission from the ZnO layer into the metamaterial with suppression of forward emission by 90% in comparison to ZnO on silicon is observed. We attribute this observation to the presence of dispersionless plasmonic modes in the ENZ regime as shown by the results of theoretical modeling presented here. Integration of ENZ metamaterials with light emitters is an attractive platform for realizing a low threshold subwavelength laser

  5. Complex networks are an emerging property of hierarchical preferential attachment

    CERN Document Server

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Allard, Antoine; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Dubé, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Real complex systems are not rigidly structured; no clear rules or blueprints exist for their construction. Yet, amidst their apparent randomness, complex structural properties appear to universally emerge. We propose that an important class of complex systems can be modelled as a construction of potentially infinitely many levels of organization all following the same universal growth principle known as preferential attachment. We give examples of such hierarchy in real systems, for instance in the pyramid of production entities of the movie industry. More importantly, we show how real complex networks can be interpreted as a projection of our model, from which their scale independence, their clustering or modularity, their hierarchy, their fractality and their navigability naturally emerge. Our results suggest that complex networks, viewed as growing systems, can be quite simple, and that the apparent complexity of their structure is largely a reflection of the hierarchical nature of our world.

  6. Granger causality stock market networks: Temporal proximity and preferential attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Výrost, Tomáš; Lyócsa, Štefan; Baumöhl, Eduard

    2015-06-01

    The structure of return spillovers is examined by constructing Granger causality networks using daily closing prices of 20 developed markets from 2nd January 2006 to 31st December 2013. The data is properly aligned to take into account non-synchronous trading effects. The study of the resulting networks of over 94 sub-samples revealed three significant findings. First, after the recent financial crisis the impact of the US stock market has declined. Second, spatial probit models confirmed the role of the temporal proximity between market closing times for return spillovers, i.e. the time distance between national stock markets matters. Third, a preferential attachment between stock markets exists, i.e. the probability of the presence of spillover effects between any given two markets increases with their degree of connectedness to others.

  7. Preferential dissolution behaviour in Ni–Cr dental cast alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Viswanathan S Saji; Han Cheol Choe

    2010-08-01

    A Ni–Cr–Mo dental alloy was fabricated by three different casting methods, viz. centrifugal casting, high frequency induction casting and vacuum pressure casting. The dependence of cast microstructure on the electrochemical corrosion behaviour was investigated using potentiodynamic cyclic and potentiostatic polarization techniques, impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results were compared and discussed with those obtained for a Co–Cr–Mo counterpart. The results of the study showed that the variation in casting morphologies with casting methods has only marginal influence in the overall corrosion resistance of Ni–Cr and Co–Cr dental alloys. There was severe preferential dissolution of Ni rich, Cr and Mo depleted zones from the Ni–Cr–Mo alloy. The overall corrosion resistance property of the Co–Cr base alloy was better than that of the Ni–Cr base alloy.

  8. Efficient target control of complex networks based on preferential matching

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xizhe; Lv, Tianyang

    2016-01-01

    Controlling a complex network towards a desire state is of great importance in many applications. Existing works present an approximate algorithm to find the driver nodes used to control partial nodes of the network. However, the driver nodes obtained by this algorithm depend on the matching order of nodes and cannot get the optimum results. Here we present a novel algorithm to find the driver nodes for target control based on preferential matching. The algorithm elaborately arrange the matching order of nodes in order to minimize the size of the driver nodes set. The results on both synthetic and real networks indicate that the performance of proposed algorithm are better than the previous one. The algorithm may have various application in controlling complex networks.

  9. From Idealism to Realism? EU Preferential Trade Agreement Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Garcia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the EU’s ‘conflicted power’ in trade has played out within its preferential trade agreement (PTA strategies with third parties. It does this by providing an overview of how approaches to the EU’s external trade policies have evolved over time, especially since the end of the Cold War. Tracing changes in discourse in the EU’s consolidated trade policy demonstrates how the policy objectives have evolved from what could be characterised as a soft and even normative power to a much more realist one, attempting to safeguard its position in the international economic order. Notwithstanding these changes, explained by a combination of international context and ideational preferences, an underlying overall continuity has remained in terms of the main economic interests to be realised through trade policy, which presents a portrait of the EU as a rational and realist (if sometimes conflicted actor in the global economy.

  10. Growing networks with preferential addition and deletion of edges

    CERN Document Server

    Deijfen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A preferential attachment model for a growing network incorporating deletion of edges is studied and the expected asymptotic degree distribution is analyzed. At each time step $t=1,2,\\ldots$, with probability $\\pi_1>0$ a new vertex with one edge attached to it is added to the network and the edge is connected to an existing vertex chosen proportionally to its degree, with probability $\\pi_2$ a vertex is chosen proportionally to its degree and an edge is added between this vertex and a randomly chosen other vertex, and with probability $\\pi_3=1-\\pi_1-\\pi_21/3$, the fraction $p_k$ decays exponentially at rate $(\\pi_1+\\pi_2)/2\\pi_3$. There is hence a non-trivial upper bound for how much deletion the network can incorporate without loosing the power-law behavior of the degree distribution. The analytical results are supported by simulations.

  11. Cambogin is preferentially cytotoxic to cells expressing PDGFR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Tian

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs have been implicated in a wide array of human malignancies, including medulloblastoma (MB, the most common brain tumor of childhood. Although significant progress in MB biology and therapeutics has been achieved during the past decades, MB remains a horrible challenge to the physicians and researchers. Therefore, novel inhibitors targeting PDGFR signaling pathway may offer great promise for the treatment of MB. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and mechanisms of cambogin in Daoy MB cells. Our results show that cambogin triggers significant S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via down regulation of cyclin A and E, and activation of caspases. More importantly, further mechanistic studies demonstrated that cambogin inhibits PDGFR signaling in Daoy and genetically defined mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF cell lines. These results suggest that cambogin is preferentially cytotoxic to cells expressing PDGFR. Our findings may provide a novel approach by targeting PDGFR signaling against MB.

  12. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  13. Preferential Use of Public TCR during Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunqian; Nguyen, Phuong; Ma, Jing; Wu, Tianhua; Jones, Lindsay L; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Geiger, Terrence L

    2016-06-15

    How the TCR repertoire, in concert with risk-associated MHC, imposes susceptibility for autoimmune diseases is incompletely resolved. Due largely to recombinatorial biases, a small fraction of TCRα or β-chains are shared by most individuals, or public. If public TCR chains modulate a TCRαβ heterodimer's likelihood of productively engaging autoantigen, because they are pervasive and often high frequency, they could also broadly influence disease risk and progression. Prior data, using low-resolution techniques, have identified the heavy use of select public TCR in some autoimmune models. In this study, we assess public repertoire representation in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis at high resolution. Saturation sequencing was used to identify >18 × 10(6) TCRβ sequences from the CNSs, periphery, and thymi of mice at different stages of autoimmune encephalomyelitis and healthy controls. Analyses indicated the prominent representation of a highly diverse public TCRβ repertoire in the disease response. Preferential formation of public TCR implicated in autoimmunity was identified in preselection thymocytes, and, consistently, public, disease-associated TCRβ were observed to be commonly oligoclonal. Increased TCR sharing and a focusing of the public TCR response was seen with disease progression. Critically, comparisons of peripheral and CNS repertoires and repertoires from preimmune and diseased mice demonstrated that public TCR were preferentially deployed relative to nonshared, or private, sequences. Our findings implicate public TCR in skewing repertoire response during autoimmunity and suggest that subsets of public TCR sequences may serve as disease-specific biomarkers or influence disease susceptibility or progression. PMID:27183575

  14. Cyclosporin A preferentially attenuates skeletal slow-twitch muscle regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyabara E.H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, is associated with muscle regeneration via NFATc1/GATA2-dependent pathways. However, it is not clear whether calcineurin preferentially affects the regeneration of slow- or fast-twitch muscles. We investigated the effect of a calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, on the morphology and fiber diameter of regenerating slow- and fast-twitch muscles. Adult Wistar rats (259.5 ± 9 g maintained under standard conditions were treated with CsA (20 mg/kg body weight, ip for 5 days, submitted to cryolesion of soleus and tibialis anterior (TA muscles on the 6th day, and then treated with CsA for an additional 21 days. The muscles were removed, weighed, frozen, and stored in liquid nitrogen. Cryolesion did not alter the body weight gain of the animals after 21 days of regeneration (P = 0.001 and CsA significantly reduced the body weight gain (15.5%; P = 0.01 during the same period. All treated TA and soleus muscles showed decreased weights (17 and 29%, respectively, P < 0.05. CsA treatment decreased the cross-sectional area of both soleus and TA muscles of cryoinjured animals (TA: 2108 ± 930 vs 792 ± 640 µm²; soleus: 2209 ± 322 vs 764 ± 439 m²; P < 0.001. Histological sections of both muscles stained with Toluidine blue revealed similar regenerative responses after cryolesion. In addition, CsA was able to minimize these responses, i.e., centralized nuclei and split fibers, more efficiently so in TA muscle. These results indicate that calcineurin preferentially plays a role in regeneration of slow-twitch muscle.

  15. Diagnostic features of emotional expressions are processed preferentially.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Scheller

    Full Text Available Diagnostic features of emotional expressions are differentially distributed across the face. The current study examined whether these diagnostic features are preferentially attended to even when they are irrelevant for the task at hand or when faces appear at different locations in the visual field. To this aim, fearful, happy and neutral faces were presented to healthy individuals in two experiments while measuring eye movements. In Experiment 1, participants had to accomplish an emotion classification, a gender discrimination or a passive viewing task. To differentiate fast, potentially reflexive, eye movements from a more elaborate scanning of faces, stimuli were either presented for 150 or 2000 ms. In Experiment 2, similar faces were presented at different spatial positions to rule out the possibility that eye movements only reflect a general bias for certain visual field locations. In both experiments, participants fixated the eye region much longer than any other region in the face. Furthermore, the eye region was attended to more pronouncedly when fearful or neutral faces were shown whereas more attention was directed toward the mouth of happy facial expressions. Since these results were similar across the other experimental manipulations, they indicate that diagnostic features of emotional expressions are preferentially processed irrespective of task demands and spatial locations. Saliency analyses revealed that a computational model of bottom-up visual attention could not explain these results. Furthermore, as these gaze preferences were evident very early after stimulus onset and occurred even when saccades did not allow for extracting further information from these stimuli, they may reflect a preattentive mechanism that automatically detects relevant facial features in the visual field and facilitates the orientation of attention towards them. This mechanism might crucially depend on amygdala functioning and it is potentially impaired

  16. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N;

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...... between cystic fibrosis patients has occurred....

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa host-adaptation in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rau, Martin Holm

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of transition from an environmental lifestyle to a host-associated lifestyle, as exemplified in the life-long airway infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Long-term infection is associated with extensive genetic adaptation of P...

  18. Genetic characterization of Microcystis aeruginosa isolates from Portuguese freshwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are microorganisms that pose a serious threat to the aquatic waterways through the production of dense blooms under eutrophic conditions and the release of toxic secondary metabolites-cyanotoxins. Within cyanobacteria, the colonial planktonic Microcystis aeruginosa is widely distributed in both fresh and brackish aquatic environments throughout the world being frequently observed in the Portuguese water systems. Apart from the well-established distribution of M. aeruginosa in Portugal, knowledge of its genetic diversity and population structure is unknown. Therefore, in this study twenty-seven strains were obtained from the North, Centre and South regions of Portugal and were subjected to extensive phylogenetic analyses using simultaneously four distinct genetic markers (16S rRNA, 16S-23S ITS, DNA gyrase subunit ß and cell division protein (ftsZ)) encompassing in total 2834 bp. With this work we characterized the phylogenetic relationship among the Portuguese strains, with the southern strains showing higher genetic structure relatively to the North and Centre strains. A total of fifteen genotypes were determined for M. aeruginosa in Portuguese water systems revealing a high genetic diversity. This is also the first study to report geographic variation on the population structure of the Portuguese M. aeruginosa. PMID:27263013

  19. Structure of a putative acetyltransferase (PA1377) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Anna M.; Tata, Renée; Chauviac, François-Xavier; Sutton, Brian J; Brown, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of an acetyltransferase encoded by the gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Comparison with a related acetyltransferase revealed a structural difference in the active site that was taken to reflect a difference in substrate binding and/or specificity between the two enzymes.

  20. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Oligomers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Azurin Solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sokolová, L.; Williamson, H.; Sýkora, Jan; Hof, Martin; Gray, H. B.; Brutschy, B.; Vlček Jr., Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 16 (2011), s. 4790-4800. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10124; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : mass spectrometry * oligomers * pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin solutions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  1. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity of...

  2. Characterization of carbapenem nonsusceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Østergaard, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    From January 1st 2011 through June 30th 2011, 116 nonreplicate, noncystic fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with reduced carbapenem susceptibility were collected from 12 out of 13 Danish departments of clinical microbiology. The presence of acquired β-lactamases was assessed with...

  3. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna;

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P...

  4. Induction of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Jensen, E T; Høiby, N;

    1991-01-01

    Imipenem induced high levels of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Piperacillin also induced beta-lactamase production in these biofilms but to a lesser degree. The combination of beta-lactamase production with other protective properties of the biofilm mode of growth...

  5. Ciprofloxacin interactions with imipenem and amikacin against multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Giamarellou, H; Petrikkos, G

    1987-01-01

    In vitro interactions of ciprofloxacin with imipenem and amikacin were evaluated by the killing-curve technique against 26 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to amikacin and resistant or moderately susceptible to ciprofloxacin and imipenem. Imipenem enhanced killing by ciprofloxacin in tests with 11 strains, whereas amikacin enhanced killing in tests with only 4 strains.

  6. Effect of fluid motion on colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin LI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis aeruginosa, generally occurring in large colonies under natural conditions, mainly exists as single cells in laboratory cultures. The mechanisms involved in colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa and their roles in algal blooms remain unknown. In this study, based on previous research findings that fluid motion may stimulate the colony formation in green algae, culture experiments were conducted under axenic conditions in a circular water chamber where the flow rate, temperature, light, and nutrients were controlled. The number of cells of Microcystis aeruginosa, the number of cells per colony, and the colonial characteristics in various growth phases were observed and measured. The results indicated that the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa, which was not observed under stagnant conditions, was evident when there was fluid motion, with the number of cells per largest colony reaching 120 and the proportion of the number of cells in colonial form to the total number of cells and the mean number of cells per colony reaching their peak values at a flow rate of 35 cm/s. Based on the analysis of colony formation process, fluid motion stimulates the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa in the lag growth phase, while flushes and disaggregates the colonies in the exponential growth phase. The stimulation effect in the lag growth phase may be attributable to the involvement of fluid motion in a series of physiological processes, including the uptake of trace elements and the synthesis and secretion of polysaccharides. In addition, the experimental groups exhibiting typical colonial characteristics in the lag growth phase were found to have higher cell biomass in the later phase.

  7. Preferential concentration of heavy particles in compressible isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Liu, Han; Ma, Zongqiang; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of particle-laden compressible isotropic turbulence with Taylor Reynolds number Reλ ˜ 100 are conducted by using a high-order turbulence solver, which is based on high-order compact finite difference method in the whole flow domain and localized artificial diffusivities for discontinuities. For simplicity, only one-way coupling (i.e., the influence of fluid on particles) between the carrier flow and particles is considered. The focus is on the study of the preferential concentration of heavy particles in dissipative scale of turbulence and the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, the effect of Stokes number (St) on the particle distribution in flow of Mach 1.01 (referred to as high-Mach-number case in this study) is investigated as a necessary supplementation for the previous studies in incompressible and weakly compressible flows. It turns out that heavy particles with Stokes number close to unity exhibit the strongest preferential concentration, which is in agreement with the observation in incompressible flow. All types of heavy particles have a tendency to accumulate in high-density regions of the background flow. While all kinds of particles dominantly collect in low-vorticity regions, intermediate and large particles (St = 1 and St = 5) are also found to collect in high-vorticity regions behind the randomly formed shocklets. Secondly, the impact of turbulent Mach number (Mt) (or the compressibility) of the carrier flow on the spatial distribution of the particles with St = 1 is discussed using the simulated compressible flows with Mt being 0.22, 0.68, and 1.01, respectively. In low-Mach-number flow, particles tend to concentrate in regions of low vorticity due to the centrifuge effect of vortices and particle concentration decreases monotonically with the increasing vorticity magnitude. As Mach number increases, the degree of particle clustering is slightly weakened in low-vorticity regions but is enhanced in high-vorticity regions, which

  8. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pure Exotoxin A on Mice WBC in Comparison with Human WBC Contaminated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Naghmachi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction & Objective: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram negative bacterial. This bacterium is resistant to many antibiotics and chemical disinfectants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacteria and caused infection in skin, external ear, upper respiratory tract, large intestine and is an important bacteria in nosocomial infections. It causes acute infection in burn disease. This bacterium can produce exotoxin A and effect on elongation factor II and can stop protein synthesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exotoxin A on mice WBC and comparison of the results with human WBC that contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials & Methods: This is an experimental study which was conducted in 1384 on burn disease patients referred to Shiraz Ghotbodin hospital. Sample that contaminated with PA was taken from these patients for WBC count and WBC differentiation. Sample was also taken from 100 burn patients without infection (50 male and 50 female. Toxigenic strain of PA103 was cultured on liquid media and used for purification of exotoxin A. This sample was injected to 50 mice (I.V and after different incubation time, WBC was counted. Ten normal mice was used as control. Collected data analyzed by SPSS. Results: WBC count decreased in mice that received Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A in comparison with normal mice (P<0.05. WBC count was significantly decreased in burn patients in comparison with normal individuals (P<0.029 and most decrease was belonged to PMN. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa that produce exotoxin induce WBC decrease in burn disease and also in mice that contaminated with exotoxin of this bacteria. It can be concluded that bacterial infection in burn patients is toxigenic strain of PA that produce exotoxin A.

  9. Glycan involvement in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautto, Liisa; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Everest-Dass, Arun; Leong, Andrea; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark D P; Packer, Nicolle H; Peterson, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    The human eye is constantly bathed by tears, which protect the ocular surface via a variety of mechanisms. The O-linked glycans of tear mucins have long been considered to play a role in binding to pathogens and facilitating their removal in the tear flow. Other conjugated glycans in tears could similarly contribute to pathogen binding and removal but have received less attention. In the work presented here we assessed the contribution of glycan moieties, in particular the protein attached N-glycans, presented by the broad complement of tear proteins to the adhesion of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of microbial keratitis and ulceration of the cornea. Our adhesion assay involved immobilising the macromolecular components of tears into the wells of a polyvinyl difluoride (PVDF) microtitre filter plate and probing the binding of fluorescently labelled bacteria. Three P. aeruginosa strains were studied: a cytotoxic strain (6206) and an invasive strain (6294) from eye infections, and an invasive strain (320) from a urinary tract infection (UTI). The ocular isolates adhered two to three times more to human tears than to human saliva or porcine gastric mucin, suggesting ocular niche-specific adaptation. Support for the role of the N-glycans carried by human tear proteins in the binding and removal of P. aeruginosa from the eye was shown by: 1) pre-incubation of the bacteria with free component sugars, galactose, mannose, fucose and sialyl lactose (or combination thereof) inhibiting adhesion of all the P. aeruginosa strains to the immobilised tear proteins, with the greatest inhibition of binding of the ocular cytotoxic 6206 and least for the invasive 6294 strain; 2) pre-incubation of the bacteria with N-glycans released from the commercially available human milk lactoferrin, an abundant protein that carries N-linked glycans in tears, inhibiting the adhesion to tears of the ocular bacteria by up to 70%, which was significantly more

  10. The clash of liberalizations : preferential versus multilateral trade liberalization in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Karacaovali, Baybars; Limão, Nuno

    2005-01-01

    There has been an explosion in the number of preferential trade agreements in the past decade. Preferential trade agreements are characterized by liberalization with respect to only a few partners and thus they can potentially clash with and retard multilateral trade liberalization. Despite this important concern with preferential trade agreements, there is almost no systematic evidence on whether they actually affect multilateral trade liberalization. The authors model the effect of preferen...

  11. Effect of reactor heat transfer limitations on CO preferential oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, X.; Besser, R. S.

    Our recent studies of CO preferential oxidation (PrOx) identified systematic differences between the characteristic curves of CO conversion for a microchannel reactor with thin-film wall catalyst and conventional mini packed-bed lab reactors (m-PBR's). Strong evidence has suggested that the reverse water-gas-shift (r-WGS) side reaction activated by temperature gradients in m-PBR's is the source of these differences. In the present work, a quasi-3D tubular non-isothermal reactor model based on the finite difference method was constructed to quantitatively study the effect of heat transport resistance on PrOx reaction behavior. First, the kinetic expressions for the three principal reactions involved were formed based on the combination of experimental data and literature reports and their parameters were evaluated with a non-linear regression method. Based on the resulting kinetic model and an energy balance derived for PrOx, the finite difference method was then adopted for the quasi-3D model. This model was then used to simulate both the microreactor and m-PBR's and to gain insights into their different conversion behavior. Simulation showed that the temperature gradients in m-PBR's favor the reverse water-gas-shift (r-WGS) reaction, thus causing a much narrower range of permissible operating temperature compared to the microreactor. Accordingly, the extremely efficient heat removal of the microchannel/thin-film catalyst system eliminates temperature gradients and efficiently prevents the onset of the r-WGS reaction.

  12. Preferential translation of chloroplast ribosomal proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear cr-1 mutant of C. reinhardtii is deficient in the 30S subunit of the chloroplast (cp) ribosome and in cp protein synthesis. The cp spectinomycin resistant mutant, spr-u-1-27-3, has a normal level of 70S ribosomes but only a low rate of cp protein synthesis with spectinomycin present. In both mutants there is little accumulation of the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco LSU), but near wild-type levels of cp synthesized r-proteins. In cells pulse-labelled with 35SO4 and immunoprecipitated with specific antisera, the ratio of the rate of synthesis of cp r-proteins to that of Rubisco LSU is 7 times greater in both mutants than in wild-type. No difference in the rate of turnover between r-proteins and Rubisco LSU in mutant and wild-type cells was observed during a one hour chase. The mRNA levels for r-protein L1 and Rubisco LSU actually increase slightly in the mutants. These data suggest that C. reinhardtii has a translation mechanism for preferential synthesis of cp r-proteins that operates under conditions of reduced total cp protein synthesis

  13. Renewables, Preferential Trade Agreements and EU Energy Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Leal-Arcas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A major aim of the international community is to decarbonize the economy. With renewables, international trade in energy is likely to increase. In turn, the international trading system can be a major vehicle towards moving away from fossil fuels to renewable energy. To this end, it can provide fair competition, economies of scale and knowledge transfer. This article analyzes the impact of European Union (EU preferential trade agreements (PTAs in addressing climate change mitigation and energy security by promoting renewables. Currently, there is a proliferation of PTAs; this trend seems irreversible and is likely to persist, given the current crisis in the multilateral trading system. We argue that the EU can, through its network of PTAs, move towards greater energy independence as renewable energy becomes increasingly economically viable. This article provides a thorough review of the renewable energy-related provisions in the EU’s current PTAs and recommends three tangible ways through which the EU could capitalize its vast network of PTAs to boost the renewable energy market.

  14. Upper visual field distractors preferentially bias attention to the left.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicole A; Castine, Benjamin R; Loetscher, Tobias; Nicholls, Michael E R

    2015-03-01

    Pseudoneglect is influenced by vertical visual field stimulation, such that attentional biases are stronger for upper space distractors. Leftward biases result from right hemisphere visuospatial processing, and may be accentuated by additional right hemisphere activation during upper space distraction. Three experiments examined potential explanations for this finding. Experiment 1 controlled for perceptual grouping and leftward biases remained stronger in upper space. Experiment 2 used peripheral distractors to eliminate two further potential explanations: centre-of-mass and framing effects. Eye tracking was included to compare overt and covert attention. Findings supported the occurrence of a stronger leftward attentional bias during upper space distraction. Distractors were rarely fixated, suggesting covert attentional mechanisms are preferentially drawn toward upper space distractors. Experiment 3 employed a cueing paradigm that purposefully directed attention away from centre to determine whether pseudoneglect was influenced by overt attentional orienting. Results indicated that when attention was overtly directed away from centre, the strength of pseudoneglect did not differ based on visual field. It is concluded that covert attention toward upper space distractors recruits additional right hemisphere activation, leading existing leftward biases to be accentuated. PMID:25437374

  15. Functional hierarchy underlies preferential connectivity disturbances in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Genevieve J; Murray, John D; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Glahn, David C; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Repovs, Grega; Krystal, John H; Anticevic, Alan

    2016-01-12

    Schizophrenia may involve an elevated excitation/inhibition (E/I) ratio in cortical microcircuits. It remains unknown how this regulatory disturbance maps onto neuroimaging findings. To address this issue, we implemented E/I perturbations within a neural model of large-scale functional connectivity, which predicted hyperconnectivity following E/I elevation. To test predictions, we examined resting-state functional MRI in 161 schizophrenia patients and 164 healthy subjects. As predicted, patients exhibited elevated functional connectivity that correlated with symptom levels, and was most prominent in association cortices, such as the fronto-parietal control network. This pattern was absent in patients with bipolar disorder (n = 73). To account for the pattern observed in schizophrenia, we integrated neurobiologically plausible, hierarchical differences in association vs. sensory recurrent neuronal dynamics into our model. This in silico architecture revealed preferential vulnerability of association networks to E/I imbalance, which we verified empirically. Reported effects implicate widespread microcircuit E/I imbalance as a parsimonious mechanism for emergent inhomogeneous dysconnectivity in schizophrenia. PMID:26699491

  16. An algorithm for preferential selection of spectroscopic targets in LEGUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffrey L.Carlin; Carl J.Grillmair; Puragra Guhathakurta; Zhan-Wen Han; Jin-Liang Hou; Hsu-Tai Lee; Jing Li; Chao Liu; Xiao-Wei Liu; Kai-Ke Pan; J.A.Sellwood; Sébastien Lépine; Hong-Chi Wang; Fan Yang; Brian Yanny; Yue-Yang Zhang; Zheng Zheng; Zi Zhu; Heidi Jo Newberg; Li-Cai Deng; Timothy C.Beers; Yu-Qin Chen; Norbert Christlieb; Xiao-Ting Fu; Shuang Gao

    2012-01-01

    We describe a general target selection algorithm that is applicable to any survey in which the number of available candidates is much larger than the number of objects to be observed.This routine aims to achieve a balance between a smoothlyvarying,well-understood selection function and the desire to preferentially select certain types of targets.Some target-selection examples are shown that illustrate different possibilities of emphasis functions.Although it is generally applicable,the algorithm was developed specifically for the LAMOST Experiment for Galactic Understanding and Exploration(LEGUE)survey that will be carried out using the Chinese Guo Shou Jing Telescope.In particular,this algorithm was designed for the portion of LEGUE targeting the Galactic halo,in which we attempt to balance a variety of science goals that require stars at fainter magnitudes than can be completely sampled by LAMOST.This algorithm has been implemented for the halo portion of the LAMOST pilot survey,which began in October 2011.

  17. Preferential rotation of chiral dipoles in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kramel, Stefan; Toschi, Federico; Voth, Greg A

    2016-01-01

    Particles in the shape of chiral dipoles show a preferential rotation in three dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence. A chiral dipole consists of a rod with two helices of opposite handedness, one at each end. We can use 3d printing to fabricate these particles with length in the inertial range and track their rotations in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids. High aspect ratio chiral dipoles will align with the extensional eigenvectors of the strain rate tensor and the helical ends will respond to the strain field by spinning around its long axis. The mean of the measured spinning rate is non-zero and reflects the average stretching the particles experience. We use Stokesian dynamics simulations of chiral dipoles in pure strain flow to quantify the dependence of spinning on particle shape. Based on the known response to pure strain, we build a model that gives the spinning rate of small chiral dipoles using Lagrangian velocity gradients from high resolution direct numerical simulations. The stat...

  18. An improved scheme for classifying susceptibility to preferential flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeys, Julien; Koestel, John; Hollis, John M.; Jarvis, Nicholas J.

    2010-05-01

    The ability to reliably predict the occurrence and strength of preferential flow in different soils and land use systems would be of great benefit in environmental planning and management at multiple spatial scales, from field to catchments and regions. We recently proposed a simple classification scheme for predicting the susceptibility of soil horizons and pedons to macropore flow, designed to support predictive modelling (Jarvis N.J. et al., 2009. A conceptual model of soil susceptibility to macropore flow. Vadose Zone Journal, 8: 902-910). The scheme, which takes the form of a decision tree, was successfully validated against a small dataset of solute transport experiments. However, in its present form, it is strongly biased toward European agricultural soils, since it was developed to support pesticide risk assessment in the EU. In this poster, we propose an improved version of the classification scheme, which is much broader in scope, with relevance for a much wider range of soils worldwide, including those with clay mineralogies that limit the development of soil macro-structure and restrict macropore flow (e.g. Ferralsols and Andosols). The new scheme is tested in a literature meta-analysis exercise, making use of the temporal moments of solute breakthrough curves derived from fits of the mobile / immobile model to steady-state experiments on short laboratory columns.

  19. Antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase inpatients with cystic fibrosis are markers of the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to beta-lactams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Walter-Rasmussen, J; Pressler, T; Pedersen, S S; Høiby, N

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal beta-lactamase production is considered to be the most important resistance mechanism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against beta-lactams. Recently we have detected serum and sputum antibodies against P. aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase (a beta ab), using immunoblotting techniques. In...

  20. Toxicogenomic response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ortho-phenylphenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toghrol Freshteh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is the most common opportunistic pathogen implicated in nosocomial infections and in chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP is an antimicrobial agent used as an active ingredient in several EPA registered disinfectants. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of information on its target molecular pathways and the cellular responses that it elucidates in bacteria in general and in P. aeruginosa in particular. An understanding of the OPP-driven gene regulation and cellular response it elicits will facilitate more effective utilization of this antimicrobial and possibly lead to the development of more effective disinfectant treatments. Results Herein, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the cellular responses of P. aeruginosa exposed to 0.82 mM OPP for 20 and 60 minutes. Our data indicated that OPP upregulated the transcription of genes encoding ribosomal, virulence and membrane transport proteins after both treatment times. After 20 minutes of exposure to 0.82 mM OPP, genes involved in the exhibition of swarming motility and anaerobic respiration were upregulated. After 60 minutes of OPP treatment, the transcription of genes involved in amino acid and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were upregulated. Further, the transcription of the ribosome modulation factor (rmf and an alternative sigma factor (rpoS of RNA polymerase were downregulated after both treatment times. Conclusion Results from this study indicate that after 20 minutes of exposure to OPP, genes that have been linked to the exhibition of anaerobic respiration and swarming motility were upregulated. This study also suggests that the downregulation of the rmf and rpoS genes may be indicative of the mechanism by which OPP causes decreases in cell viability in P. aeruginosa. Consequently, a protective response involving the upregulation of translation leading to the

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa porin OprF exists in two different conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Etsuko; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2006-06-16

    The major nonspecific porin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, OprF, produces a large channel yet allows only a slow diffusion of various solutes. Here we provide an explanation of this apparent paradox. We first show, by introduction of tobacco etch virus protease cleavage site in the middle of OprF protein, that most of OprF population folds as a two-domain protein with an N-terminal beta-barrel domain and a C-terminal periplasmic domain rich in alpha-helices. However, sedimentation of unilamellar proteoliposomes through an iso-osmotic gradient showed that only about 5% of the OprF population produced open channels. Gel filtration showed that the open channel conformers tended to occur in oligomeric associations. Because the open channel conformer is likely to fold as a single domain protein with a large beta-barrel, we reasoned that residues near the C terminus may be exposed on cell surface in this conformer. Introduction of a cysteine residue at position 312 produced a functional mutant protein. By using bulky biotinylation reagents on intact cells, we showed that this cysteine residue was not exposed on cell surface in most of the OprF population. However, the minority OprF population that was biotinylated in such experiments was enriched for the conformer with pore-forming activity and had a 10-fold higher pore-forming specific activity than the bulk OprF population. Finally trypsin treatment, which preferentially cleaves the C-terminal domain of the two-domain conformer, did not affect the pore-forming activity of OprF nor did it digest the minority conformer whose residue 312 is exposed on cell surface. PMID:16595653

  2. Structure of a putative acetyltransferase (PA1377) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of an acetyltransferase encoded by the gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Comparison with a related acetyltransferase revealed a structural difference in the active site that was taken to reflect a difference in substrate binding and/or specificity between the two enzymes. Gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a 177-amino-acid conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function. The structure of this protein (termed pitax) has been solved in space group I222 to 2.25 Å resolution. Pitax belongs to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase family and contains all four sequence motifs conserved among family members. The β-strand structure in one of these motifs (motif A) is disrupted, which is believed to affect binding of the substrate that accepts the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA

  3. Improved production of rhamno lipids by a pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant derived by random mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, producing high level of the rhamno lipid bio surfactants was selected on Sigmund Wagner plates. The mutant designated P. aeruginosa Persian Type Culture Collection 1637 produces rhamno lipids at concentration 10 times more than present strain. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis and surface tension measurement showed that the bio surfactants produced by the mutant were identical to those produced by the wild type strain. The bio surfactants exhibited a low surface tension of 28.0 mn m-1 and a low critical micelle concentration of 9 mg l-1. Similar to the wild type strain, the mutant produced bio surfactants at the stationary phase

  4. Hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark

    hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa and E. coli in diagnostic material. The distribution of the two pathogens is visualized using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two histological patterns were observed in the work presented in Article II; one was very hemorrhagic with few bacteria while...... pneumonia associated with E. coli infection. The perivascular localization, tendency for a higher frequency of a very hemorrhagic response and alveolar edema were the only differences noted between hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa compared to E. coli. Article III describes an infectious dose...... the interviews with farmers experiencing outbreaks of hemorrhagic pneumonia among their mink was that the disease always started in the mink kits, never in the adults. Furthermore, 39% reported that most deaths occurred in the male mink. The results presented in this thesis suggest that factors of the...

  5. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jensen, Peter Ø; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael Christian; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity of...... extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host. The...... immune response leading to this chronic inflammation is described. Finally, novel treatment strategies againstP. aeruginosa are described including, quorum-sensing inhibition and induced biofilm-dispersion. The tolerance towards currently available antimicrobials calls for development of alternative...

  6. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity is...... controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  7. Preferential Intercalation of Pyridinedicarboxylates into Layered Double Hydroxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蕾; 莫丹; 陈大舟

    2005-01-01

    Intercalation of 2,3-,2,4-,2,5-,2,6-,3,4-,or3,5-pyridincdicarboxylate into the layered double hydroxide (LDH),[Mg0.73AIo.27(OH)2](CO3)0.14*1.34H2O was carried out by the reconstruction method in the molar ratio of organic acid: calcined LDH=3:8, in 80% alcoholic aqueous solution at 70℃. Selective reaction was observed in com-petitive experiments involving an equal concentration pairs of acids. The preference order of the organic acids intercalated into the Mg-Al-LDH was found to be in the order of 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylate>2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate>2,4-pyridinedicarboxylate>3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate>3,4-pyridinedicarboxylate>2,6-pyridinedic arboxylate. The structures of the intercalates formed by the reaction of six guests with Mg-Al-LDH were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared and thermogravimetry techniques. And the charge density on the oxygens of each of the carboxylate groups for the six anions was investigated utilizing ab initio (HF/6-31G) method by G98w. From the X-ray diffraction data, the guest size and the charge density of the oxygens of the guest, the orientation of 2,3-,2,4-,2,5-,2,6-,3,4-, or 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate anions between the layers was determined and the preferential intercalation mechanism was discussed. These results indicate the possibility of a molecular recognition ability of LDH and it would be exploited for the chemical separation of some anions from solution.

  8. Frac Sand Mines Are Preferentially Sited in Unzoned Rural Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Locke

    Full Text Available Shifting markets can cause unexpected, stochastic changes in rural landscapes that may take local communities by surprise. Preferential siting of new industrial facilities in poor areas or in areas with few regulatory restrictions can have implications for environmental sustainability, human health, and social justice. This study focuses on frac sand mining-the mining of high-quality silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing processes for gas and oil extraction. Frac sand mining gained prominence in the 2000s in the upper midwestern United States where nonmetallic mining is regulated primarily by local zoning. I asked whether frac sand mines were more commonly sited in rural townships without formal zoning regulations or planning processes than in those that undertook zoning and planning before the frac sand boom. I also asked if mine prevalence was correlated with socioeconomic differences across townships. After creating a probability surface to map areas most suitable for frac sand mine occurrence, I developed neutral landscape models from which to compare actual mine distributions in zoned and unzoned areas at three different spatial extents. Mines were significantly clustered in unzoned jurisdictions at the statewide level and in 7 of the 8 counties with at least three frac sand mines and some unzoned land. Subsequent regression analyses showed mine prevalence to be uncorrelated with land value, tax rate, or per capita income, but correlated with remoteness and zoning. The predicted mine count in unzoned townships was over two times higher than that in zoned townships. However, the county with the most mines by far was under a county zoning ordinance, perhaps indicating industry preferences for locations with clear, homogenous rules over patchwork regulation. Rural communities can use the case of frac sand mining as motivation to discuss and plan for sudden land-use predicaments, rather than wait to grapple with unfamiliar legal processes

  9. Frac Sand Mines Are Preferentially Sited in Unzoned Rural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Shifting markets can cause unexpected, stochastic changes in rural landscapes that may take local communities by surprise. Preferential siting of new industrial facilities in poor areas or in areas with few regulatory restrictions can have implications for environmental sustainability, human health, and social justice. This study focuses on frac sand mining—the mining of high-quality silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing processes for gas and oil extraction. Frac sand mining gained prominence in the 2000s in the upper midwestern United States where nonmetallic mining is regulated primarily by local zoning. I asked whether frac sand mines were more commonly sited in rural townships without formal zoning regulations or planning processes than in those that undertook zoning and planning before the frac sand boom. I also asked if mine prevalence was correlated with socioeconomic differences across townships. After creating a probability surface to map areas most suitable for frac sand mine occurrence, I developed neutral landscape models from which to compare actual mine distributions in zoned and unzoned areas at three different spatial extents. Mines were significantly clustered in unzoned jurisdictions at the statewide level and in 7 of the 8 counties with at least three frac sand mines and some unzoned land. Subsequent regression analyses showed mine prevalence to be uncorrelated with land value, tax rate, or per capita income, but correlated with remoteness and zoning. The predicted mine count in unzoned townships was over two times higher than that in zoned townships. However, the county with the most mines by far was under a county zoning ordinance, perhaps indicating industry preferences for locations with clear, homogenous rules over patchwork regulation. Rural communities can use the case of frac sand mining as motivation to discuss and plan for sudden land-use predicaments, rather than wait to grapple with unfamiliar legal processes during a period of

  10. Preferential heating using transurethral thermoablation (T3) improves clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Ernest W.; Miller, Paul D.; Parsons, Keith

    1997-05-01

    Transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT) has been widely reported for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) but with variable results. This is likely due to the inability to develop and maintain high intraprostatic temperatures. The T3 device has a preferential heating pattern which prevents shutdowns as a result of rectal heating thus allowing continuous energy delivery throughout the therapy. High temperatures greater than 70 degrees Celsius are maintained resulting in extensive coagulative necrosis in the transitional zone. Treatment was performed in an outpatient clinic using topical anaesthesia with occasional low dose I.V. analgesia. One hundred and fifty-four patients have been treated in 3 centers using a similar protocol. Inclusion criteria required an AUA symptom score greater than or equal to 9 and a peak uroflow rate less than or equal to 12 ml/sec. Mean prostate size was 40.6 cc. One hundred and eighteen patients have been followed for at least 12 months, and 58 for 24 months. AUA symptom score decreased from a mean of 19.8 to 8.9 (12 M), and 7.6 (24 M). Improvement was seen in all 7 symptoms evaluated. Peak flow rates increased from a mean of 9.3 to 13.4 (12 M), and 13.1 (24 M). Improvement in symptom score and peak flow was observed across all prostate sizes. By 2 years, 15 patients had dropped out of the study, 8 for alternative treatment (6 TURP, 1 bladder neck incision, 1 urethrotomy) and 7 for administrative or other reasons. Treatment with the T3 device provides excellent improvement in symptoms, flow rates and patients satisfaction. T3 fulfills the criteria for an effective, minimally invasive, outpatient treatment for symptomatic BPH.

  11. In vitro inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by Xylitol

    OpenAIRE

    Letícia Pinheiro de Sousa; Annelisa Farah da Silva; Natalia Oliveira Calil; Murilo Gomes Oliveira; Silvio Silvério da Silva; Nádia Rezende Barbosa Raposo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the antimicrobial activity and the anti-adherent property of xylitol (0.5, 2.5 and 5.0%, w/v) on two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (ATCC 9027 and clinical). The assay of antimicrobial activity was performed to determine a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the adhesion test was performed, by which the parameters regarding, growth in the culture medium, number of colony forming units (CFUs) released and slide evaluation by scanning electron microscopy (...

  12. Hydrocarbon assimilation and biosurfactant production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, A K; Käppeli, O; Fiechter, A; Reiser, J.

    1991-01-01

    We isolated transposon Tn5-GM-induced mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG201 that were unable to grow in minimal media containing hexadecane as a carbon source. Some of these mutants lacked extracellular rhamnolipids, as shown by measuring the surface and interfacial tensions of the cell culture supernatants. Furthermore, the concentrated culture media of the mutant strains were tested for the presence of rhamnolipids by thin-layer chromatography and for rhamnolipid activities, including hem...

  13. The action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in intrinsic drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi; JIA Wen-xiang; ZENG Wei; YANG Wei-qing; CHENG Xi; LI Xue-ru; WANG Lan-lan; KANG Mei; ZHANG Zai-rong

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in studying the relationship between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance to drugs. However, the relationship still remains unclear in the macroscopic bacterial growth. Our study is to illuminate the change of bacterial drug resistance of gyrA mutant and active efflux pump during the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilms. Methods The strains of type Ⅱ topoisomerase gene mutant (gyrA mutant) and multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pump were clinical isolates and detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The process of bacterial biofilms development was observed by scanning electron microscope. Triparental mating experiments were performed to transfer report gene of green fluorescent protein (GFP) into P. aeruginosa biofilms strains and followed by analysis of bacterial survival rate between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance.Results The fluorescent strains with pGFPuv could develop mature biofilms on Teflon surface. Before a period of 72 hours, the survival rate of biofilms bacteria and intrinsic resistance strains in ciprofloxacin solution was significantly different (P0.05). The carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and azithromycin could significantly reduce the drug resistance of biofilm strains and efflux pump strains.Conclusions In the development of P. aeruginosa biofilms, the strains of gyrA mutation and MDR efflux could be conferred with new level of drug resistance. When co-cultured mutated strains with biofilm strains, biofilms may play a major role in bacterial resistance. But after 72 hours incubation (a mature biofilms had been developed), there was no clearly difference between the number of mutant strains and biofilm strains.

  14. [Phlegmonous gastritis. Report of a case induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Jiménez, F A; Arocena Cedrón, M G; Goikoetxea Artola, J M; Lázaro Aramburu, S; Múgica Barreiros, P

    1992-06-01

    The authors present a case of phlegmonous gastritis in a 65 year old patient. The diagnosis was made in the operating room and the treatment was conservative; no gastric resection was done. This clinical entity is interesting because it is a least frequent pathology, the pathogenic bacteria which was the cause (Pseudomona aeruginosa) has at this time not been reported in the literature, including the favorable outcome of the patient without gastric resection. PMID:1633018

  15. Nanoscale Adhesion Forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pili

    OpenAIRE

    Beaussart, Audrey; Baker, Amy E.; Kuchma, Sherry L.; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; O’Toole, George A; Yves F Dufrêne

    2014-01-01

    A variety of bacterial pathogens use nanoscale protein fibers called type IV pili to mediate cell adhesion, a primary step leading to infection. Currently, how these nanofibers respond to mechanical stimuli and how this response is used to control adhesion is poorly understood. Here, we use atomic force microscopy techniques to quantify the forces guiding the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili to surfaces. Using chemical force microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy, we sho...

  16. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    OpenAIRE

    Luyan Ma; Matthew Conover; Haiping Lu; Parsek, Matthew R.; Kenneth Bayles; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organis...

  17. Variability in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide Expression during Crude Oil Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, R. Sean; Frontera-Suau, Roberto; Morris, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial utilization of crude oil components, such as the n-alkanes, requires complex cell surface adaptation to allow adherence to oil. To better understand microbial cell surface adaptation to growth on crude oil, the cell surface characteristics of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, U1 and U3, both isolated from the same crude oil-degrading microbial community enriched on Bonny Light crude oil (BLC), were compared. Analysis of growth rates demonstrated an increased lag time for U1 cells ...

  18. Fosfomycin Enhances the Active Transport of Tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    MacLeod, David L.; Velayudhan, Jyoti; Kenney, Thomas F.; Therrien, Joseph H.; Sutherland, Jennifer L.; Barker, Lynn M.; Baker, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of mucins present in bronchiectatic airways predispose patients to bacterial infections and reduce the effectiveness of antibiotic therapies by directly inactivating antibiotics. Consequently, new antibiotics that are not inhibited by mucins are needed to treat chronic respiratory infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. In these studies, we demonstrate that fosfomycin synergistically enhances the activity of tobramycin in the presence of mucin. T...

  19. Identification of genes required for Pseudomonas aeruginosa carnitine catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wargo, Matthew J.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine is a quaternary amine compound prevalent in animal tissues, and a potential carbon, nitrogen and energy source for pathogens during infection. Characterization of activities in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell lysates has previously shown that carnitine is converted to 3-dehydrocarnitine (3-dhc) which is in turn metabolized to glycine betaine (GB), an intermediate metabolite in the catabolism of carnitine to glycine. However, the identities of the enzymes required for carnitine catabolis...

  20. Characterization of the Polymyxin B Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, L.; Alvarez-Ortega, C.; Wiegand, I.; Olivares, J.; Kocincova, D.; Lam, J S; Martinez, J.L.; Hancock, R. E. W.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is increasingly becoming a threat for human health. Indeed, some strains are resistant to almost all currently available antibiotics, leaving very limited choices for antimicrobial therapy. In many such cases, polymyxins are the only available option, although as their utilization increases so does the isolation of resistant strains. In this study, we screened a comprehensive PA14 mutant library to identify genes involved in changes of susceptibi...

  1. Emergence of colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Tabriz hospitals, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Goli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The prevalence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main reason of new drugs resurgence such as colistin. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and the rate of colistin resistance along with its correlation with overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps among P. aeruginosa isolates.Materials and Methods: Hundred clinical isolates were collected from 100 patients during 6 months in 2014. Susceptibility to the eight antibiotics was investigated using Kirby-Bauer and agar dilution methods. The Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of efflux genes.Results: Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: ticarcillin (73%, ciprofloxacin (65%, aztreonam (60%, ceftazidime (55%, gentamicin (55%, imipenem (49%, piperacillin/tazobactam (34% and colistin (2%. In disk diffusion method, only two isolates were non susceptible to colistin, however in agar dilution method the two isolates were confirmed as resistant and two others were intermediate resistant. Sixty eight (68% isolates were multi-drug resistant and 10 isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Both colistin resistant isolates showed overexpression of both efflux pumps, but two intermediate resistant isolates exhibited reduction of efflux genes expression.Conclusions: Emergence of colistin resistance is increasing in P. aeruginosa indicating great challenge in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains of this organism in Iran. ParRS may promote either induced or constitutive resistance to colistin through the activation of distinct mechanisms such as MDR efflux pumps, and LPS modification. Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Multi drug resistant, Colistin, MexAB-OprM, MexXY-OprM

  2. Development of potent inhibitors of pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Laura C.; O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Zhang, Zinan; Siryaporn, Albert; Silpe, Justin E.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new approaches for the treatment of antimicrobial-resistant infections is an urgent public health priority. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogen, in particular, is a leading source of infection in hospital settings, with few available treatment options. In the context of an effort to develop antivirulence strategies to combat bacterial infection, we identified a series of highly effective small molecules that inhibit the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence fact...

  3. Polysaccharide of the slime glycolipoprotein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Koepp, L H; Orr, T.; Bartell, P F

    1981-01-01

    The polysaccharide moiety was isolated by mild acid hydrolysis from the slime glycolipoprotein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BI. After gel filtration, the polysaccharide obtained from the Carbohydrate peak fractions was found to be lipid- and protein-free. Analyses indicated that the polysaccharide contained the carbohydrate components of the parent glycolipoprotein. Molecular size of the polysaccharide was estimated by gel filtration as 70,000 to 100,000. The polysaccharide showed no indi...

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Early Childhood: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Braga de CarvalhoVianna; Rodolfo de Almeida Lima Castro; Marta Lua Pimentel Winz Almeida; Andréa Gonçalves Antonio; Flávia dos Santos Moraes

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium that usually affects immunocompromised patients, causing infections whose signals and symptoms are related to the affected organ. The patient presented in this article was infected when he was 9 months old. Such condition led to certain alterations like dental improperly positioned teeth, retained deciduous teeth, hipodonty of permanent teeth, atrophy of the upper jaw and dental crowding. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to report ...

  5. Secretion of Elastinolytic Enzymes and Their Propeptides by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Peter; de Groot, Arjan; Bitter, Wilbert; Tommassen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is synthesized as a preproenzyme. The signal sequence is cleaved off during transport across the inner membrane and, in the periplasm, proelastase is further processed. We demonstrate that the propeptide and the mature elastase are both secreted but that the propeptide is degraded extracellularly. In addition, reduction of the extracellular proteolytic activity led to the accumulation of unprocessed forms of LasA and LasD in the extracellular medium, which s...

  6. Biofilm Formation by Hyperpiliated Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Poney; Burrows, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Under static growth conditions, hyperpiliated, nontwitching pilT and pilU mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa formed dense biofilms, showing that adhesion, not twitching motility, is necessary for biofilm initiation. Under flow conditions, the pilT mutant formed mushroom-like structures larger than those of the wild type but the pilU mutant was defective in biofilm formation. Therefore, twitching motility affects the development of biofilm structure, possibly through modulation of detachment.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Displays Multiple Phenotypes during Development as a Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Karin; Anne K. Camper; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Costerton, J. William; Davies, David G

    2002-01-01

    Complementary approaches were employed to characterize transitional episodes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development using direct observation and whole-cell protein analysis. Microscopy and in situ reporter gene analysis were used to directly observe changes in biofilm physiology and to act as signposts to standardize protein collection for two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and protein identification in chemostat and continuous-culture biofilm-grown populations. Using these appro...

  8. Characterization of Temporal Protein Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms†

    OpenAIRE

    Southey-Pillig, Christopher J.; Davies, David G; Sauer, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Phenotypic and genetic evidence supporting the notion of biofilm formation as a developmental process is growing. In the present work, we provide additional support for this hypothesis by identifying the onset of accumulation of biofilm-stage specific proteins during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maturation and by tracking the abundance of these proteins in planktonic and three biofilm developmental stages. The onset of protein production was found to correlate with the progression of biofil...

  9. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi Elham; Esmaeili Akbar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  10. Cloning and surface expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O antigen in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, J B; Hatano, K; Meluleni, G S; Pier, G B

    1992-01-01

    As a step toward developing recombinant oral vaccines, we have explored the feasibility of expression of O polysaccharide antigens from Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Escherichia coli. We cloned in E. coli HB101 a 26.2-kilobase DNA fragment from P. aeruginosa strain PA103 that specifies the production of the O polysaccharide of Fisher immunotype 2 (IT-2) strains. The recombinant organism incorporated the P. aeruginosa IT-2 O polysaccharide onto the core of the E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Tra...

  11. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    suggest that addition of oral ciprofloxacin to inhaled tobramycin may reduce lung inflammation. Clinical trials with new formulations of old antibiotics for inhalation therapy (aztreonam lysine) against chronic P. aeruginosa infection improved patient-reported outcome, lung function, time to acute...... patients without P. aeruginosa infection did not improve lung function. Here I review the recent advances in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections with a focus on inhalation treatments targeted at prophylaxis and chronic suppressive therapy....

  12. Within-host microevolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Italian cystic fibrosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Dolce, Daniela; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Petersen, Bent; Ciofu, Oana; Campana, Silvia; Molin, Søren; Taccetti, Giovanni; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and a more complete understanding of P. aeruginosa within-host genomic evolution, transmission, and population genomics may provide a basis for improving intervention strategies. Here, we report the first genomic analysis of P. aeruginosa isolates sampled from Italian CF patients. By genome sequencing of 26 isolates sampled over 19 years from four patients, we elucidated...

  13. Burn Patients Infected With Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Japoni, Aziz; Rafaatpour, Noroddin; Mardaneh, Jalal; Abbasi, Pejman; Amin Shahidi, Maneli; Dehyadegari, Mohammad Ali; Alipour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the burn patients is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and remains a serious health concern among the clinicians. Objectives: The aim of this study was to detect MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in burn patients and determine multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, and respective resistance patterns. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 270 strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from the burn patients ...

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasion of and multiplication within corneal epithelial cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Fleiszig, S M; Zaidi, T S; Pier, G.B. (G.B.)

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is usually considered an extracellular pathogen. Using assays to determine intracellular survival in the presence of gentamicin, we have previously demonstrated that P. aeruginosa is able to invade corneal cells during infectious keratitis in mice. In vitro, P. aeruginosa was found to enter the following cells: human corneal cells removed by irrigation; epithelial cells in the cornea of rats, mice, and rabbits; and primary corneal epithelial cells cultured from rat and ...

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae on the perinea of males with spinal cord injuries.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmore, D S; Schick, D G; Montgomerie, J Z

    1982-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization is found in a high percentage of males with spinal cord injury. The perineum is the body site most frequently colonized, and specific serotypes may persist for weeks. We examined patients for the presence of P. aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae on the perineum and adjacent body sites by using contact plates. P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, or both were cultured from perineal swabs of 22 male patients. Wells (2.5 cm2) containing agar medium selective for th...

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivett, Brock A.; Ream, Dave C.; Fiester, Steven E.; Kidane, Destaalem

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  17. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase and Pseudomonas keratitis using a thiol-based peptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, F R; Paterson, C. A.; Gray, R. D.; Wells, J T

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase is a zinc metalloproteinase which is released during P. aeruginosa infections. Pseudomonas keratitis, which occurs following contact lens-induced corneal trauma, can lead to rapid, liquefactive necrosis of the cornea. This destruction has been attributed to the release of both host-derived enzymes and the bacterial products P. aeruginosa elastase, alkaline protease, exotoxin A, and lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor, HSCH2 (DL...

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  19. High genetic diversity among Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated in a public hospital in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Lúcia Dias Siqueira; Rosilene Fressatti Cardoso; Rubia Andreia Falleiros de Pádua; Katiany Rizzieri Caleffi-Ferracioli; Cesar Helbel; Adolfo Carlos Barreto Santos; Elisabeth Eyko Aoki; Celso Vataru Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    In Brazil and other regions of the world, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. have emerged as important agents of nosocomial infection and are commonly involved in outbreaks. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the genetic relationship among P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated from patients in a public university hospital in northwestern Paraná, Brazil, and report their antimicrobial resistance profile. A total of 75 P. aeruginosa and 94 Acinetobacter s...

  20. Inhibitory activity of Iranian plant extracts on growth and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    S Mansouri; Safa, A.; Najar, S. G.; Najar, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a drug resistance opportunistic bacterium. Biofilm formation is key factor for survivalof P. aeruginosa in various environments. Polysaccharides may be involved in biofilm formation. The purpose of thisstudy was to evaluate antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities of seven plant extracts with known alpha-glucosidaseinhibitory activities on different strains of P. aeruginosa.Methodology and results: Plants were extracted with methanol by the maceration method. ...

  1. Characterization of antibody-mediated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, M; Reen, D J

    1992-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system was developed and used to study adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to human epithelial cells and the abilities of specific antibodies to inhibit this process. Human buccal epithelial cells coated onto microtiter plates were incubated with P. aeruginosa suspensions, and adherent bacteria were detected by using anti-P. aeruginosa serum and a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antiserum. Adhesion, quantitated as an increase in A405, varied lin...

  2. Molecular identification and detection of virulence genes among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different infectious origins

    OpenAIRE

    Vajiheh Sadat Nikbin; Mohammad Mehdi Aslani; Marjan Hashemipour; Zeinab Sharafi; Fereshteh Shahcheraghi; Gholamhossein Ebrahimipour

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses a variety of virulence factors that may contribute to its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate oprI, oprL and toxA genes for PCR identification of clinical P. aeruginosa. In order to find out any relation between special virulence factors and special manifestation of P. aeruginosa infections, we detected virulence factors among these isolates by PCR. Ribotyping was used to evaluate the clonal relationship between stra...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia in two UK district hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Enoch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively studied the epidemiology of bacteraemia due to P. aeruginosa in two UK district hospitals so as to determine prevention strategies and assess the efficacy and compliance with local hospital antibiotic guidelines. Eighty six episodes occurred in 85 patients over the 3 year period. There was a year on year increase in bacteraemias, due predominantly to an increased proportion of community-onset episodes. Urinary catheterisation was a significant risk factor, along with anaemia, renal disease, malignancy and diabetes. The antibiotic guidelines were adequate for 92.8% of episodes but only 73.8% of patients received adequate therapy. Failure to follow the guidelines was principally due to unwillingness to use gentamicin due to concerns about nephrotoxicity. The antibiotic guidelines may need reviewing to accommodate this problem and further work is required to address urinary catheter care in both the hospital and community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa should be considered a significant pathogen when patients are admitted with features of sepsis.

  4. INHIBITION OF VIRULENCE FACTORS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BY DICLOFENAC SODIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hisham A

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is a major problem. Targeting virulence factors is an alternative option to avoid the emergence of resistance to antibiotics. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentration of diclofenac sodium on the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa was investigated. The virulence factors included protease, haemolysin, pyocyanin and pyoverdin, in addition to pathogenic behaviors such as swimming and twitching motilities and biofilm formation. Diclofenac sodium showed significant inhibition of virulence factors as compared to the control. Diclofenac sodium decreased twitching and swimming motilities by 29.27% and 45.36%, respectively. The percentage of inhibition of pyocyanin by diclofenac sodium was 42.32%. On the other hand, pyoverdin was inhibited to a lesser extent (36.72%). Diclofenac sodium reduced protease by 52.58% and biofilm formation by 58.37%. Moreover, haemolytic activity in the presence of diclofenac sodium was 15.64% as compared to the control (100% haemolytic activity). The inhibitory activities may be due to inhibition of quorum sensing that regulates the expression of virulence factors. This study suggests the potential for the use of diclofenac sodium as an anti-virulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. PMID:27328521

  5. Arsenic efflux from Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yan

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton plays an important role in arsenic speciation, distribution, and cycling in freshwater environments. Little information, however, is available on arsenic efflux from the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes. This study investigated M. aeruginosa arsenic efflux and speciation by pre-exposing it to 10 µM arsenate or arsenite for 24 h during limited (12 h and extended (13 d depuration periods under phosphate enriched (+P and phosphate depleted (-P treatments. Arsenate was the predominant species detected in algal cells throughout the depuration period while arsenite only accounted for no greater than 45% of intracellular arsenic. During the limited depuration period, arsenic efflux occurred rapidly and only arsenate was detected in solutions. During the extended depuration period, however, arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA were found to be the two predominant arsenic species detected in solutions under -P treatments, but arsenate was the only species detected under +P treatments. Experimental results also suggest that phosphorus has a significant effect in accelerating arsenic efflux and promoting arsenite bio-oxidation in M. aeruginosa. Furthermore, phosphorus depletion can reduce arsenic efflux from algal cells as well as accelerate arsenic reduction and methylation. These findings can contribute to our understanding of arsenic biogeochemistry in aquatic environments and its potential environmental risks under different phosphorus levels.

  6. Inquisition of Microcystis aeruginosa and Synechocystis nanowires: characterization and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sure, Sandeep; Torriero, Angel A J; Gaur, Aditya; Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Ackland, M Leigh; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-11-01

    Identification of extracellular conductive pilus-like structures (PLS) i.e. microbial nanowires has spurred great interest among scientists due to their potential applications in the fields of biogeochemistry, bioelectronics, bioremediation etc. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we identified microbial nanowires in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 which is an aerobic, photosynthetic microorganism. We also confirmed the earlier finding that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 produces microbial nanowires. In contrast to the use of highly instrumented continuous flow reactors for Synechocystis reported earlier, we identified simple and optimum culture conditions which allow increased production of nanowires in both test cyanobacteria. Production of these nanowires in Synechocystis and Microcystis were found to be sensitive to the availability of carbon source and light intensity. These structures seem to be proteinaceous in nature and their diameter was found to be 4.5-7 and 8.5-11 nm in Synechocystis and M. aeruginosa, respectively. Characterization of Synechocystis nanowires by transmission electron microscopy and biochemical techniques confirmed that they are type IV pili (TFP) while nanowires in M. aeruginosa were found to be similar to an unnamed protein (GenBank : CAO90693.1). Modelling studies of the Synechocystis TFP subunit i.e. PilA1 indicated that strategically placed aromatic amino acids may be involved in electron transfer through these nanowires. This study identifies PLS from Microcystis which can act as nanowires and supports the earlier hypothesis that microbial nanowires are widespread in nature and play diverse roles. PMID:26319534

  7. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl, pellicle Formation (Pel and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  8. Light intensity adaptation and phycobilisome composition of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raps, S.; Kycia, J.H.; Ledbetter, M.C.; Siegelman, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    Phycobilisomes isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa grown to midlog at high light (270 microeinsteins per square meter per second) or at low light intensities (40 microeinsteins per square meter per second) were found to be identical. Electron micrographs established that they have a triangular central core apparently consisting of three allophycocyanin trimers surrounded by six rods, each composed of two hexameric phycocyanin molecules. The apparent mass of a phycobilisome obtained by gel filtration is 2.96 x 10/sup 6/ daltons. The molar ratio of the phycobiliproteins per phycobilisome is 12 phycocyanin hexamers:9 allophycocyanin trimers. The electron microscopic observations combined with the phycobilisome apparent mass and the phycobiliprotein stoichiometry data indicate that M. aeruginosa phycobilisomes are composed of a triangular central core of three stacks of three allophycocyanin trimers and six rods each containing two phycocyanin hexamers. Adaptation of M. aeruginosa to high light intensity results in a decrease in the number of phycobilisomes per cell with no alteration in phycobilisome composition or structure.

  9. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hao; Zhang, Lu; Weng, Yuding; Chen, Ronghao; Zhu, Feng; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here, we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM. PMID:27014238

  10. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao eTan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis (CF patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM.

  11. Continued transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a wash hand basin tap in a critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M I; Bradley, C W; Tracey, J; Oppenheim, B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen, colonizing hospital water supplies including taps and sinks. We report a cluster of P. aeruginosa acquisitions during a period of five months from tap water to patients occupying the same burns single room in a critical care unit. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured from clinical isolates from four different patients was indistinguishable from water strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Water outlets in critical care may be a source of P. aeruginosa despite following the national guidance, and updated guidance and improved control measures are needed to reduce the risks of transmission to patients. PMID:27249962

  12. Inhibitory effects of sanguinarine against the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843 and possible mechanisms of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Jihai [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Liu, Deming [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Crop Germplasm Innovation and Resource Utilization, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gong, Daoxin; Zeng, Qingru; Yan, Zhiyong [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gu, Ji-Dong, E-mail: jdgu@hku.hk [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Toxicology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Sanguinarine was found as a strong algicidal biologically derived substance. •Sanguinarine can induce oxidative stress in the cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. •Photosystem is a target of toxicity of sanguinarine on M. aeruginosa. •Sanguinarine can induce DNA damage and inhibit cell division. -- Abstract: Sanguinarine showed strong inhibitory effect against Microcystis aeruginosa, a typical water bloom-forming and microcystins-producing cyanobacterium. The EC50 of sanguinarine against the growth of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 was 34.54 ± 1.17 μg/L. Results of chlorophyll fluorescence transient analysis indicated that all the electron donating side, accepting side, and the reaction center of the Photosystem II (PS II) were the targets of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 upon exposure indicated that sanguinarine induced oxidative stress in the active growing cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843. Further results of gene expression analysis indicated that DNA damage and cell division inhibition were also involved in the inhibitory action mechanism of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The inhibitory characteristics of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa suggest that the ecological- and public health-risks need to be evaluated before its application in cyanobacterial bloom control to avoid devastating events irreversibly.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  14. Secretory IgA as a diagnostic tool for Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanaes, Kasper; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Pressler, Tacjana; Buchwald, Christian; Høiby, Niels

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa sinusitis may be the focus for intermittent lung colonization in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The sinusitis may induce elevated IgA levels in nasal secretion and saliva against P. aeruginosa. METHODS: 120 CF patients chronically infected, intermittently...... colonized or without P. aeruginosa in the lungs participated in this cross-sectional study. IgA and IgG against P. aeruginosa sonicate and alginate were measured in nasal secretions, saliva, and in serum by ELISA. RESULTS: The intermittently colonized patients had significantly higher IgA levels in nasal...

  15. Antibiogram of Multidrug-Resistant Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa after Biofield Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, prevalence of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) has been noticed with high morbidity and mortality. Aim of the present study was to determine the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment on MDR clinical lab isolates (LS) of P. aeruginosa. Five MDR clinical lab isolates (LS 22, LS 23, LS 38, LS 47, and LS 58) of P. aeruginosa were taken and divided into two groups i.e. control and biofield treated. Control and treated group were analy...

  16. 19 CFR 181.52 - Subsequent claims for preferential tariff treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Subsequent claims for preferential tariff treatment. 181.52 Section 181.52 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Drawback and Duty-Deferral Programs § 181.52 Subsequent claims for preferential tariff treatment. If...

  17. 19 CFR 10.583 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment... RATE, ETC. Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements § 10.583 Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation. (a) Basis of claim....

  18. 19 CFR 10.510 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment... RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements § 10.510 Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation. (a) Claim. An importer may make a claim for...

  19. 19 CFR 10.410 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment... RATE, ETC. United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements § 10.410 Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation. (a) Declaration. In connection with a claim for...

  20. What Do We Know About Preferential Trade Agreements and Temporary Trade Barriers?

    OpenAIRE

    Chad P. Bown; Karacaovali, Baybars; Tovar, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Two of the most important trade policy developments to take place since the 1980s are the expansion of preferential trade agreements and temporary trade barriers, such as antidumping, safeguards, and countervailing duties. Despite the empirical importance of preferential trade agreements and temporary trade barriers and the common feature that each can independently have quite discriminato...

  1. Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Do Not Preferentially Attend to Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Campbell, Ruth; Coleman, Mike; Milne, Elizabeth; Swettenham, John

    2012-01-01

    Preferential attention to biological motion can be seen in typically developing infants in the first few days of life and is thought to be an important precursor in the development of social communication. We examined whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 3-7 years preferentially attend to point-light displays depicting…

  2. Transport and fate of microorganisms in soils with preferential flow under different solution chemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    [1] Laboratory and numerical studies were conducted to investigate the transport and fate of Escherichia coli D21g and coliphage f174 in saturated soils with preferential flow under different solution ionic strength (IS'='1, 5, 20, and 100 mM) conditions. Preferential flow systems were created by em...

  3. 19 CFR 10.217 - Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment. 10.217 Section 10.217 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... justification of claim for preferential treatment. (a) Verification by Customs. A claim for...

  4. 19 CFR 10.550 - Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment. 10.550 Section 10.550 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment. (a) Verification. A claim for...

  5. 19 CFR 10.824 - Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment. 10.824 Section 10.824 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... and justification of claim for preferential treatment. (a) Verification. A claim for...

  6. 19 CFR 10.257 - Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment. 10.257 Section 10.257 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF...-Textile Articles § 10.257 Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment....

  7. 19 CFR 10.784 - Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment. 10.784 Section 10.784 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... and justification of claim for preferential treatment. (a) Verification. A claim for...

  8. 19 CFR 10.616 - Verification and justification of claim for preferential tariff treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification and justification of claim for preferential tariff treatment. 10.616 Section 10.616 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... and Determinations § 10.616 Verification and justification of claim for preferential tariff...

  9. MECANISMOS DE RESISTENCIA EN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA: ENTENDIENDO A UN PELIGROSO ENEMIGO Resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: understanding a dangerous enemy

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Andrés Gómez Álvarez; Aura Lucía Leal Castro; María de Jesús Pérez de Gonzalez; Myriam Lucía Navarrete Jiménez

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa es un bacilo Gram negativo no fermentador, ampliamente relacionado con la infección nosocomial. Este tipo de infecciones se presentan en pacientes severamente comprometidos, hospitalizados especialmente en unidades de cuidado intensivo, donde existe una alta presión de selección de resistencia por parte de los antibióticos. Estas infecciones nosocomiales tienen implicaciones en el pronóstico del paciente, los costos del tratamiento, la estancia hospitalaria, la morbilid...

  10. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Manuel R; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai; Perron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound

  11. The phenotypic evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations changes in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassermann, Tina; Meinike Jørgensen, Karin; Ivanyshyn, Karolina;

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a widely used antibiotic, in the class of quinolones, for treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The immediate response of P. aeruginosa to subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin has been investigated previously. However, the long-term phenotypic adaptation, which...

  12. Analysis of integrons and associated gene cassettes in clinical isolates of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Southwest Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Odumosu, Bamidele T; Adeniyi, Bolanle A.; Chandra, Ram

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa harbours integrons and other mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and transposons, which easily disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinical strains of P. aeruginosa. Methodology Plasmid extraction of 54 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa was carried out by alkaline lysis method; and plasmid size estimation was done by using E. coli V517 standard plasmid marker. Fifty-four clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from ...

  13. Positive signature-tagged mutagenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Tracking patho-adaptive mutations promoting airways chronic infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bianconi, Irene; Milani, Andrea; Cigana, Cristina; Paroni, Moira; Levesque, Roger C.; Bertoni, Giovanni; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long chronic infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent lifestyle is established with P. aeruginosa patho-adaptive variants, which are clonal with the initially-acquired strains. Several reports indicated that P. aeruginosa adapts by loss-of-function mutations which enhance fitness in CF airways and sustain its clonal expansion during chronic infection. To validate this model of P. aeruginosa adap...

  14. Detection of AmpC-β-lactamases producing isolates among carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from burn patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Akbar Mirsalehian; Davood Kalantar-Neyestanaki; Keramat Nourijelyani; Kheirollah Asadollahi; Morovat Taherikalani; Mohammad Emaneini; Fereshteh Jabalameli

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for devastating nosocomial infections among severely burn patients. Class C of cephalosporinase (AmpC-β-lactamases) is important cause of multiple β-lactam resistance in P. aeruginosa. The aim of this study was to detect the AmpC-β-lactamases producing isolates among carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from burn patient. Material and Methods a total of 100 isolates of carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolates from diffe...

  15. Development of antibiotic resistance and up-regulation of the antimutator gene pfpI in mutator Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to inactivation of two DNA oxidative repair genes (mutY, mutM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandsberg, Lotte Frigaard; Macia, Maria D.; Bergmann, Kirsten R.;

    2011-01-01

    showed only a fivefold increase, whereas the single mutant PAOMMgm (mutM) showed a nonsignificant increase in MR compared with PAO1 and the single mutants. Mutations in the regulator nfxB leading to hyperexpression of MexCD-OprJ efflux pump were found as the mechanism of resistance to ciprofloxacin in...... the double mutant. A better fitness of the mutator compared with PAO1 was found in growth competition experiments in the presence of ciprofloxacin at concentrations just below minimal inhibitory concentration. Up-regulation of the antimutator gene pfpI, that has been shown to provide protection to...

  16. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies augment bacterial clearance in a murine pneumonia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K; Christophersen, L; Bjarnsholt, T;

    2016-01-01

    -P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies on bacterial eradication in a murine pneumonia model. METHODS: P. aeruginosa pneumonia was established in Balb/c mice and the effects of prophylactic IgY administration on lung bacteriology, clinical parameters and subsequent inflammation were compared to controls. RESULTS...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular products inhibit staphylococcal growth, and disrupt established biofilms produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Yang, Liang; Qu, Di;

    2009-01-01

    in overnight cultures had no effect on established P. aeruginosa biofilms and planktonic growth. These findings reveal that P. aeruginosa extracellular products are important microbial competition factors that overcome competition with S. epidermidis, and the results may provide clues for the development...

  18. Polysaccharides serve as scaffold of biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lung infection by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major pathologic features in patients with cystic fibrosis. Mucoid P. aeruginosa is notorious for its biofilm forming capability and resistance to immune attacks. In this study, the roles of extracellular polymeric substances f...

  19. Evolutionary insight from whole-genome sequencing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Jelsbak, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic airway infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and it is directly associated with the morbidity and mortality connected with this disease. The ability of P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF patients is sugg...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Burmølle, Mette; Hentzer, Morten; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hougen, Hans Petter; Calum, Henrik; Madsen, Kit G; Moser, Claus; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael Christian

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant to...

  1. Glutathione exhibits antibacterial activity and increases tetracycline efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YaNi; DUAN KangMin

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays important roles in pulmonary diseases, and inhaled GSH therapy has been used to treat cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in clinical trials. The results in this report revealed that GSH altered the sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to different antibiotics through pathways unrelated to the oxidative stress as generally perceived. In addition, GSH and its oxidized form inhibited the growth of P. Aeruginosa.

  2. Mutations in 23S rRNA Confer Resistance against Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Søndergaard, Mette S. R.; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær;

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important concern in the treatment of long-term airway infections in cystic fibrosis patients. In this study, we report the occurrence of azithromycin resistance among clinical P. aeruginosa DK2 isolates. We demonstrate that...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis: insights into pathogenic processes and treatment strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassett, Daniel J; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Irvin, Randall T;

    2010-01-01

    CF airway mucus can be infected by opportunistic microorganisms, notably Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Once organisms are established as biofilms, even the most potent antibiotics have little effect on their viability, especially during late-stage chronic infections. Better understanding of the mechani...... mechanisms used by P. aeruginosa to circumvent host defenses and therapeutic intervention strategies is critical for advancing novel treatment strategies....

  4. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lo Sciuto

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery.

  5. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Bertuccini, Lucia; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery. PMID:25093328

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Fiandaca, Mark J; Pedersen, Jette; Hansen, Christine Rønne; Andersen, Claus Bøgelund; Pressler, Tacjana; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels

    2009-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the appearance and location of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung and in sputum. Samples include preserved tissues of CF patients who died due to chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection prior to the advent of intensive antibiotic...

  7. Epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis and the possible role of contamination by dental equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Giwercman, B; Ojeniyi, B; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Hansen, A; Koch, C; Fiehn, N E; Høiby, N

    1997-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often suffer from Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection yet the source of this organism is not known. In order to determine whether CF patients might be contaminated with P. aeruginosa from dental equipment, a total of 103 water samples from 25 dental sessions in...

  8. Effects of Microcystis aeruginosa on life history of water flea Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Li, Kang; Chen, Taoying; Dai, Xilin; Jiang, Min; Diana, James S.

    2011-07-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic freshwater systems are a worldwide problem, creating adverse effects for many aquatic organisms by producing toxic microcystins and deteriorating water quality. In this study, microcystins (MCs) in Microcystis aeruginosa, and Daphnia magna exposed to M. aeruginosa, were analyzed by HPLC-MS, and the effects of M. aeruginosa on D. magna were investigated. When D. magna was exposed to M. aeruginosa for more than 2 h, Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) was detected. When exposed to 1.5 × 106, 3 × 106, 0.75 × 107, and 1.5 × 107 cell/mL of M. aeruginosa for 96 h, average survival of D. magna for treatments were 23.33%, 33.33%, 13.33%, 16.67%, respectively, which were significantly lower than the average 100% survival in the control group ( P < 0.05). The adverse effects of M. aeruginosa on body length, time for the first brood, brood numbers, gross fecundity, lifespan, and population growth of D. magna were density-dependent. These results suggest that the occurrence of M. aeruginosa blooms could strongly inhibit the population growth of D. magna through depression of survival, individual growth and gross fecundity. In the most serious situations, M. aeruginosa blooms could undermine the food web by eliminating filter-feeding zooplankton, which would destroy the ecological balance of aquaculture water bodies.

  9. Rhamnolipids Are Virulence Factors That Promote Early Infiltration of Primary Human Airway Epithelia by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Zulianello, Laurence; Canard, Coralie; Köhler, Thilo; Caille, Dorothée; Lacroix, Jean-Silvain; Meda, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised individuals. Bacterial adherence to the basolateral domain of the host cells and internalization are thought to participate in P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. However, the mechanism by which the pathogen initially modulates the paracellular permeability of polarized respiratory epithelia remains to be understood. To investigate this mechanism, we have searched for vir...

  10. Evaluation of a FRET-peptide substrate to predict virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy E Kaman

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a number of proteases that are associated with virulence and disease progression. A substrate able to detect P. aeruginosa-specific proteolytic activity could help to rapidly alert clinicians to the virulence potential of individual P. aeruginosa strains. For this purpose we designed a set of P. aeruginosa-specific fluorogenic substrates, comprising fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-labeled peptides, and evaluated their applicability to P. aeruginosa virulence in a range of clinical isolates. A FRET-peptide comprising three glycines (3xGly was found to be specific for the detection of P. aeruginosa proteases. Further screening of 97 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates showed a wide variation in 3xGly cleavage activity. The absence of 3xGly degradation by a lasI knock out strain indicated that 3xGly cleavage by P. aeruginosa could be quorum sensing (QS-related, a hypothesis strengthened by the observation of a strong correlation between 3xGly cleavage, LasA staphylolytic activity and pyocyanin production. Additionally, isolates able to cleave 3xGly were more susceptible to the QS inhibiting antibiotic azithromycin (AZM. In conclusion, we designed and evaluated a 3xGly substrate possibly useful as a simple tool to predict virulence and AZM susceptibility.

  11. Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in sputum headspace through volatile organic compound analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goeminne Pieter C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic pulmonary infection is the hallmark of Cystic Fibrosis lung disease. Searching for faster and easier screening may lead to faster diagnosis and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa. Our aim was to analyze and build a model to predict the presence of P. aeruginosa in sputa. Methods Sputa from 28 bronchiectatic patients were used for bacterial culturing and analysis of volatile compounds by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Data analysis and model building were done by Partial Least Squares Regression Discriminant analysis (PLS-DA. Two analysis were performed: one comparing P. aeruginosa positive with negative cultures at study visit (PA model and one comparing chronic colonization according to the Leeds criteria with P. aeruginosa negative patients (PACC model. Results The PA model prediction of P. aeruginosa presence was rather poor, with a high number of false positives and false negatives. On the other hand, the PACC model was stable and explained chronic P. aeruginosa presence for 95% with 4 PLS-DA factors, with a sensitivity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 86% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Conclusion Our study shows the potential for building a prediction model for the presence of chronic P. aeruginosa based on volatiles from sputum.

  12. Epistatic Mutations And Unpredictable Phenotypes In Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Eva Kammer; Abou Hachem, Maher; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, able to adapt to stressful environments such as the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the CF environment is associated with phenotypic changes, such as switch in mucoidy, antibiotic resistance and loss of virulence...

  13. Genome‐wide identification of novel small RNAs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    44 sRNAs in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, RNA sequencing (RNA‐seq) is used to identify novel transcripts in P. aeruginosa involving a combination of three different sequencing libraries. Almost all known sRNAs and over 500 novel intergenic sRNAs are identified...

  14. The role of quorum sensing in the pathogenicity of the cunning aggressor Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2007-01-01

    , and, particularly, higher organisms We have focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen producing more than 30 QS-regulated virulence factors. P. aeruginosa causes several types of nosocomial infection, and lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We review the role of QS in...

  15. Multiple roles of biosurfactants in structural biofilm development by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2007-01-01

    . aeruginosa rhl4 mutants were defective in migration-dependent development of mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in the later phase of biofilm formation. Experiments involving three-color-coded mixed-strain P. aeruginosa biofilms demonstrated that the wild-type and rhl4 and pil4 mutant strains formed...

  16. Effects of sulfate on microcystin production, photosynthesis, and oxidative stress in Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Gin, Karina Y H; He, Yiliang

    2016-02-01

    Increasing sulfate in freshwater systems, caused by human activities and climate change, may have negative effects on aquatic organisms. Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) is both a major primary producer and a common toxic cyanobacterium, playing an important role in the aquatic environment. This study first investigated the effects of sulfate on M. aeruginosa. The experiment presented here aims at analyzing the effects of sulfate on physiological indices, molecular levels, and its influencing mechanism. The results of our experiment showed that sulfate (at 40, 80, and 300 mg L(-1)) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth, increased both intracellular and extracellular toxin contents, and enhanced the mcyD transcript level. Sulfate inhibited the photosynthesis of M. aeruginosa, based on the decrease in pigment content and the down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes after sulfate exposure. Furthermore, sulfate decreased the maximum electron transport rate, causing the cell to accumulate surplus electrons and form reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sulfate also increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, which showed that sulfate damaged the cytomembrane. This damage contributed to the release of intracellular toxin to the culture medium. Although sulfate increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, expression of sod, and total antioxidant capacity in M. aeruginosa, it still overwhelmed the antioxidant system since the ROS level simultaneously increased, and finally caused oxidative stress. Our results indicate that sulfate has direct effects on M. aeruginosa, inhibits photosynthesis, causes oxidative stress, increases toxin production, and affects the related genes expression in M. aeruginosa. PMID:26490939

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3

    OpenAIRE

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Konrad H Paszkiewicz; Studholme, David J.; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Venturi, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3.

  18. Paerucumarin, a new metabolite produced by the pvc gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke-Pearson, Michael F; Brady, Sean F

    2008-10-01

    The pvc gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been linked to the biosynthesis of both the pyoverdine chromophore and pseudoverdine. Our reinvestigation of the role this gene cluster plays in P. aeruginosa secondary metabolite biosynthesis shows that its major product is actually paerucumarin, a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin. PMID:18689486

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Bacterial Components Influence the Cytokine Response in Thymocytes and Splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Andreas; Zimmermann, Corinna; Mausberg, Anne K; Dehmel, Thomas; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hofstetter, Harald H

    2016-05-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause many different diseases. The spectrum of such infections in general includes inflammation and bacterial sepsis. Hospital-acquired pneumonia, naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, is associated with a particularly high mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa is complex and mediated by several virulence factors, as well as cell-associated factors. We have previously demonstrated that stimulation with different bacteria triggers the cytokine response of thymocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of P. aeruginosa and its different components on the cytokine production of immature and mature immune cells. We found that the induced cytokine pattern in the thymus and the spleen after infections with P. aeruginosa is primarily mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer cell membrane, but other components of the bacterium can influence the cytokine secretion as well. Stimulation with heat-killed P. aeruginosa and LPS does not influence the amount of cytokine-producing CD4(+) T cells but instead suppresses the emergence of Th17 cells. However, stimulation with P. aeruginosa or its components triggers the interleukin-17 (IL-17) response both in thymocytes and in splenocytes. We conclude that infections with P. aeruginosa affect the cytokine secretion of immature and mature cells and that IL-17 and Th17 cells play only a minor role in the development of pathological systemic inflammatory disease conditions during P. aeruginosa infections. Therefore, other inflammatory immune responses must be responsible for septic reactions of the host. PMID:26902726

  20. Heterogeneity of biofilms formed by nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Baoleri; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Ciofu, O.; Andersen, Jens Bo; Hoiby, N.; Molin, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Biofilms are thought to play a key role in the occurrence of lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, 20 nonmucoid P. aeruginosa isolates collected during different periods of chronic infection from eight CF patients were assessed with respect...

  1. Spatial and temporal occurrence of preferential flow in a forested headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiekenkamp, I.; Huisman, J. A.; Bogena, H. R.; Lin, H. S.; Vereecken, H.

    2016-03-01

    The highly dynamic nature of preferential flow in time and space makes it challenging to identify and analyze its occurrence at the catchment scale. Novel analysis methods using soil moisture sensor response times offer an opportunity to investigate catchment-wide controls on preferential flow. The aim of this study was to identify factors that control preferential flow occurrence based on 3-year soil moisture monitoring using a wireless sensor network in the Wüstebach catchment, Germany. At 101 locations, the sensor response times at three depths (5, 20, and 50 cm) were classified into one of four classes: (1) non-sequential preferential flow, (2) velocity-based preferential flow, (3) sequential flow, and (4) no response. A conceptual model, postulating that preferential flow in the Wüstebach catchment is dominated by differences in soil type, landscape position, and rainfall input, was proposed for hypothesis testing. To test the conceptual model, the classification results were combined with spatial and event-based data to understand and identify controlling factors. Spatial parameters consisted of hydrological, topographical, and soil physical and chemical parameters. Temporal factors included precipitation characteristics and antecedent soil moisture conditions. The conceptual model as proposed could only be partly confirmed. Event-based occurrence of preferential flow was highly affected by precipitation amount, with a nearly catchment-wide preferential response during large storm events. During intermediate events, preferential flow was controlled by small-scale heterogeneity, instead of showing catchment-wide patterns. The effect of antecedent catchment wetness on the occurrence of preferential flow was generally less profound, although a clear negative relationship was found for precipitation events with more than 25 mm. It was found that spatial occurrence of preferential flow was however governed by small-scale soil and biological features and local

  2. Predicting the growth of new links by new preferential attachment similarity indices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ke Hu; Ju Xiang; Xiao-Ke Xu; Hui-Jia Li; Wan-Chun Yang; Yi Tang

    2014-03-01

    By revisiting the preferential attachment (PA) mechanism for generating a classical scale-free network, we propose a class of novel preferential attachment similarity indices for predicting future links in evolving networks. Extensive experiments on 14 real-life networks show that these new indices can provide more accurate prediction than the traditional one. Due to the improved prediction accuracy and low computational complexity, these proposed preferential attachment indices can be helpful for providing both instructions for mining unknown links and new insights to understand the underlying mechanisms that drive the network evolution.

  3. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Ma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organism for the study of biofilms. The extracellular polymeric substance of P. aeruginosa biofilms is an ill-defined mix of polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Here, we directly visualize the product of the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl exopolysaccharide at different stages of biofilm development. During attachment, Psl is anchored on the cell surface in a helical pattern. This promotes cell-cell interactions and assembly of a matrix, which holds bacteria in the biofilm and on the surface. Chemical dissociation of Psl from the bacterial surface disrupted the Psl matrix as well as the biofilm structure. During biofilm maturation, Psl accumulates on the periphery of 3-D-structured microcolonies, resulting in a Psl matrix-free cavity in the microcolony center. At the dispersion stage, swimming cells appear in this matrix cavity. Dead cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA are also concentrated in the Psl matrix-free area. Deletion of genes that control cell death and autolysis affects the formation of the matrix cavity and microcolony dispersion. These data provide a mechanism for how P. aeruginosa builds a matrix and subsequently a cavity to free a portion of cells for seeding dispersal. Direct visualization reveals that Psl is a key scaffolding matrix component and opens up avenues for therapeutics of biofilm-related complications.

  4. Antibiofilm activities of certain biocides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gharavi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can produce biofilm. Biofilm is a complex, three dimensional structure in which microorganisms are attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix made of extracellular polymers. Due to high resistance to antimicrobial agents, biofilms create difficulties in various situations in healthcare. In this study, antibiofilm activities of some biocides in P. aeruginosa were studied."nMaterials and methods: The biofilm production ability of P. aeruginosa strain 214 (a clinical isolate was determined in the presence of six biocides including of ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA, silver nitrate (AgNO3, bismuth ethanedithiol (BisEDT, bismuth dimercaprol (BisBAL, bismuth-2-mercaptoethanol (BisMEO and bismuth propanedithiol (BisPDT using the modified microtiter plate method. Bactericidal activity of the biocides against biofilm and planktonic cells was investigated. In this study, permeation of biocides through alginate layer was evaluated with a sandwich cup method."nResults: The results demonstrated that in the presence of bismuth thiols, biofilm production in MIC and sub MIC concentrations was considerably inhibited. Bismuththiols had lower antibiofilm bactericidal activity than EDTA and silver nitrate. One possible mechanism of biofilm resistance is exopolysaccharide production which prevents the access of antimicrobial agents to cells inside the biofilm. Bismuth thiols could not penetrate, while EDTA and silver nitrate had high penetration rate."nConclusions: Due to the frequent use of silver nitrate and EDTA in various applications, low efficacy in the inhibition of biofilm production, unstudied toxicity of BTs for humans and high efficacy in the inhibition of biofilm production, it is suggested that combinatory effect of BTs with silver nitrate or EDTA on biofilms and biofilm production be investigated.

  5. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  6. Ginseng treatment reduces bacterial load and lung pathology in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Z; Johansen, H K; Faber, V;

    1997-01-01

    The predominant pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which results in a chronic lung infection associated with progressive pulmonary insufficiency. In a rat model of chronic P. aeruginosa pneumonia mimicking that in patients with CF, we studied whether the...... inflammation and antibody responses could be changed by treatment with the Chinese herbal medicine ginseng. An aqueous extract of ginseng was injected subcutaneously, and cortisone and saline were used as controls. Two weeks after challenge with P. aeruginosa, the ginseng-treated group showed a significantly...... against P. aeruginosa sonicate and a shift from an acute type to a chronic type of lung inflammation compared to those in the control and cortisone-treated groups were observed. These findings indicate that ginseng treatment of an experimental P. aeruginosa pneumonia in rats promotes a cellular response...

  7. Dynamics and spatial distribution of beta-lactamase expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N.; Hentzer, Morten; Andersen, Jens Bo; Ciofu, O.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Høiby, N.

    2004-01-01

    The development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics is a problem in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. The main resistance mechanism is high-level expression of the chromosomally encoded AmpC beta-lactamase of P. aeruginosa...... cells growing in biofilms. Several genes have been shown to influence the level of ampC expression, but little is known about the regulation of ampC expression in P. aeruginosa biofilms. To study the expression of ampC in P. aeruginosa biofilms, we constructed a reporter that consisted of the fusion of...... the ampC promoter to gfp(ASV) encoding an unstable version of the green fluorescent protein. In vitro biofilms of P. aeruginosa were exposed to the beta-lactam antibiotics imipenem and ceftazidime. Sub-MICs of imipenem significantly induced the monitor system of the biofilm bacteria in the peripheries...

  8. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Molin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP reductase (ENR from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent. EGCG treatment was further shown to be able to attenuate the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa.

  9. [Surviving Forms in Antibiotic-Treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyukin, A L; Kozlova, A N; Sorokin, V V; Suzina, N E; Cherdyntseva, T A; Kotova, I B; Gaponov, A M; Tutel'yan, A V; El'-Registan, G I

    2015-01-01

    Survival of bacterial populations treated with lethal doses of antibiotics is ensured by the presence of very small numbers of persister cells. Unlike antibiotic-resistant cells, antibiotic tolerance of persisters is not inheritable and reversible. The present work provides evidence supporting the hypothesis of transformation (maturation) of persisters of an opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed by ciprofloxacin (CF) treatment (25-100 μg/mL) into dormant cystlike cells (CLC) and non-culturable cells (NC), as was described previously for a number. of non-spore-forming bacteria. Subpopulations of type 1 and type 2 persisters, which survived antibiotic treatment and developed into dormant forms, were heterogeneous in their capacity to form colonies or microcolonies upon germination, in resistance to heating at 70 degrees C, and in cell morphology Type 1 persisters, which were formed after 1-month incubation in the stationary-phase cultures in the medium with decreased C and N concentrations, developed in several types of surviving cells, including those similar to CLC in cell morphology. In the course of 1-month incubation of type 2 persisters, which were formed in exponentially growing cultures, other types of surviving cells developed: immature CLC and L-forms. Unlike P. aeruginosa CLC formed in the control post-stationary phase cultures without antibiotic treatment, most of 1-month persisters, especially type 2 ones, were characterized by the loss of colony-forming capacity, probably due to transition into an uncultured state with relatively high numbers of live intact cells (Live/Dead test). Another survival strategy of P. aeruginosa populations was ensured by a minor subpopulation of CF-tolerant and CF-resistant cells able to grow in the form of microcolonies or regular colonies of decreased size in the presence of the antibiotic. The described P. aeruginosa dormant forms may be responsible for persistent forms in bacteria carriers and latent

  10. Protective role of murine norovirus against Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Hober, Didier; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bortolotti, Perrine; Faure, Karine; Dessein, Rodrigue; Kipnis, Eric; Guery, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered mouse pathogen, representing the most common contaminant in laboratory mouse colonies. Nevertheless, the effects of MNV infection on biomedical research are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection could alter immune response in mice with acute lung infection. Here we report that co-infection with MNV increases survival of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute lung injury and decreases in vivo production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that MNV infection can deeply modify the parameters studied in conventional models of infection and lead to false conclusions in experimental models. PMID:26338794

  11. Functional analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer PAI.

    OpenAIRE

    Passador, L; Tucker, K D; Guertin, K R; Journet, M P; Kende, A S; Iglewski, B H

    1996-01-01

    A series of structural analogs of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer [PAI, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone] were obtained and tested for their ability to act as autoinducers in stimulating the expression of the gene for elastase (lasB) by measuring beta-galactosidase production from a lasB-lacZ gene fusion in the presence of the transcriptional activator LasR. The data suggest that the length of the acyl side chain of the autoinducer molecule is the most critical factor for activity...

  12. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Gandee, Leah; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Zimmern, Philippe; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model.

  13. Genetic studies of the murine corneal response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, R S; Beisel, K; Hazlett, L D

    1981-01-01

    The murine genetic control of resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection previously has been demonstrated to be regulated by two complementing dominant genes, PsCR1 and PsCR2. The PsCR1 locus apparently is not associated with the H-2 complex, whereas the PsCR2 locus could not definitively be associated with H-2. In this study we attempted to demonstrate a possible H-2 linkage of the PsCR2 locus. A panel of inbred congenic strains varying with either the H-2 haplotype or genetic backgr...

  14. Infectious conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a bathroom

    OpenAIRE

    Eguchi, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Tatsuro; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Mitamura, Sayaka; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Background The elucidation of the routes of transmission of a pathogen is crucial for the prevention of infectious diseases caused by bacteria that are not a resident in human tissue. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of suture-related conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for which we identified the transmission route using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Case presentation A 38-year-old man, who had undergone surgery for glaucoma 2 years ago previously, pres...

  15. Biosurfactant Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Renewable Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Thavasi, R.; Subramanyam Nambaru, V. R. M.; Jayalakshmi, S.; Balasubramanian, T.; Banat, Ibrahim M.

    2011-01-01

    This study deals with production and characterization of biosurfactant from renewable resources by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Biosurfactant production was carried out in 3L fermentor using waste motor lubricant oil and peanut oil cake. Maximum biomass (11.6 mg/ml) and biosurfactant production (8.6 mg/ml) occurred with peanut oil cake at 120 and 132 h respectively. Characterization of the biosurfactant revealed that, it is a lipopeptide with chemical composition of protein (50.2%) and lipid (49.8...

  16. An unusual presentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa blebitis following combined surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabana Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of blebitis that occurred 3 years later following a combined glaucoma and cataract surgery. It was an atypical presentation, as patient had no classical fiery looking signs of blebitis despite the isolated organism being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Improvized surgical techniques like use of Mitomycin C, releasable flap sutures though considered as part of the recommended procedure for better surgical outcomes, their role as potential risk factors for visually blinding complications like endophthalmitis are often overlooked. This case report throws light on such risk factors for bleb associated infections and recommends removal or trimming of all releasable sutures and the need for a regular postoperative follow-up.

  17. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model. (paper)

  18. Electron Flow through Nitrotyrosinate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Azurin

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Herrera, Nadia; Hill, Michael G.; Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed ruthenium-modified Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurins that incorporate 3-nitrotyrosine (NO_(2)YOH) between Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)_2(imidazole)(histidine) and Cu redox centers in electron transfer (ET) pathways. We investigated the structures and reactivities of three different systems: RuH107NO_(2)YOH109, RuH124NO_(2)YOH122, and RuH126NO_(2)YOH122. RuH107NO_(2)YOH109, unlabeled H124NO_(2)YOH122, and unlabeled H126NO_(2)YOH122 were structurally characterized. The pKa’s of NO_(2)YOH a...

  19. Antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Jamaica Resistencia a antibióticos en cepas clínicas de Pseudomonas aeruginosa en Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Paul D.; Anicetus Izundu

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Jamaica, and to obtain baseline information on the presence of this important pathogen. METHODS: A total of 51 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, obtained from 162 clinical specimens from major hospitals and laboratories in seven parishes in Jamaica, were analyzed between May and August 2002. Isolates were tested against 18 different antibiotics by a disk diffusion method. RESULTS: Organisms were cul...

  20. Cystic fibrosis-niche adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduces virulence in multiple infection hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Riva, Camilla; Juhas, Mario; Schwager, Stephan; Eberl, Leo; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to thrive in diverse ecological niches and to cause serious human infection. P. aeruginosa environmental strains are producing various virulence factors that are required for establishing acute infections in several host organisms; however, the P. aeruginosa phenotypic variants favour long-term persistence in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Whether P. aeruginosa strains, which have adapted to the CF-niche, have lost their competitive fitness in the other environment remains to be investigated. In this paper, three P. aeruginosa clonal lineages, including early strains isolated at the onset of infection, and late strains, isolated after several years of chronic lung infection from patients with CF, were analysed in multi-host model systems of acute infection. P. aeruginosa early isolates caused lethality in the three non-mammalian hosts, namely Caenorhabditis elegans, Galleria mellonella, and Drosophila melanogaster, while late adapted clonal isolates were attenuated in acute virulence. When two different mouse genetic background strains, namely C57Bl/6NCrl and Balb/cAnNCrl, were used as acute infection models, early P. aeruginosa CF isolates were lethal, while late isolates exhibited reduced or abolished acute virulence. Severe histopathological lesions, including high leukocytes recruitment and bacterial load, were detected in the lungs of mice infected with P. aeruginosa CF early isolates, while late isolates were progressively cleared. In addition, systemic bacterial spread and invasion of epithelial cells, which were detected for P. aeruginosa CF early strains, were not observed with late strains. Our findings indicate that niche-specific selection in P. aeruginosa reduced its ability to cause acute infections across a broad range of hosts while maintaining the capacity for chronic infection in the CF host. PMID:22558188