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Sample records for aeruginosa lung infection

  1. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in normal and athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Espersen, F; Pedersen, S S;

    1993-01-01

    We have compared a chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in alginate beads in normal and athymic rats with an acute infection with free live P. aeruginosa bacteria. The following parameters were observed and described: mortality, macroscopic and microscopic pathologic changes......, and antibody responses. The rats challenged with P. aeruginosa alginate beads experienced a generally more severe lung pathology and the antibody responses were more homogeneous with less dispersion as compared to the rats having free live P. aeruginosa bacteria. In general, manifestations were more severe...... in the athymic rats compared to the normal rats. It is, however, notable that the athymic rats developed similar microscopic lung manifestations as the normal rats when given a large number of P. aeruginosa in the beads, with dense accumulation of neutrophil granulocytes and microcolonies comparable...

  2. Sphingoid long chain bases prevent lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Tavakoli Tabazavareh, Shaghayegh; Grassmé, Heike; Becker, Katrin Anne; Japtok, Lukasz; Steinmann, Jörg; Joseph, Tammar; Lang, Stephan; Tuemmler, Burkhard; Schuchman, Edward H; Lentsch, Alex B; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J; Futerman, Anthony H; Gulbins, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, trauma, burn wound, or patients requiring ventilation are susceptible to severe pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physiological innate defense mechanisms against this pathogen, and their alterations in lung diseases, are for the most part unknown. We now demonstrate a role for the sphingoid long chain base, sphingosine, in determining susceptibility to lung infection by P. aeruginosa. Tracheal and bronchial sphingosine levels were significantly reduced in tissues from cystic fibrosis patients and from cystic fibrosis mouse models due to reduced activity of acid ceramidase, which generates sphingosine from ceramide. Inhalation of mice with sphingosine, with a sphingosine analog, FTY720, or with acid ceramidase rescued susceptible mice from infection. Our data suggest that luminal sphingosine in tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells prevents pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection in normal individuals, paving the way for novel therapeutic paradigms based on inhalation of acid ceramidase or of sphingoid long chain bases in lung infection. PMID:25085879

  3. Improved outcome of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is associated with induction of a Th1-dominated cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Jensen, P O; Kobayashi, O;

    2002-01-01

    patients, the lungs of susceptible BALB/c mice were re-infected with P. aeruginosa 14 days after the initial infection. Singly-infected BALB/c mice, as well as non-infected mice, were used as controls. Decreased mortality and milder lung inflammation in re-infected BALB/c mice, as well as a tendency......Repeated challenge with antigen is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of pulmonary diseases. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) experience recurrent pulmonary colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa before establishment of chronic lung infection. To mimic recurrent lung infections in CF...... production, in chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in CF....

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasl and rhll quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian;

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared...

  5. P. aeruginosa in the paranasal sinuses and transplanted lungs have similar adaptive mutations as isolates from chronically infected CF lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Aanaes, Kasper;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells are present as biofilms in the paranasal sinuses and the lungs of chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Since different inflammatory responses and selective antibiotic pressures are acting in the sinuses compared with the lungs, we compared...... the adaptive profiles of mucoid and non-mucoid isolates from the two locations. METHODS: We studied the genetic basis of phenotypic diversification and gene expression profiles in sequential lung and sinus P. aeruginosa isolates from four chronically infected CF patients, including pre- and post-lung...... transplantation isolates. RESULTS: The same phenotypes caused by similar mutations and similar gene expression profiles were found in mucoid and non-mucoid isolates from the paranasal sinuses and from the lungs before and after transplantation. CONCLUSION: Bilateral exchange of P. aeruginosa isolates between...

  6. Loss of Social Behaviours in Populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infecting Lungs of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin;

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted...... as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P....... aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits -biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved...

  7. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzymes in lung infections of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Döring, G; Goldstein, W; A. Röll; Schiøtz, P O; Høiby, N; Botzenhart, K.

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzymes in cystic fibrosis lung infection in the presence and absence of specific serum antibodies. In sputa of 21 cystic fibrosis patients, concentrations of P. aeruginosa proteases and exotoxin A were determined by sensitive radioimmunoassays. In all sputa, detection of exoenzymes was negative (less than or equal to 10 ng). Positive serum antibody titers to bacterial exoenzymes were found in the majority of patients. Purified immunoglobu...

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolutionary Adaptation and Diversification in Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Lung Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Craig; O'Brien, Siobhan; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations undergo a characteristic evolutionary adaptation during chronic infection of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, including reduced production of virulence factors, transition to a biofilm-associated lifestyle, and evolution of high-level antibiotic resistance. Populations of P. aeruginosa in chronic CF lung infections typically exhibit high phenotypic diversity, including for clinically important traits such as antibiotic resistance and toxin production, and this diversity is dynamic over time, making accurate diagnosis and treatment challenging. Population genomics studies reveal extensive genetic diversity within patients, including for transmissible strains the coexistence of highly divergent lineages acquired by patient-to-patient transmission. The inherent spatial structure and spatial heterogeneity of selection in the CF lung appears to play a key role in driving P. aeruginosa diversification. PMID:26946977

  9. Detection of N-acylhomoserine lactones in lung tissues of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Hentzer, Morten;

    2000-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with expression of virulence factors, many of which are controlled by two N:-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum-sensing systems. Escherichia coli strains equipped with a luxR-based monitor system expressing green fluorescent protein...... (GFP) in the presence of exogenous AHL molecules were used to detect the production of AHLs from P. aeruginosa in vivo. Mice were challenged intratracheally with alginate beads containing P. aeruginosa and E. coli and killed on different days after the challenge. By means of confocal scanning laser...... microscopy, GFP-expressing E. coli bacteria could be detected in the lung tissues, indicating production and excretion of AHL molecules in vivo by the infecting P. aeruginosa. AHL signals were detected mainly in lung tissues exhibiting severe pathological changes. These findings support the view...

  10. Characterising novel anti-biofilm targets for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the cystic fibrosis lung

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Ronan

    2014-01-01

    The global rise in antibiotic resistance is a significant problem facing healthcare professionals. In particular within the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, bacteria can establish chronic infection and resistance to a wide array of antibiotic therapies. One of the principle pathogens associated with chronic infection in the CF lung is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa can establish chronic infection in the CF lung partly through the use of the biofilm mode of growth. This biofilm mode of growth...

  11. Inflammatory Markers in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Lung Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Pukhalsky

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic endobronchial inflammation and bacterial infection are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder associated with improper function of chloride channels. Inflammation in CF lung is greatly amplified after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. In this study the relationship between P. aeruginosa status and inflammatory markers has been investigated. Seventeen CF children in acute lung exacerbation were examined. CF patients without P. aeruginosa infection were characterized by elevated activity of sputum elastase, reduced response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and significant resistance to the antiproliferative action of glucocorticoids. These parameters were normalized after antibiotic treatment. The patients with prolonged P. aeruginosa infection demonstrated extremely high levels of elastase activity and elevated amounts of sputum IL-8 and TNF-α. Although antibiotic treatment resulted in clinical improvement, it failed to suppress excessive immune response in the lung. The data indicate that CF patients with prolonged P. aeruginosa need the modified treatment, which should include immunomodulating drugs and protease inhibitors as well as antibacterial therapy.

  12. Production of mucoid microcolonies by Pseudomonas aeruginosa within infected lungs in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, J; Chan, R.; Lam, K.; Costerton, J W

    1980-01-01

    Direct electron microscopic examination of postmortem lung material from cystic fibrosis patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa has shown that these bacterial cells form distinct fiber-enclosed microcolonies in the infected alveoli. Similar examination of bronchoscopy material from infected cystic fibrosis patients showed that the fibres of the enveloping matrix are definitely associated with the bacterial cells. The fibers of the extracellular matrix stain with ruthenium red and are t...

  13. Novel mouse model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a chronic infection in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by establishing an alginate-containing biofilm. The infection has been studied in several animal models; however, most of the models required artificial embedding of the bacteria. We present here a new...... pulmonary mouse model without artificial embedding. The model is based on a stable mucoid CF sputum isolate (NH57388A) with hyperproduction of alginate due to a deletion in mucA and functional N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum-sensing systems. Chronic lung infection could be established in both CF...

  14. Antibodies against beta-lactamase can improve ceftazidime treatment of lung infection with beta-lactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a rat model of chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Bagge, Niels; Høiby, Niels

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that antibodies against the chromosomal beta-lactamase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a beta ab) might act as beta-lactamase inhibitors in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection with P. aeruginosa, we compared in a rat model of chronic lung infection the...... efficacy of treatment with ceftazidime in beta-lactamase-immunized (group I) and non-immunized (group II) rats. Chronic lung infection was established with alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa producing high amounts of beta-lactamase in 133 Lewis rats. Prior to infection, group I (66 rats) was immunized three...... times at 2-week intervals with purified beta-lactamase in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) and group II (67 rats) received IFA. Ceftazidime treatment was initiated after challenge and continued for 10 days, after which the rats were sacrificed and the lung bacteriology and pathology were analysed. Rat...

  15. Intrinsic and environmental mutagenesis drive diversification and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chronic lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Oliver, Antonio; Blázquez, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile opportunistic pathogen causing a wide variety of hospital-acquired acute infections in immunocompromised patients as well as chronic respiratory infections in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis or other chronic respiratory diseases. Several traits contribute to its ability to colonize and persist in the lungs of chronically infected patients, including development of high resistance to antimicrobials and hypermutability, biofilm growth, and alginate hyperproduction, or a customized pathogenicity, which may include the loss of classical virulence factors and metabolic changes. Here we argue that a combination of both intrinsic and environmental mutagenesis leads to a high number of mutant variants in the population. The conducive environment then triggers a positive feedback loop leading to adaptation and persistence of P. aeruginosa, rendering these chronic infections almost impossible to eradicate. PMID:22080096

  16. Quorum sensing and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bjarnsholt

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant microorganism in chronic lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients. The chronic lung infection is preceded by intermittent colonization. When the chronic infection becomes established, it is well accepted that the isolated strains differ phenotypically from the intermittent strains. Dominating changes are the switch to mucoidity (alginate overproduction and loss of epigenetic regulation of virulence such as the Quorum Sensing (QS. To elucidate the dynamics of P. aeruginosa QS systems during long term infection of the CF lung, we have investigated 238 isolates obtained from 152 CF patients at different stages of infection ranging from intermittent to late chronic. Isolates were characterized with regard to QS signal molecules, alginate, rhamnolipid and elastase production and mutant frequency. The genetic basis for change in QS regulation were investigated and identified by sequence analysis of lasR, rhlR, lasI and rhlI. The first QS system to be lost was the one encoded by las system 12 years (median value after the onset of the lung infection with subsequent loss of the rhl encoded system after 17 years (median value shown as deficiencies in production of the 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL QS signal molecules respectively. The concomitant development of QS malfunction significantly correlated with the reduced production of rhamnolipids and elastase and with the occurrence of mutations in the regulatory genes lasR and rhlR. Accumulation of mutations in both lasR and rhlR correlated with development of hypermutability. Interestingly, a higher number of mucoid isolates were found to produce C4-HSL signal molecules and rhamnolipids compared to the non-mucoid isolates. As seen from the present data, we can conclude that P. aeruginosa and particularly the mucoid strains do not lose the QS regulation or the ability to produce rhamnolipids until the late stage of the chronic infection.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasI and rhlI quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Givskov, Michael;

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared...

  18. Improved outcome of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is associated with induction of a Th1-dominated cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Jensen, P O; Kobayashi, O;

    2002-01-01

    Repeated challenge with antigen is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of pulmonary diseases. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) experience recurrent pulmonary colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa before establishment of chronic lung infection. To mimic recurrent lung infections in CF p...

  19. Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Kolpen

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major severe complication in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, where P. aeruginosa persists and grows in biofilms in the endobronchial mucus under hypoxic conditions. Numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs surround the biofilms and create local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O, an intermediate in the denitrification pathway. We measured N2O and O2 with electrochemical microsensors in 8 freshly expectorated sputum samples from 7 CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection. The concentrations of NO3(- and NO2(- in sputum were estimated by the Griess reagent. We found a maximum median concentration of 41.8 µM N2O (range 1.4-157.9 µM N2O. The concentration of N2O in the sputum was higher below the oxygenated layers. In 4 samples the N2O concentration increased during the initial 6 h of measurements before decreasing for approximately 6 h. Concomitantly, the concentration of NO3(- decreased in sputum during 24 hours of incubation. We demonstrate for the first time production of N2O in clinical material from infected human airways indicating pathogenic metabolism based on denitrification. Therefore, P. aeruginosa may acquire energy for growth by denitrification in anoxic endobronchial mucus in CF patients. Such ability for anaerobic growth may be a hitherto ignored key aspect of chronic P. aeruginosa infections that can inform new strategies for treatment and prevention.

  20. Diversity of metabolic profiles of cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa during the early stages of lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2015-01-01

    and mutations in the global regulator genes mucA, lasR and rpoN. Our aim was to understand the metabolic changes occurring over time and between niches of the CF airways. By applying Phenotype MicroArrays, we investigated changes in the carbon and nitrogen catabolism of subsequently clonally related mucoid...... and non-mucoid (NM) lung and sinus P. aeruginosa isolates from 10 CF patients (five intermittently colonized/five chronically infected). We found the most pronounced catabolic changes for the early/late NM isolate comparisons, with respiratory reduction seen for all chronically infecting isolates and two...... of metabolic pathways via the KEGG database showed a prevalence of substrates involved in the metabolism of Ala, Asp and Glu, d-Ala, and Arg and Pro. In conclusion, extensive heterogeneity in the metabolic profiles of the P. aeruginosa isolates was observed from the initial stages of the infection, showing...

  1. Neurotrophic and neuroimmune responses to early-life Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Silvia; Scuri, Mario; Samsell, Lennie; Ducatman, Barbara; Bejarano, Pablo; Auais, Alexander; Doud, Melissa; Mathee, Kalai; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    Early-life respiratory infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common in children with cystic fibrosis or immune deficits. Although many of its clinical manifestations involve neural reflexes, little information is available on the peripheral nervous system of infected airways. This study sought to determine whether early-life infection triggers a neurogenic-mediated immunoinflammatory response, the mechanisms of this response, and its relationship with other immunoinflammatory pathways. Weanling and adult rats were inoculated with suspensions containing P. aeruginosa (PAO1) coated on alginate microspheres suspended in Tris-CaCl(2) buffer. Five days after infection, rats were injected with capsaicin to stimulate nociceptive nerves in the airway mucosa, and microvascular permeability was measured using Evans blue as a tracer. PAO1 increased neurogenic inflammation in the extra- and intrapulmonary compartments of weanlings but not in adults. The mechanism involves selective overexpression of NGF, which is critical for the local increase in microvascular permeability and for the infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into infected lung parenchyma. These effects are mediated in part by induction of downstream inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, especially IL-1beta, IL-18, and leptin. Our data suggest that neurogenic-mediated immunoinflammatory mechanisms play important roles in airway inflammation and hyperreactivity associated with P. aeruginosa when infection occurs early in life. PMID:20543002

  2. Phenotypes selected during chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients: implications for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Wang, Hengzhuang; Høiby, Niels

    2012-07-01

    During chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods of time under the challenging selective pressure imposed by the immune system and antibiotic treatment as a result of its biofilm mode of growth and adaptive evolution mediated by genetic variation. Mucoidy, hypermutability and acquirement of mutational antibiotic resistance are important adaptive phenotypes that are selected during chronic P. aeruginosa infection. This review dicsusses the role played by these phenotypes for the tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics and show that mucoidy and hypermutability change the architecture of in vitro formed biofilms and lead to increase tolerance to antibiotics. Production of high levels of beta-lactamase impairs penetration of beta-lactam antibiotics due to inactivation of the antibiotic. In conclusion, these data underline the importance of biofilm prevention strategies by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy before phenotypic diversification during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis.

  3. Novel experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection model mimicking long-term host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Claus; van Gennip, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    Moser C, van Gennip M, Bjarnsholt T, Jensen PO, Lee B, Hougen HP, Calum H, Ciofu O, Givskov M, Molin S, Hoiby N. Novel experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection model mimicking long-term host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis. APMIS 2009; 117: 95-107. The dominant cause of premature...... death in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) is chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The chronic lung infection often lasts for decades with just one clone. However, as a result of inflammation, antibiotic treatment and different niches in the lungs, the clone undergoes...... and 2003) of the chronic lung infection of one CF patient using the seaweed alginate embedment model. The results showed that the non-mucoid clones reduced their virulence over time, resulting in faster clearing of the bacteria from the lungs, improved pathology and reduced pulmonary production...

  4. Effects of quorum-sensing on immunoglobulin G responses in a rat model of chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    WU, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian;

    2004-01-01

    Levels of serum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were observed for 106 days in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Significantly weaker responses of serum IgG and IgG1 and a lower ratio of IgGI/IgG2a were found in the rats infected with the quorum-signal-deficient mutant, PAO1 (rhl...

  5. Pathogenic effects of biofilm with chronic pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Yan; Yiqiang Chen; Zhijun Song; Hong Wu; Jinliang Kong; Xuejun Qin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish an animal model of P.aeruginosa biofilm associated with chronic pulmonary infection and investigate the pathogenic effects of biofilm. Methods: Experiments in vitro, measuring the MICS, MBCS of ievofloxacin(LFX), ceftazidime(CAZ) in PAO579 in alginate beads and planktonic PAO579. Rats were challenged with 0.1 ml of PAO579(109CFU/ml) in alginate beads or 0.1 ml of planktonic PAO579(109CFU/ml), 3,7,14 days after challenging, bacteriological, pathological features were observed. Results: The MICS, MBCS of LFX, CAZ in PAO579 in alginate beads were higher than those in planktonic PAO579 in vitro. CFU/lung in alginate beads group was significantly higher than that in planktonic bacteria group(P = 0.002, P =0.004, P = 0.002, respectively); macroscopic lung pathology and the inflammation in alginate beads group were significantly more severe compared to those in planktonic bacteria group in vivo. Conclusion: P.aeruginosa biofilm protected bacterium from killing of antibiotics and might mediate the host immune damage in the lung tissue and made bacterium evade the host immune defense.

  6. Bead-size directed distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa results in distinct inflammatory response in a mouse model of chronic lung infection

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    Christophersen, L J; Trøstrup, H; Damlund, Dina Silke Malling;

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by biofilms, tolerant to antibiotics and host responses. Instead, immune responses contribute to the tissue damage. However, this may depend on localization of infection in the upper conductive...

  7. Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates maintain the biofilm formation capacity and the gene expression profiles during the chronic lung infection of CF patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Bao le ri; Schjerling, Charlotte K.; Kirkby, Nikolai;

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic diversifications of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) promote long-term survival of bacteria during chronic lung infection. Twelve clonally related, sequential mucoid and non-mucoid paired P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from three......-mucoid isolates observed in this particular P. aeruginosa clone reflects different adaptation strategies used by these two phenotypes in the different niches of the CF lung environment....

  8. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  9. Early immune response in susceptible and resistant mice strains with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection determines the type of T-helper cell response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Hougen, H P; Song, Z;

    1999-01-01

    Most cystic fibrosis (CF) patients become chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs. The infection is characterized by a pronounced antibody response and a persistant inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Moreover a high antibody response correlates...... with a poor prognosis. We speculated that a change from this Th2-like response to a Th1-like response might decrease the lung inflammation and thus improve the prognosis in CF patients. To investigate this, we infected C3H/HeN and BALB/c mice intratracheally with P. aeruginosa. In addition, we studied...... with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection have a better disease outcome compared to the Th2-reacting BALB/c mice, indicating that a Th1 response might be beneficial in CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection....

  10. Poor antioxidant status exacerbates oxidative stress and inflammatory response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in Guinea Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the presence of oxidative stress in cystic fibrosis (CF). The disease has long been associated with both increased production of reactive oxygen species and impaired antioxidant status, in particular during the chronic pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... of oxidative stress. The aim of our study was to investigate the consequences of a 7-day biofilm-grown P. aeruginosa lung infection in 3-month-old guinea pigs receiving either ASC-sufficient or ASC-deficient diet for at least 2 months. The animals receiving ASC-deficient diet showed significantly higher......, which is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in CF. Guinea pigs are unable to synthesize ascorbate (ASC) or vitamin C, a major antioxidant of the lung, and thus like human beings rely on its presence in the diet. On this basis, guinea pigs receiving ASC-deficient diet have been used as a model...

  11. Elucidation of the Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Determinant of Colistin Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Murine Thigh and Lung Infection Models▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dudhani, Rajesh V.; Turnidge, John D.; Coulthard, Kingsley; Milne, Robert W.; Rayner, Craig R.; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L.

    2009-01-01

    Colistin is increasingly used as last-line therapy against Gram-negative pathogens. The pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) index that best correlates with the efficacy of colistin remains undefined. The activity of colistin against three strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied in neutropenic mouse thigh and lung infection models. The PKs of unbound colistin were determined from single-dose PK studies together with extensive plasma protein binding analyses. Dose-fractionation stud...

  12. Experimental chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in rats. Non-specific stimulation with LPS reduces lethality as efficiently as specific immunization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Hougen, H P; Høiby, N;

    1995-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis, we investigated the possibility of preventing chronic lung inflammation or decreasing the progression of the infection. We compared the lethality, pathology, bacterial clearance, and immunogenicity after...... with either E. coli LPS or P. aeruginosa sonicate. Four and two weeks prior to challenge other rats were vaccinated with either E. coli LPS or P. aeruginosa sonicate. Controls did not receive any stimulation or vaccination. The lethality after challenge was lower in rats stimulated with E. coli LPS (p = 0...

  13. Azithromycin blocks quorum sensing and alginate polymer formation and increases the sensitivity to serum and stationary growth phase killing of P. aeruginosa and attenuates chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in Cftr -/--mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, N.; Lee, Bao le ri; Hentzer, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    The consequences of O-acetylated alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the lungs of chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are tolerance to both antibiotic treatments and effects on the innate and the adaptive defense mechanisms. In clinical trials, azithromycin (AZM......, whereas cells in the exponential phase did not. Interestingly, AZM-treated P. aeruginosa lasI mutants appeared to be particularly resistant to serum, whereas bacteria with a functional QS system did not. We show in a CF mouse model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection that AZM treatment results...

  14. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is more severe in Th2 responding BALB/c mice compared to Th1 responding C3H/HeN mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Johansen, H K; Song, Z;

    1997-01-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by a pronounced antibody response and microcolonies surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). Poor prognosis is correlated with a high antibody response to P. aeruginosa antigens. An animal...... model of this infection was established in two strains of mice: C3H/HeN and BALB/c, generally known as Th1 and Th2 responders, respectively, which were challenged with alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa. Mortality was significantly lower in C3H/HeN compared to BALB/c mice (p P. aeruginosa...... was cleared more efficiently in C3H/HeN mice and significantly more C3H/HeN mice showed normal lung histopathology (p P. aeruginosa antigen and concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells...

  15. Requirement of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa CbrA Sensor Kinase for Full Virulence in a Murine Acute Lung Infection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Amy T. Y.; Janot, Laure; Pena, Olga M.; Neidig, Anke; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Hilchie, Ashley; Levesque, Roger C.; Overhage, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is a major cause of respiratory tract and other nosocomial infections. The sensor kinase CbrA is a central regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in vitro also regulates virulence-related processes in P. aeruginosa. Here, we investigated the role of CbrA in two murine models of infection. In both peritoneal infections in leukopenic mice and lung infection models, the cbrA mutant was less virulent since substantially larger numbers of cbrA mutant bacteria were required to cause the same level of infection as wild-type or complemented bacteria. In contrast, in the chronic rat lung model the cbrA mutant grew and persisted as well as the wild type, indicating that the decrease of in vivo virulence of the cbrA mutant did not result from growth deficiencies on particular carbon substrates observed in vitro. In addition, a mutant in the cognate response regulator CbrB showed no defect in virulence in the peritoneal infection model, ruling out the involvement of certain alterations of virulence properties in the cbrA mutant including defective swarming motility, increased biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity, since these alterations are controlled through CbrB. Further investigations indicated that the mutant was more susceptible to uptake by phagocytes in vitro, resulting in greater overall bacterial killing. Consistent with the virulence defect, it took a smaller number of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to kill the cbrA mutant than to kill the wild type. Transcriptional analysis of the cbrA mutant during D. discoideum infection led to the conclusion that CbrA played an important role in the iron metabolism, protection of P. aeruginosa against oxidative stress, and the regulation of certain virulence factors. PMID:24379284

  16. Requirement of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa CbrA sensor kinase for full virulence in a murine acute lung infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Amy T Y; Janot, Laure; Pena, Olga M; Neidig, Anke; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Hilchie, Ashley; Levesque, Roger C; Overhage, Joerg; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is a major cause of respiratory tract and other nosocomial infections. The sensor kinase CbrA is a central regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in vitro also regulates virulence-related processes in P. aeruginosa. Here, we investigated the role of CbrA in two murine models of infection. In both peritoneal infections in leukopenic mice and lung infection models, the cbrA mutant was less virulent since substantially larger numbers of cbrA mutant bacteria were required to cause the same level of infection as wild-type or complemented bacteria. In contrast, in the chronic rat lung model the cbrA mutant grew and persisted as well as the wild type, indicating that the decrease of in vivo virulence of the cbrA mutant did not result from growth deficiencies on particular carbon substrates observed in vitro. In addition, a mutant in the cognate response regulator CbrB showed no defect in virulence in the peritoneal infection model, ruling out the involvement of certain alterations of virulence properties in the cbrA mutant including defective swarming motility, increased biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity, since these alterations are controlled through CbrB. Further investigations indicated that the mutant was more susceptible to uptake by phagocytes in vitro, resulting in greater overall bacterial killing. Consistent with the virulence defect, it took a smaller number of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to kill the cbrA mutant than to kill the wild type. Transcriptional analysis of the cbrA mutant during D. discoideum infection led to the conclusion that CbrA played an important role in the iron metabolism, protection of P. aeruginosa against oxidative stress, and the regulation of certain virulence factors.

  17. Augmented effect of early antibiotic treatment in mice with experimental lung infections due to sequentially adapted mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, M; Moser, Claus; Christensen, Louise D;

    2009-01-01

    Background: Effects of treatment with tobramycin initiated 1 or 24 h post-infection were investigated in a new version of a pulmonary infection model in mice. The model reflects the differentiated behaviour of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strains isolated from the lungs of one chronically infect...

  18. Overcoming barriers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections: Engineered nanoparticles for local delivery of a cationic antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Angelo, Ivana; Casciaro, Bruno; Miro, Agnese; Quaglia, Fabiana; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Ungaro, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are very promising in the treatment of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections experienced by cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Nevertheless, there is an urgent need of inhalable formulations able to deliver the intact CAMP in conductive airways and to shield its interactions with airway mucus/bacterial biofilm, thus enhancing CAMP/bacteria interactions. Along these lines, the aim of this work was the design and development of nano-embedded microparticles (NEM) for sustained delivery of CAMPs in the lung. To this purpose, nanoparticles (NPs) made of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) containing a model CAMP, colistin (Col), were produced by emulsion/solvent diffusion technique. Engineering NPs with chitosan (CS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) allowed to modulate surface properties and, in so doing, to improve NP transport through artificial CF mucus. In order to achieve a long-term stable dosage form useful for NP inhalation, NPs were spray-dried in different carriers (lactose or mannitol), thus producing NEM. The most promising NEM formulations were selected on the basis of bulk and flow properties, distribution of NPs in the carrier and aerosolization performance upon delivery through a breath-actuated dry powder inhaler. Of note, selected Col-loaded NEM were found to kill P. aeruginosa biofilm and to display a prolonged efficacy in biofilm eradication compared to the free Col. This effect was likely ascribable to the ability of NPs to penetrate into bacterial biofilm, as demonstrated by confocal analysis, and to sustain Col release inside it. Taken all together, our results indicate that adequate engineering of PLGA NPs represents an enticing technological approach to harness novel antimicrobials for P. aeruginosa lung infection, such as CAMPs, especially in CF. PMID:26340361

  19. Faster activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in resistant mice during early innate response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P Ø; Moser, C; Kobayashi, O;

    2004-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are crucial for the outcome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We compared PMNs and inflammatory cytokines in the lungs and blood from susceptible BALB/c and resistant C3H/HeN mice 1 and 2 days after intratracheal...... was decreased 1 day after bacterial challenge, whereas the expression was increased after 2 days of challenge on PMNs of C3H/HeN mice only. These changes were accompanied by a more severe lung inflammation in BALB/c mice and faster clearance of the bacteria in C3H/HeN mice. In conclusion, the rapid early...... bacterial clearance in the lungs of C3H/HeN mice could be explained by faster activation of the PMNs, as indicated by the higher up-regulation of CD11b. The severe lung inflammation in BALB/c mice may be caused by the early higher content of G-CSF in the sera mobilizing PMNs from the bone marrow...

  20. Elucidation of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic determinant of colistin activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in murine thigh and lung infection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhani, Rajesh V; Turnidge, John D; Coulthard, Kingsley; Milne, Robert W; Rayner, Craig R; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L

    2010-03-01

    Colistin is increasingly used as last-line therapy against Gram-negative pathogens. The pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) index that best correlates with the efficacy of colistin remains undefined. The activity of colistin against three strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied in neutropenic mouse thigh and lung infection models. The PKs of unbound colistin were determined from single-dose PK studies together with extensive plasma protein binding analyses. Dose-fractionation studies were conducted over 24 h with a dose range of 5 to 160 mg/kg of body weight/day. The bacterial burden in the thigh or lung was measured at 24 h after the initiation of treatment. Relationships between antibacterial effect and measures of exposure to unbound (f) colistin (area under the concentration-time curve [fAUC/MIC], maximum concentration of drug in plasma [fC(max)]/MIC, and the time that the concentration in plasma is greater than the MIC [fT > MIC]) were examined by using an inhibitory sigmoid maximum-effect model. Nonlinearity in the PKs of colistin, including its plasma protein binding, was observed. The PK/PD index that correlated best with its efficacy was fAUC/MIC in both the thigh infection model (R(2) = 87%) and the lung infection model (R(2) = 89%). The fAUC/MIC targets required to achieve 1-log and 2-log kill against the three strains were 15.6 to 22.8 and 27.6 to 36.1, respectively, in the thigh infection model, while the corresponding values were 12.2 to 16.7 and 36.9 to 45.9 in the lung infection model. The findings of this in vivo study indicate the importance of achieving adequate time-averaged exposure to colistin. The results will facilitate efforts to define the more rational design of dosage regimens for humans. PMID:20028824

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  2. Cytokine and surface receptor diversity of NK cells in resistant C3H/HeN and susceptible BALB/c mice with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2003-01-01

    infection in cystic fibrosis. Lung cell suspensions were depleted of lymphocytes by magnetic cell sorting. The concentrations of IFN-gamma, IL-1beta and GM-CSF were estimated by ELISA at day 1 and 2 after infection. Non-infected mice were used as controls. Flow cytometry was used to estimate the surface...... expression of Fc receptors was significantly lower on NK cells in C3H/HeN mice at day 1 and 2. In conclusion, the present results show phenotypic differences in NK cells in the two mice strains in chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection, indicating different modulating effects in the Th1/Th2 balance....

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. Mechanism of antibiotic resistance and target of the humoral immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    of chronic lung infection by assessing the effect of a beta ab raised by vaccination with purified chromosomal beta-lactamase on the outcome of the treatment with ceftazidime of bacteria resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. Our results showed that significantly lower bacterial load and better lung pathology......The intensive antibiotic treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa has improved the survival rate and the clinical condition of Danish patients. Acquirement of resistance to anti-pseudomonal antibiotics is one of the main drawbacks...... of this therapeutic strategy and our results showed the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to several antibiotics during 25 years of intensive antibiotic treatment. Our studies have been concentrating on the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. We have shown an association between...

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate is refractory to Th1 immune response and impedes host immune clearance in a mouse model of acute lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana;

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic respiratory pathogen that accounts for most of the morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In CF-affected lungs, the bacteria undergo conversion from a non-mucoid to a non-tractable mucoid phenotype, due to overproduction of alginate....... The effect of alginate production on pathogenicity was investigated by using an acute lung infection mouse model that compared a non-mucoid P. aeruginosa strain, PAO1, to its constitutive alginate-overproducing derivative, Alg(+) PAOmucA22, and an alginate-defective strain, Alg(-) PAOalgD. Bacterial......-gamma was observed. Higher ratios of IFN-gamma/IL4 and IFN-gamma/IL10, but lower IL10 levels, were also found in all three groups. These results indicate a Th1-predominated immune response in these animals. Such cytokine responses could have aided the clearance of non-mucoid P. aeruginosa, but were not sufficient...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  6. Quorum Sensing and Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Lung Infection of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, T.; Jensen, P.O.; Jakobsen, T.H.;

    2010-01-01

    in production of the 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL QS signal molecules respectively. The concomitant development of QS malfunction significantly correlated with the reduced production of rhamnolipids and elastase and with the occurrence of mutations in the regulatory genes lasR and rhlR. Accumulation of mutations...... in both lasR and rhlR correlated with development of hypermutability. Interestingly, a higher number of mucoid isolates were found to produce C4-HSL signal molecules and rhamnolipids compared to the non-mucoid isolates. As seen from the present data, we can conclude that P. aeruginosa and particularly...

  7. Production of N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones by P. aeruginosa isolates from chronic lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisenberger, O; Givskov, M; Riedel, K;

    2000-01-01

    The N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by sequential Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from chronically infected patients with cystic fibrosis were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography. It is demonstrated that both the amounts and the types of molecules synthesized by isolates from...

  8. Evolution and diversification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the paranasal sinuses of cystic fibrosis children have implications for chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Rau, Martin Holm; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent colonizer of the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Depending on early treatment regimens, the colonization will, with high probability, develop into chronic infections sooner or later, and it is important to es...

  9. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes restrict growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Ø;

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have increased susceptibility to chronic lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the ecophysiology within the CF lung during infections is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the in vivo growth physiology of P. aeruginosa within lungs...... of chronically infected CF patients. A novel, quantitative peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH)-based method was used to estimate the in vivo growth rates of P. aeruginosa directly in lung tissue samples from CF patients and the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in infected lungs...... in a mouse model. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa within CF lungs did not correlate with the dimensions of bacterial aggregates but showed an inverse correlation to the concentration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surrounding the bacteria. A growth-limiting effect on P. aeruginosa by PMNs was also...

  10. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system has an exotoxin S/T/Y independent pathogenic role during acute lung infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlies Galle

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system (T3SS is a complex nanomachine of many pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. It forms a proteinaceous channel that is inserted into the host eukaryotic cell membrane for injection of bacterial proteins that manipulate host cell signaling. However, few studies have focused on the effector-independent functions of the T3SS. Using a murine model of acute lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human opportunistic pathogen, we compared the pathogenicity of mutant bacteria that lack all of the known effector toxins ( ΔSTY, with mutant bacteria that also lack the major translocator protein PopB (ΔSTY/ΔPopB and so cannot form a functional T3SS channel in the host cell membrane. Mortality was higher among mice challenged with ΔSTY compared to mice challenged with ΔSTY/ΔPopB mutant bacteria. In addition, mice infected with ΔSTY showed decreased bacterial clearance from the lungs compared to those infected with ΔSTY/ΔPopB. Infection was in both cases associated with substantial killing of lung infiltrating macrophages. However, macrophages from ΔSTY-infected mice died by pro-inflammatory necrosis characterized by membrane permeabilization and caspase-1 mediated IL-1β production, whereas macrophages from ΔSTY/ΔPopB infected mice died by apoptosis, which is characterized by annexin V positive staining of the cell membrane and caspase-3 activation. This was confirmed in macrophages infected in vitro. These results demonstrate a T3SS effector toxin independent role for the T3SS, in particular the T3SS translocator protein PopB, in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa during acute lung infection.

  11. Simple Sequence Repeats Together with Mismatch Repair Deficiency Can Bias Mutagenic Pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Chronic Lung Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro J Moyano; Sofía Feliziani; Julio A Di Rienzo; Smania, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and undergoes a process of genetic adaptation based on mutagenesis. We evaluated the role of mononucleotide G:C and A:T simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in this adaptive process. An in silico survey of the genome sequences of 7 P. aeruginosa strains showed that mononucleotide G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were greatly under-represented in coding regions, suggesting a strong coun...

  12. Large Porous Particles for Sustained Release of a Decoy Oligonucelotide and Poly(ethylenimine): Potential for Combined Therapy of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Angelo, Ivana; Perfetto, Brunella; Costabile, Gabriella; Ambrosini, Veronica; Caputo, Pina; Miro, Agnese; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Quaglia, Fabiana; Ungaro, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the specific inhibition of nuclear factor-κB by a decoy oligonucleotide (dec-ODN) delivered through inhalable large porous particles (LPP) made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) may be highly beneficial for long-term treatment of lung inflammation. Nevertheless, besides chronic inflammation, multifunctional systems aimed to control also infection are required in chronic lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). In this work, we tested the hypothesis that engineering PLGA-based LPP with branched poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) may improve LPP properties for pulmonary delivery of dec-ODN, with particular regard to the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. After getting insight into the role of PEI on the technological properties of PLGA-based LPP for delivery of dec-ODN, the putative synergistic effect of PEI free or PEI released from LPP on in vitro antimicrobial activity of tobramycin (Tb) and aztreonam (AZT) against P. aeruginosa was elucidated. Meanwhile, cytotoxicity studies on A549 cells were carried out. Results clearly demonstrate that the dry powders have promising aerosolization properties and afford a prolonged in vitro release of both dec-ODN and PEI. The encapsulation of PEI into LPP results in a 2-fold reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration of AZT, while reducing the cytotoxic effect of PEI. Of note, the developed ODN/PLGA/PEI LPP persisted at lung at least for 14 days after intratracheal administration in rats where they can provide sustained and combined release of dec-ODN and PEI. dec-ODN will likely act as an anti-inflammatory drug, while PEI may enhance the therapeutic activity of inhaled antibiotics, which are commonly employed for the treatment of concomitant lung infections. PMID:27002689

  13. Synthetic furanones inhibit quorum-sensing and enhance bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.; Hentzer, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections by killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth, but resistance to antibiotics can develop readily. The discovery that bacterial quorum-sensing regulates bacterial virulence as well as the formation of biofilms opens up new ways...... to control certain bacterial infections. Furanone compounds capable of inhibiting bacterial quorum-sensing systems have been isolated from the marine macro alga Delisea pulchra. Objectives: Two synthetic furanones were tested for their ability to attenuate bacterial virulence in the mouse models of chronic...... lung infection by targeting bacterial quorum-sensing without directly killing bacteria or inhibiting their growth. Methods: Study I. Mice with Escherichia coli MT102 [luxR-PluxI-gfp(ASV)] lung infection were injected intravenously with N-acyl homoserine lactones with or without furanones to test...

  14. Clonal dissemination, emergence of mutator lineages and antibiotic resistance evolution in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis chronic lung infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla López-Causapé

    Full Text Available Chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF. We investigated the interplay between three key microbiological aspects of these infections: the occurrence of transmissible and persistent strains, the emergence of variants with enhanced mutation rates (mutators and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, 10 sequential isolates, covering up to an 8-year period, from each of 10 CF patients were studied. As anticipated, resistance significantly accumulated overtime, and occurred more frequently among mutator variants detected in 6 of the patients. Nevertheless, highest resistance was documented for the nonmutator CF epidemic strain LES-1 (ST-146 detected for the first time in Spain. A correlation between resistance profiles and resistance mechanisms evaluated [efflux pump (mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY and ampC overexpression and OprD production] was not always obvious and hypersusceptibility to certain antibiotics (such as aztreonam or meropenem was frequently observed. The analysis of whole genome macrorestriction fragments through Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE revealed that a single genotype (clone FQSE-A produced persistent infections in 4 of the patients. Multilocus Sequence typing (MLST identified clone FQSE-A as the CF epidemic clone ST-274, but striking discrepancies between PFGE and MLST profiles were evidenced. While PFGE macrorestriction patterns remained stable, a new sequence type (ST-1089 was detected in two of the patients, differing from ST-274 by only two point mutations in two of the genes, each leading to a nonpreviously described allele. Moreover, detailed genetic analyses revealed that the new ST-1089 is a mutS deficient mutator lineage that evolved from the epidemic strain ST-274, acquired specific resistance mechanisms, and underwent further interpatient spread. Thus, presented results provide the first evidence of interpatient dissemination

  15. Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Kühl, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O), an intermediate in the...... denitrification pathway. We measured N2O and O2 with electrochemical microsensors in 8 freshly expectorated sputum samples from 7 CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection. The concentrations of NO3(-) and NO2(-) in sputum were estimated by the Griess reagent. We found a maximum median concentration of 41.......8 µM N2O (range 1.4-157.9 µM N2O). The concentration of N2O in the sputum was higher below the oxygenated layers. In 4 samples the N2O concentration increased during the initial 6 h of measurements before decreasing for approximately 6 h. Concomitantly, the concentration of NO3(-) decreased in sputum...

  16. Hypoxia modulates infection of epithelial cells by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Schaible

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen commonly associated with lung and wound infections. Hypoxia is a frequent feature of the microenvironment of infected tissues which induces the expression of genes associated with innate immunity and inflammation in host cells primarily through the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF and Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB pathways which are regulated by oxygen-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases. Hypoxia also affects virulence and antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens. However, less is known about the impact of hypoxia on host-pathogen interactions such as bacterial adhesion and infection. In the current study, we demonstrate that hypoxia decreases the internalization of P. aeruginosa into cultured epithelial cells resulting in decreased host cell death. This response can also be elicited by the hydroxylase inhibitor Dimethyloxallyl Glycine (DMOG. Reducing HIF-2α expression or Rho kinase activity diminished the effects of hypoxia on P. aeruginosa infection. Furthermore, in an in vivo pneumonia infection model, application of DMOG 48 h before infection with P. aeruginosa significantly reduced mortality. Thus, hypoxia reduces P. aeruginosa internalization into epithelial cells and pharmacologic manipulation of the host pathways involved may represent new therapeutic targets in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection.

  17. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....... This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic...

  18. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic...... fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials...

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  20. Respiratory syncytial virus infection facilitates acute colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Wolfs, Tom F W; Ciofu, Oana;

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals and patients ventilated mechanically and is the major pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, in which it causes chronic infections. Epidemiological, in vitro and animal data suggest a role for respiratory...... virus infections in facilitating colonization and infection with P. aeruginosa. A study was undertaken to determine whether respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection could facilitate the initiation of an acute infection with P. aeruginosa in vivo. Balb/c mice were infected intranasally with P....... aeruginosa, with and without simultaneous inoculation with RSV. Lung function measurements were undertaken using Whole Body Plethysmography and lungs were harvested 24 hr after inoculation. Mice exposed to RSV and P. aeruginosa showed 2,000 times higher colony-forming units (CFU) counts of P. aeruginosa...

  1. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B;

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant......-treated biofilm. Garlic extract was administered as treatment for a mouse pulmonary infection model. Mice were treated with garlic extract or placebo for 7 days, with the initial 2 days being prophylactic before P. aeruginosa was instilled in the left lung of the mice. Bacteriology, mortality, histopathology...... and phagocytosis by PMNs, as well as leading to an improved outcome of pulmonary infections....

  2. Microevolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to a chronic pathogen of the cystic fibrosis lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogardt, Michael; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading pathogen of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infection. Life-long persistance of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung requires a sophisticated habitat-specific adaptation of this pathogen to the heterogeneous and fluctuating lung environment. Due to the high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs, P. aeruginosa increasingly experiences complex physiological and morphological changes. Pulmonary adaptation of P. aeruginosa is mediated by genetic variations that are fixed by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. In this context, the emergence of hypermutable phenotypes (mutator strains) obviously improves the microevolution of P. aeruginosa to the diverse microenvironments of the CF lung. Mutator phenotypes are amplified during CF lung disease and accelerate the intraclonal diversification of P. aeruginosa. The resulting generation of numerous subclonal variants is advantegous to prepare P. aeruginosa population for unpredictable stresses (insurance hypothesis) and thus supports long-term survival of this pathogen. Oxygen restriction within CF lung environment further promotes persistence of P. aeruginosa due to increased antibiotic tolerance, alginate production and biofilm formation. Finally, P. aeruginosa shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted chronic virulent pathogen of end-stage infection of the CF lung. Common changes that are observed among chronic P. aeruginosa CF isolates include alterations in surface antigens, loss of virulence-associated traits, increasing antibiotic resistances, the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate and the modulation of intermediary and micro-aerobic metabolic pathways (Hogardt and Heesemann, Int J Med Microbiol 300(8):557-562, 2010). Loss-of-function mutations in mucA and lasR genes determine the transition to mucoidity and loss of quorum sensing, which are hallmarks of the chronic virulence potential of P. aeruginosa. Metabolic factors

  3. What Makes Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Persist in the Lungs of CF Patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke;

    2015-01-01

    The most important problem for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is the airway infections responsible for the gradually decreasing lung function as the infections persist. We have investigated properties that may be involved in persistence of P. aeruginosa (PA) in the lungs of young CF children...

  4. Serum concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF correlate with the Th1/Th2 cytokine response in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Ø; Pressler, Tacjana;

    2005-01-01

    The inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is dominated by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). There seems to be a relationship between the PMN-dominated inflammation, pronounced antibody production and a Th2-dominated response. Apart from...... lung function. In addition, an inverse correlation between IL-3 and IFN-gamma was observed. The results indicate involvement of endogenous GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 in the skewed Th response in CF, and change to a Th1-dominated response might be achieved with GM-CSF treatment....

  5. Genetic adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis: strong and weak mutators with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds emerge in mucA and/or lasR mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Wassermann, Tina; Høiby, Niels

    2010-04-01

    During the chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods due to adaptive evolution mediated by genetic variation. Hypermutability is considered to play an important role in this adaptive evolution and it has been demonstrated that mutator populations are amplified in the CF lung by hitchhiking with adaptive mutations. Two of the genes that are frequently mutated in isolates from chronic infection are mucA and lasR. Loss-of-function mutations in these genes determine the phenotypic switch to mucoidy and loss of quorum sensing, which are considered hallmarks of chronic virulence. The aims of our study were to investigate (1) the genetic background of the P. aeruginosa subpopulations with non-mutator, weak or strong mutator phenotype and their dynamics during the chronic lung infection, and (2) the time sequence in which the hypermutable, mucoid and quorum-sensing-negative phenotypes emerge during chronic lung infection. For these purposes the sequences of mutS, mutL, uvrD, mutT, mutY and mutM anti-mutator genes as well as of mucA and lasR were analysed in 70 sequential P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from the respiratory secretions of 10 CF patients (one to three isolates per time point). Analysis of the genetic background of the mutator phenotype showed that mutS was the most commonly affected gene followed by mutL in isolates with strong mutator phenotype. The mutT, mutY, mutM genes were affected in isolates with low fold-changes in the mutation frequencies compared to the reference strain PAO1. Isolates with non-mutator, weak or strong mutator phenotype were represented at all time points showing co-existence of these subpopulations, which suggests parallel evolution of the various mutators in the different focal niches of infection in the CF lung. Mutations in mucA and lasR occurred earlier than mutations in the anti-mutator genes, showing that hypermutability is not a prerequisite for the

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diversification during Infection Development in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent pathogen of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Its long persistence in CF airways is associated with sophisticated mechanisms of adaptation, including biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, hypermutability and customized pathogenicity in which virulence factors are expressed according the infection stage. CF adaptation is triggered by high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs and by antibiotic treatments. Bacteria undergo genetic, phenotypic, and physiological variations that are fastened by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. During CF infection development, P. aeruginosa gradually shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted pathogen of chronic infection. This paper reviews the most common changes undergone by P. aeruginosa at each stage of infection development in CF lungs. The comprehensive understanding of the adaptation process of P. aeruginosa may help to design more effective antimicrobial treatments and to identify new targets for future drugs to prevent the progression of infection to chronic stages. PMID:25438018

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diversification during Infection Development in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida Sousa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent pathogen of cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease. Its long persistence in CF airways is associated with sophisticated mechanisms of adaptation, including biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, hypermutability and customized pathogenicity in which virulence factors are expressed according the infection stage. CF adaptation is triggered by high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs and by antibiotic treatments. Bacteria undergo genetic, phenotypic, and physiological variations that are fastened by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. During CF infection development, P. aeruginosa gradually shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted pathogen of chronic infection. This paper reviews the most common changes undergone by P. aeruginosa at each stage of infection development in CF lungs. The comprehensive understanding of the adaptation process of P. aeruginosa may help to design more effective antimicrobial treatments and to identify new targets for future drugs to prevent the progression of infection to chronic stages.

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  9. Molecular epidemiology and dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations in lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lars; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Frost, Anne Louise Viborg;

    2007-01-01

    The ability to establish lifelong persistent infections is a fundamental aspect of the interactions between many pathogenic microorganisms and their mammalian hosts. One example is chronic lung infections by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients...... than 2 decades. Our data also suggest that the P. aeruginosa population structure in the CF patient airways has been influenced by competition between different clones and that the two dominant clones have been particularly competitive within the lungs, which may add to their overall establishment...... and cause long-term chronic infections. These findings suggest that hitherto-unrecognized evolutionary pathways may be involved in the development of successful and persistent P. aeruginosa colonizers of CF patient lungs....

  10. Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tümmler, B; Bosshammer, J; Breitenstein, S; Brockhausen, I; Gudowius, P; Herrmann, C; Herrmann, S; Heuer, T; Kubesch, P; Mekus, F; Römling, U; Schmidt, K D; Spangenberg, C; Walter, S

    1997-02-01

    The lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regarded as one of the major causes of health decline in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The CF host response to the persistent bacterial antigen load in the endobronchiolar lumen is characterized by a pronounced humoral response, local production of cytokines, influx of neutrophils into the lung and a protease-protease inhibitor imbalance predominantly sustained by released neutrophil elastase. CF is an autosomal recessive disease, and we could demonstrate for our local patient population that the age-dependent risk to become chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa can be differentiated by the disease-causing CFTR mutation genotype. The age-specific colonisation rates were significantly lower in pancreas sufficient than in pancreas insufficient patients. P. aeruginosa is occasionally detected in throat swabs already in infancy or early childhood in most patients although there is a lapse of several years amenable to preventive measures such as vaccination until onset of persistent colonization. The epidemiology of the infection with P. aeruginosa was investigated by quantitative macrorestriction fragment pattern analysis. The distribution and frequency of clones found in CF patients match that found in other clinical and environmental aquatic habitats, but the over-representation of specific clones at a CF clinic indicates a significant impact of nosocomial transmission for the prevalence of P. aeruginosa-positive patients at a particular center. Most patients remain colonized with the initially acquired P. aeruginosa clone. According to direct sputum analysis the majority of patients is carrying a single clonal variant at a concentration of 10(7)-10(9) CFU. Co-colonization with other species or other clones is infrequent. Independent of the underlying genotype, the CF lung habitat triggers a uniform, genetically fixed conversion of bacterial phenotype. Most CFP, aeruginosa strains become non-motile, mucoid

  11. Lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950304 The diagnosis and treatment of pulmonaryaspergilloma in the aged—a report of 17 cases.LI Di-anqin(李殿清),et al.Henan Provincial Pulmon DisHosp,Zhengzhou,450003.Chin J Geriatr 1994;13(6):338-339.Seventeen cases of pulmonary aspergilloma in theaged were reported.The primary diseases were pul-monary tuberculosis in 14 cases and pulmonary cyst,cancer of lung and pulmonary abscess in one each.In14 cases,the clinical manifestation was frequenthemoptysis;the occurrence rate was 82.4%.Among

  12. Management of refractory Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Sordé

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Roger Sordé1,2, Albert Pahissa1,2, Jordi Rello3,41Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI, Spain; 3Department of Critical Care, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 4CIBER Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, SpainAbstract: Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common life-limiting inherited disease in Caucasian populations. The main cause of death in CF patients is respiratory failure resulting from chronic pulmonary infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent organism in the airway colonization of CF patients, and its persistence in the airways has been related to greater morbidity with a more rapid deterioration in lung function. P. aeruginosa has enormous genetic and metabolic flexibility that allows it to adapt and persist within the airways of CF patients, and it has the ability to easily acquire antimicrobial resistance. For these reasons, the management of infections and chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa remains a challenge for physicians. This article reviews the current and future antibacterial chemotherapy options for respiratory pseudomonal infection in CF patients.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respiratory infection, antimicrobial treatment

  13. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B;

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant......-treated biofilm. Garlic extract was administered as treatment for a mouse pulmonary infection model. Mice were treated with garlic extract or placebo for 7 days, with the initial 2 days being prophylactic before P. aeruginosa was instilled in the left lung of the mice. Bacteriology, mortality, histopathology....... P. aeruginosa was grown in vitro in continuous-culture once-through flow chambers with and without garlic extract. The garlic-treated biofilms were susceptible to both tobramycin and PMN grazing. Furthermore, the PMNs showed an increase in respiratory burst activation, when incubated with the garlic...

  14. Lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009188 Multi-slice spiral CT appearances of pulmonary infections after liver transplantation.XIE Lixuan(谢丽璇),et al.Dept Imaging,Changzheng Hosp,2nd Milit Med Univ,Shanghai 200003.Chin J Radiol,2009;43(1):8-11.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa vesicles associate with and are internalized by human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehn Meta J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogen associated with chronic and ultimately fatal lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. To investigate how P. aeruginosa-derived vesicles may contribute to lung disease, we explored their ability to associate with human lung cells. Results Purified vesicles associated with lung cells and were internalized in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Vesicles from a CF isolate exhibited a 3- to 4-fold greater association with lung cells than vesicles from the lab strain PAO1. Vesicle internalization was temperature-dependent and was inhibited by hypertonic sucrose and cyclodextrins. Surface-bound vesicles rarely colocalized with clathrin. Internalized vesicles colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER marker, TRAPα, as well as with ER-localized pools of cholera toxin and transferrin. CF isolates of P. aeruginosa abundantly secrete PaAP (PA2939, an aminopeptidase that associates with the surface of vesicles. Vesicles from a PaAP knockout strain exhibited a 40% decrease in cell association. Likewise, vesicles from PAO1 overexpressing PaAP displayed a significant increase in cell association. Conclusion These data reveal that PaAP promotes the association of vesicles with lung cells. Taken together, these results suggest that P. aeruginosa vesicles can interact with and be internalized by lung epithelial cells and contribute to the inflammatory response during infection.

  16. Lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930120 A clinical study of 50 cases of legion-naires disease.WANG Baofa(王保法),et al.Dept Intern Med,2nd Affili Hosp,Hehei MedColl,Shijiazhuang,050000.Chin J Tuberc &Respir Dis 1992;15(5):266-268.The clinical features and X-ray manifesta-tions of 50 cases of legionnaires disease wereanalysed.8 cases might be due to nosocomial in-fection through breathing in flying particles ofthe saliva or phlegm.According to the mainclinical features,this disease could be dividedinto common pneumonia type,acute gastroen-teritis type,encephalopathy type,shock type,and acute renal insufficiency type.The differen-

  17. Ginseng treatment reduces bacterial load and lung pathology in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Z; Johansen, H K; Faber, V;

    1997-01-01

    the inflammation and antibody responses could be changed by treatment with the Chinese herbal medicine ginseng. An aqueous extract of ginseng was injected subcutaneously, and cortisone and saline were used as controls. Two weeks after challenge with P. aeruginosa, the ginseng-treated group showed a significantly...... against P. aeruginosa sonicate and a shift from an acute type to a chronic type of lung inflammation compared to those in the control and cortisone-treated groups were observed. These findings indicate that ginseng treatment of an experimental P. aeruginosa pneumonia in rats promotes a cellular response...... resembling a TH1-like response. On the basis of these results it is suggested that ginseng may have the potential to be a promising natural medicine, in conjunction with other forms of treatment, for CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection....

  18. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jensen, Peter Ø; Høiby, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity...... of infection in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and in chronic wounds. In this review we address the molecular basis of biofilm development by P. aeruginosa as well as the mechanisms employed by this bacterium in the increased tolerance displayed against antimicrobials. The complex build......-up of the extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host...

  19. Expression of PPARγ and paraoxonase 2 correlated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoebe E Griffin

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3OC(12HSL can inhibit function of the mammalian anti-inflammatory transcription factor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARγ, and can be degraded by human paraoxonase (PON2. Because 3OC(12HSL is detected in lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF patients infected with P. aeruginosa, we investigated the relationship between P. aeruginosa infection and gene expression of PPARγ and PON2 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF of children with CF. Total RNA was extracted from cell pellets of BALF from 43 children aged 6 months-5 years and analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative real time PCR for gene expression of PPARγ, PON2, and P. aeruginosa lasI, the 3OC(12HSL synthase. Patients with culture-confirmed P. aeruginosa infection had significantly lower gene expression of PPARγ and PON2 than patients without P. aeruginosa infection. All samples that were culture-positive for P. aeruginosa were also positive for lasI expression. There was no significant difference in PPARγ or PON2 expression between patients without culture-detectable infection and those with non-Pseudomonal bacterial infection, so reduced expression was specifically associated with P. aeruginosa infection. Expression of both PPARγ and PON2 was inversely correlated with neutrophil counts in BALF, but showed no correlation with other variables evaluated. Thus, lower PPARγ and PON2 gene expression in the BALF of children with CF is associated specifically with P. aeruginosa infection and neutrophilia. We cannot differentiate whether this is a cause or the effect of P. aeruginosa infection, but propose that the level of expression of these genes may be a marker for susceptibility to early acquisition of P. aeruginosa in children with CF.

  20. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høiby Niels

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. New results from one small trial suggest that addition of oral ciprofloxacin to inhaled tobramycin may reduce lung inflammation. Clinical trials with new formulations of old antibiotics for inhalation therapy (aztreonam lysine against chronic P. aeruginosa infection improved patient-reported outcome, lung function, time to acute exacerbations and sputum density of P. aeruginosa. Other drugs such as quinolones are currently under investigation for inhalation therapy. A trial of the use of anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics for long-term prophylaxis showed no effect in patients who were not already infected. Use of azithromycin to treat CF patients without P. aeruginosa infection did not improve lung function. Here I review the recent advances in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections with a focus on inhalation treatments targeted at prophylaxis and chronic suppressive therapy.

  1. In vivo imaging of the lung inflammatory response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its modulation by azithromycin

    OpenAIRE

    Stellari, Fabio; Bergamini, Gabriella; Sandri, Angela; Donofrio, Gaetano; Sorio, Claudio; Ruscitti, Francesca; Villetti, Gino; Assael, Barouk M; Melotti, Paola; Lleo, Maria M

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation of the airways is a central component in lung diseases and is frequently associated with bacterial infections. Monitoring the pro-inflammatory capability of bacterial virulence factors in vivo is challenging and usually requires invasive methods. Methods Lung inflammation was induced using the culture supernatants from two Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains, VR1 and VR2, isolated from patients affected by cystic fibrosis and showing different phenotypes in...

  2. Impaired upregulation of keratinocyte growth factor in injured lungs induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in immunosuppressed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jin-fu; QU Jie-ming; HE Li-xian; OU Zhou-luo

    2006-01-01

    Background The number of immunosupressed patients has increased in the past decades. Among them Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is one of the leading bacteria for pneumonia that are associated with poor prognosis. However, the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa pneumonia in immunosupressed patients is not understood completely. Previous reports showed keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is associated with lung injury in immunocompetent hosts. In this study, we investigated the different reactions of lung injury, lung pathology and KGF expressions in P. aeruginosa pneumonia between immunosuppressed and immunocompetent rats.Methods Immunosuppression of male rats was induced by injecting immunosuppressive subcutaneously.Pneumonia was established by instilling P. aeruginous tracheally. The immunocompetent rats were the control group. Survival rate, lung histopathology, pulmonary permeability and oedema, KGF mRNA and protein expressions in lungs of both groups were investigated.Results The survival rate of immunosuppressed group was lower than that of immunocompetent group (33.3%vs 83.3%). After exposure to bacteria, pulmonary permeability and wet/dry ratio in immunosuppressed group were higher than those in immunocompetent group. Pulmonary congestion and haemorrhage were more intensive in immunosuppressed group compared to immunocompetent group. Apoptosis and necrosis were also observed in infected lungs of immunosuppressed rats. Although we detected KGF expressions in lungs of both groups after infection, the expressions of KGF protein and mRNA gene in immunosuppressed group were much lower than in immunocompetent group.Conclusions Compared with immunocompetent group, there was more intensive lung injury in immunosuppressed group. Severe lung injury may contribute to the poor prognosis of pneumonia. KGF expressions of pneumonia in immunosuppressed rats were less than those in immunocompetent ones.

  3. Nosocomial infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa: review of recent trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A; Allen, J R; Burke, J; Ducel, G; Harris, A; John, J; Johnson, D; Lew, M; MacMillan, B; Meers, P

    1983-01-01

    The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in nosocomial infections occurring since 1975 is reviewed. Data from the National Nosocomial Infections Study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control, from individual medical centers, and from the literature were used to compare the relative frequency of occurrence of nosocomial infection caused by P. aeruginosa with that of infection caused by other gram-negative bacilli. The relative frequency of P. aeruginosa as a nosocomial pathogen has increased, although wide variations are seen among individual medical centers. P. aeruginosa continues to be a major pathogen among patients with immunosuppression, cystic fibrosis, malignancy, and trauma. While Staphylococcus aureus has become the predominant pathogen in some large burn centers, P. aeruginosa is the most important gram-negative pathogen. Periodic review of the epidemiology of P. aeruginosa infection is warranted in view of the changing incidence of infection caused by this organism.

  4. Characterization of JG024, a pseudomonas aeruginosa PB1-like broad host range phage under simulated infection conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Manfred

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes lung infections in patients suffering from the genetic disorder Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Once a chronic lung infection is established, P. aeruginosa cannot be eradicated by antibiotic treatment. Phage therapy is an alternative to treat these chronic P. aeruginosa infections. However, little is known about the factors which influence phage infection of P. aeruginosa under infection conditions and suitable broad host range phages. Results We isolated and characterized a phage, named JG024, which infects a broad range of clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa strains. Sequencing of the phage genome revealed that the phage JG024 is highly related to the ubiquitous and conserved PB1-like phages. The receptor of phage JG024 was determined as lipopolysaccharide. We used an artificial sputum medium to study phage infection under conditions similar to a chronic lung infection. Alginate production was identified as a factor reducing phage infectivity. Conclusions Phage JG024 is a suitable broad host range phage which could be used in phage therapy. Phage infection experiments under simulated chronic lung infection conditions showed that alginate production reduces phage infection efficiency.

  5. Serum concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF correlate with the Th1/Th2 cytokine response in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Ø; Pressler, Tacjana;

    2005-01-01

    mobilizing monocytes and PMNs from the bone marrow, GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 select subsets of dendritic cells, which subsequently induce distinct Th responses. Therefore, the present study examines the correlation between the mobilizing cytokines in serum and the Th responses. The IFN-gamma and IL-4...... production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF in serum as well as lung function, were determined in 37 CF patients with and 6 CF patients without chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection. The GM-CSF/G-CSF ratio correlated both with the IFN-gamma production and good...... lung function. In addition, an inverse correlation between IL-3 and IFN-gamma was observed. The results indicate involvement of endogenous GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 in the skewed Th response in CF, and change to a Th1-dominated response might be achieved with GM-CSF treatment....

  6. Interference of Pseudomonas aeruginosa signalling and biofilm formation for infection control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Høiby, Niels;

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the best described bacterium with regards to quorum sensing (QS), in vitro biofilm formation and the development of antibiotic tolerance. Biofilms composed of P. aeruginosa are thought to be the underlying cause of many chronic infections, including those in wounds...... and in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in QS, QS-enabled virulence, biofilm formation and biofilm-enabled antibiotic tolerance. We now have substantial knowledge of the multicellular behaviour of P. aeruginosa in vitro. A major...

  7. Transcriptional Activation of Mucin by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide in the Pathogenesis of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Dong; Dohrman, Austin F.; Gallup, Marianne; Miyata, Susumu; Gum, James R.; Kim, Young S.; Nadel, Jay A.; Prince, Alice; Basbaum, Carol B.

    1997-02-01

    An unresolved question in cystic fibrosis (CF) research is how mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a CI ion channel, cause airway mucus obstruction leading to fatal lung disease. Recent evidence has linked the CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutation to the onset and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the airways, and here we provide evidence directly linking P. aeruginosa infection to mucus overproduction. We show that P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide profoundly upregulates transcription of the mucin gene MUC 2 in epithelial cells via inducible enhancer elements and that this effect is blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG 126. These findings improve our understanding of CF pathogenesis and suggest that the attenuation of mucin production by lipopolysaccharide antagonists and tyrosine kinase inhibitors could reduce morbidity and mortality in this disease.

  8. Effects of quorum sensing system lasR/rhlR gene on the expression of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in tracheal intubation model rat with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-qing XIANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of lasR/rhlR gene on Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in rat tracheal intubation model with biofilm infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. aer wild strain (PAO1 and quorum sensing (QS deficient strain (ΔlasRΔrhlR. Methods  Twenty-one SD rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (7 each: ΔlasRΔrhlR-treated group, PAO1-treated group and sterile control group. Biofilms (BF were cultured in vitro, and the BF coated tube (infected respectively with Ps. aer PAO1 strain, ΔlasRΔrhlR strain, or with asepsis was inserted into the trachea to establish the rat model. The rats were sacrificed on the 7th day after intubation. Colony count of lung tissue homogenate (cfu and lung HE staining were performed, and IL-10 content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, TGF-β1 in lung tissue, and the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in lung cells were determined. Results  The bacterial counts were significantly higher in PAO1 and ΔlasRΔrhlR groups than that in sterile control group, and the counts were obviously higher in PAO1 group (10 400.00±6313.70/g lung tissue than that in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (975.00±559.97/g lung tissue, P<0.05. There was no significant pathological changes in lung tissue in sterile control group, while the bronchi and blood vessels in PAO1 group were infiltrated by a large number of inflammatory cells and complicated with alveolar septum thickening and local abscess and necrosis. The pathological changes were milder in ΔlasRΔrhlR group than in PAO1 group; the expression of Foxp3 mRNA was higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than that in sterile control group (0.65±0.32, and it was significantly higher in PAO1 group (4.62±1.07 than in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (2.15±1.43, P<0.05. The accumulated optical density value of TGF-β1 was significantly higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than in sterile control group (3721.66±1412.95, and significantly higher in PAO1 group (65 090.56±33

  9. Genotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from lung transplant recipients and aquatic environment-detected in-hospital transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ewa; Welinder-Olsson, Christina; Gilljam, Marita

    2014-02-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common in lung transplant recipients and may lead to severe complications. Bacteriological surveillance aims to detect transmission of microbes between hospital environment and patients. We sought to determine whether genotyping of P. aeruginosa isolates could improve identifications of pathways of infection. From 2004 to 2009, we performed genotyping with multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of P. aeruginosa isolates cultured from lung transplant recipients at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg. During a small outbreak in 2008, cultivation and genotyping of isolates from sink and drains samples from the hospital ward were performed. Pseudomona aeruginosa from 11/18 patients were genotyped to unique strains. The remaining seven patients were carriers of a P. aeruginosa strain of cluster A genotype. Pseudomona aeruginosa was isolated in 4/8 water samples, typed by MLVA also as cluster A genotype and confirmed by PFGE to be similar or identical to the isolates from four transplanted patients. In conclusion, genotyping of isolates revealed a clonal relationship between patient and water isolates, indicating in-hospital transmission of P. aeruginosa. We suggest genotyping with MLVA for rapid routine surveillance, with the PFGE method used for extended, confirmatory analyses. PMID:24450429

  10. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. New results from one small trial...

  11. Controlled trial of inhaled budesonide in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchopulmonary Psuedomonas aeruginosa infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Pedersen, S S; Nielsen, K G;

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of anti-inflammatory treatment with inhaled glucocorticosteroids in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and complicating chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) lung infection was studied in a placebo-controlled, parallel, double-blind single center trial. Active treatment...

  12. Lung epithelial MyD88 drives early pulmonary clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a flagellin dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas, Adam A; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Claushuis, Theodora A M; de Vos, Alex F; Florquin, Sandrine; de Boer, Onno J; Hou, Baidong; Van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a flagellated pathogen frequently causing pneumonia in hospitalized patients and sufferers of chronic lung disease. Here we investigated the role of the common Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor myeloid differentiation factor (MyD)88 in myeloid vs. lung epithelial cells in clearance of P. aeruginosa from the airways. Mice deficient for MyD88 in lung epithelial cells (Sftpccre-MyD88-lox mice) or myeloid cells (LysMcre-MyD88-lox mice) and bone marrow chimeric mice deficient for TLR5 (the receptor recognizing Pseudomonas flagellin) in either parenchymal or hematopoietic cells were infected with P. aeruginosa via the airways. Sftpccre-MyD88-lox mice demonstrated a reduced influx of neutrophils into the bronchoalveolar space and an impaired early antibacterial defense after infection with P. aeruginosa, whereas the response of LysMcre-MyD88-lox mice did not differ from control mice. The immune-enhancing role of epithelial MyD88 was dependent on recognition of pathogen-derived flagellin by epithelial TLR5, as demonstrated by an unaltered clearance of mutant P. aeruginosa lacking flagellin from the lungs of Sftpccre-MyD88-lox mice and an impaired bacterial clearance in bone marrow chimeric mice lacking TLR5 in parenchymal cells. These data indicate that early clearance of P. aeruginosa from the airways is dependent on flagellin-TLR5-MyD88-dependent signaling in respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:27288486

  13. Phenotypes selected during chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Wang, Hengzhuang;

    2012-01-01

    During chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods of time under the challenging selective pressure imposed by the immune system and antibiotic treatment as a result of its biofilm mode of growth and adaptive evolution mediated...... the importance of biofilm prevention strategies by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy before phenotypic diversification during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis....

  14. Antimicrobial resistance, respiratory tract infections and role of biofilms in lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2015-01-01

    Lung infection is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis and is mainly dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The biofilm mode of growth makes eradication of the infection impossible, and it causes a chronic inflammation in the airways. The general mechanisms...

  15. Bacteriocin-mediated competition in cystic fibrosis lung infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoul, Melanie; West, Stuart A.; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2015-01-01

    , especially human pathogens, remains to be tested. We examined the role of bacteriocins in competition using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains infecting lungs of humans with cystic fibrosis (CF). We assessed the ability of different strains to kill each other using phenotypic assays, and sequenced their genomes...

  16. Phase II studies of nebulised Arikace in CF patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, J P; Dupont, L; Konstan, M W; Billings, J; Fustik, S; Goss, C H; Lymp, J; Minic, P; Quittner, A L; Rubenstein, R C; Young, K R; Saiman, L; Burns, J L; Govan, J R W; Ramsey, B; Gupta, R

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Arikace is a liposomal amikacin preparation for aerosol delivery with potent Pseudomonas aeruginosa killing and prolonged lung deposition. Objectives To examine the safety and efficacy of 28 days of once-daily Arikace in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with P aeruginosa. Methods 105 subjects were evaluated in double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Subjects were randomised to once-daily Arikace (70, 140, 280 and 560 mg; n=7, 5, 21 and 36 subjects) or placebo (n=36) for 28 days. Primary outcomes included safety and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included lung function (forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1)), P aeruginosa density in sputum, and the Cystic Fibrosis Quality of Life Questionnaire—Revised (CFQ-R). Results The adverse event profile was similar among Arikace and placebo subjects. The relative change in FEV1 was higher in the 560 mg dose group at day 28 (p=0.033) and at day 56 (28 days post-treatment, 0.093L±0.203 vs −0.032L±0.119; p=0.003) versus placebo. Sputum P aeruginosa density decreased >1 log in the 560 mg group versus placebo (days 14, 28 and 35; p=0.021). The Respiratory Domain of the CFQ-R increased by the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) in 67% of Arikace subjects (560 mg) versus 36% of placebo (p=0.006), and correlated with FEV1 improvements at days 14, 28 and 42 (p<0.05). An open-label extension (560 mg Arikace) for 28 days followed by 56 days off over six cycles confirmed durable improvements in lung function and sputum P aeruginosa density (n=49). Conclusions Once-daily Arikace demonstrated acute tolerability, safety, biologic activity and efficacy in patients with CF with P aeruginosa infection. PMID:23749840

  17. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: characteristics of eradicated and persistent isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G. A.; van der Ent, C. K.; Molin, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 567574 Abstract Despite intensive eradication therapy, some CF patients with early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection rapidly develop a chronic infection. To elucidate factors associated with this persistence, bacterial characteristics of early P. aeruginosa isolates...

  18. Differential infection properties of three inducible prophages from an epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Chloe E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common bacterial pathogen infecting the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The Liverpool Epidemic Strain (LES is transmissible, capable of superseding other P. aeruginosa populations and is associated with increased morbidity. Previously, multiple inducible prophages have been found to coexist in the LES chromosome and to constitute a major component of the accessory genome not found in other sequenced P. aerugionosa strains. LES phages confer a competitive advantage in a rat model of chronic lung infection and may, therefore underpin LES prevalence. Here the infective properties of three LES phages were characterised. Results This study focuses on three of the five active prophages (LESφ2, LESφ3 and LESφ4 that are members of the Siphoviridae. All were induced from LESB58 by norfloxacin. Lytic production of LESφ2 was considerably higher than that of LESφ3 and LESφ4. Each phage was capable of both lytic and lysogenic infection of the susceptible P. aeruginosa host, PAO1, producing phage-specific plaque morphologies. In the PAO1 host background, the LESφ2 prophage conferred immunity against LESφ3 infection and reduced susceptibility to LESφ4 infection. Each prophage was less stable in the PAO1 chromosome with substantially higher rates of spontaneous phage production than when residing in the native LESB58 host. We show that LES phages are capable of horizontal gene transfer by infecting P. aeruginosa strains from different sources and that type IV pili are required for infection by all three phages. Conclusions Multiple inducible prophages with diverse infection properties have been maintained in the LES genome. Our data suggest that LESφ2 is more sensitive to induction into the lytic cycle or has a more efficient replicative cycle than the other LES phages.

  19. Positive correlation of algD transcription to lasB and lasA transcription by populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Storey, D G; Ujack, E E; Mitchell, I.; Rabin, H R

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a chronic infection in the lungs of individuals with cystic fibrosis. The P. aeruginosa isolates from these infections, when grown under laboratory conditions, characteristically are mucoid and produce low levels of the more destructive virulence factors, such as exotoxin A and the proteases. We wanted to determine if during the chronic lung infections associated with CF, the expression of alginate was inversely correlated to the expression of exotoxin A, elastas...

  20. Challenges with current inhaled treatments for chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greally, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) is the predominant pathogen infecting the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Initial colonization is usually transient and associated with non-mucoid strains, which can be eradicated if identified early. This strategy can prevent, or at least delay, chronic Pa infection, which eventually develops in the majority of patients by their late teens or early adulthood. This article discusses the management and latest treatment developments of Pa lung infection in patients with CF, with a focus on nebulized antibiotic therapy.

  1. Genetic adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis: strong and weak mutators with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds emerge in mucA and/or lasR mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    -changes in the mutation frequencies compared to the reference strain PAO1. Isolates with non-mutator, weak or strong mutator phenotype were represented at all time points showing co-existence of these subpopulations, which suggests parallel evolution of the various mutators in the different focal niches of infection...... evolutionary pathways concordant with adaptive radiation were observed in different clonal lineages of P. aeruginosa from CF patients....

  2. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura De Simone

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in

  3. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Maura; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  4. Bacterial sinusitis can be a focus for initial lung colonisation and chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    and can be a focus for initial lung colonisation or for maintaining lung infections in CF patients. We are confident that anti-P. aeruginosa IgA can be used as an early supplementary tool to diagnose P. aeruginosa colonisation; P. aeruginosa being the microorganism causing most morbidity and mortality...... in CF patients. This is important since urgent treatment reduces morbidity when CF patients are early colonised with P. aeruginosa, however, there is a lack of diagnostic tools for detecting the early colonisation in the lungs and in the sinuses. We initiated a treatment strategy for CF patients...... not present in patients who primarily have sinus CF-pathogenic bacteria. It is important that guidelines are created for how CF patients with CF-pathogenic bacteria in the sinuses are to be treated, including criteria for who may likely benefit from FESS, and who may be treated exclusively with conservative...

  5. Cellular responses of A549 alveolar epithelial cells to serially collected Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients at different stages of pulmonary infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawdon, Nicole A; Aval, Pouya Sadeghi; Barnes, Rebecca J;

    2010-01-01

    . Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from the early stages of the infection exhibited high adherence to A549 cells, were readily internalized, and able to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, apoptosis of infected cells, and the release of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Late P....... aeruginosa isolates collected from patients with chronic lung infection were shown to have reduced adherence to and internalization into A549 cells compared with bacteria from patients with intermittent P. aeruginosa colonization, and induced lower production of ROS and apoptosis, but caused high...

  6. Specific Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Zebrafish Is Mediated by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phennicie, Ryan T.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Singer, John T.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Carol H.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by recessive mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is associated with prevalent and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. Despite numerous studies that have sought to elucidate the role of CFTR in the innate immune response, the links between CFTR, innate immunity, and P. aeruginosa infection remain unclear. The present work highlights the zebrafish as a powerful model organism for human infectious disease, particularly infection by P. aeruginosa. Zebrafish embryos with reduced expression of the cftr gene (Cftr morphants) exhibited reduced respiratory burst response and directed neutrophil migration, supporting a connection between cftr and the innate immune response. Cftr morphants were infected with P. aeruginosa or other bacterial species that are commonly associated with infections in CF patients, including Burkholderia cenocepacia, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus. Intriguingly, the bacterial burden of P. aeruginosa was found to be significantly higher in zebrafish Cftr morphants than in controls, but this phenomenon was not observed with the other bacterial species. Bacterial burden in Cftr morphants infected with a P. aeruginosa ΔLasR mutant, a quorum sensing-deficient strain, was comparable to that in control fish, indicating that the regulation of virulence factors through LasR is required for enhancement of infection in the absence of Cftr. The zebrafish system provides a multitude of advantages for studying the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa and for understanding the role that innate immune cells, such as neutrophils, play in the host response to acute bacterial infections commonly associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:20732993

  7. Role of IL-1β in experimental cystic fibrosis upon P. aeruginosa infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Palomo

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is associated with increased inflammatory responses to pathogen challenge. Here we revisited the role of IL-1β in lung pathology using the experimental F508del-CFTR murine model on C57BL/6 genetic background (Cftr(tm1eur or d/d, on double deficient for d/d and type 1 interleukin-1 receptor (d/d X IL-1R1-/-, and antibody neutralization. At steady state, young adult d/d mice did not show any signs of spontaneous lung inflammation. However, IL-1R1 deficiency conferred partial protection to repeated P. aeruginosa endotoxins/LPS lung instillation in d/d mice, as 50% of d/d mice succumbed to inflammation, whereas all d/d x IL-1R1-/- double mutants survived with lower initial weight loss and less pulmonary collagen and mucus production, suggesting that the absence of IL-1R1 signaling is protective in d/d mice in LPS-induced lung damage. Using P. aeruginosa acute lung infection we found heightened neutrophil recruitment in d/d mice with higher epithelial damage, increased bacterial load in BALF, and augmented IL-1β and TNF-α in parenchyma as compared to WT mice. Thus, F508del-CFTR mice show enhanced IL-1β signaling in response to P. aeruginosa. IL-1β antibody neutralization had no effect on lung homeostasis in either d/d or WT mice, however P. aeruginosa induced lung inflammation and bacterial load were diminished by IL-1β antibody neutralization. In conclusion, enhanced susceptibility to P. aeruginosa in d/d mice correlates with an excessive inflammation and with increased IL-1β production and reduced bacterial clearance. Further, we show that neutralization of IL-1β in d/d mice through the double mutation d/d x IL-1R1-/- and in WT via antibody neutralization attenuates inflammation. This supports the notion that intervention in the IL-1R1/IL-1β pathway may be detrimental in CF patients.

  8. In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging of Bacteriogenic Cyanide in the Lungs of Live Mice Infected with Cystic Fibrosis Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Seong-Won; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Lim, Jeesun; Kim, So Hyun; Kim, Sang-Tae; Cho, You-Hee; Yoon, Juyoung; Park, Sungsu

    2011-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), commonly found in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, often produce cyanide (CN), which inhibits cellular respiration. CN in sputa is a potential biomarker for lung infection by CF pathogens. However, its actual concentration in the infected lungs is unknown. Methods and Findings This work reports observation of CN in the lungs of mice infected with cyanogenic PA or Bcc strains using a CN fluorescent chemos...

  9. Macrophage dysfunction and susceptibility to pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in surfactant protein C-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Stephan W; Senft, Albert P; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Maxfield, Melissa D; Ross, Gary F; Richardson, Theresa R; Prows, Daniel R; Xu, Yan; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2008-07-01

    To determine the role of surfactant protein C (SP-C) in host defense, SP-C-deficient (Sftpc-/-) mice were infected with the pulmonary pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by intratracheal injection. Survival of young, postnatal day 14 Sftpc-/- mice was decreased in comparison to Sftpc+/+ mice. The sensitivity to Pseudomonas bacteria was specific to the 129S6 strain of Sftpc-/- mice, a strain that spontaneously develops interstitial lung disease-like lung pathology with age. Pulmonary bacterial load and leukocyte infiltration were increased in the lungs of Sftpc-/- mice 24 h after infection. Early influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the lungs of uninfected newborn Sftpc-/- mice relative to Sftpc+/+ mice indicate that the lack of SP-C promotes proinflammatory responses in the lung. Mucin expression, as indicated by Alcian blue staining, was increased in the airways of Sftpc-/- mice following infection. Phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages from Sftpc-/- mice was reduced. The uptake of fluorescent beads in vitro and the number of bacteria phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages in vivo was decreased in the Sftpc-/- mice. Alveolar macrophages from Sftpc-/- mice expressed markers of alternative activation that are associated with diminished pathogen response and advancing pulmonary fibrosis. These findings implicate SP-C as a modifier of alveolar homeostasis. SP-C plays an important role in innate host defense of the lung, enhancing macrophage-mediated Pseudomonas phagocytosis, clearance and limiting pulmonary inflammatory responses. PMID:18566429

  10. More than 10 years' continuous oral treatment with specific immunoglobulin Y for the prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Elin; Kollberg, Hans; Johannesson, Marie; Wejåker, Per-Erik; Carlander, David; Larsson, Anders

    2007-06-01

    Immunotherapy with specific antibodies is an alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of infections in humans and animals. We have used orally administered immunoglobulin Y (IgY) preparations, purified from eggs of hens immunized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, to prevent pulmonary P. aeruginosa infections in a group of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Respiratory infections are major problems for CF patients because of the thick mucus in the airways, and chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections occur in virtually all CF patients and cause morbidity and mortality. The IgY-treated group had only 2.5 P. aeruginosa-positive sputum cultures per 100 months, and none of the IgY-treated patients became chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa. In the control group, 13.7 of the cultures per 100 months were positive for P. aeruginosa, and 24% of patients became chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa. The first enrolled patient in this study has now been treated continuously for more than 10 years. During the first 8 years she only had four P. aeruginosa-positive cultures. After 8 years she became chronically infected, but still after 10 years the bacteria have not turned mucoid. No negative side effects of IgY treatment have been noted during these 10 years. To our knowledge this is the longest treatment with specific yolk antibodies for therapeutic purposes. PMID:17651078

  11. PFGE and antibiotic susceptibility phenotype analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain chronically infecting Cystic Fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Pulcrano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of chronic lung infection and following pulmonary worsening of cystic fibrosis patients. To verify whether bacterial modifications regarding motility, mucoidy, and serum susceptibility proceeded from an adaptation to chronic infection or a replacement with a new strain, sequential P. aeruginosa isolates of known phenotype collected from 5 cystic fibrosis patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of all isolates was performed by the disc diffusion method. PFGE typing demonstrated that strains dissimilar in colony morphotype and of different antibiotic susceptibility patterns could be of the same genotype. Some patients were colonized with a rather constant P. aeruginosa flora, with strains of different phenotypes but of one genotype. Instead, some patients may be colonized by more than one genotype. Secretion of mucoid exopolysaccharide and acquisition of a new antibiotic susceptibility phenotype in these strain appear to evolve during chronic colonization in cystic fibrosis patients from specific adaptation to infection rather than from acquisition of new bacterial strains.

  12. Physiological levels of nitrate support anoxic growth by denitrification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at growth rates reported in cystic fibrosis lungs and sputum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitten, Laura Line; Alhede, Morten; Kolpen, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    reported that O2 is mainly consumed by the activated PMNs, while O2 consumption by aerobic respiration is diminutive and nitrous oxide (N2O) is produced in infected CF sputum. This suggests that the reported growth rates of P. aeruginosa in lungs and sputum may result from anaerobic respiration using...

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville-Petri Friman

    Full Text Available Pathogenic life styles can lead to highly specialized interactions with host species, potentially resulting in fitness trade-offs in other ecological contexts. Here we studied how adaptation of the environmentally transmitted bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to cystic fibrosis (CF patients affects its survival in the presence of natural phage (14/1, ΦKZ, PNM and PT7 and protist (Tetrahymena thermophila and Acanthamoebae polyphaga enemies. We found that most of the bacteria isolated from relatively recently intermittently colonised patients (1-25 months, were innately phage-resistant and highly toxic for protists. In contrast, bacteria isolated from long time chronically infected patients (2-23 years, were less efficient in both resisting phages and killing protists. Moreover, chronic isolates showed reduced killing of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella probably due to weaker in vitro growth and protease expression. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa long-term adaptation to CF-lungs could trade off with its survival in aquatic environmental reservoirs in the presence of microbial enemies, while lowered virulence could reduce pathogen opportunities to infect insect vectors; factors that are both likely to result in poorer environmental transmission. From an applied perspective, phage therapy could be useful against chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections that are often characterized by multidrug resistance: chronic isolates were least resistant to phages and their poor growth will likely slow down the emergence of beneficial resistance mutations.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Ghoul, Melanie; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Buckling, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic life styles can lead to highly specialized interactions with host species, potentially resulting in fitness trade-offs in other ecological contexts. Here we studied how adaptation of the environmentally transmitted bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients affects its survival in the presence of natural phage (14/1, ΦKZ, PNM and PT7) and protist (Tetrahymena thermophila and Acanthamoebae polyphaga) enemies. We found that most of the bacteria isolated from relatively recently intermittently colonised patients (1-25 months), were innately phage-resistant and highly toxic for protists. In contrast, bacteria isolated from long time chronically infected patients (2-23 years), were less efficient in both resisting phages and killing protists. Moreover, chronic isolates showed reduced killing of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella) probably due to weaker in vitro growth and protease expression. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa long-term adaptation to CF-lungs could trade off with its survival in aquatic environmental reservoirs in the presence of microbial enemies, while lowered virulence could reduce pathogen opportunities to infect insect vectors; factors that are both likely to result in poorer environmental transmission. From an applied perspective, phage therapy could be useful against chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections that are often characterized by multidrug resistance: chronic isolates were least resistant to phages and their poor growth will likely slow down the emergence of beneficial resistance mutations.

  15. Fitness of isogenic colony morphology variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in murine airway infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Rakhimova

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are associated with the diversification of the persisting clone into niche specialists and morphotypes, a phenomenon called 'dissociative behaviour'. To explore the potential of P. aeruginosa to change its morphotype by single step loss-of-function mutagenesis, a signature-tagged mini-Tn5 plasposon library of the cystic fibrosis airway isolate TBCF10839 was screened for colony morphology variants under nine different conditions in vitro. Transposon insertion into 1% of the genome changed colony morphology into eight discernable morphotypes. Half of the 55 targets encode features of primary or secondary metabolism whereby quinolone production was frequently affected. In the other half the transposon had inserted into genes of the functional categories transport, regulation or motility/chemotaxis. To mimic dissociative behaviour of isogenic strains in lungs, pools of 25 colony morphology variants were tested for competitive fitness in an acute murine airway infection model. Six of the 55 mutants either grew better or worse in vivo than in vitro, respectively. Metabolic proficiency of the colony morphology variant was a key determinant for survival in murine airways. The most common morphotype of self-destructive autolysis did unexpectedly not impair fitness. Transposon insertions into homologous genes of strain PAO1 did not reproduce the TBCF10839 mutant morphotypes for 16 of 19 examined loci pointing to an important role of the genetic background on colony morphology. Depending on the chosen P. aeruginosa strain, functional genome scans will explore other areas of the evolutionary landscape. Based on our discordant findings of mutant phenotypes in P. aeruginosa strains PAO1, PA14 and TBCF10839, we conclude that the current focus on few reference strains may miss modes of niche adaptation and dissociative behaviour that are relevant for the microevolution of complex traits in the wild.

  16. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity o...... treatment strategies where the underlying targets are less prone for resistance development as bacteria, in retrospect, have a unique ability to evade the actions of classic antibiotics.......Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity......-up of the extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host...

  17. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection definition: EuroCareCF Working Group report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressler, T; Bohmova, C; Conway, S;

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection with P. aeruginosa develops in most patients with cystic fibrosis (CF); by adulthood 80% of patients are infected and chronic P. aeruginosa infection is the primary cause of increased morbidity and mortality in CF. Chronic infection is preceded by an intermittent stage...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms exposed to imipenem exhibit changes in global gene expression and beta-lactamase and alginate production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N.; Schuster, M.; Hentzer, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    The lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are commonly colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Chronic endobronchial P. aeruginosa infections are impossible to eradicate with antibiotics, but intensive suppressive antibiotic therapy is essential to maintain the lung function of CF patien...

  19. Antibiofilm and anti-infection of a marine bacterial exopolysaccharide against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimei eWu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides shows that EPS273 primarily consists of glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. Further investigation demonstrates that EPS273 reduces the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, exoprotease and rhamnolipid, and the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to human lung cells A549 and zebrafish embryos is also obviously attenuated by EPS273. In addition, EPS273 also greatly reduces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and extracellular DNA (eDNA, which are important factors for biofilm formation. Furthermore, EPS273 exhibits strong antioxidant potential by quenching hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. Notably, the antibiofouling activity of EPS273 is observed in the marine environment up to two weeks according to the amounts of bacteria and diatoms in the glass slides submerged in the ocean. Taken together, the properties of EPS273 indicate that it has a promising prospect in combating bacterial biofilm-associated infection, food-processing contamination and marine biofouling.

  20. Antibiofilm and Anti-Infection of a Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shimei; Liu, Ge; Jin, Weihua; Xiu, Pengyuan; Sun, Chaomin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination, and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium P. stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed biofilm of P. aeruginosa PAO1. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides shows that EPS273 primarily consists of glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. Further investigation demonstrates that EPS273 reduces the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, exoprotease, and rhamnolipid, and the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to human lung cells A549 and zebrafish embryos is also obviously attenuated by EPS273. In addition, EPS273 also greatly reduces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and extracellular DNA (eDNA), which are important factors for biofilm formation. Furthermore, EPS273 exhibits strong antioxidant potential by quenching hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. Notably, the antibiofouling activity of EPS273 is observed in the marine environment up to 2 weeks according to the amounts of bacteria and diatoms in the glass slides submerged in the ocean. Taken together, the properties of EPS273 indicate that it has a promising prospect in combating bacterial biofilm-associated infection, food-processing contamination and marine biofouling. PMID:26903981

  1. Protective effect of Lactobacillus casei on Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Miake, S; Yokokura, T; Yoshikai, Y; Mutai, M; Nomoto, K.

    1985-01-01

    The protective effect of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei YIT9018 (LC 9018) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice was compared with that of Corynebacterium parvum. Survival of mice after intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection with P. aeruginosa was augmented in mice that had been pretreated i.p. with LC 9018 5 days previously. Similar treatment of mice with C. parvum, however, was not effective at all. Moreover, mice became more susceptible to infection with P. aeruginosa after such treat...

  2. In vivo pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of colistin and imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana;

    2012-01-01

    Many Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are sensitive to antibiotics in susceptibility testing, but eradication of the infection is difficult. The main reason is the biofilm formation in the airways of patients with CF. The pharmacokinetics (PKs......) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of antimicrobials can reliably be used to predict whether antimicrobial regimens will achieve the maximum bactericidal effect against infections. Unfortunately, however, most PK/PD studies of antimicrobials have been done on planktonic cells and very few PK/PD studies have been done...... on biofilms, partly due to the lack of suitable models in vivo. In the present study, a biofilm lung infection model was developed to provide an objective and quantitative evaluation of the PK/PD profile of antimicrobials. Killing curves were set up to detect the antimicrobial kinetics on planktonic...

  3. Selective Sweeps and Parallel Pathoadaptation Drive Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolution in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz Caballero, Julio; Clark, Shawn T.; Coburn, Bryan; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Pauline W.; Donaldson, Sylva L.; Tullis, D Elizabeth; Yau, Yvonne C. W.; Waters, Valerie J; Hwang, David M.; Guttman, David S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pulmonary infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a recalcitrant problem in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. While the clinical implications and long-term evolutionary patterns of these infections are well studied, we know little about the short-term population dynamics that enable this pathogen to persist despite aggressive antimicrobial therapy. Here, we describe a short-term population genomic analysis of 233 P. aeruginosa isolates collected from 12 sputum specimens obtained...

  4. In Vitro Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Using Conditions That Mimic the Environment at Specific Infection Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmer-Hamood, J A; Dzvova, N; Kruczek, C; Hamood, A N

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and acute systemic infections in severely burned patients and immunocompromised patients including cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and HIV infected individuals. In response to the environmental conditions at specific infection sites, P. aeruginosa expresses certain sets of cell-associated and extracellular virulence factors that produce tissue damage. Analyzing the mechanisms that govern the production of these virulence factors in vitro requires media that closely mimic the environmental conditions within the infection sites. In this chapter, we review studies based on media that closely resemble three in vivo conditions, the thick mucus accumulated within the lung alveoli of CF patients, the serum-rich wound bed and the bloodstream. Media resembling the CF alveolar mucus include standard laboratory media supplemented with sputum obtained from CF patients as well as prepared synthetic mucus media formulated to contain the individual components of CF sputum. Media supplemented with serum or individual serum components have served as surrogates for the soluble host components of wound infections, while whole blood has been used to investigate the adaptation of pathogens to the bloodstream. Studies using these media have provided valuable information regarding P. aeruginosa gene expression in different host environments as varying sets of genes were differentially regulated during growth in each medium. The unique effects observed indicate the essential role of these in vitro media that closely mimic the in vivo conditions in providing accurate information regarding the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:27571695

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  6. Macrophage Dysfunction and Susceptibility to Pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Surfactant Protein C-Deficient Mice1

    OpenAIRE

    Glasser, Stephan W.; Senft, Albert P; Jeffrey A Whitsett; Melissa D. Maxfield; Ross, Gary F.; Richardson, Theresa R.; Prows, Daniel R.; Xu, Yan; Korfhagen, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the role of surfactant protein C (SP-C) in host defense, SP-C-deficient (Sftpc−/−) mice were infected with the pulmonary pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by intratracheal injection. Survival of young, postnatal day 14 Sftpc−/−ice was decreased in comparison to Sftpc+/+ mice. The sensitivity to Pseudomonas bacteria was specific to the 129S6 strain of Sftpc−/− mice, a strain that spontaneously develops interstitial lung disease-like lung pathology with age. Pulmonary bacterial load ...

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis: insights into pathogenic processes and treatment strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassett, Daniel J; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Irvin, Randall T;

    2010-01-01

    CF airway mucus can be infected by opportunistic microorganisms, notably Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Once organisms are established as biofilms, even the most potent antibiotics have little effect on their viability, especially during late-stage chronic infections. Better understanding of the mechani...... of the mechanisms used by P. aeruginosa to circumvent host defenses and therapeutic intervention strategies is critical for advancing novel treatment strategies....

  8. Clinical and Morphological Studies on Spontaneous Cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Dinev1, S Denev2* and G Beev2

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, pathoanatomical, histological, and bacteriological studies were performed on broiler chickens, growing broiler parents, and growing egg layers, in three different poultry farms, after an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The method of contamination of the birds was established. Several local and systemic clinico-morphological forms of spontaneous P. aeruginosa infections in various categories of stock birds were described: cases of P. aeruginosa infection resulting from injection of contaminated vaccines; case of P. aeruginosa infections through contaminated aerosol vaccine and cases of pododermatitis, periarthritis and arthritis in broiler chickens associated with P. aeruginosa infection. In different cases mortality range between 0.5 and 50%. The results showed that apart from embryonic mortality in hatcheries, and septicemic infections in newly hatched chickens, the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa was associated with localized and systemic lesions in this category, as well as in young and growing birds. On one hand, these results have a theoretical significance, contributing for the confirmation and expansion of the wide array of clinico-morphological forms of P. aeruginosa infections in birds. On the other hand, the knowledge on these forms has a purely practical significance in the diagnostics of P. aeruginosa infections by poultry pathologists and veterinary practitioners.

  9. Panax ginseng has anti-infective activity against opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting quorum sensing, a bacterial communication process critical for establishing infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Z; Kong, K F; Wu, H;

    2010-01-01

    immune systems and cystic fibrosis. The QS systems of P. aeruginosa use N-acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) as signal molecules. Previously we have demonstrated that Panax ginseng treatment allowed the animals with P. aeruginosa pneumonia to effectively clear the bacterial infection. We postulated......A and LasB and down-regulated the synthesis of the AHL molecules. Ginseng has a negative effect on the QS system of P. aeruginosa, may explain the ginseng-dependent bacterial clearance from the animal lungs in vivo in our previous animal study. It is possible that enhancing and repressing activities...... of ginseng are mutually exclusive as it is a complex mixture, as shown with the HPLC analysis of the hot water extract. Though ginseng is a promising natural synergetic remedy, it is important to isolate and evaluate the ginseng compounds associated with the anti-QS activity....

  10. Contribution of Quorum Sensing to the Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Burn Wound Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Griswold, John A.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Hamood, Abdul N.

    1999-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing systems, las and rhl, control the production of numerous virulence factors. In this study, we have used the burned-mouse model to examine the contribution of quorum-sensing systems to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections in burn wounds. Different quorum-sensing mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 that were defective in the lasR, lasI, or rhlI gene or both the lasI and rhlI genes were utilized. The following parameters of the P. aeruginosa infection ...

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  12. Effect of Shear Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Jozef; Monsieurs, Pieter; Yu, Sung-Huan; Crabbé, Aurélie; Förstner, Konrad U.; Malfroot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic colonization of the lungs by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To gain insights into the characteristic biofilm phenotype of P. aeruginosa in the CF lungs, mimicking the CF lung environment is critical. We previously showed that growth of the non-CF-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in a rotating wall vessel, a device that simulates the low fluid shear (LS) conditions present in the CF lung, leads to the formation of in-suspension, self-aggregating biofilms. In the present study, we determined the phenotypic and transcriptomic changes associated with the growth of a highly adapted, transmissible P. aeruginosa CF strain in artificial sputum medium under LS conditions. Robust self-aggregating biofilms were observed only under LS conditions. Growth under LS conditions resulted in the upregulation of genes involved in stress response, alginate biosynthesis, denitrification, glycine betaine biosynthesis, glycerol metabolism, and cell shape maintenance, while genes involved in phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion, and multidrug efflux were downregulated. In addition, a number of small RNAs appeared to be involved in the response to shear stress. Finally, quorum sensing was found to be slightly but significantly affected by shear stress, resulting in higher production of autoinducer molecules during growth under high fluid shear (HS) conditions. In summary, our study revealed a way to modulate the behavior of a highly adapted P. aeruginosa CF strain by means of introducing shear stress, driving it from a biofilm lifestyle to a more planktonic lifestyle. PMID:27486191

  13. Reduced mucosal associated invariant T-cells are associated with increased disease severity and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary defects in host immune responses have been hypothesised to contribute towards an inability of subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF to effectively clear pulmonary infections. Innate T-lymphocytes provide rapid pathogen-specific responses prior to the development of classical MHC class I and II restricted T-cell responses and are essential to the initial control of pulmonary infection. We aimed to examine the relationship between peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype and clinical outcomes in adults with CF. METHODS: We studied 41 subjects with CF and 22, age matched, non-smoking healthy control subjects. Lymphocytes were extracted from peripheral blood samples and phenotyped by flow-cytometry. Lymphocyte phenotype was correlated with sputum microbiology and clinical parameters. RESULTS: In comparison to healthy control subjects, mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT-lymphocytes were significantly reduced in the peripheral blood of subjects with CF (1.1% versus 2.0% of T-lymphocytes, P = 0.002. MAIT cell concentration was lowest in CF subjects infected with P. aeruginosa and in subjects receiving treatment for a pulmonary exacerbation. Furthermore a reduced MAIT cell concentration correlated with severity of lung disease. CONCLUSION: Reduced numbers of MAIT cells in subjects with CF were associated with P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection, pulmonary exacerbations and more severe lung disease. These findings provide the impetus for future studies examining the utility of MAIT cells in immunotherapies and vaccine development. Longitudinal studies of MAIT cells as biomarkers of CF pulmonary infection are awaited.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Forms Biofilms in Acute Infection Independent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 h of infection in thermally injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections as well. Using light, electron, and confocal scanning laser microscopy, P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burn...

  15. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa co-infection is associated with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes and poor clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoli, D H; Yang, J; Khansaheb, M K; Helfman, B; Peng, L; Stecenko, A A; Goldberg, J B

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) patients suffer from accelerated rates of pulmonary decline compared to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). However, the mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. While CFRD is associated with increased respiratory infections, a link between infection and enhanced pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear. The development of glucose intolerance is spectral, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) prior to the diagnosis of CFRD. Inclusion of IGT patients within the NGT group may diminish the ability to identify correlations with CFRD. With this in mind, this study aimed to determine if the association between CFRD and respiratory infections is correlated with pulmonary decline. Respiratory cultures from 234 CF patients with confirmed diagnosis of NGT or CFRD were analyzed to measure rates of infection, focusing on the two most prevalent bacteria in CF, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection status was correlated with pulmonary function and confounding clinical variables including age, gender, blood glucose levels, and CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) phenotype were considered in multivariate analyses. CFRD patients, particularly those with extremely high blood glucose levels, were more likely than NGT patients to be co-infected with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, compared to infection with only one pathogen. Co-infection was associated with decreased lung function and increased frequency of pulmonary exacerbations, even after adjustment for confounding variables. Alterations in the microbial community composition, as opposed to the presence of a single pathogen, may account for greater pulmonary decline in CFRD patients. PMID:26993289

  16. Selective recruitment of Th I cells induced by re-infection of succeptible and resistant mice with Pseudomonas aerugionosa in the lungs indicates protective role of IL-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Jensen, P O; Kobayashi, O;

    2002-01-01

    Repeated challenge with antigen is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of pulmonary diseases. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) experience recurrent pulmonary colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa before establishment of chronic lung infection. To mimic recurrent lung infections in CF p...

  17. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor enhances the pro-inflammatory response of interferon-γ-treated macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonali; Barr, Helen; Liu, Yi-Chia; Robins, Adrian; Heeb, Stephan; Williams, Paul; Fogarty, Andrew; Cámara, Miguel; Martínez-Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN)-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human macrophages

  18. Virus-Induced Type I Interferon Deteriorates Control of Systemic Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Merches

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type I interferon (IFN-I predisposes to bacterial superinfections, an important problem during viral infection or treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-α. IFN-I-induced neutropenia is one reason for the impaired bacterial control; however there is evidence that more frequent bacterial infections during IFN-α-treatment occur independently of neutropenia. Methods: We analyzed in a mouse model, whether Pseudomonas aeruginosa control is influenced by co-infection with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. Bacterial titers, numbers of neutrophils and the gene-expression of liver-lysozyme-2 were determined during a 24 hours systemic infection with P. aeruginosa in wild-type and Ifnar-/- mice under the influence of LCMV or poly(I:C. Results: Virus-induced IFN-I impaired the control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was associated with neutropenia and loss of lysozyme-2-expression in the liver, which had captured P. aeruginosa. A lower release of IFN-I by poly(I:C-injection also impaired the bacterial control in the liver and reduced the expression of liver-lysozyme-2. Low concentration of IFN-I after infection with a virulent strain of P. aeruginosa alone impaired the bacterial control and reduced lysozyme-2-expression in the liver as well. Conclusion: We found that during systemic infection with P. aeruginosa Kupffer cells quickly controlled the bacteria in cooperation with neutrophils. Upon LCMV-infection this cooperation was disturbed.

  19. Cathelicidin host defence peptide augments clearance of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by its influence on neutrophil function in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula E Beaumont

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins are multifunctional cationic host-defence peptides (CHDP; also known as antimicrobial peptides and an important component of innate host defence against infection. In addition to microbicidal potential, these peptides have properties with the capacity to modulate inflammation and immunity. However, the extent to which such properties play a significant role during infection in vivo has remained unclear. A murine model of acute P. aeruginosa lung infection was utilised, demonstrating cathelicidin-mediated enhancement of bacterial clearance in vivo. The delivery of exogenous synthetic human cathelicidin LL-37 was found to enhance a protective pro-inflammatory response to infection, effectively promoting bacterial clearance from the lung in the absence of direct microbicidal activity, with an enhanced early neutrophil response that required both infection and peptide exposure and was independent of native cathelicidin production. Furthermore, although cathelicidin-deficient mice had an intact early cellular inflammatory response, later phase neutrophil response to infection was absent in these animals, with significantly impaired clearance of P. aeruginosa. These findings demonstrate the importance of the modulatory properties of cathelicidins in pulmonary infection in vivo and highlight a key role for cathelicidins in the induction of protective pulmonary neutrophil responses, specific to the infectious milieu. In additional to their physiological roles, CHDP have been proposed as future antimicrobial therapeutics. Elucidating and utilising the modulatory properties of cathelicidins has the potential to inform the development of synthetic peptide analogues and novel therapeutic approaches based on enhancing innate host defence against infection with or without direct microbicidal targeting of pathogens.

  20. Interleukin-17 Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Intervention in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infection and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Daniel; Taylor, Patricia; Fletcher, Dave; van Heeckeren, Rolf; Eastman, Jean; van Heeckeren, Anna; Davis, Pamela; Chmiel, James F; Pearlman, Eric; Bonfield, Tracey L

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by an excessive neutrophilic inflammatory response within the airway as a result of defective cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor (CFTR) expression and function. Interleukin-17A induces airway neutrophilia and mucin production associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, which is associated with the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. The objectives of this study were to use the preclinical murine model of cystic fibrosis lung infection and inflammation to investigate the role of IL-17 in CF lung pathophysiology and explore therapeutic intervention with a focus on IL-17. Cftr-deficient mice (CF mice) and wild-type mice (WT mice) infected with P. aeruginosa had robust IL-17 production early in the infection associated with a persistent elevated inflammatory response. Intratracheal administration of IL-17 provoked a neutrophilic response in the airways of WT and CF animals which was similar to that observed with P. aeruginosa infection. The neutralization of IL-17 prior to infection significantly improved the outcomes in the CF mice, suggesting that IL-17 may be a therapeutic target. We demonstrate in this report that the pathophysiological contribution of IL-17 may be due to the induction of chemokines from the epithelium which is augmented by a deficiency of Cftr and ongoing inflammation. These studies demonstrate the in vivo contribution of IL-17 in cystic fibrosis lung disease and the therapeutic validity of attenuating IL-17 activity in cystic fibrosis. PMID:27271746

  1. Role of ppGpp in Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pulmonary infection and virulence regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Yu, Hua; Zhang, Di; Xiong, Junzhi; Qiu, Jing; Xin, Rong; He, Xiaomei; Sheng, Halei; Cai, Wenqiang; Jiang, Lu; Zhang, Kebin; Hu, Xiaomei

    2016-11-01

    During infection, bacteria might generate adaptive responses to facilitate their survival and colonization in the host environment. The alarmone guanosine 5'-triphosphate-3'-diphosphate (ppGpp), the levels of which are regulated by the RelA and SpoT enzymes, plays a critical role in mediating bacterial adaptive responses and virulence. However, the mechanism by which ppGpp regulates virulence-associated traits in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is poorly understood. To investigate the regulatory role of ppGpp, the ppGpp-deficient strain ΔRS (relA and spoT gene double mutant) and the complemented strain ΔRS(++) (complemented with relA and spoT genes) were constructed. Herein, we reported that the ΔRS strain showed decreased cytotoxicity towards A549 human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell lines and led to reduced mortality, lung edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in a mouse model of acute pneumonia compared to wild-type PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the ΔRS strain displayed reduced T3SS expression, decreased levels of elastase activity, pyocyanin, pyoverdin and alginate, and inhibited swarming and biofilm formation compared to PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). In addition, the results demonstrate that ppGpp-mediated regulation of T3SS, virulence factor production, and swarming occurs in a quinolone quorum-sensing system-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that ppGpp is required for virulence regulation in P. aeruginosa, providing new clues for the development of interference strategies against bacterial infection.

  2. Protective effect of DNA vaccine encoding pseudomonas exotoxin A and PcrV against acute pulmonary P. aeruginosa Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzi Jiang

    Full Text Available Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been a long-standing challenge for clinical therapy because of complex pathogenesis and resistance to antibiotics, thus attaching importance to explore effective vaccines for prevention and treatment. In the present study, we constructed a novel DNA vaccine by inserting mutated gene toxAm encoding Pseudomonas Exotoxin A and gene pcrV encoding tip protein of the type III secretion system into respective sites of a eukaryotic plasmid pIRES, named pIRES-toxAm-pcrV, and next evaluated the efficacy of the vaccine in murine acute Pseudomonas pneumonia models. Compared to DNA vaccines encoding single antigen, mice vaccinated with pIRES-toxAm-pcrV elicited higher levels of antigen-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG, enhanced splenic cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens, additionally PAO1 challenge in mice airway resulted in reduced bacteria burden and milder pathologic changes in lungs. Besides, it was observed that immunogenicity and protection could be promoted by the CpG ODN 1826 adjuvant. Taken together, it's revealed that recombinant DNA vaccine pIRES-toxAm-pcrV was a potential candidate for immunotherapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and the CpG ODN 1826 a potent stimulatory adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  3. Mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by hydrogen peroxide: a mechanism for virulence activation in the cystic fibrosis lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathee, K; Ciofu, O; Sternberg, C;

    1999-01-01

    The leading cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is respiratory failure due in large part to chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that undergo mucoid conversion, display a biofilm mode of growth in vivo and resist the infiltration of polymorphonuclear...... of alginate, (ii) exhibited no detectable differences in growth rate, (iii) showed an unaltered LPS profile, (iv) were approximately 72% reduced in the amount of inducible-beta-lactamase and (v) secreted little or no LasA protease and only showed 44% elastase activity. A characteristic approximately 54 k....... These findings indicate that gene activation in bacteria by toxic oxygen radicals, similar to that found in plants and mammalian cells, may serve as a defence mechanism for the bacteria. This suggests that mucoid conversion is a response to oxygen radical exposure and that this response is a mechanism of defence...

  4. Mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by hydrogen peroxide: a mechanism for virulence activation in the cystic fibrosis lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathee, Kalai; Ciofu, Oana; Sternberg, Claus;

    1999-01-01

    The leading cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is respiratory failure due in large part to chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that undergo mucoid conversion, display a biofilm mode of growth in vivo and resist the infiltration of polymorphonuclear......) exhibited no detectable differences in growth rate, (iii) showed an unaltered LPS profile, (iv) were similar to 72% reduced in the amount of inducible-beta-lactamase and (v) secreted little or Department of Clinical no LasA protease and only showed 44% elastase activity. A characteristic similar to 54 k....... These findings indicate that gene activation in bacteria by toxic oxygen radicals, similar to that found in plants and mammalian cells, may serve as a defence mechanism for the bacteria. This suggests that mucoid conversion is a response to oxygen radical exposure and that this response is a mechanism of defence...

  5. Assessing the emergence of resistance: the absence of biological cost in vivo may compromise fosfomycin treatments for P. aeruginosa infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fosfomycin is a cell wall inhibitor used efficiently to treat uncomplicated urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections. A very convenient feature of fosfomycin, among others, is that although the expected frequency of resistant mutants is high, the biological cost associated with mutation impedes an effective growth rate, and bacteria cannot offset the obstacles posed by host defenses or compete with sensitive bacteria. Due to the current scarcity of new antibiotics, fosfomycin has been proposed as an alternative treatment for other infections caused by a wide variety of bacteria, particularly Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, whether fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa provides a fitness cost still remains unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We herein present experimental evidence to show that fosfomycin resistance cannot only emerge easily during treatment, but that it is also cost-free for P. aeruginosa. We also tested if, as has been reported for other species such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis, fosfomycin resistant strains are somewhat compromised in their virulence. As concerns colonization, persistence, lung damage, and lethality, we found no differences between the fosfomycin resistant mutant and its sensitive parental strain. The probability of acquisition in vitro of resistance to the combination of fosfomycin with other antibiotics (tobramycin and imipenem has also been studied. While the combination of fosfomycin with tobramycin makes improbable the emergence of resistance to both antibiotics when administered together, the combination of fosfomycin plus imipenem does not avoid the appearance of mutants resistant to both antibiotics. CONCLUSIONS: We have reached the conclusion that the use of fosfomycin for P. aeruginosa infections, even in combined therapy, might not be as promising as expected. This study should encourage the scientific community to assess the in vivo cost of resistance

  6. Drosophila melanogaster as an animal model for the study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing both acute and chronic infections in susceptible hosts. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections are thought to be caused by bacterial biofilms. Biofilms are highly structured, multicellular, microbial communities encased in an extracellular matrix that enable long-term survival in the host. The aim of this research was to develop an animal model that would allow an in vivo study of P. aeruginosa biofilm infections in a Drosophila melanogaster host. At 24 h post oral infection of Drosophila, P. aeruginosa biofilms localized to and were visualized in dissected Drosophila crops. These biofilms had a characteristic aggregate structure and an extracellular matrix composed of DNA and exopolysaccharide. P. aeruginosa cells recovered from in vivo grown biofilms had increased antibiotic resistance relative to planktonically grown cells. In vivo, biofilm formation was dependent on expression of the pel exopolysaccharide genes, as a pelB::lux mutant failed to form biofilms. The pelB::lux mutant was significantly more virulent than PAO1, while a hyperbiofilm strain (PAZHI3 demonstrated significantly less virulence than PAO1, as indicated by survival of infected flies at day 14 postinfection. Biofilm formation, by strains PAO1 and PAZHI3, in the crop was associated with induction of diptericin, cecropin A1 and drosomycin antimicrobial peptide gene expression 24 h postinfection. In contrast, infection with the non-biofilm forming strain pelB::lux resulted in decreased AMP gene expression in the fly. In summary, these results provide novel insights into host-pathogen interactions during P. aeruginosa oral infection of Drosophila and highlight the use of Drosophila as an infection model that permits the study of P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo.

  7. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute burn and chronic surgical wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith H Turner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in most P. aeruginosa strains. To investigate the genetic requirements for acute and chronic pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa infections, we combined high-throughput sequencing-mediated transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq and genome-wide insertion mutant fitness profiling (Tn-seq to characterize gene expression and fitness determinants in murine models of burn and non-diabetic chronic wound infection. Generally we discovered that expression of a gene in vivo is not correlated with its importance for fitness, with the exception of metabolic genes. By combining metabolic models generated from in vivo gene expression data with mutant fitness profiles, we determined the nutritional requirements for colonization and persistence in these infections. Specifically, we found that long-chain fatty acids represent a major carbon source in both chronic and acute wounds, and P. aeruginosa must biosynthesize purines, several amino acids, and most cofactors during infection. In addition, we determined that P. aeruginosa requires chemotactic flagellar motility for fitness and virulence in acute burn wound infections, but not in non-diabetic chronic wound infections. Our results provide novel insight into the genetic requirements for acute and chronic P. aeruginosa wound infections and demonstrate the power of using both gene expression and fitness profiling for probing bacterial virulence.

  8. In the absence of effector proteins, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type three secretion system needle tip complex contributes to lung injury and systemic inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon P Audia

    Full Text Available Herein we describe a pathogenic role for the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type three secretion system (T3SS needle tip complex protein, PcrV, in causing lung endothelial injury. We first established a model in which P. aeruginosa wild type strain PA103 caused pneumonia-induced sepsis and distal organ dysfunction. Interestingly, a PA103 derivative strain lacking its two known secreted effectors, ExoU and ExoT [denoted PA103 (ΔU/ΔT], also caused sepsis and modest distal organ injury whereas an isogenic PA103 strain lacking the T3SS needle tip complex assembly protein [denoted PA103 (ΔPcrV] did not. PA103 (ΔU/ΔT infection caused neutrophil influx into the lung parenchyma, lung endothelial injury, and distal organ injury (reminiscent of sepsis. In contrast, PA103 (ΔPcrV infection caused nominal neutrophil infiltration and lung endothelial injury, but no distal organ injury. We further examined pathogenic mechanisms of the T3SS needle tip complex using cultured rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs and revealed a two-phase, temporal nature of infection. At 5-hours post-inoculation (early phase infection, PA103 (ΔU/ΔT elicited PMVEC barrier disruption via perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton and did so in a cell death-independent manner. Conversely, PA103 (ΔPcrV infection did not elicit early phase PMVEC barrier disruption. At 24-hours post-inoculation (late phase infection, PA103 (ΔU/ΔT induced PMVEC damage and death that displayed an apoptotic component. Although PA103 (ΔPcrV infection induced late phase PMVEC damage and death, it did so to an attenuated extent. The PA103 (ΔU/ΔT and PA103 (ΔPcrV mutants grew at similar rates and were able to adhere equally to PMVECs post-inoculation indicating that the observed differences in damage and barrier disruption are likely attributable to T3SS needle tip complex-mediated pathogenic differences post host cell attachment. Together, these infection data suggest that the T3SS needle

  9. Phage Therapy: a Step Forward in the Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Diana P.; Vilas Boas, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance constitutes one of the major worldwide public health concerns. Bacteria are becoming resistant to the vast majority of antibiotics, and nowadays, a common infection can be fatal. To address this situation, the use of phages for the treatment of bacterial infections has been extensively studied as an alternative therapeutic strategy. Since Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common causes of health care-associated infections, many studies have reported the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial efficacy of phage therapy against this bacterium. This review collects data of all the P. aeruginosa phages sequenced to date, providing a better understanding about their biodiversity. This review further addresses the in vitro and in vivo results obtained by using phages to treat or prevent P. aeruginosa infections as well as the major hurdles associated with this therapy. PMID:25972556

  10. Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation of Morphological and Nanomechanical Properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ninell Pollas

    2008-01-01

    treatment. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic human pathogen accounting for hospital-acquired infections, infections of ulcers and burn wounds, and is the predominant cause of chronic lung infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. Regarding the treatment and control of P. aeruginosa infection...

  11. In vivo fluorescence imaging of bacteriogenic cyanide in the lungs of live mice infected with cystic fibrosis pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Won Nam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, commonly found in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF patients, often produce cyanide (CN, which inhibits cellular respiration. CN in sputa is a potential biomarker for lung infection by CF pathogens. However, its actual concentration in the infected lungs is unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This work reports observation of CN in the lungs of mice infected with cyanogenic PA or Bcc strains using a CN fluorescent chemosensor (4',5'-fluorescein dicarboxaldehyde with a whole animal imaging system. When the CN chemosensor was injected into the lungs of mice intratracheally infected with either PA or B. cepacia strains embedded in agar beads, CN was detected in the millimolar range (1.8 to 4 mM in the infected lungs. CN concentration in PA-infected lungs rapidly increased within 24 hours but gradually decreased over the following days, while CN concentration in B. cepacia-infected lungs slowly increased, reaching a maximum at 5 days. CN concentrations correlated with the bacterial loads in the lungs. In vivo efficacy of antimicrobial treatments was tested in live mice by monitoring bacteriogenic CN in the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: The in vivo imaging method was also found suitable for minimally invasive testing the efficacy of antibiotic compounds as well as for aiding the understanding of bacterial cyanogenesis in CF lungs.

  12. Characterization of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in a culture collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.S. Zanetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in our culture collection did not grow or grew poorly and showed lysis on the culture plates when removed from the collection and inoculated on MacConkey agar. One hypothesis was that bacteriophages had infected and killed those clinical isolates. To check the best storage conditions to maintain viable P. aeruginosa for a longer time, clinical isolates were stored at various temperatures and were grown monthly. We investigated the presence of phage in 10 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa stored in our culture collection. Four strains of P. aeruginosa were infected by phages that were characterized by electron microscopy and isolated to assess their ability to infect. The best condition to maintain the viability of the strains during storage was in water at room temperature. Three Siphoviridae and two Myoviridae phages were visualized and characterized by morphology. We confirmed the presence of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates, and their ability to infect and lyse alternative hosts. Strain PAO1, however, did not show lysis to any phage. Mucoid and multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa showed lysis to 50% of the phages tested.

  13. Screening of Molecular Virulence Markers in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Clinical Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Lazar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus (S. aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps. aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts. The frequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains has determined the development of new strategies in order to elucidate the different mechanisms used by these bacteria at different stages of the infectious process, providing the scientists with new procedures for preventing, or at least improving, the control of S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa infections. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens. We used multiplex and uniplex PCR assays to detect the genes encoding different cell-wall associated and extracellular virulence factors, in order to evaluate potential associations between the presence of putative virulence genes and the outcome of infections caused by these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections.

  14. Infective complications in patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rančić Milan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study was aimed at analyzing the site, kind and type of infection which develop in patients having lung cancer at hospital treatment. Material and methods. Clinical data of the patients hospitalized for lung cancer were analyzed at the Clinic for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis in Knez Selo in the period from January 2002 till December 2007. A great number of patients (1296-75.9% had non-small cell lung cancer. In 1708 patients with lung cancer, 773 febrile episodes were recorded, i.e. 687 states of infections. Results. Most of the infections were recorded in the tracheobronchial tree (60.9%. The infection was confirmed microbiologically in 38% of infectious states. Predominant Gram positive pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus, but among Gram negative pathogens there were Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. Discussion. A significantly better therapy response to antibiotics was found in the group of patients where microbiological agents were isolated (p<0.05. The predominant site of infection in the patients with lung cancer is the tracheobronchial tree without a significant difference between frequency of Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens.

  15. Nitrosoglutathione generating nitric oxide nanoparticles as an improved strategy for combating Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouake, Jason; Schairer, David; Kutner, Allison; Sanchez, David A; Makdisi, Joy; Blecher-Paz, Karin; Nacharaju, Parimala; Tuckman-Vernon, Chaim; Gialanella, Phil; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2012-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a community-acquired, nosocomial pathogen that is an important cause of human morbidity and mortality; it is intrinsically resistant to several antibiotics and is capable of developing resistance to newly developed drugs via a variety of mechanisms. P aeruginosa's ubiquity and multidrug resistance (MDR) warrants the development of innovative methods that overcome its ability to develop resistance. We have previously described a nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticle (NO-np) platform that effectively kills gram-positive and gram-negative organisms in vitro and accelerates clinical recovery in vivo in murine wound and abscess infection models. We have also demonstrated that when glutathione (GSH) is added to NO-np, the nitroso intermediate S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is formed, which has greater activity against P aeruginosa and other gram-negative organisms compared with NO-np alone. In the current study, we evaluate the potential of NO-np to generate GSNO both in vitro and in vivo in a murine excisional wound model infected with an MDR clinical isolate of P aeruginosa. Whereas NO-np alone inhibited P aeruginosa growth in vitro for up to 8 hours, NO-np+GSH completely inhibited P aeruginosa growth for 24 hours. Percent survival in the NO-np+GSH-treated isolates was significantly lower than in the NO-np (36.1% vs 8.3%; P=.004). In addition, NO-np+GSH accelerated wound closure in P aeruginosa-infected wounds, and NO-np+GSH-treated wounds had significantly lower bacterial burden when compared to NO-np-treated wounds (P<.001). We conclude that GSNO is easily generated from our NO-np platform and has the potential to be used as an antimicrobial agent against MDR organisms such as P aeruginosa. PMID:23377518

  16. Impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing on biofilm persistence in an in vivo intraperitoneal foreign-body infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise Dahl; Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Ø;

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes chronic biofilm-based infections in host organisms. P. aeruginosa employs quorum sensing (QS) to control expression of its virulence, and to establish and maintain chronic infections. Under such conditions, the biofilm mode...... that the efficiency of the mouse innate defence against biofilm-forming P. aeruginosa is improved when the bacteria are treated with QS drugs that induce QS deficiency....

  17. Tobramycin Inhalation Powder (TIP): An Efficient Treatment Strategy for the Management of Chronic Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, John; Vaughan, Steven; Parkins, Michael D

    2013-11-13

    Repeated bouts of acute and chronic lung infections are responsible for progressive pulmonary function decline in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), ultimately leading to respiratory failure and death. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the archetypical CF pathogen, causes chronic infection in 70% of individuals, and is associated with an accelerated clinical decline. The management of P. aeruginosa in CF has been revolutionized with the development and widespread use of inhaled antibiotics. Aerosol delivery of antimicrobial compounds in CF enables extremely high concentrations of antibiotics to be reached directly at the site of infection potentially overcoming adaptive resistance and avoiding the potential for cumulative systemic toxicities. Tobramycin inhalation powder (TIP) represents the first dry powder inhaled (DPI) antibiotic available for use in CF. DPIs are notable for a markedly reduced time for administration, ease of portability, and increased compliance. TIP has been developed as a therapeutic alternative to tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS), the standard of care for the past 20 years within CF. Relative to TIS 300 mg nebulized twice daily in on-and-off cycles of 28 days duration, TIP 112 mg twice daily via the T-326 inhaler administered on the same schedule is associated with marked time savings, increased patient satisfaction, and comparable clinical end points. TIP represents an innovative treatment strategy for those individuals with CF and holds the promise of increased patient compliance and thus the potential for improved clinical outcomes.

  18. Impact of new water systems on healthcare-associated colonization or infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Annick; Quantin, Catherine; Vanhems, Philippe; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Bertrand, Xavier; Astruc, Karine; Chavanet, Pascal; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to study the impact of new water systems, which were less contaminated with P. aeruginosa, on the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases (colonizations or infections) in care units that moved to a different building between 2005 and 2014. Methods: Generalized Estimated Equations were used to compare the incidence of P. aeruginosa healthcare-associated cases according to the building. Results: Twenty-nine units moved during the study period and 2,759 cases occurred in these units. No difference was observed when the new building was compared with older buildings overall. Conclusion: Our results did not support our hypothesis of a positive association between water system contamination and the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases. These results must be confirmed by linking results of water samples and patients’ data. PMID:27274443

  19. The Stringent Response Is Essential for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence in the Rat Lung Agar Bead and Drosophila melanogaster Feeding Models of Infection▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, Stefanie L.; Green, Christopher; Stevens, Katarzyna M.; Day, Brad; Erickson, David L.; Woods, Donald E.; Storey, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    The stringent response is a regulatory system that allows bacteria to sense and adapt to nutrient-poor environments. The central mediator of the stringent response is the molecule guanosine 3′,5′-bispyrophosphate (ppGpp), which is synthesized by the enzymes RelA and SpoT and which is also degraded by SpoT. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that a relA mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the principal cause of lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients, was attenuated in virulence in a Dro...

  20. Tobramycin Inhalation Powder™: a novel drug delivery system for treating chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Michael D; Elborn, J Stuart

    2011-10-01

    Lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is typified by the development of chronic airways infection culminating in bronchiectasis and progression to end-stage respiratory disease. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous gram-negative bacteria, is the archetypical CF pathogen and is associated with an accelerated clinical decline. The development and widespread use of chronic suppressive aerosolized antibacterial therapies, in particular Tobramycin Inhalation Solution (TIS), in CF has contributed to reduced lung function decline and improved survival. However, the requirement for the aerosolization of these agents through nebulizers has been associated with increased treatment burden, reduced quality of life and remain a barrier to broader uptake. Tobramycin Inhalation Powder (TIP™) has been developed by Novartis with the express purpose of delivering the same benefits as TIS in a time-effective manner. Administered via the T-326™ (Novartis) Inhaler in four individual 28-mg capsules, TIP can be administered in a quarter of the time of traditional nebulizers and is inherently portable. In clinical studies, TIP has been shown to be safe, result in equivalent or superior reductions in P. aeruginosa sputum density and produce similar improvements in pulmonary function. TIP offers significant advantages in time saving, portability and convenience over traditional nebulized TIS with comparable clinical outcomes for individuals with CF.

  1. Virus-induced type I interferon deteriorates control of systemic pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    OpenAIRE

    Merches, Katja; Khairnar, Vishal; Knuschke, Torben; et al.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type I interferon (IFN-I) predisposes to bacterial superinfections, an important problem during viral infection or treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-α). IFN-I-induced neutropenia is one reason for the impaired bacterial control; however there is evidence that more frequent bacterial infections during IFN-α-treatment occur independently of neutropenia. METHODS: We analyzed in a mouse model, whether Pseudomonas aeruginosa control is influenced by co-infection with the lymphocy...

  2. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute Burn and Chronic Surgical Wound Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Keith H.; Jake Everett; Urvish Trivedi; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Marvin Whiteley

    2014-01-01

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in ...

  3. Histoplasmosis lung. Primary pulmonary infection: histoplasmoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histoplasmosis is a primarily pulmonary originated mycosis which is acquired by inhalation. In the majority of the cases infection goes unnoticed or gets manifested by slight respiratory symptoms. Histoplasmoma is a relatively common form of acute lung histoplasmosis, in form of nodules, which is generally accompanied by calcification that can increase in size and simulate a lung neoplasia. This article describes a case of an immunocompromised patient with this kind of pulmonary mycosis

  4. Effect of Garlic Oil on Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Induced in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antimicrobial activity and other medical benefits of garlic oil have been attributed to the presence of sulphides in it. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a multidrug resistance opportunistic human pathogen that infect many patients .To control these infections, there is a need for other agents with greater antimicrobial activity and less toxicity. In this study, the effect of irradiated and non-irradiated garlic oil has been evaluated. The irradiation of garlic oil at 10.0 kGy decreased slightly its antibacterial activity against the tested Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results revealed that there was no effect of garlic oil either irradiated or non-irradiated on the adherent cells formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa tested organism on tissue culture plate. Garlic oil (irradiated or nonirradiated) was administrated subcutaneously as treatment for a mouse infection model. Bacteriological examination and mortality rate were used as indicators. The treatment with non-irradiated garlic oil decreased the number of bacteria in the infected group in contrast with the placebo group (saline), while, irradiation of garlic oil with 10.0 kGy had no effect on the infected bacteria. Also, the results indicated that, the treatment with non-irradiated garlic oil decreased the mortality in comparison with irradiated garlic oil which did not show any effect. Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that there were morphological changes in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with non- irradiated garlic oil in comparison with untreated one

  5. Tobramycin inhalation powder (TOBI Podhaler) for the treatment of lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Espinosa, E; Marcos, C; Alonso, T; Giron, R M; Gomez-Punter, R M; Garcia-Castillo, E; Zamora, E; Cisneros, C; Garcia, J; Valenzuela, C; Ancochea, J

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease secondary to a defect in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR). Mortality in CF is associated with impairment of lung function in which bacterial infection plays a fundamental role. The microorganism Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a marker of poor prognosis. Tobramycin was the first parenteral antibiotic to be used as inhaled medication in CF. Owing to its beneficial effects; it was subsequently used in designed inhaled formulations. The first formulation was the inhalation solution, which improved lung function, lowered hospitalization rates, and reduced the courses of intravenous antibiotic. However, the high associated costs and time necessary to administer the medication negatively affected quality of life. The recent development of tobramycin inhalation powder has optimized treatment. The dry powder inhaler is a simple device that reduces administration time and improves adherence. As there is no risk of bacterial contamination, disinfection is unnecessary.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Nina; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Ciofu, Oana;

    2012-01-01

    The molecular epidemiology of the chronic airway infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) was investigated by cross-sectional analysis of bacterial isolates from 51 CF centers and by longitudinal analysis of serial isolates which had been collected at the CF...

  7. Is Quorum Sensing Interference a Viable Alternative to Treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) coordinates the expression of multiple virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa; hence its inhibition has been postulated as a new alternative to treat its infections. In particular, QS interference approaches claim that they attenuate bacterial virulence without directly decreasing bacterial growth and suggest that in vivo the immune system would control the infections. Moreover, since in vitro experiments performed in rich medium demonstrate that interfering with QS decreases the production of virulence factors without affecting bacterial growth it was assumed than in vivo therapies will minimize the selection of resistant strains. Therefore, the underlying assumptions toward an effective implementation of a successful Quorum sensing interference (QSI) therapy for treating P. aeruginosa infections are that (i) QS only exerts important effects in the regulation of virulence genes but it does not affect metabolic processes linked to growth, (ii) the expression of virulence factors is only positively regulated by QS, (iii) inhibition of virulence factors in vivo do not affect bacterial growth, (iv) the immune system of the infected patients will be able to get rid of the infections, and (v) the therapy will be effective in the strains that are actively producing the infections. Nevertheless, for QSI in P. aeruginosa, substantial experimental evidence against the validity of most of these assumptions has accumulated during the past years, suggesting that a far better understanding of its virulence and its behavior during infections is needed in order to design truly solid QSI therapeutic alternatives to combat this remarkable pathogen. PMID:27683577

  8. Avidity of anti-P aeruginosa antibodies during chronic infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Petersen, T D; Jensen, P;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to study the impact on the lung function of patients with cystic fibrosis of the avidity of antipseudomonal antibodies, the avidity of antibodies against the chromosomal beta-lactamase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a beta ab) and against the 60-65 kDa heat shock protein of P...... function the avidity of a beta ab was higher than in patients with poor lung function (p = 0.018). No significant difference in the avidity of the anti-GroEL antibodies was observed between the two groups of patients. CONCLUSION: In patients with cystic fibrosis a high avidity of a beta ab could contribute...

  9. Spread of colistin resistant non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa among chronically infected Danish cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Ciofu, Oana;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa have rarely been reported in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. METHODS: We performed a 17-year prospective study on colistin susceptibility and compared our findings with clinical variables. RESULTS: The first outbreak started in 1995 and lasted 5...... the first outbreak. Most resistant isolates belonged to two major clones that had similar genotypes in the two outbreaks. The P. aeruginosa isolates were all non-mucoid and they appeared in a group of chronically infected patients that had been admitted to the same ward for antibiotic treatment and...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Fiandaca, Mark J;

    2009-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the appearance and location of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung and in sputum. Samples include preserved tissues of CF patients who died due to chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection prior to the advent of intensive antibiotic...

  11. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-1B Negatively Impacts Host Defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Lei; Xie, Zhongping; Li, Hua; Pang, Zheng; Junkins, Robert D; Tremblay, Michel L; Chen, Xiaochun; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in immune-compromised individuals. Mechanisms governing immune responses to P. aeruginosa infection remain incompletely defined. Herein, we demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is a critical negative regulator in P. aeruginosa infection. PTP1B-deficient mice display greatly enhanced bacterial clearance and reduced disease scores, which are accompanied by increased neutrophil infiltration and cytokine production. Interestingly, PTP1B deficiency mainly up-regulates the production of interferon-stimulated response elements-regulated cytokines and chemokines, including chemokine ligand 5 (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted), CXCL10 (interferon γ-inducible protein 10), and interferon-β production. Further studies reveal that PTP1B deficiency leads to increased interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) expression and activation. These findings demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism of the immune response to P. aeruginosa infection through PTP1B-IRF7 interaction. This novel PTP1B-IRF7-interferon-stimulated response elements pathway may have broader implications in Toll-like receptor-mediated innate immunity. PMID:27105736

  12. Exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide as a marker of early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis J. Gilchrist

    Full Text Available Hydrogen cyanide is readily detected in the headspace above Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures and in the breath of cystic fibrosis (CF patients with chronic (P. aeruginosa infection. We investigated if exhaled breath HCN is an early marker of P. aeruginosa infection. 233 children with CF who were free from P. aeruginosa infection were followed for 2 years. Their median (interquartile range age was 8.0 (5.0–12.2 years. At each study visit, an exhaled breath sample was collected for hydrogen cyanide analysis. In total, 2055 breath samples were analysed. At the end of the study, the hydrogen cyanide concentrations were compared to the results of routine microbiology surveillance. P. aeruginosa was isolated from 71 children during the study with an incidence (95% CI of 0.19 (0.15–0.23 cases per patient-year. Using a random-effects logistic model, the estimated odds ratio (95% CI was 3.1 (2.6–3.6, which showed that for a 1- ppbv increase in exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide, we expected a 212% increase in the odds of P. aeruginosa infection. The sensitivity and specificity were estimated at 33% and 99%, respectively. Exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide is a specific biomarker of new P. aeruginosa infection in children with CF. Its low sensitivity means that at present, hydrogen cyanide cannot be used as a screening test for this infection.

  13. Increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection under hindlimb-unloading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Hernan; Belay, Tesfaye; Fountain, Kimberly; Vance, Monique; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that spaceflight conditions alter the immune system and resistance to infection [Belay T, Aviles H, Vance M, Fountain K, and Sonnenfeld G. J Allergy Clin Immunol 170: 262-268, 2002; Hankins WR and Ziegelschmid JF. In: Biomedical Results of Apollo. Washington, DC: NASA, 1975, p. 43-81. (NASA Spec. Rep. SP-368)]. Ground-based models, including the hindlimb-unloading model, have become important tools for increasing understanding of how spaceflight conditions can influence physiology. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of hindlimb unloading on the susceptibility of mice to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Hindlimb-unloaded and control mice were subcutaneously infected with 1 LD50 of P. aeruginosa. Survival, bacterial organ load, and antibody and corticosterone levels were compared among the groups. Hindlimb unloading had detrimental effects for infected mice. Animals in the hindlimb-unloaded group, compared with controls, 1). showed significantly increased mortality and reduced time to death, 2). had increased levels of corticosterone, and 3). were much less able to clear bacteria from the organs. These results suggest that hindlimb unloading may induce the production of corticosterone, which may play a critical role in the modulation of the immune system leading to increased susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection.

  14. Lactic acid bacteria protect human intestinal epithelial cells from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affhan, S; Dachang, W; Xin, Y; Shang, D

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens that cause nosocomial and food-borne infections. They promote intestinal diseases. Gastrointestinal colonization by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa has rarely been researched. These organisms spread to extra gastrointestinal niches, resulting in increasingly progressive infections. Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive bacteria that produce lactic acid as the major end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. These bacteria inhibit pathogen colonization and modulate the host immune response. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus on enteric infections caused by the paradigmatic human pathogens S. aureus ATCC25923 and P. aeruginosa ATCC27853. The effect of whole cells and neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) of the lactobacilli on LoVo human carcinoma enterocyte (ATCC CCL-229) infection was analyzed by co-exposure, pre-exposure, and post-exposure studies. Simultaneous application of whole cells and CFS of the lactobacilli significantly eradicated enterocyte infection (P 0.05). This result could be attributed to interference by extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in the development of a pathogen that did not form colonies. Furthermore, results of the plate count and LIVE/ DEAD BacLight bacterial viability staining attributed this inhibition to a non-bacteriocin-like substance, which acted independently of organic acid and H2O2 production. Based on these results, the cell-free supernatant derived from lactobacilli was concluded to restrain the development of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa enteric infections. PMID:26681052

  15. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik;

    2012-01-01

    . aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. Findings We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found...

  16. Frequency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotypes in burn wound infections and their resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estahbanati, Hamid Karimi; Kashani, Parnian Pour; Ghanaatpisheh, Fahimeh

    2002-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a prominent role as an etiological agent involved in serious infections in burned patients. In this study P. aeruginosa infections were analyzed at the Motahari Burn Center in Tehran (from 22 December 1998 to April 1999) to estimate their frequency, antibiotic susceptibility and serotypes. One hundred and eighty-four positive cultures and 205 bacterial strains were isolated among swabs or biopsy specimens during the study period. Pseudomonas was found to be the most common (57%) followed by Acinetobacter (17%), Escherichia coli (12%), Staphylococcus aureus (8%) and other organisms (6%). The frequency of P. aeruginosa resistance to gentamicin, ceftizoxime, carbenicillin, cephalothin and ceftazidime was over 90%. The antibiotics to which P. aeruginosa was most sensitive were amikacin and tetracyclin. The "O" serotypes isolated from the 117 Pseudomona aeroginosa isolates were serotypes O:2, O:5, O:6, O:8, O:11, O:12 and O:16. The most common serotype was O:6 (20/17%) followed by O:11 (18/15%) and O:5 (14/12%). The serotype most resistant was O:16 (8%) and the most sensitive was O:8 (2%). Since treatment of infection with available antibiotics according to the results attained proved to be difficult, prevention of infection in the burned patients is considered as an appropriate means of conquering overcoming infection problems. The sum of frequencies of serotypes O:6, O:11, O:5 and O:16 was more than 60%, therefore vaccination of burn patients with polyvalent antiserum to these serotypes could possibly produce immunity in more than half of the burned patients. PMID:12052372

  17. Isolated Candida infection of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Shweihat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida pneumonia is a rare infection of the lungs, with the majority of cases occurring secondary to hematological dissemination of Candida organisms from a distant site, usually the gastrointestinal tract or skin. We report a case of a 77-year-old male who is life-long smoker with a history of rheumatoid arthritis and polymyalgia rheumatica, but did not take immunosuppressants for those conditions. Here, we present an extremely rare case of isolated pulmonary parenchymal Candida infection in the form pulmonary nodules without evidence of systemic disease which has only been described in a few previous reports.

  18. Homogentisate 1-2-Dioxygenase Downregulation in the Chronic Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian Epidemic Strain-1 in the CF Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Christopher J; Wynn, Matthew; Pinto, Rachel; Cordwell, Stuart; Rose, Barbara R; Harbour, Colin; Triccas, James A; Manos, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Some Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains including Australian Epidemic Strain-1 (AES-1 or AUS-01) cause persistent chronic infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with greater morbidity and mortality. Factors conferring persistence are largely unknown. Previously we analysed the transcriptomes of AES-1 grown in Luria broth, nematode growth medium for Caenorhabditis elegans assay (both aerobic) and artificial sputum medium (mainly hypoxic). Transcriptional comparisons included chronic AES-1 strains against PAO1 and acute AES-1 (AES-1R) against its chronic isogen (AES-1M), isolated 10.5 years apart from a CF patient and not eradicated in the meantime. Prominent amongst genes downregulated in AES-1M in all comparisons was homogentisate-1-2-dioxygenase (hmgA); an oxygen-dependent gene known to be mutationally deactivated in many chronic infection strains of P. aeruginosa. To investigate if hmgA downregulation and deactivation gave similar virulence persistence profiles, a hmgA mutant made in UCBPP-PA14 utilising RedS-recombinase and AES-1M were assessed in the C. elegans virulence assay, and the C57BL/6 mouse for pulmonary colonisation and TNF-α response. In C. elegans, hmgA deactivation resulted in significantly increased PA14 virulence while hmgA downregulation reduced AES-1M virulence. AES-1M was significantly more persistent in mouse lung and showed a significant increase in TNF-α (p<0.0001), sustained even with no detectable bacteria. PA14ΔhmgA did not show increased TNF-α. This study suggests that hmgA may have a role in P. aeruginosa persistence in chronic infection and the results provide a starting point for clarifying the role of hmgA in chronic AES-1. PMID:26252386

  19. Systemic Inflammatory Responses and Lung Injury following Hip Fracture Surgery Increases Susceptibility to Infection in Aged Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections frequently occur following hip fracture surgery in aged patients. However, the underlying reasons are not fully understood. The present study investigates the systemic inflammatory response and pulmonary conditions following hip fracture surgery as a means of identifying risk factors for lung infections using an aged rodent model. Aged, male Sprague-Dawley rats (8 animals per group underwent a sham procedure or hip fracture plus femoral intramedullary pinning. Animals were sacrificed 1, 3, and 7 days after the injury. Markers of systemic inflammation and pulmonary injury were analyzed. Both sham-operated and injured/surgical group animals underwent intratracheal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1, 3, and 7 days after surgery. P. aeruginosa counts in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and survival rates were recorded. Serum TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10 levels and markers of pulmonary injury were significantly increased at 1 and 3 days following hip fracture and surgery. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa at 1 and 3 days after injury had a significantly decreased survival rate and more P. aeruginosa recovered from blood and BAL fluid. This study shows that hip fracture and surgery in aged rats induced a systemic inflammatory response and lung injury associated with increased susceptibility to infection during the acute phase after injury and surgery.

  20. Les infections à Pseudomonas aeruginosa au service des maladies infectieuses du CHU YO, Burkina Faso: à propos deux cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoudou, Savadogo; Lassina, Dao; Fla, Koueta

    2015-01-01

    Nous rapportons deux cas d'infection à Pseudomonas aeruginosa: un cas de méningite et un cas d'infection urinaire. Les auteurs rappellent qu’à côté des étiologies classiques des méningites et des infections urinaires, des germes résistants comme Pseudomonas aeruginosa peuvent être responsables d'infections à localisation méningées et urinaires et dont il faut connaître pour une bonne prise en charge. Le traitement de ces infections requiert un antibiogramme au regard de la grande capacité de résistance de Pseudomonas aeruginosa en milieu hospitalier. La limitation des gestes invasifs et l'application rigoureuse des mesures de prévention des infections en milieu hospitalier contribueront à lutter efficacement contre ces infections en milieu de soins. PMID:26491521

  1. The role of quorum sensing in the pathogenicity of the cunning aggressor Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2007-01-01

    , and, particularly, higher organisms We have focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen producing more than 30 QS-regulated virulence factors. P. aeruginosa causes several types of nosocomial infection, and lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We review the role of QS...

  2. Study on antimicrobial potential of neem oil nanoemulsion against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Labeo rohita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Prabhakar; R S, Suresh Kumar; Jerobin, Jayakumar; Thomas, John; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2014-01-01

    Presence of several biochemical constituents in neem makes it an efficient antimicrobial agent for pathogenic diseases. The current investigation was aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of neem nanoemulsion as a control measure for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in freshwater fish Labeo rohita. The median lethal concentration (LC50) for the neem oil and neem nanoemulsion was 73.9 and 160.3 mg/L, respectively. The biomarker enzymes of treated fish tissues showed a significant difference in the level of glutathione reductase, catalase, and lipid peroxidation in neem oil-treated samples than in neem nanoemulsion-treated samples at Pneem nanoemulsion was more effective in both in vitro and in vivo methods. Present findings suggest that neem-based nanoemulsion has negligible toxicity to Rohu fishes. This makes neem-based nanoemulsion as an efficient therapeutic agent against P. aeruginosa infection, leading to its possible usage in the aquaculture industry. PMID:24502533

  3. Study on antimicrobial potential of neem oil nanoemulsion against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Labeo rohita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Prabhakar; R S, Suresh Kumar; Jerobin, Jayakumar; Thomas, John; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2014-01-01

    Presence of several biochemical constituents in neem makes it an efficient antimicrobial agent for pathogenic diseases. The current investigation was aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of neem nanoemulsion as a control measure for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in freshwater fish Labeo rohita. The median lethal concentration (LC50) for the neem oil and neem nanoemulsion was 73.9 and 160.3 mg/L, respectively. The biomarker enzymes of treated fish tissues showed a significant difference in the level of glutathione reductase, catalase, and lipid peroxidation in neem oil-treated samples than in neem nanoemulsion-treated samples at Pneem nanoemulsion was more effective in both in vitro and in vivo methods. Present findings suggest that neem-based nanoemulsion has negligible toxicity to Rohu fishes. This makes neem-based nanoemulsion as an efficient therapeutic agent against P. aeruginosa infection, leading to its possible usage in the aquaculture industry.

  4. Treatment of lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Döring, Gerd; Flume, Patrick; Heijerman, Harry;

    2012-01-01

    In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung damage secondary to chronic infection is the main cause of death. Treatment of lung disease to reduce the impact of infection, inflammation and subsequent lung injury is therefore of major importance. Here we discuss the present status of antibiotic...

  5. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Antibiotic Resistance in Patients with Nosocomial Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meliha Cagla Sonmezer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is resistant to various antibiotics and can cause serious nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality. In this clinical study, we investigated the risk factors in patients who were diagnosed with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Methods. A retrospective case control study including patients with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Patients who were resistant to any of the six antibiotics (imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ceftazidime constituted the study group. Results. One hundred and twenty isolates were isolated. Various risk factors were detected for each antibiotic in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, previous cefazolin use was found as an independent risk factor for the development of imipenem resistance (OR = 3.33; CI 95% [1.11–10.0]; p = 0.03, whereas previous cerebrovascular attack (OR = 3.57; CI 95% [1.31–9.76]; p = 0.01 and previous meropenem use (OR = 4.13; CI 95% [1.21–14.07]; p = 0.02 were independent factors for the development of meropenem resistance. For the development of resistance to ciprofloxacin, hospitalization in the neurology intensive care unit (OR = 4.24; CI 95% [1.5–11.98]; p = 0.006 and mechanical ventilator application (OR = 11.7; CI 95% [2.24–61.45]; p = 0.004 were independent risk factors. Conclusion. The meticulous application of contact measures can decrease the rate of nosocomial infections.

  6. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Antibiotic Resistance in Patients with Nosocomial Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, Gunay; Erdinc, Fatma Sebnem; Kaya Kilic, Esra; Adiloglu, Ali; Hatipoglu, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is resistant to various antibiotics and can cause serious nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality. In this clinical study, we investigated the risk factors in patients who were diagnosed with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Methods. A retrospective case control study including patients with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Patients who were resistant to any of the six antibiotics (imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ceftazidime) constituted the study group. Results. One hundred and twenty isolates were isolated. Various risk factors were detected for each antibiotic in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, previous cefazolin use was found as an independent risk factor for the development of imipenem resistance (OR = 3.33; CI 95% [1.11–10.0]; p = 0.03), whereas previous cerebrovascular attack (OR = 3.57; CI 95% [1.31–9.76]; p = 0.01) and previous meropenem use (OR = 4.13; CI 95% [1.21–14.07]; p = 0.02) were independent factors for the development of meropenem resistance. For the development of resistance to ciprofloxacin, hospitalization in the neurology intensive care unit (OR = 4.24; CI 95% [1.5–11.98]; p = 0.006) and mechanical ventilator application (OR = 11.7; CI 95% [2.24–61.45]; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors. Conclusion. The meticulous application of contact measures can decrease the rate of nosocomial infections. PMID:27656220

  7. Antibiofilm and Anti-Infection of a Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shimei; Liu, Ge; Jin, Weihua; Xiu, Pengyuan; Sun, Chaomin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination, and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium P. stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed b...

  8. Comparison of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome between monomicrobial and polymicrobial Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bloodstream infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzel Richard P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies of nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI have demonstrated a higher mortality for polymicrobial bacteremia when compared to monomicrobial nBSI. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in systemic inflammatory response and mortality between monomicrobial and polymicrobial nBSI with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 98 adults with P. aeruginosa (Pa nBSI. SIRS scores were determined 2 days prior to the first positive blood culture through 14 days afterwards. Monomicrobial (n = 77 and polymicrobial BSIs (n = 21 were compared. Results 78.6% of BSIs were caused by monomicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (MPa and 21.4% by polymicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (PPa. Median APACHE II score on the day of BSI was 22 for MPa and 23 for PPa BSIs. Septic shock occurred in 33.3% of PPa and in 39.0% of MPa (p = 0.64. Progression to septic shock was associated with death more frequently in PPa (OR 38.5, CI95 2.9–508.5 than MPa (OR 4.5, CI95 1.7–12.1. Maximal SIR (severe sepsis, septic shock or death was seen on day 0 for PPa BSI vs. day 1 for MPa. No significant difference was noted in the incidence of organ failure, 7-day or overall mortality between the two groups. Univariate analysis revealed that APACHE II score ≥20 at BSI onset, Charlson weighted comorbidity index ≥3, burn injury and respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and hematologic failure were associated with death, while age, malignant disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatic failure, gastrointestinal complications, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, infection with imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa and polymicrobial nBSI were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematologic failure (p Conclusion In this historical cohort study of nBSI with P. aeruginosa, the incidence of septic shock and organ failure was high in both groups. Additionally, patients with PPa BSI were not more acutely ill, as judged by APACHE II

  9. Annexin A2 Regulates Autophagy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection through the Akt1-mTOR-ULK1/2 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongpeng; Tan, Shirui; Yu, Min; Jundt, Michael C; Zhang, Shuang; Wu, Min

    2015-10-15

    Earlier studies reported that a cell membrane protein, Annexin A2 (AnxA2), plays multiple roles in the development, invasion, and metastasis of cancer. Recent studies demonstrated that AnxA2 also functions in immunity against infection, but the underlying mechanism remains largely elusive. Using a mouse infection model, we reveal a crucial role for AnxA2 in host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as anxa2(-/-) mice manifested severe lung injury, systemic dissemination, and increased mortality compared with wild-type littermates. In addition, anxa2(-/-) mice exhibited elevated inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-γ), decreased bacterial clearance by macrophages, and increased superoxide release in the lung. We further identified an unexpected molecular interaction between AnxA2 and Fam13A, which activated Rho GTPase. P. aeruginosa infection induced autophagosome formation by inhibiting Akt1 and mTOR. Our results indicate that AnxA2 regulates autophagy, thereby contributing to host immunity against bacteria through the Akt1-mTOR-ULK1/2 signaling pathway.

  10. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Palacios

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Several studies have shown that HIV patients are at higher risk of lung cancer. Our aim is to analyse the prevalence and features of lung cancer in HIV-infected patients. Methods: The clinical charts of 4,721 HIV-infected patients seen in three hospitals of southeast Spain (study period 1992–2012 were reviewed, and all patients with a lung cancer were analysed. Results: There were 61 lung cancers, giving a prevalence of 1.2%. There was a predominance of men (82.0%, and smokers (96.6%; mean pack-years 35.2, with a median age of 48.0 (41.7–52.9 years, and their distribution according to risk group for HIV was: intravenous drug use 58.3%, homosexual 20.0%, and heterosexual 16.7%. Thirty-four (56.7% patients were Aids cases, and 29 (47.5% had prior pulmonar events: tuberculosis 16, bacterial pneumonia 9, and P. jiroveci pneumonia 4. The median nadir CD4 count was 149/mm3 (42–232, the median CD4 count at the time of diagnosis of the lung cancer was 237/mm3 (85–397, and 66.1%<350/mm3. 66.7% were on ART, and 70% of them had undetectable HIV viral load. The most common histological types of lung cancer were adenocarcinoma and epidermoid, with 24 (40.0% and 23 (38.3% cases, respectively. There were 49 (80.3% cases with advanced stages (III and IV at diagnosis. The distribution of treatments was: only palliative 23 (39.7%, chemotherapy 14 (24.1%, surgery and chemotherapy 8 (13.8%, radiotherapy 7 (12.1%, surgery 4 (6.9%, and other combined treatments 2 (3.4%. Forty-six (76.7% patients died, with a median survival time of 3 months. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 6 months was 42.7% (at 12 months 28.5%. Conclusions: The prevalence of lung cancer in this cohort of HIV-patients is high. People affected are mainly men, smokers, with transmission of HIV by intravenous drug use, and around half of them with prior opportunistic pulmonary events. Most patients had low nadir CD4 count, and were immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis

  11. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang;

    2011-01-01

    of P. aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.25%. Oral administration of ginseng extracts in mice promoted phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by airway phagocytes, but did not affect phagocytosis of a PAO1-filM mutant. Our study suggests that ginseng treatment may help to eradicate the biofilm......Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments...... protected animal models from developing chronic lung infection by P. aeruginosa. In the present study, the effects of ginseng on the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms were further investigated in vitro and in vivo. Ginseng aqueous extract at concentrations of 0.5-2.0% did not inhibit the growth of P...

  12. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Souto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05. In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p < 0.01. Smokers presenting P. aeruginosa and high frequencies of supragingival plaque were more likely to present CP than PH. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are frequently detected in the oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis.

  13. Mobile genetic elements of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hydrotherapy facility and respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S G; Cardoso, O

    2014-03-01

    The content of mobile genetic elements in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates of a pristine natural mineral water system associated with healthcare was compared with clinical isolates from respiratory infections. One isolate, from the therapy pool circuit, presented a class 1 integron, with 100% similarity to a class 1 integron contained in plasmid p4800 of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Kp4800 strain, which is the first time it has been reported in P. aeruginosa. Class 1 integrons were found in 25.6% of the clinical isolates. PAGI1 orf3 was more prevalent in environmental isolates, while PAGI2 c105 and PAGI3 sg100 were more prevalent in clinical isolates. Plasmids were not observed in either population.

  14. Pseudomonas infection and mucociliary and absorptive clearance in the cystic fibrosis lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Weiner, Daniel J; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Muthukrishnan, Ashok; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Lacy, Ryan T; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2016-05-01

    Airway surface liquid hyperabsorption and mucus accumulation are key elements of cystic fibrosis lung disease that can be assessed in vivo using functional imaging methods. In this study we evaluated experimental factors affecting measurements of mucociliary clearance (MCC) and small-molecule absorption (ABS) and patient factors associated with abnormal absorption and mucus clearance.Our imaging technique utilises two radiopharmaceutical probes delivered by inhalation. Measurement repeatability was assessed in 10 adult cystic fibrosis subjects. Experimental factors were assessed in 29 adult and paediatric cystic fibrosis subjects (51 scans). Patient factors were assessed in a subgroup with optimal aerosol deposition (37 scans; 24 subjects). Paediatric subjects (n=9) underwent initial and 2-year follow-up scans. Control subjects from a previously reported study are included for comparison.High rates of central aerosol deposition influenced measurements of ABS and, to a lesser extent, MCC. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis was only detectable in subjects with previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Cystic fibrosis subjects without P. aeruginosa had similar MCC to control subjects. Cystic fibrosis subjects had consistently higher ABS rates.We conclude that the primary experimental factor affecting MCC/ABS measurements is central deposition percentage. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis is associated with P. aeruginosa infection. ABS is consistently increased in cystic fibrosis.

  15. Specific and nonspecific imaging of localized Fisher immunotype 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if radiolabeled specific antibodies directed against bacterial antigens could be used to detect sites of infection, gamma camera imaging studies were performed in animals infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) directed against Fisher Immunotype 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a nonmicrobial, nonmammalian haptene, p-arsanilic acid, were labeled with 125I by the lodogen-Bead method. Unilateral, deep thigh infections were created by innoculation with 2 X 10(8) Fisher Immunotype 1 P. aeruginosa. Twenty-four hours later, one of the radiolabeled antibodies was injected intravenously at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg (100-150 microCi). Serial gamma imaging was then carried out beginning at 4 hr and at approximately 24-hr intervals thereafter. Beginning as early as 4 hr postinjection, the area of inflammation could be visualized with either the specific or nonspecific Mab, with the images continuing to intensify until 24-48 hr postinjection. At 48 hr, the contrast between lesion and background with the nonspecific Mab began to fade, while the contrast in the specific Mab-generated images continued to intensify until approximately 192 hr postinjection. Clear-cut differentiation between specific and nonspecific Mab-generated images was possible by 72 hr postinjection. We conclude that specific immune imaging of localized infection with Mab's directed against specific microbial antigens is possible and should be clinically useful. In addition, images created by the localization of immunoglobulin non-specifically at the site of inflammation in the first 24-48 hr postinjection may also provide useful information as to the anatomic location of hidden abscesses

  16. Green Nail Syndrome (Pseudomonas aeruginosa Nail Infection: Two Cases Successfully Treated with Topical Nadifloxacin, an Acne Medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Müller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Green nail syndrome (GNS caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common bacterial nail infection. The treatment of GNS is challenging in many cases and recommendations based on clinical trials are lacking. We report two cases with GNS successfully treated with off-label use of topical nadifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone approved for acne and bacterial skin infections in some countries.

  17. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break signaling and repair pathway in infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly hazardous DNA double-strand breaks can be induced in eukaryotic cells by a number of agents including pathogenic bacterial strains. We have investigated the genotoxic potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen causing devastating nosocomial infections in cystic fibrosis or immunocompromised patients. Our data revealed that infection of immune or epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa triggered DNA strand breaks and phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Moreover, it induced formation of discrete nuclear repair foci similar to gamma-irradiation-induced foci, and containing γH2AX and 53BP1, an adaptor protein mediating the DNA-damage response pathway. Gene deletion, mutagenesis, and complementation in P. aeruginosa identified ExoS bacterial toxin as the major factor involved in γH2AX induction. Chemical inhibition of several kinases known to phosphorylate H2AX demonstrated that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) was the principal kinase in P. aeruginosa-induced H2AX phosphorylation. Finally, infection led to ATM kinase activation by an auto-phosphorylation mechanism. Together, these data show for the first time that infection by P. aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break repair machinery of the host cells. This novel information sheds new light on the consequences of P. aeruginosa infection in mammalian cells. As pathogenic Escherichia coli or carcinogenic Helicobacter pylori can alter genome integrity through DNA double-strand breaks, leading to chromosomal instability and eventually cancer, our findings highlight possible new routes for further investigations of P. aeruginosa in cancer biology and they identify ATM as a potential target molecule for drug design. (authors)

  18. Effect of ozone water rinse on wound healing in rats withPseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju-Hua Ye; Jun-Wu Huang; Hong-Yun Shi

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the promoting effect of ozone water rinse on wound healing in rats with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.Methods:Wistar male rats were selected as experimental animals and randomly divided into control group, chlorhexidine group and ozone water group,Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected wounds were made and cleaned with normal saline, chlorhexidine and ozone water respectively; would healing of three groups was observed, wound tissue was collected and contents of inflammatory factors, apoptosis molecules and autophagy markers were detected.Results:Wound healing rates of chlorhexidine group and ozone water group were higher than that of control group and wound healing time was shorter than that of control group, wound healing rate of ozone water group was higher than that of chlorhexidine group and wound healing time was shorter than that of chlorhexidine group; TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, Fas, FasL and Beclin-1 contents and LC3Ⅱ/LC3Ⅰ ratios in wound tissue of chlorhexidine group and ozone water group were lower than those of control group, and TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, Fas, FasL and Beclin-1 contents and LC3Ⅱ/LC3Ⅰ ratios in wound tissue of ozone water group were lower than those of chlorhexidine group.Conclusions:Compared with normal saline and chlorhexidine, ozone water rinse helps to promote wound healing, improve wound healing rate and shorten wound healing time in rats withPseudomonas aeruginosa infection, and meanwhile it can inhibit cell apoptosis and autophagy in the wounds.

  19. Interactions between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus during co-cultivations and polymicrobial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Angela T; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are versatile bacterial pathogens and common etiological agents in polymicrobial infections. Microbial communities containing both of these pathogens are shaped by interactions ranging from parasitic to mutualistic, with the net impact of these interactions in many cases resulting in enhanced virulence. Polymicrobial communities of these organisms are further defined by multiple aspects of the host environment, with important implications for disease progression and therapeutic outcomes. This mini-review highlights the impact of these interactions on the host and individual pathogens, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these interactions, and host-specific factors that drive interactions between these two important pathogens. PMID:27236810

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy decreases mortality in a murine model of burn-wound sepsis involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The colonization of burn wounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can lead to septic shock, organ injuries, and high mortality rates. We hypothesized that negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT would decrease invasion and proliferation of P. aeruginosa within the burn wound and reduce mortality. METHODS: Thermal injuries were induced in anesthetized mice, and P. aeruginosa was applied to the wound surface for 24 h. After removing the burn eschar and debridement, the animals were subjected to either NPWT or wet-to-dry (WTD treatment protocols. The bacterial loads on the wound surface were assessed during 7 d of treatment, as were the concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral blood samples. Survival was monitored daily for 14 d after burn induction. Finally, samples of wounded skin, lung, liver, and kidney were collected and subjected to histopathological examination. RESULTS: Applying P. aeruginosa to the burn wound surface led to sepsis. During early stages of treatment, NPWT reduced the mortality of the septic animals and levels of P. aeruginosa within the burn wound compared with WTD-treated animals. Circulating levels of cytokines and cytoarchitectural abnormalities were also significantly reduced via NPWT. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that NPWT inhibits the invasion and proliferation of P. aeruginosa in burn-wounded tissue and decreases early mortality in a murine model of burn-wound sepsis. These therapeutic benefits likely result from the ability of NPWT to decrease bacterial proliferation on the wound surface, reduce cytokine serum concentrations, and prevent damage to internal organs.

  1. Polysaccharides serve as scaffold of biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    from biofilms formed by mucoid P. aeruginosa were investigated. Alginate is not an essential structure component for mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms. Genetic studies revealed that Pel and Psl polysaccharides serve as essential scaffold and mediate macrocolony formation in mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms....... The Psl polysaccharide is more important than Pel polysaccharide in mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilm structure maintenance and phagocytosis resistance. The polysaccharides were further found to protect mucoid P. aeruginosa strain from host immune clearance in a mouse model of acute lung infection....

  2. Role of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate–Reduced Oxidase Proteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa–Induced Lung Inflammation and Permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Panfeng; Mohan, Vijay; Mansoor, Syed; Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy; Sadikot, Ruxana T.; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Earlier studies indicated a role for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. However, the role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–reduced (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) proteins and the mechanism of activation for NADPH oxidase in P. aeruginosa infection are not well-defined. Here, we investigated the role of NOX2 and NOX4 proteins in P. aeruginosa infection, ROS generation, and endothelial barrier function in murine lungs and in human lung m...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...

  4. Chronic infection phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are associated with failure of eradication in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidya, P; Smith, L; Beaudoin, T; Yau, Y C; Clark, S; Coburn, B; Guttman, D S; Hwang, D M; Waters, V

    2016-01-01

    Early eradication treatment with inhaled tobramycin is successful in the majority of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) with incident Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. However, in 10-40 % of cases, eradication fails and the reasons for this are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether specific microbial characteristics could explain eradication treatment failure. This was a cross-sectional study of CF patients (aged 0-18 years) with incident P. aeruginosa infection from 2011 to 2014 at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. Phenotypic assays were done on all incident P. aeruginosa isolates, and eradicated and persistent isolates were compared using the Mann-Whitney test or the two-sided Chi-square test. A total of 46 children with CF had 51 incident P. aeruginosa infections. In 72 % (33/46) of the patients, eradication treatment was successful, while 28 % failed eradication therapy. Persistent isolates were less likely to be motile, with significantly less twitch motility (p=0.001), were more likely to be mucoid (p=0.002), and more likely to have a tobramycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥ 128 μg/mL (p=0.02) compared to eradicated isolates. Although biofilm production was similar, there was a trend towards more persistent isolates with deletions in quorum-sensing genes compared with eradicated isolates (p=0.06). Initial acquisition of P. aeruginosa with characteristics of chronic infection is associated with failure of eradication treatment. PMID:26492874

  5. Effect of bacteriophage infection in combination with tobramycin on the emergence of resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Lindsey B; McLean, Robert J C; Rohde, Rodney E; Aron, Gary M

    2014-10-03

    Bacteriophage infection and antibiotics used individually to reduce biofilm mass often result in the emergence of significant levels of phage and antibiotic resistant cells. In contrast, combination therapy in Escherichia coli biofilms employing T4 phage and tobramycin resulted in greater than 99% and 39% reduction in antibiotic and phage resistant cells, respectively. In P. aeruginosa biofilms, combination therapy resulted in a 60% and 99% reduction in antibiotic and PB-1 phage resistant cells, respectively. Although the combined treatment resulted in greater reduction of E. coli CFUs compared to the use of antibiotic alone, infection of P. aeruginosa biofilms with PB-1 in the presence of tobramycin was only as effective in the reduction of CFUs as the use of antibiotic alone. The study demonstrated phage infection in combination with tobramycin can significantly reduce the emergence of antibiotic and phage resistant cells in both E. coli and P. aeruginosa biofilms, however, a reduction in biomass was dependent on the phage-host system.

  6. Ex vivo transcriptional profiling reveals a common set of genes important for the adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chronically infected host sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielecki, P.; Komor, U.; Bielecka, A.; Müsken, M.; Puchalka, J.; Pletz, M.W.; Ballmann, M.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Weiss, S.; Häussler, S.

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major nosocomial pathogen causing both devastating acute and chronic persistent infections. During the course of an infection, P.¿ aeruginosa rapidly adapts to the specific conditions within the host. In the present study, we aimed at the ident

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Extremely Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ST357) Strain CMC_VB_PA_B22862 Isolated from a Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragasam, Agila Kumari; Yesurajan, Francis; Doss C, George Priya; George, Biju; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Walia, Kamini

    2016-01-01

    Extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains causing severe infections have become a serious concern across the world. Here, we report draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa with an extremely drug-resistant profile isolated from a patient with community-acquired bloodstream infection in India.

  8. Immunochemical Determination of Pyocyanin and 1-Hydroxyphenazine as Potential Biomarkers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastells, Carme; Pascual, Nuria; Sanchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M-Pilar

    2016-02-01

    A novel immunochemical approach to diagnose Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections is reported, which is based on the quantification of relevant and specific virulence factors secreted by this microorganism. Specific antibodies have been raised using hapten PC1 (a 1:1 mixture of 9-hydroxy- and 6-hydroxy-phenazine-2-carobxylic acids), designed to recognize 1-hydroxyphenazine (1-OHphz), which is the main metabolite of pyocyanin (PYO). PYO is one of the most important virulence factors produced by nearly all P. aeruginosa strains, and other species do not produce this factor. With these antibodies, an immunochemical analytical procedure able to quantify both 1-OHphz and PYO in complex clinical samples has been developed. 1-OHphz can be directly measured in solubilized sputum samples diluted 20 times with the assay buffer. Quantification of PYO is accomplished after conversion to 1-OHphz in just 20 min under basic conditions. A LOD of 0.60 ± 0.01 nM (4.80 ± 0.08 nmol kg(-1) sputum) is reached for both biomarker targets under the conditions established, a value that is much below the reported concentrations on sputum samples obtained from infected patients (up to 100 μM). The assay is robust, reproducible, accurate, can be run in about 2 h, and many samples can be measured simultaneously. The present reported assay could represent a significant improvement in the diagnosis of infectious diseases caused by this pathogen. PMID:26738983

  9. Increased serum concentration of G-CSF in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P.O.; Moser, C.; Kharazmi, A.;

    2006-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the major reason for premature death in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Infected patients experience a progressive deterioration of the lung tissue caused by a persistent accumulation of PMNs. We investigated if the pulmonary accumulation of PM...

  10. Increased serum concentration of G-CSF in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P Ø; Moser, C; Kharazmi, A;

    2006-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the major reason for premature death in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Infected patients experience a progressive deterioration of the lung tissue caused by a persistent accumulation of PMNs. We investigated if the pulmonary accumulation of PMNs...

  11. Preventing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum infections by anti-adhesion-active components of edible seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachmaninov Ofra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to animal/human cells for infection establishment involves adhesive proteins, including its galactose- and fucose-binding lectins PA-IL (LecA and PA-IIL (LecB. The lectin binding to the target-cell receptors may be blocked by compatible glycans that compete with those of the receptors, functioning as anti-adhesion glycodecoys. The anti-adhesion treatment is of the utmost importance for abrogating devastating antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa infections in immunodeficient and cystic fibrosis (CF patients. This strategy functions in nature in protecting embryos and neonates. We have shown that PA-IL, PA-IIL, and also CV-IIL (a PA-IIL homolog produced in the related pathogen Chromobacterium violaceum are highly useful for revealing natural glycodecoys that surround embryos in diverse avian eggs and are supplied to neonates in milks and royal jelly. In the present study, these lectins were used as probes to search for seed embryo-protecting glycodecoys. Methods The lectin-blocking glycodecoy activities were shown by the hemagglutination-inhibition test. Lectin-binding glycoproteins were detected by Western blotting with peroxidase-labeled lectins. Results The present work reports the finding - by using PA-IL, PA-IIL, and CV-IIL - of rich glycodecoy activities of low ( 10 kDa compounds (including glycoproteins in extracts of cashew, cocoa, coffee, pumpkin, and tomato seeds, resembling those of avian egg whites, mammal milks, and royal jelly. Conclusions Edible seed extracts possess lectin-blocking glycodecoys that might protect their embryos from infections and also might be useful for hampering human and animal infections.

  12. Antenatal infection/inflammation and postnatal lung maturation and injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikegami Machiko

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chorioamnionitis is frequently associated with preterm deliveries before 30 weeks gestation. Chorioamnionitis correlates both with an increased risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and with a decreased risk of respiratory distress syndrome. Both interleukin-1α and endotoxin can induce inflammation in the fetal lungs and lung maturation after preterm birth when given by intra-amniotic injection. Inflammation can also result in an arrest of alveolarization, and this lung developmental abnormality is prominent in the lungs of preterm infants that die of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The mechanisms by which infection/inflammation can have both beneficial and injurious effects on the preterm lung remain to be characterized.

  13. Vaccination promotes TH1-like inflammation and survival in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. A new prophylactic principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Cryz, S J; Hougen, H P;

    1997-01-01

    of the macroscopic lung inflammation compared to the other vaccination groups (p = 0.009). The same effect could be obtained by IFN-gamma treatment (p = 0.004). The chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection was established in two inbred mice strains C3H/HeN, known as TH1 responders, and Balb/c, known as TH2 responders......The ongoing lung tissue damage in chronically Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has been shown to be caused by elastase liberated from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), which dominate the chronic inflammation in these patients. Most CF patients, however, contract...... the chronic lung infection with P. aeruginosa after a one-year period (median) of intermittent colonization. Therefore, prevention of the onset of the chronic infection or prevention of the dominance of the inflammation by PMNs would be important goals for a vaccine strategy against P. aeruginosa in CF...

  14. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N;

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...... between cystic fibrosis patients has occurred....

  15. Positive correlation of algD transcription to lasB and lasA transcription by populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, D G; Ujack, E E; Mitchell, I; Rabin, H R

    1997-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a chronic infection in the lungs of individuals with cystic fibrosis. The P. aeruginosa isolates from these infections, when grown under laboratory conditions, characteristically are mucoid and produce low levels of the more destructive virulence factors, such as exotoxin A and the proteases. We wanted to determine if during the chronic lung infections associated with CF, the expression of alginate was inversely correlated to the expression of exotoxin A, elastase, and the LasA protease. We measured the transcript accumulation of algD, a marker of alginate, toxA, the structural gene for exotoxin A, lasB, the structural gene for elastase, and lasA, the structural gene for LasA protease, from the sputum bacterial populations of 23 patients. In the 131 samples tested, we frequently detected transcripts from the four genes. When a Spearman rank correlation analysis was done on the samples, we found no correlation between algD transcript accumulation and toxA transcript accumulation. This result suggested that toxA was regulated independently of algD. Curiously, we found a positive correlation between algD transcript accumulation and both lasB and lasA transcript accumulation levels. This correlation may not indicate a direct association between algD and either lasA or lasB. More likely, it indicates a common regulatory element in a cascade of regulators or a common environmental cue that triggers transcription. PMID:9317008

  16. Multidrug resistant Psudomonas aeruginosa infections complicating surgical wounds and the potential challenges in managing post-operative wound infections:University of Calabar Teaching Hospital experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jombo GT; Akpan S; Epoke J; Denen Akaa P; Odey F

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To ascertain the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) recovered from surgical site infections (SSIs). Methods:The study was retrospective in nature and was compiled for a period of five years (1st February, 2004-31st January, 2009). Data were generated from the culture of post-operative wound swab specimens by the microbiology laboratory of University of Calabar Teaching Hospital. Relevant information from the patients’ records was compiled, such as age, gender, type of surgical procedure, microorganisms recovered and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns. Obtained data was analysed by using Epi Info 6 statistical software. Results:Of the 4 533 wound swab specimens processed, 673 were culture positive and P. aeruginosa was recovered from 13.1%of the culture positive specimens with its rate of recovery decreasing with age progression (P0.05). Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates were from general surgery wards and least from orthopaedic wards. Ofloxacin, ceftriaxone and augmentin were the most active antibiotics while ampicillin, tetracycline and co-trimoxazole were the least active antibiotics, with no antibiotic having a 100%activity against the organism. Conclusions:In view of the high resistance displayed by P. aeruginosa recovered from SSIs, adequate antiseptic procedures should be entrenched to avoid colonization of surgical wounds by this microorganism as well as others with similar sensitivity profile. Ofloxacin, ceftriaxone and augmentin may be considered for prevention of P.aeruginosa infection.

  17. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Goudarzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin. Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6% of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4% isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6% was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in embryonated hen's eggs. An alternative in vivo model for the screening of antibacterial substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtl, A; Möllmann, U; Schrinner, E; Stelzner, A

    1997-09-01

    Embryonated hens' eggs can be reliably infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in laboratory experiments. Therapy tests with the antibiotics azlocillin (CAS 37091-66-0) and gentamicin (CAS 13291-74-2) on this type of infected hens' eggs demonstrate that this test system offers a realistic alternative to septic experiments with small laboratory rodents. Chick embryos survive a lethal Pseudomonas infection when azlocillin or gentamicin in a relevant therapeutic dose are administered immediately after the infective agent. The use of Pseudomonas infected chick embryos in the screening for new antiinfectives allows, therefore, a considerable reduction of the number of laboratory rodents required. PMID:9342424

  19. Large-area burns with pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Fang-gang; ZHAO Xiao-zhuo; BIAN Jing; ZHANG Guo-an

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection due to pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PDRPA) has become a challenge in clinical practice. The aim of this research was to summarize the treatment of large-area burns (60%-80%) with PDRPA infection and respiratory failure in our hospital over the last two years, and to explore a feasible treatment protocol for such patients.Methods We retrospectively analyzed the treatment of five patients with large-area burns accompanied by PDRPA infection and respiratory failure transferred to our hospital from burn units in hospitals in other Chinese cities from January 2008 to February 2010. Before PDRPA infection occurred, all five patients had open wounds with large areas of granulation because of the failure of surgery and dissolving of scar tissue; they had also undergone long-term administration of carbapenems. This therapy included ventilatory support, rigorous repair of wounds, and combined antibiotic therapy targeted at drug-resistance mechanisms, including carbapenems, ciprofloxacin, macrolide antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors.Results Four patients recovered from bums and one died after therapy.Conclusions First, compromised immunity caused by delayed healing of burn wounds in patients with large-area bums and long-term administration of carbapenems may be the important factors in the initiation and progression of PDRPA infection. Second, if targeted at drug-resistance mechanisms, combined antibiotic therapy using carbapenems,ciprofloxacin, macrolide antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors could effectively control PDRPA infection. Third, although patients with large-area burns suffered respiratory failure and had high risks from anesthesia and surgery, only aggressive skin grafting with ventilatory support could control the infection and save lives. Patients may not be able to tolerate a long surgical procedure, so the duration of surgery should be minimized, and the frequency of surgery increased.

  20. Nosocomial urinary tract infection in the intensive care unit: when should Pseudomonas aeruginosa be suspected? Experience of the French national surveillance of nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit, Rea-Raisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venier, A-G; Lavigne, T; Jarno, P; L'heriteau, F; Coignard, B; Savey, A; Rogues, A-M

    2012-01-01

    Individual and ward risk factors for P. aeruginosa-induced urinary tract infection in the case of nosocomial urinary tract infection in the intensive care unit were determined with hierarchical (multilevel) logistic regression. The 2004-2006 prospective French national intensive care unit nosocomial infection surveillance dataset was used and 3252 patients with urinary tract infection were included; 16% were infected by P. aeruginosa. Individual risk factors were male sex, duration of stay, antibiotics at admission and transfer from another intensive care unit. Ward risk factors were patient turnover and incidence of P. aeruginosa-infected patients.

  1. Inflammation in Achromobacter xylosoxidans infected cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Pressler, T.; Nielsen, K. G.;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection may cause conspicuous chronic pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Evolution in lung function was compared in chronically infected patients. Cytokine...

  2. Selection of phages and conditions for the safe phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor; Krylov; Olga; Shaburova; Elena; Pleteneva; Sergey; Krylov; Alla; Kaplan; Maria; Burkaltseva; Olga; Polygach; Elena; Chesnokova

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens forced us to consider the phage therapy as one of the possible alternative approaches to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to consider the conditions for the safe, long-term use of phage therapy against various infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We describe the selection of the most suitable phages, their most effective combinations and some approaches for the rapid recognition of phages unsuitable for use in therapy. The benefi ts and disadvantages of the various different approaches to the preparation of phage mixtures are considered, together with the specifi c conditions that are required for the safe application of phage therapy in general hospitals and the possibilities for the development of personalized phage therapy.

  3. Acute exposure to silica nanoparticles enhances mortality and increases lung permeability in a mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Delaval, Mathilde; Boland, Sonja; Solhonne, Brigitte; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Mornet, Stéphane; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Background The lung epithelium constitutes the first barrier against invading pathogens and also a major surface potentially exposed to nanoparticles. In order to ensure and preserve lung epithelial barrier function, the alveolar compartment possesses local defence mechanisms that are able to control bacterial infection. For instance, alveolar macrophages are professional phagocytic cells that engulf bacteria and environmental contaminants (including nanoparticles) and secrete pro-inflammator...

  4. Adenoviral augmentation of elafin protects the lung against acute injury mediated by activated neutrophils and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, A J; Wallace, W A; Marsden, M E; Govan, J R; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    2001-08-01

    During acute pulmonary infection, tissue injury may be secondary to the effects of bacterial products or to the effects of the host inflammatory response. An attractive strategy for tissue protection in this setting would combine antimicrobial activity with inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE), a key effector of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury. We postulated that genetic augmentation of elafin (an endogenous inhibitor of HNE with intrinsic antimicrobial activity) could protect the lung against acute inflammatory injury without detriment to host defense. A replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected A549 cells against the injurious effects of both HNE and whole activated human neutrophils in vitro. Intratracheal replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected murine lungs against injury mediated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo. Genetic augmentation of elafin therefore has the capacity to protect the lung against the injurious effects of both bacterial pathogens resistant to conventional antibiotics and activated neutrophils. PMID:11466403

  5. Nitric oxide production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus;

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in CF patients is characterized by persisting mucoid biofilm in hypoxic endobronchial mucus. These biofilms are surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), which are the major consumers of O2 for production of O2-. In this s...

  6. Protective role of murine norovirus against Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Hober, Didier; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bortolotti, Perrine; Faure, Karine; Dessein, Rodrigue; Kipnis, Eric; Guery, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered mouse pathogen, representing the most common contaminant in laboratory mouse colonies. Nevertheless, the effects of MNV infection on biomedical research are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection could alter immune response in mice with acute lung infection. Here we report that co-infection with MNV increases survival of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute lung injury and decreases in vivo production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that MNV infection can deeply modify the parameters studied in conventional models of infection and lead to false conclusions in experimental models. PMID:26338794

  7. Ex Vivo Perfusion Treatment of Infection in Human Donor Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, D; Cypel, M; Bonato, R; Machuca, T N; Iskender, I; Hashimoto, K; Linacre, V; Chen, M; Coutinho, R; Azad, S; Martinu, T; Waddell, T K; Hwang, D M; Husain, S; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2016-04-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a platform to treat infected donor lungs with antibiotic therapy before lung transplantation. Human donor lungs that were rejected for transplantation because of clinical concern regarding infection were randomly assigned to two groups. In the antibiotic group (n = 8), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h with high-dose antibiotics (ciprofloxacin 400 mg or azithromycin 500 mg, vancomycin 15 mg/kg, and meropenem 2 g). In the control group (n = 7), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h without antibiotics. A quantitative decrease in bacterial counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was found in all antibiotic-treated cases but in only two control cases. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were significantly lower in the antibiotic group compared with the control group. EVLP with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy significantly improved pulmonary oxygenation and compliance and reduced pulmonary vascular resistance. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were strongly correlated with levels of perfusates tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β and macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α and 1β at 12 h. In conclusion, EVLP treatment of infected donor lungs with broad-spectrum antibiotics significantly reduced BAL bacterial counts and endotoxin levels and improved donor lung function. PMID:26730551

  8. Baicalein attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and relieves the inflammatory response in P. aeruginosa-infected macrophages by downregulating the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo J

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Luo,* Jin-liang Kong,* Bi-ying Dong, Hong Huang, Ke Wang, Li-hong Wu, Chang-chun Hou, Yue Liang, Bing Li, Yi-qiang Chen Department of Respiratory Disease, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Burgeoning antibiotic resistance and unfavorable outcomes of inflammatory injury after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection have necessitated the development of novel agents that not only target quorum sensing (QS but also combat inflammatory injury with the least risk of resistance. This study aimed to assess the anti-QS and anti-inflammatory activities of baicalein, a traditional herbal medicine that is widely used in the People’s Republic of China, against P. aeruginosa infection. We found that subminimum inhibitory concentrations of baicalein efficiently interfered with the QS-signaling pathway of P. aeruginosa via downregulation of the transcription of QS-regulated genes and the translation of QS-signaling molecules. This interference resulted in the global attenuation of QS-controlled virulence factors, such as motility and biofilm formation, and the secretion into the culture supernatant of extracellular virulence factors, including pyocyanin, LasA protease, LasB elastase, and rhamnolipids. Moreover, we examined the anti-inflammatory activity of baicalein and its mode of action via a P. aeruginosa-infected macrophage model to address its therapeutic effect. Baicalein reduced the P. aeruginosa-induced secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNFα. In addition, baicalein suppressed P. aeruginosa-induced activation of the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways in cocultured macrophages; this may be the mechanism by which baicalein inhibits the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, our study demonstrates that baicalein represents a potential treatment for P. aeruginosa infection because it

  9. Development of Liposomal Ciprofloxacin to Treat Lung Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cipolla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Except for management of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA in cystic fibrosis, there are no approved inhaled antibiotic treatments for any other diseases or for infections from other pathogenic microorganisms such as tuberculosis, non-tuberculous mycobacteria, fungal infections or potential inhaled biowarfare agents including Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Coxiella burnetii (which cause pneumonic tularemia, plague and Q fever, respectively. Delivery of an antibiotic formulation via the inhalation route has the potential to provide high concentrations at the site of infection with reduced systemic exposure to limit side effects. A liposomal formulation may improve tolerability, increase compliance by reducing the dosing frequency, and enhance penetration of biofilms and treatment of intracellular infections. Two liposomal ciprofloxacin formulations (Lipoquin® and Pulmaquin® that are in development by Aradigm Corporation are described here.

  10. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  11. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, Isolated from Patient with Burn Wound Infection in Guilan,Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Nikokar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains a major problem in burn patients. The main objective of this study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and frequency of class 1 integrons among P. aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with burn wound infections in a new Burn Centre in Guilan, Iran.Materials and Methods: The bacterial isolates were collected from 182 patients with burn wound infections and P. aeruginosa species were identified by standard bacteriological methods. The drug susceptibility test, using 11 antimicrobial agents, was performed for all the isolates via agar disk diffusion method. PCR was carried out for the detection of integrons.Results: Out of a total of 182 hospitalized patients in the burn center assessed, 86 (47% found to have P. aeruginosa in their isolates. Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: cloxacillin (91.8%, cotrimoxazole (86%, cephazolin (83.7%, carbenicillin (74.4%, piperacillin (69.9%, ceftazidime (68.8%, ciprofloxacin (66.3%, tobramycin (58.2%, amikacin (48.8% and gentamicin (37.2%, while the most effective antibiotic was imipenem with a resistance rate of 23.3%. Thirty nine (45.3% isolates were detected as multi-drug resistant. The PCR results showed that 37 (43% P. aeruginosa isolates and 27 (69.2% multi-drug resistant strains harbored class 1 integrons. A significant correlation was obtained between the presence of integrons and resistance against imipenem, ceftazidime, piperacillin and ciprofloxacin (P < 0.001.Conclusion: Optimization of using antimicrobial agents and control of infection is recommended to prevent the increasing population of drug resistant organisms in the new burn centre setting in this study. Furthermore, the high frequency of class 1 integrons among multi-drug resistant strains might be responsible for dissemination of antibiotic resistance gene.

  12. In the Absence of Effector Proteins, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type Three Secretion System Needle Tip Complex Contributes to Lung Injury and Systemic Inflammatory Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Audia, Jonathon P.; Ashley S. Lindsey; Housley, Nicole A.; Ochoa, Courtney R.; Chun Zhou; Michie Toba; Masahiko Oka; Annamdevula, Naga S.; Fitzgerald, Meshann S.; Frank, Dara W.; Alvarez, Diego F.

    2013-01-01

    Herein we describe a pathogenic role for the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type three secretion system (T3SS) needle tip complex protein, PcrV, in causing lung endothelial injury. We first established a model in which P. aeruginosa wild type strain PA103 caused pneumonia-induced sepsis and distal organ dysfunction. Interestingly, a PA103 derivative strain lacking its two known secreted effectors, ExoU and ExoT [denoted PA103 (ΔU/ΔT)], also caused sepsis and modest distal organ injury whereas an isog...

  13. Rapid Necrotic Killing of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Is Caused by Quorum-Sensing-Controlled Production of Rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P. Ø.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Phipps, Richard Kerry;

    2007-01-01

    a QS-regulated tolerance of biofilm bacteria to the antimicrobial properties of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The precise QS-regulated effect on the PMNs is, however, unknown. Incubation of human PMNs with supernatants from dense P. aeruginosa cultures showed that the QS-competent P. aeruginosa...... induced rapid necrosis of the PMNs. This mechanism was also observed in mouse lungs infected with P. aeruginosa, and in sputum obtained from P.-aeruginosa-infected patients with cystic fibrosis. Evidence is presented that the necrotic effect was caused by rhamnolipids, production of which is QS controlled...

  14. Quantitative analysis of the IgG and IgG subclass immune responses to chromosomal Pseudomonas aeruginosa beta-lactamase in serum from patients with cystic fibrosis by western blotting and laser scanning densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O; Pressler, T;

    1996-01-01

    lung infection with P aeruginosa was further investigated by correlating the a beta ab IgG subclasses with pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis. METHODS: Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG subclass a beta ab were investigated by western blotting and quantified by laser scanning densitometry......BACKGROUND: Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a beta ab) are markers of the development of resistance of P aeruginosa to beta-lactam antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. The role of these antibodies in patients with chronic....... A longitudinal study on 43 consecutive patients with cystic fibrosis who developed chronic lung infection with P aeruginosa was performed. RESULTS: IgG subclass a beta ab appeared in all patients with chronic infection with P aeruginosa. Eleven years after the onset of infection all the patients had IgG1, 79...

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in a Group of Captive Humboldt Penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Dimitri; Ziemssen, Eva; Schade, Benjamin; Kappe, Eva; Schmitt, Ferdinand; Kempf, Hermann; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2016-06-01

    Nine Humboldt penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ), between 1 and 1.5 years old and kept at Zoo Dresden, developed local and systemic infections with various opportunistic pathogens within a period of 4 months. Affected birds died peracutely without preceding symptoms or showed various clinical signs, including separation from conspecifics, reduced food intake, lethargy, dyspnea, swelling of the salt glands, and ocular discharge. One bird showed central nervous signs, including seizures. Pathologic examination of deceased birds revealed severe necrotizing inflammation of the mucous membranes and deep structures of the glottis, trachea, nasal sinus, and conchae and granulomatous inflammation of the salt glands. Further findings were airsacculitis, pneumonia, hepatitis, conjunctivitis, and myositis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the predominant pathogen in 7 cases. Six penguins died or were euthanatized, whereas 3 penguins that received systemic antibiotic treatment with tobramycin (10 mg/kg IM q24h for 10 days) showed rapid clinical improvement. Insufficient turnover rate of the filtration system, biofilm formation on pipe surfaces, and other factors are assumed to have promoted pathogen buildup in the pool water and subsequent infection.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: factors relating to mortality with emphasis on resistance pattern and antimicrobial treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millena R.S. Pinheiro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective case-control study was conducted to investigate the risk factors for death among intensive care unit patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Out of 131 patients investigated, 67 (51.1% died within 30 days of being diagnosed with this infection. The mean duration of hospital stay before this diagnosis was 28.5 ± 26.5 days. No association was found between bacterial resistance and death in this study (multiresistant p= 0.26; panresistant p= 0.42, but the adequacy of the initial treatment was inversely proportional to the degree of resistance. There was a tendency towards greater mortality among patients who received combination therapy (empirical p= 0.09; definitive p= 0.08, despite the greater frequency of appropriate treatment in these patients and the similar degree of severity in the two groups. This finding may be explained by pharmacodynamic parameters that were not studied or by the extensive use of aminoglycosides in the combination therapy, which play a controversial role in combination therapy due to their potential for renal toxicity. The multivariate analysis in our study demonstrated that age [odds ratio (OR 1.04], septic shock (OR 15.4 and hypoalbuminemia (OR 0.32 were independent risk factors for death.

  17. Burn Patients Infected With Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Japoni, Aziz; Rafaatpour, Noroddin; Mardaneh, Jalal; Abbasi, Pejman; Amin Shahidi, Maneli; Dehyadegari, Mohammad Ali; Alipour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the burn patients is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and remains a serious health concern among the clinicians. Objectives: The aim of this study was to detect MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in burn patients and determine multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, and respective resistance patterns. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 270 strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from the burn patients ...

  18. Chlorine gas exposure increases susceptibility to invasive lung fungal infection

    OpenAIRE

    Gessner, Melissa A.; Doran, Stephen F.; Yu, Zhihong; Dunaway, Chad W.; Matalon, Sadis; Steele, Chad

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is a highly irritating and reactive gas with potential occupational and environmental hazards. Acute exposure to Cl2 induces severe epithelial damage, airway hyperreactivity, impaired alveolar fluid clearance, and pulmonary edema in the presence of heightened inflammation and significant neutrophil accumulation in the lungs. Herein, we investigated whether Cl2 exposure affected the lung antimicrobial immune response leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infection...

  19. Decreased Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on nanomodified endotracheal tubes: a dynamic lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Mary C; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious complication of mechanical ventilation that has been shown to be associated with increased mortality rates and medical costs in the pediatric intensive care unit. Currently, there is no cost-effective solution to the problems posed by VAP. Endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that are resistant to bacterial colonization and that inhibit biofilm formation could provide a novel solution to the problems posed by VAP. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate differences in the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on unmodified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ETTs and on ETTs etched with a fungal lipase, Rhizopus arrhizus, to create nanoscale surface features. These differences were evaluated using an in vitro model of the pediatric airway to simulate a ventilated patient in the pediatric intensive care unit. Each experiment was run for 24 hours and was supported by computational models of the ETT. Dynamic conditions within the ETT had an impact on the location of bacterial growth within the tube. These conditions also quantitatively affected bacterial growth especially within the areas of tube curvature. Most importantly, experiments in the in vitro model revealed a 2.7 log reduction in the number (colony forming units/mL) of P. aeruginosa on the nanoroughened ETTs compared to the untreated PVC ETTs after 24 hours. This reduction in total colony forming units/mL along the x-axis of the tube was similar to previous studies completed for Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, this dynamic study showed that lipase etching can create surface features of nanoscale roughness on PVC ETTs that decrease bacterial attachment of P. aeruginosa without the use of antibiotics and may provide clinicians with an effective and inexpensive tool to combat VAP. PMID:27563242

  20. Decreased Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on nanomodified endotracheal tubes: a dynamic lung model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Mary C; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious complication of mechanical ventilation that has been shown to be associated with increased mortality rates and medical costs in the pediatric intensive care unit. Currently, there is no cost-effective solution to the problems posed by VAP. Endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that are resistant to bacterial colonization and that inhibit biofilm formation could provide a novel solution to the problems posed by VAP. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate differences in the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on unmodified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ETTs and on ETTs etched with a fungal lipase, Rhizopus arrhizus, to create nanoscale surface features. These differences were evaluated using an in vitro model of the pediatric airway to simulate a ventilated patient in the pediatric intensive care unit. Each experiment was run for 24 hours and was supported by computational models of the ETT. Dynamic conditions within the ETT had an impact on the location of bacterial growth within the tube. These conditions also quantitatively affected bacterial growth especially within the areas of tube curvature. Most importantly, experiments in the in vitro model revealed a 2.7 log reduction in the number (colony forming units/mL) of P. aeruginosa on the nanoroughened ETTs compared to the untreated PVC ETTs after 24 hours. This reduction in total colony forming units/mL along the x-axis of the tube was similar to previous studies completed for Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, this dynamic study showed that lipase etching can create surface features of nanoscale roughness on PVC ETTs that decrease bacterial attachment of P. aeruginosa without the use of antibiotics and may provide clinicians with an effective and inexpensive tool to combat VAP. PMID:27563242

  1. Bundled strategies against infection after liver transplantation: Lessons from multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Asahi; Kaido, Toshimi; Iida, Taku; Yagi, Shintaro; Hata, Koichiro; Okajima, Hideaki; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Infection is a life-threatening complication after liver transplantation (LT). A recent outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggered changes in our infection control measures. This study investigated the usefulness of our bundled interventions against postoperative infection after LT. This before-and-after analysis enrolled 130 patients who underwent living donor or deceased donor LT between January 2011 and October 2014. We initiated 3 measures after January 2013: (1) we required LT candidates to be able to walk independently; (2) we increased the hand hygiene compliance rate and contact precautions; and (3) we introduced procalcitonin (PCT) measurement for a more precise determination of empirical antimicrobial treatment. We compared factors affecting the emergence of drug-resistant microorganisms, such as the duration of antimicrobial and carbapenem therapy and hospital stay, and outcomes such as bacteremia and death from infection between before (n = 77) and after (n = 53) the LT suspension period. The utility of PCT measurement was also evaluated. Patients' backgrounds were not significantly different before and after the protocol revision. Incidence of bacteremia (44% versus 25%; P = 0.02), detection rate of multiple bacteria (18% versus 4%; P = 0.01), and deaths from infections (12% versus 2%; P =  0.04) significantly decreased after the protocol revision. Duration of antibiotic (42.3 versus 25.1 days; P =  0.002) and carbapenem administration (15.1 versus 5.2 days; P < 0.001) and the length of postoperative hospital stay (85.4 versus 63.5 days; P =  0.048) also decreased after the protocol revision. PCT mean values were significantly higher in the bacteremia group (10.10 ng/mL), compared with the uneventful group (0.65 ng/mL; P =  0.002) and rejection group (2.30 ng/mL; P =  0.02). One-year overall survival after LT significantly increased in the latter period (71% versus 94%; P =  0

  2. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan Balantidium coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sat; Harding, Godfrey

    2003-05-01

    Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B coli in large numbers. Treatment with doxycycline hyclate led to marked improvement. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan B coli should be considered in individuals who report contact with pigs. PMID:18159451

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: scientific evidence regarding clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira da Silva Filho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based techniques have been increasingly used in the creation of clinical guidelines and the development of recommendations for medical practice. The use of levels of evidence allows the reader to identify the quality of scientific information that supports the recommendations made by experts. The objective of this review was to address current concepts related to the clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. For the preparation of this review, the authors defined a group of questions that would be answered in accordance with the principles of PICO–an acronym based on questions regarding the Patients of interest, Intervention being studied, Comparison of the intervention, and Outcome of interest. For each question, a structured review of the literature was performed using the Medline database in order to identify the studies with the methodological design most appropriate to answering the question. The questions were designed so that each of the authors could write a response. A first draft was prepared and discussed by the group. Recommendations were then made on the basis of the level of scientific evidence, in accordance with the classification system devised by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, as well as the level of agreement among the members of the group.

  4. Paragonimus kellicotti: A Lung Infection in Our Own Backyard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Johannesen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paragonimiasis is an infection caused by the lung fluke of the genus Paragonimus. Within the United States, paragonimiasis has been commonly diagnosed in Southeast Asian immigrants infected with the Asian lung fluke Paragonimus westermani. Infections from the North American lung fluke, Paragonimus kellicotti, have been rare, although more infections have been seen in people in the Midwestern United States. A 29-year-old male with a history of pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma presented with hemoptysis. A CT scan showed a mass in the left upper lung lobe. A biopsy showed eosinophils and parasite eggs, some with a recognizable operculum. Further investigation revealed that he takes canoe trips on rivers within Missouri and would eat crayfish caught from these rivers. A blood sample was confirmed positive for Paragonimiasis serologically at the Center for Disease Control. Paragonimus kellicotti is found in rivers within the Mississippi basin. Infection occurs by consuming uncooked or undercooked crawfish. Microscopic identification of parasite eggs has been the gold standard. Serologic tests have been developed to aid in the diagnosis. Patients typically present with fever and hemoptysis. Common CT findings include pleural effusion, a mass, and lymphadenopathy. Awareness of P. kellicotti is important to guide appropriate diagnostic testing and ensuring proper treatment.

  5. Paragonimus kellicotti: A Lung Infection in Our Own Backyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, Eric; Nguyen, Van

    2016-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is an infection caused by the lung fluke of the genus Paragonimus. Within the United States, paragonimiasis has been commonly diagnosed in Southeast Asian immigrants infected with the Asian lung fluke Paragonimus westermani. Infections from the North American lung fluke, Paragonimus kellicotti, have been rare, although more infections have been seen in people in the Midwestern United States. A 29-year-old male with a history of pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma presented with hemoptysis. A CT scan showed a mass in the left upper lung lobe. A biopsy showed eosinophils and parasite eggs, some with a recognizable operculum. Further investigation revealed that he takes canoe trips on rivers within Missouri and would eat crayfish caught from these rivers. A blood sample was confirmed positive for Paragonimiasis serologically at the Center for Disease Control. Paragonimus kellicotti is found in rivers within the Mississippi basin. Infection occurs by consuming uncooked or undercooked crawfish. Microscopic identification of parasite eggs has been the gold standard. Serologic tests have been developed to aid in the diagnosis. Patients typically present with fever and hemoptysis. Common CT findings include pleural effusion, a mass, and lymphadenopathy. Awareness of P. kellicotti is important to guide appropriate diagnostic testing and ensuring proper treatment.

  6. The TAK1→IKKβ→TPL2→MKK1/MKK2 signaling cascade regulates IL-33 expression in Cystic Fibrosis airway epithelial cells following infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel eFarias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In cystic fibrosis (CF, chronic respiratory infections result in an exaggerated and uncontrolled inflammatory response that ultimately lead to a decrease in pulmonary function. We have previously described the presence of the alarmin IL-33 in lung explants from CF patients. The signals regulating IL-33 expression in the airway epithelium following a gram-negative bacterial infection are currently unknown. Our objective was to characterize the pathways in CF airway epithelial cells (AECs leading to an increase in IL-33 expression. We found that, in CF AECs expressing a deletion of a phenylalanine at position 508 of the gene coding for Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTRdelF508, exposure to live Pseudomonas aeruginosa upregulates IL-33 via the TLR2 and TLR5 signalling pathways. This up-regulation can be partially or fully reverted by pre-incubating CFTRdelF508 AECs with a CFTR corrector (VX-809 and/or a CFTR potentiator (VX-770. Similarly, incubation with the CFTR corrector and/or the CFTR potentiator also decreased IL-8 expression in response to infection. Moreover, using different protein kinase inhibitors that target elements downstream of TLR signalling, we show that the TAK1→IKKβ→TPL2→MKK1/MKK2 pathway regulates IL-33 expression following an infection with P. aeruginosa. Our findings represent the first characterization of the signals regulating IL-33 expression in CF airway epithelial cells in response to a bacterial infection.

  7. Rapid development in vitro and in vivo of resistance to ceftazidime in biofilm-growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N; Ciofu, O; Skovgaard, L T;

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the development of resistance of biofilm-growing P. aeruginosa during treatment with ceftazidime. Biofilms were established in vitro using a modified Robbins device (MRD) and in vivo in the rat model of chronic lung infection. Three P. aeruginosa strains...

  8. Tasco®: a product of Ascophyllum nodosum enhances immune response of Caenorhabditis elegans against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Saveetha; Khan, Wajahatullah; Evans, Franklin; Critchley, Alan T; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    The effects of Tasco®, a product made from the brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) were tested for the ability to protect Caenorhabditis elegans against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. A water extract of Tasco® (TWE) reduced P. aeruginosa inflicted mortality in the nematode. The TWE, at a concentration of 300 µg/mL, offered the maximum protection and induced the expression of innate immune response genes viz.; zk6.7 (Lypases), lys-1 (Lysozyme), spp-1 (Saponin like protein), f28d1.3 (Thaumatin like protein), t20g5.7 (Matridin SK domain protein), abf-1 (Antibacterial protein) and f38a1.5 (Lectin family protein). Further, TWE treatment also affected a number of virulence components of the P. aeuroginosa and reduced its secreted virulence factors such as lipase, proteases and toxic metabolites; hydrogen cyanide and pyocyanin. Decreased virulence factors were associated with a significant reduction in expression of regulatory genes involved in quorum sensing, lasI, lasR, rhlI and rhlR. In conclusion, the TWE-treatment protected the C. elegans against P. aeruginosa infection by a combination of effects on the innate immunity of the worms and direct effects on the bacterial quorum sensing and virulence factors. PMID:22363222

  9. Tasco®: A Product of Ascophyllum nodosum Enhances Immune Response of Caenorhabditis elegans Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Evans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Tasco®, a product made from the brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum were tested for the ability to protect Caenorhabditis elegans against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. A water extract of Tasco® (TWE reduced P. aeruginosa inflicted mortality in the nematode. The TWE, at a concentration of 300 µg/mL, offered the maximum protection and induced the expression of innate immune response genes viz.; zk6.7 (Lypases, lys-1 (Lysozyme, spp-1 (Saponin like protein, f28d1.3 (Thaumatin like protein, t20g5.7 (Matridin SK domain protein, abf-1 (Antibacterial protein and f38a1.5 (Lectin family protein. Further, TWE treatment also affected a number of virulence components of the P. aeuroginosa and reduced its secreted virulence factors such as lipase, proteases and toxic metabolites; hydrogen cyanide and pyocyanin. Decreased virulence factors were associated with a significant reduction in expression of regulatory genes involved in quorum sensing, lasI, lasR, rhlI and rhlR. In conclusion, the TWE-treatment protected the C. elegans against P. aeruginosa infection by a combination of effects on the innate immunity of the worms and direct effects on the bacterial quorum sensing and virulence factors.

  10. Evaluation of the Larval Therapy in the Healing Process of Infected Wounds with Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Rey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. During the last two decadesthe larval therapy has reemerged as a safe andreliable alternative for the healing of cutaneousulcers that do not respond to the conventionaltreatments.Objective. To evaluate the use of the larvaeof Lucilia sericata as a treatment for infectedwounds with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in ananimal model.Materials and methods. Twelve rabbits wererandomly distributed in 3 groups: the firstgroup was treated with larval therapy; the secondwas treated with antibiotics therapy and to thethird no treatment was applied, therefore wasestablished as a control group. To each animala wound was artificially induced, and then asuspension of P. aeruginosa was inoculated intothe lesion. Finally, every rabbit was evaluateduntil the infection development was recognizedand treatment was set up for the first twogroups according with the protocols mentionedabove. Macroscopic evaluation of the woundswas based on the presence of edema, exudates,bad odor, inflammation around the wound andthe presence of granulation tissue. The healingprocess was evaluated by monitoring histologicalchanges in the dermal tissue.Results. Differences in the time requiredfor wound healing were observed between thefirst group treated with larval therapy (10 daysand the second group treated with conventionalantibiotics therapy (20 days.Conclusion. The L. sericata larva is and efficienttool as a therapy for infected wounds withP. aeruginosa.

  11. Twenty-five-year outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting individuals with cystic fibrosis: identification of the prairie epidemic strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Michael D; Glezerson, Bryan A; Sibley, Christopher D; Sibley, Kristen A; Duong, Jessica; Purighalla, Swathi; Mody, Christopher H; Workentine, Matthew L; Storey, Douglas G; Surette, Michael G; Rabin, Harvey R

    2014-04-01

    Transmissible strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been described for cystic fibrosis (CF) and may be associated with a worse prognosis. Using a comprehensive strain biobank spanning 3 decades, we sought to determine the prevalence and stability of chronic P. aeruginosa infection in an adult population. P. aeruginosa isolates from sputum samples collected at initial enrollment in our adult clinic and at the most recent clinic visit were examined by a combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing and compared against a collection of established transmissible and local non-CF bronchiectasis (nCFB) isolates. A total of 372 isolates from 107 patients, spanning 674 patient-years, including 66 patients with matched isolates from initial and final encounters, were screened. A novel clone with increased antibacterial resistance, termed the prairie epidemic strain (PES), was found in 29% (31/107 patients) of chronically infected patients referred from multiple prairie-based CF centers. This isolate was not found in those diagnosed with CF as adults or in a control population with nCFB. While 90% (60/66 patients) of patients had stable infection over a mean of 10.8 years, five patients experienced strain displacement of unique isolates, with PES occurring within 2 years of transitioning to adult care. PES has been present in our cohort since at least 1987, is unique to CF, generally establishes chronic infection during childhood, and has been found in patients at the time of transition of patients from multiple prairie-based CF clinics, suggesting broad endemicity. Studies are under way to evaluate the clinical implications of PES infection.

  12. Mannitol Does Not Enhance Tobramycin Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Cystic Fibrosis Model System of Biofilm Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Price

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a human genetic disease that results in the accumulation of thick, sticky mucus in the airways, which results in chronic, life-long bacterial biofilm infections that are difficult to clear with antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is correlated with worsening lung disease and P. aeruginosa transitions to an antibiotic tolerant state during chronic infections. Tobramycin is an aminoglycoside currently used to combat lung infections in individuals with CF. While tobramycin is effective at eradicating P. aeruginosa in the airways of young patients, it is unable to completely clear the chronic P. aeruginosa infections in older patients. A recent report showed that co-addition of tobramycin and mannitol enhanced killing of P. aeruginosa grown in vitro as a biofilm on an abiotic surface. Here we employed a model system of bacterial biofilms formed on the surface of CF-derived airway cells to determine if mannitol would enhance the antibacterial activity of tobramycin against P. aeruginosa grown on a more clinically relevant surface. Using this model system, which allows the growth of robust biofilms with high-level antibiotic tolerance analogous to in vivo biofilms, we were unable to find evidence for enhanced antibacterial activity of tobramycin with the addition of mannitol, supporting the observation that this type of co-treatment failed to reduce the P. aeruginosa bacterial load in a clinical setting.

  13. Impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing on biofilm persistence in an in vivo intraperitoneal foreign-body infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise D; Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Ø;

    2007-01-01

    of growth contributes significantly to P. aeruginosa tolerance to the action of the innate and adaptive defence system and numerous antibiotics. In the present study, an in vivo foreign-body infection model was established in the peritoneal cavity of mice. Experimental data showed that QS-deficient P...... to the placebo-treated group. These results were obtained with both an inbred (BALB/c) and an outbred (NMRI) mouse strain. The present results support a model by which functional QS systems play a pivotal role in the ability of bacteria to resist clearing by the innate immune system and strongly suggest...... that the efficiency of the mouse innate defence against biofilm-forming P. aeruginosa is improved when the bacteria are treated with QS drugs that induce QS deficiency....

  14. Outbreak of infection in a burns unit due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa originating from contaminated tubing used for irrigation of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J; Thuesen, B; Nielsen, S V;

    1993-01-01

    Five patients with extensive deep burns developed septicaemia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa serogroup O-7.8 and phage type 21 or 21/188 shortly after they had been admitted to hospital. Four other burned patients became colonized with the same strain. The source of infection was contaminated tap...... water used for irrigation of the burns, as part of the first-aid treatment which the patients received when entering the hospital. Contamination was restricted to showers and tubing that were permanently connected to the taps, and the outbreak stopped after they had been disinfected. Tubing and showers...... used for irrigation of burns should be dismantled and heat-disinfected after each patient and not reconnected to the taps until immediately before the next treatment. Taps used for irrigation of burns should be monitored regularly for the presence of P. aeruginosa and other potentially pathogenic...

  15. INCIDENCE OF FLUOROQUINOLONE RESISTANCE IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA FROM URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Poiata

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of 105 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected from patients with urinary tract infectionswas assessed by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs using agar dilution method against thefollowing agents: norfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin.Resistance rates of P. aeruginosa to tested fluoroquinolones was fairly uniformly distributed between compounds asfollowed: norfloxacin - 52.4%, ofloxacin- 49.5%, ciprofloxacin - 51.4%, pefloxacin - 49.5%. Analysis of cross-resistancein P. aeruginosa showed a correlated magnitude of resistance between fluoroquinolones. Among the P.aeruginosa strainsthe number of those showing simultaneously resistance to all tested agents is high (n=50.The significant increase in fluoroquinolone resistance probably reflects the widspread use of this agent and the clinicaluse of these compunds should be carefully monitored since most bacterial strains shows cross-resitance.

  16. INADEQUATE ANTIBODY-RESPONSE AGAINST RESPIRATORY VIRAL-INFECTION IN LONG-SURVIVING RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; GROEN, M; VANDERLOGT, K; WILDEVUUR, CRH; PROP, J

    1995-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients suffer from a high number of viral infections. It has been suggested that the defense against viral infections is impaired in lung transplants, Therefore, we investigated in rat lung transplants whether antibody responses against an intrapulmonary viral infection were impa

  17. The effect of short-term, high-dose oral N-acetylcysteine treatment on oxidative stress markers in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P-aeruginosa infection - A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne; Pressler, Tacjana; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection have increased oxidative stress as a result of an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species caused by inflammation and their inactivation by the impaired antioxidant systems. Supplem......Background: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection have increased oxidative stress as a result of an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species caused by inflammation and their inactivation by the impaired antioxidant systems....... Supplementation with anti-oxidants is potentially beneficial for CF patients. Methods: The effect of 4 weeks of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment (2400 mg/day divided into two doses) on biochemical parameters of oxidative stress was investigated in an open-label, controlled, randomized trial on 21 patients......; 11 patients in the NAC group and 10 in the control group. Biochemical parameters of oxidative burden and plasma levels of antioxidants were assessed at the end of the study and compared to the baseline values in the two groups. Results: A significant increase in the plasma levels of the antioxidant...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) Share Compartir Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings On this Page What ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  19. Use of Ceftolozane/Tazobactam in the Treatment of Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection in a Pediatric Leukemia Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Samuel L; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; DePombo, April M; Bhatti, Micah M; Tverdek, Frank P; Gettys, Suzanne C; Nicolau, David P; Nunez, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is of increasing concern in pediatric patients. Ceftolozane/tazobactam is a novel cephalosporin/β-lactamase inhibitor combination with activity against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas; however, no data exist on its use in children. This report summarizes the treatment of a multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection in a pediatric leukemia patient with ceftolozane/tazobactam and provides the first description of its pharmacokinetics in pediatrics. PMID:27254038

  20. Catheter-related infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: virulence factors involved and their relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Katerina; Hola, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-11-01

    The nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is equipped with a large arsenal of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors which enhance its invasive potential. The complex relationships among virulence determinants have hitherto not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 175 catheter-related isolates were observed for the presence of selected virulence factors, namely extracellular enzymes and siderophore production, biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, and motility. A high percentage of the strains produced most of the tested virulence factors. A positive correlation was identified between the production of several exoproducts, and also between the formation of both types of biofilm. An opposite trend was observed between the two types of biofilm and the production of siderophores. Whereas the relationship between the submerged biofilm production (i.e. the biofilm formed on the solid surface below the water level) and the siderophore secretion was negative, the production of air-liquid interface (A-L) biofilm (i.e. the biofilm floating on the surface of the cultivation medium) and the siderophore secretion were positively correlated. All correlations were statistically significant at the level P = 0.05 with the correlation coefficient γ ≥ 0.50. Our results suggest that: (1) the co-production of the lytic enzymes and siderophores can play an important role in the pathogenesis of the catheter-related infections and should be taken into account when the virulence potential is assessed; (2) biofilm-positive strains are capable of forming both submerged and non-attached A-L biofilms; and (3) the different micro-environment in the submerged biofilm and A-L biofilm layers have opposite consequences for the production of other virulence factors.

  1. Catheter-related infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: virulence factors involved and their relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Katerina; Hola, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-11-01

    The nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is equipped with a large arsenal of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors which enhance its invasive potential. The complex relationships among virulence determinants have hitherto not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 175 catheter-related isolates were observed for the presence of selected virulence factors, namely extracellular enzymes and siderophore production, biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, and motility. A high percentage of the strains produced most of the tested virulence factors. A positive correlation was identified between the production of several exoproducts, and also between the formation of both types of biofilm. An opposite trend was observed between the two types of biofilm and the production of siderophores. Whereas the relationship between the submerged biofilm production (i.e. the biofilm formed on the solid surface below the water level) and the siderophore secretion was negative, the production of air-liquid interface (A-L) biofilm (i.e. the biofilm floating on the surface of the cultivation medium) and the siderophore secretion were positively correlated. All correlations were statistically significant at the level P = 0.05 with the correlation coefficient γ ≥ 0.50. Our results suggest that: (1) the co-production of the lytic enzymes and siderophores can play an important role in the pathogenesis of the catheter-related infections and should be taken into account when the virulence potential is assessed; (2) biofilm-positive strains are capable of forming both submerged and non-attached A-L biofilms; and (3) the different micro-environment in the submerged biofilm and A-L biofilm layers have opposite consequences for the production of other virulence factors. PMID:24842562

  2. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics combined with an increasing acknowledgement of the role of biofilms in chronic infections has led to a growing interest in new antimicrobial strategies that target the biofilm mode of growth. In the aggregated biofilm mode, cell-to-cell communication...... alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  3. A proof-of-concept model for the identification of the key events in the infection process with specific reference to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in corneal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Soumpasis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is a common medical practice to characterise an infection based on the causative agent and to adopt therapeutic and prevention strategies targeting the agent itself. However, from an epidemiological perspective, exposure to a microbe can be harmless to a host as a result of low-level exposure or due to host immune response, with opportunistic infection only occurring as a result of changes in the host, pathogen, or surrounding environment. Methods: We have attempted to review systematically the key host, pathogen, and environmental factors that may significantly impact clinical outcomes of exposure to a pathogen, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection as a case study. Results and discussion: Extended contact lens wearing and compromised hygiene may predispose users to microbial keratitis, which can be a severe and vision-threatening infection. P. aeruginosa has a wide array of virulence-associated genes and sensing systems to initiate and maintain cell populations at the corneal surface and beyond. We have adapted the well-known concept of the epidemiological triangle in combination with the classic risk assessment framework (hazard identification, characterisation, and exposure to develop a conceptual pathway-based model that demonstrates the overlapping relationships between the host, the pathogen, and the environment; and to illustrate the key events in P. aeruginosa eye infection. Conclusion: This strategy differs from traditional approaches that consider potential risk factors in isolation, and hopefully will aid the identification of data and models to inform preventive and therapeutic measures in addition to risk assessment. Furthermore, this may facilitate the identification of knowledge gaps to direct research in areas of greatest impact to avert or mitigate adverse outcomes of infection.

  4. A proof-of-concept model for the identification of the key events in the infection process with specific reference to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in corneal infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumpasis, Ilias; Knapp, Laura; Pitt, Tyrone

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a common medical practice to characterise an infection based on the causative agent and to adopt therapeutic and prevention strategies targeting the agent itself. However, from an epidemiological perspective, exposure to a microbe can be harmless to a host as a result of low-level exposure or due to host immune response, with opportunistic infection only occurring as a result of changes in the host, pathogen, or surrounding environment. Methods We have attempted to review systematically the key host, pathogen, and environmental factors that may significantly impact clinical outcomes of exposure to a pathogen, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection as a case study. Results and discussion Extended contact lens wearing and compromised hygiene may predispose users to microbial keratitis, which can be a severe and vision-threatening infection. P. aeruginosa has a wide array of virulence-associated genes and sensing systems to initiate and maintain cell populations at the corneal surface and beyond. We have adapted the well-known concept of the epidemiological triangle in combination with the classic risk assessment framework (hazard identification, characterisation, and exposure) to develop a conceptual pathway-based model that demonstrates the overlapping relationships between the host, the pathogen, and the environment; and to illustrate the key events in P. aeruginosa eye infection. Conclusion This strategy differs from traditional approaches that consider potential risk factors in isolation, and hopefully will aid the identification of data and models to inform preventive and therapeutic measures in addition to risk assessment. Furthermore, this may facilitate the identification of knowledge gaps to direct research in areas of greatest impact to avert or mitigate adverse outcomes of infection. PMID:26546946

  5. Diagnostic multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections and detection of antibiotic susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) and detection of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates from culture. We conducted the cross-sectional study in 140 patients with wound infections who admitted to referral burn center of Motahari, Tehran, Iran, during a 12-month period from 2005-2006. Skin biopsy specimens were aseptically taken from each patient, one for PCR and one for bacterial culture. A M-PCR test based on simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL, was used to directly detect fluorescent pseudomonades and P. aeruginosa in skin biopsy specimens. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa isolates to 16 antibiotics was determined using the disc diffusion method. Out of 140 biopsy specimens, M-PCR detected 66 (47.2%) isolates, while culture detected 57 (40.7%) isolates as P. aeruginosa. Positive results for both genes which observed only for P. aeruginosa, while only one gene, oprI, was amplified from other fluorescent pseudomonades (n=12) and all other bacterial tested (n=62) were negative by the amplification test. The most effective antibiotics against isolate of P. aeruginosa were cefepime (79%), azetreonam (76%), ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (68%), tobramycin (62%) and amikacin (61%). Multiplex PCR assay appears promising for the rapid and sensitive detection of P. aeruginosa from the burned skin biopsy specimens. Simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL could detect P. aeruginosa and oprI gene only for other fluorescent pseudomonades. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of lung infections in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, Ville; Ruuskanen, Olli [Turku University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Turku (Finland); Svedstroem, Erkki [Turku University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Turku (Finland)

    2008-11-15

    The advantages and limitations of MRI in lung infections in children have not been well established. This article illustrates the MRI findings in children with pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and other pathogens. Lung parenchymal, pleural, and lymph node abnormalities are well characterized by MRI. Loculation of pleural fluid is detected in children with empyema. Contrast enhancement may be useful in the differentiation of active inflammation from noninflammatory changes. MRI can be particularly useful in the follow-up of children with chronic pulmonary diseases. (orig.)

  7. Development of inhalable hyaluronan/mannitol composite dry powders for flucytosine repositioning in local therapy of lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costabile, G; d'Angelo, I; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, R; Mitidieri, E; Pompili, B; Del Porto, P; Leoni, L; Visca, P; Miro, A; Quaglia, F; Imperi, F; Sorrentino, R; Ungaro, F

    2016-09-28

    Flucytosine (5-fluorocytosine, 5-FC) is a fluorinated analogue of cytosine currently approved for the systemic treatment of fungal infections, which has recently demonstrated a very promising antivirulence activity against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we propose novel inhalable hyaluronic acid (HA)/mannitol composite dry powders for repositioning 5-FC in the local treatment of lung infections, including those affecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Different dry powders were produced in one-step by spray-drying. Powder composition and process conditions were selected after in depth formulation studies aimed at selecting the 5-FC/HA/mannitol formulation with convenient aerosolization properties and drug release profile in simulated lung fluids. The optimized 5-FC/HA/mannitol powder for inhalation (HyaMan_FC#3) was effectively delivered from different breath-activated dry powder inhalers (DPI) already available to CF patients. Nevertheless, the aerodynamic assessment of fine particles suggested that the developed formulation well fit with a low-resistance DPI. HyaMan_FC#3 inhibited the growth of the fungus Candida albicans and the production of the virulence factor pyoverdine by P. aeruginosa at 5-FC concentrations that did not affect the viability of both wild type (16HBE14o-) and CF (CFBE41o-) human bronchial epithelial cells. Finally, pharmacokinetics of HyaMan_FC#3 inhalation powder and 5-FC solution after intratracheal administration in rats were compared. In vivo results clearly demonstrated that, when formulated as dry powder, 5-FC levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were significantly higher and sustained over time as compared to those obtained with the 5-FC solution. Of note, when the same 5-FC amount was administered intravenously, no significant drug amount was found in the lung at each time point from the injection. To realize a 5-FC lung concentration similar to that obtained by using HyaMan_FC#3

  8. Evaluation of antibiotic efficacy against infections caused by planktonic or biofilm cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthall, Gabriel; Touzel, Rebecca E; Hind, Charlotte K; Titball, Richard W; Sutton, J Mark; Thomas, Rachael J; Wand, Matthew E

    2015-11-01

    The lack of novel antibiotics for more than a decade has placed increased pressure on existing therapies to combat the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. This study evaluated the Galleria mellonella insect model in determining the efficacy of available antibiotics against planktonic and biofilm infections of MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in comparison with in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. In general, in vitro analysis agreed with the G. mellonella studies, and susceptibility in Galleria identified different drug resistance mechanisms. However, the carbapenems tested appeared to perform better in vivo than in vitro, with meropenem and imipenem able to clear K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa infections with strains that had bla(NDM-1) and bla(VIM) carbapenemases. This study also established an implant model in G. mellonella to allow testing of antibiotic efficacy against biofilm-derived infections. A reduction in antibiotic efficacy of amikacin against K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa biofilms was observed compared with a planktonic infection. Ciprofloxacin was found to be less effective at clearing a P. aeruginosa biofilm infection compared with a planktonic infection, but no statistical difference was seen between K. pneumoniae biofilm and planktonic infections treated with this antibiotic (P>0.05). This study provides important information regarding the suitability of Galleria as a model for antibiotic efficacy testing both against planktonic and biofilm-derived MDR infections.

  9. Evaluation of antibiotic efficacy against infections caused by planktonic or biofilm cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthall, Gabriel; Touzel, Rebecca E; Hind, Charlotte K; Titball, Richard W; Sutton, J Mark; Thomas, Rachael J; Wand, Matthew E

    2015-11-01

    The lack of novel antibiotics for more than a decade has placed increased pressure on existing therapies to combat the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. This study evaluated the Galleria mellonella insect model in determining the efficacy of available antibiotics against planktonic and biofilm infections of MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in comparison with in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. In general, in vitro analysis agreed with the G. mellonella studies, and susceptibility in Galleria identified different drug resistance mechanisms. However, the carbapenems tested appeared to perform better in vivo than in vitro, with meropenem and imipenem able to clear K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa infections with strains that had bla(NDM-1) and bla(VIM) carbapenemases. This study also established an implant model in G. mellonella to allow testing of antibiotic efficacy against biofilm-derived infections. A reduction in antibiotic efficacy of amikacin against K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa biofilms was observed compared with a planktonic infection. Ciprofloxacin was found to be less effective at clearing a P. aeruginosa biofilm infection compared with a planktonic infection, but no statistical difference was seen between K. pneumoniae biofilm and planktonic infections treated with this antibiotic (P>0.05). This study provides important information regarding the suitability of Galleria as a model for antibiotic efficacy testing both against planktonic and biofilm-derived MDR infections. PMID:26364845

  10. Evolution of metabolic divergence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term infection facilitates a proto-cooperative interspecies interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Hossein Khademi, Seyed Mohammad; Krogh Johansen, Helle; Ingmer, Hanne; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Jelsbak, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The effect of polymicrobial interactions on pathogen physiology and how it can act either to limit pathogen colonization or to potentiate pathogen expansion and virulence are not well understood. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are opportunistic pathogens commonly found together in polymicrobial human infections. However, we have previously shown that the interactions between these two bacterial species are strain dependent. Whereas P. aeruginosa PAO1, a commonly used laboratory strain, effectively suppressed S. aureus growth, we observed a commensal-like interaction between the human host-adapted strain, DK2-P2M24-2003, and S. aureus. In this study, characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectral (MS) molecular networking revealed a significant metabolic divergence between P. aeruginosa PAO1 and DK2-P2M24-2003, which comprised several virulence factors and signaling 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline (HAQ) molecules. Strikingly, a further modulation of the HAQ profile was observed in DK2-P2M24-2003 during interaction with S. aureus, resulting in an area with thickened colony morphology at the P. aeruginosa–S. aureus interface. In addition, we found an HAQ-mediated protection of S. aureus by DK2-P2M24-2003 from the killing effect of tobramycin. Our findings suggest a model where the metabolic divergence manifested in human host-adapted P. aeruginosa is further modulated during interaction with S. aureus and facilitate a proto-cooperative P. aeruginosa–S. aureus relationship. PMID:26684729

  11. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pleteneva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic” and temperate (“lysogenic” bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine.

  12. A genetic approach to the development of new therapeutic phages to fight pseudomonas aeruginosa in wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent ("lytic") and temperate ("lysogenic") bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

  13. Multiple virulence factors regulated by quorum sensing may help in establishment and colonisation of urinary tract by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during experimental urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Damage caused by an organism during infection is attributed to production of virulence factors. Different virulence factors produced by the organism contribute to its pathogenicity, individually. During infectious conditions, role of virulence factors produced by the pathogen is different, depending upon the site of involvement. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen known to cause infections of the respiratory tract, burn wound, urinary tract and eye. Importance of virulence factors produced by P. Aeruginosa during infections such as keratitis, burn wound and respiratory tract is known. The present study was designed to understand the importance of different virulence factors of P. aeruginosa in urinary tract infection in vivo. Materials and methods: An ascending urinary tract infection model was established in mice using standard parent strain PAO1 and its isogenic mutant, JP2. Mice were sacrificed at different time intervals and renal tissue homogenates were used for estimation of renal bacterial load and virulence factors. Results: Both parent and mutant strains were able to reach the renal tissue. PAO 1 PAO1was isolated from renal tissue till day 5 post-infection. However, the mutant strain was unable to colonise the renal tissue. Failure of mutant strain to colonise was attributed to its inability to produce protease, elastase and rhamnolipid. Conclusion: This study suggests that protease, elastase and rhamnolipid contribute to pathogenesis and survival of P. aeruginosa during urinary tract infection.

  14. Hypoxia, innate immunity and infection in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Bettina; Schaffer, Kirsten; Taylor, Cormac T

    2010-12-31

    The mucosal surface of the lung is the key interface between the external atmosphere and the bloodstream. Normally, this well oxygenated tissue is maintained in state of sterility by a number of innate immune processes. These include a physical and dynamic mucus barrier, the production of microbiocidal peptides and the expression of specific pattern recognition receptors on alveolar epithelial cells and resident macrophages and dendritic cells which recognise microbial structures and initiate innate immune responses which promote the clearance of potentially infectious agents. In a range of diseases, the mucosal surface of the lung experiences decreased oxygen tension leading to localised areas of prominent hypoxia which can impact upon innate immune and subsequent infectious and inflammatory processes. Under these conditions, the lung is generally more susceptible to infection and subsequent inflammation. In the current review, we will discuss recent data pertaining to the role of hypoxia in regulating both host and pathogen in the lung during pulmonary disease and how this contributes to innate immunity, infection and inflammation. PMID:20709192

  15. Modifications of lung clearance mechanisms by acute influenza A infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four volunteers with naturally acquired, culture-proved influenza A infection inhaled a radiolabeled aerosol to permit investigation of lung mucociliary clearance mechanisms during and after symptomatic illness. Mucus transport in the trachea was undetectable when monitored with an external multidetector probe within 48 hours of the onset of the illness, but was found at a normal velocity by 1 week in three of the four subjects. In two volunteers who coughed 23 to 48 times during the 4.5-hour observation period, whole lung clearance was as fast within the first 48 hours of illness as during health 3 months later in spite of the absence of measurable tracheal mucus transport. Conversely, in spite of the return 1 week later of mucus transport at velocities expected in the trachea, whole lung clearance for the 4.5-hour period was slowed in two volunteers who coughed less than once an hour. The data offer evidence that cough is important in maintaining lung clearance for at least several days after symptomatic influenza A infection when other mechanisms that depend on ciliary function are severely deficient

  16. Hypoxia, innate immunity and infection in the lung.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schaible, Bettina

    2012-02-01

    The mucosal surface of the lung is the key interface between the external atmosphere and the bloodstream. Normally, this well oxygenated tissue is maintained in state of sterility by a number of innate immune processes. These include a physical and dynamic mucus barrier, the production of microbiocidal peptides and the expression of specific pattern recognition receptors on alveolar epithelial cells and resident macrophages and dendritic cells which recognise microbial structures and initiate innate immune responses which promote the clearance of potentially infectious agents. In a range of diseases, the mucosal surface of the lung experiences decreased oxygen tension leading to localised areas of prominent hypoxia which can impact upon innate immune and subsequent infectious and inflammatory processes. Under these conditions, the lung is generally more susceptible to infection and subsequent inflammation. In the current review, we will discuss recent data pertaining to the role of hypoxia in regulating both host and pathogen in the lung during pulmonary disease and how this contributes to innate immunity, infection and inflammation.

  17. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan Balantidium coli

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sat; Harding, Godfrey

    2003-01-01

    Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B col...

  18. Evaluation of oprD Gene Expression in Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated From Severe Burn Patients With Secondary Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azimi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen isolated from severe burn patients with secondary infection. Since high resistance to most types of antibiotics is common among these bacteria, the treatment of infections caused by these agents is very difficult. Loss of oprD proteins from the outer membrane of bacterial cells causes a significant decrease in the sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to carbapenems. Objectives This study was performed to investigate the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn patients with secondary infection and also to evaluate oprD gene expression as a possible resistance mechanism to carbapenem in isolated carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Patients and Methods One-hundred and eighty-nine clinical isolates of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from burn patients, were identified by microbiological methods followed by determination of antibiotic resistance pattern by the Kirby-Bauer procedure. The expression of oprD gene was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results Our study showed that 94.2% of the isolates were resistant to imipenem, 99.5% to meropenem, and all were resistant to ertapenem. The OprD gene expression among carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates showed a 2 × 10-3 to 0.5 times decrease compared to the standard sensitive strain (P < 0.05. Conclusions The results of this study indicated that a decrease in oprD gene expression is an important mechanism of resistance in carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from severe burn patients with secondary infection.

  19. MUC18 Regulates Lung Rhinovirus Infection and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Reena; Jiang, Di; Wu, Qun; Stevenson, Connor R.; Schaefer, Niccolette R.; Chu, Hong Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background MUC18 is upregulated in the lungs of asthma and COPD patients. It has been shown to have pro-inflammatory functions in cultured human airway epithelial cells during viral infections and in mice during lung bacterial infections. However, the in vivo role of MUC18 in the context of viral infections remains poorly understood. The goal of this study is to define the in vivo function of MUC18 during respiratory rhinovirus infection. Methods Muc18 wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice were infected with human rhinovirus 1B (HRV-1B) and sacrificed after 1 day to determine the inflammatory and antiviral responses. To examine the direct effects of Muc18 on viral infection, tracheal epithelial cells isolated from WT and KO mice were grown under air-liquid interface and infected with HRV-1B. Finally, siRNA mediated knockdown of MUC18 was performed in human airway epithelial cells (AECs) to define the impact of MUC18 on human airway response to HRV-1B. Results Both viral load and neutrophilic inflammation were significantly decreased in Muc18 KO mice compared to WT mice. In the in vitro setting, viral load was significantly lower and antiviral gene expression was higher in airway epithelial cells of Muc18 KO mice than the WT mice. Furthermore, in MUC18 knockdown human AECs, viral load was decreased and antiviral gene expression was increased compared to controls. Conclusions Our study is the first to demonstrate MUC18’s pro-inflammatory and pro-viral function in an in vivo mouse model of rhinovirus infection. PMID:27701461

  20. Influence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Chawla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8% patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3% and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008, greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007, a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03, and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis.

  1. Sputum containing zinc enhances carbapenem resistance, biofilm formation and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerettaz, Mélanie; Dieppois, Guennaëlle; Que, Yok Ai; Ducret, Véréna; Zuchuat, Sandrine; Perron, Karl

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic lung infections are the leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients, a serious problem which is notably due to the numerous P. aeruginosa virulence factors, to its ability to form biofilms and to resist the effects of most antibiotics. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa is highly coordinated through complex regulatory systems. We recently found that CzcRS, the zinc and cadmium-specific two-component system is not only involved in metal resistance, but also in virulence and carbapenem antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa. Interestingly, zinc has been shown to be enriched in the lung secretions of cystic fibrosis patients. In this study, we investigated whether zinc might favor P. aeruginosa pathogenicity using an artificial sputum medium to mimic the cystic fibrosis lung environment. Our results show that zinc supplementation triggers a dual P. aeruginosa response: (i) it exacerbates pathogenicity by a CzcRS two-component system-dependent mechanism and (ii) it stimulates biofilm formation by a CzcRS-independent mechanism. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa cells embedded in these biofilms exhibited increased resistance to carbapenems. We identified a novel Zn-sensitive regulatory circuit controlling the expression of the OprD porin and modifying the carbapenem resistance profile. Altogether our data demonstrated that zinc levels in the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients might aggravate P. aeruginosa infection. Targeting zinc levels in sputum would be a valuable strategy to curb the increasing burden of P. aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:25448466

  2. Next-Generation "-omics" Approaches Reveal a Massive Alteration of Host RNA Metabolism during Bacteriophage Infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallereau, Anne; Blasdel, Bob G; De Smet, Jeroen; Monot, Marc; Zimmermann, Michael; Kogadeeva, Maria; Sauer, Uwe; Jorth, Peter; Whiteley, Marvin; Debarbieux, Laurent; Lavigne, Rob

    2016-07-01

    As interest in the therapeutic and biotechnological potentials of bacteriophages has grown, so has value in understanding their basic biology. However, detailed knowledge of infection cycles has been limited to a small number of model bacteriophages, mostly infecting Escherichia coli. We present here the first analysis coupling data obtained from global next-generation approaches, RNA-Sequencing and metabolomics, to characterize interactions between the virulent bacteriophage PAK_P3 and its host Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We detected a dramatic global depletion of bacterial transcripts coupled with their replacement by viral RNAs over the course of infection, eventually leading to drastic changes in pyrimidine metabolism. This process relies on host machinery hijacking as suggested by the strong up-regulation of one bacterial operon involved in RNA processing. Moreover, we found that RNA-based regulation plays a central role in PAK_P3 lifecycle as antisense transcripts are produced mainly during the early stage of infection and viral small non coding RNAs are massively expressed at the end of infection. This work highlights the prominent role of RNA metabolism in the infection strategy of a bacteriophage belonging to a new characterized sub-family of viruses with promising therapeutic potential. PMID:27380413

  3. Next-Generation "-omics" Approaches Reveal a Massive Alteration of Host RNA Metabolism during Bacteriophage Infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Chevallereau

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As interest in the therapeutic and biotechnological potentials of bacteriophages has grown, so has value in understanding their basic biology. However, detailed knowledge of infection cycles has been limited to a small number of model bacteriophages, mostly infecting Escherichia coli. We present here the first analysis coupling data obtained from global next-generation approaches, RNA-Sequencing and metabolomics, to characterize interactions between the virulent bacteriophage PAK_P3 and its host Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We detected a dramatic global depletion of bacterial transcripts coupled with their replacement by viral RNAs over the course of infection, eventually leading to drastic changes in pyrimidine metabolism. This process relies on host machinery hijacking as suggested by the strong up-regulation of one bacterial operon involved in RNA processing. Moreover, we found that RNA-based regulation plays a central role in PAK_P3 lifecycle as antisense transcripts are produced mainly during the early stage of infection and viral small non coding RNAs are massively expressed at the end of infection. This work highlights the prominent role of RNA metabolism in the infection strategy of a bacteriophage belonging to a new characterized sub-family of viruses with promising therapeutic potential.

  4. Stochastic tracking of infection in a CF lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zarei

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT scan are the two ubiquitous imaging sources that physicians use to diagnose patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF or any other Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. Unfortunately the cost constraints limit the frequent usage of these medical imaging procedures. In addition, even though both CT scan and MRI provide mesoscopic details of a lung, in order to obtain microscopic information a very high resolution is required. Neither MRI nor CT scans provide micro level information about the location of infection in a binary tree structure the binary tree structure of the human lung. In this paper we present an algorithm that enhances the current imaging results by providing estimated micro level information concerning the location of the infection. The estimate is based on a calculation of the distribution of possible mucus blockages consistent with available information using an offline Metropolis-Hastings algorithm in combination with a real-time interpolation scheme. When supplemented with growth rates for the pockets of mucus, the algorithm can also be used to estimate how lung functionality as manifested in spirometric tests will change in patients with CF or COPD.

  5. Isolation of human β-defensin-4 in lung tissue and its increase in lower respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukae Hiroshi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human β-defensin-4 (hBD-4, a new member of the β-defensin family, was discovered by an analysis of the genomic sequence. The objective of this study was to clarify hBD-4 expression in human lung tissue, along with the inducible expression in response to infectious stimuli, localization, and antimicrobial activities of hBD-4 peptides. We also investigated the participation of hBD-4 in chronic lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI by measuring the concentrations of hBD-4 peptides in human bronchial epithelial lining fluid (ELF. Methods The antimicrobial activity of synthetic hBD-4 peptides against E. coli and P. aeruginosa was measured by radial diffusion and colony count assays. We identified hBD-4 in homogenated human lung tissue by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a radioimmunoassay (RIA. Localization of hBD-4 was studied through immunohistochemical analysis (IHC. We investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS on hBD-4 expression and its release from small airway epithelial cells (SAEC. We collected ELF from patients with chronic LRTI using bronchoscopic microsampling to measure hBD-4 concentrations by RIA. Results hBD-4 exhibited salt-sensitive antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa. We detected the presence of hBD-4 peptides in human lung tissue. IHC demonstrated the localization of hBD-4-producing cells in bronchial and bronchiolar epithelium. The levels of hBD-4 peptides released from LPS-treated SAECs were higher than those of untreated control cells. ELF hBD-4 was detectable in 4 of 6 patients with chronic LRTI, while the amounts in controls were all below the detectable level. Conclusion This study suggested that hBD-4 plays a significant role in the innate immunity of the lower respiratory tract.

  6. Outbreak of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa producing VIM-1 carbapenemase in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakris, A; Pournaras, S; Woodford, N; Palepou, M F; Babini, G S; Douboyas, J; Livermore, D M

    2000-03-01

    Resistance to imipenem and meropenem was observed in 211 (16.5%) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered in a Greek university hospital during 1996 to 1998. In six isolates selected from throughout this period, high-level resistance to both carbapenems (MICs >/= 128 microg/ml) was associated with production of the class B beta-lactamase VIM-1. bla(VIM)-bearing isolates belonged to serotype O:12 and were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. PMID:10699045

  7. The Effect of Strict Segregation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mansfeld, Rosa; de Vrankrijker, Angelica; Brimicombe, Roland; Heijerman, Harry; Teding van Berkhout, Ferdinand; Spitoni, Cristian; Grave, Sanne; van der Ent, Cornelis; Wolfs, Tom; Willems, Rob; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Segregation of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) was implemented to prevent chronic infection with epidemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with presumed detrimental clinical effects, but its effectiveness has not been carefully evaluated. Methods The effect of strict segregation on the incidence of P. aeruginosa infection in CF patients was investigated through longitudinal protocolized follow-up of respiratory tract infection before and after segregation. In two nested cross-sectional studies in 2007 and 2011 the P. aeruginosa population structure was investigated and clinical parameters were determined in patients with and without infection with the Dutch epidemic P. aeruginosa clone (ST406). Results Of 784 included patients 315 and 382 were at risk for acquiring chronic P. aeruginosa infection before and after segregation. Acquisition rates were, respectively, 0.14 and 0.05 per 1,000 days at risk (HR: 0.66, 95% CI [0.2548–1.541]; p = 0.28). An exploratory subgroup analysis indicated lower acquisition after segregation in children < 15 years of age (HR: 0.43, 95% CI[0.21–0.95]; p = 0.04). P. aeruginosa population structure did not change after segregation and ST406 was not associated with lung function decline, death or lung transplantation. Conclusions Strict segregation was not associated with a statistically significant lower acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and ST406 was not associated with adverse clinical outcome. After segregation there were no new acquisitions of ST406. In an unplanned exploratory analysis chronic acquisition of P. aeruginosa was lower after implementation of segregation in patients under 15 years of age. PMID:27280467

  8. Epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis and the possible role of contamination by dental equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Giwercman, B; Ojeniyi, B;

    1997-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often suffer from Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection yet the source of this organism is not known. In order to determine whether CF patients might be contaminated with P. aeruginosa from dental equipment, a total of 103 water samples from 25 dental sessions...... in Frederiksberg Municipal Oral Health Care Service were examined. Three samples (2.9%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. Three hundred and twenty-seven water samples from 82 dental sessions from various other Municipal Oral Health Services in Denmark, attended by CF patients, were also examined. Eighteen of 327...... samples (5.5%) from nine sessions (11%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. In one case, genotypically identical (RFLP, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) P. aeruginosa strains were found both in water from the dental equipment and in the CF patients sputum. This indicates a small risk for acquiring P...

  9. Modeling Granulomas in Response to Infection in the Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenrui; Schlesinger, Larry S; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a large role in the innate immune response of the lung. However, when these highly immune-regulatory cells are unable to eradicate pathogens, the adaptive immune system, which includes activated macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is called upon to control the pathogens. This collection of immune cells surrounds, isolates and quarantines the pathogen, forming a small tissue structure called a granuloma for intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In the present work we develop a mathematical model of the dynamics of a granuloma by a system of partial differential equations. The 'strength' of the adaptive immune response to infection in the lung is represented by a parameter α, the flux rate by which T cells and M1 macrophages that immigrated from the lymph nodes enter into the granuloma through its boundary. The parameter α is negatively correlated with the 'switching time', namely, the time it takes for the number of M1 type macrophages to surpass the number of infected, M2 type alveolar macrophages. Simulations of the model show that as α increases the radius of the granuloma and bacterial load in the granuloma both decrease. The model is used to determine the efficacy of potential host-directed therapies in terms of the parameter α, suggesting that, with fixed dosing level, an infected individual with a stronger immune response will receive greater benefits in terms of reducing the bacterial load. PMID:26986986

  10. Comparison of severity of illness scoring systems for patients with nosocomial bloodstream infection due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Wenzel Richard P

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several acute illness severity scores have been proposed for evaluating patients on admission to intensive care units but these have not been compared for patients with nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI. We compared three severity of illness scoring systems for predicting mortality in patients with nBSI due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 63 adults in intensive care units with P. aeruginosa monomicrobial nBSI. Results The Acute Physiology, Age, Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, and Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (SAPS II, were calculated daily from 2 days prior through 2 days after the first positive blood culture. Calculation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve confirmed that APACHE II and SAPS II at day -1 and SOFA at day +1 were better predictors of outcome than days -2, 0 and day 2 of BSI. By stepwise logistic regression analysis of these three scoring systems, SAPS II (OR: 13.03, CI95% 2.51–70.49 and APACHE II (OR: 12.51, CI95% 3.12–50.09 on day -1 were the best predictors for mortality. Conclusion SAPS II and APACHE II are more accurate than the SOFA score for predicting mortality in this group of patients at day -1 of BSI.

  11. Prevention of catheter-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by levofloxacin-impregnated catheters in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ping; Liu Wei; Kong Jinliang; Wu Hong; Chen Yiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Implanted medical catheter-related infections are increasing,hence a need for developing catheter polymers bonded to antimicrobials.We evaluated preventive effects of levofloxacin-impregnated catheters in catheterrelated Psuedomonas aeruginosa (strain PAO1) infection.Methods Drug release from levofloxacin-impregnated catheters was measured in vitro.Levofloxacin-impregnated catheters and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) catheters were immersed in 5 ml 50% Luria Bertani medium containing 108 CFU/ml Pseudomonas aeruginosa then incubated for 6,12,24 or 48 hours at 37℃ when bacteria adhering to the catheters and bacteria in the growth culture medium were determined.Impregnated and PVC catheters were singly implanted subcutaneously in mice,50 μl (107CFU) of PAO1 was injected into catheters.After the first and fifth days challenge,bacterial counts on implanted catheters and in surrounding tissues were determined microbiologically.Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on implanted catheters were assessed by scanning electron microscopy.Results Drug release from levofloxacin-impregnated catheters was rapid.Levofloxacin-impregnated catheters had significantly fewer bacteria compared to PVC in vitro.After first and fifth day of challenge,no or significantly fewer bacteria adhered to impregnated catheters or in surrounding tissues compared to PVC.Scanning electron microscopical images after first day displayed from none to significantly fewer bacteria adhering to impregnated implanted catheters,compared to bacteria and microcolonies adhering to PVC catheters.After the fifth day,no bacteria were found on impregnated catheters,compared to clusters surrounding mucus-like substance and coral-shaped biofilms with polymorphonuclear leukocyte on PVC catheters.After the first day of challenge,secretion occurred in all implanted catheters with surrounding tissues mildly hyperaemic and swollen.After the fifth day,minute secretions inside impregnated catheters and no

  12. Elucidating the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fatty Acid Degradation Pathway: Identification of Additional Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase Homologues

    OpenAIRE

    Zarzycki-Siek, Jan; Norris, Michael H.; Kang, Yun (Kenneth); Sun, Zhenxin; Bluhm, Andrew P.; McMillan, Ian A.; Hoang, Tung T.

    2013-01-01

    The fatty acid (FA) degradation pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, was recently shown to be involved in nutrient acquisition during BALB/c mouse lung infection model. The source of FA in the lung is believed to be phosphatidylcholine, the major component of lung surfactant. Previous research indicated that P. aeruginosa has more than two fatty acyl-CoA synthetase genes (fadD; PA3299 and PA3300), which are responsible for activation of FAs using ATP and coenzyme A. T...

  13. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists.

  14. Reinforcement of the bactericidal effect of ciprofloxacin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by hyperbaric oxygen treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Mousavi, Nabi; Sams, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the most severe complication in cystic fibrosis patients. It is characterised by antibiotic-tolerant biofilms in the endobronchial mucus with zones of oxygen (O2) depletion mainly due to polymorphonuclear leucocyte activity. Whilst the exact mechan...

  15. Effects of Colistin on Surface Ultrastructure and Nanomechanics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ninell Pollas; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Sullivan, Claretta J.;

    2009-01-01

    Chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients are primarily caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Though difficult to counteract effectively, colistin, an antimicrobial peptide, is proving useful. However, the exact mechanism of action of colistin is not fully understood. In this study, atomic ...

  16. ANTIPSEUDOMONAL EFFICACY OF EXTRACTS OF SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS USED IN AYURVEDIC FORMULATIONS TO MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANT PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA (MDRPA ISOLATES FROM WOUND INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayachandran V.P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available P.aeruginosa one of the prominent bacteria associated with wound infections and the recent years have seen an increase in the prevalence of P.aeruginosa in wound cases. Multiple drug resistant P. aeruginosa (MDRPA is defined as an isolate resistant or intermediate to at least three antipseudomonal drugs like cephalosporins, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. Medical community is in search of effective and novel drug against this pathogen. Recent years have witnessed the antimicrobial potential of plant sources. Hence prevalence of MDRPA among wound infections and exploration of plant extracts as antipseudomonal agents is a field confronting current research. P. aeruginosa isolates were obtained from wound infections and their resistance to eleven antibiotics were checked .69.6 % of isolates were found to be MDRPA. Imipenem was found to be the most effective antibiotic, followed by amikacin and gatifloxacin. Cold ethanolic and hot water extracts of nine medicinal plants were evaluated. The antibacterial efficacy of the extracts was checked by well diffusion. Microbroth tube dilution method was carried out to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. The ethanolic and water extracts of the peel of P. granatum were found to be effective against MDRPA with MIC of 200 µg/ml. The development of resistance against the present drug of choice imipenem, is of particular concern. Hence the extracts of P. granatum can be used for drug innovations as antipseudomonal agents.

  17. Transcriptional profiling at different sites in lungs of pigs during acute bacterial respiratory infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Shila; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Hedegaard, Jakob;

    2011-01-01

    The local transcriptional response was studied in different locations of lungs from pigs experimentally infected with the respiratory pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5B, using porcine cDNA microarrays. This infection gives rise to well-demarcated infection loci in the lung......, characterized by necrotic and haemorrhagic lesions. Lung tissue was sampled from necrotic areas, from visually unaffected areas and from areas bordering on necrotic areas. Expression pattern of these areas from infected pigs was compared to healthy lung tissue from un-infected pigs. Transcription of selected...... genes important in the innate defence response were further analysed by quantitative realtime reverse-transcriptase PCR. A clear correlation was observed between the number of differentially expressed genes as well as the magnitude of their induction and the sampling location in the infected lung...

  18. In Vitro Antibiofilm Efficacies of Different Antibiotic Combinations with Zinc Sulfate against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Recovered from Hospitalized Patients with Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Elkhatib

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are a serious healthcare dilemma influencing millions of patients every year and represent the second most frequent type of body infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a multidrug-resistant pathogen causing numerous chronic biofilm-associated infections including urinary tract, nosocomial, and medical devices-related infections. In the present study, the biofilm of P. aeruginosa CCIN34519, recovered from inpatients with UTIs, was established on polystyrene substratum and scanning electron microscopy (SEM and was utilized for visualization of the biofilm. A previously described in vitro system for real-time monitoring of biofilm growth/inhibition was utilized to assess the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, ertapenem, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and tobramycin as single antibiotics as well as in combinations with zinc sulfate (2.5 mM against P. aeruginosa CCIN34519 biofilm. Meanwhile, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs at 24 h and mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs at 96 h were determined for the aforementioned antibiotics. The real-time monitoring data revealed diverse responses of P. aeruginosa CCIN34519 biofilm to the tested antibiotic-zinc sulfate combinations with potential synergisms in cases of fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and norfloxacin and carbapenem (ertapenem as demonstrated by reduced MIC and MPC values. Conversely, considerable antagonisms were observed with cephalosporin (ceftriaxone and aminoglycosides (gentamicin, and tobramycin as shown by substantially increased MICs and MPCs values. Further deliberate in vivo investigations for the promising synergisms are required to evaluate their therapeutic potentials for treatment of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa biofilms as well as for developing preventive strategies.

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus Isolated From Patients With Nosocomial Infections Admitted to Tehran Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallah

    1970-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Nosocomial infections constitute a global health problem, leading to a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The choice of antimicrobial treatment for nosocomial infections is often empirical and based on the knowledge of local antimicrobial activity patterns of the most common bacteria causing such infections. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the 3 most prevalent bacterial pathogens including Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus causing nosocomial infections and their antimicrobial resistant profiles in patients admitted to three hospitals in Tehran city, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates were obtained from different samples of patients with nosocomial infections admitted to different wards of three hospitals including Milad, Motahary and Loghman from November 2014 to April 2015. Nosocomial infections were defined as a culture-proven infection, which occurred more than 48 hours after admission. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Results In total, 539 samples were collected during the study period from patients with nosocomial infections. Overall, 198, 75 and 98 A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates were obtained, respectively. Cefepim and meropenem were found to be the most effective antibiotics for nosocomial infections caused by S. aureus with only 1 resistant isolate. Resistance to gentamicin and amikacin and susceptibility to cefepim was the highest compared to other antibiotics amongst P. aeruginosa isolates which is in consistent with the fact that cephalosporins remain useful agents for the management of nosocomial infections caused by P. aeruginosa. Acinetobacter baumannii isolates showed lower susceptibility rates to imipenem and ciprofloxacin than other

  20. Diffuse interstitial lung infiltrates in a smoker with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanath P Vasudevan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare interstitial lung disease characteristically affecting middle-aged smokers. It has unpredictable clinical course and may be associated with malignant neoplasms. Opportunistic lung infections are frequently considered when patients with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection present with respiratory symptoms and an abnormal chest X-ray. Though fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is diagnostic for infectious etiologies, surgical lung biopsies are preferred to diagnose noninfectious lung diseases and to help guide appropriate therapy. In the present study, we report a case of progressive bilateral lung infiltrates in a smoker with HIV infection which presented a diagnostic dilemma in view of coexistent HIV infection. Analysis of clinical symptomatology aided by surgical lung biopsy helped in diagnosis.

  1. Computed tomography in diagnosis of lung pneumocystosis in hiv-infected and aids patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article deals with the issue concerning epidemiology of pneumocystosis, clinical and radiological features of changes in the lungs in treatment of opportunistic infections. Indications for the use of computed tomography in HIV-infected and AIDS patients, radiation CT semiotics of changes in lung pneumocystosis, the possibility of establishing of exacted diagnosis in pneumocysosis of the lungs when using CT, differential diagnosis issues have been considered in the paper

  2. Systems Biology Investigations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolution in Association with Human Airway Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Damkiær

    Most knowledge about evolutionary adaptation has been gained from experimental evolution studies, in which organisms have been allowed to evolve under simple, well-defined conditions in the laboratory. While these studies have provided novel insight into the fundamental processes of evolutionary...... adaptation, it is less clear to which extent the observations can be generalized to natural systems, in which organisms evolve in complex heterogeneous environments. The focus of this thesis has been to explore different aspects of evolutionary adaptation of bacterial populations evolving in natural....... aeruginosa DK2 clone lineage during 200,000 generations of evolution in the CF airways from its entrance in the clinic in the 1970’ies until the end of 2010. Genetic analysis showed that the DK2 lineage between 1973 and 2007 accumulated mutations in a near-linear manner with an overall genomic signature...

  3. Virus Infection and Titration of SARS-CoV in Mouse Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Fett, Craig; Zhao, Jincun; Perlman, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Two critical steps when investigating an animal model of a virus infection are consistently successfully infecting animals and accurately determining viral titers in tissue throughout the course of infection. Here we discuss in detail how to infect mice with SARS-CoV and then quantify the titer of virus in the lung.

  4. Development of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during two decades of antipseudomonal treatment at the Danish CF Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Pedersen, S S;

    1994-01-01

    was found between the MIC and the number of antipseudomonal courses of antibiotics. The proportion of resistant in vivo selected P. aeruginosa strains, presumed to be stably derepressed producers of chromosomal beta-lactamase, also increased significantly during the period studied. Our results confirm...... that the beta-lactamase production is an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa.......At the Danish CF Center patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection were treated 3-4 times a year (from 1976) with a 2-week intravenous antipseudomonal course which included preferentially an aminoglycoside and a beta-lactam antibiotic. We investigated the development of antibiotic...

  5. Burn wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers weight loss in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Su Grace; Lehnhardt Marcus; Jacobsen Frank; Fan Ming H; Burkhard Olaf; Steinstraesser Lars; Daigeler Adrien; Steinau Hans U; Remick Daniel; Wang Stewart C

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite dramatic improvements in the management of burns, infection still remains a serious risk for the burn patient. The aim of this study was to shed light on the impact of acute burn injury with or without infection on cytokine profiles. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 21) were randomized into three groups: 1) burn only 2) burn and infection or 3) sham burn. Weight was monitored and blood was collected for cytokine ELISA, LPS quantification, and peripheral blood analy...

  6. Effect of apple cider vinegar on the healing of experimentally–induced wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    A. H. Alawi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard wounds were made in the backs of 18 rabbits. The rabbits were then divided into 6 equal groups. Rabbits of group (1, constituted a control group and their wounds were treated with physiological saline solution. In group (2, the wounds were treated with Cefotaxime at a concentration of 500 mg. Wounds of the third, fourth, and fifth groups were treated with 5%, 3.75%, and 2.5% apple cider vinegar respectively. Wounds of the sixth groups of rabbits were treated with a combination of equal amounts of Cefotaxime and apple cider vinegar 3.75%. All of the wounds were infected with various isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the time of infected. Wound treatment was done each 48 hours until complete healing. Results of this study indicated that using apple cider vinegar 3.75% gave results similar to those obtained by using the antibiotic (same rates of bacterial reduction. However, using a combination of equal amounts of apple cider vinegar and the antibiotic lead to more rapid and more better healing than using each one of them alone.

  7. Effects of ambroxol on alginate of mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Hua; Wan, Zhenyan; Bai, Dan

    2008-07-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in mechanically ventilated newborns, which can cause life-threatening infections. Alginate of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is considered an important virulence factor which contributes to the resistance to antibiotics. Traditionally, ambroxol is widely used in newborns with lung problems as a mucolytic agent and antioxidant agent as well. And there are few studies that demonstrated the anti-biofilm activity of ambroxol. In this study, we found that ambroxol can affect the structure of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Further, we found that ambroxol reduces the production of alginate, the expression of the important genes and the activity of key enzyme guanosine diphospho-D-mannose dehydrogenase (GDP-mannose dehydrogenase; GMD) which were involved in alginate biosynthesis.

  8. Brote por Pseudomonas aeruginosa, en el área de atención ambulatoria de heridas quirúrgicas, en pacientes posmastectomizadas Outbreak of postmastectomy wound infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an ambulatory surgical care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vilar-Compte

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Describir un brote por Pseudomonas aeruginosa, en el área de atención ambulatoria de herida quirúrgica, en pacientes posmastectomizadas. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Entre el 13 de marzo y el 18 de mayo de 2000 se definió como caso a las pacientes del Instituto Nacional de Cancerología de la Ciudad de México, mastectomizadas con infección quirúrgica por P aeruginosa resistente a ciprofloxacina y gentamicina. Se tomaron cultivos de los antisépticos, del material de curaciones, del agua y del personal de salud. Se efectuó un análisis de casos y controles. RESULTADOS: Se identificaron 13 infecciones tardías del sitio quirúrgico por P aeruginosa. La Pseudomona se aisló de las narinas de la enfermera y de las gasas que ella misma colocaba sobre la mesa de mayo, pero no de los paquetes de gasas cerrados del área de curaciones ambulatoria de tumores mamarios. El 14 de abril de 2000 se transfirió a la enfermera a otra área y se instauraron medidas estrictas para el control de infecciones. Después de esta fecha se diagnosticaron cuatro casos más. La radioterapia fue el único factor de riesgo asociado con la infección (RM=5.1, IC 95%=1.1-28.4. CONCLUSIONES: El brote probablemente estuvo causado en un inicio por una fuente común y se extendió por infección cruzada entre las pacientes. Las prácticas deficientes detectadas en el manejo de heridas y drenajes condujo a instaurar medidas preventivas específicas.OBJECTIVE: To describe an outbreak due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in postmastectomy wounds. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cases were patients with a surgical infection caused by P. aeruginosa resistant to ciprofloxacin and gentamycin seen between March 13, 2000 and May 18, 2000, at Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia in Mexico City. Specimens for culturing were taken from faucets, antiseptics, and tap water, as well as from healthcare workers. A case-control analysis was conducted. RESULTS: Thirteen late surgical infections were caused

  9. Burn wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers weight loss in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Grace

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite dramatic improvements in the management of burns, infection still remains a serious risk for the burn patient. The aim of this study was to shed light on the impact of acute burn injury with or without infection on cytokine profiles. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 21 were randomized into three groups: 1 burn only 2 burn and infection or 3 sham burn. Weight was monitored and blood was collected for cytokine ELISA, LPS quantification, and peripheral blood analysis. Animals were sacrificed either after 6 or 12 days. Results Infected animals showed substantial weight loss until day 6 post-burn as compared to burn alone. Endotoxin and TNF-α levels were elevated early in the infected burn group within 48 hours post-burn. In contrast, significant up-regulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 occurred later in the clinical course and was associated with the recovery from weight loss. Conclusion Our results suggest that in the presence of infection, you get a SIRS response possibly due to transient endotoxemia that is only seen in the infection group. In contrast, both burn and infection get a late IL-10 (CARS response, which is then associated with a return to normal weight in the infection group.

  10. Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in sputum headspace through volatile organic compound analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goeminne Pieter C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic pulmonary infection is the hallmark of Cystic Fibrosis lung disease. Searching for faster and easier screening may lead to faster diagnosis and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa. Our aim was to analyze and build a model to predict the presence of P. aeruginosa in sputa. Methods Sputa from 28 bronchiectatic patients were used for bacterial culturing and analysis of volatile compounds by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Data analysis and model building were done by Partial Least Squares Regression Discriminant analysis (PLS-DA. Two analysis were performed: one comparing P. aeruginosa positive with negative cultures at study visit (PA model and one comparing chronic colonization according to the Leeds criteria with P. aeruginosa negative patients (PACC model. Results The PA model prediction of P. aeruginosa presence was rather poor, with a high number of false positives and false negatives. On the other hand, the PACC model was stable and explained chronic P. aeruginosa presence for 95% with 4 PLS-DA factors, with a sensitivity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 86% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Conclusion Our study shows the potential for building a prediction model for the presence of chronic P. aeruginosa based on volatiles from sputum.

  11. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Decreases Mortality in a Murine Model of Burn-Wound Sepsis Involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Liu; Qin Zhou; Yunchuan Wang; Zhengcai Liu; Maolong Dong; Yaojun Wang; Xiao Li; Dahai Hu

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The colonization of burn wounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can lead to septic shock, organ injuries, and high mortality rates. We hypothesized that negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) would decrease invasion and proliferation of P. aeruginosa within the burn wound and reduce mortality. METHODS: Thermal injuries were induced in anesthetized mice, and P. aeruginosa was applied to the wound surface for 24 h. After removing the burn eschar and debridement, the animals were subjected...

  12. Evolution and adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms driven by mismatch repair system-deficient mutators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela M Luján

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen causing chronic airway infections, especially in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. The majority of the CF patients acquire P. aeruginosa during early childhood, and most of them develop chronic infections resulting in severe lung disease, which are rarely eradicated despite intensive antibiotic therapy. Current knowledge indicates that three major adaptive strategies, biofilm development, phenotypic diversification, and mutator phenotypes [driven by a defective mismatch repair system (MRS], play important roles in P. aeruginosa chronic infections, but the relationship between these strategies is still poorly understood. We have used the flow-cell biofilm model system to investigate the impact of the mutS associated mutator phenotype on development, dynamics, diversification and adaptation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Through competition experiments we demonstrate for the first time that P. aeruginosa MRS-deficient mutators had enhanced adaptability over wild-type strains when grown in structured biofilms but not as planktonic cells. This advantage was associated with enhanced micro-colony development and increased rates of phenotypic diversification, evidenced by biofilm architecture features and by a wider range and proportion of morphotypic colony variants, respectively. Additionally, morphotypic variants generated in mutator biofilms showed increased competitiveness, providing further evidence for mutator-driven adaptive evolution in the biofilm mode of growth. This work helps to understand the basis for the specific high proportion and role of mutators in chronic infections, where P. aeruginosa develops in biofilm communities.

  13. Evolution and adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms driven by mismatch repair system-deficient mutators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, Adela M; Maciá, María D; Yang, Liang; Molin, Søren; Oliver, Antonio; Smania, Andrea M

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen causing chronic airway infections, especially in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The majority of the CF patients acquire P. aeruginosa during early childhood, and most of them develop chronic infections resulting in severe lung disease, which are rarely eradicated despite intensive antibiotic therapy. Current knowledge indicates that three major adaptive strategies, biofilm development, phenotypic diversification, and mutator phenotypes [driven by a defective mismatch repair system (MRS)], play important roles in P. aeruginosa chronic infections, but the relationship between these strategies is still poorly understood. We have used the flow-cell biofilm model system to investigate the impact of the mutS associated mutator phenotype on development, dynamics, diversification and adaptation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Through competition experiments we demonstrate for the first time that P. aeruginosa MRS-deficient mutators had enhanced adaptability over wild-type strains when grown in structured biofilms but not as planktonic cells. This advantage was associated with enhanced micro-colony development and increased rates of phenotypic diversification, evidenced by biofilm architecture features and by a wider range and proportion of morphotypic colony variants, respectively. Additionally, morphotypic variants generated in mutator biofilms showed increased competitiveness, providing further evidence for mutator-driven adaptive evolution in the biofilm mode of growth. This work helps to understand the basis for the specific high proportion and role of mutators in chronic infections, where P. aeruginosa develops in biofilm communities.

  14. In vitro efficacy of copper and silver ions in eradicating Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Acinetobacter baumannii: implications for on-site disinfection for hospital infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-I; Shih, Hsiu-Yun; Lee, Chien-Ming; Yang, Thomas C; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Lin, Yusen E

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Acinetobacter baumannii are major opportunistic waterborne pathogens causing hospital-acquired infections. Copper-silver ionization has been shown to be effective in controlling Legionella colonization in hospital water systems. The objective was to determine the efficacy of copper and silver ions alone and in combination in eradicating P. aeruginosa, S. maltophilia and A. baumannii at the concentration applied to Legionella control. Kill curve experiments and mathematical modeling were conducted at copper and silver ion concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08 mg/L, respectively. The combinations of copper and silver ions were tested at concentrations of 0.2/0.02 and 0.4/0.04 mg/L, respectively. Initial organism concentration was ca. of 3 x 10(6)cfu/mL, and viability of the test organisms was assessed at predetermined time intervals. Samples (0.1 mL) withdrawn were mixed with 10 microL neutralizer solution immediately, serially diluted and plated in duplicate onto blood agar plates. The culture plates were incubated for 48 h at 37 degrees C and enumerated for the cfu (detection limit 10 cfu/mL). The results showed all copper ion concentrations tested (0.1-0.8 mg/L) achieved more than 99.999% reduction of P. aeruginosa which appears to be more susceptible to copper ions than S. maltophilia and A. baumannii. Silver ions concentration of 0.08 mg/L achieved more than 99.999% reduction of P. aeruginosa, S. maltophilia and A. baumannii in 6, 12 and 96 h, respectively. Combination of copper and silver ions exhibited a synergistic effect against P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii while the combination exhibited an antagonistic effect against S. maltophilia. Ionization may have a potential to eradicate P. aeruginosa, S. maltophilia and A. baumannii from hospital water systems.

  15. Leukemia inhibitory factor protects the lung during respiratory syncytial viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Foronjy, Robert F.; Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Cummins, Neville; Geraghty, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects the lung epithelium where it stimulates the production of numerous host cytokines that are associated with disease burden and acute lung injury. Characterizing the host cytokine response to RSV infection, the regulation of host cytokines and the impact of neutralizing an RSV-inducible cytokine during infection were undertaken in this study. Methods A549, primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells and wild-type, TIR-domain-containing ...

  16. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M.; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the vir...

  17. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2015-12-04

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  18. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish an effici......Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish...

  20. Complete Remission of Minimal Change Disease Following an Improvement of Lung Mycobacterium avium Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Aoi; Uchida, Takahiro; Ito, Seigo; Oshima, Naoki; Oda, Takashi; Kumagai, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman suddenly developed peripheral edema. Her massive proteinuria, hypoproteinemia, and renal biopsy findings yielded the diagnosis of minimal change disease (MCD). In addition, lung Mycobacterium avium infection was diagnosed according to a positive culture of her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The lung lesion was improved by anti-nontuberculous mycobacteria therapy. Surprisingly, her proteinuria also gradually decreased and she attained complete remission of MCD without any immunosuppressive therapy. She has subsequently remained in complete remission. We herein report an interesting case of MCD with lung Mycobacterium avium infection, suggesting a causal relationship among infection, immune system abnormality, and MCD/nephrotic syndrome. PMID:27629965

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Burmølle, Mette;

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant to...... that biofilm bacteria in which QS is blocked either by mutation or by administration of QS inhibitory drugs are sensitive to treatment with tobramycin and H2O2, and are readily phagocytosed by PMNs, in contrast to bacteria with functional QS systems. In contrast to the wild-type, QS-deficient biofilms...

  2. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment decreases the inflammatory response in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Hougen, H P; Rygaard, J;

    1996-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF), we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by intraperitoneal treatment with recombinant rat interferon-gamma (rrIFN-gamma). Rats were treated either before or after intratracheal ch...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in patients with cystic fibrosis; population structure, the Dutch clone and effects of segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansfeld, R. van

    2014-01-01

    More than half of the patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in their lungs. It was thought that patients acquired unique strains of this bacterium from the environment, however in the last decades epidemic clones have been described in other countries that are m

  4. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Wout, Emily F A; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Boxtel, Ria; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Tommassen, J.P.M.; Marciniak, Stefan J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the

  5. Polymyxin B in Combination with Antimicrobials Lacking In Vitro Activity versus Polymyxin B in Monotherapy in Critically Ill Patients with Acinetobacter baumannii or Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatto, Maria Helena; Vieira, Fabiane J; Antochevis, Laura C; Behle, Tainá F; Lopes, Natane T; Zavascki, Alexandre P

    2015-10-01

    There is no clinical evidence supporting the use of polymyxin B in combination with another antimicrobial for infections caused by extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii or Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. We developed a cohort study of patients in two intensive care units from teaching hospitals to evaluate treatment with intravenous polymyxin B for ≥48 h for severe A. baumannii or P. aeruginosa infections. Covariates potentially associated with 30-day mortality were evaluated in a Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 101 patients were included; 33 (32.7%) were treated with polymyxin B in combination with an antimicrobial lacking in vitro activity and 68 (67.3%) with polymyxin B in monotherapy. The overall 30-day mortality was 59.4% (60 patients), comprising 42.4% (14 of 33) and 67.6% (46 of 68) in combination and monotherapy groups, respectively (P = 0.03). The mortality rates were 18.5/1,000 patient days and 36.4/1,000 patient days in the combination and monotherapy groups, respectively (P = 0.02). Combination therapy was independently associated with lower 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.17 to 0.64; P = 0.001). Creatinine clearance of ≥60 ml/min was also a protective factor, while a higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II) score and polymicrobial infection were associated with increased mortality. The results did not change after adding a propensity score for prescribing combination therapy into the model. The protective effect remained when only combination with β-lactam or carbapenem was considered and in both subgroups of patients: those with A. baumannii infection and those with lower respiratory tract infections. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical study to show a benefit of combination over monotherapy with polymyxin B for severe extensively drug-resistant A. baumannii or P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:26259799

  6. Multiple roles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa TBCF10839 PilY1 in motility, transport and infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Yu-Sing Tammy; Brandes, Gudrun; Rakhimova, Elza;

    2009-01-01

    of quinolones and pyocyanin, but on the other hand promoted growth in stationary phase and bacterial survival in murine airway infection models. The PilY1 population consisted of a major full-length and a minor shorter PilY1* isoform. PilY1* was detectable in small extracellular quinolone-positive aggregates...

  7. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    P. aeruginosa is part of a large group of free-living bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment. This organism is often found in natural waters such as lakes and rivers in concentrations of 10/100 mL to >1,000/100 mL. However, it is not often found in drinking water. Usually it is found in 2% of samples, or less, and at concentrations up to 2,300 mL(-1) (Allen and Geldreich 1975) or more often at 3-4 CFU/mL. Its occurrence in drinking water is probably related more to its ability to colonize biofilms in plumbing fixtures (i.e., faucets, showerheads, etc.) than its presence in the distribution system or treated drinking water. P. aeruginosa can survive in deionized or distilled water (van der Jooij et al. 1982; Warburton et al. 1994). Hence, it may be found in low nutrient or oligotrophic environments, as well as in high nutrient environments such as in sewage and in the human body. P. aeruginosa can cause a wide range of infections, and is a leading cause of illness in immunocompromised individuals. In particular, it can be a serious pathogen in hospitals (Dembry et al. 1998). It can cause endocarditis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, and meningitis, and is a leading cause of septicemia. P. aeruginosa is also a major cause of folliculitis and ear infections acquired by exposure to recreational waters containing the bacterium. In addition, it has been recognized as a serious cause of keratitis, especially in patients wearing contact lenses. P. aeruginosa is also a major pathogen in burn and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a high mortality rate in both populations (MOlina et al. 1991; Pollack 1995). P. aeruginosa is frequently found in whirlpools and hot tubs, sometimes in 94-100% of those tested at concenrations of Price and Ahearn 1988). Many outbreaks of folliculitis and ear infections have been reportedly associated with the use of whirlpools and hot tubs that contain P. aeruginosa (Ratnam et al

  8. First Report of Lung Transplantation in a Patient With Active Pulmonary Mycobacterium simiae Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, T; Katzenstein, Terese Lea; Lillebaek, T;

    2013-01-01

    bilateral lung transplantation for end-stage idiopathic bronchiectasis and chronic M simiae infection. The disease proved manageable on a regimen of clarithromycin, moxifloxacin, and cotrimoxazole with a successful outcome 1-year posttransplantation. There is increasing evidence that nontuberculous...

  9. Concomitant Cryptococcosis and Burkholderia Infection in an Asymptomatic Lung Transplant Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Concomitant pulmonary infections with Cryptococcus neoformans and Burkholderia cepacia in lung transplant recipients are very rare and create unique diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Herein, we present a double lung transplant patient with cystic fibrosis who was found to have coinfection with these two rare organisms, though he was completely asymptomatic.

  10. Novel bacteriophage therapy for controlling metallo-beta-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Catfish

    OpenAIRE

    Khairnar, Krishna; Raut, Mahendra P; Rajshree H. Chandekar; Sanmukh, Swapnil G; Waman N. PAUNIKAR

    2013-01-01

    Background The bacteriophage therapy is an effective antimicrobial approach with potentially important applications in medicine and biotechnology which can be seen as an additional string in the bow. Emerging drug resistant bacteria in aquaculture industry due to unrestricted use of antibiotics warrants more sustainable and environmental friendly strategies for controlling fish infections. The isolated bacteria from fish lesions was characterised based on isolation on selective and differenti...

  11. Human papillomavirus infection in lung vs. oral squamous cell carcinomas: a polymerase chain reaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, M; Morshedi Asl, S

    2011-06-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been suspected in pathogenesis of various malignancies; however, the available data are not conclusive. This study aimed to determine and compare the frequency of HPV infection in oral and lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) by a sensitive method. Sixty specimens of oral and lung SCC (30 cases each one) were reevaluated in Tabriz Imam Reza Centre in a 24 month period. Following genomic DNA extract, the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification was performed in presence of specific MY11 and MY09 primers for HPV infection. Three cervical specimens and a combination of PCR solution lacking DNA plus healthy persons' DNA samples were employed as positive and negative controls, respectively. The oral group was significantly older than the lung group (68.90 vs. 56.67 y, p infection in the oral and lung groups were comparable (20 vs. 10%, respectively; p = 0.47). Majority of patients with HPV infection were older than 60 years (88.9%) or male (88.9%). In the oral group, all these cases were well differentiated and the majority was of lower lip origin (83.3%). In the lung group, 66.7% of these specimens were moderately differentiated and the origin was bronchus in all cases. In conclusion, the rate of HPV infection in lung and oral SCC samples is rather lower than the previous reports in the literature. This rate is apparently higher in the oral than the lung SCC specimens. PMID:22235505

  12. Diffuse interstitial lung infiltrates in a smoker with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Vasudevan, Viswanath P.; Praveen K. Jinnur; Vishal Verma; Sasikanth Nallagatla

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare interstitial lung disease characteristically affecting middle-aged smokers. It has unpredictable clinical course and may be associated with malignant neoplasms. Opportunistic lung infections are frequently considered when patients with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection present with respiratory symptoms and an abnormal chest X-ray. Though fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is diagnostic for infectious etiologies, sur...

  13. Invasive Aspergillus infections in hospitalized patients with chronic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessolossky M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mireya Wessolossky,1 Verna L Welch,2 Ajanta Sen,1 Tara M Babu,1 David R Luke21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, USABackground: Although invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is more prevalent in immunocompromised patients, critical care clinicians need to be aware of the occurrence of IPA in the nontraditional host, such as a patient with chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to describe the IPA patient with chronic lung disease and compare the data with that of immunocompromised patients.Methods: The records of 351 patients with Aspergillus were evaluated in this single-center, retrospective study for evidence and outcomes of IPA. The outcomes of 57 patients with chronic lung disease and 56 immunocompromised patients were compared. Patients with chronic lung disease were defined by one of the following descriptive terms: emphysema, asthma, idiopathic lung disease, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, sarcoid, or pulmonary leukostasis.Results: Baseline demographics were similar between the two groups. Patients with chronic lung disease were primarily defined by emphysema (61% and asthma (18%, and immunocompromised patients primarily had malignancies (27% and bone marrow transplants (14%. A higher proportion of patients with chronic lung disease had a diagnosis of IPA by bronchoalveolar lavage versus the immunocompromised group (P < 0.03. The major risk factors for IPA were found to be steroid use in the chronic lung disease group and neutropenia and prior surgical procedures in the immunocompromised group. Overall, 53% and 69% of chronic lung disease and immunocompromised patients were cured (P = 0.14; 55% of chronic lung patients and 47% of immunocompromised patients survived one month (P = 0.75.Conclusion: Nontraditional patients with IPA, such as those with chronic lung disease, have outcomes and mortality similar to that in the

  14. LipL21 mRNA expression in lungs of hamsters infected with pathogenic Leptospira

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chintana Chirathaworn; Namo Suksomyos; Somchai Utivamek; Somboon Keelawat; Duangjai Suwancharoen; Duangporn Phulsuksombati; Yong Poovorawan

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Pulmonary haemorrhage is an increasing cause of death in leptospirosis patients.However,molecu-lar mechanism underlying pathologies in this organ is not clearly understood.It has been shown that sodium transport was disturbed following Leptospira infection.LipL21 is the second abundant outer membrane protein found only in pathogenic Leptospira.Its expression in vivo has been shown which suggests that this protein may be involved in survival in hosts or pathogenesis.However,the expression of this protein in host organs and its role in lung pathology has not been demonstrated.In this study we demonstrated the expression of LipL21 in lungs of hamsters infected with pathogenic Leptospira.Methods:Lung tissues were collected from Golden Syri-an hamsters injected with Leptospira interrogans serovar Pyrogenes at days 3,5 and 7 post-infection.Four ham-sters were used for each time point.Lungs from non-infected hamsters were collected as a control group.Li-pL21 mRNA expression in lung tissues was investigated by reverse transcription and nested PCR.Results:Li-pL21 mRNA expression was detected in all lung tissues from hamsters infected with pathogenic Leptospira.No PCR product was detected when tissues from non-infected hamsters were investigated.Conclusion:Our data demonstrated that LipL21 is expressed in lungs of hamsters infected with pathogenic Leptospira.Additional ex-periments such as quantitation and localization of LipL21 expression in lungs will provide further information whether this protein is involved in pathogenesis.

  15. ExoU contributes to late killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa - infected endothelial cells ExoU contribui para a morte tardia de células endoteliais infectadas por Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Mattos Saliba

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available To ascertain the role of ExoU in late P. aeruginosa cytotoxicity, endothelial cells (EC were exposed to wild type PA103, PA103deltaexoU and PA103::exsA for 1h and to gentamicin in culture medium. After 24h, the viability of PA103-infected cells (33.7 ± 14.3% was significantly lower than the viability of PA103deltaexoU- (77.7 ± 6.3% or PA103::exsA- (79.5 ± 23.3% infected EC. P. aeruginosa cytotoxicity did not depend on the bacterial ability to interact with EC because the percentage of cells with associated PA103 (35.9 ± 15.8% was similar to the percentage in PA103deltaexoU- (34.2 ± 16.0% and lower than the percentage in PA103::exsA-infected cultures (82.9 ± 18.9%. Cell treatment with cytochalasin D reduced the PA103 internalization by EC but did not interfere with its ability to kill host cells.Para determinar o papel de ExoU na citotoxicidade tardia de P. aeruginosa, células endoteliais (CE foram expostas às cepas PA103, PA103deltaxoU e PA103::exsA por 1h e à gentamicina em meio de cultura. Após 24h, a viabilidade das CE infectadas com PA103 (33.7 ± 14.3% foi inferior à de CE infectadas com PA103deltaexoU (77.7 ± 6.3% e PA103::exsA (79.5 ± 23.3%. A citotoxicidade não dependeu da capacidade de interagir com as CE porque o percentual de células com bactérias associadas em culturas expostas a PA103 foi semelhante ao percentual em culturas expostas a PA103deltaexoU e inferior em culturas expostas a PA103::exsA. O tratamento das CE com citocalasina D reduziu a internalização de PA103, mas não interferiu em sua citotoxicidade.

  16. Two cases with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two patients with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field are reported. Lung abscesses occurred during the term of leukopenia following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer. Both patients were diagnosed as small cell lung cancer, and were treated concurrently with chemotherapy (Cisplatin + Etoposide) and radiotherapy (total 40-50 Gy). Case 1 was a 59 years old male. Seven weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) originated in the lung field with radiation pneumonitis, and giant bronchial fistula was formed, that showed the specific bronchofiberscopic findings. Case 2 was a 67 years old male. Twelve weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa originated in the irradiated lung field following the formation of a pneumatocele. MRSA and pseudomonas aeruginosa are important as cause of hospital infection, and both can cause lung abscess. However, in our cases, lung abscess were formed just in the irradiated lung field and rapidly enlarged. These clinical findings suggested that myelosuppression and radiation injury of lung tissue might cause such giant lung abscess. (author)

  17. The balance between protective and pathogenic immune responses in the TB-infected lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Ian M; Robinson, Richard T; Cooper, Andrea M

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease of the lung, and efficient transmission is dependent on the generation of a lesion in the lung, which results in a bacterium-laden cough. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is able to manipulate both the innate and acquired immune response of the host. This manipulation results in an effective CD4(+) T cell response that limits disease throughout the body but can also promote the development of progressively destructive lesions in the lung. In this way Mtb infection can result in an ambulatory individual who has a lesion in the lung capable of transmitting Mtb. The inflammatory environment within the lung lesion is manipulated by Mtb throughout infection and can limit the expression of acquired immunity by a variety of pathways.

  18. Lung function and bronchial responsiveness after Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Birgitte Kjær; Jensen, Jørgen S; Nielsen, Kim G;

    2008-01-01

    follow-up examination including lung function testing (28 PCR-positive and 37 PCR-negative). In addition to the PCR-test for M. pneumoniae all respiratory tract specimens were additionally tested for other atypical bacteria and for viruses by PCR. Lung function was measured as specific airway resistance...... on lung function and bronchial responsiveness. In a retrospective, clinical cohort-study children younger than 5 years-of-age when PCR-tested for M. pneumoniae were enrolled. Sixty-five children with clinical symptoms suggesting infection with M. pneumoniae during an epidemic season completed a clinical...... 1.21 (kPa sec), P = 0.45; and mean change in specific resistance was 13% versus 9%, P = 0.42. In conclusion, M. pneumoniae infection in early childhood was not associated with long-term effects on lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness 2 years after infection....

  19. Mouse lung infection model to assess Rhodococcus equi virulence and vaccine protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Iglesias, Patricia; Scortti, Mariela; MacArthur, Iain; Hapeshi, Alexia; Rodriguez, Héctor; Prescott, John F; Vazquez-Boland, José A

    2014-08-01

    The pathogenic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi causes severe purulent lung infections in foals and immunocompromised people. Although relatively unsusceptible to R. equi, mice are widely used for in vivo studies with this pathogen. The most commonly employed mouse model is based on systemic (intravenous) infection and determination of R. equi burdens in spleen and liver. Here, we investigated the murine lung for experimental infection studies with R. equi. Using a 10(7)CFU intranasal challenge in BALB/c mice, virulent R. equi consistently survived in quantifiable numbers up to 10 days in the lungs whereas virulence-deficient R. equi bacteria were rapidly cleared. An internally controlled virulence assay was developed in which the test R. equi strains are co-inoculated and monitored in the same mouse. Isogenic R. equi bacteria lacking either the plasmid vapA gene or the entire virulence plasmid were compared using this competitive assay. Both strains showed no significant differences in in vivo fitness in the lung, indicating that the single loss of the virulence factor VapA was sufficient to account for the full attenuation seen in the absence of the virulence plasmid. To test the adequacy of the lung infection model for monitoring R. equi vaccine efficacy, BALB/c mice were immunized with live R. equi and challenged intranasally. Vaccination conferred protection against acute pulmonary challenge with virulent R. equi. Our data indicate that the murine lung infection model provides a useful tool for both R. equi virulence and vaccine studies. PMID:24852140

  20. Co-Carriage of blaKPC-2 and blaNDM-1 in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Associated with Hospital Infections from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepjyoti Paul

    Full Text Available Global spread of KPC poses to be a serious threat complicating treatment options in hospital settings. The present study investigates the genetic environment of blaKPC-2 among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of India. The study isolates were collected from different wards and clinics of Silchar Medical College and Hospital, India, from 2012-2013. The presence of blaKPC was confirmed by genotypic characterization followed by sequencing. Cloning of the blaKPC-2 gene was performed and the genetic environment of this gene was characterized as well. Transferability of the resistance gene was determined by transformation assay and Southern hybridization. Additionally, restriction mapping was also carried out. Two isolates of P. aeruginosa were found to harbor blaKPC-2, were resistant towards aminoglycosides, quinolone and β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combination. In both the isolates, the resistance determinant was associated with class 1 integron and horizontally transferable. Both the isolates were co-harboring blaNDM-1. The first detection of this integron mediated blaKPC-2 coexisting with blaNDM-1 in P. aeruginosa from India is worrisome, and further investigation is required to track the gene cassette mediated blaKPC-2 in terms of infection control and to prevent the spread of this gene in hospitals as well as in the community.

  1. Detection of Temporal Clusters of Healthcare-Associated Infections or Colonizations with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Two Hospitals: Comparison of SaTScan and WHONET Software Packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Annick; Bertrand, Xavier; Vanhems, Philippe; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Chavanet, Pascal; Astruc, Karine; Thouverez, Michelle; Quantin, Catherine; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig Serge

    2015-01-01

    The identification of temporal clusters of healthcare-associated colonizations or infections is a challenge in infection control. WHONET software is available to achieve these objectives using laboratory databases of hospitals but it has never been compared with SaTScan regarding its detection performance. This study provided the opportunity to evaluate the performance of WHONET software in comparison with SaTScan software as a reference to detect clusters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A retrospective study was conducted in two French university hospitals. Cases of P. aeruginosa colonizations or infections occurring between 1st January 2005 and 30th April 2014 in the first hospital were analyzed overall and by medical ward/care unit. Poisson temporal and space-time permutation models were used. Analyses were repeated for the second hospital on data from 1st July 2007 to 31st December 2013 to validate WHONET software (in comparison with SaTScan) in another setting. During the study period, 3,946 isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from 2,996 patients in the first hospital. The incidence rate was 89.8 per 100,000 patient-days (95% CI [87.0; 92.6]). Several clusters were observed overall and at the unit level and some of these were detected whatever the method used. WHONET results were consistent with the analyses that took patient-days and temporal trends into account in both hospitals. Because it is more flexible and easier to use than SaTScan, WHONET software seems to be a useful tool for the prospective surveillance of hospital data although it does not take populations at risk into account.

  2. Cellular immune responses in the lungs of pigs infected in utero with PRRSV: An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tingstedt, Jens Erik; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The cellular response in the lungs of pigs transplacentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was examined by immunohistochemistry. Double staining for the T-cell marker antigen CD3 and PRRSV demonstrated that the appearance and distribution of T-cells homing...... to the lungs of infected pigs correlated well with the presence and location of virus-infected cells. Single stainings showed that cells positive for the CD2 and CD8 antigen were almost as numerous in pneumonic lesions as CD3 positive cells whereas cells expressing the CD4 antigen were rare. The morphology...

  3. Immunological study on integrated PilQ and disulphide loop region of PilA against acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection:In silico analysis and in vitro production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alireza Salimi Chirani; Robabeh Majidzadeh; Hossein Dabiri; Javad Rezaei; Ali Esmaili; Yasamin Abdanan Kord; Narges Khabazzadeh Tehrani; Negin Attaran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Nowadays, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), the highly regarded opportunistic pathogen, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The P. aeruginosa type IV pili (T4P) as a multiple functional surface organelle in the development of acute P. aeruginosa infections have been well documented. Today, in silico analysis is a quick, and cost-effective tool for vaccine development. Methods: In present study, several turns' motifs along with the chimeric protein were predicted. Based on the hydropathy analysis, numerous antibody-accessible hydrophilic regions were characterized in the chimeric protein. A synthetic chimeric gene, encoding integrated PilQ and disulphide loop region of PilA, was designed. Modeling was done to predict the 3D structure of protein. The model was validated by using Ramachandran plot statistics and by ProSA server. Identification of B-cell and T-cell corresponding epitopes was done by using appropriate servers. Results: The closer 3D model to the native form of the chimeric protein was achieved. Validation results showed that 95.1%residues were in favor region and 3.6%of amino acid residues were in the allowed region. The B-cell epitope mappings showed that almost all the epitopes had irregular enriched structures. The major histocompatibility complex binding sequence prediction identified several human major histocompatibility complex class I and II restricted T-cell epitopes. The integrated PilQ and PilA disulphide loop encoding regions in the frame of pET28a(+) vector were expressed and purified efficiently. Conclusions: We expect that the two recognized antigenic determinants from our chimeric protein, “AYHKGNWSGYGKDGNIGIKDEDGMNCGPIAGSCTFPTTGTS-KSPSPFVDLGAKDATSG” and “GPIAGSCTFPTTGTSKSPSP”, can be able to evoke strong both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mouse models.

  4. Effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase on alveolar epithelial permeability in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elastase-deficient mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are less virulent than the wild type and are easily cleared from the lungs of guinea pigs. The effect of P. aeruginosa elastase on lung epithelium, however, is not yet understood. We addressed the hypothesis that breach of the epithelial barrier by elastase from P. aeruginosa allows invading organisms and toxic substances to penetrate the interstitium. We measured the clearance of aerosolized technetium-labeled albumin (molecular weight, 69,000) from the lungs of anesthetized guinea pigs with the aid of a gamma camera and a dedicated computer. Aerosols of the elastase (0.1 to 5 micrograms) increased the rate of clearance of labeled albumin from the lungs in proportion to the elastase dose. Electron microscopic studies using horseradish peroxidase as a tracer revealed that elastase interrupts intercellular tight junctions of the epithelial lining, thereby increasing the permeability to macromolecules. The amounts of elastase used in this report did not cause interstitial or alveolar edema, as determined by both postmortem extravascular lung water volume measurement and morphological examination. The data indicate that the elastase is a potentially important virulence factor in acute lung infection

  5. Clinical analysis of infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa%铜绿假单胞菌所致感染的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王婷; 刘晓民; 刘腾

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate clinical data,drug resistance and trends of patient9 infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the hospital and provide a scientific basis for rational clinical use of antimicrobial drugs. Methods The underlying diseases,use of antimicrobial drugs,invasive procedures and antimicrobial susceptibility resistance of 803 Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Results There were 803 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from 247 cases of patients,and the specimens were mainly isolated from sputum. In departments distribution,ICU was the highest,followed by geriatric ward and the neurology ward. Patients often combined with the underlying diseases and had line suctioning,endotra-cheal intubation,catheterization and other invasive procedures. What the patients used most was piperacillin / cilostazol tazobactam,followed by meropenem and cefoperazone / sulbactam. Drug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was serious in the hospital,the most sensitive one was polymyxin B,followed by amikacin. The ratios of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) and pan-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PDR-PA) were 88.43% and 10. 70% respectively. Conclusion Pseudomonas aeruginosa is isolated mostly in the sputum,commonly happens to the elderly patients and mainly concentrates in the ICU,relates to the patients' serious condition,combining with more underlying diseases,and accepting invasive procedures. Carbapenems should be limited in the clinical use of carbapenems in order to reduce multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.%目的 调查本院铜绿假单胞菌感染患者的临床资料、耐药状况及变化趋势,为临床合理应用抗菌药物提供科学的依据.方法 回顾性分析本院803株铜绿假单胞菌感染患者基础疾病、应用抗菌药物、侵入性操作及细菌药敏耐药情况.结果 247例患者中共分离出 803株铜绿假单胞菌,标本主要分离自痰液;科室分布以

  6. In Vitro Analysis of Metabolites Secreted during Infection of Lung Epithelial Cells by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Kah Leong; Jee, Jap Meng; Yap, Ivan; Yong, Phelim Voon Chen

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated basidiomycetous yeast commonly associated with pigeon droppings and soil. The opportunistic pathogen infects humans through the respiratory system and the metabolic implications of C. neoformans infection have yet to be explored. Studying the metabolic profile associated with the infection could lead to the identification of important metabolites associated with pulmonary infection. Therefore, the aim of the study was to simulate cryptococcal infection at the primary site of infection, the lungs, and to identify the metabolic profile and important metabolites associated with the infection at low and high multiplicity of infections (MOI). The culture supernatant of lung epithelial cells infected with C. neoformans at MOI of 10 and 100 over a period of 18 hours were analysed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The metabolic profiles obtained were further analysed using multivariate analysis and the pathway analysis tool, MetaboAnalyst 2.0. Based on the results from the multivariate analyses, ten metabolites were selected as the discriminatory metabolites that were important in both the infection conditions. The pathways affected during early C. neoformans infection of lung epithelial cells were mainly the central carbon metabolism and biosynthesis of amino acids. Infection at a higher MOI led to a perturbance in the β-alanine metabolism and an increase in the secretion of pantothenic acid into the growth media. Pantothenic acid production during yeast infection has not been documented and the β-alanine metabolism as well as the pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis pathways may represent underlying metabolic pathways associated with disease progression. Our study suggested that β-alanine metabolism and the pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis pathways might be the important pathways associated with cryptococcal infection. PMID:27054608

  7. Serial histopathological examination of the lungs of mice infected with influenza A virus PR8 strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Fukushi

    Full Text Available Avian influenza H5N1 and pandemic (H1N1 2009 viruses are known to induce viral pneumonia and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD. The mortality rate of ARDS/DAD is extremely high, at approximately 60%, and no effective treatment for ARDS/DAD has been established. We examined serial pathological changes in the lungs of mice infected with influenza virus to determine the progress from viral pneumonia to ARDS/DAD. Mice were intranasally infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 virus, and their lungs were examined both macro- and micro-pathologically every 2 days. We also evaluated general condition, survival rate, body weight, viral loads in lung, and surfactant proteins in serum. As a result, all infected mice died within 9 days postinfection. At 2 days postinfection, inflammation in alveolar septa, i.e., interstitial pneumonia, was observed around bronchioles. From 4 to 6 days postinfection, interstitial pneumonia with alveolar collapse expanded throughout the lungs. From 6 to 9 days postinfection, DAD with severe alveolar collapse was observed in the lungs of all of dying and dead mice. In contrast, DAD was not observed in the live infected-mice from 2 to 6 days postinfection, despite their poor general condition. In addition, histopathological analysis was performed in mice infected with a dose of PR8 virus which was 50% of the lethal dose for mice in the 20-day observation period. DAD with alveolar collapse was observed in all dead mice. However, in the surviving mice, instead of DAD, glandular metaplasia was broadly observed in their lungs. The present study indicates that DAD with severe alveolar collapse is associated with death in this mouse infection model of influenza virus. Inhibition of the development of DAD with alveolar collapse may decrease the mortality rate in severe viral pneumonia caused by influenza virus infection.

  8. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Detection of Isolates harboring blaCTX gene causing infections in hospital and determination of their susceptibility to antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Rabani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Because of its ubiquitous nature, ability to survive in moist environments, and innate resistance to many antibiotics and antiseptics, P. aeruginosa is a common pathogen in hospitals. The goals of this study were detection of Psudomonas aeruginosa harboring blaCTX gene causing infections in hospitals and determination of their susceptibility to antibiotics and ESBL production. Methods: In the present cross-sectional study, clinical samples from hospitalized patients were collected and culture was done on apropriate media. Final identification was performed using biochemical tests and API 20NE system. According to the protocol CLSI 2014 disc diffusion, combination disk, modified hodge test (MHT and E-test were used for antibiotic susceptibility, ESBL production, carbapenemas production, and MIC values of imipenem respectively. The blaCTX gene was detected in the isolates by PCR molecular method. Results: In the current study, 45 isolates of Pseudomonas aeroginosa were obtained from hospitalized patients, consisting of 19 males (42.2% and 26 females (57.8%. As observed, 57.8% (26 strains of isolates were recovered from sputum. The most effective antibiotics against isolates were amikacin and colistin with 97.8% suseptibility whereas the highest resistance was to cefotaxime (97.8%. As revealed 77.8% of isolates showed response to group 2 carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem. All imipenem resistant strains had the MIC more than 32. Seventeen strains (37.7% were  showed resistant to quinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin. The results of PCR on blaCTX gene indicated that 15.5% of the isolates possess the gene. Conclusion: Carbapenem group of antibiotic in 22% of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa were ineffective and indiscriminate prescribing of these drugs will increase the ratet of resistance.

  9. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  10. Cedecea davisae’s Role in a Polymicrobial Lung Infection in a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayer G. Ismaael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic airway colonization and infection are the hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia cepacia are well-documented bacterial culprits in this chronic suppurative airway disease. Advanced molecular diagnostics have uncovered a possible role of a larger group of microorganisms in CF. Cedecea is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and is an emerging pathogen. We present a case of a polymicrobial healthcare-associated pneumonia in a CF patient caused by Cedecea davisae, among other bacteria.

  11. Effect of exposure to diesel exhaust particles on the susceptibility of the lung to infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Castranova, V; Ma, J. Y.; Yang, H.M.; Antonini, J M; Butterworth, L; Barger, M W; Roberts, J.; Ma, J K

    2001-01-01

    There are at least three mechanisms by which alveolar macrophages play a critical role in protecting the lung from bacterial or viral infections: production of inflammatory cytokines that recruit and activate lung phagocytes, production of antimicrobial reactive oxidant species, and production of interferon (an antiviral agent). In this article we summarize data concerning the effect of exposure to diesel exhaust particles on these alveolar macrophage functions and the role of adsorbed organi...

  12. Immunization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines and adjuvant can modulate the type of inflammatory response subsequent to infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Espersen, F; Cryz, S J;

    1994-01-01

    immunized with P. aeruginosa whole-cell sonicates, O-polysaccharide toxin A conjugate, an alginate-toxin A conjugate, or native alginate. Control animals received sterile saline or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The macroscopic (mean score, 2.4 versus 2.7 to 3.2) (P

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms exposed to imipenem exhibit changes in global gene expression and beta-lactamase and alginate production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Niels; Schuster, Martin; Hentzer, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    expression in biofilm populations. Many genes showed small but statistically significant differential expression in response to imipenem. We identified 34 genes that were induced or repressed in biofilms exposed to imipenem more than fivefold compared to the levels of induction or repression for the controls......The lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are commonly colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Chronic endobronchial P. aeruginosa infections are impossible to eradicate with antibiotics, but intensive suppressive antibiotic therapy is essential to maintain the lung function of CF patients....... The treatment often includes beta-lactam antibiotics. How these antibiotics influence gene expression in the surviving biofilm population of P. aeruginosa is not clear. Thus, we used the microarray technology to study the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of a beta-lactam antibiotic, imipenem, on gene...

  14. Current situation and treatment of nosocomial infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa%院内铜绿假单胞菌感染:现状和诊治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆国平; 马健

    2016-01-01

    院内铜绿假单胞菌感染是临床尤其是 ICU 的棘手问题,耐药率高,导致呼吸机相关性肺炎、血流感染等,治疗困难,延长住院时间,增加病死率和治疗成本。积极预防,早期明确、合理的抗生素治疗是铜绿假单胞菌治疗的关键。%Nosocomial infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a dilemma in clinic,especially at ICU with high rate of antibiotic resistance,and lead to ventilator associated pneumonia,bloodstream infections, etc.There are difficulties in the treatment,lengthening of ICU stay,high mortality and increased treatment costs.Positive prevention,early diagnosis,reasonable antiboitics are the key to the benign prognosis of Pseud-omonas aeruginosa.

  15. Toward an Alternative Therapeutic Approach for Skin Infections: Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacilli Against Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mohamed M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A; Zaki, Noha M

    2013-09-01

    The wide spread of antimicrobial resistance has urged the need of alternative therapeutic approach. In this context, probiotic lactobacilli have been reported for the prevention and treatment of many gastrointestinal and urogenital infections. However, very little is known about their antagonistic activity against skin pathogens. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the potential of lactobacilli to interfere with pathogenesis features of two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens, namely methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multiple-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 49 lactobacilli were recovered, identified and tested for their antagonistic activities against the aforementioned pathogens. Of these, eight isolates were capable of blocking the adherence of pathogens to mammalian cells independent of the skin pathogen tested or model adopted. Moreover, three Lactobacillus isolates (LRA4, LC2 and LR5) effectively prevented the pathogen internalization into epithelial cells in addition to potentiating phagocyte-mediated pathogen killing. Interestingly, the lactobacilli LC2, LF9 and LRA4 markedly inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates in coculture experiments. Besides, the lactobacilli LRA4, LC2, LR5 and LF9 have counteracted pathogen cytotoxicity. Taken together, the present study revealed some inhibitory activities of lactobacilli against two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens. Moreover, it revealed two lactobacilli, namely LC2 and LRA4, with antagonistic capacity against different virulence determinants of skin pathogens. These lactobacilli are considered promising probiotic candidates that may represent an alternative therapeutic approach for skin infections.

  16. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J Q; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D; Lewenza, Shawn; Dong, Tao G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg(2+) or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities. PMID:27271742

  17. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J Q; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D; Lewenza, Shawn; Dong, Tao G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg(2+) or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Ghoul, Melanie; Molin, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    -resistant and highly toxic for protists. In contrast, bacteria isolated from long time chronically infected patients (2-23 years), were less efficient in both resisting phages and killing protists. Moreover, chronic isolates showed reduced killing of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella) probably due to weaker...

  19. Persistence mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients undergoing ciprofloxacin therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Diver, J M; Schollaardt, T; Rabin, H R; Thorson, C; Bryan, L E

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms of persistence to ciprofloxacin in nine sets of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated during ciprofloxacin therapy of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients were studied. Low to moderate levels of ciprofloxacin resistance developed in each case. Each set of pretherapy ciprofloxacin-susceptible, during-therapy ciprofloxacin-resistant, and posttherapy ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates were shown to be genotypically related by using a radiolabeled epidemiological g...

  20. Flagellin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces transforming growth factor beta 1 expression in normal bronchial epithelial cells through mitogen activated protein kinase cascades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-jing; WANG Dan-dan; SUN Tie-ying

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute lung infection due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. Aeruginosa) is a serious problem, especially in patients with structural lung conditions or immune compromised hosts, leading to an overwhelming threat with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. As an outcome of infection, fibrosis can be linked with chronic lung diseases. But some fibrotic manifestations, such as an irreversible decrease of lung function and fibrous bands seen on chest imaging, have been found after an acute infection with P. Aeruginosa. Fibrogenesis/remodeling resulting from acute lung infection by P.aeruginosa is rarely reported. This study was designed to explore the relation between fibrogenesis/remodeling and acute infection by P. Aeruginosa in vitro. We used flagellin protein from P. Aeruginosa, a key initiator of acute P.aeruginosa lung infection, to elucidate mechanisms by which acute lung infection with P. Aeruginosa can cause fibrogenesis/remodeling.Methods We studied the effect of flagellin from P. Aeruginosa (flagellin for short) on the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression, and the possible involvement of the signaling pathway, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Flagellin was purified from the P. Aeruginosa standard strain, PAO1. Normal bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B were challenged with different concentrations of flagellin, and cell viability assessment was performed by cell counting kit-8. BEAS-2B cells were incubated with flagellin with the specific MAPK inhibitors or TRAF6 siRNA. Cell lysates and the cultured supernatant were collected. The level of TGF-β1 and IL-8 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Western blotting was used to detect the protein levels of MAPK signal proteins p38, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK).Results Expression of TGF-β1 in BEAS-2B cells was elevated by

  1. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host-pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25699030

  2. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamilé eLópez Hernández

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as a valuate tools to explore host-pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio, and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g. Caenorhabditis elegans in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favour of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions.

  3. Meropenem in cystic fibrosis patients infected with resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Burkholderia cepacia and with hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Jensen, Tim; Pressler, Tacjana;

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of meropenem, administered on a compassionate basis to 62 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (age: 24plus minus6 years) with hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics and/or infection by bacteria resistant to other antibiotics. METHODS: Fifty...... in pulmonary function (as a percentage of the predictive values) was 5.6% for FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in the first second) and 8.6% for FVC (forced vital capacity). C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and leukocyte count decreased significantly. In courses administered...... complaint. The following side effects were observed: nausea (0.8%), itching (4%), rash (3.2%), drug fever (1.6%). CONCLUSIONS: Meropenem proved to be a valuable drug in the treatment of CF patients with chronic pulmonary infection with multiresistant P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia and with hypersensitivity...

  4. Contributions of efflux pumps to high level resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ciprofloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dan-dan; SUN Tie-ying; HU Yun-jian

    2007-01-01

    @@ Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is one of the leading pathogens involved in nosocomial pneumonia. In addition, P. aeruginosa infection is associated with significant morbidity and mortality.1 A major problem in P. aeruginosa infection is that this organism exhibits natural and acquired resistance to many structurally and functionally diverse antibiotics.

  5. Interspecific small molecule interactions between clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus from adult cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fugère

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are the most prevalent pathogens in airway infections of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. We studied how these pathogens coexist and interact with each other. Clinical isolates of both species were retrieved from adult CF patients. Culture supernatants from 63 P. aeruginosa isolates triggered a wide range of biofilm-stimulatory activities when added to the culture of a control S. aureus strain. The extent of biofilm formation by S. aureus was positively correlated to the levels of the 2-alkyl-4-(1H-quinolones (AQs Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy quinoline N-oxide (HQNO produced by the P. aeruginosa isolates. Supernatants from P. aeruginosa isogenic mutants deficient in PQS and HQNO production stimulated significantly less biofilm formation by S. aureus than that seen with the parental strain PA14. When studying co-isolated pairs of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus retrieved from patients showing both pathogens, P. aeruginosa supernatants stimulated less biofilm production by the S. aureus counterparts compared to that observed using the control S. aureus strain. Accordingly, some P. aeruginosa isolates produced low levels of exoproducts and also some of the clinical S. aureus isolates were not stimulated by their co-isolates or by PA14 despite adequate production of HQNO. This suggests that colonization of the CF lungs promotes some type of strain selection, or that co-existence requires specific adaptations by either or both pathogens. Results provide insights on bacterial interactions in CF.

  6. Analysis for 340 Cases of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection and Drug Resistance%340株铜绿假单胞菌感染及耐药性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华俊彦; 刘丙进; 田伟强; 魏益娟

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解铜绿假单胞菌感染分布及其时不同类型抗菌药物的耐药情况,以指导临床合理用药.方法 抽取2009年1~12月浙江省丽水市中心医院感染铜绿假单胞菌病例340例,分别对临床感染病原菌分布、细菌耐药性及临床用药情况等进行回顾性分析.结果 从痰标本中分离的铜绿假单胞菌菌株最多,阳性率为80.3%;对铜绿假单胞菌敏感性最高的是多粘菌素(97.1%),其次是阿米卡星(91.8%)、妥布霉素(83.2%);耐药性最高的是复方磺胺甲(口恶)唑(97.4%),其次是米诺环素(92.6%)、美洛西林(70.9%).金属酶阳性菌株仅对多粘菌素B敏感,对其余抗菌药物表现高度耐药.结论 医院感染铜绿假单胞菌的情况十分严峻,医生应合理选用抗菌药物,减少耐药菌株的产生.%Objective To investigate Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection distribution and drug resistance of different types of antibacterial agents in our hospital from January to December on 2009, to guide the clinical rational use of medicines. Methods 340 cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in our hospital were collected, the distribution of clinical infection, bacterial resistance and retrospectively clinical medication were analyzed, respectively. Results The most Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from sputum samples, with the positive rate as 80. 3% ; the highest sensitive agent to Pseudomonas aeruginosa was polymyxin(account for 97.1% ) .followed by amikacin(91.8% ) ,obramycin(83.2% ) ;the highest resistance was SMZ-TMP( account for 97.4% ) .followed by klinomycin(92. 6% ) ,mezlocillin(70. 9% ). The metalloenzyme masculine strain was only sensitive to polymyxin B, while resistant to other antibiotics. Conclusion Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in hospital is in a tough situation. The drug sensitivity results suggest that doctors should choose antibiotics reasonable, in order to reduce the emergence of drug-resistant strains.

  7. Immunization with 3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone-r-PcrV conjugate enhances survival of mice against lethal burn infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isar Dejban Golpasha

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quorum Sensing and type III secretion system play an important role in the virulence of Pseudomonas (P. aeruginosa in burn wound infections. We aimed to explore the feasibility of using 3-oxo-C12-HSL-r-PcrV conjugate as a candidate vaccine against P. aeruginosa caused infections. 3-oxo-C12-HSL-r-PcrV conjugate was prepared and used for immunization of mice (10 μg, subcutaneous, three times, at 2-week intervals. Mice were divided into five groups: I: PcrV; II: 3-oxo-C12-HSL-r-PcrV (10 μg; III: 3-oxo-C12-HSL-r-PcrV (20 μg; IV: 3-oxo-C12-HSL; and V: PBS receiving groups.  After each shot of immunization, total and isotype antibody responses against corresponding antigen were measured to determine the immunization efficacy. One month after the last immunization, all groups were burned and challenged subeschar with P. aeruginosa PAO1. Survival rate and bacterial quantity in the skin and internal organs (liver and spleen were evaluated 25-hr after burn infection. Immunization with 3-oxo-C12-HSL-r-PcrV significantly increased total IgG and specific subclass antibodies (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgM in the serum of the groups II and III compared to the control group (p<0.001. While all the control mice (PBS injected group died within 2 days after bacterial challenge, 64% of the group I, 78% of group II, and 86% of group III, survived within 14 days after challenge. Interestingly, bacterial burden in the liver and spleen of 3-oxo-C12-HSL-r-PcrV injected group (III was significantly lower than the control group (p<0.001.  The present study proposed two-component vaccine to inhibit Pseudomonas infections in burned mouse. 

  8. Chronic hepatitis E infection in lung transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Puchhammer-Stockl, Elisabeth; van der Weide, Hinke Y.; Haagsma, Elizabeth B.; Jaksch, Peter; Bejvl, Isabella; Niesters, Hubert G.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 has been identified in patients with autochthonous HEV infections in developed countries and is currently being recognized as an emerging zoonotic pathogen. HEV infection may lead to a chronic hepatitis in immune-compromised patients. METHODS: We studie

  9. Anaerobic survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by pyruvate fermentation requires an Usp-type stress protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K; Boes, N; Escbach, M;

    2006-01-01

    :4596-4604, 2004). Anaerobic long-term survival of P. aeruginosa might be essential for survival in deeper layers of a biofilm and the persistent infection of anaerobic mucus plaques in the cystic fibrosis lung. Proteome analysis of P. aeruginosa cells during a 7-day period of pyruvate fermentation revealed......Recently, we identified a pyruvate fermentation pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa sustaining anaerobic survival in the absence of alternative anaerobic respiratory and fermentative energy generation systems (M. Eschbach, K. Schreiber, K. Trunk, J. Buer, D. Jahn, and M. Schobert, J. Bacteriol. 186...... the induced synthesis of three enzymes involved in arginine fermentation, ArcA, ArcB, and ArcC, and the outer membrane protein OprL. Moreover, formation of two proteins of unknown function, PA3309 and PA4352, increased by factors of 72- and 22-fold, respectively. Both belong to the group of universal stress...

  10. [Acanthamoeba, naturally intracellularly infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after their isolation from a microbiologically contaminated drinking water system in a hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, R; Burghardt, H; Bergmann, H

    1995-03-01

    The drinking water system of a new hospital building that was highly contaminated with bacteria before opening was investigated too for the prevalence of small free living amoebae. Germ counts resulted in > 100 CFU/ml in 100% of the cold water samples, that showed also growth of P. aeruginosa, whereas E. coli and coliforme bacteria could not be identified. The investigation of 37 water samples for protozoa revealed growth of small freeliving amoebae in 20 samples (54%) belonging to 10 species of the genus Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Hartmannella, Echinamoeba among others. In addition 2 Ciliate- and 2 Microflagellate-species could be observed. While all Naegleria strains isolated belonged to the N. gruberi-complex two of 16 Acanthamoeba-isolates proved to be pathogenic for laboratory mice. From 7 watersamples positive with P. aeruginosa 5 Acanthamoeba- and 2 Echinamoeba strains could be isolated which revealed intracellular multiplication of P. aeruginosa. Because of their well known resistances against chlorine, the amoebae and their cysts are considered to be vectors for these intracellular bacteria. A complete sanitation of the incriminated drinking water system was accomplished by combined chemical and thermic disinfection measures.

  11. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin that hijacks the host ubiquitin proteolytic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Bomberger

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen chronically infecting the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, pneumonia, cystic fibrosis (CF, and bronchiectasis. Cif (PA2934, a bacterial toxin secreted in outer membrane vesicles (OMV by P. aeruginosa, reduces CFTR-mediated chloride secretion by human airway epithelial cells, a key driving force for mucociliary clearance. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism whereby Cif reduces CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Cif redirected endocytosed CFTR from recycling endosomes to lysosomes by stabilizing an inhibitory effect of G3BP1 on the deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB, USP10, thereby reducing USP10-mediated deubiquitination of CFTR and increasing the degradation of CFTR in lysosomes. This is the first example of a bacterial toxin that regulates the activity of a host DUB. These data suggest that the ability of P. aeruginosa to chronically infect the lungs of patients with COPD, pneumonia, CF, and bronchiectasis is due in part to the secretion of OMV containing Cif, which inhibits CFTR-mediated chloride secretion and thereby reduces the mucociliary clearance of pathogens.

  12. Suppression in lung defense responses after bacterial infection in rats pretreated with different welding fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiology suggests that inhalation of welding fumes increases the susceptibility to lung infection. The effects of chemically distinct welding fumes on lung defense responses after bacterial infection were compared. Fume was collected during gas metal arc (GMA) or flux-covered manual metal arc (MMA) welding using two consumable electrodes: stainless steel (SS) or mild steel (MS). The fumes were separated into water-soluble and -insoluble fractions. The GMA-SS and GMA-MS fumes were found to be relatively insoluble, whereas the MMA-SS was highly water soluble, with the soluble fraction comprised of 87% Cr and 11% Mn. On day 0, male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with saline (vehicle control) or the different welding fumes (0.1 or 2 mg/rat). At day 3, the rats were intratracheally inoculated with 5 x 103 Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, left lungs were removed, homogenized, cultured overnight, and colony-forming units were counted to assess pulmonary bacterial clearance. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on right lungs to recover phagocytes and BAL fluid to measure the production of nitric oxide (NO) and immunomodulatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, and IL-10. In contrast to the GMA-SS, GMA-MS, and saline groups, pretreatment with the highly water soluble MMA-SS fume caused significant body weight loss, extensive lung damage, and a dramatic reduction in pulmonary clearance of L. monocytogenes after infection. NO concentrations in BAL fluid and lung immunostaining of inducible NO synthase were dramatically increased in rats pretreated with MMA-SS before and after infection. MMA-SS treatment caused a significant decrease in IL-2 and significant increases in TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 after infection. In conclusion, pretreatment with MMA-SS increased production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) after infection, which are likely responsible for the elevation

  13. Hypoxia, innate immunity and infection in the lung

    OpenAIRE

    Schaible, Bettina; Schaffer, Kirsten; Taylor, Cormac T.

    2010-01-01

    The mucosal surface of the lung is the key interface between the external atmosphere and the bloodstream. Normally, this well oxygenated tissue is maintained in state of sterility by a number of innate immune processes. These include a physical and dynamic mucus barrier, the production of microbiocidal peptides and the expression of specific pattern recognition receptors on alveolar epithelial cells and resident macrophages and dendritic cells which recognise microbial structures and initiate...

  14. Lung function and bronchial responsiveness after Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, B.B.; Jensen, J.S.; Nielsen, K.G.;

    2008-01-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) pneumoniae has been associated with exacerbation of symptoms in asthmatic school children and adults; and an etiological role in asthma has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether infection with M. pneumoniae in early childhood has a long-term influence...... on lung function and bronchial responsiveness. In a retrospective, clinical cohort-study children younger than 5 years-of-age when PCR-tested for M. pneumoniae were enrolled. Sixty-five children with clinical symptoms suggesting infection with M. pneumoniae during an epidemic season completed a clinical...... follow-up examination including lung function testing (28 PCR-positive and 37 PCR-negative). In addition to the PCR-tested for M. pneumoniae all respiratory tract specimens were additionally tested for other atypical bacteria and for viruses by PCR. Lung function was measured as specific airway...

  15. Effects of Marijuana on the Lung and Its Defenses against Infection and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkin, Donald P.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the many effects of marijuana use on the lungs. States that patients with pre-existing immune deficits are particularly vulnerable to marijuana-related pulmonary infections. However, warns that habitual use of marijuana may lead to respiratory cancer must await epidemiological studies, which are now possible since 30 years have passed…

  16. Mechanical ventilation enhances lung inflammation and caspase activity in a model of mouse pneumovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Bem; J.B.M. van Woensel; A.P. Bos; A. Koski; A.W. Farnand; J.B. Domachowske; H.F. Rosenberg; T.R. Martin; G. Matute-Bello

    2009-01-01

    Severe infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children can progress to respiratory distress and acute lung injury (ALI). Accumulating evidence suggests that mechanical ventilation (MV) is an important cofactor in the development of ALI by modulating the host immune responses to bacteria

  17. TREM-2 promotes macrophage survival and lung disease after respiratory viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kangyun; Byers, Derek E.; Jin, Xiaohua; Agapov, Eugene; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Patel, Anand C.; Cella, Marina; Gilfilan, Susan; Colonna, Marco; Kober, Daniel L.; Brett, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections and type 2 immune responses are thought to be critical for the development of chronic respiratory disease, but the link between these events needs to be better defined. Here, we study a mouse model in which infection with a mouse parainfluenza virus known as Sendai virus (SeV) leads to long-term activation of innate immune cells that drive IL-13–dependent lung disease. We find that chronic postviral disease (signified by formation of excess airway mucus and accumulation of M2-differentiating lung macrophages) requires macrophage expression of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2). Analysis of mechanism shows that viral replication increases lung macrophage levels of intracellular and cell surface TREM-2, and this action prevents macrophage apoptosis that would otherwise occur during the acute illness (5–12 d after inoculation). However, the largest increases in TREM-2 levels are found as the soluble form (sTREM-2) long after clearance of infection (49 d after inoculation). At this time, IL-13 and the adapter protein DAP12 promote TREM-2 cleavage to sTREM-2 that is unexpectedly active in preventing macrophage apoptosis. The results thereby define an unprecedented mechanism for a feed-forward expansion of lung macrophages (with IL-13 production and consequent M2 differentiation) that further explains how acute infection leads to chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:25897174

  18. Regulatory aspects of Phase 3 endpoints for new inhaled antibiotics for cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Alan Bruce; Abuan, Tammy; Yeager, Melissa A

    2012-08-01

    Available regulatory guidelines for developing inhaled anti-infective therapies offer general advice, but specific guidance often provides conflicting and outdated advice in regard to clinical trial design. For instance, the availability of two approved drugs makes the conduct of placebo-controlled trials longer than 28 days problematic. Comparator drugs require use per the product label, making comparator trials difficult to blind as taste, foaming, regimen, device, and delivery time differences are present. Currently, there is no consensus on the most appropriate endpoints for evaluation of aerosolized antimicrobials. FEV(1) is a surrogate endpoint that it is a predictor of mortality--it is standardized, reproducible, noninvasive, simple, and inexpensive to perform but small statistically significant changes may not be clinically important. FEV(1) improvement also has a ceiling effect in patients with mild lung function impairment and spirometry cannot be reliably done in patients under the age of 6 years. A patient-reported outcome is a promising clinical endpoint. However, there is not currently an accepted tool that can be used as a primary endpoint for the FDA or the EMA, although the latter recognizes the CFQ-R as a validated secondary endpoint and the FDA grandfathered acceptance of the CFQ-R respiratory domain in the pivotal aztreonam for inhalation study. Exacerbations are an important clinical endpoint that reflects morbidity and are a major driver of cost of care, but they occur infrequently and a standardized definition has not been reached. Furthermore, an exacerbation endpoint may fail even with an otherwise effective antibiotic therapy. Regulatory authorities will have a difficult time approving any new inhaled antibiotic based on one clinical endpoint alone. PMID:22857271

  19. Molecular detection of an atypical, highly resistant, clonal Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate in cystic fibrosis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Deirdre

    2013-03-01

    The identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates in sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can be challenging due to the multitude of phenotypic changes isolates undergo during adaptation to the microenvironment of the CF lung.

  20. 铜绿假单胞菌血流感染27例临床分析%Clinical analysis of bloodstream infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁艳苓; 姚婉贞; 宁永忠

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of blood stream infections caused by P. aeruginosa. Methods The clinical data were retrospectively reviewed for the patients with P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection who were treated in Peking University Third Hospital from January 2006 to December 2009. Results A total of 27 patients were found with P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection. The Charlson scores of the patients were 4. 48 ± 2. 10. All patients had fever and increased or decreased white blood cell counts when their bloodstream infection was identified. Six patients were infected by multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains. Compared with the patients with non-MDR P. aeruginosa infection, the patients infected by MDR strains had significantly higher APACHE TJ scores and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores at admission, longer stay in Intensive Care Unit (RICU and SICU), higher prevalence of multiple (two or more) antibiotics use before positive blood culture after admission, and lower proprotion of patients with appropriate antibiotic therapy after blood culture. The Charlson scores, clinical manifestation, APACHE TJ scores and SOFA scores at the time of bloodstream infection, and in-hospital mortality were similar between the two groups of patients. Conclusions The patients with P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection showed severe clinical status and high mortality rate. The MDR strains-infected patients had more severe conditions than those infected by non-MDR strains, but their clinical manifestations were similar. Patients with bloodstream infection should subject to microbiological testing and be treated with appropriate active agents as soon as possible to reduce fatality rate.%目的 探讨铜绿假单胞菌血流感染的临床特点及细菌耐药性.方法 回顾性分析北京大学第三医院2006年1月-2009年12月铜绿假单胞菌血流感染患者的临床及微生物学资料.结果 27例患者纳入分

  1. Extracellular Adenosine Protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae Lung Infection by Regulating Pulmonary Neutrophil Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Ghanem, Elsa N; Clark, Stacie; Roggensack, Sara E; McIver, Sally R; Alcaide, Pilar; Haydon, Philip G; Leong, John M

    2015-08-01

    An important determinant of disease following Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) lung infection is pulmonary inflammation mediated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). We found that upon intratracheal challenge of mice, recruitment of PMNs into the lungs within the first 3 hours coincided with decreased pulmonary pneumococci, whereas large numbers of pulmonary PMNs beyond 12 hours correlated with a greater bacterial burden. Indeed, mice that survived infection largely resolved inflammation by 72 hours, and PMN depletion at peak infiltration, i.e. 18 hours post-infection, lowered bacterial numbers and enhanced survival. We investigated host signaling pathways that influence both pneumococcus clearance and pulmonary inflammation. Pharmacologic inhibition and/or genetic ablation of enzymes that generate extracellular adenosine (EAD) (e.g. the ectoenzyme CD73) or degrade EAD (e.g. adenosine deaminase) revealed that EAD dramatically increases murine resistance to S. pneumoniae lung infection. Moreover, adenosine diminished PMN movement across endothelial monolayers in vitro, and although inhibition or deficiency of CD73 had no discernible impact on PMN recruitment within the first 6 hours after intratracheal inoculation of mice, these measures enhanced PMN numbers in the pulmonary interstitium after 18 hours of infection, culminating in dramatically elevated numbers of pulmonary PMNs at three days post-infection. When assessed at this time point, CD73-/- mice displayed increased levels of cellular factors that promote leukocyte migration, such as CXCL2 chemokine in the murine lung, as well as CXCR2 and β-2 integrin on the surface of pulmonary PMNs. The enhanced pneumococcal susceptibility of CD73-/- mice was significantly reversed by PMN depletion following infection, suggesting that EAD-mediated resistance is largely mediated by its effects on PMNs. Finally, CD73-inhibition diminished the ability of PMNs to kill pneumococci in vitro, suggesting that EAD alters

  2. Airway CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Lung Injury during Infant Viral Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Thomas J; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Bickham, Kara L; Gordon, Claire L; Zhang, Feifan; Levin, Bruce; Baird, John S; Farber, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    Infants and young children are disproportionately susceptible to severe complications from respiratory viruses, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Recent studies show that the T cell response in the lung is important for protective responses to respiratory infections, although details on the infant/pediatric respiratory immune response remain sparse. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the local versus systemic immune response in infants and young children with respiratory failure from viral respiratory tract infections and its association to disease severity. Daily airway secretions were sampled from infants and children 4 years of age and younger receiving mechanical ventilation owing to respiratory failure from viral infection or noninfectious causes. Samples were examined for immune cell composition and markers of T cell activation. These parameters were then correlated with clinical disease severity. Innate immune cells and total CD3(+) T cells were present in similar proportions in airway aspirates derived from infected and uninfected groups; however, the CD8:CD4 T cell ratio was markedly increased in the airways of patients with viral infection compared with uninfected patients, and specifically in infected infants with acute lung injury. T cells in the airways were phenotypically and functionally distinct from those in blood with activated/memory phenotypes and increased cytotoxic capacity. We identified a significant increase in airway cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in infants with lung injury from viral respiratory tract infection that was distinct from the T cell profile in circulation and associated with increasing disease severity. Airway sampling could therefore be diagnostically informative for assessing immune responses and lung damage. PMID:26618559

  3. Inhibition of lung serine proteases in mice: a potentially new approach to control influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błazejewska Paulina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host serine proteases are essential for the influenza virus life cycle because the viral haemagglutinin is synthesized as a precursor which requires proteolytic maturation. Therefore, we studied the activity and expression of serine proteases in lungs from mice infected with influenza and evaluated the effect of serine protease inhibitors on virus replication both in cell culture and in infected mice. Results Two different inbred mouse strains were investigated: DBA/2J as a highly susceptible and C57Bl/6J as a more resistant strain to influenza virus infection. The serine proteases from lung homogenates of mice exhibited pH optima of 10.00. Using the substrate Bz-Val-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide or in zymograms, the intensities of proteolysis increased in homogenates from both mouse strains with time post infection (p.i. with the mouse-adapted influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1; PR8. In zymograms at day 7 p.i., proteolytic bands were stronger and numerous in lung homogenates from DBA/2J than C57Bl/6J mice. Real-time PCR results confirmed differential expression of several lung proteases before and after infecting mice with the H1N1 virus. The most strongly up-regulated proteases were Gzma, Tmprss4, Elane, Ctrl, Gzmc and Gzmb. Pretreatment of mouse and human lung cell lines with the serine protease inhibitors AEBSF or pAB or a cocktail of both prior to infection with the H1N1 or the A/Seal/Massachusetts/1/80 (H7N7; SC35M virus resulted in a decrease in virus replication. Pretreatment of C57Bl/6J mice with either AEBSF or a cocktail of AEBSF and pAB prior to infection with the H1N1 virus significantly reduced weight loss and led to a faster recovery of treated versus untreated mice while pAB alone exerted a very poor effect. After infection with the H7N7 virus, the most significant reduction of weight loss was obtained upon pretreatment with either the protease inhibitor cocktail or pAB. Furthermore, pretreatment of C57BL/6J

  4. Influenza infects lung microvascular endothelium leading to microvascular leak: role of apoptosis and claudin-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Armstrong

    Full Text Available Severe influenza infections are complicated by acute lung injury, a syndrome of pulmonary microvascular leak. The pathogenesis of this complication is unclear. We hypothesized that human influenza could directly infect the lung microvascular endothelium, leading to loss of endothelial barrier function. We infected human lung microvascular endothelium with both clinical and laboratory strains of human influenza. Permeability of endothelial monolayers was assessed by spectrofluorimetry and by measurement of the transendothelial electrical resistance. We determined the molecular mechanisms of flu-induced endothelial permeability and developed a mouse model of severe influenza. We found that both clinical and laboratory strains of human influenza can infect and replicate in human pulmonary microvascular endothelium, leading to a marked increase in permeability. This was caused by apoptosis of the lung endothelium, since inhibition of caspases greatly attenuated influenza-induced endothelial leak. Remarkably, replication-deficient virus also caused a significant degree of endothelial permeability, despite displaying no cytotoxic effects to the endothelium. Instead, replication-deficient virus induced degradation of the tight junction protein claudin-5; the adherens junction protein VE-cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton were unaffected. Over-expression of claudin-5 was sufficient to prevent replication-deficient virus-induced permeability. The barrier-protective agent formoterol was able to markedly attenuate flu-induced leak in association with dose-dependent induction of claudin-5. Finally, mice infected with human influenza developed pulmonary edema that was abrogated by parenteral treatment with formoterol. Thus, we describe two distinct mechanisms by which human influenza can induce pulmonary microvascular leak. Our findings have implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of acute lung injury from severe influenza.

  5. Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, Alexander N.; Foong, Rachel E.; Bozanich, Elizabeth M.; Berry, Luke J.; Garratt, Luke W.; Gualano, Rosa C.; Jones, Jessica E.; Dousha, Lovisa F.; Zosky, Graeme R.; Sly, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Larcombe et al. (2011) Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 334–342. Background  Males are generally more susceptible to respiratory infections; however, there are few data on the physiological responses to such infections in males and females. Objectives  To determine whether sexual dimorphism exists in the physiological/inflammatory responses of weanling and adult BALB/c mice to influenza. Methods  Weanling and adult mice of both sexes were inoculated with influenza A or appropriate control solution. Respiratory mechanics, responsiveness to methacholine (MCh), viral titre and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellular inflammation/cytokines were measured 4 (acute) and 21 (resolution) days post‐inoculation. Results  Acute infection impaired lung function and induced hyperresponsiveness and cellular inflammation in both sexes at both ages. Males and females responded differently with female mice developing greater abnormalities in tissue damping and elastance and greater MCh responsiveness at both ages. BAL inflammation, cytokines and lung viral titres were similar between the sexes. At resolution, all parameters had returned to baseline levels in adults and weanling males; however, female weanlings had persisting hyperresponsiveness. Conclusions  We identified significant differences in the physiological responses of male and female mice to infection with influenza A, which occurred in the absence of variation in viral titre and cellular inflammation. PMID:21668688

  6. Impairment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Resistance to Antibiotics by Combining the Drugs with a New Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, Barbora; El Hage, Salome; Baziard, Genevieve; Roques, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an important role in chronic lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) through its ability to form antibiotic-resistant biofilms. In P. aeruginosa, biofilm development and the production of several virulence factors are mainly regulated by the rhl and las quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which are controlled by two N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules. In a previous study, we discovered an original QS inhibitor, N-(2-pyrimidyl)butanamide, called C11, based on the structure of C4-homoserine lactone, and found that it is able to significantly inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. However, recent data indicate that P. aeruginosa grows under anaerobic conditions and forms biofilms in the lungs of CF patients that are denser and more robust than those formed under aerobic conditions. Our confocal microscopy observations of P. aeruginosa biofilms developed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions confirmed that the biofilms formed under these two conditions have radically different architectures. C11 showed significant dose-dependent antibiofilm activity on biofilms grown under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with a greater inhibitory effect being seen under conditions of anaerobiosis. Gene expression analyses performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that C11 led to the significant downregulation of rhl QS regulatory genes but also to the downregulation of both las QS regulatory genes and QS system-regulated virulence genes, rhlA and lasB. Furthermore, the activity of C11 in combination with antibiotics against P. aeruginosa biofilms was tested, and synergistic antibiofilm activity between C11 and ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and colistin was obtained under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This study demonstrates that C11 may increase the efficacy of treatments for P. aeruginosa infections by increasing the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and by attenuating the pathogenicity of the

  7. Impairment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Resistance to Antibiotics by Combining the Drugs with a New Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furiga, Aurelie; Lajoie, Barbora; El Hage, Salome; Baziard, Genevieve; Roques, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an important role in chronic lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) through its ability to form antibiotic-resistant biofilms. In P. aeruginosa, biofilm development and the production of several virulence factors are mainly regulated by the rhl and las quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which are controlled by two N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules. In a previous study, we discovered an original QS inhibitor, N-(2-pyrimidyl)butanamide, called C11, based on the structure of C4-homoserine lactone, and found that it is able to significantly inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. However, recent data indicate that P. aeruginosa grows under anaerobic conditions and forms biofilms in the lungs of CF patients that are denser and more robust than those formed under aerobic conditions. Our confocal microscopy observations of P. aeruginosa biofilms developed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions confirmed that the biofilms formed under these two conditions have radically different architectures. C11 showed significant dose-dependent antibiofilm activity on biofilms grown under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with a greater inhibitory effect being seen under conditions of anaerobiosis. Gene expression analyses performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that C11 led to the significant downregulation of rhl QS regulatory genes but also to the downregulation of both las QS regulatory genes and QS system-regulated virulence genes, rhlA and lasB. Furthermore, the activity of C11 in combination with antibiotics against P. aeruginosa biofilms was tested, and synergistic antibiofilm activity between C11 and ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and colistin was obtained under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This study demonstrates that C11 may increase the efficacy of treatments for P. aeruginosa infections by increasing the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and by attenuating the pathogenicity of the

  8. Biological efficacy and stability of diluted ticarcillin-clavulanic acid in the topical treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Fiona L; Moss, Susan M; Trott, Darren J; Shipstone, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    Topical compounded Timentin(®) diluted with an inactive vehicle has been reported to be effective in the treatment of otitis externa caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aims of this study were to determine the biological efficacy of Timentin(®) (ticarcillin and clavulanic acid) when diluted in the carrier vehicle Methopt(®) against P. aeruginosa and to determine the efficacy and stability of Timentin(®) aqueous stock concentrate solution. Timentin(®) stock concentrate was tested against four P. aeruginosa isolates on days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28; then after 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 12 months of storage at 4 or -20°C. The diluted Timentin(®)-Methopt(®) solutions were tested against all isolates after 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 17, 21, 24 and 28 days of storage at 24 or 4°C. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels for all strains were determined using the broth microdilution method. The MIC of the stock solution remained relatively constant and acceptable throughout the study when stored at -20°C and was also acceptable for shorter time periods (6-9 months) when stored at 4°C. The MIC for the diluted Timentin(®)-Methopt(®) solution remained relatively constant and acceptable throughout the study for all four bacterial strains, with no difference between the solutions stored at 4 or 24°C. The results of this study indicate that storage of the Timentin(®) stock solution at -20°C does not compromise efficacy for at least 12 months and that Timentin(®) diluted in Methopt(®) was stable for 28 days when stored at either 4 or 24°C.

  9. Treatment of Severe Post-kidney-transplant Lung Infection by Integrative Chinese and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore treatments of severe post-kidney-transplant lung infection by integrative Chinese and Western medicine (ICWM), in order to elevate the curing rate as well as to lower the death rate. Methods: Based on conventional ways of Western medical treatments of 18 cases of severe post-kidney-transplant lung infection, such as putting the patients in single individual ward, antibiotics to prevent infection, respiratory machines, blood filtration, nutritional support, steroids, and maintaining electrolytes balance, we applied integrated Chinese medicinal treatments, like altering conventional prescription "pneumonia Ⅲ ", and conducted clinical observation of effectiveness, and indexes including white blood cell (WBC), neutrophilic granulocyte, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), blood creatinine (Cr), etc. Results: Of the 18cases studied, 7 were already cured, 8 proved the treatment effective, 3 died. All clinical indexes had statistically significant changes compared with those of before treatment (P<0.01). Conclusion: ICWM can increase curing rate and lower death rate.

  10. Genome Wide Host Gene Expression Analysis in Chicken Lungs Infected with Avian Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhale, Pradeep N.; Kumar, Himanshu; Kulkarni, Diwakar D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of avian influenza infection varies greatly with individual bird species and virus strain. The molecular pathogenesis of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) or the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infection in avian species remains poorly understood. Thus, global immune response of chickens infected with HPAI H5N1 (A/duck/India/02CA10/2011) and LPAI H9N2 (A/duck/India/249800/2010) viruses was studied using microarray to identify crucial host genetic components responsive to these infection. HPAI H5N1 virus induced excessive expression of type I IFNs (IFNA and IFNG), cytokines (IL1B, IL18, IL22, IL13, and IL12B), chemokines (CCL4, CCL19, CCL10, and CX3CL1) and IFN stimulated genes (OASL, MX1, RSAD2, IFITM5, IFIT5, GBP 1, and EIF2AK) in lung tissues. This dysregulation of host innate immune genes may be the critical determinant of the severity and the outcome of the influenza infection in chickens. In contrast, the expression levels of most of these genes was not induced in the lungs of LPAI H9N2 virus infected chickens. This study indicated the relationship between host immune genes and their roles in pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in chickens. PMID:27071061

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin LecB inhibits tissue repair processes by triggering β-catenin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cott, Catherine; Thuenauer, Roland; Landi, Alessia; Kühn, Katja; Juillot, Samuel; Imberty, Anne; Madl, Josef; Eierhoff, Thorsten; Römer, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that induces severe lung infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and acute lung injury. Under these conditions, the bacterium diminishes epithelial integrity and inhibits tissue repair mechanisms, leading to persistent infections. Understanding the involved bacterial virulence factors and their mode of action is essential for the development of new therapeutic approaches. In our study we discovered a so far unknown effect of the P. aeruginosa lectin LecB on host cell physiology. LecB alone was sufficient to attenuate migration and proliferation of human lung epithelial cells and to induce transcriptional activity of NF-κB. These effects are characteristic of impaired tissue repair. Moreover, we found a strong degradation of β-catenin, which was partially recovered by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. In addition, LecB induced loss of cell-cell contacts and reduced expression of the β-catenin targets c-myc and cyclin D1. Blocking of LecB binding to host cell plasma membrane receptors by soluble l-fucose prevented these changes in host cell behavior and signaling, and thereby provides a powerful strategy to suppress LecB function. Our findings suggest that P. aeruginosa employs LecB as a virulence factor to induce β-catenin degradation, which then represses processes that are directly linked to tissue recovery. PMID:26862060

  12. Colistin-Tobramycin Combinations Are Superior to Monotherapy Concerning the Killing of Biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, G.; Yang, Liang; Wu, H.;

    2010-01-01

    biofilms. Methods. P. aeruginosa biofilms were generated in vitro and in rat lungs. In a pilot study, 5 patients with cystic fibrosis inhaled colistin and then tobramycin for 4 weeks. The changes in P. aeruginosa counts and lung function were assessed before and after therapy. Results. Antibiotic...... combination therapy significantly reduced the number of P. aeruginosa cells in P. aeruginosa biofilm models in vitro. When rats were challenged with 1 x 10(7) cfu of P. aeruginosa, which was embedded in alginate beads, mortality rates, lung pathologic findings, and bacterial colony-forming unit counts were...

  13. Respiratory Failure due to Possible Donor-Derived Sporothrix schenckii Infection in a Lung Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Bahr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. De novo and donor-derived invasive fungal infections (IFIs contribute to morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant (SOT recipients. Reporting of donor-derived IFIs (DDIFIs to the Organ Procurement Transplant Network has been mandated since 2005. Prior to that time no systematic monitoring of DDIFIs occurred in the United States. Case Presentation. We report a case of primary graft dysfunction in a 49-year-old male lung transplant recipient with diffuse patchy bilateral infiltrates likely related to pulmonary Sporothrix schenckii infection. The organism was isolated from a bronchoalveolar lavage on the second day after transplantation. Clinical and radiographic responses occurred after initiation of amphotericin B lipid formulation. Conclusion. We believe that this was likely a donor-derived infection given the early timing of the Sporothrix isolation after transplant in a bilateral single lung transplant recipient. This is the first case report of sporotrichosis in a lung transplant recipient. Our patient responded well to amphotericin induction therapy followed by maintenance therapy with itraconazole. The implications of donor-derived fungal infections and Sporothrix in transplant recipients are reviewed. Early recognition and management of these fungi are essential in improving outcomes.

  14. Respiratory Failure due to Possible Donor-Derived Sporothrix schenckii Infection in a Lung Transplant Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Nathan C; Janssen, Katherine; Billings, Joanne; Loor, Gabriel; Green, Jaime S

    2015-01-01

    Background. De novo and donor-derived invasive fungal infections (IFIs) contribute to morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Reporting of donor-derived IFIs (DDIFIs) to the Organ Procurement Transplant Network has been mandated since 2005. Prior to that time no systematic monitoring of DDIFIs occurred in the United States. Case Presentation. We report a case of primary graft dysfunction in a 49-year-old male lung transplant recipient with diffuse patchy bilateral infiltrates likely related to pulmonary Sporothrix schenckii infection. The organism was isolated from a bronchoalveolar lavage on the second day after transplantation. Clinical and radiographic responses occurred after initiation of amphotericin B lipid formulation. Conclusion. We believe that this was likely a donor-derived infection given the early timing of the Sporothrix isolation after transplant in a bilateral single lung transplant recipient. This is the first case report of sporotrichosis in a lung transplant recipient. Our patient responded well to amphotericin induction therapy followed by maintenance therapy with itraconazole. The implications of donor-derived fungal infections and Sporothrix in transplant recipients are reviewed. Early recognition and management of these fungi are essential in improving outcomes.

  15. Candida albicans ethanol stimulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa WspR-controlled biofilm formation as part of a cyclic relationship involving phenazines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie I Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In chronic infections, pathogens are often in the presence of other microbial species. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common and detrimental lung pathogen in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF and co-infections with Candida albicans are common. Here, we show that P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and phenazine production were strongly influenced by ethanol produced by the fungus C. albicans. Ethanol stimulated phenotypes that are indicative of increased levels of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP, and levels of c-di-GMP were 2-fold higher in the presence of ethanol. Through a genetic screen, we found that the diguanylate cyclase WspR was required for ethanol stimulation of c-di-GMP. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that ethanol stimulates WspR signaling through its cognate sensor WspA, and promotes WspR-dependent activation of Pel exopolysaccharide production, which contributes to biofilm maturation. We also found that ethanol stimulation of WspR promoted P. aeruginosa colonization of CF airway epithelial cells. P. aeruginosa production of phenazines occurs both in the CF lung and in culture, and phenazines enhance ethanol production by C. albicans. Using a C. albicans adh1/adh1 mutant with decreased ethanol production, we found that fungal ethanol strongly altered the spectrum of P. aeruginosa phenazines in favor of those that are most effective against fungi. Thus, a feedback cycle comprised of ethanol and phenazines drives this polymicrobial interaction, and these relationships may provide insight into why co-infection with both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans has been associated with worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis.

  16. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltner, John B.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Pope, Christopher E.; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E.; Greenberg, E. Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Over years to decades, P. aeruginosa adapts genetically as it establishes chronic lung infections. Nonsynonymous mutations in lasR, the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator, are common in CF. In laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa, LasR activates transcription of dozens of genes, including that for another QS regulator, RhlR. Despite the frequency with which lasR coding variants have been reported to occur in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, little is known about their consequences for QS. We sequenced lasR from 2,583 P. aeruginosa CF isolates. The lasR sequences of 580 isolates (22%) coded for polypeptides that differed from the conserved LasR polypeptides of well-studied laboratory strains. This collection included 173 unique lasR coding variants, 116 of which were either missense or nonsense mutations. We studied 31 of these variants. About one-sixth of the variant LasR proteins were functional, including 3 with nonsense mutations, and in some LasR-null isolates, genes that are LasR dependent in laboratory strains were nonetheless expressed. Furthermore, about half of the LasR-null isolates retained RhlR activity. Therefore, in some CF isolates the QS hierarchy is altered such that RhlR quorum sensing is independent of LasR regulation. Our analysis challenges the view that QS-silent P. aeruginosa is selected during the course of a chronic CF lung infection. Rather, some lasR sequence variants retain functionality, and many employ an alternate QS strategy involving RhlR. PMID:27703072

  17. Paragonimus westermani infection in lung: A confounding diagnostic entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Kalhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paragonimiasis is a food-borne parasitic zoonosis caused by the genus Paragonimus. Fresh water snails, crabs, and crayfish are the first and second intermediate hosts, respectively. Humans acquire this infection by ingesting uncooked/undercooked crustaceans. Laboratory diagnosis of Paragonimiasis is done by demonstration of ova in the sputum/feces/pleural fluid or by serology. A case of pulmonary Paragonimiasis is presented herewith; the patient having been diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis earlier. The aim of this presentation is to highlight this entity so that it is considered in the differential diagnosis in a case of hemoptysis.

  18. Paragonimus westermani infection in lung: A confounding diagnostic entity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhan, Shivani; Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Sonia; Kakria, Neha; Dudani, Sharmila; Gupta, Anshu

    2015-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is a food-borne parasitic zoonosis caused by the genus Paragonimus. Fresh water snails, crabs, and crayfish are the first and second intermediate hosts, respectively. Humans acquire this infection by ingesting uncooked/undercooked crustaceans. Laboratory diagnosis of Paragonimiasis is done by demonstration of ova in the sputum/feces/pleural fluid or by serology. A case of pulmonary Paragonimiasis is presented herewith; the patient having been diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis earlier. The aim of this presentation is to highlight this entity so that it is considered in the differential diagnosis in a case of hemoptysis. PMID:25983414

  19. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Emily F A van 't Wout; Annemarie van Schadewijk; Ria van Boxtel; Dalton, Lucy E.; Clarke, Hanna J.; Jan Tommassen; Marciniak, Stefan J; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded pr...

  20. Efficacy of Aerosol MP-376, a Levofloxacin Inhalation Solution, in Models of Mouse Lung Infection Due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sabet, Mojgan; Miller, Courtney E.; Nolan, Thomas G.; Senekeo-Effenberger, Kathy; Dudley, Michael N.; Griffith, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Progressive respiratory failure due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. The pulmonary delivery of antimicrobial agents provides high concentrations of drug directly to the site of infection and attains pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic indices exceeding those which can be achieved with systemic dosing. MP-376 is a new formulation of levofloxacin that enables the safe aerosol delivery of high concentrations of drug to pulmon...

  1. Effect of a plant polyphenol-rich extract on the lung protease activities of influenza-virus-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkedjieva, Julia; Toshkova, Reneta; Antonova-Nikolova, Stefka; Stefanova, Tsvetanka; Teodosieva, Ani; Ivanova, Iskra

    2007-01-01

    Influenza infection was induced in white mice by intranasal inoculation of the virus A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2). The lung protease and the protease-inhibitory activities were followed for 9 days after infection. The intranasal application of a polyphenol-rich extract (PC) isolated from Geranium sanguineum L. induced a continuous rise in the anti-protease activity but did not cause substantial changes in the lung protease activity of healthy mice. Influenza virus infection triggered a slight reduction in protease activity in the lungs at 5 and 48 h post infection (p.i.) and a marked increase at 24 h and 6 day p.i.. Protease inhibition in the lungs was reduced at 24 and 48 h p.i. and an increase was observed at 5 h and 6 and 9 days p.i.. PC treatment brought both activities to normal levels. The restoration of the examined parameters was consistent with a prolongation of mean survival time and reduction of mortality rate, infectious virus titre and lung consolidation. PC reinstated superoxide production by alveolar macrophages and increased their number in virus-infected mice. The favourable effect on the protease and the protease-inhibitory activities in the lungs of influenza-virus-infected mice apparently contributes to the overall protective effect of PC in the murine experimental influenza A/Aichi infection. The antiviral effect of the individual constituents was evaluated. PMID:17542152

  2. Systemic signature of the lung response to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen L A Pennings

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus is a frequent cause of severe bronchiolitis in children. To improve our understanding of systemic host responses to RSV, we compared BALB/c mouse gene expression responses at day 1, 2, and 5 during primary RSV infection in lung, bronchial lymph nodes, and blood. We identified a set of 53 interferon-associated and innate immunity genes that give correlated responses in all three murine tissues. Additionally, we identified blood gene signatures that are indicative of acute infection, secondary immune response, and vaccine-enhanced disease, respectively. Eosinophil-associated ribonucleases were characteristic for the vaccine-enhanced disease blood signature. These results indicate that it may be possible to distinguish protective and unfavorable patient lung responses via blood diagnostics.

  3. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed.

  4. Lung fibrosis in deceased HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica J Shaddock

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP is one of the most common opportunistic infections found in patients with HIV. The prognosis if ventilation is required is poor, with mortality of 36 - 80%. Although more recent studies have shown improved survival, our experience has been that close to 100% of such patients die, and we therefore decided to investigate further. Methods. All patients with confirmed or suspected PcP who died owing to respiratory failure were eligible for the study. Where consent was obtained, trucut lung biopsies were performed post mortem, stored in formalin and sent for histopathological assessment. Results. Twelve adequate lung biopsies were obtained from 1 July 2008 to 28 February 2011 – 3 from men and 9 from women. The mean age was 34.7 years (range 24 - 46, and the mean admission CD4 count was 20.8 (range 1 - 68 cells/μl and median 18.5 cells/μl. All specimens demonstrated typical PcP histopathology; in addition, 9 showed significant interstitial fibrosis. Three had co-infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV, two of which had fibrosis present. There was no evidence of TB or other fungal infections. Conclusion. The high mortality seen in this cohort of PcP patients was due to intractable respiratory failure from interstitial lung fibrosis. whereas the differential includes ventilator induced lung injury, drug resistance or co-infections, we suggest that this is part of the disease progression in certain individuals. Further studies are required to identify interventions that could modify this process and improve outcomes in patients with PcP who require mechanical ventilation. S Afr J HIV Med 2012;13(2:64-67.

  5. Mixed Fungal Lung Infection with Aspergillus Fumigatus and Candida Albicans in a Immunocomprimised Patient: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    S., Jaya; Vipparti, Haritha

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of invasive, opportunistic mycoses has increased significantly over the past 2 decades. In the immune-compromised host, many fungi, including species of fungi typically considered non-pathogenic, have the potential to cause serious morbidity and mortality. Here we report a rare case of mixed fungal infection of the lung with Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus in a patient on prolonged steroid therapy.

  6. Metatranscriptomics reveals metabolic adaptation and induction of virulence factors by Haemophilus parasuis during lung infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bello-Ortí, Bernardo; Howell, Kate J; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J; Aragon, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a common inhabitant of the upper respiratory tract of pigs, and the causative agent of Glässer’s disease. This disease is characterized by polyserositis and arthritis, produced by the severe inflammation caused by the systemic spread of the bacterium. After an initial colonization of the upper respiratory tract, H. parasuis enters the lung during the early stages of pig infection. In order to study gene expression at this location, we sequenced the ex vivo and in vivo ...

  7. Profiling microRNAs in lung tissue from pigs infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

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    Podolska Agnieszka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of non-protein-coding genes that play a crucial regulatory role in mammalian development and disease. Whereas a large number of miRNAs have been annotated at the structural level during the latest years, functional annotation is sparse. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP causes serious lung infections in pigs. Severe damage to the lungs, in many cases deadly, is caused by toxins released by the bacterium and to some degree by host mediated tissue damage. However, understanding of the role of microRNAs in the course of this infectious disease in porcine is still very limited. Results In this study, the RNA extracted from visually unaffected and necrotic tissue from pigs infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was subjected to small RNA deep sequencing. We identified 169 conserved and 11 candidate novel microRNAs in the pig. Of these, 17 were significantly up-regulated in the necrotic sample and 12 were down-regulated. The expression analysis of a number of candidates revealed microRNAs of potential importance in the innate immune response. MiR-155, a known key player in inflammation, was found expressed in both samples. Moreover, miR-664-5p, miR-451 and miR-15a appear as very promising candidates for microRNAs involved in response to pathogen infection. Conclusions This is the first study revealing significant differences in composition and expression profiles of miRNAs in lungs infected with a bacterial pathogen. Our results extend annotation of microRNA in pig and provide insight into the role of a number of microRNAs in regulation of bacteria induced immune and inflammatory response in porcine lung.

  8. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of lung infections in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franquet, Tomas [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Thoracic Radiology Section, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-03-15

    Non-AIDS immunocompromised patients are susceptible to infections by a wide range of organisms. In the past several decades, advances in the treatment of cancer, organ transplantation, and immunosuppressive therapy have resulted in large numbers of patients who develop abnormalities in their immune system. Moreover, mildly impaired host immunity as it occurs in chronic debilitating illness, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition, alcoholism, advanced age, prolonged corticosteroid administration, and chronic obstructive lung disease have also been regarded as predisposing factors of pulmonary infections. Imaging plays a crucial role in the detection and management of patients with pulmonary infectious diseases. When pulmonary infection is suspected, knowledge of the varied radiographic manifestations will narrow the differential diagnosis, helping to direct additional diagnostic measures and serving as an ideal tool for follow-up examinations. Combination of pattern recognition with knowledge of the clinical setting is the best approach to pulmonary infection occurring in the immunocompromised patients. (orig.)

  9. Humoral and lung immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a primate model of protection

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    Noton K. Dutta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently we reported (Mehra et al., 2013, that lung granulomas from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG-vaccinated cynomolgus macaques exhibit upon challenge with M. tuberculosis a more balanced expression of α- and β-chemokines, relative to comparable samples from sham-vaccinated animals by comparative transcriptomics. Here, we studied the recruitment of immune cells to blood and lungs in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques as a function of prior BCG-vaccination. Vaccination initially enhanced the levels of both macrophages and lymphocytes in blood. In contrast, significantly more CD4+ lymphocytes were later recruited to the lungs of sham-vaccinated animals compared with earlier times/BCG vaccinated animals. BCG-vaccination had a short-lived impact on the anti-M. tuberculosis response. M. tuberculosis continued to replicate in the lung even in the wake of increased CD4+ T cell recruitment to primate lungs, indicating that immune subversive mechanisms are key to its survival in vivo.

  10. Mycobacterium sherrisii Lung Infection in a Brazilian Patient with Silicosis and a History of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

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    Carolina de Oliveira Abrão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM diseases became relevant with the emergence and spread of HIV and are also related to lung infection in non-HIV individuals with structural lung diseases. Mycobacterium sherrisii is a NTM first characterized in 2004. Only a few cases have been reported. The aim of this case report is to describe the first detailed case of infection with M. sherrisii in a patient with silicosis and history of pulmonary tuberculosis. A 50-year-old HIV-negative white male, previous smoker, with silicosis and a history of treated pulmonary tuberculosis developed a worsening of cough and expectoration pattern, and two sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli. Presumptive treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis was initiated with rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, but, at month 5 of treatment, despite correct medication intake and slight improvement of symptoms, sputum bacilloscopy remained positive. Sputum cultures were positive Mycobacterium sherrisii. Treatment regimen was altered to streptomycin (for 2 months, ethambutol, clarithromycin, rifabutin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. M. sherrisii should be considered a possible etiological agent of lung infections in patients with pneumoconiosis and history of tuberculosis.

  11. Cigarette smoke worsens lung inflammation and impairs resolution of influenza infection in mice

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    Jones Jessica E

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke has both pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Both active and passive cigarette smoke exposure are linked to an increased incidence and severity of respiratory virus infections, but underlying mechanisms are not well defined. We hypothesized, based on prior gene expression profiling studies, that upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators by short term smoke exposure would be protective against a subsequent influenza infection. Methods BALB/c mice were subjected to whole body smoke exposure with 9 cigarettes/day for 4 days. Mice were then infected with influenza A (H3N1, Mem71 strain, and analyzed 3 and 10 days later (d3, d10. These time points are the peak and resolution (respectively of influenza infection. Results Inflammatory cell influx into the bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF, inflammatory mediators, proteases, histopathology, viral titres and T lymphocyte profiles were analyzed. Compared to smoke or influenza alone, mice exposed to smoke and then influenza had more macrophages, neutrophils and total lymphocytes in BALF at d3, more macrophages in BALF at d10, lower net gelatinase activity and increased activity of tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease-1 in BALF at d3, altered profiles of key cytokines and CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, worse lung pathology and more virus-specific, activated CD8+ T lymphocytes in BALF. Mice smoke exposed before influenza infection had close to 10-fold higher lung virus titres at d3 than influenza alone mice, although all mice had cleared virus by d10, regardless of smoke exposure. Smoke exposure caused temporary weight loss and when smoking ceased after viral infection, smoke and influenza mice regained significantly less weight than smoke alone mice. Conclusion Smoke induced inflammation does not protect against influenza infection. In most respects, smoke exposure worsened the host response to influenza. This animal model may be useful in studying how smoke worsens

  12. Variation in lung function is associated with worse clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    João Paulo Heinzmann-Filho; Leonardo Araujo Pinto; Paulo José Cauduro Marostica; Márcio Vinícius Fagundes Donadio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the variation in lung function over one year is associated with worse clinical outcomes, as well as with a decline in lung function in the following years, in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving CF patients (4-19 years of age), evaluated over a three-year period. We evaluated demographic characteristics, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, antibiotic use, hospitalization, six-minute walk dista...

  13. Variation in lung function is associated with worse clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; Pinto, Leonardo Araujo; Marostica, Paulo José Cauduro; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the variation in lung function over one year is associated with worse clinical outcomes, as well as with a decline in lung function in the following years, in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving CF patients (4-19 years of age), evaluated over a three-year period. We evaluated demographic characteristics, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, antibiotic use, hospitalization, six-minute walk distance ...

  14. Pulmonary bacteriophage therapy on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains: first steps towards treatment and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morello

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant bacteria are the cause of an increasing number of deadly pulmonary infections. Because there is currently a paucity of novel antibiotics, phage therapy--the use of specific viruses that infect bacteria--is now more frequently being considered as a potential treatment for bacterial infections. Using a mouse lung-infection model caused by a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, we evaluated bacteriophage treatments. New bacteriophages were isolated from environmental samples and characterized. Bacteria and bacteriophages were applied intranasally to the immunocompetent mice. Survival was monitored and bronchoalveolar fluids were analysed. Quantification of bacteria, bacteriophages, pro-inflammatory and cytotoxicity markers, as well as histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. A curative treatment (one single dose administrated 2 h after the onset of the infection allowed over 95% survival. A four-day preventive treatment (one single dose resulted in a 100% survival. All of the parameters measured correlated with the efficacy of both curative and preventive bacteriophage treatments. We also showed that in vitro optimization of a bacteriophage towards a clinical strain improved both its efficacy on in vivo treatments and its host range on a panel of 20 P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains. This work provides an incentive to develop clinical studies on pulmonary bacteriophage therapy to combat multidrug-resistant lung infections.

  15. Chitinase 3-Like 1 (Chil1) Regulates Survival and Macrophage-Mediated Interleukin-1β and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha during Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Chad R; Wang, Jianmiao; Sharma, Lokesh; Losier, Ashley; Lui, Wei; Andrews, Nathaniel; Elias, Jack A; Kazmierczak, Barbara I; Roy, Craig R; Dela Cruz, Charles S

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes hospital-acquired pneumonia and is associated with high mortality. An effective response to such an infection includes efficient clearance of pathogenic organisms while limiting collateral damage from the host inflammatory response, known as host resistance and host tolerance, respectively. P. aeruginosa expresses a type III secretion system (T3SS) needle complex that induces NLRC4 (NOD-like receptor C4) activation, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production, and host tissue damage. Chitinase 3-like-1 (Chil1) is expressed during infection and binds to its receptor, IL-13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2), to regulate the pathogen-host response during Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, but the role Chil1 plays in balancing the host resistance and host tolerance during P. aeruginosa pneumonia is not known. We conducted experiments using C57BL/6 mice with or without a genetic deficiency of Chil1 and demonstrated that Chil1-deficient mice succumb to P. aeruginosa infection more rapidly than the wild type (WT). The decreased survival time in infected Chil1-deficient mice is associated with more neutrophils recruited to the airways, more lung parenchymal damage, and increased pulmonary consolidation while maintaining equivalent bacterial killing compared to WT mice. Infected Chil1-deficient mice and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from Chil1-deficient mice have increased production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-1β compared to infected WT mice and macrophages. Infection of Chil1-deficient BMDMs with non-NLRC4-triggering P. aeruginosa, which is deficient in the T3SS needle complex, did not alter the excessive IL-1β production compared to BMDMs from WT mice. The addition of recombinant Chil1 decreases the excessive IL-1β production but only partially rescues stimulated BMDMs from IL-13Rα2-deficient mice. Our data provide mechanistic insights into how Chil1 regulates P. aeruginosa-induced host responses. PMID:27141083

  16. Human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently kill influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    LI Hong; Xiang, Zheng; Feng, Ting; Li, Jinrong; Liu, Yinping; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Yin, Zhongwei; Yu, Meixing; Shen, Chongyang; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    γδ-T cells play an indispensable role in host defense against different viruses, including influenza A virus. However, whether these cells have cytotoxic activity against influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells and subsequently contribute to virus clearance remains unknown. Using influenza virus-infected A549 cells, human lung alveolar epithelial cells, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of aminobisphosphonate pamidronate (PAM)-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells and their under...

  17. In vitro volatile organic compound profiling using GC×GC-TOFMS to differentiate bacteria associated with lung infections: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizio, K D; Perrault, K A; Troobnikoff, A N; Ueland, M; Shoma, S; Iredell, J R; Middleton, P G; Forbes, S L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infections are the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Due to the polymicrobial nature of these infections, the identification of the particular bacterial species responsible is an essential step in diagnosis and treatment. Current diagnostic procedures are time-consuming, and can also be expensive, invasive and unpleasant in the absence of spontaneously expectorated sputum. The development of a rapid, non-invasive methodology capable of diagnosing and monitoring early bacterial infection is desired. Future visions of real-time, in situ diagnosis via exhaled breath testing rely on the differentiation of bacteria based on their volatile metabolites. The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to investigate whether a range of CF-associated bacterial species (i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cenocepacia, Haemophilus influenzae, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus milleri) could be differentiated based on their in vitro volatile metabolomic profiles. Headspace samples were collected using solid phase microextraction (SPME), analyzed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) and evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA) in order to assess the multivariate structure of the data. Although it was not possible to effectively differentiate all six bacteria using this method, the results revealed that the presence of a particular pattern of VOCs (rather than a single VOC biomarker) is necessary for bacterial species identification. The particular pattern of VOCs was found to be dependent upon the bacterial growth phase (e.g. logarithmic versus stationary) and sample storage conditions (e.g. short-term versus long-term storage at  -18 °C). Future studies of CF-associated bacteria and exhaled breath condensate will benefit from the approaches presented in this study and further

  18. Effects of Respiratory Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection on Allergen-Induced Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness and Lung Inflammation in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Hong Wei; Honour, Joyce M.; Rawlinson, Catherine A.; Harbeck, Ronald J.; Richard J Martin

    2003-01-01

    Airway mycoplasma infection may be associated with asthma pathophysiology. However, the direct effects of mycoplasma infection on asthma remain unknown. Using a murine allergic-asthma model, we evaluated the effects of different timing of airway Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection on bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), lung inflammation, and the protein levels of Th1 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ]) and Th2 (interleukin 4 [IL-4]) cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. When mycoplasma infection occ...

  19. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-09-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity.

  20. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity. PMID:27596047

  1. Toxicogenomic response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ortho-phenylphenol

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    Toghrol Freshteh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is the most common opportunistic pathogen implicated in nosocomial infections and in chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP is an antimicrobial agent used as an active ingredient in several EPA registered disinfectants. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of information on its target molecular pathways and the cellular responses that it elucidates in bacteria in general and in P. aeruginosa in particular. An understanding of the OPP-driven gene regulation and cellular response it elicits will facilitate more effective utilization of this antimicrobial and possibly lead to the development of more effective disinfectant treatments. Results Herein, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the cellular responses of P. aeruginosa exposed to 0.82 mM OPP for 20 and 60 minutes. Our data indicated that OPP upregulated the transcription of genes encoding ribosomal, virulence and membrane transport proteins after both treatment times. After 20 minutes of exposure to 0.82 mM OPP, genes involved in the exhibition of swarming motility and anaerobic respiration were upregulated. After 60 minutes of OPP treatment, the transcription of genes involved in amino acid and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were upregulated. Further, the transcription of the ribosome modulation factor (rmf and an alternative sigma factor (rpoS of RNA polymerase were downregulated after both treatment times. Conclusion Results from this study indicate that after 20 minutes of exposure to OPP, genes that have been linked to the exhibition of anaerobic respiration and swarming motility were upregulated. This study also suggests that the downregulation of the rmf and rpoS genes may be indicative of the mechanism by which OPP causes decreases in cell viability in P. aeruginosa. Consequently, a protective response involving the upregulation of translation leading to the

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reduces VX-809 Stimulated F508del-CFTR Chloride Secretion by Airway Epithelial Cells.

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    Bruce A Stanton

    Full Text Available P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the lungs of 85% of adult patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Previously, we demonstrated that P. aeruginosa reduced wt-CFTR Cl secretion by airway epithelial cells. Recently, a new investigational drug VX-809 has been shown to increase F508del-CFTR Cl secretion in human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells, and, in combination with VX-770, to increase FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second by an average of 3-5% in CF patients homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation. We propose that P. aeruginosa infection of CF lungs reduces VX-809 + VX-770- stimulated F508del-CFTR Cl secretion, and thereby reduces the clinical efficacy of VX-809 + VX-770.F508del-CFBE cells and primary cultures of CF-HBE cells (F508del/F508del were exposed to VX-809 alone or a combination of VX-809 + VX-770 for 48 hours and the effect of P. aeruginosa on F508del-CFTR Cl secretion was measured in Ussing chambers. The effect of VX-809 on F508del-CFTR abundance was measured by cell surface biotinylation and western blot analysis. PAO1, PA14, PAK and 6 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa (3 mucoid and 3 non-mucoid significantly reduced drug stimulated F508del-CFTR Cl secretion, and plasma membrane F508del-CFTR.The observation that P. aeruginosa reduces VX-809 and VX-809 + VX-770 stimulated F508del CFTR Cl secretion may explain, in part, why VX-809 + VX-770 has modest efficacy in clinical trials.

  3. Discovery, characterization and in vivo activity of pyocin SD2, a protein antibiotic from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Laura C; Josts, Inokentijs; Grinter, Rhys; White, Paul; Byron, Olwyn; Tucker, Nicholas P; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Kleanthous, Colin; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Walker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa means alternative approaches to antibiotic development are urgently required. Pyocins, produced by P. aeruginosa for intraspecies competition, are highly potent protein antibiotics known to actively translocate across the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa. Understanding and exploiting the mechanisms by which pyocins target, penetrate and kill P. aeruginosa is a promising approach to antibiotic development. In this work we show the therapeutic potential of a newly identified tRNase pyocin, pyocin SD2, by demonstrating its activity in vivo in a murine model of P. aeruginosa lung infection. In addition, we propose a mechanism of cell targeting and translocation for pyocin SD2 across the P. aeruginosa outer membrane. Pyocin SD2 is concentrated at the cell surface, via binding to the common polysaccharide antigen (CPA) of P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS), from where it can efficiently locate its outer membrane receptor FpvAI. This strategy of utilizing both the CPA and a protein receptor for cell targeting is common among pyocins as we show that pyocins S2, S5 and SD3 also bind to the CPA. Additional data indicate a key role for an unstructured N-terminal region of pyocin SD2 in the subsequent translocation of the pyocin into the cell. These results greatly improve our understanding of how pyocins target and translocate across the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa. This knowledge could be useful for the development of novel anti-pseudomonal therapeutics and will also support the development of pyocin SD2 as a therapeutic in its own right. PMID:27252387

  4. Brote por Pseudomonas aeruginosa, en el área de atención ambulatoria de heridas quirúrgicas, en pacientes posmastectomizadas Outbreak of postmastectomy wound infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an ambulatory surgical care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Vilar-Compte; Benedicte Jacquemin; Adriana Díaz-González; Consuelo Velásquez; Patricia Volkow

    2003-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Describir un brote por Pseudomonas aeruginosa, en el área de atención ambulatoria de herida quirúrgica, en pacientes posmastectomizadas. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Entre el 13 de marzo y el 18 de mayo de 2000 se definió como caso a las pacientes del Instituto Nacional de Cancerología de la Ciudad de México, mastectomizadas con infección quirúrgica por P aeruginosa resistente a ciprofloxacina y gentamicina. Se tomaron cultivos de los antisépticos, del material de curaciones, del agua y del ...

  5. Immunization protected well nourished mice but not undernourished ones from lung injury in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection

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    da Cunha Maria

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-resistant (MRSA has been frequently isolated from endotracheal and lung puncture aspirates in malnourished children with pneumonia. In this work we evaluated the susceptibility of undernourished BALB/c mice and its ability to mount a protective immunity against MRSA with emphasis on the lung involvement. Results BALB/c mice submitted to a 20% dietary restriction during 20 days presented a significant decrease in body weight, lymphocyte number and also atrophy in thymus and intestinal epithelium. Determination of bacterial load by the number of colony forming units (CFU indicated a similar susceptibility whereas the findings of Gram stain clearly suggested a higher amount of bacteria in the lungs of normal mice than in the undernourished ones. Immunization reduced bacterial growth in the lungs of normal mice but not in the undernourished ones. Histopathological analysis showed that inflammation appeared in the lungs from normal mice only after infection and that immunization prevented this pulmonary inflammatory process. On the other hand, undernourished mice presented lung inflammation even before infection. In addition, the degree of this inflammatory process did not change with infection or previous immunization. Conclusion Our results indicated that lung injury during MRSA infection is prevented by previous immunization in well nourished but not in undernourished mice.

  6. Oral administration of specific yolk antibodies (IgY) may prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis: a phase I feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollberg, Hans; Carlander, David; Olesen, Hanne; Wejåker, Per-Erik; Johannesson, Marie; Larsson, Anders

    2003-06-01

    Respiratory infection is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infections ultimately occur in virtually all patients. It is impossible to eradicate PA when a patient has been chronically colonized. Immunotherapy with specific egg-yolk antibodies (IgY) may be an alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of PA infections. We wanted to determine if treatment with specific IgY can prolong the period between the first and the second PA colonization? And long-term, can the treatment diminish the number of positive PA cultures and postpone the onset of chronic colonization? CF patients gargled daily with an IgY-antibody preparation, purified from eggs of hens immunized with PA bacteria. They were compared to a group of patients who did not gargle with the preparation. Both groups had their first colonization with PA eradicated by antibiotics. The basic treatment was essentially the same in both groups. In the initial study, the period between the first and second colonization with PA was significantly prolonged for the treated vs. the control group (Kaplan-Meier P = 0.015, Breslow test). In the prolonged study, the treated group had only 2.5 sputum cultures positive for PA per 100 months of observation, and none of these patients became chronically colonized with PA. No adverse events were reported. In the control group, 13.7 cultures per 100 months of observation were positive for PA, and 5 (24%) patients became chronically colonized with PA. This feasibility study shows that antipseudomonal IgY has the potential to effectively prevent PA colonization without any severe adverse effects. A phase III study should be initiated. PMID:12746939

  7. A case of failed eradication of cystic fibrosis-related sinus colonisation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Linnane, Barry

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen associated with cystic fibrosis that has potential to decrease lung function and cause respiratory failure. Paranasal sinuses are increasingly recognised as potential reservoirs for intermittent colonisation by P. aeruginosa. This case documents investigation and outcome of P. aeruginosa recurrence in a male paediatric patient over an eight year period.

  8. Nanodiscs as a therapeutic delivery agent: inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infection in the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Numata M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mari Numata,1 Yelena V Grinkova,2 James R Mitchell,1 Hong Wei Chu,1 Stephen G Sligar,2 Dennis R Voelker1 1Department of Medicine, Program in Cell Biology, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA; 2Department of Biochemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA Abstract: There is increasing interest in the application of nanotechnology to solve the difficult problem of therapeutic administration of pharmaceuticals. Nanodiscs, composed of a stable discoidal lipid bilayer encircled by an amphipathic membrane scaffold protein that is an engineered variant of the human Apo A-I constituent of high-density lipoproteins, have been a successful platform for providing a controlled lipid composition in particles that are especially useful for investigating membrane protein structure and function. In this communication, we demonstrate that nanodiscs are effective in suppressing respiratory syncytial viral (RSV infection both in vitro and in vivo when self-assembled with the minor pulmonary surfactant phospholipid palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG. Preparations of nanodiscs containing POPG (nPOPG antagonized interleukin-8 production from Beas2B epithelial cells challenged by RSV infection, with an IC50 of 19.3 µg/mL. In quantitative in vitro plaque assays, nPOPG reduced RSV infection by 93%. In vivo, nPOPG suppressed inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung, as well as IFN-γ production in response to RSV challenge. nPOPG also completely suppressed the histopathological changes in lung tissue elicited by RSV and reduced the amount of virus recovered from lung tissue by 96%. The turnover rate of nPOPG was estimated to have a half-time of 60–120 minutes (m, based upon quantification of the recovery of the human Apo A-I constituent. From these data, we conclude that nPOPG is a potent antagonist of RSV infection and its inflammatory sequelae both in vitro and in vivo. Keywords: nanodiscs, therapeutic delivery, anti-viral, innate immunity

  9. Synergistic antibacterial efficacy of early combination treatment with tobramycin and quorum-sensing inhibitors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intraperitoneal foreign-body infection mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise; van Gennip, Maria; Jakobsen, Tim H;

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS)-deficient Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms formed in vitro are more susceptible to tobramycin than QS-proficient P. aeruginosa biofilms, and combination treatment with a QS inhibitor (QSI) and tobramycin shows synergistic effects on the killing of in vitro biofilms. We extended...

  10. Sequential Treatment of Biofilms with Aztreonam and Tobramycin Is a Novel Strategy for Combating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chronic Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Macià, María D; Rubio, Rosa; Moyà, Bartolomé; Cabot, Gabriel; López-Causapé, Carla; Pérez, José L; Cantón, Rafael; Oliver, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Traditional therapeutic strategies to control chronic colonization in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are based on the use of a single nebulized antibiotic. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy and dynamics of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under sequential therapy with inhaled aztreonam (ATM) and tobramycin (TOB). Laboratory strains PAO1, PAOMS (hypermutable), PAOMA (mucoid), and PAOMSA (mucoid and hypermutable) and two hypermutable CF strains, 146-HSE (Liverpool epidemic strain [LES-1]) and 1089-HSE (ST1089), were used. Biofilms were developed using the flow cell system. Mature biofilms were challenged with peak and 1/10-peak concentrations of ATM (700 mg/liter and 70 mg/liter), TOB (1,000 mg/liter and 100 mg/liter), and their alternations (ATM/TOB/ATM and TOB/ATM/TOB) for 2 (t = 2), 4 (t = 4), and 6 days (t = 6). The numbers of viable cells (CFU) and resistant mutants were determined. Biofilm structural dynamics were monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy and processed with COMSTAT and IMARIS software programs. TOB monotherapy produced an intense decrease in CFU that was not always correlated with a reduction in biomass and/or a bactericidal effect on biofilms, particularly for the CF strains. The ATM monotherapy bactericidal effect was lower, but effects on biofilm biomass and/or structure, including intense filamentation, were documented. The alternation of TOB and ATM led to an enhancement of the antibiofilm activity against laboratory and CF strains compared to that with the individual regimens, potentiating the bactericidal effect and/or the reduction in biomass, particularly at peak concentrations. Resistant mutants were not documented in any of the regimens at the peak concentrations and only anecdotally at the 1/10-peak concentrations. These results support the clinical evaluation of sequential regimens with inhaled antibiotics in CF, as opposed to the current maintenance treatments with just one

  11. 恶性肿瘤患者铜绿假单胞菌血流感染的临床分析%Clinical analysis of cancer patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白长森; 李丁; 张文芳; 张青; 郑珊; 张鹏

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析恶性肿瘤患者合并铜绿假单胞菌血流感染的相关危险因素及耐药性情况。方法:回顾性分析天津医科大学肿瘤医院2010年1月至2012年12月30例合并铜绿假单胞菌血流感染及90例无铜绿假单胞菌血流感染的恶性肿瘤患者的临床资料;采用Whonet 5.6软件和SPSS 19.0对数据进行统计学分析。结果:感染组患者男20例,女10例,平均年龄(60.9±11.2)岁;对照组患者男60例,女30例,平均年龄(51.3±15.9)岁;多因素Logistic回归分析显示住院次数、合并其他部位感染和应用≥2种类型抗生素为恶性肿瘤患者合并铜绿假单胞菌血流感染的独立危险因素(P80%)。合并铜绿假单胞菌血流感染的恶性肿瘤患者的死亡率为60%。结论:恶性肿瘤患者合并铜绿假单胞菌血流感染死亡率高,在临床工作中必须采取综合防治的措施,减少铜绿假单胞菌血流感染的发生。%Objective:To analyze risk factors of cancer patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infections and drug resistance. Methods:Clinical data of 30 cancer patients with P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection and 90 without infection who were ad-mitted in the Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital between January 2010 and December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Whonet 5.6 and SPSS19.0 software were used for statistical analysis of the data. Results:The infection group consisted of 20 male and 10 female patients with a mean age of 60.9±11.2 years. The control group consisted of 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 51.3 ± 15.9 years. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the number of hospitalization, combined with infection of other sites, and more than two types of antibiotics were independent risk factors of cancer patients with P. aeruginosa bloodstream infec-tions. P. aeruginosa showed high sensitivity(>80%) to carbapenems, ceftazidime, cefepime

  12. Nodular inflammatory foci are sites of T cell priming and control of murine cytomegalovirus infection in the neonatal lung.

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    Felix R Stahl

    Full Text Available Neonates, including mice and humans, are highly susceptible to cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. However, many aspects of neonatal CMV infections such as viral cell tropism, spatio-temporal distribution of the pathogen as well as genesis of antiviral immunity are unknown. With the use of reporter mutants of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV we identified the lung as a primary target of mucosal infection in neonatal mice. Comparative analysis of neonatal and adult mice revealed a delayed control of virus replication in the neonatal lung mucosa explaining the pronounced systemic infection and disease in neonates. This phenomenon was supplemented by a delayed expansion of CD8(+ T cell clones recognizing the viral protein M45 in neonates. We detected viral infection at the single-cell level and observed myeloid cells forming "nodular inflammatory foci" (NIF in the neonatal lung. Co-localization of infected cells within NIFs was associated with their disruption and clearance of the infection. By 2-photon microscopy, we characterized how neonatal antigen-presenting cells (APC interacted with T cells and induced mature adaptive immune responses within such NIFs. We thus define NIFs of the neonatal lung as niches for prolonged MCMV replication and T cell priming but also as sites of infection control.

  13. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

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    Xiaomei Feng

    Full Text Available Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S. aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS and high capacity runner (HCR rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  14. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  15. Pyocyanina contributory factor in haem acquisition and virulence enhancement of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the lung [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Benedyk

    Full Text Available Several recent studies show that the lungs infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are often co-colonised by oral bacteria including black-pigmenting anaerobic (BPA Porphyromonas species. The BPAs have an absolute haem requirement and their presence in the infected lung indicates that sufficient haem, a virulence up-regulator in BPAs, must be present to support growth. Haemoglobin from micro-bleeds occurring during infection is the most likely source of haem in the lung. Porphyromonas gingivalis displays a novel haem acquisition paradigm whereby haemoglobin must be firstly oxidised to methaemoglobin, facilitating haem release, either by gingipain proteolysis or capture via the haem-binding haemophore HmuY. P. aeruginosa produces the blue phenazine redox compound, pyocyanin. Since phenazines can oxidise haemoglobin, it follows that pyocyanin may also facilitate haem acquisition by promoting methaemoglobin production. Here we show that pyocyanin at concentrations found in the CF lung during P. aeruginosa infections rapidly oxidises oxyhaemoglobin in a dose-dependent manner. We demonstrate that methaemoglobin formed by pyocyanin is also susceptible to proteolysis by P. gingivalis Kgp gingipain and neutrophil elastase, thus releasing haem. Importantly, co-incubation of oxyhaemoglobin with pyocyanin facilitates haem pickup from the resulting methemoglobin by the P. gingivalis HmuY haemophore. Mice intra-tracheally challenged with viable P. gingivalis cells plus pyocyanin displayed increased mortality compared to those administered P. gingivalis alone. Pyocyanin significantly elevated both methaemoglobin and total haem levels in homogenates of mouse lungs and increased the level of arginine-specific gingipain activity from mice inoculated with viable P. gingivalis cells plus pyocyanin compared with mice inoculated with P. gingivalis only. These findings indicate that pyocyanin, by promoting haem availability through methaemoglobin formation and

  16. Biosynthesis of pyocyanin pigment by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    M.Z. El-Fouly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty-three isolates belonging to the genus Pseudomonas were isolated from different environmental sources including; soil, water and clinical specimens. Twenty out of them were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and individually screened for pyocyanin production. P. aeruginosa R1; isolated from rice-cultivated soil and P. aeruginosa U3 selected from clinical specimen (Urinary tract infection were the highest pyocyanin producers; pyocyanin production reached 9.3 and 5.9 μg/ml, respectively on synthetic glucose supplemented nutrient medium (GSNB. The identification of both selected strains (P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 was confirmed by 16S rRNA, the similarity with other strains available in database was 97% (with P. aeruginosa FPVC 14 and 94% (with P. aeruginosa 13.A, respectively. P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 are accessed at gene bank with accession numbers KM924432 and KM603511, in the same order. Pyocyanin was extracted by standard methods, purified by column chromatography and characterized by UV-Vis absorption, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The antimicrobial activity of purified pyocyanin against multi-drug resistant microbes was investigated; the efficiency of pyocyanin was more obvious in Gram +ve bacteria than Gram−ve bacteria and yeast. To reduce the cost of pyocyanin production, a new conventional medium based on cotton seed meal supplemented with peptone was designed. The pyocyanin production of both selected strains P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 using the new medium is increased by 30.1% and 17.2%, respectively in comparison with synthetic GSNB medium, while the cost of production process is reduced by 56.7%.

  17. Treatment of Cytomegalovirus Infection with Cidofovir and CMV Immune Globulin in a Lung Transplant Recipient

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    Heinrike Wilkens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection after lung transplantation is associated with increased risk for pneumonitis and bronchiolitis obliterans as well as allograft rejection and opportunistic infections. Ganciclovir is the mainstay of prophylaxis and treatment but CMV infections can be unresponsive. Apart from direct antiviral drugs, CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG preparations may be considered but are only licensed for prophylaxis. A CMV-seronegative 42-year-old man with cystic fibrosis received a lung from a CMV-seropositive donor. Intravenous ganciclovir prophylaxis was delayed until day 12 due to acute postoperative renal failure and was accompanied by five doses of CMVIG (10 g. By day 16, CMV-DNA was detectable and rising; CMV-specific T-cells were undetectable. Switch from ganciclovir to foscarnet prompted a transient decrease in CMV viral load, but after increasing again to reach 3600 copies/mL foscarnet was changed to intravenous cidofovir and CMVIG was restarted. CMV load continued to fluctuate and declined slowly, whereas CMV-specific T-cells were detected five months later and increased thereafter. At last follow-up, the patient was in very good clinical condition with no evidence of bronchiolitis obliterans. No side effects of this treatment were observed. In this hard-to-treat case, the combination of cidofovir with off-label use of CMVIG contributed to a successful outcome.

  18. Inhaled antibiotics for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients: challenges to treatment adherence and strategies to improve outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodnár R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Réka Bodnár,1,2 Ágnes Mészáros,2 Máté Oláh,2 Tamás Ágh3 1Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Heim Pál Children’s Hospital, Budapest, Hungary; 2University Pharmacy Department of Pharmacy Administration, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; 3Syreon Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary Background: Inhaled antibiotics (ABs are recommended for use in the therapy of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The aim of this systematic literature review was to identify level of adherence to inhaled ABs and to determine predictors and consequences of nonadherence in CF. Methods: A systematic literature search of English-language articles was conducted in April 2015 using Medline and Embase. No publication date limit was applied. The literature screening was conducted by two independent reviewers. All of the included studies were assessed for quality. Results: The search yielded 193 publications, of which ten met the inclusion criteria and underwent data extraction. Seven studies focused on inhaled tobramycin, one on inhaled colistimethate, one on inhaled levofloxacin, and one on inhaled aztreonam lysine. Medication adherence to inhaled ABs was analyzed by pharmacy refill history, daily phone diary, parent and child self-reports, vials counting, or electronic monitoring. In randomized controlled trials (n=3, proportion of adherent patients (>75%–80% of required doses taken ranged from 86% to 97%; in prospective cohort studies (n=3, adherence rates ranged between 36% and 92%, and in retrospective studies (n=4 it ranged between 60% and 70%. The adherence to inhaled ABs in CF was found to be associated with the complexity of treatment, time of drug administration, age of patients, treatment burden (adverse events, taste, and patient satisfaction. Conclusion: The high diversity of adherence data was because of the different study designs (randomized controlled trials vs real-world studies and the lack

  19. Cytotoxic immune responses in the lungs correlate to disease severity in patients with hantavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmuson, J; Pourazar, J; Mohamed, N; Lejon, K; Evander, M; Blomberg, A; Ahlm, C

    2016-04-01

    Hantavirus infections may cause severe and sometime life-threatening lung failure. The pathogenesis is not fully known and there is an urgent need for effective treatment. We aimed to investigate the association between pulmonary viral load and immune responses, and their relation to disease severity. Bronchoscopy with sampling of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was performed in 17 patients with acute Puumala hantavirus infection and 16 healthy volunteers acting as controls. Lymphocyte subsets, granzyme concentrations, and viral load were determined by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. Analyses of BAL fluid revealed significantly higher numbers of activated CD8(+) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, as well as higher concentrations of the cytotoxins granzymes A and B in hantavirus-infected patients, compared to controls. In patients, Puumala hantavirus RNA was detected in 88 % of BAL cell samples and correlated inversely to the T cell response. The magnitude of the pulmonary cytotoxic lymphocyte response correlated to the severity of disease and systemic organ dysfunction, in terms of need for supplemental oxygen treatment, hypotension, and laboratory data indicating renal failure, cardiac dysfunction, vascular leakage, and cell damage. Regulatory T cell numbers were significantly lower in patients compared to controls, and may reflect inadequate immune regulation during hantavirus infection. Hantavirus infection elicits a pronounced cytotoxic lymphocyte response in the lungs. The magnitude of the immune response was associated with disease severity. These results give insights into the pathogenesis and possibilities for new treatments. PMID:26873376

  20. A Biomathematical Model of Pneumococcal Lung Infection and Antibiotic Treatment in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibylle Schirm

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is considered to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The outcome depends on both, proper antibiotic treatment and the effectivity of the immune response of the host. However, due to the complexity of the immunologic cascade initiated during infection, the latter cannot be predicted easily. We construct a biomathematical model of the murine immune response during infection with pneumococcus aiming at predicting the outcome of antibiotic treatment. The model consists of a number of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing dynamics of pneumococcal population, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, neutrophils and macrophages fighting the infection and destruction of alveolar tissue due to pneumococcus. Equations were derived by translating known biological mechanisms and assuming certain response kinetics. Antibiotic therapy is modelled by a transient depletion of bacteria. Unknown model parameters were determined by fitting the predictions of the model to data sets derived from mice experiments of pneumococcal lung infection with and without antibiotic treatment. Time series of pneumococcal population, debris, neutrophils, activated epithelial cells, macrophages, monocytes and IL-6 serum concentrations were available for this purpose. The antibiotics Ampicillin and Moxifloxacin were considered. Parameter fittings resulted in a good agreement of model and data for all experimental scenarios. Identifiability of parameters is also estimated. The model can be used to predict the performance of alternative schedules of antibiotic treatment. We conclude that we established a biomathematical model of pneumococcal lung infection in mice allowing predictions regarding the outcome of different schedules of antibiotic treatment. We aim at translating the model to the human situation in the near future.

  1. Multiple Inhibitory Pathways Contribute to Lung CD8+ T Cell Impairment and Protect against Immunopathology during Acute Viral Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, John J; Rogers, Meredith C; Tollefson, Sharon J; Boyd, Kelli L; Williams, John V

    2016-07-01

    Viruses are frequent causes of lower respiratory infection (LRI). Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) signaling contributes to pulmonary CD8(+) T cell (TCD8) functional impairment during acute viral LRI, but the role of TCD8 impairment in viral clearance and immunopathology is unclear. We now find that human metapneumovirus infection induces virus-specific lung TCD8 that fail to produce effector cytokines or degranulate late postinfection, with minimally increased function even in the absence of PD-1 signaling. Impaired lung TCD8 upregulated multiple inhibitory receptors, including PD-1, lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), T cell Ig mucin 3, and 2B4. Moreover, coexpression of these receptors continued to increase even after viral clearance, with most virus-specific lung TCD8 expressing three or more inhibitory receptors on day 14 postinfection. Viral infection also increased expression of inhibitory ligands by both airway epithelial cells and APCs, further establishing an inhibitory environment. In vitro Ab blockade revealed that multiple inhibitory receptors contribute to TCD8 impairment induced by either human metapneumovirus or influenza virus infection. In vivo blockade of T cell Ig mucin 3 signaling failed to enhance TCD8 function or reduce viral titers. However, blockade of LAG-3 in PD-1-deficient mice restored TCD8 effector functions but increased lung pathology, indicating that LAG-3 mediates lung TCD8 impairment in vivo and contributes to protection from immunopathology during viral clearance. These results demonstrate that an orchestrated network of pathways modifies lung TCD8 functionality during viral LRI, with PD-1 and LAG-3 serving prominent roles. Lung TCD8 impairment may prevent immunopathology but also contributes to recurrent lung infections. PMID:27259857

  2. Lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920671 Studies of BAL cells during theairborne Klebsiella pneumoniae infectionin immunocompromised mice. ZHU Ben-hong(朱本洪), et al. Dept Respir Med, XinhuaHosp, Shanghai 2nd Med Univ, 200092. Chin JTuberc & Respir Dis 1992; 15(3): 161-162. We compared immunocompromised mice

  3. Lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008289 The effect of interventional therapy in multimodality treatment on multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis.FU Yu(傅瑜),et al.Dept Tuberc,Beijing Tuberc Thora Tumor Res Instit,Beijing 101149.Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2008;31(2):95-98.Objective To evaluate the effect of interventional therapy with antituberculous drug instillation to the lesions in the treatment of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis(MDR-PTB)on conventional therapy.

  4. Tobramycin inhalation powder: an efficient and efficacious therapy for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somayaji, Ranjani; Parkins, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    Inhaled antipseudomonal therapies are critical components in the management of cystic fibrosis (CF) and have significantly contributed to improved patient outcomes. Dry powder inhaler technologies represent a significant advance in drug delivery, alleviating treatment burden and potentially improving adherence associated with traditional CF nebulized therapies. Tobramycin inhalation powder (TIP) uses PulmoSphere(®) technology for very efficient drug delivery into the lower airways. In placebo-controlled and comparative studies with traditional tobramycin formulations, TIP is equally efficacious and is associated with increased patient convenience and satisfaction. TIP has been recommended in the 2013 CF Foundation and the 2014 European guidelines as a therapy in CF for the maintenance of lung health. Going forward, TIP may offer a therapeutic advantage over traditional formulations of tobramycin as recent prospective 'real world' studies of TIP have demonstrated high patient tolerance and improved adherence compared with traditional formulations.

  5. Serial Histopathological Examination of the Lungs of Mice Infected with Influenza A Virus PR8 Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushi, Masaya; Ito, Tateki; Oka, Teruaki; Kitazawa, Toshio; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo; Yamashita, Makoto; Kudo, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    Avian influenza H5N1 and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses are known to induce viral pneumonia and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). The mortality rate of ARDS/DAD is extremely high, at approximately 60%, and no effective treatment for ARDS/DAD has been established. We examined serial pathological changes in the lungs of mice infected with influenza virus to determine the progress from viral pneumonia to ARDS/DAD. Mice were intranasally infec...

  6. Natural killer cells regulate Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg balance in chlamydial lung infection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jing; Dong, Xiaojing; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Yan; Yang, Xi; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Natural killer (NK) cell is an important component in innate immunity, playing a critical role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by modulating the function of other immune cells including T cells. In this study, we focused on the role of NK cells in regulating Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg balance during chlamydial lung infection. We found that NK cell‐depleted mice showed decreased Th1 and Th17 cells, which was correlated with reduced interferon‐γ, interleukin (IL)‐12, IL‐17 and IL‐...

  7. Acute liver failure due to Varicella zoster virus infection after lung transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verleden, G M; Vos, R; Van Raemdonck, D E; Laleman, W; Vanaudenaerde, B M

    2012-06-01

    Most adults are Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-positive at the age of 20 years. Some, however, remain antibody-negative and may develop primary chicken pox during adulthood. We report a patient with Williams-Campbell syndrome who underwent double-lung transplantation while being VZV-negative. One year after the successful procedure, he was admitted with fulminant hepatic failure and some cutaneous vesicles in his face. Despite a rapid diagnosis of VZV infection and treatment with acyclovir, his situation deteriorated within 24 hours and while awaiting an urgent liver transplantation, he developed multiple organ failure and died. PMID:22664036

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa B3 Strains Isolated from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient Undergoing Antibiotic Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Jochumsen, Nicholas; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently establishes chronic infections in the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four P. aeruginosa B3 strains isolated from a chronically infected CF patient undergoing antibiotic chemotherapy.......Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently establishes chronic infections in the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four P. aeruginosa B3 strains isolated from a chronically infected CF patient undergoing antibiotic chemotherapy....

  9. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib;

    Objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients are commonly infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but Aspergilli are also frequently isolated. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different Aspergillus. Methods: A suspension of 106 fungal spores/ml was streaked onto WATM...... suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and E. nidulans. HPLC and LC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa in the contact area of Aspergillus. Different quinolones were also identified...

  10. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  11. Inactivation of the potent Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxin pyocyanin by airway peroxidases and nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reszka, Krzysztof J; Xiong, Ye; Sallans, Larry; Pasula, Rajamouli; Olakanmi, Oyebode; Hassett, Daniel J; Britigan, Bradley E

    2012-05-15

    Pyocyanin (1-hydroxy-N-methylphenazine, PCN) is a cytotoxic pigment and virulence factor secreted by the human bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we report that exposure of PCN to airway peroxidases, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and NaNO(2) generates unique mononitrated PCN metabolites (N-PCN) as revealed by HPLC/mass spectrometry analyses. N-PCN, in contrast to PCN, was devoid of antibiotic activity and failed to kill Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, in contrast to PCN, intratracheal instillation of N-PCN into murine lungs failed to induce a significant inflammatory response. Surprisingly, at a pH of ∼7, N-PCN was more reactive than PCN with respect to NADH oxidation but resulted in a similar magnitude of superoxide production as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance and spin trapping experiments. When incubated with Escherichia coli or lung A549 cells, PCN and N-PCN both led to superoxide formation, but lesser amounts were detected with N-PCN. Our results demonstrate that PCN that has been nitrated by peroxidase/H(2)O(2)/NO(2)(-) systems possesses less cytotoxic/proinflammatory activity than native PCN. Yield of N-PCN was decreased by the presence of the competing physiological peroxidase substrates (thiocyonate) SCN(-) (myeloperoxidase, MPO, and lactoperoxidase, LPO) and Cl(-) (MPO), which with Cl(-) yielded chlorinated PCNs. These reaction products also showed decreased proinflammatory ability when instilled into the lungs of mice. These observations add important insights into the complexity of the pathogenesis of lung injury associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and provide additional rationale for exploring the efficacy of NO(2)(-) in the therapy of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infection in cystic fibrosis.

  12. Structure–function analysis reveals that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tps4 two-partner secretion system is involved in CupB5 translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Garnett, James A; Muhl, Daniela; Douse, Christopher H.; Hui, Kailyn; Busch, Andreas; Omisore, Ayodele; Yang, Yi; Simpson, Peter; Marchant, Jan; Waksman, Gabriel; Matthews, Steve; Filloux, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterium, synonymous with cystic fibrosis patients, which can cause chronic infection of the lungs. This pathogen is a model organism to study biofilms: a bacterial population embedded in an extracellular matrix that provide protection from environmental pressures and lead to persistence. A number of Chaperone-Usher Pathways, namely CupA-CupE, play key roles in these processes by assembling adhesive pili on the bacterial surface. One of...

  13. The challenge of chronic lung disease in HIV-infected children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich C Weber

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, little attention has been given to chronic lung disease (CLD in HIV-infected children. As the HIV epidemic matures in sub-Saharan Africa, adolescents who acquired HIV by vertical transmission are presenting to health services with chronic diseases. The most common is CLD, which is often debilitating. This review summarizes the limited data available on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical picture, special investigations and management of CLD in HIV-infected adolescents. A number of associated conditions: lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis, tuberculosis and bronchiectasis are well described. Other pathologies such as HIV-associated bronchiolitis obliterans resulting in non-reversible airway obstruction, has only recently been described. In this field, there are many areas of uncertainty needing urgent research. These areas include the definition of CLD, pathophysiological mechanisms and common pathologies responsible. Very limited data are available to formulate an effective plan of investigation and management.

  14. 秀丽隐杆线虫-耐药铜绿假单胞菌感染模型的建立%Establishment of an infection model using Caenorhabditis elegans-multidrug resistance P.aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雨朦; 陈代杰; 李继安; 邵雷; 朱春宝

    2011-01-01

    目的 建立耐药铜绿假单胞菌感染的秀丽隐杆线虫感染模型。方法 利用临床分离的P.aeruginosa A258制各BHI、PGS、NG和Aga线虫感染平板。采用不同浓度的四环素、利福平和多粘菌素B对感染线虫进行治疗,考察感染线虫的存活率。结果 不同感染平板对线虫致死情况不同。采用NG感染平板对glp-4;sek-1线虫进行感染,其LT50 为3.5d。32μg/mL利福平和16μg/mL多粘菌素B对该感染线虫进行治疗,与不加入药物的对照组相比,其存活率分别提高了5和14倍。但一定浓度的四环素没有提高感染线虫的存活率,在线虫体内不能抑制P.aeruginosa A258的感染,与体外抑菌实验结果相一致。结论 建立了秀丽隐杆线虫-耐药铜绿假单胞菌A258感染模型,为此模型用于抗感染化合物的筛选奠定基础。%Objective Establishment of an infection model using Caenorhabditis elegans-multidrug resistance P. Aeruginosa system. Method P. Aeruginosa A258 strain isolated from clinical patient was used to prepare BHI, PGS, NG and Agar plates for infecting Caenorhabditis elegans. The infected worms were then treated by tetracycline, rifampicin and polymyxin B at different concentrations to investigate the survival rates of infected worms. Results Different infective plates led to different patterns on the worm death. The LT50 was 3.5 days, when glp-4;sek-l mutant worms were transferred to NG medium. Comparing to control groups without antibiotic, the survival rates of infected worms which were treated with 32μg/mL rifampicin and 16ug/mL polymyxin B were increased to 5 and 14 folds. However, tetracycline which was not active against P. Aeruginosa A258 in vitro, and did not promote survival of infected worms. Conclusion We had established the infection model of C. Elegans-multidrug resistance P. Aeruginosa A258, and the model may build the basic of screening anti-infective compounds.

  15. The T6SSs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PAO1 and Their Effectors: Beyond Bacterial-Cell Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sana, Thibault G; Berni, Benjamin; Bleves, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for many diseases such as chronic lung colonization in cystic fibrosis patients and acute infections in hospitals. The capacity of P. aeruginosa to be pathogenic toward several hosts is notably due to different secretion systems. Amongst them, P. aeruginosa encodes three Type Six Secretion Systems (T6SS), named H1- to H3-T6SS, that act against either prokaryotes and/or eukaryotic cells. They are independent from each other and inject diverse toxins that interact with different components in the host cell. Here we summarize the roles of these T6SSs in the PAO1 strain, as well as the toxins injected and their targets. While H1-T6SS is only involved in antiprokaryotic activity through at least seven different toxins, H2-T6SS and H3-T6SS are also able to target prokaryotic as well as eukaryotic cells. Moreover, recent studies proposed that H2- and H3-T6SS have a role in epithelial cells invasion by injecting at least three different toxins. The diversity of T6SS effectors is astounding and other effectors still remain to be discovered. In this review, we present a table with other putative P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 T6SS-dependent effectors. Altogether, the T6SSs of P. aeruginosa are important systems that help fight other bacteria for their ecological niche, and are important in the pathogenicity process. PMID:27376031

  16. Diffuse interstitial and multiple cavitary lung lesions due to Talaromyces marneffei infection in a non-HIV patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H R; Xu, N L; Lin, M; Hu, X L; Chen, J H; Chen, Y S; Cai, S X

    2015-11-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with unproductive cough and dyspnea for 6 months in Fujian Province, China. His misuse of a large amount of steroids (accumulated dose equivalent to 3530 mg prednisolone) resulted in Talaromyces marneffei infection. Chest computed tomographic scan revealed diffuse interstitial and multiple cavitary lung lesions. Treatment with amphotericin B combined with itraconazole resulted in total recovery, with marked regression of lung lesions. PMID:26550481

  17. Diffuse interstitial and multiple cavitary lung lesions due to Talaromyces marneffei infection in a non-HIV patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old man presented with unproductive cough and dyspnea for 6 months in Fujian Province, China. His misuse of a large amount of steroids (accumulated dose equivalent to 3530 mg prednisolone resulted in Talaromyces marneffei infection. Chest computed tomographic scan revealed diffuse interstitial and multiple cavitary lung lesions. Treatment with amphotericin B combined with itraconazole resulted in total recovery, with marked regression of lung lesions.

  18. Diffuse interstitial and multiple cavitary lung lesions due to Talaromyces marneffei infection in a non-HIV patient

    OpenAIRE

    Li, H.R.; N.L. Xu; Lin, M.; X. L. Hu; Chen17, J. H.; Chen, Y. S.; Cai, S X

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with unproductive cough and dyspnea for 6 months in Fujian Province, China. His misuse of a large amount of steroids (accumulated dose equivalent to 3530 mg prednisolone) resulted in Talaromyces marneffei infection. Chest computed tomographic scan revealed diffuse interstitial and multiple cavitary lung lesions. Treatment with amphotericin B combined with itraconazole resulted in total recovery, with marked regression of lung lesions.

  19. Use of an artificial neural network to predict risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Pan, Qin-Shi; Hong, Wan-Dong; Pan, Jingye; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Xu, Gang; Wang, Yu-Min

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods to analyze and predict the related risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients are various, but the results are inconsistent. A total of 609 patients with lung cancer were enrolled to allow factor comparison using Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test or the Chi-square test. Variables that were significantly related to the presence of nosocomial infection were selected as candidates for input into the final ANN model. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the performance of the artificial neural network (ANN) model and logistic regression (LR) model. The prevalence of nosocomial infection from lung cancer in this entire study population was 20.1% (165/609), nosocomial infections occurring in sputum specimens (85.5%), followed by blood (6.73%), urine (6.0%) and pleural effusions (1.82%). It was shown that long term hospitalization (≥ 22 days, P= 0.000), poor clinical stage (IIIb and IV stage, P=0.002), older age (≥ 61 year old, P=0.023), and use the hormones were linked to nosocomial infection and the ANN model consisted of these four factors .The artificial neural network model with variables consisting of age, clinical stage, time of hospitalization, and use of hormones should be useful for predicting nosocomial infection in lung cancer cases.

  20. Extracellular DNA chelates cations and induces antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, bacterial polysaccharides and proteins, which are up to 1000-fold more antibiotic resistant than planktonic cultures. To date, extracellular DNA has been shown to function as a structural support to maintain Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm architecture. Here we show that DNA is a multifaceted component of P. aeruginosa biofilms. At physiologically relevant concentrations, extracellular DNA has antimicrobial activity, causing cell lysis by chelating cations that stabilize lipopolysaccharide (LPS and the outer membrane (OM. DNA-mediated killing occurred within minutes, as a result of perturbation of both the outer and inner membrane (IM and the release of cytoplasmic contents, including genomic DNA. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of DNA created a cation-limited environment that resulted in induction of the PhoPQ- and PmrAB-regulated cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance operon PA3552-PA3559 in P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, DNA-induced expression of this operon resulted in up to 2560-fold increased resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and 640-fold increased resistance to aminoglycosides, but had no effect on beta-lactam and fluoroquinolone resistance. Thus, the presence of extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix contributes to cation gradients, genomic DNA release and inducible antibiotic resistance. DNA-rich environments, including biofilms and other infection sites like the CF lung, are likely the in vivo environments where extracellular pathogens such as P. aeruginosa encounter cation limitation.

  1. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus) infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friant, Sagan; Brown, Kelsey; Saari, Mason T; Segel, Nicholas H; Slezak, Julia; Goldberg, Tony L

    2015-12-01

    Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs.

  2. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagan Friant

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs.

  3. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced acute lung inflammation by regulation of PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuanyuan; Nie, Yan; Cheng, Binfeng; Tao, Jin; Ma, Xiaoyao; Jiang, Min; Gao, Jie; Bai, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative pathogen-induced nosocomial infections and resistance are a most serious menace to global public health. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan (QF), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula, has been used clinically in China for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections, acute or chronic bronchitis and pulmonary infection. In this study, the effects of QF on Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced acute pneumonia in mice were evaluated. The mechanisms by which four typical anti-inflammatory ingredients from QF, arctigenin (ATG), cholic acid (CLA), chlorogenic acid (CGA) and sinapic acid (SPA), regulate anti-inflammatory signaling pathways and related targets were investigated using molecular biology and molecular docking techniques. The results showed that pretreatment with QF significantly inhibits the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and chemokines (IL-8 and RANTES), reduces leukocytes recruitment into inflamed tissues and ameliorates pulmonary edema and necrosis. In addition, ATG was identified as the primary anti-inflammatory agent with action on the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways. CLA and CGA enhanced the actions of ATG and exhibited synergistic NF-κB inactivation effects possibly via the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, CLA is speculated to target FGFR and MEK firstly. Overall, QF regulated the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways to inhibit pathogenic bacterial infections effectively. PMID:27175332

  4. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced acute lung inflammation by regulation of PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuanyuan; Nie, Yan; Cheng, Binfeng; Tao, Jin; Ma, Xiaoyao; Jiang, Min; Gao, Jie; Bai, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative pathogen-induced nosocomial infections and resistance are a most serious menace to global public health. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan (QF), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula, has been used clinically in China for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections, acute or chronic bronchitis and pulmonary infection. In this study, the effects of QF on Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced acute pneumonia in mice were evaluated. The mechanisms by which four typical anti-inflammatory ingredients from QF, arctigenin (ATG), cholic acid (CLA), chlorogenic acid (CGA) and sinapic acid (SPA), regulate anti-inflammatory signaling pathways and related targets were investigated using molecular biology and molecular docking techniques. The results showed that pretreatment with QF significantly inhibits the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and chemokines (IL-8 and RANTES), reduces leukocytes recruitment into inflamed tissues and ameliorates pulmonary edema and necrosis. In addition, ATG was identified as the primary anti-inflammatory agent with action on the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways. CLA and CGA enhanced the actions of ATG and exhibited synergistic NF-κB inactivation effects possibly via the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, CLA is speculated to target FGFR and MEK firstly. Overall, QF regulated the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways to inhibit pathogenic bacterial infections effectively.

  5. Are ciprofloxacin dosage regimens adequate for antimicrobial efficacy and prevention of resistance? Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection in elderly patients as a simulation case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaubon, Yoann; Bourguignon, Laurent; Goutelle, Sylvain; Martin, Olivier; Maire, Pascal; Ducher, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to define the optimal dosage (OD) of ciprofloxacin in order to prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a geriatric population with a bloodstream infection. A thousand pharmacokinetic profiles were simulated with a ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetic model from the literature. Three dosing regimens were tested for five days: once daily (QD), twice daily (BID), and thrice daily (TID). First of all, effective dosages (ED) of ciprofloxacin were defined as those achieving a target AUC24 /MIC ≥ 125. Then, these ED were simulated in order to calculate the percentage of time spent within the mutant selection window (TMSW ) and to select optimal dosage (OD) defined as those achieving TMSW ≤ 20%. Based on the AUC24 /MIC, for low MICs (0.125 μg/mL), all dosing regimens recommended by French guidelines were effective. For intermediate MICs (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mL), simulated doses higher than those recommended were needed to achieve the efficacy target. About prevention of resistance for low MICs, dosages recommended were only effective in patients with creatinine clearance (CLCR ) ≥ 60 mL/min. For intermediate MICs, dosages higher than recommended were needed to achieve the optimality target. This study shows that current ciprofloxacin dosing guidelines have not been optimized to prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance, especially in geriatric patients with mild to severe renal impairment. To achieve both efficacy and prevention of resistance, ciprofloxacin dosages greater than those recommended would be needed. Tolerance of such higher doses needs to be evaluated in clinical studies.

  6. CD36 and Fyn kinase mediate malaria-induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifeanyi U Anidi

    Full Text Available Severe malaria can trigger acute lung injury characterized by pulmonary edema resulting from increased endothelial permeability. However, the mechanism through which lung fluid conductance is altered during malaria remains unclear. To define the role that the scavenger receptor CD36 may play in mediating this response, C57BL/6J (WT and CD36-/- mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA and monitored for changes in pulmonary endothelial barrier function employing an isolated perfused lung system. WT lungs demonstrated a >10-fold increase in two measures of paracellular fluid conductance and a decrease in the albumin reflection coefficient (σalb compared to control lungs indicating a loss of barrier function. In contrast, malaria-infected CD36-/- mice had near normal fluid conductance but a similar reduction in σalb. In WT mice, lung sequestered iRBCs demonstrated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. To determine whether knockout of CD36 could protect against ROS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, mouse lung microvascular endothelial monolayers (MLMVEC from WT and CD36-/- mice were exposed to H2O2. Unlike WT monolayers, which showed dose-dependent decreases in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER from H2O2 indicating loss of barrier function, CD36-/- MLMVEC demonstrated dose-dependent increases in TER. The differences between responses in WT and CD36-/- endothelial cells correlated with important differences in the intracellular compartmentalization of the CD36-associated Fyn kinase. Malaria infection increased total lung Fyn levels in CD36-/- lungs compared to WT, but this increase was due to elevated production of the inactive form of Fyn further suggesting a dysregulation of Fyn-mediated signaling. The importance of Fyn in CD36-dependent endothelial signaling was confirmed using in vitro Fyn knockdown as well as Fyn-/- mice, which were also protected from H2O2- and malaria-induced lung endothelial leak, respectively. Our

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in cigarette smoke exposure and influenza A virus infection-induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashodhar P Bhandary

    Full Text Available Parenchymal lung inflammation and airway and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis are associated with cigarette smoke exposure (CSE, which contributes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Epidemiological studies indicate that people exposed to chronic cigarette smoke with or without COPD are more susceptible to influenza A virus (IAV infection. We found increased p53, PAI-1 and apoptosis in AECs, with accumulation of macrophages and neutrophils in the lungs of patients with COPD. In Wild-type (WT mice with passive CSE (PCSE, p53 and PAI-1 expression and apoptosis were increased in AECs as was lung inflammation, while those lacking p53 or PAI-1 resisted AEC apoptosis and lung inflammation. Further, inhibition of p53-mediated induction of PAI-1 by treatment of WT mice with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide (CSP reduced PCSE-induced lung inflammation and reversed PCSE-induced suppression of eosinophil-associated RNase1 (EAR1. Competitive inhibition of the p53-PAI-1 mRNA interaction by expressing p53-binding 3'UTR sequences of PAI-1 mRNA likewise suppressed CS-induced PAI-1 and AEC apoptosis and restored EAR1 expression. Consistent with PCSE-induced lung injury, IAV infection increased p53, PAI-1 and apoptosis in AECs in association with pulmonary inflammation. Lung inflammation induced by PCSE was worsened by subsequent exposure to IAV. Mice lacking PAI-1 that were exposed to IAV showed minimal viral burden based on M2 antigen and hemagglutination analyses, whereas transgenic mice that overexpress PAI-1 without PCSE showed increased M2 antigen and inflammation after IAV infection. These observations indicate that increased PAI-1 expression promotes AEC apoptosis and exacerbates lung inflammation induced by IAV following PCSE.

  8. Simultaneous sinus and lung infections in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Aanaes, Kasper;

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The sinuses should be considered as a bacterial reservoir and a target for surgery and antibiotic treatment in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The observed decrease in serum precipitating antibodies (precipitins) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa may indicate a beneficial...

  9. The effect of pstS and phoB on quorum sensing and swarming motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Blus-Kadosh

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause a wide range of infections and inflammations in a variety of hosts, such as chronic biofilm associated lung infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. Phosphate, an essential nutrient, has been recognized as an important signal that affects virulence in P. aeruginosa. In the current study we examined the connection between phosphate regulation and surface motility in P. aeruginosa. We focused on two important genes, pstS, which is involved in phosphate uptake, and phoB, a central regulator that responds to phosphate starvation. We found that a mutant lacking pstS is constantly starved for phosphate and has a hyper swarming phenotype. Phosphate starvation also induced swarming in the wild type. The phoB mutant, on the other hand, did not express phosphate starvation even when phosphate was limited and showed no swarming. A double mutant lacking both genes (pstS and phoB showed a similar phenotype to the phoB mutant (i.e. no swarming. This highlights the role of phoB in controlling swarming motility under phosphate-depleted conditions. Finally, we were able to demonstrate that PhoB controls swarming by up-regulating the Rhl quorum sensing system in P. aeruginosa, which resulted in hyper production of rhamonlipids: biosurfactants that are known to induce swarming motility.

  10. Trappin-2 promotes early clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through CD14-dependent macrophage activation and neutrophil recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Thomas S; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Hamilton, Thomas W; Lipka, Alexander F; Farrell, Lesley; Davidson, Donald J; Duffin, Rodger; Morris, Andrew Conway; Haslett, Chris; Govan, John R W; Gregory, Christopher D; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Simpson, A John

    2009-04-01

    Microaspiration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to the pathogenesis of nosocomial pneumonia. Trappin-2 is a host defense peptide that assists with the clearance of P. aeruginosa through undefined mechanisms. A model of macrophage interactions with replicating P. aeruginosa (strain PA01) in serum-free conditions was developed, and the influence of subantimicrobial concentrations of trappin-2 was subsequently studied. PA01 that was pre-incubated with trappin-2 (at concentrations that have no direct antimicrobial effects), but not control PA01, was cleared by alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, trappin-2-enhanced clearance of PA01 was completely abrogated by CD14- null macrophages. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated the presence of trappin-2 on the bacterial cell surface of trappin-2-treated PA01. In a murine model of early lung infection, trappin-2-treated PA01 was cleared more efficiently than control PA01 2 hours of intratracheal instillation. Furthermore, trappin-2-treated PA01 up-regulated the murine chemokine CXCL1/KC after 2 hours with a corresponding increase in neutrophil recruitment 1 hour later. These in vivo trappin-2-treated PA01 effects were absent in CD14-deficient mice. Trappin-2 appears to opsonize P. aeruginosa for more efficient, CD14-dependent clearance by macrophages and contributes to the induction of chemokines that promote neutrophil recruitment. Trappin-2 may therefore play an important role in innate recognition and clearance of pathogens during the very earliest stages of pulmonary infection. PMID:19264904

  11. Effect of Long-Term Voluntary Exercise Wheel Running on Susceptibility to Bacterial Pulmonary Infections in a Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Pauline B van de Weert-van Leeuwen; de Vrankrijker, Angélica M. M.; Joachim Fentz; Oana Ciofu; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.; Arets, Hubertus G. M.; Hulzebos, Hendrikus J.; Cornelis K van der Ent; Jeffrey M Beekman; Johansen, Helle K.

    2013-01-01

    Regular moderate exercise has been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects and improve immune effector functions, resulting in reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Whether regular exercise also affects bacterial infection susceptibility is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether regular voluntary exercise wheel running prior to a pulmonary infection with bacteria (P. aeruginosa) affects lung bacteriology, sickness severity and phagocyte immune f...

  12. Protection of immunocompromised mice against lethal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by active or passive immunization with recombinant P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein F and outer membrane protein I fusion proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    von Specht, B U; Knapp, B.; Muth, G; Bröker, M.; Hungerer, K D; Diehl, K D; Massarrat, K; Seemann, A; Domdey, H

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant outer membrane proteins (Oprs) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione S-transferase (GST)-linked fusion proteins. GST-linked Oprs F and I (GST-OprF190-350 [GST linked to OprF spanning amino acids 190 to 350] and GST-OprI21-83, respectively) and recombinant hybrid Oprs (GST-OprF190-342-OprI21-83 and GST-OprI21-83-OprF190-350) were isolated and tested for their efficacy as vaccines in immunodeficient mice. GST-OprF-OprI protected the mice against...

  13. Integrated analysis of microRNA expression and mRNA transcriptome in lungs of avian influenza virus infected broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian influenza virus (AIV outbreaks are worldwide threats to both poultry and humans. Our previous study suggested microRNAs (miRNAs play significant roles in the regulation of host response to AIV infection in layer chickens. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis if genetic background play essential role in the miRNA regulation of AIV infection in chickens and if miRNAs that were differentially expressed in layer with AIV infection would be modulated the same way in broiler chickens. Furthermore, by integrating with parallel mRNA expression profiling, potential molecular mechanisms of host response to AIV infection can be further exploited. Results Total RNA isolated from the lungs of non-infected and low pathogenic H5N3 infected broilers at four days post-infection were used for both miRNA deep sequencing and mRNA microarray analyses. A total of 2.6 M and 3.3 M filtered high quality reads were obtained from infected and non-infected chickens by Solexa GA-I Sequencer, respectively. A total of 271 miRNAs in miRBase 16.0 were identified and one potential novel miRNA was discovered. There were 121 miRNAs differentially expressed at the 5% false discovery rate by Fisher’s exact test. More miRNAs were highly expressed in infected lungs (108 than in non-infected lungs (13, which was opposite to the findings in layer chickens. This result suggested that a different regulatory mechanism of host response to AIV infection mediated by miRNAs might exist in broiler chickens. Analysis using the chicken 44 K Agilent microarray indicated that 508 mRNAs (347 down-regulated were differentially expressed following AIV infection. Conclusions A comprehensive analysis combining both miRNA and targeted mRNA gene expression suggests that gga-miR-34a, 122–1, 122–2, 146a, 155, 206, 1719, 1594, 1599 and 451, and MX1, IL-8, IRF-7, TNFRS19 are strong candidate miRNAs or genes involved in regulating the host response to AIV

  14. Epigenetic acquisition of inducibility of type III cytotoxicity in P. aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guery Benoit

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, is often encountered in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pneumonia, as well as acute settings like mechanical ventilation acquired pneumonia or neutropenic patients. It is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in these diseases. In lungs, P. aeruginosa settles in a biofilm mode of growth with the secretion of exopolysaccharides in which it is encapsulated, enhancing its antibiotic resistance and contributing to the respiratory deficiency of patients. However, bacteria must first multiply to a high density and display a cytotoxic phenotype to avoid the host's defences. A virulence determinant implicated in this step of infection is the type III secretion system (TTSS, allowing toxin injection directly into host cells. At the beginning of the infection, most strains isolated from patients' lungs possess an inducible TTSS allowing toxins injection or secretion upon in vivo or in vitro activation signals. As the infection persists most of the bacteria permanently loose this capacity, although no mutations have been evidenced. We name "non inducible" this phenotype. As suggested by the presence of a positive feedback circuit in the regulatory network controlling TTSS expression, it may be due to an epigenetic switch allowing heritable phenotypic modifications without genotype's mutations. Results Using the generalised logical method, we designed a minimal model of the TTSS regulatory network that could support the epigenetic hypothesis, and studied its dynamics which helped to define a discriminating experimental scenario sufficient to validate the epigenetic hypothesis. A mathematical framework based on formal methods from computer science allowed a rigorous validation and certification of parameters of this model leading to epigenetic behaviour. Then, we demonstrated that a non inducible strain of P. aeruginosa can stably acquire the

  15. Systemic Inflammatory Responses and Lung Injury following Hip Fracture Surgery Increases Susceptibility to Infection in Aged Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Zhang; Tiansheng Sun; Zhi Liu; Jianzheng Zhang; Xiaowei Wang; Jia Liu

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary infections frequently occur following hip fracture surgery in aged patients. However, the underlying reasons are not fully understood. The present study investigates the systemic inflammatory response and pulmonary conditions following hip fracture surgery as a means of identifying risk factors for lung infections using an aged rodent model. Aged, male Sprague-Dawley rats (8 animals per group) underwent a sham procedure or hip fracture plus femoral intramedullary pinning. Animals we...

  16. Distal Airway Stem Cells Render Alveoli in Vitro and During Lung Regeneration Following H1N1 Influenza Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pooja A.; Hu, Yuanyu; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Hoe, Neo Boon; Wei, Tay Seok; Mu, Dakai; Sun, Yan; Joo, Lim Siew; Dagher, Rania; Zielonka, Elisabeth; Wang, Yun; Chow, Vincent T.; Crum, Christopher P.; Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The extent of lung regeneration following catastrophic damage and the potential role of adult stem cells in such a process remains obscure. Sublethal infection of mice with an H1N1 influenza virus related to that of the 1918 pandemic triggers massive airway damage followed by apparent regeneration. We show here that p63-expressing stem cells in the bronchiolar epithelium undergo rapid proliferation after infection and radiate to interbronchiolar regions of alveolar ablation. Once there, these...

  17. Detection of P. aeruginosa harboring bla CTX-M-2, bla GES-1 and bla GES-5, bla IMP-1 and bla SPM-1 causing infections in Brazilian tertiary-care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polotto Milena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nosocomial infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa presenting resistance to beta-lactam drugs are one of the most challenging targets for antimicrobial therapy, leading to substantial increase in mortality rates in hospitals worldwide. In this context, P. aeruginosa harboring acquired mechanisms of resistance, such as production of metallo-beta-lactamase (MBLs and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs have the highest clinical impact. Hence, this study was designed to investigate the presence of genes codifying for MBLs and ESBLs among carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolated in a Brazilian 720-bed teaching tertiary care hospital. Methods Fifty-six carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were evaluated for the presence of MBL and ESBL genes. Strains presenting MBL and/or ESBL genes were submitted to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for genetic similarity evaluation. Results Despite the carbapenem resistance, genes for MBLs (blaSPM-1 or blaIMP-1 were detected in only 26.7% of isolates. Genes encoding ESBLs were detected in 23.2% of isolates. The blaCTX-M-2 was the most prevalent ESBL gene (19.6%, followed by blaGES-1 and blaGES-5 detected in one isolate each. In all isolates presenting MBL phenotype by double-disc synergy test (DDST, the blaSPM-1 or blaIMP-1 genes were detected. In addition, blaIMP-1 was also detected in three isolates which did not display any MBL phenotype. These isolates also presented the blaCTX-M-2 gene. The co-existence of blaCTX-M-2 with blaIMP-1 is presently reported for the first time, as like as co-existence of blaGES-1 with blaIMP-1. Conclusions In this study MBLs production was not the major mechanism of resistance to carbapenems, suggesting the occurrence of multidrug efflux pumps, reduction in porin channels and production of other beta-lactamases. The detection of blaCTX-M-2,blaGES-1 and blaGES-5 reflects the recent emergence of ESBLs among antimicrobial resistant P. aeruginosa and

  18. Expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1 impairs viral clearance and exacerbates lung injury during influenza infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keer Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS proteins are inducible feedback inhibitors of cytokine signaling. SOCS1-/- mice die within three weeks postnatally due to IFN-γ-induced hyperinflammation. Since it is well established that IFN-γ is dispensable for protection against influenza infection, we generated SOCS1-/-IFN-γ-/- mice to determine whether SOCS1 regulates antiviral immunity in vivo. Here we show that SOCS1-/-IFN-γ-/- mice exhibited significantly enhanced resistance to influenza infection, as evidenced by improved viral clearance, attenuated acute lung damage, and consequently increased survival rates compared to either IFN-γ-/- or WT animals. Enhanced viral clearance in SOCS1-/-IFN-γ-/- mice coincided with a rapid onset of adaptive immune responses during acute infection, while their reduced lung injury was associated with decreased inflammatory cell infiltration at the resolution phase of infection. We further determined the contribution of SOCS1-deficient T cells to antiviral immunity. Anti-CD4 antibody treatment of SOCS1-/-IFN-γ-/- mice had no significant effect on their enhanced resistance to influenza infection, while CD8+ splenocytes from SOCS1-/-IFN-γ-/- mice were sufficient to rescue RAG1-/- animals from an otherwise lethal infection. Surprisingly, despite their markedly reduced viral burdens, RAG1-/- mice reconstituted with SOCS1-/-IFN-γ-/- adaptive immune cells failed to ameliorate influenza-induced lung injury. In conclusion, in the absence of IFN-γ, the cytoplasmic protein SOCS1 not only inhibits adaptive antiviral immune responses but also exacerbates inflammatory lung damage. Importantly, these detrimental effects of SOCS1 are conveyed through discrete cell populations. Specifically, while SOCS1 expression in adaptive immune cells is sufficient to inhibit antiviral immunity, SOCS1 in innate/stromal cells is responsible for aggravated lung injury.

  19. CXCR3 Directs Antigen-Specific Effector CD4+ T Cell Migration to the Lung During Parainfluenza Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Cookenham, Tres; Miller, Shannon C;

    2009-01-01

    Effector T cells are a crucial component of the adaptive immune response to respiratory virus infections. Although it was previously reported that the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3 affect trafficking of respiratory virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, it is unclear whether these receptors govern...... effector CD4(+) T cell migration to the lungs. To assess the role of CCR5 and CXCR3 in vivo, we directly compared the migration of Ag-specific wild-type and chemokine receptor-deficient effector T cells in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice during a parainfluenza virus infection. CXCR3-deficient effector CD4......(+) T cells were 5- to 10-fold less efficient at migrating to the lung compared with wild-type cells, whereas CCR5-deficient effector T cells were not impaired in their migration to the lung. In contrast to its role in trafficking, CXCR3 had no impact on effector CD4(+) T cell proliferation, phenotype...

  20. Nocardia kroppenstedtii sp. nov., an actinomycete isolated from a lung transplant patient with a pulmonary infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Amanda L

    2014-03-01

    A novel actinomycete, strain N1286(T), isolated from a lung transplant patient with a pulmonary infection, was provisionally assigned to the genus Nocardia. The strain had chemotaxonomic and morphological properties typical of members of the genus Nocardia and formed a distinct phyletic line in the Nocardia 16S rRNA gene tree. Isolate N1286(T) was most closely related to Nocardia farcinica DSM 43665(T) (99.8% gene sequence similarity) but could be distinguished from the latter by the low level of DNA-DNA relatedness. These strains were also distinguishable on the basis of a broad range of phenotypic properties. It is concluded that strain N1286(T) represents a novel species of the genus Nocardia for which the name Nocardia kroppenstedtii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is N1286(T) ( = DSM 45810(T) = NCTC 13617(T)).

  1. Immuno PET/MR imaging allows specific detection of Aspergillus fumigatus lung infection in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Anna-Maria; Hasenberg, Mike; Thornton, Christopher R.;

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a life-threatening lung disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, and is a leading cause of invasive fungal infection-related mortality and morbidity in patients with hematological malignancies and bone marrow transplants. We developed and teste...

  2. Emergence of carbapenem resistance due to the novel insertion sequence ISPa8 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randal C Fowler

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections due to the persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients are typically associated with the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the emergence of carbapenem resistance when a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa collected from a patient with cystic fibrosis was challenged with meropenem. Nine carbapenem-resistant mutants were selected with subinhibitory concentrations of meropenem from a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa and characterized for carbapenem resistance. Increased carbapenem MICs were associated with the identification of the novel insertion sequence ISPa8 within oprD or its promoter region in all the mutants. The position of ISPa8 was different for each of the mutants evaluated. In addition, Southern blot analyses identified multiple copies of ISPa8 within the genomes of the mutants and their parent isolate. These data demonstrate that transposition of IS elements within the Pseudomonas genome can influence antibiotic susceptibility. Understanding the selective pressures associated with the emergence of antibiotic resistance is critical for the judicious use of antimicrobial chemotherapy and the successful treatment of bacterial infections.

  3. Emergence of carbapenem resistance due to the novel insertion sequence ISPa8 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Randal C; Hanson, Nancy D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lung infections due to the persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients are typically associated with the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the emergence of carbapenem resistance when a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa collected from a patient with cystic fibrosis was challenged with meropenem. Nine carbapenem-resistant mutants were selected with subinhibitory concentrations of meropenem from a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa and characterized for carbapenem resistance. Increased carbapenem MICs were associated with the identification of the novel insertion sequence ISPa8 within oprD or its promoter region in all the mutants. The position of ISPa8 was different for each of the mutants evaluated. In addition, Southern blot analyses identified multiple copies of ISPa8 within the genomes of the mutants and their parent isolate. These data demonstrate that transposition of IS elements within the Pseudomonas genome can influence antibiotic susceptibility. Understanding the selective pressures associated with the emergence of antibiotic resistance is critical for the judicious use of antimicrobial chemotherapy and the successful treatment of bacterial infections.

  4. 多药耐药铜绿假单胞菌医院感染的高危因素及药物敏感性分析%High risk factors of nosocomial infection caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and analysis of drug sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹利君; 王春萍

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the risk factors for nosocomial infection caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and analyze the drug sensitivity. METHODS A total of 98 cases of patients with P. Aeruginosa infection in our hospital from Jan 2007 to May 2011 were selected in this study and divided them into control group (sensitive group) with 48 cases and observation group (multi-drug resistant group) with 50 patients. The age, length of stay, mechanical ventilation rate associated with lung-based diseases, APACHE TJ score and so on for the two groups were compared, and statistics and analysis for the observation group of departments and MIC distribution were performed. RESULTS The age of the observed group (60. 25±5. 66)years was older than the control group (53. 14±6. 13)years, length of stay (35. 28±6. 89)d was longer than the control group (26. 52±6. 37)d, mechanical ventilation rate (50. 0%) was higher than control group (25. 0%) , associated with lung disease (28.0%) was proportion (12. 5%} higher than the control group, APACHE II score (20. 5± 3.1) points was (15. 4i2, 9) points higher than the control group. The highest proportion in distributed departments were ICU and neurology, and they were 24. 0% and 20. 0% respectively, There were significantly different (P<0. 05). CONCLUSION There are characteristics of the nosocomial infection in risk factors and drug sensitivity of multi-drug resistant P. Aeruginosa, which are is worthy of the attention in clinic.%目的 探讨分析多药耐药性铜绿假单胞菌医院感染的高危因素及药物敏感性.方法 选取2007年1月-2011年5月检测出的98例铜绿假单胞菌感染患者为研究对象,将其分为对照组(敏感组)48例和观察组(多药耐药组)50例,对两组年龄、住院时间、机械通气率、伴有肺部基础疾病、APACHEⅡ评分等进行统计及比较,并对观察组的科室分布及MIC进行统计及分析.结果 观察组平均年龄(60.25±5.66)

  5. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pure Exotoxin A on Mice WBC in Comparison with Human WBC Contaminated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    M Naghmachi; A Sharifi; J Kohanteb

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction & Objective: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram negative bacterial. This bacterium is resistant to many antibiotics and chemical disinfectants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacteria and caused infection in skin, external ear, upper respiratory tract, large intestine and is an important bacteria in nosocomial infections. It causes acute infection in burn disease. This bacterium can produce exotoxin A and effect on elongation factor II and can stop protein ...

  6. 421株医院感染铜绿假单胞菌的耐药性分析%Analysis of Nosocomial Infection with 421 Strains of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and the Approach of Drug Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张英; 安翠平; 任晓华; 杨慧芳; 霍卫池; 彭雯; 冯涛; 何士彦

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the distribution and situation of drug resistance of pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from our hospital. Methods:The microbilogical system API was used to indentify pseudomonas aeruginosa while the drug resistance in vitro was determined by K-B methods. Results:Most of pseudomonas aeruginosa were found in the department of respiratory internal medicine and ICU, they almost accounted for 79.8%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to cefepime, bactrim and ambramycin, but to other drugs it showed different degrees of drug resistance. For example, the resistance rate of pseudomonas aeruginosa to the third generation cephalosporins (ie. Ceftriaxone, cefotaxim, ceftazidime) and gentamicin that belongs to aminoglycosides, were as high as 50.0%, and then it came to be the FQNS (ie. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin) and amikacin, the resistance rate was more than 20.0%. However, in our hospital cefoperazone/ sulbactam, piperacillin/ surname and imipenem still maintained a higher sensitivity to the pseudomonas aeruginosa, their resistance rate were lower than 10.0%. Conclusion: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the main pathogenic bacteria in nosocomial infection, so reinforce the monitoring on the drug resistance of pseudomonas aeruginosa and to standardize the application of antibacterials are helpful to maintaining antibacterial activity of sensitive antibacterials.%目的 了解我院铜绿假单胞菌(PAE) 对常用抗菌药物的耐药现状及标本分布.方法 采用法国生物梅里埃生物API 鉴定系统进行鉴定,并采用K-B 纸片扩散法进行体外耐药检测及统计耐药率.结果 临床分离的421 株PAE 在ICU 和呼吸内科感染率最高,占总构成比的79.8%.PAE 除对头孢吡肟、复方新诺明和四环素敏感外(敏感率为100%),对其它多种抗菌药物均表现不同程度的耐药现象.如对不含酶抑制剂的三代头孢类药物头孢曲松、头孢噻肟、头孢他啶以及氨基糖苷类的庆

  7. Incorporation of Farnesol Significantly Increases the Efficacy of Liposomal Ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, H M H N; Herpin, M J; Kolacny, D; Harb, A; Romanovicz, D; Smyth, H D C

    2016-08-01

    The challenge of eliminating Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, such as in cystic fibrosis lungs, remains unchanged due to the rapid development of antibiotic resistance. Poor drug penetration into dense P. aeruginosa biofilms plays a vital role in ineffective clearance of the infection. Thus, the current antibiotic therapy against P. aeruginosa biofilms need to be revisited and alternative antibiofilm strategies need to be invented. Fungal quorum sensing molecule (QSM), farnesol, appears to have detrimental effects on P. aeruginosa. Thus, this study aimed to codeliver naturally occurring QSM farnesol, with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin as a liposomal formulation to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilms. Four different liposomes (with ciprofloxacin and farnesol, Lcip+far; with ciprofloxacin, Lcip; with farnesol, Lfar; control, Lcon) were prepared using dehydration-rehydration method and characterized. Drug entrapment and release were evaluated by spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The efficacy of liposomes was assessed using standard biofilm assay. Liposome-treated 24 h P. aeruginosa biofilms were quantitatively assessed by XTT reduction assay and crystal violet assay, and qualitatively by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ciprofloxacin release from liposomes was higher when encapsulated with farnesol (Lcip+far) compared to Lcip (3.06% vs 1.48%), whereas farnesol release was lower when encapsulated with ciprofloxacin (Lcip+far) compared to Lfar (1.81% vs 4.75%). The biofilm metabolism was significantly lower when treated with Lcip+far or Lcip compared to free ciprofloxacin (XTT, P < 0.05). When administered as Lcip+far, the ciprofloxacin concentration required to achieve similar biofilm inhibition was 125-fold or 10-fold lower compared to free ciprofloxacin or Lcip, respectively (P < 0.05). CLSM and TEM confirmed predominant biofilm disruption, greater dead cell ratio, and increased depth of

  8. Influenza A Virus Infection in Pigs Attracts Multifunctional and Cross-Reactive T Cells to the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talker, Stephanie C.; Stadler, Maria; Koinig, Hanna C.; Mair, Kerstin H.; Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene M.; Graage, Robert; Zell, Roland; Dürrwald, Ralf; Starick, Elke; Harder, Timm; Weissenböck, Herbert; Lamp, Benjamin; Hammer, Sabine E.; Ladinig, Andrea; Saalmüller, Armin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pigs are natural hosts for influenza A viruses and play a critical role in influenza epidemiology. However, little is known about their influenza-evoked T-cell response. We performed a thorough analysis of both the local and systemic T-cell response in influenza virus-infected pigs, addressing kinetics and phenotype as well as multifunctionality (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-2 [IL-2]) and cross-reactivity. A total of 31 pigs were intratracheally infected with an H1N2 swine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) and consecutively euthanized. Lungs, tracheobronchial lymph nodes, and blood were sampled during the first 15 days postinfection (p.i.) and at 6 weeks p.i. Ex vivo flow cytometry of lung lymphocytes revealed an increase in proliferating (Ki-67+) CD8+ T cells with an early effector phenotype (perforin+ CD27+) at day 6 p.i. Low frequencies of influenza virus-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells could be detected in the lung as early as 4 days p.i. On consecutive days, influenza virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells produced mainly IFN-γ and/or TNF-α, reaching peak frequencies around day 9 p.i., which were up to 30-fold higher in the lung than in tracheobronchial lymph nodes or blood. At 6 weeks p.i., CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells had accumulated in lung tissue. These cells showed diverse cytokine profiles and in vitro reactivity against heterologous influenza virus strains, all of which supports their potential to combat heterologous influenza virus infections in pigs. IMPORTANCE Pigs not only are a suitable large-animal model for human influenza virus infection and vaccine development but also play a central role in the emergence of new pandemic strains. Although promising candidate universal vaccines are tested in pigs and local T cells are the major correlate of heterologous control, detailed and targeted analyses of T-cell responses at the site of infection are scarce. With the present study, we

  9. Dampening Host Sensing and Avoiding Recognition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cigana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and causes a wide range of acute and chronic infections. P. aeruginosa infections are kept in check by an effective immune surveillance in the healthy host, while any imbalance or defect in the normal immune response can manifest in disease. Invasive acute infection in the immunocompromised patients is mediated by potent extracellular and cell bound bacterial virulence factors. Life-threatening chronic infection in cystic fibrosis patients is maintained by pathogenic variants that contribute to evade detection and clearance by the immune system. Here, we reviewed the molecular basis of receptor-mediated recognition of P. aeruginosa and their role in initiating inflammation and the colonization. In addition, the consequence of the P. aeruginosa genetic adaptation for the antibacterial defence and the maintaining of chronic infection are discussed.

  10. Intensive-care unit lung infections: The role of imaging with special emphasis on multi-detector row computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Luigia; Pinto, Antonio; Merola, Stefanella; Gagliardi, Nicola; Tortora, Giovanni [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cardarelli Hospital, Naples Italy-Via G. Merliani 31, 80127 Naples (Italy); Scaglione, Mariano [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cardarelli Hospital, Naples Italy-Via G. Merliani 31, 80127 Naples (Italy)], E-mail: mscaglione@tiscali.it

    2008-03-15

    Nosocomial pneumonia is the most frequent hospital-acquired infection. In mechanically ventilated patients admitted to an intensive-care unit as many as 7-41% may develop pneumonia. The role of imaging is to identify the presence, location and extent of pulmonary infection and the presence of complications. However, the poor resolution of bedside plain film frequently limits the value of radiography as an accurate diagnostic tool. To date, multi-detector row computed tomography with its excellent contrast resolution is the most sensitive modality for evaluating lung parenchyma infections.

  11. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.;

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa......, but that the silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...... planktonic bacteria. These observations strongly indicate that the concentration of silver in currently available wound dressings is much too low for treatment of chronic biofilm wounds. It is suggested that clinicians and manufacturers of the said wound dressings consider whether they are treating wounds...

  12. Perinatal Exposure to Insecticide Methamidophos Suppressed Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines Responding to Virus Infection in Lung Tissues in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Watanabe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamidophos, a representative organophosphate insecticide, is regulated because of its severe neurotoxicity, but it is suspected of contaminating agricultural foods in many countries due to illicit use. To reveal unknown effects of methamidophos on human health, we evaluated the developmental immunotoxicity of methamidophos using a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection mouse model. Pregnant mice were exposed to methamidophos (10 or 20 ppm in their drinking water from gestation day 10 to weaning on postnatal day 21. Offsprings born to these dams were intranasally infected with RSV. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interferon-gamma in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids after infection were significantly decreased in offspring mice exposed to methamidophos. Treatment with methamidophos did not affect the pulmonary viral titers but suppressed moderately the inflammation of lung tissues of RSV-infected offspring, histopathologically. DNA microarray analysis revealed that gene expression of the cytokines in the lungs of offspring mice exposed to 20 ppm of methamidophos was apparently suppressed compared with the control. Methamidophos did not suppress IL-6 production in RSV-infected J774.1 cell cultures. Thus, exposure of the mother to methamidophos during pregnancy and nursing was suggested to cause an irregular immune response in the lung tissues in the offspring mice.

  13. Reactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin with reduced glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Shimmon, Ronald; Dawson, Michael; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common cause of chronic and recurrent lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) whose sputa contain copious quantities of P. aeruginosa toxin, pyocyanin. Pyocyanin triggers tissue damage mainly by its redox cycling and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The reactions between reduced glutathione (GSH) and pyocyanin were observed using absorption spectra from spectrophotometry and the reaction products analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Pyocyanin reacted with GSH non-enzymatically at 37 degrees C resulting in the production of red-brown products, spectophotometrically visible as a 480 nm maximum absorption peak after 24 h of incubation. The reaction was concentration-dependent on reduced glutathione but not on pyocyanin. Minimizing the accessibility of oxygen to the reaction decreased its rate. The anti-oxidant enzyme catalase circumvented the reaction. Proton-NMR analysis demonstrated the persistence of the original aromatic ring and the methyl-group of pyocyanin in the red-brown products. Anti-oxidant agents having thiol groups produced similar spectophotometrically visible peaks. The presence of a previously unidentified non-enzymatic GSH-dependent metabolic pathway for pyocyanin has thus been identified. The reaction between pyocyanin and GSH is concentration-, time-, and O(2)-dependent. The formation of H(2)O(2) as an intermediate and the thiol group in GSH seem to be important in this reaction. PMID:18797520

  14. Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Foreign-Body Biofilm Infections through Reduction of the Cyclic Di-GMP Level in the Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise D.; van Gennip, Maria; Rybtke, Morten Theil;

    2013-01-01

    be used for biofilm control in vivo. We constructed a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in which a reduction in the c-di-GMP level can be achieved via induction of the Escherichia coli YhjH c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. Initial experiments showed that induction of yhjH expression led to dispersal...

  15. Evolution of metabolic divergence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term infection facilitates a proto-cooperative interspecies interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Khademi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2016-01-01

    host-adapted strain, DK2-P2M24-2003, and S. aureus. In this study, characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectral (MS) molecular networking revealed a significant metabolic divergence between P. aeruginosa PAO...

  16. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pfpI gene plays an antimutator role and provides general stress protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2009-02-01

    Hypermutator Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, characterized by an increased spontaneous-mutation rate, are found at high frequencies in chronic lung infections. Hypermutability is associated with the loss of antimutator genes related to DNA repair or damage avoidance systems. Only a few antimutator genes have been described in P. aeruginosa, although there is some evidence that additional genes may be involved in naturally occurring hypermutability. In order to find new P. aeruginosa antimutator genes, we constructed and screened a library of random insertions in the PA14 strain. Some previously described P. aeruginosa and/or Escherichia coli antimutator genes, such as mutS, mutL, uvrD, mutT, ung, and mutY, were detected, indicating a good coverage of our insertional library. One additional mutant contained an insertion in the P. aeruginosa PA14-04650 (pfpI) gene, putatively encoding a member of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily, which includes chaperones, peptidases, and the Parkinson's disease protein DJ-1a. The pfpI-defective mutants in both PAO1 and PA14 showed higher spontaneous mutation rates than the wild-type strains, suggesting that PfpI plays a key role in DNA protection under nonstress conditions. Moreover, the inactivation of pfpI resulted in a dramatic increase in the H(2)O(2)-induced mutant frequency. Global transcription studies showed the induction of bacteriophage Pf1 genes and the repression of genes related to iron metabolism, suggesting that the increased spontaneous-mutant frequency may be due to reduced protection against the basal level of reactive oxygen species. Finally, pfpI mutants are more sensitive to different types of stress and are affected in biofilm formation. PMID:19028889

  17. Tetrahydrodipicolinate N-succinyltransferase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: structure analysis and gene deletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Schnell

    Full Text Available The diaminopimelic acid pathway of lysine biosynthesis has been suggested to provide attractive targets for the development of novel antibacterial drugs. Here we report the characterization of two enzymes from this pathway in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, utilizing structural biology, biochemistry and genetics. We show that tetrahydrodipicolinate N-succinyltransferase (DapD from P. aeruginosa is specific for the L-stereoisomer of the amino substrate L-2-aminopimelate, and its D-enantiomer acts as a weak inhibitor. The crystal structures of this enzyme with L-2-aminopimelate and D-2-aminopimelate, respectively, reveal that both compounds bind at the same site of the enzyme. Comparison of the binding interactions of these ligands in the enzyme active site suggests misalignment of the amino group of D-2-aminopimelate for nucleophilic attack on the succinate moiety of the co-substrate succinyl-CoA as the structural basis of specificity and inhibition. P. aeruginosa mutants where the dapA gene had been deleted were viable and able to grow in a mouse lung infection model, suggesting that DapA is not an optimal target for drug development against this organism. Structure-based sequence alignments, based on the DapA crystal structure determined to 1.6 Å resolution revealed the presence of two homologues, PA0223 and PA4188, in P. aeruginosa that could substitute for DapA in the P. aeruginosa PAO1ΔdapA mutant. In vitro experiments using recombinant PA0223 protein could however not detect any DapA activity.

  18. Mannitol enhances antibiotic sensitivity of persister bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barraud

    Full Text Available The failure of antibiotic therapies to clear Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the key mortality factor for cystic fibrosis (CF patients, is partly attributed to the high tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Mannitol has previously been found to restore aminoglycoside sensitivity in Escherichia coli by generating a proton-motive force (PMF, suggesting a potential new strategy to improve antibiotic therapy and reduce disease progression in CF. Here, we used the commonly prescribed aminoglycoside tobramycin to select for P. aeruginosa persister cells during biofilm growth. Incubation with mannitol (10-40 mM increased tobramycin sensitivity of persister cells up to 1,000-fold. Addition of mannitol to pre-grown biofilms was able to revert the persister phenotype and improve the efficacy of tobramycin. This effect was blocked by the addition of a PMF inhibitor or in a P. aeruginosa mutant strain unable to metabolise mannitol. Addition of glucose and NaCl at high osmolarity also improved the efficacy of tobramycin although to a lesser extent compared to mannitol. Therefore, the primary effect of mannitol in reverting biofilm associated persister cells appears to be an active, physiological response, associated with a minor contribution of osmotic stress. Mannitol was tested against clinically relevant strains, showing that biofilms containing a subpopulation of persister cells are better killed in the presence of mannitol, but a clinical strain with a high resistance to tobramycin was not affected by mannitol. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to improvements in lung function by facilitating mucus clearance in CF, mannitol also affects antibiotic sensitivity in biofilms and does so through an active, physiological response.

  19. Metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa involved in competition with respiratory bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eBeaume

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic airway infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa considerably contributes to lung tissue destruction and impairment of pulmonary function in cystic-fibrosis (CF patients. Complex interplays between P. aeruginosa and other co-colonizing pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia spp and Klebsiella pneumoniae may be crucial for pathogenesis and disease progression.Methods: We generated a library of PA14 transposon insertion mutants to identify P. aeruginosa genes required for exploitative and direct competitions with S. aureus, B. cenocepacia, and K. pneumoniae. Results: Whereas wild type PA14 inhibited S. aureus growth, two transposon insertions located in pqsC and carB, resulted in reduced growth inhibition. PqsC is involved in the synthesis of 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs, a family of molecules having antibacterial properties, while carB is a key gene in pyrimidine biosynthesis. The carB mutant was also unable to grow in the presence of B. cepacia and K. pneumoniae but not E. coli and S. epidermidis. We further identified a transposon insertion in purF, encoding a key enzyme of purine metabolism. This mutant displayed a severe growth deficiency in the presence of Gram-negative but not of Gram-positive bacteria. We identified a beneficial interaction in a bioA transposon mutant, unable to grow on rich medium. This growth defect could be restored either by addition of biotin or by co-culturing the mutant in the presence of K. pneumoniae or E. coli.Conclusions: Complex interactions take place between the various bacterial species colonizing CF-lungs. This work identified both detrimental and beneficial interactions occurring between P. aeruginosa and three other respiratory pathogens involving several major metabolic pathways. Manipulating these pathways could be used to interfere with bacterial interactions and influence the colonization by respiratory pathogens.

  20. In Vitro Pharmacodynamics of Levofloxacin and Other Aerosolized Antibiotics under Multiple Conditions Relevant to Chronic Pulmonary Infection in Cystic Fibrosis ▿

    OpenAIRE

    King, Paula; Lomovskaya, Olga; Griffith, David C.; Burns, Jane L.; Dudley, Michael N.

    2009-01-01

    The inhalational administration of antibiotics can provide high concentrations locally in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and, thus, can be useful for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections. The present study evaluated the in vitro activities of levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, amikacin, and aztreonam against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, and Staphylococcus aureus from cys...