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Sample records for aeruginosa lasr mutants

  1. Biofilm production by clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and structural changes in LasR protein of isolates non biofilm-producing

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    Jailton Lobo da Costa Lima

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biofilm production is an important mechanism for the survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its relationship with antimicrobial resistance represents a challenge for patient therapeutics. P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen frequently associated to nosocomial infections, especially in imunocompromised hosts. Objectives: Analyze the phenotypic biofilm production in P. aeruginosa isolates, describe clonal profiles, and analyze quorum sensing (QS genes and the occurrence of mutations in the LasR protein of non-biofilm producing isolates. Methods: Isolates were tested for biofilm production by measuring cells adherence to the microtiter plates. Clonal profile analysis was carried out through ERIC-PCR, QS genes were by specific PCR. Results: The results showed that 77.5% of the isolates were considered biofilm producers. The results of genotyping showed 38 distinct genetic profiles. As for the occurrence of the genes, 100% of the isolates presented the lasR, rhlI and rhlR genes, and 97.5%, presented the lasI gene. In this study nine isolates were not biofilm producers. However, all presented the QS genes. Amplicons related to genes were sequenced in three of the nine non-biofilm-producing isolates (all presenting different genetic similarity profile and aligned to the sequences of those genes in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 (standard biofilm-producing strain. Alignment analysis showed an insertion of three nucleotides (T, C and G causing the addition of an amino acid valine in the sequence of the LasR protein, in position 53. Conclusion: The modeling of the resulting LasR protein showed a conformational change in its structure, suggesting that this might be the reason why these isolates are unable to produce biofilm. Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Biofilm, Multiresistance, Quorum sensing (QS

  2. Growth phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lasR mutants adapted to the airways of cystic fibrosis patients

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    D'Argenio, D.A.; Wu, M.H.; Hoffman, L.R.

    2007-01-01

    growth in the laboratory on a rich medium. The lasR loss-of-function mutations in these strains conferred a growth advantage with particular carbon and nitrogen sources, including amino acids, in part due to increased expression of the catabolic pathway regulator CbrB. This growth phenotype could...

  3. A high throughput amenable Arabidopsis-P. aeruginosa system reveals a rewired regulatory module and the utility to identify potent anti-infectives.

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    Suresh Gopalan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that in a metasystem consisting of Arabidopsis seedlings growing in liquid medium (in 96 well plates even microbes considered to be innocuous such as laboratory strains of E. coli and B. subtilis can cause potent damage to the host. We further posited that such environment-induced adaptations are brought about by 'system status changes' (rewiring of pre-existing cellular signaling networks and components of the host and the microbe, and that prolongation of such a situation could lead to the emergence of pathogenic states in real-life. Here, using this infection model, we show that the master regulator GacA of the human opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa (strain PA14 is dispensable for pathogenesis, as evidenced by three independent read-outs. The gene expression profile of the host after infection with wild type PA14 or the gacA mutant are also identical. GacA normally acts upstream of the quorum sensing regulatory circuit (that includes the regulator LasR that controls a subset of virulence factors. Double mutants in gacA and lasR behave similar to the lasR mutant, as seen by abrogation of a characteristic cell type specific host cell damage caused by PA14 or the gacA mutant. This indicates that a previously unrecognized regulatory mechanism is operative under these conditions upstream of LasR. In addition, the detrimental effect of PA14 on Arabidopsis seedlings is resistant to high concentrations of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. These data suggest that the Arabidopsis seedling infection system could be used to identify anti-infectives with potentially novel modes of action.

  4. A high throughput amenable Arabidopsis-P. aeruginosa system reveals a rewired regulatory module and the utility to identify potent anti-infectives.

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    Gopalan, Suresh; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2011-01-21

    We previously demonstrated that in a metasystem consisting of Arabidopsis seedlings growing in liquid medium (in 96 well plates) even microbes considered to be innocuous such as laboratory strains of E. coli and B. subtilis can cause potent damage to the host. We further posited that such environment-induced adaptations are brought about by 'system status changes' (rewiring of pre-existing cellular signaling networks and components) of the host and the microbe, and that prolongation of such a situation could lead to the emergence of pathogenic states in real-life. Here, using this infection model, we show that the master regulator GacA of the human opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa (strain PA14) is dispensable for pathogenesis, as evidenced by three independent read-outs. The gene expression profile of the host after infection with wild type PA14 or the gacA mutant are also identical. GacA normally acts upstream of the quorum sensing regulatory circuit (that includes the regulator LasR) that controls a subset of virulence factors. Double mutants in gacA and lasR behave similar to the lasR mutant, as seen by abrogation of a characteristic cell type specific host cell damage caused by PA14 or the gacA mutant. This indicates that a previously unrecognized regulatory mechanism is operative under these conditions upstream of LasR. In addition, the detrimental effect of PA14 on Arabidopsis seedlings is resistant to high concentrations of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. These data suggest that the Arabidopsis seedling infection system could be used to identify anti-infectives with potentially novel modes of action.

  5. Additive Effects of Quorum Sensing Anti-Activators on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Traits and Transcriptome

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    Kyle L. Asfahl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS via acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL signals coordinates virulence gene expression. AHL signals must reach a critical threshold before enough is bound by cognate regulators LasR and RhlR to drive transcription of target genes. In addition, three anti-activator proteins, QteE, QscR, and QslA, sequester QS regulators to increase the threshold for induction and delay expression of QS target genes. It remains unclear how multiple anti-activators work together to achieve the quorum threshold. Here, we employed a combination of mutational, kinetic, phenotypic, and transcriptomic analysis to examine regulatory effects and interactions of the three distinct anti-activators. We observed combinatorial, additive effects on QS gene expression. As measured by reporter gene fusion, individual deletion of each anti-activator gene increased lasB expression and QS-controlled virulence factor production. Deletion of qslA in combination with the deletion of any other anti-activator gene resulted in the greatest increase and earliest activation of lasB gene expression. Western analysis revealed that relative increases in soluble LasR in anti-activator mutants correlate with increased lasB expression and QS-controlled virulence factor production. RNA-seq of the previously uncharacterized QslA and QteE regulons revealed overlapping, yet distinct groups of differentially expressed genes. Simultaneous inactivation of qteE and qslA had the largest effect on gene expression with 999 genes induced and 798 genes repressed in the double mutant vs. wild-type. We found that LasR and RhlR-activated QS genes formed a subset of the genes induced in the qteE, qslA, and double mutant. The activation of almost all of these QS genes was advanced from stationary phase to log phase in the qteE qslA double mutant. Taken together, our results identify additive effects of anti-activation on QS gene expression, likely

  6. Comprehensive MALDI-TOF biotyping of the non-redundant Harvard Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 transposon insertion mutant library.

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    Oumeraci, Tonio; Jensen, Vanessa; Talbot, Steven R; Hofmann, Winfried; Kostrzewa, Markus; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; von Neuhoff, Nils; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium that is ubiquitously present in the aerobic biosphere. As an antibiotic-resistant facultative pathogen, it is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections. Its rapid and accurate identification is crucial in clinical and therapeutic environments. In a large-scale MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based screen of the Harvard transposon insertion mutant library of P. aeruginosa strain PA14, intact-cell proteome profile spectra of 5547 PA14 transposon mutants exhibiting a plethora of different phenotypes were acquired and analyzed. Of all P. aeruginosa PA14 mutant profiles 99.7% were correctly identified as P. aeruginosa with the Biotyper software on the species level. On the strain level, 99.99% of the profiles were mapped to five different individual P. aeruginosa Biotyper database entries. A principal component analysis-based approach was used to determine the most important discriminatory mass features between these Biotyper groups. Although technical replicas were consistently categorized to specific Biotyper groups in 94.2% of the mutant profiles, biological replicas were not, indicating that the distinct proteotypes are affected by growth conditions. The PA14 mutant profile collection presented here constitutes the largest coherent P. aeruginosa MALDI-TOF spectral dataset publicly available today. Transposon insertions in thousands of different P. aeruginosa genes did not affect species identification from MALDI-TOF mass spectra, clearly demonstrating the robustness of the approach. However, the assignment of the individual spectra to sub-groups proved to be non-consistent in biological replicas, indicating that the differentiation between biotyper groups in this nosocomial pathogen is unassured.

  7. Investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signaling system for identifying multiple inhibitors using molecular docking and structural analysis methodology.

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    Soheili, Vahid; Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh Fazly; Abdollahpour, Nooshin; Hadizadeh, Farzin

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and a common Gram-negative bacterium in hospital-acquired infections. It causes death in many burn victims, cystic-fibrosis and neutropenic-cancer patients. It is known that P. aeruginosa biofilm maturation and production of cell-associated and extracellular virulence factors such as pyocyanin, elastase and rhamnolipids are under the control of a quorum-sensing (QS) system. Among several proteins involved in the Pseudomonas QS mechanism, LasR and PqsE play an important role in its cascade signaling system. They can cause increases in QS factors, biofilm maturation, and the production of virulence factors. Therefore, inhibition of these proteins can reduce the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. According to the structure of corresponding auto-inducers bound to these proteins, in silico calculations were performed with some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to estimate possible interactions and find the co-inhibitors of LasR and PqsE. The results showed that oxicams (Piroxicam and Meloxicam) can interact well with active sites of both proteins with the Ki of 119.43 nM and 4.0 μM for Meloxicam and 201.39 nM and 4.88 μM against LasR and PqsE, respectively. These findings suggested that Piroxicam and Meloxicam can be used as potential inhibitors for control of the P. aeruginosa QS signaling system and biofilm formation, and may be used in the design of multiple inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of LasR Ligands through a Virtual Screening Approach

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    Skovstrup, Søren; Le Quement, Sebastian Thordal; Hansen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    as an attractive therapeutic target for the next generation of antimicrobial agents. In the present study, a virtual screening workflow combining pharmacophore‐ and structure‐based approaches was used to identify new LasR ligands. Five novel inducers and three inhibitors of LasR activity were validated...... experimentally by use of a cell‐based assay. Interestingly, these compounds are molecularly distinct from the native signal molecule, N‐3‐oxododecanoyl‐L‐homoserine lactone (OHN), and may serve as lead structures for the design of new drugs. The binding modes of these compounds to the OHN binding site in Las......R were predicted and used to identify the key interactions that contribute to the induction and inhibition of LasR activity....

  9. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

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    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, K.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2002-01-01

    Novel molecular tools have been constructed which allow for in situ detection of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The reporter responds to AHL activation of LasR lay expression of an unstable version of the green-fluorescent protein (Gfp...

  10. Cell surface physico chemistry alters biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide mutants

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    Flemming, CA; Palmer, RJ; Arrage, AA; van der Mei, H.C.; White, DC

    1999-01-01

    The hydrophobic and electrostatic characteristics of bacterial cell surfaces were compared with attachment proclivity and biomass accumulation over time between wildtype Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O6 (possesses A and B band LPS), and three LPS-deficient mutants, vi;. A28 (A(+)B(-)), R5

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa RhlR is required to neutralize the cellular immune response in a Drosophila melanogaster oral infection model

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    Limmer, Stefanie; Haller, Samantha; Drenkard, Eliana; Lee, Janice; Yu, Shen; Kocks, Christine; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth mechanistic understanding of microbial infection necessitates a molecular dissection of host–pathogen relationships. Both Drosophila melanogaster and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been intensively studied. Here, we analyze the infection of D. melanogaster by P. aeruginosa by using mutants in both host and pathogen. We show that orally ingested P. aeruginosa crosses the intestinal barrier and then proliferates in the hemolymph, thereby causing the infected flies to die of bacteremia. Host defenses against ingested P. aeruginosa included an immune deficiency (IMD) response in the intestinal epithelium, systemic Toll and IMD pathway responses, and a cellular immune response controlling bacteria in the hemocoel. Although the observed cellular and intestinal immune responses appeared to act throughout the course of the infection, there was a late onset of the systemic IMD and Toll responses. In this oral infection model, P. aeruginosa PA14 did not require its type III secretion system or other well-studied virulence factors such as the two-component response regulator GacA or the protease AprA for virulence. In contrast, the quorum-sensing transcription factor RhlR, but surprisingly not LasR, played a key role in counteracting the cellular immune response against PA14, possibly at an early stage when only a few bacteria are present in the hemocoel. These results illustrate the power of studying infection from the dual perspective of host and pathogen by revealing that RhlR plays a more complex role during pathogenesis than previously appreciated. PMID:21987808

  12. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA analog and its protein product: rec-102 is a mutant allele of the P. aeruginosa PAO recA gene

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    Kokjohn, T.A.; Miller, R.V.

    1987-04-01

    We cloned a 2.3-kilobase-pair fragment of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO chromosome which is capable of complementing recA mutations of Escherichia coli. The recA-complementing activity was further localized to a 1.5-kilobase-pair PvuII-HindIII fragment. Southern blot analysis under conditions of high stringency indicated that DNA sequence homology is shared by the E. coli recA gene and the P. aeruginosa recA analog. The cloned recA analog was shown to restore resistance to methyl methanesulfonate, nitrofurantoin, and UV irradiation to E. coli recA mutants. Upon introduction of the cloned P. aeruginosa gene, these mutants regained recombination proficiency in HfrH-mediated conjugation and the ability to induce lambda prophages and SOS functions (din gene transcription) after exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Lambda prophage carrying a cI ind mutation was not inducible, suggesting that the mechanism of induction of these SOS functions by the P. aeruginosa RecA analog is similar to that by the activated E. coli RecA protein. The product of the recA analog was identified in minicells as a protein of approximately 47,000 daltons. Western blot analysis using anti-E. coli RecA antibody demonstrated that this protein is antigenically cross-reactive with the E. coli recA protein. The recA-containing fragment was cloned into the broad-host-range vector pCP13 and introduced into Rec- strains of P. aeruginosa containing the rec-102 allele. The plasmid was shown to restore recombination proficiency in FP5-mediated conjugations and to restore resistance to UV irradiation and methyl methanesulfonate to these Rec- mutants. It was shown that a wild-type allele of rec-102 is necessary for UV-mediated induction of D3 and F116 prophages. The cloned recA analog restored the UV inducibility of these prophages in rec-102 mutants.

  13. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA analog and its protein product: rec-102 is a mutant allele of the P. aeruginosa PAO recA gene

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    Kokjohn, T.A.; Miller, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    We cloned a 2.3-kilobase-pair fragment of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO chromosome which is capable of complementing recA mutations of Escherichia coli. The recA-complementing activity was further localized to a 1.5-kilobase-pair PvuII-HindIII fragment. Southern blot analysis under conditions of high stringency indicated that DNA sequence homology is shared by the E. coli recA gene and the P. aeruginosa recA analog. The cloned recA analog was shown to restore resistance to methyl methanesulfonate, nitrofurantoin, and UV irradiation to E. coli recA mutants. Upon introduction of the cloned P. aeruginosa gene, these mutants regained recombination proficiency in HfrH-mediated conjugation and the ability to induce lambda prophages and SOS functions (din gene transcription) after exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Lambda prophage carrying a cI ind mutation was not inducible, suggesting that the mechanism of induction of these SOS functions by the P. aeruginosa RecA analog is similar to that by the activated E. coli RecA protein. The product of the recA analog was identified in minicells as a protein of approximately 47,000 daltons. Western blot analysis using anti-E. coli RecA antibody demonstrated that this protein is antigenically cross-reactive with the E. coli recA protein. The recA-containing fragment was cloned into the broad-host-range vector pCP13 and introduced into Rec- strains of P. aeruginosa containing the rec-102 allele. The plasmid was shown to restore recombination proficiency in FP5-mediated conjugations and to restore resistance to UV irradiation and methyl methanesulfonate to these Rec- mutants. It was shown that a wild-type allele of rec-102 is necessary for UV-mediated induction of D3 and F116 prophages. The cloned recA analog restored the UV inducibility of these prophages in rec-102 mutants

  14. Decreased outer membrane permeability in imipenem-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Trias, J; Dufresne, J; Levesque, R C; Nikaido, H

    1989-01-01

    The outer membrane of imipenem-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to have decreased permeability to imipenem but not to cephaloridine. These experiments were performed with intact cells and liposomes containing imipenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase derived from Pseudomonas maltophilia, in both cases utilizing an imipenem concentration of 50 microM. In contrast, liposome swelling assays using imipenem at 8 mM detected no significant difference between the imipenem-resistant mu...

  15. Multiple antibiotic susceptibility of polyphosphate kinase mutants (ppk1 and ppk2 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as revealed by global phenotypic analysis

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    Javiera Ortiz-Severín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is known to be a multidrug resistant opportunistic pathogen. Particularly, P. aeruginosa PAO1 polyphosphate kinase mutant (ppk1 is deficient in motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence FINDINGS: By using Phenotypic Microarrays (PM we analyzed near 2000 phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1 polyP kinase mutants (ppk1 and ppk2. We found that both ppk mutants shared most of the phenotypic changes and interestingly many of them related to susceptibility toward numerous and different type of antibiotics such as Ciprofloxacin, Chloramphenicol and Rifampicin CONCLUSIONS: Combining the fact that ppk1 mutants have reduced virulence and are more susceptible to antibiotics, polyP synthesis and particularly PPK1, is a good target for the design of molecules with anti-virulence and anti-persistence properties.

  16. SERS detection of the biomarker hydrogen cyanide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

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    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary cause of chronic airway infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infections are seen from the first P. aeruginosa culture in about 75% of young CF patients, and it is important to discover new ways to detect P. aeruginosa at an earlier stage...... long-term infection, a mutation in the patho-adaptive lasR gene can alter the expression of HCN, which is why it is sometimes not possible to detect HCN in the breath of chronically infected patients. Four P. aeruginosa reference strains and 12 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF children...... were evaluated, and HCN was clearly detected from overnight cultures of all wild type-like isolates and half of the later isolates from the same patients. The clinical impact could be that P. aeruginosa infections could be detected at an earlier stage, because daily breath sampling with an immediate...

  17. Design and synthesis of a biotinylated chemical probe for detecting the molecular targets of an inhibitor of the production of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin.

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    Baker, Ysobel R; Galloway, Warren R J D; Hodgkinson, James T; Spring, David R

    2013-09-25

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human pathogen associated with a variety of life-threatening nosocomial infections. This organism produces a range of virulence factors which actively cause damage to host tissues. One such virulence factor is pyocyanin, known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections. Previous studies had identified a novel compound capable of strongly inhibiting the production of pyocyanin. It was postulated that this inhibition results from modulation of an intercellular communication system termed quorum sensing, via direct binding of the compound with the LasR protein receptor. This raised the possibility that the compound could be an antagonist of quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa, which could have important implications as this intercellular signaling mechanism is known to regulate many additional facets of P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. However, there was no direct evidence for the binding of the active compound to LasR (or any other targets). Herein we describe the design and synthesis of a biotin-tagged version of the active compound. This could potentially be used as an affinity-based chemical probe to ascertain, in a direct fashion, the active compound's macromolecular biological targets, and thus better delineate the mechanism by which it reduces the level of pyocyanin production.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants resistant to urea inhibition of growth on acetanilide.

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    Gregoriou, M; Brown, P R; Tata, R

    1977-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI 3 was able to grow in medium containing acetanilide (N-phenylacetamide) as a carbon source when NH4+ was the nitrogen source but not when urea was the nitrogen source. AIU mutants isolated from strain AI 3 grew on either medium. Urease levels in bacteria grown in the presence of urea were 10-fold lower when NH4+ or acetanilide was also in the medium, but there were no apparent differences in urease or its synthesis between strain AI 3 and mutant AIU 1N. The first metabolic step in the acetanilide utlization is catalyzed by an amidase. Amidases in several AIU strains showed altered physiochemical properties. Urea inhibited amidase in a time-dependent reaction, but the rates of the inhibitory reaction with amidases from the AIU mutants were slower than with AI 3 amidase. The purified amidase from AIU 1N showed a marked difference in its pH/activity profile from that obtained with purified AI 3 amidase. These observations indicate that the ability of strain AIU 1N and the other mutants to grow on acetanilide/urea medium is associated with a mutation in the amidase structural gene; this was confirmed for strain AIU 1N by transduction.

  19. Metabolite Profiling to Characterize Disease-related Bacteria GLUCONATE EXCRETION BY PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA MUTANTS AND CLINICAL ISOLATES FROM CYSTIC FIBROSIS PATIENTS

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    Behrends, V; Bell, TJ; Liebeke, M; Cordes-Blauert, A; Ashraf, SN; Nair, C; Zlosnik, JEA; Williams, HD; Bundy, JG

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic footprinting of supernatants has been proposed as a tool for assigning gene function. We used NMR spectroscopy to measure the exometabolome of 86 single-gene transposon insertion mutant strains (mutants from central carbon metabolism and regulatory mutants) of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, grown on a medium designed to represent the nutritional content of cystic fibrosis sputum. Functionally related genes had similar metabolic profiles. E.g. for two-component sy...

  20. Genotypic Diversity within a Single Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain Commonly Shared by Australian Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

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    Anna Sze Tai

    Full Text Available In cystic fibrosis (CF, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes intra-strain genotypic and phenotypic diversification while establishing and maintaining chronic lung infections. As the clinical significance of these changes is uncertain, we investigated intra-strain diversity in commonly shared strains from CF patients to determine if specific gene mutations were associated with increased antibiotic resistance and worse clinical outcomes. Two-hundred-and-one P. aeruginosa isolates (163 represented a dominant Australian shared strain, AUST-02 from two Queensland CF centres over two distinct time-periods (2001-2002 and 2007-2009 underwent mexZ and lasR sequencing. Broth microdilution antibiotic susceptibility testing in a subset of isolates was also performed. We identified a novel AUST-02 subtype (M3L7 in adults attending a single Queensland CF centre. This M3L7 subtype was multi-drug resistant and had significantly higher antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentrations than other AUST-02 subtypes. Prospective molecular surveillance using polymerase chain reaction assays determined the prevalence of the 'M3L7' subtype at this centre during 2007-2009 (170 patients and 2011 (173 patients. Three-year clinical outcomes of patients harbouring different strains and subtypes were compared. MexZ and LasR sequences from AUST-02 isolates were more likely in 2007-2009 than 2001-2002 to exhibit mutations (mexZ: odds ratio (OR = 3.8; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.1-13.5 and LasR: OR = 2.5; 95%CI: 1.3-5.0. Surveillance at the adult centre in 2007-2009 identified M3L7 in 28/509 (5.5% P. aeruginosa isolates from 13/170 (7.6% patients. A repeat survey in 2011 identified M3L7 in 21/519 (4.0% P. aeruginosa isolates from 11/173 (6.4% patients. The M3L7 subtype was associated with greater intravenous antibiotic and hospitalisation requirements, and a higher 3-year risk of death/lung transplantation, than other AUST-02 subtypes (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 9.4; 95%CI: 2

  1. Scaffold of Selenium Nanovectors and Honey Phytochemicals for Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Formation

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    Prateeksha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Honey is an excellent source of polyphenolic compounds that are effective in attenuating quorum sensing (QS, a chemical process of cell-to-cell communication system used by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. However, lower water solubility and inadequate bioavailability remains major concerns of these therapeutic polyphenols. Its therapeutic index can be improved by using nano-carrier systems to target QS signaling potently. In the present study, we fabricated a unique drug delivery system comprising selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs; non-viral vectors and polyphenols of honey (HP for enhancement of anti-QS activity of HP against P. aeruginosa PAO1. The developed selenium nano-scaffold showed superior anti-QS activity, anti-biofilm efficacy, and anti-virulence potential in both in-vitro and in-vivo over its individual components, SeNPs and HP. LasR is inhibited by selenium nano-scaffold in-vitro. Using computational molecular docking studies, we have also demonstrated that the anti-virulence activity of selenium nano-scaffold is reliant on molecular binding that occurs between HP and the QS receptor LasR through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Our preliminary investigations with selenium-based nano-carriers hold significant promise to improve anti-virulence effectiveness of phytochemicals by enhancing effective intracellular delivery.

  2. Structural Insight into the Gene Expression Profiling of the hcn Operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Chowdhury, Nilkanta; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic human pathogen. It generally attacks immunosuppressed patients like AIDS, cancer, cystic fibrosis, etc. The virulence of P. aeruginosa is mediated by various virulence factors. One of such potential virulence factors is HCN synthesized by HCN synthase enzyme, which is encoded by the hcnABC operon. The expressions of the genes of this operon are regulated by three transcriptional regulators, viz., LasR, ANR, and RhlR. In our previous work, we analyzed the molecular details of the functionalities of LasR. In this work, we focused on ANR. ANR is a regulatory protein which belongs to the FNR family and works in anaerobic condition. ANR binds to the promoter DNA, named ANR box, as a dimer. The dimerization of this ANR protein is regulated by Fe 4 S 4 , an iron-sulfur cluster. This dimer of ANR (ANR-Fe 4 S 4 /ANR-Fe 4 S 4 ) recognizes and binds the promoter DNA sequence and regulates the transcription of this hcnABC operon. Till date, the biomolecular details of the interactions of ANR dimer with the promoter DNA are not fully understood. Thus, we built the molecular model of ANR-Fe 4 S 4 /ANR-Fe 4 S 4 . We docked the complex with the corresponding promoter DNA region. We analyzed the mode of interactions with the promoter DNA under different conditions. Thus, we tried to analyze the functionality of the ANR protein during the expressions of the genes of the hcnABC operon. So far, this is the first report to detail the molecular mechanism of the gene expression in P. aeruginosa.

  3. SERS detection of the biomarker hydrogen cyanide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

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    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Sommer, Lea M.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Boisen, Anja

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary cause of chronic airway infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infections are seen from the first P. aeruginosa culture in about 75% of young CF patients, and it is important to discover new ways to detect P. aeruginosa at an earlier stage. The P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) contains a triple bond, which is utilized in this study because of the resulting characteristic C≡N peak at 2135 cm-1 in a Raman spectrum. The Raman signal was enhanced by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on a Au-coated SERS substrate. After long-term infection, a mutation in the patho-adaptive lasR gene can alter the expression of HCN, which is why it is sometimes not possible to detect HCN in the breath of chronically infected patients. Four P. aeruginosa reference strains and 12 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF children were evaluated, and HCN was clearly detected from overnight cultures of all wild type-like isolates and half of the later isolates from the same patients. The clinical impact could be that P. aeruginosa infections could be detected at an earlier stage, because daily breath sampling with an immediate output could be possible with a point-of-care SERS device.

  4. Triazole-containing N-acyl homoserine lactones targeting the quorum sensing system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Reimert; Jakobsen, Tim H.; Bang, Claus Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    the pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance of a bacterial biofilm. To identify the structural elements important for antagonistic or agonistic activity against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR protein, we report the synthesis and screening of new triazole-containing mimics of natural N-acyl homoserine lactones....... A series of azide- and alkyne-containing homoserine lactone building blocks was used to prepare an expanded set of 123 homoserine lactone analogues through a combination of solution- and solid-phase synthesis methods. The resulting compounds were subjected to cell-based quorum sensing screening assays...

  5. Benefits of a Unified LaSRS++ Simulation for NAS-Wide and High-Fidelity Modeling

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    Glaab, Patricia; Madden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The LaSRS++ high-fidelity vehicle simulation was extended in 2012 to support a NAS-wide simulation mode. Since the initial proof-of-concept, the LaSRS++ NAS-wide simulation is maturing into a research-ready tool. A primary benefit of this new capability is the consolidation of the two modeling paradigms under a single framework to save cost, facilitate iterative concept testing between the two tools, and to promote communication and model sharing between user communities at Langley. Specific benefits of each type of modeling are discussed along with the expected benefits of the unified framework. Current capability details of the LaSRS++ NAS-wide simulations are provided, including the visualization tool, live data interface, trajectory generators, terminal routing for arrivals and departures, maneuvering, re-routing, navigation, winds, and turbulence. The plan for future development is also described.

  6. Identification of Fitness Determinants during Energy-Limited Growth Arrest in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, David W; Bergkessel, Megan; Newman, Dianne K

    2017-11-28

    Microbial growth arrest can be triggered by diverse factors, one of which is energy limitation due to scarcity of electron donors or acceptors. Genes that govern fitness during energy-limited growth arrest and the extent to which they overlap between different types of energy limitation are poorly defined. In this study, we exploited the fact that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can remain viable over several weeks when limited for organic carbon (pyruvate) as an electron donor or oxygen as an electron acceptor. ATP values were reduced under both types of limitation, yet more severely in the absence of oxygen. Using transposon-insertion sequencing (Tn-seq), we identified fitness determinants in these two energy-limited states. Multiple genes encoding general functions like transcriptional regulation and energy generation were required for fitness during carbon or oxygen limitation, yet many specific genes, and thus specific activities, differed in their relevance between these states. For instance, the global regulator RpoS was required during both types of energy limitation, while other global regulators such as DksA and LasR were required only during carbon or oxygen limitation, respectively. Similarly, certain ribosomal and tRNA modifications were specifically required during oxygen limitation. We validated fitness defects during energy limitation using independently generated mutants of genes detected in our screen. Mutants in distinct functional categories exhibited different fitness dynamics: regulatory genes generally manifested a phenotype early, whereas genes involved in cell wall metabolism were required later. Together, these results provide a new window into how P. aeruginosa survives growth arrest. IMPORTANCE Growth-arrested bacteria are ubiquitous in nature and disease yet understudied at the molecular level. For example, growth-arrested cells constitute a major subpopulation of mature biofilms, serving as an antibiotic-tolerant reservoir in chronic

  7. Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bleuel, Darren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, Micah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rusnak, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Soltz, Ron [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tonchev, Anton [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-05

    The Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS) will generate intense photon and neutron beams to address important gaps in the study of radionuclide science that directly impact Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Forensics, and Nuclear Material Detection. The co-location of MeV-scale neutral and photon sources with radiochemical analytics provides a unique facility to meet current and future challenges in nuclear security and nuclear science.

  8. Extracts of Cordia gilletii de wild (Boraginaceae) quench the quorum sensing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okusa, Philippe N; Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Vandeputte, Olivier; Stévigny, Caroline; Jaziri, Mondher El; Duez, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The fight against infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistances needs the exploration of new active compounds with new proprieties like disrupting quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which is a cell-to-cell communication that regulates bacterial virulence factors. In this work, leaves and root barks extracts of a Congolese medicinal plant, Cordia gilletii, were investigated for their effect on the production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa major virulence factors regulated by QS. The effect of C. gilletii extracts on virulence factors of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was studied by the evaluation of the production of pyocyanine, elastase and biofilm; and by the measurement of the expression of QS-related genes. The dichloromethane extract from root barks was found to quench the production of pyocyanin, a QS-dependent virulence factor in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Moreover, this extract specifically inhibits the expression of several QS-regulated genes (i.e. lasB, rhlA, lasI, lasR, rhlI, and rhlR) and reduces biofilm formation by PAO1. This study contributes to explain the efficacy of C. gilletii in the traditional treatment of infectious diseases caused by P. aeruginosa.

  9. Extracts of Cordia gilletii de wild (Boraginaceae) quench the quorum sensing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okusa, Philippe N.; Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Vandeputte, Olivier; Stévigny, Caroline; Jaziri, Mondher El; Duez, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The fight against infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistances needs the exploration of new active compounds with new proprieties like disrupting quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which is a cell-to-cell communication that regulates bacterial virulence factors. In this work, leaves and root barks extracts of a Congolese medicinal plant, Cordia gilletii, were investigated for their effect on the production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa major virulence factors regulated by QS. Materials and Methods: The effect of C. gilletii extracts on virulence factors of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was studied by the evaluation of the production of pyocyanine, elastase and biofilm; and by the measurement of the expression of QS-related genes. Results: The dichloromethane extract from root barks was found to quench the production of pyocyanin, a QS-dependent virulence factor in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Moreover, this extract specifically inhibits the expression of several QS-regulated genes (i.e. lasB, rhlA, lasI, lasR, rhlI, and rhlR) and reduces biofilm formation by PAO1. Conclusion: This study contributes to explain the efficacy of C. gilletii in the traditional treatment of infectious diseases caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26401363

  10. Metabolic Compensation of Fitness Costs Is a General Outcome for Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mutants Overexpressing Efflux Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares Pacheco, Jorge; Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Alcalde Rico, Manuel; Martínez, José Luis

    2017-07-25

    It is generally assumed that the acquisition of antibiotic resistance is associated with a fitness cost. We have shown that overexpression of the MexEF-OprN efflux pump does not decrease the fitness of a resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain compared to its wild-type counterpart. This lack of fitness cost was associated with a metabolic rewiring that includes increased expression of the anaerobic nitrate respiratory chain when cells are growing under fully aerobic conditions. It was not clear whether this metabolic compensation was exclusive to strains overexpressing MexEF-OprN or if it extended to other resistant strains that overexpress similar systems. To answer this question, we studied a set of P. aeruginosa mutants that independently overexpress the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, or MexXY efflux pumps. We observed increased expression of the anaerobic nitrate respiratory chain in all cases, with a concomitant increase in NO 3 consumption and NO production. These efflux pumps are proton/substrate antiporters, and their overexpression may lead to intracellular H + accumulation, which may in turn offset the pH homeostasis. Indeed, all studied mutants showed a decrease in intracellular pH under anaerobic conditions. The fastest way to eliminate the excess of protons is by increasing oxygen consumption, a feature also displayed by all analyzed mutants. Taken together, our results support metabolic rewiring as a general mechanism to avoid the fitness costs derived from overexpression of P. aeruginosa multidrug efflux pumps. The development of drugs that block this metabolic "reaccommodation" might help in reducing the persistence and spread of antibiotic resistance elements among bacterial populations. IMPORTANCE It is widely accepted that the acquisition of resistance confers a fitness cost in such a way that in the absence of antibiotics, resistant populations will be outcompeted by susceptible ones. Based on this assumption, antibiotic cycling regimes have been

  11. Genetic improvement of Rhamnolipid Production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Gelawi, Majed Hussain; Al-Makadci, O.A.

    2007-01-01

    Six bacterial isolates (isolated previously) were identified and/or ensured their identification. Results showed that these isolates belong to P. aeruginosa, and all isolates were capable of producing rhamnolipid, and best ones was P. aeruginosa RB67. In order to get rhamnolipid hyper producer mutants, mutagenesis of P. aeruginosa RB 67 using UV light and MNNG were performed. Fifty colonies from each treatment (UV and MNNG) were selected and screened for their ability to produce rhamnolipid semi-quantitatively by replica plated on blood agar and CTAB-methylene blue agar. Based on the last method, twelve colonies from each treatment (UV and MNNG) were selected and used for measuring rhamnose concentration. The results showed that these mutants varied in their ability to produce rhamnolipid and some of them showed an increase in rhamnalipid production. The highest rhamnose concentration (94 ug/mL) was achieved by the mutant (MOM12). Furthermore, FTIR spectroscopy results indicated that there were no apparent qualitative differences in rhamnolipid produced from mutants. (author)

  12. Polymyxin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phoQ mutants is dependent on additional two-component regulatory systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutu, Alina D; Sgambati, Nicole; Strasbourger, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin as a consequence of mutations in the PhoPQ regulatory system, mediated by covalent lipid A modification. Transposon mutagenesis of a polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutant defined 41 novel loci required for resistance, including two regulatory s......, indicate that addition of 4-amino-L-arabinose to lipid A is not the only PhoPQ-regulated biochemical mechanism required for resistance, and demonstrate that colRS and cprS mutations can contribute to high-level clinical resistance....... with the known role of this modification in polymyxin resistance. Surprisingly, tandem deletion of colRS or cprRS in the ΔphoQ mutant or individual deletion of cprR or cprS failed to suppress 4-amino-L-arabinose addition to lipid A, indicating that this modification alone is not sufficient for Pho...

  13. Mechanisms responsible for imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates exposed to imipenem concentrations within the mutant selection window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilara, Foula; Galani, Irene; Souli, Maria; Papanikolaou, Konstantinos; Giamarellou, Helen; Papadopoulos, Antonios

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the propensities of imipenem to select for resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants by determining the mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) for 9 unrelated clinical isolates and the accession of any relationship with mechanisms of resistance development. The MPC/MIC ratios ranged from 4 to 16. Detection of resistance mechanisms in the mutant derivatives of the nine isolates mainly revealed inactivating mutations in the gene coding for outer membrane protein OprD. Point mutations leading to premature stop codons or amino acid substitution S278P, ≥1bp deletion leading to frameshift mutations and interruption of the oprD by an insertion sequence, were observed. MPC and mutant selection window (MSW) are unique parameters that may guide the implementation of antimicrobial treatment, providing useful information about the necessary imipenem concentration needed in the infection area, in order to avoid the emergence of resistance, especially in clinical situations with high bacterial load. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) dumps water after first in-flight cold flow test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA SR-71A successfully completed its first cold flow flight as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California on March 4, 1998. During a cold flow flight, gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen are cycled through the linear aerospike engine to check the engine's plumbing system for leaks and to check the engine operating characterisitics. Cold-flow tests must be accomplished successfully before firing the rocket engine experiment in flight. The SR-71 took off at 10:16 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty-seven minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.58 before landing at Edwards at 12:13 p.m. PST. 'I think all in all we had a good mission today,' Dryden LASRE Project Manager Dave Lux said. Flight crew member Bob Meyer agreed, saying the crew 'thought it was a really good flight.' Dryden Research Pilot Ed Schneider piloted the SR-71 during the mission. Lockheed Martin LASRE Project Manager Carl Meade added, 'We are extremely pleased with today's results. This will help pave the way for the first in-flight engine data-collection flight of the LASRE.' The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous

  15. Use of model plant hosts to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahme, Laurence G.; Tan, Man-Wah; Le, Long; Wong, Sandy M.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    1997-01-01

    We used plants as an in vivo pathogenesis model for the identification of virulence factors of the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Nine of nine TnphoA mutant derivatives of P. aeruginosa strain UCBPP-PA14 that were identified in a plant leaf assay for less pathogenic mutants also exhibited significantly reduced pathogenicity in a burned mouse pathogenicity model, suggesting that P. aeruginosa utilizes common strategies to infect both hosts. Seven of these nine mutants contain TnphoA insertions in previously unknown genes. These results demonstrate that an alternative nonvertebrate host of a human bacterial pathogen can be used in an in vivo high throughput screen to identify novel bacterial virulence factors involved in mammalian pathogenesis. PMID:9371831

  16. A proteome analysis of the response of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa oxyR mutant to iron limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinckx, Tiffany; Wei, Qing; Matthijs, Sandra; Noben, Jean-Paul; Daniels, Ruth; Cornelis, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the response to oxidative stress is orchestrated by the LysR regulator OxyR by activation of the transcription of two catalase genes (katA and katB), of the alkyl-hydroxyperoxidases ahpCF and ahpB. Next to the expected high sensitivity to oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS: H(2)O(2), O(2)(-)), the oxyR mutant shows a defective growth under conditions of iron limitation (Vinckx et al. 2008). Although production and uptake of the siderophore pyoverdine is not affected by the absence of oxyR, the mutant is unable to satisfy its need for iron when grown under iron limiting conditions. In order to get a better insight into the effects caused by iron limitation on the physiological response of the oxyR mutant we decided to compare the proteomes of the wild type and the mutant grown in the iron-poor casamino acids medium (CAA), in CAA plus H(2)O(2), and in CAA plus the strong iron chelator ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) (EDDHA). Especially in the presence of hydrogen peroxide the oxyR cells increase the production of stress proteins (Dps and IbpA). The superoxide dismutase SodM is produced in higher amounts in the oxyR mutant grown in CAA plus H(2)O(2). The PchB protein, a isochorismate-pyruvate lyase involved in the siderophore pyochelin biosynthesis is not detectable in the extracts from the oxyR mutant grown in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. When cells were grown in the presence of EDDHA, we observed a reduction of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur), and an increase in the two subunits of the succinyl-CoA synthetase and the fumarase FumC1.

  17. Potency of carbapenems for the prevention of carbapenem-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the high potency of a new carbapenem doripenem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakyo, Shihomi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Tanimoto, Koichi; Fujimoto, Shuhei; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2006-04-01

    The potencies of the carbapenems; doripenem (DRPM), meropenem (MEPM) and imipenem (IPM) in preventing the emergence of carbapenem-resistant mutants were examined in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. The carbapenems predominantly selected carbapenem-resistant mutants or carbapenem mutants with reduced susceptibilities that were specifically resistant to carbapenems and had arisen as a result of the reduced level of expression of the outer membrane protein with a molecular weight of about 48,000 (OprD). The potency of carbapenems in preventing the growth of the mutants differed for DRPM, MEPM and IPM. The isolation frequency of the mutant was examined on agar plates containing each of the carbapenems at a concentration of 1/2 or 1/4 MIC of each carbapenem for that mutant. Mutants were not selected on agar containing DRPM at a frequency of greater than 10(-9) per cell per generation, whereas mutants of each strain were selected on agar containing MEPM or IPM at frequencies of 10(-7) to 10(-9) per cell per generation. The drug concentrations and the drug concentration range for the selective increase of carbapenem resistant mutants in the broth culture containing each carbapenem differed for each carbapenem. DRPM exhibited both the lowest drug concentration and the narrowest range of drug concentration for selection of the carbapenem-resistant mutants. The results shown in this report indicated that DRPM exhibited the greatest ability to prevent the emergence of the mutant.

  18. Flavonoids Suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Allosteric Inhibition of Quorum-sensing Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Mukherjee, Sampriti; McCready, Amelia R.; Cong, Jian-Ping; Aquino, Christopher J.; Kim, Hahn; Henke, Brad R.; Smith, Chari D.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-cell communication that bacteria use to regulate collective behaviors. Quorum sensing depends on the production, detection, and group-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. In many bacterial species, quorum sensing controls virulence factor production. Thus, disrupting quorum sensing is considered a promising strategy to combat bacterial pathogenicity. Several members of a family of naturally produced plant metabolites called flavonoids inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by an unknown mechanism. Here, we explore this family of molecules further, and we demonstrate that flavonoids specifically inhibit quorum sensing via antagonism of the autoinducer-binding receptors, LasR and RhlR. Structure-activity relationship analyses demonstrate that the presence of two hydroxyl moieties in the flavone A-ring backbone are essential for potent inhibition of LasR/RhlR. Biochemical analyses reveal that the flavonoids function non-competitively to prevent LasR/RhlR DNA binding. Administration of the flavonoids to P. aeruginosa alters transcription of quorum sensing-controlled target promoters and suppresses virulence factor production, confirming their potential as anti-infectives that do not function by traditional bacteriocidal or bacteriostatic mechanisms. PMID:28119451

  19. Trehalose biosynthesis promotes Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djonović, Slavica; Urbach, Jonathan M; Drenkard, Eliana; Bush, Jenifer; Feinbaum, Rhonda; Ausubel, Jonathan L; Traficante, David; Risech, Martina; Kocks, Christine; Fischbach, Michael A; Priebe, Gregory P; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is a multi-host pathogen that infects plants, nematodes, insects, and vertebrates. Many PA14 factors are required for virulence in more than one of these hosts. Noting that plants have a fundamentally different cellular architecture from animals, we sought to identify PA14 factors that are specifically required for plant pathogenesis. We show that synthesis by PA14 of the disaccharide trehalose is required for pathogenesis in Arabidopsis, but not in nematodes, insects, or mice. In-frame deletion of two closely-linked predicted trehalose biosynthetic operons, treYZ and treS, decreased growth in Arabidopsis leaves about 50 fold. Exogenously co-inoculated trehalose, ammonium, or nitrate, but not glucose, sulfate, or phosphate suppressed the phenotype of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS mutant. Exogenous trehalose or ammonium nitrate does not suppress the growth defect of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS mutant by suppressing the plant defense response. Trehalose also does not function intracellularly in P. aeruginosa to ameliorate a variety of stresses, but most likely functions extracellularly, because wild-type PA14 rescued the in vivo growth defect of the ΔtreYZΔtreS in trans. Surprisingly, the growth defect of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS double mutant was suppressed by various Arabidopsis cell wall mutants that affect xyloglucan synthesis, including an xxt1xxt2 double mutant that completely lacks xyloglucan, even though xyloglucan mutants are not more susceptible to pathogens and respond like wild-type plants to immune elicitors. An explanation of our data is that trehalose functions to promote the acquisition of nitrogen-containing nutrients in a process that involves the xyloglucan component of the plant cell wall, thereby allowing P. aeruginosa to replicate in the intercellular spaces in a leaf. This work shows how P. aeruginosa, a multi-host opportunistic pathogen, has repurposed a highly conserved "house-keeping" anabolic pathway (trehalose

  20. Trehalose biosynthesis promotes Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Djonović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is a multi-host pathogen that infects plants, nematodes, insects, and vertebrates. Many PA14 factors are required for virulence in more than one of these hosts. Noting that plants have a fundamentally different cellular architecture from animals, we sought to identify PA14 factors that are specifically required for plant pathogenesis. We show that synthesis by PA14 of the disaccharide trehalose is required for pathogenesis in Arabidopsis, but not in nematodes, insects, or mice. In-frame deletion of two closely-linked predicted trehalose biosynthetic operons, treYZ and treS, decreased growth in Arabidopsis leaves about 50 fold. Exogenously co-inoculated trehalose, ammonium, or nitrate, but not glucose, sulfate, or phosphate suppressed the phenotype of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS mutant. Exogenous trehalose or ammonium nitrate does not suppress the growth defect of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS mutant by suppressing the plant defense response. Trehalose also does not function intracellularly in P. aeruginosa to ameliorate a variety of stresses, but most likely functions extracellularly, because wild-type PA14 rescued the in vivo growth defect of the ΔtreYZΔtreS in trans. Surprisingly, the growth defect of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS double mutant was suppressed by various Arabidopsis cell wall mutants that affect xyloglucan synthesis, including an xxt1xxt2 double mutant that completely lacks xyloglucan, even though xyloglucan mutants are not more susceptible to pathogens and respond like wild-type plants to immune elicitors. An explanation of our data is that trehalose functions to promote the acquisition of nitrogen-containing nutrients in a process that involves the xyloglucan component of the plant cell wall, thereby allowing P. aeruginosa to replicate in the intercellular spaces in a leaf. This work shows how P. aeruginosa, a multi-host opportunistic pathogen, has repurposed a highly conserved "house-keeping" anabolic

  1. Inhibition of biofilm formation, quorum sensing and infection in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by natural products-inspired organosulfur compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel C Cady

    Full Text Available Using a microplate-based screening assay, the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation of several S-substituted cysteine sulfoxides and their corresponding disulfide derivatives were evaluated. From our library of compounds, S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and its breakdown product, diphenyl disulfide, significantly reduced the amount of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa at levels equivalent to the active concentration of 4-nitropyridine-N-oxide (NPO (1 mM. Unlike NPO, which is an established inhibitor of bacterial biofilms, our active compounds did not reduce planktonic cell growth and only affected biofilm formation. When used in a Drosophila-based infection model, both S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and diphenyl disulfide significantly reduced the P. aeruginosa recovered 18 h post infection (relative to the control, and were non-lethal to the fly hosts. The possibility that the observed biofilm inhibitory effects were related to quorum sensing inhibition (QSI was investigated using Escherichia coli-based reporters expressing P. aeruginosa lasR or rhIR response proteins, as well as an endogenous P. aeruginosa reporter from the lasI/lasR QS system. Inhibition of quorum sensing by S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide was observed in all of the reporter systems tested, whereas diphenyl disulfide did not exhibit QSI in either of the E. coli reporters, and showed very limited inhibition in the P. aeruginosa reporter. Since both compounds inhibit biofilm formation but do not show similar QSI activity, it is concluded that they may be functioning by different pathways. The hypothesis that biofilm inhibition by the two active compounds discovered in this work occurs through QSI is discussed.

  2. Enterobactin-mediated iron transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, K; Young, L; Neshat, S

    1990-01-01

    A pyoverdine-deficient strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was unable to grow in an iron-deficient minimal medium in the presence of the nonmetabolizable iron chelator ethylene diamine-di(omega-hydroxyphenol acetic acid) (EDDHA), although addition of enterobactin to EDDHA-containing minimal media did restore growth of the pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa. Consistent with the apparent ability of enterobactin to provide iron to P. aeruginosa, enterobactin-dependent 55Fe3+ uptake was observed in cells of P. aeruginosa previously grown in an iron-deficient medium containing enterobactin (or enterobactin-containing Escherichia coli culture supernatant). This uptake was energy dependent, was observable at low concentrations (60 nM) of FeCl3, and was absent in cells cultured without enterobactin. A novel protein with a molecular weight of approximately 80,000 was identified in the outer membranes of cells grown in iron-deficient minimal medium containing enterobactin, concomitant with the induction of enterobactin-dependent iron uptake. A Tn501 insertion mutant lacking this protein was isolated and shown to be deficient in enterobactin-mediated iron transport at 60 nM FeCl3, although it still exhibited enterobactin-dependent growth in iron-deficient medium containing EDDHA. It was subsequently observed that the mutant was, however, capable of enterobactin-mediated iron transport at much higher concentrations (600 nM) of FeCl3. Indeed, enterobactin-dependent iron uptake at this concentration of iron was observed in both the mutant and parent strains irrespective of whether they had been cultured in the presence of enterobactin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2174865

  3. Tasco®: A Product of Ascophyllum nodosum Enhances Immune Response of Caenorhabditis elegans Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Evans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Tasco®, a product made from the brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum were tested for the ability to protect Caenorhabditis elegans against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. A water extract of Tasco® (TWE reduced P. aeruginosa inflicted mortality in the nematode. The TWE, at a concentration of 300 µg/mL, offered the maximum protection and induced the expression of innate immune response genes viz.; zk6.7 (Lypases, lys-1 (Lysozyme, spp-1 (Saponin like protein, f28d1.3 (Thaumatin like protein, t20g5.7 (Matridin SK domain protein, abf-1 (Antibacterial protein and f38a1.5 (Lectin family protein. Further, TWE treatment also affected a number of virulence components of the P. aeuroginosa and reduced its secreted virulence factors such as lipase, proteases and toxic metabolites; hydrogen cyanide and pyocyanin. Decreased virulence factors were associated with a significant reduction in expression of regulatory genes involved in quorum sensing, lasI, lasR, rhlI and rhlR. In conclusion, the TWE-treatment protected the C. elegans against P. aeruginosa infection by a combination of effects on the innate immunity of the worms and direct effects on the bacterial quorum sensing and virulence factors.

  4. Crystal structure, intensity luminescence characteristics and stimulated radiation of disordered gallate LaSr2Ga11O20-Nd3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminskij, A.A.; Mill', B.V.; Belokoneva, E.L.; Butashin, A.V.; Sarkisov, S.Eh.; Kurbanov, K.; Khodzhabagyan, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    LnA 2 2+ Ga 11 O 20 and A 3 2+ M 0.5 5+ Ga 10.5 O 20 compounds are synthesized, LaSr 2 Ga 11 O 20 and LaSr 2 Ga 11 O 20 -Nd 3+ monocrystals are grown by Czochralski method. Their X-ray diffraction analysis is conducted, absorption - luminescence characteristics are obtained, stimulated Nd 3+ ion radiation is excited and investigated in two generating channel waves 4 F 3/2 → 4 I 11/2,13/2 at 300 K

  5. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pirA gene encodes a second receptor for ferrienterobactin and synthetic catecholate analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghysels, Bart; Ochsner, Urs; Möllman, Ute; Heinisch, Lothar; Vasil, Michael; Cornelis, Pierre; Matthijs, Sandra

    2005-05-15

    Actively secreted iron chelating agents termed siderophores play an important role in the virulence and rhizosphere competence of fluorescent pseudomonads, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa which secretes a high affinity siderophore, pyoverdine, and the low affinity siderophore, pyochelin. Uptake of the iron-siderophore complexes is an active process that requires specific outer membrane located receptors, which are dependent of the inner membrane-associated protein TonB and two other inner membrane proteins, ExbB and ExbC. P. aeruginosa is also capable of using a remarkable variety of heterologous siderophores as sources of iron, apparently by expressing their cognate receptors. Illustrative of this feature are the 32 (of which 28 putative) siderophore receptor genes observed in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. However, except for a few (pyoverdine, pyochelin, enterobactin), the vast majority of P. aeruginosa siderophore receptor genes still remain to be characterized. Ten synthetic iron chelators of catecholate type stimulated growth of a pyoverdine/pyochelin deficient P. aeruginosa PAO1 mutant under condition of severe iron limitation. Null mutants of the 32 putative TonB-dependent siderophore receptor encoding genes engineered in the same genetic background were screened for obvious deficiencies in uptake of the synthetic siderophores, but none showed decreased growth stimulation in the presence of the different siderophores. However, a double knock-out mutant of ferrienterobactin receptor encoding gene pfeA (PA 2688) and pirA (PA0931) failed to be stimulated by 4 of the tested synthetic catecholate siderophores whose chemical structures resemble enterobactin. Ferric-enterobactin also failed to stimulate growth of the double pfeA-pirA mutant although, like its synthetic analogues, it stimulated growth of the corresponding single mutants. Hence, we confirmed that pirA represents a second P. aeruginosa ferric-enterobactin receptor. The example of these two

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasl and rhll quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared....... The rat model of P. aeruginosa lung infection was used in the present study. The rats were killed on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 after infection with the P. aeruginosa strains. The results showed that during the early stages of infection, the PAO1 double mutant induced a stronger serum antibody response, higher...... number of lung bacteria, and minor serum IgG and IgG1 responses but increased lung interferon gamma production were detected in the group infected with the PAO1 double mutant when compared with the PAO1-infected group. Delayed immune responses were observed in the PAO1-infected group and they might...

  7. A characterization of DNA release in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures and biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allesen-Holm, Marie; Barken, Kim Bundvig; Yang, Liang

    2006-01-01

    -type P. aeruginosa biofilms stained with different DNA stains suggested that the extracellular DNA is located primarily in the stalks of mushroom-shaped multicellular structures, with a high concentration especially in the outer part of the stalks forming a border between the stalk-forming bacteria...... to whole-genome DNA. Evidence that the extracellular DNA in P. aeruginosa biofilms and cultures is generated via lysis of a subpopulation of the bacteria was obtained through experiments where extracellular beta-galactosidase released from lacZ-containing P. aeruginosa strains was assessed. Experiments...... and the cap-forming bacteria. Biofilms formed by lasIrhlI, pqsA and fliMpilA mutants contained less extracellular DNA than biofilms formed by the wild type, and the mutant biofilms were more susceptible to treatment with sodium dodecyl sulphate than the wild-type biofilm....

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasI and rhlI quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Givskov, Michael

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared....... The rat model of P. aeruginosa lung infection was used in the present study. The rats were killed on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 after infection with the P. aeruginosa strains. The results showed that during the early stages of infection, the PAO1 double mutant induced a stronger serum antibody response, higher...... number of lung bacteria, and minor serum IgG and IgG1 responses but increased lung interferon gamma production were detected in the group infected with the PAO1 double mutant when compared with the PAO1-infected group. Delayed immune responses were observed in the PAO1-infected group and they might...

  9. Pigments influence the tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to photodynamically induced oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlandi, Viviana T; Bolognese, Fabrizio; Chiodaroli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    by exogenous photosensitizers and visible light. To evaluate whether P. aeruginosa pigments can contribute to its relative tolerance to PDT, we analysed the response to this treatment of isogenic transposon mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with altered pigmentation. In general, in the presence of pigments...

  10. Investigating the link between imipenem resistance and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musafer, Hadeel K; Kuchma, Sherry L; Naimie, Amanda A; Schwartzman, Joseph D; Al-Mathkhury, Harith J Fahad; O'Toole, George A

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous environmental organism, is a difficult-to-treat opportunistic pathogen due to its broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance and its ability to form biofilms. In this study, we investigate the link between resistance to a clinically important antibiotic, imipenem, and biofilm formation. First, we observed that the laboratory strain P. aeruginosa PAO1 carrying a mutation in the oprD gene, which confers resistance to imipenem, showed a modest reduction in biofilm formation. We also observed an inverse relationship between imipenem resistance and biofilm formation for imipenem-resistant strains selected in vitro, as well as for clinical isolates. We identified two clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients that formed robust biofilms, but were sensitive to imipenem (MIC ≤ 2 μg/ml). To test the hypothesis that there is a general link between imipenem resistance and biofilm formation, we performed transposon mutagenesis of these two clinical strains to identify mutants defective in biofilm formation, and then tested these mutants for imipenem resistance. Analysis of the transposon mutants revealed a role for previously described biofilm factors in these clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, including mutations in the pilY1, pilX, pilW, algC, and pslI genes, but none of the biofilm-deficient mutants became imipenem resistant (MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml), arguing against a general link between biofilm formation and resistance to imipenem. Thus, assessing biofilm formation capabilities of environmental isolates is unlikely to serve as a good predictor of imipenem resistance. We also discuss our findings in light of the limited literature addressing planktonic antibiotic resistance factors that impact biofilm formation.

  11. Novel drug targets in cell wall biosynthesis exploited by gene disruption in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Ayssar A; Steinicke, Susanne; Oehlmann, Wulf; Braun, Yvonne; Wanas, Hanaa; Shuralev, Eduard A; Huck, Carmen; Maringer, Marko; Rohde, Manfred; Singh, Mahavir

    2017-01-01

    For clinicians, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a nightmare pathogen that is one of the top three causes of opportunistic human infections. Therapy of P. aeruginosa infections is complicated due to its natural high intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Active efflux and decreased uptake of drugs due to cell wall/membrane permeability appear to be important issues in the acquired antibiotic tolerance mechanisms. Bacterial cell wall biosynthesis enzymes have been shown to be essential for pathogenicity of Gram-negative bacteria. However, the role of these targets in virulence has not been identified in P. aeruginosa. Here, we report knockout (k.o) mutants of six cell wall biosynthesis targets (murA, PA4450; murD, PA4414; murF, PA4416; ppiB, PA1793; rmlA, PA5163; waaA, PA4988) in P. aeruginosa PAO1, and characterized these in order to find out whether these genes and their products contribute to pathogenicity and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Except waaA k.o, deletion of cell wall biosynthesis targets significantly reduced growth rate in minimal medium compared to the parent strain. The k.o mutants showed exciting changes in cell morphology and colonial architectures. Remarkably, ΔmurF cells became grossly enlarged. Moreover, the mutants were also attenuated in vivo in a mouse infection model except ΔmurF and ΔwaaA and proved to be more sensitive to macrophage-mediated killing than the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the deletion of the murA gene resulted in loss of virulence activity in mice, and the virulence was restored in a plant model by unknown mechanism. This study demonstrates that cell wall targets contribute significantly to intracellular survival, in vivo growth, and pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, these findings establish a link between cell wall targets and virulence of P. aeruginosa and thus may lead to development of novel drugs for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection.

  12. Features of magnetic susceptibility and inhomogeneous magnetic state in La-Sr manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovgij, V.T.; Linnik, A.I.; Kamenev, V.I.; Prokopenko, V.K.; Mikhajlov, V.I.; Khokhlov, V.A.; Kadontseva, A.M.; Linnik, T.A.; Davydejko, N.V.; Turchenko, V.A.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous magnetic susceptibility has been observed in mono- and polycrystalline (ceramic) samples of La-Sr manganites. The oscillations of the magnetic susceptibility observed for monocrystal samples in the vicinity of the Curie temperature (and in the paramagnetic region) are explained by the existence of magnetic clusters. The appearance of susceptibility oscillations in ceramic samples is attributed to the formation of magnetic clusters, which may occur both in grains (at the interface between ferro- and antiferromagnetic phases) and at the grain boundaries [ru

  13. Effect of doping Ca on polaron hopping in LaSr 2 Mn 2 O 7

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 5-6. Effect of doping Ca on polaron hopping in LaSr2Mn2O7. S N Bhatia Osama A Yassin. Colossal Magnetoresistance & Other Materials Volume 58 Issue 5-6 May-June 2002 pp 1061- ...

  14. Mutant prevention concentrations of four carbapenems against gram-negative rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2010-06-01

    We tested the propensities of four carbapenems to select for resistant Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii mutants by determining the mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) for 100 clinical strains with various ss-lactam phenotypes. Among the members of the Enterobacteriaceae family and A. baumannii strains, the MPC/MIC ratios were mostly 2 to 4. In contrast, for P. aeruginosa the MPC/MIC ratios were 4 to > or =16. The MPC/MIC ratios for beta-lactamase-positive K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates were much higher (range, 4 to >16 microg/ml) than those for ss-lactamase-negative strains.

  15. Multiple roles of biosurfactants in structural biofilm development by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa play a role both in maintaining channels between multicellular structures in biofilms and in dispersal of cells from biofilms. Through the use of flow cell technology and enhanced confocal laser scanning microscopy......, we have obtained results which suggest that the biosurfactants produced by P. aeruginosa play additional roles in structural biofilm development. We present genetic evidence that during biofilm development by P. aeruginosa, biosurfactants promote microcolony formation in the initial phase...... and facilitate migration-dependent structural development in the later phase. P. aeruginosa rhl4 mutants, deficient in synthesis of biosurfactants, were not capable of forming microcolonies in the initial phase of biofilm formation. Experiments involving two-color-coded mixed-strain biofilms showed that P...

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Cryptococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Antonella; Yang, Mo Wei; Gruber, Jordon; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Luberto, Chiara; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous and opportunistic bacterium that inhibits the growth of different microorganisms, including Gram-positive bacteria and fungi such as Candida spp. and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this study, we investigated the interaction between P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus spp. We found that P. aeruginosa PA14 and, to a lesser extent, PAO1 significantly inhibited the growth of Cryptococcus spp. The inhibition of growth was observed on solid medium by the visualization of a zone of inhibition of yeast growth and in liquid culture by viable cell counting. Interestingly, such inhibition was only observed when P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus were co-cultured. Minimal inhibition was observed when cell-cell contact was prevented using a separation membrane, suggesting that cell contact is required for inhibition. Using mutant strains of Pseudomonas quinoline signaling, we showed that P. aeruginosa inhibited the growth of Cryptococcus spp. by producing antifungal molecules pyocyanin, a redox-active phenazine, and 2-heptyl-3,4-dihydroxyquinoline (PQS), an extracellular quorum-sensing signal. Because both P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus neoformans are commonly found in lung infections of immunocompromised patients, this study may have important implication for the interaction of these microbes in both an ecological and a clinical point of view.

  17. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  18. Only Acyl Carrier Protein 1 (AcpP1 Functions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fatty Acid Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Cheng Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains three open reading frames, PA2966, PA1869, and PA3334, which encode putative acyl carrier proteins, AcpP1, AcpP2, and AcpP3, respectively. In this study, we found that, although these apo-ACPs were successfully phosphopantetheinylated by P. aeruginosa phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PcpS and all holo-forms of these proteins could be acylated by Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase (AasS, only AcpP1 could be used as a substrate for the synthesis of fatty acids, catalyzed by P. aeruginosa cell free extracts in vitro, and only acpP1 gene could restore growth in the Escherichia coliacpP mutant strain CY1877. And P. aeruginosaacpP1 could not be deleted, while disruption of acpP2 or acpP3 in the P. aeruginosa genome allowed mutant strains to grow as well as the wild type strain. These findings confirmed that only P. aeruginosa AcpP1 functions in fatty acid biosynthesis, and that acpP2 and acpP3 do not play roles in the fatty acid synthetic pathway. Moreover, disruption of acpP2 and acpP3 did not affect the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL, but replacement of P. aeruginosaacpP1 with E. coliacpP caused P. aeruginosa to reduce the production of AHL molecules, which indicated that neither P. aeruginosa AcpP2 nor AcpP3 can act as a substrate for synthesis of AHL molecules in vivo. Furthermore, replacement of acpP1 with E. coliacpP reduced the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce some exo-products and abolished swarming motility in P. aeruginosa.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgR Phosphorylation Status Differentially Regulates Pyocyanin and Pyoverdine Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Little

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs numerous, complex regulatory elements to control expression of its many virulence systems. The P. aeruginosa AlgZR two-component regulatory system controls the expression of several crucial virulence phenotypes. We recently determined, through transcriptomic profiling of a PAO1 ΔalgR mutant strain compared to wild-type PAO1, that algZR and hemCD are cotranscribed and show differential iron-dependent gene expression. Previous expression profiling was performed in strains without algR and revealed that AlgR acts as either an activator or repressor, depending on the gene. Thus, examination of P. aeruginosa gene expression from cells locked into different AlgR phosphorylation states reveals greater physiological relevance. Therefore, gene expression from strains carrying algR alleles encoding a phosphomimetic (AlgR D54E or a phosphoablative (AlgR D54N form were compared by microarray to PAO1. Transcriptome analyses of these strains revealed 25 differentially expressed genes associated with iron siderophore biosynthesis or heme acquisition or production. The PAO1 algR D54N mutant produced lower levels of pyoverdine but increased expression of the small RNAs prrf1 and prrf2 compared to PAO1. In contrast, the algR D54N mutant produced more pyocyanin than wild-type PAO1. On the other hand, the PAO1 algR D54E mutant produced higher levels of pyoverdine, likely due to increased expression of an iron-regulated gene encoding the sigma factor pvdS, but it had decreased pyocyanin production. AlgR specifically bound to the prrf2 and pvdS promoters in vitro. AlgR-dependent pyoverdine production was additionally influenced by carbon source rather than the extracellular iron concentration per se. AlgR phosphorylation effects were also examined in a Drosophila melanogaster feeding, murine acute pneumonia, and punch wound infection models. Abrogation of AlgR phosphorylation attenuated P. aeruginosa virulence in these infection

  20. Utility of in vivo transcription profiling for identifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa genes needed for gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koh, Andrew Y; Mikkelsen, Per J; Smith, Roger S

    2010-01-01

    these mutants and WT P. aeruginosa PA14. To evaluate T3SS factors, we tested GI colonization and neutropenia-induced dissemination of both deletional (PAO1 and PAK) and insertional (PA14) mutants in four genes in the P. aeruginosa T3SS, exoS or exoU, exoT, and popB. There were no significant differences in GI......, increased transcription of genes during in vivo murine GI colonization is not predictive of an essential role for the gene product in either colonization or overall survival following induction of neutropenia....

  1. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A S; Joergensen, B; Bjarnsholt, T

    2010-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is widely used for debridement of chronic infected wounds; however, for wounds harbouring specific bacteria limited effect or failure of the treatment has been described. Here we studied the survival of Lucilia sericata maggots encountering Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa DeltalasR rhlR (DeltaRR) QS-deficient mutant in different concentrations. Maggots were killed...

  2. Mutant Prevention Concentrations of Four Carbapenems against Gram-Negative Rods▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the propensities of four carbapenems to select for resistant Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii mutants by determining the mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) for 100 clinical strains with various ß-lactam phenotypes. Among the members of the Enterobacteriaceae family and A. baumannii strains, the MPC/MIC ratios were mostly 2 to 4. In contrast, for P. aeruginosa the MPC/MIC ratios were 4 to ≥16. The MPC/MIC ratios for β-lactamase-positive K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates were much higher (range, 4 to >16 μg/ml) than those for ß-lactamase-negative strains. PMID:20308376

  3. Antimicrobial peptides at work: interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR with lipid bilayers mimicking the P. aeruginosa and E. coli membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Lucia; Stellato, Marco Ignazio; Oliva, Rosario; Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Petraccone, Luigi; D'Errico, Geradino; de Santis, Augusta; Galdiero, Stefania; Del Vecchio, Pompea

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising candidates as future therapeutics in order to face the problem of antibiotic resistance caused by pathogenic bacteria. Myxinidin is a peptide derived from the hagfish mucus displaying activity against a broad range of bacteria. We have focused our studies on the physico-chemical characterization of the interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR, which contains a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus and four additional positive charges, with two model biological membranes (DOPE/DOPG 80/20 and DOPE/DOPG/CL 65/23/12), mimicking respectively Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane bilayers. All our results have coherently shown that, although both myxinidin and WMR interact with the two membranes, their effect on membrane microstructure and stability are different. We further have shown that the presence of cardiolipin plays a key role in the WMR-membrane interaction. Particularly, WMR drastically perturbs the DOPE/DOPG/CL membrane stability inducing a segregation of anionic lipids. On the contrary, myxinidin is not able to significantly perturb the DOPE/DOPG/CL bilayer whereas interacts better with the DOPE/DOPG bilayer causing a significant perturbing effect of the lipid acyl chains. These findings are fully consistent with the reported greater antimicrobial activity of WMR against P. aeruginosa compared with myxinidin.

  4. Ellagic acid derivatives from Terminalia chebula Retz. downregulate the expression of quorum sensing genes to attenuate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajal Sarabhai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burgeoning antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has necessitated the development of anti pathogenic agents that can quench acylhomoserine lactone (AHL mediated QS with least risk of resistance. This study explores the anti quorum sensing potential of T. chebula Retz. and identification of probable compounds(s showing anti QS activity and the mechanism of attenuation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: Methanol extract of T. chebula Retz. fruit showed anti QS activity using Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. Bioactive fraction (F7, obtained by fractionation of methanol extract using Sephadex LH20, showed significant reduction (p<0.001 in QS regulated production of extracellular virulence factors in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Biofilm formation and alginate were significantly (p<0.05 reduced with enhanced (20% susceptibility to tobramycin. Real Time PCR of F7 treated P. aeruginosa showed down regulation of autoinducer synthase (lasI and rhlI and their cognate receptor (lasR and rhlR genes by 89, 90, 90 and 93%, respectively. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry also showed 90 and 64% reduction in the production of 3-oxo-C(12HSL and C(4HSL after treatment. Decrease in AHLs as one of the mechanisms of quorum quenching by F7 was supported by the reversal of inhibited swarming motility in F7-treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 on addition of C(4HSL. F7 also showed antagonistic activity against 3-oxo-C(12HSL-dependent QS in E. coli bioreporter. C. elegans fed on F7-treated P. aeruginosa showed enhanced survival with LT50 increasing from 24 to 72 h. LC-ESI-MS of F7 revealed the presence of ellagic acid derivatives responsible for anti QS activity in T. chebula extract. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report on anti QS activity of T. chebula fruit linked to EADs which down regulate the expression of lasIR and rhlIR genes with concomitant decrease in AHLs in P. aeruginosa PAO1 causing attenuation of its virulence factors

  5. Origin and characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 clones surviving after the induction of transposable prophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krylov, V.N.; Solov`era, T.I.; Burkal`tseva, M.V. [State Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Various mutations cancelling the lethal effect of phage lytic development and simultaneous phenotypic modifications were found in rare clones surviving after incubation at 42{degrees}C of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (D3112 cts15), lysogenic for thermoinducible mutant cts15 of the transposable prophage (TP) D3112. All mutations arose prior to thermal induction. Temperature induction of other bacteriophages (nontransposable) did not lead to selection of bacterial morphological mutants. Therefore, it was concluded that mutagenesis occurred upon the partial (reversible) TP derepression accompanied by coupled replication-transposition of TP, the latter being the direct cause of the mutator effect. Isolation of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 mutant R10 (this mutant is resistant to infection with TP at 42{degrees}C) allowed the proper selection and examination of numerous survivors. Comparison of their types derived from lysogens with different prophage location indicated that the number of secondary sites where TP integration is possible without the loss of cell viability is limited. Several transposition events occurred in the history of some survivors (during a repeated or single derepression event). Type D clones, which produce small colonies, are of special interest, because mechanisms underlying the survival of such clones are extremely diverse, and their phenotypes indicate the possibility of stable chromosomal rearrangements in the genome of P. aeruginosa. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa with lasI quorum-sensing deficiency during corneal infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, H.; Bandara, R.; Conibear, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    To understand the importance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing systems in the development of corneal infection, the genotypic characteristics and pathogenesis of seven ocular isolates with low-protease and acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) activity and quorum-sensing mutants of PAO1 deficient...

  7. Synthetic Peptides to Target Stringent Response-Controlled Virulence in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Murine Cutaneous Infection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pletzer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms continuously monitor their surroundings and adaptively respond to environmental cues. One way to cope with various stress-related situations is through the activation of the stringent stress response pathway. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa this pathway is controlled and coordinated by the activity of the RelA and SpoT enzymes that metabolize the small nucleotide secondary messenger molecule (pppGpp. Intracellular ppGpp concentrations are crucial in mediating adaptive responses and virulence. Targeting this cellular stress response has recently been the focus of an alternative approach to fight antibiotic resistant bacteria. Here, we examined the role of the stringent response in the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and the Liverpool epidemic strain LESB58. A ΔrelA/ΔspoT double mutant showed decreased cytotoxicity toward human epithelial cells, exhibited reduced hemolytic activity, and caused down-regulation of the expression of the alkaline protease aprA gene in stringent response mutants grown on blood agar plates. Promoter fusions of relA or spoT to a bioluminescence reporter gene revealed that both genes were expressed during the formation of cutaneous abscesses in mice. Intriguingly, virulence was attenuated in vivo by the ΔrelA/ΔspoT double mutant, but not the relA mutant nor the ΔrelA/ΔspoT complemented with either gene. Treatment of a cutaneous P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection with anti-biofilm peptides increased animal welfare, decreased dermonecrotic lesion sizes, and reduced bacterial numbers recovered from abscesses, resembling the phenotype of the ΔrelA/ΔspoT infection. It was previously demonstrated by our lab that ppGpp could be targeted by synthetic peptides; here we demonstrated that spoT promoter activity was suppressed during cutaneous abscess formation by treatment with peptides DJK-5 and 1018, and that a peptide-treated relA complemented stringent response double mutant strain exhibited reduced peptide

  8. The phenotypic evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations changes in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassermann, Tina; Meinike Jørgensen, Karin; Ivanyshyn, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a widely used antibiotic, in the class of quinolones, for treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The immediate response of P. aeruginosa to subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin has been investigated previously. However, the long-term phenotypic adaptation, which...... populations compared to unexposed populations. Three replicate populations of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its hypermutable mutant ΔmutS were cultured aerobically for approximately 940 generations by daily passages in LB medium with and without subinhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin and aliquots...

  9. Identification of type II and type III pyoverdine receptors from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chial, Magaly; Ghysels, Bart; Beatson, Scott A; Geoffroy, Valérie; Meyer, Jean Marie; Pattery, Theresa; Baysse, Christine; Chablain, Patrice; Parsons, Yasmin N; Winstanley, Craig; Cordwell, Stuart J; Cornelis, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces, under conditions of iron limitation, a high-affinity siderophore, pyoverdine (PVD), which is recognized at the level of the outer membrane by a specific TonB-dependent receptor, FpvA. So far, for P. aeruginosa, three different PVDs, differing in their peptide chain, have been described (types I-III), but only the FpvA receptor for type I is known. Two PVD-producing P. aeruginosa strains, one type II and one type III, were mutagenized by a mini-TnphoA3 transposon. In each case, one mutant unable to grow in the presence of the strong iron chelator ethylenediaminedihydroxyphenylacetic acid (EDDHA) and the cognate PVD was selected. The first mutant, which had an insertion in the pvdE gene, upstream of fpvA, was unable to take up type II PVD and showed resistance to pyocin S3, which is known to use type II FpvA as receptor. The second mutant was unable to take up type III PVD and had the transposon insertion in fpvA. Cosmid libraries of the respective type II and type III PVD wild-type strains were constructed and screened for clones restoring the capacity to grow in the presence of PVD. From the respective complementing genomic fragments, type II and type III fpvA sequences were determined. When in trans, type II and type III fpvA restored PVD production, uptake, growth in the presence of EDDHA and, in the case of type II fpvA, pyocin S3 sensitivity. Complementation of fpvA mutants obtained by allelic exchange was achieved by the presence of cognate fpvA in trans. All three receptors posses an N-terminal extension of about 70 amino acids, similar to FecA of Escherichia coli, but only FpvAI has a TAT export sequence at its N-terminal end.

  10. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO to nalidixic acid and low levels of beta-lactam antibiotics: mapping of chromosomal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, M; Haas, D

    1982-01-01

    Resistance to high concentrations of nalidixic acid in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO was due to mutations in one locus designated nalA, which was mapped by transduction between hex-9001 and leu-10. The nalA mutants were cross-resistant to pipemidic acid, a nalidixic acid analog, at relatively low concentrations. Replicative DNA synthesis was resistant to both drugs in permeabilized cells of nalA mutants. A locus coding for low-level resistance to nalidixic acid, nalB, was cotransducible with pyrB, proC, and met-28. The nalB mutants were also resistant to low levels of pipemidic acid, novobiocin, and beta-lactam antibiotics (e.g., carbenicillin, azlocillin, and cefsulodin), but not to other drugs, such as gentamicin, rifampin, kanamycin, or tetracycline. In nalB mutants, DNA replication showed wild-type sensitivity to nalidixic acid, whereas carbenicillin-induced filamentation required higher drug levels than in the wild-type strain. Thus, nalB mutations appear to decrease cell permeability to some antibiotics. The sensitivity of replicative DNA synthesis to nalidixic acid and novobiocin was very similar in P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli; by contrast, the concentrations of these drugs needed to inhibit growth of P. aeruginosa were higher than those reported for E. coli by one or two orders of magnitude. PMID:6821455

  11. Fitness of isogenic colony morphology variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in murine airway infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Rakhimova

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are associated with the diversification of the persisting clone into niche specialists and morphotypes, a phenomenon called 'dissociative behaviour'. To explore the potential of P. aeruginosa to change its morphotype by single step loss-of-function mutagenesis, a signature-tagged mini-Tn5 plasposon library of the cystic fibrosis airway isolate TBCF10839 was screened for colony morphology variants under nine different conditions in vitro. Transposon insertion into 1% of the genome changed colony morphology into eight discernable morphotypes. Half of the 55 targets encode features of primary or secondary metabolism whereby quinolone production was frequently affected. In the other half the transposon had inserted into genes of the functional categories transport, regulation or motility/chemotaxis. To mimic dissociative behaviour of isogenic strains in lungs, pools of 25 colony morphology variants were tested for competitive fitness in an acute murine airway infection model. Six of the 55 mutants either grew better or worse in vivo than in vitro, respectively. Metabolic proficiency of the colony morphology variant was a key determinant for survival in murine airways. The most common morphotype of self-destructive autolysis did unexpectedly not impair fitness. Transposon insertions into homologous genes of strain PAO1 did not reproduce the TBCF10839 mutant morphotypes for 16 of 19 examined loci pointing to an important role of the genetic background on colony morphology. Depending on the chosen P. aeruginosa strain, functional genome scans will explore other areas of the evolutionary landscape. Based on our discordant findings of mutant phenotypes in P. aeruginosa strains PAO1, PA14 and TBCF10839, we conclude that the current focus on few reference strains may miss modes of niche adaptation and dissociative behaviour that are relevant for the microevolution of complex traits in the wild.

  12. A plasmid-encoded UmuD homologue regulates expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa SOS genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Magaña, Amada; Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Chávez-Moctezuma, Martha P; López-Meza, Joel E; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 contains the umuDC operon that encodes proteins similar to error-prone repair DNA polymerase V. The umuC gene appears to be truncated and its product is probably not functional. The umuD gene, renamed umuDpR, possesses an SOS box overlapped with a Sigma factor 70 type promoter; accordingly, transcriptional fusions revealed that the umuDpR gene promoter is activated by mitomycin C. The predicted sequence of the UmuDpR protein displays 23 % identity with the Ps. aeruginosa SOS-response LexA repressor. The umuDpR gene caused increased MMC sensitivity when transferred to the Ps. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. As expected, PAO1-derived knockout lexA-  mutant PW6037 showed resistance to MMC; however, when the umuDpR gene was transferred to PW6037, MMC resistance level was reduced. These data suggested that UmuDpR represses the expression of SOS genes, as LexA does. To test whether UmuDpR exerts regulatory functions, expression of PAO1 SOS genes was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative PCR assays in the lexA-  mutant with or without the pUC_umuD recombinant plasmid. Expression of lexA, imuA and recA genes increased 3.4-5.3 times in the lexA-  mutant, relative to transcription of the corresponding genes in the lexA+ strain, but decreased significantly in the lexA- /umuDpR transformant. These results confirmed that the UmuDpR protein is a repressor of Ps. aeruginosa SOS genes controlled by LexA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, however, did not show binding of UmuDpR to 5' regions of SOS genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of regulation.

  13. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen catalyzed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournet, Amandine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)] [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Berge, Mathieu; Roques, Christine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Bergel, Alain [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Delia, Marie-Line, E-mail: marieline.delia@ensiacet.f [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has already been shown to catalyze oxidation processes in the anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell. The present study focuses on the reverse capacity of the bacterium, i.e. reduction catalysis. Here we show that P. aeruginosa is able to catalyze the electrochemical reduction of oxygen. The use of cyclic voltammetry showed that, for a given range of potential values, the current generated in the presence of bacteria could reach up to four times the current obtained without bacteria. The adhesion of bacteria to the working electrode was necessary for the catalysis to be observed but was not sufficient. The electron transfer between the working electrode and the bacteria did not involve mediator metabolites like phenazines. The transfer was by direct contact. The catalysis required a certain contact duration between electrodes and live bacteria but after this delay, the metabolic activity of cells was no longer necessary. Membrane-bound proteins, like catalase, may be involved. Various strains of P. aeruginosa, including clinical isolates, were tested and all of them, even catalase-defective mutants, presented the same catalytic property. P. aeruginosa offers a new model for the analysis of reduction catalysis and the protocol designed here may provide a basis for developing an interesting tool in the field of bacterial adhesion.

  14. Glyceryl trinitrate is a novel inhibitor of quorum sensing in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cein, water saturated butanol (900 µl) was added followed by vortexing and centrifugation at .... The crystal structure of P. aeruginosa LasR ligand bind- ing domain was retrieved from Protein Data Bank (PDB. ID: 2UV0)22 and the rhlr receptor ...

  15. Cadmium toxicity to Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 and its microcystin-lacking mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Huang

    Full Text Available The adverse effects of microcystin (MC produced by cyanobacteria have drawn considerable attention from the public. Yet it remains unclear whether MC confers any benefits to the cyanobacteria themselves. One suggested function of MC is complexation, which may influence the bioaccumulation and toxicity of trace metals. To test this hypothesis, we examined Cd toxicity to wild-type Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 (WT and its MC-lacking mutant (MT under nutrient-enriched (+NP, phosphorus-limited (-P, and nitrogen-limited (-N conditions. The accumulation of Cd and the biochemical parameters associated with its detoxification [total phosphorus (TP, inorganic polyphosphate (Poly-P, and glutathione (GSH in the cells as well as intra- and extra-cellular carbohydrates] were quantified. Although the -P cyanobacteria accumulated less Cd than their +NP and -N counterparts, the different nutrient-conditioned cyanobacteria were similarly inhibited by similar free ion concentration of Cd in the medium ([Cd2+]F. Such good toxicity predictability of [Cd2+]F was ascribed to the synchronous decrease in the intracellular concentrations of Cd and TP. Nevertheless, Cd toxicity was still determined by the intracellular Cd to phosphorus ratio (Cd/P, in accordance with what has been reported in the literature. On the other hand, the concentrations of TP, Poly-P, and carbohydrates went up, but GSH concentration dropped down with the enhancement of [Cd2+]F, indicating their association with Cd detoxification. Although the inactivation of MC peptide synthetase gene had some nutrient and Cd concentration dependent effects on the parameters above, both cyanobacterial strains showed the same Cd accumulation ability and displayed similar Cd sensitivity. These results suggest that MC cannot affect metal toxicity either by regulating metal accumulation or by altering the detoxification ability of the cyanobacteria. Other possible functions of MC need to be further investigated.

  16. Azithromycin blocks quorum sensing and alginate polymer formation and increases the sensitivity to serum and stationary growth phase killing of P. aeruginosa and attenuates chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in Cftr -/--mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, N.; Lee, Bao le ri; Hentzer, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The consequences of O-acetylated alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the lungs of chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are tolerance to both antibiotic treatments and effects on the innate and the adaptive defense mechanisms. In clinical trials, azithromycin (AZM...... and the complement system. Moreover, we show that AZM may affect the polymerization of P. aeruginosa alginate by the incomplete precipitation of polymerized alginate and high levels of readily dialyzable uronic acids. In addition, we find that mucoid bacteria in the stationary growth phase became sensitive to AZM......, whereas cells in the exponential phase did not. Interestingly, AZM-treated P. aeruginosa lasI mutants appeared to be particularly resistant to serum, whereas bacteria with a functional QS system did not. We show in a CF mouse model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection that AZM treatment results...

  17. Baicalin inhibits biofilm formation, attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence and enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa clearance in a mouse peritoneal implant infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Luo

    Full Text Available The quorum sensing (QS circuit plays a role in the precise regulation of genes controlling virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. QS-controlled biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings has remained controversial due to emerging drug resistance; therefore, screening diverse compounds for anti-biofilm or anti-QS activities is important. This study demonstrates the ability of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs of baicalin, an active natural compound extracted from the traditional Chinese medicinal Scutellaria baicalensis, to inhibit the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance the bactericidal effects of various conventional antibiotics in vitro. In addition, baicalin exerted dose-dependent inhibitory effects on virulence phenotypes (LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, motilities and exotoxin A regulated by QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, the expression levels of QS-regulatory genes, including lasI, lasR, rhlI, rhlR, pqsR and pqsA, were repressed after sub-MIC baicalin treatment, resulting in significant decreases in the QS signaling molecules 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL, confirming the ability of baicalin-mediated QS inhibition to alter gene and protein expression. In vivo experiments indicated that baicalin treatment reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Greater worm survival in the baicalin-treated group manifested as an increase in the LT50 from 24 to 96 h. In a mouse peritoneal implant infection model, baicalin treatment enhanced the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the implants of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared with the control group. Moreover, the combination of baicalin and antibiotics significantly reduced the numbers of colony-forming units in the implants to a significantly greater degree than antibiotic treatment alone. Pathological and histological analyses revealed

  18. Autogenous regulation and kinetics of induction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA transcription as analyzed with operon fusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, J.M.; Ohman, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) was used to construct recA-cat operon fusions to quantitatively examine the transcriptional regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA gene in P. aeruginosa PAO. Wild-type P. aeruginosa containing the recA8-cat fusion was treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and showed immediate induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) specific activity, whereas a recA::Tn501 mutant of P. aeruginosa containing recA8-cat showed no induction with MMS. This indicated that a functional copy of recA was required for derepression of recA transcription and that P. aeruginosa recA protein was a positive regulatory factor promoting its own expression. Compared with that in the wild type, the uninduced level of CAT in recA8-cat-containing cells was reduced by approximately one-half in the recA::Tn501 mutant, indicating that recA+-dependent spontaneous induction contributes to the uninduced levels of recA expression in P. aeruginosa. MMS (0.012%) caused recA-directed CAT synthesis to increase almost immediately, with maximum CAT activity, fourfold higher than uninduced levels, attained at 60 min postinduction. The kinetics of recA8-cat fusion activity were shown to be directly related to the MMS doses used. Another fusion called recAa1-cat, where cat was located between the two transcriptional terminators of the P. aeruginosa recA gene, also showed dose-dependent induction by MMS, but the CAT activity from recAa1-cat was only one-half of that obtained with recA8-cat under the same conditions. Treatment of recA+ P. aeruginosa containing recA8-cat with UV irradiation produced an immediate effect on recA8-cat transcription and showed little UV dose dependency at doses of 5 J/m2 or greater

  19. Dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and its Cys3Ser mutant at single crystal gold surfaces investigated by cyclic voltammetry and atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Esben P.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Madsen, Lars Lithen

    1997-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin on polycrystalline gold is reversible (E0=360mV vs she;50mM ammonium acetate) but the voltammetric signals decay with time constants of about 3x10-3 s-1. No signal is observed for monocrystalline Au(111). Cys3Ser azurin is electrochemically inac...... into the solution, recovering the free Au(111) surface. The cyclic voltammetry and AFM data are consistent with time dependent adsorption of the azurins on gold via the disulphide bridge (wild-type) or free thiol group (Cys3Ser mutant).......Cyclic voltammetry of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin on polycrystalline gold is reversible (E0=360mV vs she;50mM ammonium acetate) but the voltammetric signals decay with time constants of about 3x10-3 s-1. No signal is observed for monocrystalline Au(111). Cys3Ser azurin is electrochemically...... inactive on either type of gold electrode but shows a reversible although decaying peak (362mV, 50mM ammonium acetate; decay time constant ~ 2x10-3 s-1) on edge-plane pyrolytic graphite.Ex situ and in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the azurins on Au(111) show initially arrays of protein structures...

  20. Drosophila melanogaster as an animal model for the study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing both acute and chronic infections in susceptible hosts. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections are thought to be caused by bacterial biofilms. Biofilms are highly structured, multicellular, microbial communities encased in an extracellular matrix that enable long-term survival in the host. The aim of this research was to develop an animal model that would allow an in vivo study of P. aeruginosa biofilm infections in a Drosophila melanogaster host. At 24 h post oral infection of Drosophila, P. aeruginosa biofilms localized to and were visualized in dissected Drosophila crops. These biofilms had a characteristic aggregate structure and an extracellular matrix composed of DNA and exopolysaccharide. P. aeruginosa cells recovered from in vivo grown biofilms had increased antibiotic resistance relative to planktonically grown cells. In vivo, biofilm formation was dependent on expression of the pel exopolysaccharide genes, as a pelB::lux mutant failed to form biofilms. The pelB::lux mutant was significantly more virulent than PAO1, while a hyperbiofilm strain (PAZHI3 demonstrated significantly less virulence than PAO1, as indicated by survival of infected flies at day 14 postinfection. Biofilm formation, by strains PAO1 and PAZHI3, in the crop was associated with induction of diptericin, cecropin A1 and drosomycin antimicrobial peptide gene expression 24 h postinfection. In contrast, infection with the non-biofilm forming strain pelB::lux resulted in decreased AMP gene expression in the fly. In summary, these results provide novel insights into host-pathogen interactions during P. aeruginosa oral infection of Drosophila and highlight the use of Drosophila as an infection model that permits the study of P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo.

  1. Regulation of Nicotine Tolerance by Quorum Sensing and High Efficiency of Quorum Quenching Under Nicotine Stress in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huiming; Zhang, Yunyun; Ma, Yifan; Tang, Mengmeng; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Meizhen

    2018-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates the behavior of bacterial populations and promotes their adaptation and survival under stress. As QS is responsible for the virulence of vast majority of bacteria, quorum quenching (QQ), the interruption of QS, has become an attractive therapeutic strategy. However, the role of QS in stress tolerance and the efficiency of QQ under stress in bacteria are seldom explored. In this study, we demonstrated that QS-regulated catalase (CAT) expression and biofilm formation help Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resist nicotine stress. CAT activity and biofilm formation in wild type (WT) and Δ rhlR strains are significantly higher than those in the Δ lasR strain. Supplementation of Δ lasI strain with 3OC12-HSL showed similar CAT activity and biofilm formation as those of the WT strain. LasIR circuit rather than RhlIR circuit is vital to nicotine tolerance. Acylase I significantly decreased the production of virulence factors, namely elastase, pyocyanin, and pyoverdine under nicotine stress compared to the levels observed in the absence of nicotine stress. Thus, QQ is more efficient under stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that QS contributes to nicotine tolerance in P. aeruginosa . This work facilitates a better application of QQ for the treatment of bacterial infections, especially under stress.

  2. FpvA receptor involvement in pyoverdine biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiangsheng; Meldrum, Allison; Poole, Keith

    2002-06-01

    Alignment of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa ferric pyoverdine receptor, FpvA, with similar ferric-siderophore receptors revealed that the mature protein carries an extension of ca. 70 amino acids at its N terminus, an extension shared by the ferric pseudobactin receptors of P. putida. Deletion of fpvA from the chromosome of P. aeruginosa reduced pyoverdine production in this organism, as a result of a decline in expression of genes (e.g., pvdD) associated with the biosynthesis of the pyoverdine peptide moiety. Wild-type fpvA restored pvd expression in the mutant, thereby complementing its pyoverdine deficiency, although a deletion derivative of fpvA encoding a receptor lacking the N terminus of the mature protein did not. The truncated receptor was, however, functional in pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake, as evidenced by its ability to promote pyoverdine-dependent growth in an iron-restricted medium. These data are consistent with the idea that the N-terminal extension plays a role in FpvA-mediated pyoverdine biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa.

  3. [Mutant prevention concentrations of antibacterial agents to ocular pathogenic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Qun; Li, Ran; Luo, Shi-Yun; Deng, Shi-Jing; Sun, Xu-Guang

    2009-01-01

    To establish a method to measure mutant prevention concentration (MPC) in vitro, and to measure MPC of antibacterial agents for ocular bacteria caused keratitis. It was an experimental study. Forty strains of ocular bacteria were separated from cornea in Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, which included 8 strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae respectively. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the levofloxacin (LVF), ofloxacin (OFL), ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NFL), tobramycin (TOB) and chloromycetin (CHL) were determined by agar dilution method from National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standard (NCCLS). The MPC were measured by accumulate-bacterial methods with bacterial population inoculated more than 1.2 x 10(10) colony forming units per milliliter with Mueller-Hinton broth and tryptic soy agar plate. With the software of SPSS 11.0, the datum such as the range of MIC, MPC, MIC90 and MPC90 were calculated, and the selection index (MPC90/ MI90) and mutant selection window (MSW) were obtained. The MI90 of LVF and TOB (4 mg/L) to Staphylococcus aureus strains were the lowest. CIP showed the lowest MIC90 (0.25 mg/L) to Pseudomonas aeruginosa among six kinds of antibacterial agents. The MIC90 of LVF to Staphylococcus epidermidis (256 mg/L), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1 mg/L) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (0.25 mg/L) were lower than other antibacterial agents. The MPC90, MSW and the MPC90/MIC90 of levofloxacin showed lower values compared with other antibacterial medicines. From all the datum, the MIC90 of CHL was the highest and the activity was the weakest. Although the activity of LVF was higher to every kind of bacteria, CIP had the highest activity antibacterial to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The capacity of CHL and TOB was weaker than Quinolones for restricting resistant mutants on ocular bacteria. LVF had the strongest capacity for restricting resistant

  4. Genome-wide screen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies new virulence factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat eZrieq

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human opportunistic pathogen that causes mortality in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. While many virulence factors of this pathogen have already been identified, several remain to be discovered. In this respect we set an unprecedented genome-wide screen of a P. aeruginosa expression library based on a yeast growth phenotype. 51 candidates were selected in a three-round screening process. The robustness of the screen was validated by the selection of three well known secreted proteins including one demonstrated virulence factor, the protease LepA. Further in silico sorting of the 51 candidates highlighted three potential new Pseudomonas effector candidates (Pec. By testing the cytotoxicity of wild type P. aeruginosa vs pec mutants towards macrophages and the virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrated that the three selected Pecs are novel virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. Additional cellular localization experiments in the host revealed specific localization for Pec1 and Pec2 that could inform about their respective functions.

  5. Molybdate transporter ModABC is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périnet, Simone; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Ouellet, Myriam M; Charette, Steve J; Levesque, Roger C

    2016-01-12

    Mechanisms underlying the success of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are poorly defined. The modA gene was previously linked to in vivo competitiveness of P. aeruginosa by a genetic screening in the rat lung. This gene encodes a subunit of transporter ModABC, which is responsible for extracellular uptake of molybdate. This compound is essential for molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductases. Since anaerobic growth conditions are known to occur during CF chronic lung infection, inactivation of a molybdate transporter could inhibit proliferation through the inactivation of denitrification enzymes. Hence, we performed phenotypic characterization of a modA mutant strain obtained by signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM_modA) and assessed its virulence in vivo with two host models. The STM_modA mutant was in fact defective for anaerobic growth and unable to use nitrates in the growth medium for anaerobic respiration. Bacterial growth and nitrate usage were restored when the medium was supplemented with molybdate. Most significantly, the mutant strain showed reduced virulence compared to wild-type strain PAO1 according to a competitive index in the rat model of chronic lung infection and a predation assay with Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. As the latter took place in aerobic conditions, the in vivo impact of the mutation in modA appears to extend beyond its effect on anaerobic growth. These results support the modABC-encoded transporter as important for the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa, and suggest that enzymatic machinery implicated in anaerobic growth during chronic lung infection in CF merits further investigation as a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  6. Quantitative proteomics unravels that the post-transcriptional regulator Crc modulates the generation of vesicles and secreted virulence determinants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reales-Calderón, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha; Martínez, Jose Luis

    2015-09-08

    Recent research indicates that the post-transcriptional regulator Crc modulates susceptibility to antibiotics and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Several P. aeruginosa virulence factors are secreted or engulfed in vesicles. To decipher the Crc modulation of P. aeruginosa virulence, we constructed a crc deficient mutant and measure the proteome associated extracellular vesicles and the vesicle-free secretome using iTRAQ. Fifty vesicle-associated proteins were more abundant and 14 less abundant in the crc-defective strain, whereas 37 were more abundant and 17 less abundant in the vesicle-free secretome. Among them, virulence determinants, such as ToxA, protease IV, azurin, chitin-binding protein, PlcB and Hcp1, were less abundant in the crc-defective mutant. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that some of the observed changes were post-transcriptional and, thus, could be attributed to a direct Crc regulatory role; whereas, for other differentially secreted proteins, the regulatory role was likely indirect. We also observed that the crc mutant presented an impaired vesicle-associated secretion of quorum sensing signal molecules and less cytotoxicity than its wild-type strain. Our results offer new insights into the mechanisms by which Crc regulates P. aeruginosa virulence, through the modulation of vesicle formation and secretion of both virulence determinants and quorum sensing signals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: HUPO 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Post-secretional activation of Protease IV by quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Jungmin; Li, Xi-Hui; Kim, Soo-Kyong; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Protease IV (PIV), a key virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a secreted lysyl-endopeptidase whose expression is induced by quorum sensing (QS). We found that PIV expressed in QS mutant has severe reduction of activity in culture supernatant (CS), even though it is overexpressed to high level. PIV purified from the QS mutant (M-PIV) had much lower activity than the PIV purified from wild type (P-PIV). We found that the propeptide cleaved from prepro-PIV was co-purified with M-PIV, bu...

  8. Anaerobic survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by pyruvate fermentation requires an Usp-type stress protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K; Boes, N; Escbach, M

    2006-01-01

    the induced synthesis of three enzymes involved in arginine fermentation, ArcA, ArcB, and ArcC, and the outer membrane protein OprL. Moreover, formation of two proteins of unknown function, PA3309 and PA4352, increased by factors of 72- and 22-fold, respectively. Both belong to the group of universal stress...... proteins (Usp). Long-term survival of a PA3309 knockout mutant by pyruvate fermentation was found drastically reduced. The oxygen-sensing regulator Anr controls expression of the PPA3309-lacZ reporter gene fusion after a shift to anaerobic conditions and further pyruvate fermentation. PA3309 expression...... was also found induced during the anaerobic and aerobic stationary phases. This aerobic stationary-phase induction is independent of the regulatory proteins Anr, RpoS, RelA, GacA, RhlR, and LasR, indicating a currently unknown mechanism of stationary-phase-dependent gene activation. PA3309 promoter...

  9. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, Maria; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten

    2012-01-01

    (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria......Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following...... intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystal structure analysis of the ligand-binding domain of PqsR (MvfR), the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) responsive quorum-sensing transcription factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ningna; Yu, Shen; Moniot, Sébastien; Weyand, Michael; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2012-01-01

    The ligand-binding domain of the transcription factor PqsR from P. aeruginosa has been crystallized and initial phases have been obtained using SAD data from seleno-l-methionine-labelled crystals. The opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs three transcriptional regulators, LasR, RhlR and PqsR, to control the transcription of a large subset of its genes in a cell-density-dependent process known as quorum sensing. Here, the recombinant production, crystallization and structure solution of the ligand-binding domain of PqsR (MvfR), the LysR-type transcription factor that responds to the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a quinolone-based quorum-sensing signal that is unique to P. aeruginosa and possibly a small number of other bacteria, is reported. PqsR regulates the expression of many virulence genes and may therefore be an interesting drug target. The ligand-binding domain (residues 91–319) was produced as a fusion with SUMO, and hexagonal-shaped crystals of purified PqsR-91–319 were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method. Crystallization in the presence of a PQS precursor allowed data collection to 3.25 Å resolution on a synchrotron beamline, and initial phases have been obtained using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data from seleno-l-methionine-labelled crystals, revealing the space group to be P6 5 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116–120, c = 115–117 Å

  11. The effect of loss of O-antigen ligase on phagocytic susceptibility of motile and non-motile Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdjian, Sally; Schutz, Kristin; Wargo, Matthew J; Lam, Joseph S; Berwin, Brent

    2017-12-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes adaptation and selection over the course of chronic respiratory tract infections which results in repeatedly-observed phenotypic changes that are proposed to enable its persistence. Two of the clinically significant P. aeruginosa phenotypic changes are loss of flagellar motility and modifications to LPS structure, including loss of O-antigen expression. The effect of loss of O-antigen, frequently described as conversion from smooth to rough LPS, and the combined effect of loss of motility and O-antigen on phagocytic susceptibility by immune cells remain unknown. To address this, we generated genetic deletion mutants of waaL, which encodes the O-antigen ligase responsible for linking O-antigen to lipid A-core oligosaccharide, in both motile and non-motile P. aeruginosa strains. With the use of these bacterial strains we provide the first demonstration that, despite a progressive selection for P. aeruginosa with rough LPS during chronic pulmonary infections, loss of the LPS O-antigen does not confer phagocytic resistance in vitro. However, use of the waaLmotABmotCD mutant revealed that loss of motility confers resistance to phagocytosis regardless of the smooth or rough LPS phenotype. These findings reveal how the O-antigen of P. aeruginosa can influence bacterial clearance during infection and expand our current knowledge about the impact of bacterial phenotypic changes during chronic infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Involvement of bacterial migration in the development of complex multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Mikkel; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren

    2003-01-01

    development, we have performed an investigation with time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms formed by various combinations of colour-coded P. aeruginosa wild type and motility mutants. We show that mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms can form in a sequential...... process involving a non-motile bacterial subpopulation and a migrating bacterial subpopulation. The non-motile bacteria form the mushroom stalks by growth in certain foci of the biofilm. The migrating bacteria form the mushroom caps by climbing the stalks and aggregating on the tops in a process which...

  13. Increased bactericidal activity of colistin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Appeldorff, Cecilie F.; Brandt, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    that production of OH˙may not contribute significantly to the bactericidal activity of colistin on P. aeruginosa biofilm. Thus, we investigated the effect of colistin treatment on biofilm of wild-type PAO1, a catalase-deficient mutant (katA) and a colistin-resistant CF isolate cultured in microtiter plates...

  14. High β-Lactamase Levels Change the Pharmacodynamics of β-Lactam Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, Oana; Yang, Liang; Wu, Hong; Song, Zhijun; Oliver, Antonio; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is a frequent problem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This resistance is mainly due to the hyperproduction of chromosomally encoded β-lactamase and biofilm formation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of β-lactamase in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of ceftazidime and imipenem on P. aeruginosa biofilms. P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its corresponding β-lactamase-overproducing mutant, PAΔDDh2Dh3, were used in this study. Biofilms of these two strains in flow chambers, microtiter plates, and on alginate beads were treated with different concentrations of ceftazidime and imipenem. The kinetics of antibiotics on the biofilms was investigated in vitro by time-kill methods. Time-dependent killing of ceftazidime was observed in PAO1 biofilms, but concentration-dependent killing activity of ceftazidime was observed for β-lactamase-overproducing biofilms of P. aeruginosa in all three models. Ceftazidime showed time-dependent killing on planktonic PAO1 and PAΔDDh2Dh3. This difference is probably due to the special distribution and accumulation in the biofilm matrix of β-lactamase, which can hydrolyze the β-lactam antibiotics. The PK/PD indices of the AUC/MBIC and Cmax/MBIC (AUC is the area under concentration-time curve, MBIC is the minimal biofilm-inhibitory concentration, and Cmax is the maximum concentration of drug in serum) are probably the best parameters to describe the effect of ceftazidime in β-lactamase-overproducing P. aeruginosa biofilms. Meanwhile, imipenem showed time-dependent killing on both PAO1 and PAΔDDh2Dh3 biofilms. An inoculum effect of β-lactams was found for both planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells. The inoculum effect of ceftazidime for the β-lactamase-overproducing mutant PAΔDDh2Dh3 biofilms was more obvious than for PAO1 biofilms, with a requirement of higher antibiotic concentration and a longer period of treatment

  15. Contribution of Cell Elongation to the Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Anaerobic Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer lining the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airway. However, molecular basis behind this anaerobiosis-triggered robust biofilm formation is not clearly defined yet. Here, we identified a morphological change naturally accompanied by anaerobic respiration in P. aeruginosa and investigated its effect on the biofilm formation in vitro. A standard laboratory strain, PAO1 was highly elongated during anaerobic respiration compared with bacteria grown aerobically. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that cell elongation likely occurred as a consequence of defective cell division. Cell elongation was dependent on the presence of nitrite reductase (NIR) that reduces nitrite (NO2 −) to nitric oxide (NO) and was repressed in PAO1 in the presence of carboxy-PTIO, a NO antagonist, demonstrating that cell elongation involves a process to respond to NO, a spontaneous byproduct of the anaerobic respiration. Importantly, the non-elongated NIR-deficient mutant failed to form biofilm, while a mutant of nitrate reductase (NAR) and wild type PAO1, both of which were highly elongated, formed robust biofilm. Taken together, our data reveal a role of previously undescribed cell biological event in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and suggest NIR as a key player involved in such process. PMID:21267455

  16. Calculation of the redox potential of the protein azurin and some mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, M; Swart, M; Snijders, JG; Berendsen, HJC; Mark, AE; Oostenbrink, C; van Gunsteren, WF; Canters, GW

    Azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a small 128-residue, copper-containing protein. Its redox potential can be modified by mutating the protein. Free-energy calculations based on classical molecular-dynamics simulations of the protein and from mutants in aqueous solution at different pH values

  17. Genome-wide identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence-related genes using a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonda L Feinbaum

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of infecting a wide range of organisms including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used a non-redundant transposon mutant library consisting of 5,850 clones corresponding to 75% of the total and approximately 80% of the non-essential PA14 ORFs to carry out a genome-wide screen for attenuation of PA14 virulence in C. elegans. We defined a functionally diverse 180 mutant set (representing 170 unique genes necessary for normal levels of virulence that included both known and novel virulence factors. Seven previously uncharacterized virulence genes (ABC transporters PchH and PchI, aminopeptidase PepP, ATPase/molecular chaperone ClpA, cold shock domain protein PA0456, putative enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase PA0745, and putative transcriptional regulator PA14_27700 were characterized with respect to pigment production and motility and all but one of these mutants exhibited pleiotropic defects in addition to their avirulent phenotype. We examined the collection of genes required for normal levels of PA14 virulence with respect to occurrence in P. aeruginosa strain-specific genomic regions, location on putative and known genomic islands, and phylogenetic distribution across prokaryotes. Genes predominantly contributing to virulence in C. elegans showed neither a bias for strain-specific regions of the P. aeruginosa genome nor for putatively horizontally transferred genomic islands. Instead, within the collection of virulence-related PA14 genes, there was an overrepresentation of genes with a broad phylogenetic distribution that also occur with high frequency in many prokaryotic clades, suggesting that in aggregate the genes required for PA14 virulence in C. elegans are biased towards evolutionarily conserved genes.

  18. Genome-wide identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence-related genes using a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinbaum, Rhonda L; Urbach, Jonathan M; Liberati, Nicole T; Djonovic, Slavica; Adonizio, Allison; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of infecting a wide range of organisms including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used a non-redundant transposon mutant library consisting of 5,850 clones corresponding to 75% of the total and approximately 80% of the non-essential PA14 ORFs to carry out a genome-wide screen for attenuation of PA14 virulence in C. elegans. We defined a functionally diverse 180 mutant set (representing 170 unique genes) necessary for normal levels of virulence that included both known and novel virulence factors. Seven previously uncharacterized virulence genes (ABC transporters PchH and PchI, aminopeptidase PepP, ATPase/molecular chaperone ClpA, cold shock domain protein PA0456, putative enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase PA0745, and putative transcriptional regulator PA14_27700) were characterized with respect to pigment production and motility and all but one of these mutants exhibited pleiotropic defects in addition to their avirulent phenotype. We examined the collection of genes required for normal levels of PA14 virulence with respect to occurrence in P. aeruginosa strain-specific genomic regions, location on putative and known genomic islands, and phylogenetic distribution across prokaryotes. Genes predominantly contributing to virulence in C. elegans showed neither a bias for strain-specific regions of the P. aeruginosa genome nor for putatively horizontally transferred genomic islands. Instead, within the collection of virulence-related PA14 genes, there was an overrepresentation of genes with a broad phylogenetic distribution that also occur with high frequency in many prokaryotic clades, suggesting that in aggregate the genes required for PA14 virulence in C. elegans are biased towards evolutionarily conserved genes.

  19. Feeding behaviour of Caenorhabditis elegans is an indicator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Lewenza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans is commonly used as an infection model for pathogenesis studies in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The standard virulence assays rely on the slow and fast killing or paralysis of nematodes but here we developed a behaviour assay to monitor the preferred bacterial food sources of C. elegans. We monitored the food preferences of nematodes fed the wild type PAO1 and mutants in the type III secretion (T3S system, which is a conserved mechanism to inject secreted effectors into the host cell cytosol. A ΔexsEΔpscD mutant defective for type III secretion served as a preferred food source, while an ΔexsE mutant that overexpresses the T3S effectors was avoided. Both food sources were ingested and observed in the gastrointestinal tract. Using the slow killing assay, we showed that the ΔexsEΔpscD had reduced virulence and thus confirmed that preferred food sources are less virulent than the wild type. Next we developed a high throughput feeding behaviour assay with 48 possible food colonies in order to screen a transposon mutant library and identify potential virulence genes. C. elegans identified and consumed preferred food colonies from a grid of 48 choices. The mutants identified as preferred food sources included known virulence genes, as well as novel genes not identified in previous C. elegans infection studies. Slow killing assays were performed and confirmed that several preferred food sources also showed reduced virulence. We propose that C. elegans feeding behaviour can be used as a sensitive indicator of virulence for P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  20. An oxidant and organic solvent tolerant alkaline lipase by P. aeruginosa mutant: downstream processing and biochemical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Bisht

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An extracellular alkaline lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant has been purified to homogeneity using acetone precipitation followed by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography and resulted in 27-fold purification with 19.6% final recovery. SDS-PAGE study suggested that the purified lipase has an apparent molecular mass of 67 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH for the purified lipase were 45°C and 8.0, respectively. The enzyme showed considerable stability in pH range of 7.0-11.0 and temperature range 35-55 °C. The metal ions Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ tend to increase the enzyme activity, whereas, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions resulted in discreet decrease in the activity. Divalent cations Ca+2 and Mg+2 seemed to protect the enzyme against thermal denaturation at high temperatures and in presence of Ca+2 (5 mM the optimum temperature shifted from 45°C to 55°C. The purified lipase displayed significant stability in the presence of several hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic solvents (25%, v/v up to 168 h. The pure enzyme preparation exhibited significant stability and compatibility with oxidizing agents and commercial detergents as it retained 40-70% of its original activities. The values of Km and Vmax for p-nitrophenyl palmitate (p-NPP under optimal conditions were determined to be 2.0 mg.mL-1 and 5000 μg.mL-1.min-1, respectively.

  1. The global regulator Crc plays a multifaceted role in modulation of type III secretion system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi-Hu; Zhang, Xi-Fen; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2013-02-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells that subvert normal host cell functions to the benefit of the pathogen, and results in serious infections. T3SS in P. aeruginosa is controlled by a complex system of regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathways. In this study, we described that Crc, an RNA-binding protein, exerts a positive impact on T3SS in P. aeruginosa, as evidenced by promoter activity assays of several key T3SS genes, transcriptomics, RT-PCR, and immunoblotting in crc mutant. We further demonstrated that the regulatory function of Crc on the T3SS was mediated through the T3SS master regulator ExsA and linked to the Cbr/Crc signaling system. Expression profiling of the crc mutant revealed a downregulation of flagship T3SS genes as well as 16 other genes known to regulate T3SS gene expression in P. aeruginosa. On the basis of these data, we proposed that Crc may exert multifaceted control on the T3SS through various pathways, which may serve to fine-tune this virulence mechanism in response to environmental changes and nutrient sources. © 2012 The Authors. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  2. Exploring the In Vitro Thrombolytic Activity of Nattokinase From a New Strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Subathra Devi; Vaithilingam, Mohanasrinivasan; Shanker, Ravi; Kumar, Sanjeev; Thiyur, Swathi; Babu, Vaishnavi; Selvakumar, Jemimah Naine; Prakash, Suyash

    2015-10-01

    Thrombolytic therapy has become a conventional treatment for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet currently, clinically prescribed thrombolytic drugs have problems such as delayed action and other side effects. Fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted interest as thrombolytic agents because of their efficiency in the fibrinolytic process, including plasmin activation. Nattokinase (NK) is a potent fibrinolytic agent for thrombosis therapy. The aim of this study was to enhance the production of NK from Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMSS by media optimization and strain improvement. In the present study, a potent NK-producing strain was isolated from cow milk and identified. To enhance the yield of NK, effect of various parameters such as pH, temperature, carbon source, nitrogen source and inoculum size were optimized. Strain improvement of P. aeruginosa CMSS was done by random UV-mutagenesis. Nattokinase was partially purified and the activity was determined by the casein digestion method, blood clot lysis and fibrin degradation assay. Based on morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization, the strain was confirmed as P. aeruginosa (GenBank accession number: JX112657), designated as P. aeruginosa CMSS. The optimum condition at pH 7 and temperature at 25˚C showed activity of NK as 1514 U mL(-1) and 1532 U mL(-1), respectively. Sucrose as the carbon source and shrimp shell powder (SSP) as the nitrogen source expressed NK activity of 1721 U mL(-1) and 2524 U mL(-1), respectively. At 1% inoculum size, the maximum rate of enzyme production was achieved with 2581 U mL(-1). The NK activity of the mutant strain UV60 was 4263 U mL(-1), indicating a two-fold increase in activity compared to the wild strain (2581 UmL(-1)). Nattokinase produced from mutant strain P. aeruginosa CMSS UV60 showed 94% blood clot lysis at ten minutes. The degradation of fibrin clot by the produced NK was observed after two hours of incubation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alters Staphylococcus aureus Sensitivity to Vancomycin in a Biofilm Model of Cystic Fibrosis Infection

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    Giulia Orazi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The airways of cystic fibrosis (CF patients have thick mucus, which fosters chronic, polymicrobial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are two of the most prevalent respiratory pathogens in CF patients. In this study, we tested whether P. aeruginosa influences the susceptibility of S. aureus to frontline antibiotics used to treat CF lung infections. Using our in vitro coculture model, we observed that addition of P. aeruginosa supernatants to S. aureus biofilms grown either on epithelial cells or on plastic significantly decreased the susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin. Mutant analyses showed that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO, a component of the P. aeruginosa Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS system, protects S. aureus from the antimicrobial activity of vancomycin. Similarly, the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin also contribute to the ability of P. aeruginosa to protect S. aureus from vancomycin, as did growth under anoxia. Under our experimental conditions, HQNO, P. aeruginosa supernatant, and growth under anoxia decreased S. aureus growth, likely explaining why this cell wall-targeting antibiotic is less effective. P. aeruginosa supernatant did not confer additional protection to slow-growing S. aureus small colony variants. Importantly, P. aeruginosa supernatant protects S. aureus from other inhibitors of cell wall synthesis as well as protein synthesis-targeting antibiotics in an HQNO- and siderophore-dependent manner. We propose a model whereby P. aeruginosa causes S. aureus to shift to fermentative growth when these organisms are grown in coculture, leading to reduction in S. aureus growth and decreased susceptibility to antibiotics targeting cell wall and protein synthesis.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exopolysaccharides are important for mixed species biofilm community development and stress tolerance

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    Saravanan ePeriasamy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produces three polysaccharides, alginate, Psl and Pel that play distinct roles in attachment and biofilm formation for monospecies biofilms. Considerably less is known about their role in the development of mixed species biofilm communities. This study has investigated the roles of alginate, Psl and Pel during biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa in a defined and experimentally informative mixed species biofilm community, consisting of P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas protegens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide had the biggest impact on the integration of P. aeruginosa in the mixed species biofilms, where the percent composition of the psl mutant was significantly lower (0.06% than its wild-type parent (2.44%. In contrast, loss of the Pel polysaccharide had no impact on mixed species biofilm development. Loss of alginate or its overproduction resulted in P. aeruginosa representing 8.4% and 18.11%, respectively, of the mixed species biofilm. Dual species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were not affected by loss of alginate, Pel or Psl, while the mucoid P. aeruginosa strain achieved a greater biomass than its parent strain. When P. aeruginosa was grown with P. protegens, loss of the Pel or alginate polysaccharides resulted in biofilms that were not significantly different from biofilms formed by the wild-type PAO1. In contrast, overproduction of alginate resulted in biofilms that were comprised of 35-40% of P. aeruginosa, which was significantly higher than the wild-type (5-20%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly reduced the percentage composition of P. aeruginosa in dual species biofilms with P. protegens (<1%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly disrupted the communal stress resistance of the three species biofilms. Thus, the polysaccharide composition of an individual species significantly impacts mixed species biofilm development and the emergent properties of such

  5. High beta-Lactamase Levels Change the Pharmacodynamics of beta-Lactam Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hengzhuang; Ciofu, Oana; Yang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    the role of beta-lactamase in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of ceftazidime and imipenem on P. aeruginosa biofilms. P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its corresponding beta-lactamase-overproducing mutant, PA Delta DDh2Dh3, were used in this study. Biofilms of these two strains in flow chambers......, microtiter plates, and on alginate beads were treated with different concentrations of ceftazidime and imipenem. The kinetics of antibiotics on the biofilms was investigated in vitro by time-kill methods. Time-dependent killing of ceftazidime was observed in PAO1 biofilms, but concentration-dependent killing...... activity of ceftazidime was observed for beta-lactamase-overproducing biofilms of P. aeruginosa in all three models. Ceftazidime showed time-dependent killing on planktonic PAO1 and PA Delta DDh2Dh3. This difference is probably due to the special distribution and accumulation in the biofilm matrix of beta...

  6. The Small RNA ErsA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Contributes to Biofilm Development and Motility through Post-transcriptional Modulation of AmrZ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falcone, Marilena; Ferrara, Silvia; Rossi, Elio

    2018-01-01

    . In this study, we show that a knock-out ersA mutant strain forms a flat and uniform biofilm, not characterized by mushroom-multicellular structures typical of a mature biofilm. Conversely, the knock-out mutant strain showed enhanced swarming and twitching motilities. To assess the influence of ErsA on the P....... aeruginosa transcriptome, we performed RNA-seq experiments comparing the knock-out mutant with the wild-type. More than 160 genes were found differentially expressed in the knock-out mutant. Parts of these genes, important for biofilm formation and motility regulation, are known to belong also to the Amr...

  7. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases reveals a role for bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic-GMP in virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesekara, Hemantha; Lee, Vincent; Brencic, Anja; Liberati, Nicole; Urbach, Jonathan; Miyata, Sachiko; Lee, Daniel G.; Neely, Alice N.; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Lory, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals and chronic respiratory disease in patients with cystic fibrosis. Cyclic nucleotides are known to play a variety of roles in the regulation of virulence-related factors in pathogenic bacteria. A set of P. aeruginosa genes, encoding proteins that contain putative domains characteristic of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that are responsible for the maintenance of cellular levels of the second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) was identified in the annotated genomes of P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 and PA14. Although the majority of these genes are components of the P. aeruginosa core genome, several are located on presumptive horizontally acquired genomic islands. A comprehensive analysis of P. aeruginosa genes encoding the enzymes of c-di-GMP metabolism (DGC- and PDE-encoding genes) was carried out to analyze the function of c-di-GMP in two disease-related phenomena, cytotoxicity and biofilm formation. Analysis of the phenotypes of DGC and PDE mutants and overexpressing clones revealed that certain virulence-associated traits are controlled by multiple DGCs and PDEs through alterations in c-di-GMP levels. A set of mutants in selected DGC- and PDE-encoding genes exhibited attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. Given that insertions in different DGC and PDE genes result in distinct phenotypes, it seems likely that the formation or degradation of c-di-GMP by these enzymes is in highly localized and intimately linked to particular targets of c-di-GMP action. PMID:16477007

  8. Formation of hydroxyl radicals contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Briales, Alejandra; Brochmann, Rikke Prejh

    2014-01-01

    induction of cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals (OH˙) during antibiotic treatment of planktonically grown cells may contribute to action of the commonly used antibiotic ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa biofilms. For this purpose, WT PAO1, a catalase deficient ΔkatA and a ciprofloxacin resistant mutant of PAO1 (gyr...

  9. Computation of interactive effects and optimization of process parameters for alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Bisht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055 was optimized in shake flask batch fermentation using response surface methodology. An empirical model was developed through Box-Behnken experimental design to describe the relationship among tested variables (pH, temperature, castor oil, starch and triton-X-100. The second-order quadratic model determined the optimum conditions as castor oil, 1.77 mL.L-1; starch, 15.0 g.L-1; triton-X-100, 0.93 mL.L-1; incubation temperature, 34.12 ºC and pH 8.1 resulting into maximum alkaline lipase production (3142.57 U.mL-1. The quadratic model was in satisfactory adjustment with the experimental data as evidenced by a high coefficient of determination (R² value (0.9987. The RSM facilitated the analysis and interpretation of experimental data to ascertain the optimum conditions of the variables for the process and recognized the contribution of individual variables to assess the response under optimal conditions. Hence Box-Behnken approach could fruitfully be applied for process optimization.

  10. Computation of interactive effects and optimization of process parameters for alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Deepali; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Darmwal, Nandan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055 was optimized in shake flask batch fermentation using response surface methodology. An empirical model was developed through Box-Behnken experimental design to describe the relationship among tested variables (pH, temperature, castor oil, starch and triton-X-100). The second-order quadratic model determined the optimum conditions as castor oil, 1.77 mL.L−1; starch, 15.0 g.L−1; triton-X-100, 0.93 mL.L−1; incubation temperature, 34.12 °C and pH 8.1 resulting into maximum alkaline lipase production (3142.57 U.mL−1). The quadratic model was in satisfactory adjustment with the experimental data as evidenced by a high coefficient of determination (R2) value (0.9987). The RSM facilitated the analysis and interpretation of experimental data to ascertain the optimum conditions of the variables for the process and recognized the contribution of individual variables to assess the response under optimal conditions. Hence Box-Behnken approach could fruitfully be applied for process optimization. PMID:24159311

  11. Microbial pathogenesis in cystic fibrosis: co-ordinate regulation of heat-shock response and conversion to mucoidy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, M J; Deretic, V

    1997-04-01

    Conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the mucoid phenotype plays a major role in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF). One mechanism responsible for mucoidy is based on mutations that inactivate the anti-sigma factor, MucA, which normally inhibits the alternative sigma factor, AIgU. The loss of MucA allows AIgU to freely direct transcription of the genes responsible for the production of the exopolysaccharide alginate resulting in mucoid colony morphology. In Escherichia coli, a close homologue of AIgU, sigma(E), directs transcription of several genes under conditions of extreme heat shock. Here we examined whether AIgU, besides its role in controlling alginate production, affects the heat-shock response in P. aeruginosa. The P. aeruginosa rpoH gene encoding a homologue of the major heat-shock sigma factor, sigma32, was found to be transcribed by AIgU containing RNA polymerase from one of its promoters (P3) identified in this study. Transcription of rpoH from P3 was elevated upon exposure to extreme heat shock in an aIgU-dependent manner. Importantly, the AIgU-dependent promoter of rpoH was found to be activated in mucoid mucA mutants. In keeping with this observation, introduction of a wild-type mucA gene abrogated AIgU-dependent rpoH transcription in mucoid P. aeruginosa laboratory isolates and CF isolates. These results suggest that conversion to mucoidy and the heat-shock response are co-ordinately regulated in P. aeruginosa. The simultaneous activation of both systems in mucA mutants, selected in the lungs of CF patients, may have significance for the inflammatory processes characteristic of the establishment of chronic infection and ensuing clinical deterioration in CF.

  12. Positive signature-tagged mutagenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: tracking patho-adaptive mutations promoting airways chronic infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Bianconi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long chronic infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Persistent lifestyle is established with P. aeruginosa patho-adaptive variants, which are clonal with the initially-acquired strains. Several reports indicated that P. aeruginosa adapts by loss-of-function mutations which enhance fitness in CF airways and sustain its clonal expansion during chronic infection. To validate this model of P. aeruginosa adaptation to CF airways and to identify novel genes involved in this microevolution, we designed a novel approach of positive-selection screening by PCR-based signature-tagged mutagenesis (Pos-STM in a murine model of chronic airways infection. A systematic positive-selection scheme using sequential rounds of in vivo screenings for bacterial maintenance, as opposed to elimination, generated a list of genes whose inactivation increased the colonization and persistence in chronic airways infection. The phenotypes associated to these Pos-STM mutations reflect alterations in diverse aspects of P. aeruginosa biology which include lack of swimming and twitching motility, lack of production of the virulence factors such as pyocyanin, biofilm formation, and metabolic functions. In addition, Pos-STM mutants showed altered invasion and stimulation of immune response when tested in human respiratory epithelial cells, indicating that P. aeruginosa is prone to revise the interaction with its host during persistent lifestyle. Finally, sequence analysis of Pos-STM genes in longitudinally P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients identified signs of patho-adaptive mutations within the genome. This novel Pos-STM approach identified bacterial functions that can have important clinical implications for the persistent lifestyle and disease progression of the airway chronic infection.

  13. Nitrogen Source Stabilization of Quorum Sensing in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bioaugmentation Strain SD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Zhen; Lai, Bai-Min; Dandekar, Ajai A; Yang, Yu-Sheng; Li, Na; Yin, Jun; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2017-08-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa SD-1 is efficient at degrading aromatic compounds and can therefore contribute to the bioremediation of wastewater. P. aeruginosa uses quorum sensing (QS) to regulate the production of numerous secreted "public goods." In wastewater bioaugmentation applications, there are myriad nitrogen sources, and we queried whether various nitrogen sources impact the stabilities of both QS and the bacterial populations. In a laboratory strain of P. aeruginosa , PAO1, the absence of a nitrogen source has been shown to destabilize these populations through the emergence of QS mutant "cheaters." We tested the ability of SD-1 to grow in casein broth, a condition that requires QS for growth, when the nitrogen source with either NH 4 Cl, NaNO 3 , or NaNO 2 or with no added nitrogen source. There was great variability in susceptibility to invasion by QS mutant cheaters and, by extension, the stability of the SD-1 population. When grown with NH 4 Cl as an extra nitrogen source, no population collapse was observed; by contrast, two-thirds of cultures grown in the presence of NaNO 2 collapsed. In the populations that collapsed, the frequency of social cheaters exceeded 40%. NaNO 3 and NaNO 2 directly favor QS mutants of P. aeruginosa SD-1. Although the mechanism by which these nitrogen sources act is not clear, these data indicate that the metabolism of nitrogen can affect the stability of bacterial populations, an important observation for continuing industrial applications with this species. IMPORTANCE Bioaugmentation as a method to help remediate wastewater pollutant streams holds significant potential to enhance traditional methods of treatment. Addition of microbes that can catabolize organic pollutants can be an effective method to remove several toxic compounds. Such bioaugmented strains of bacteria have been shown to be susceptible to competition from the microbiota that are present in wastewater streams, limiting their potential effectiveness. Here, we

  14. Sublethal Ciprofloxacin Treatment Leads to Rapid Development of High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance during Long-Term Experimental Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    that mutants with high-level ciprofloxacin resistance are selected in P. aeruginosa bacterial populations exposed to sub-MICs of ciprofloxacin. This can have implications for the long-term persistence of resistant bacteria and spread of antibiotic resistance by exposure of commensal bacterial flora to low......The dynamics of occurrence and the genetic basis of ciprofloxacin resistance were studied in a long-term evolution experiment (940 generations) in wild-type, reference strain (PAO1) and hypermutable (PAOΔmutS and PAOMY-Mgm) P. aeruginosa populations continuously exposed to sub-MICs (1....../4) of ciprofloxacin. A rapid occurrence of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants (MIC of ≥12 μg/ml, representing 100 times the MIC of the original population) were observed in all ciprofloxacin-exposed lineages of PAOΔmutS and PAOMY-Mgm populations after 100 and 170 generations, respectively, and in one of the PAO1...

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) type phase LaSr2MnCrO7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Devinder; Singh, Rajinder

    2010-01-01

    New Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) type phase LaSr 2 MnCrO 7 has been synthesized by ceramic method. Rietveld profile analysis shows that the phase crystallizes with tetragonal unit cell in the space group 14/mmm. The electrical resistivity of the phase has been measured in the temperature range of 10-300 K using Leybold closed cycle helium cryostat. The phase shows insulator-metal (I-M) transition at low temperature, the phenomenon often associated with giant magnetoresistance. 3D variable range hopping governs the electrical conduction in the insulator region above the I-M transition temperature. Magnetic susceptibility of the phase has been measured in the temperature range of 100-300 K. Magnetic studies suggest that the phase is ferromagnetic. (author)

  16. Genes Required for Free Phage Production are Essential for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chronic Lung Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Andrée-Ann; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Fothergill, Joanne L; Boyle, Brian; Laroche, Jérôme; Tucker, Nicholas P; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C

    2016-02-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. The Liverpool Epidemic Strain LESB58 is highly resistant to antibiotics, transmissible, and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its genome contains 6 prophages and 5 genomic islands. We constructed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based signature-tagged mutagenesis library of 9216 LESB58 mutants and screened the mutants in a rat model of chronic lung infection. A total of 162 mutants were identified as defective for in vivo maintenance, with 11 signature-tagged mutagenesis mutants having insertions in prophage and genomic island genes. Many of these mutants showed both diminished virulence and reduced phage production. Transcription profiling by quantitative PCR and RNA-Seq suggested that disruption of these prophages had a widespread trans-acting effect on the transcriptome. This study demonstrates that temperate phages play a pivotal role in the establishment of infection through modulation of bacterial host gene expression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Synergistic Interaction Between Phage Therapy and Antibiotics Clears Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection in Endocarditis and Reduces Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, Frank; Piccardi, Philippe; Mancini, Stefano; Gabard, Jérôme; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José M; Resch, Gregory; Que, Yok-Ai

    2017-03-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance warrants therapeutic alternatives. Here we investigated the efficacy of bacteriophage-therapy (phage) alone or combined with antibiotics against experimental endocarditis (EE) due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an archetype of difficult-to-treat infection. In vitro fibrin clots and rats with aortic EE were treated with an antipseudomonas phage cocktail alone or combined with ciprofloxacin. Phage pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy, and resistance were determined. In vitro, single-dose phage therapy killed 7 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/g of fibrin clots in 6 hours. Phage-resistant mutants regrew after 24 hours but were prevented by combination with ciprofloxacin (2.5 × minimum inhibitory concentration). In vivo, single-dose phage therapy killed 2.5 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours (P 6 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours and successfully treating 64% (n = 7/11) of rats. Phage-resistant mutants emerged in vitro but not in vivo, most likely because resistant mutations affected bacterial surface determinants important for infectivity (eg, the pilT and galU genes involved in pilus motility and LPS formation). Single-dose phage therapy was active against P. aeruginosa EE and highly synergistic with ciprofloxacin. Phage-resistant mutants had impaired infectivity. Phage-therapy alone or combined with antibiotics merits further clinical consideration. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  18. Statistical Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development: Impact of Mutations in Genes Involved in Twitching Motility, Cell-to-Cell Signaling, and Stationary-Phase Sigma Factor Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Kato, Junichi

    2002-01-01

    of variance model comprising the four P. aeruginosa strains, five time points (55, 98, 146, 242, and 314 h), and three independent rounds of biofllm experiments. The results showed that the wild type, the DeltapilHIJK mutant, and the rpoS mutant display conspicuously different types of temporal biofilm...... development, whereas the lasI mutant was indistinguishable from the wild type at all time points. The wild type and the lasI mutant formed uniform, densely packed biofilms. The rpoS mutant formed densely packed biofilms that were significantly thicker than those of the wild type, whereas the Deltapil...

  19. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA gene: the Les- phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokjohn, T.A.; Miller, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    The Les- phenotype (lysogeny establishment deficient) is a pleiotropic effect of the lesB908 mutation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. lesB908-containing strains are also (i) deficient in general recombination, (ii) sensitive to UV irradiation, and (iii) deficient in UV-stimulated induction of prophages. The P. aeruginosa recA-containing plasmid pKML3001 complemented each of these pleiotropic characteristics of the lesB908 mutation, supporting the hypothesis that lesB908 is an allele of the P. aeruginosa recA gene. The phenotypic effects of the lesB908 mutation may be best explained by the hypothesis that the lesB908 gene product is altered in such a way that it has lost synaptase activity but possesses intrinsic protease activity in the absence of DNA damage. The Les- phenotype is a result of the rapid destruction of newly synthesized phage repressor, resulting in lytic growth of the infecting virus. This hypothesis is consistent with the observations that increasing the number of copies of the phage repressor gene by increasing the multiplicity of infection (i.e., average number of phage genomes per cell) or by introducing the cloned phage repressor gene into a lesB908 mutant will also suppress the Les- phenotype in a phage-specific fashion

  20. Selection of Functional Quorum Sensing Systems by Lysogenic Bacteriophages in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Saucedo-Mora

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates the expression of virulence factors, some of which are used as public goods. Since their production is a cooperative behavior, it is susceptible to social cheating in which non-cooperative QS deficient mutants use the resources without investing in their production. Nevertheless, functional QS systems are abundant; hence, mechanisms regulating the amount of cheating should exist. Evidence that demonstrates a tight relationship between QS and the susceptibility of bacteria against the attack of lytic phages is increasing; nevertheless, the relationship between temperate phages and QS has been much less explored. Therefore, in this work, we studied the effects of having a functional QS system on the susceptibility to temperate bacteriophages and how this affects the bacterial and phage dynamics. We find that both experimentally and using mathematical models, that the lysogenic bacteriophages D3112 and JBD30 select QS-proficient P. aeruginosa phenotypes as compared to the QS-deficient mutants during competition experiments with mixed strain populations in vitro and in vivo in Galleria mellonella, in spite of the fact that both phages replicate better in the wild-type background. We show that this phenomenon restricts social cheating, and we propose that temperate phages may constitute an important selective pressure toward the conservation of bacterial QS.

  1. Post-secretional activation of Protease IV by quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungmin; Li, Xi-Hui; Kim, Soo-Kyong; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-06-30

    Protease IV (PIV), a key virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a secreted lysyl-endopeptidase whose expression is induced by quorum sensing (QS). We found that PIV expressed in QS mutant has severe reduction of activity in culture supernatant (CS), even though it is overexpressed to high level. PIV purified from the QS mutant (M-PIV) had much lower activity than the PIV purified from wild type (P-PIV). We found that the propeptide cleaved from prepro-PIV was co-purified with M-PIV, but never with P-PIV. Since the activity of M-PIV was restored by adding the CS of QS-positive and PIV-deficient strain, we hypothesized that the propeptide binds to and inhibits PIV, and is degraded to activate PIV by a QS-dependent factor. In fact, the CS of the QS-positive and PIV-deficient strain was able to degrade the propeptide. Since the responsible factor should be a QS-dependently expressed extracellular protease, we tested QS-dependent proteases of P. aeruginosa and found that LasB (elastase) can degrade the propeptide and activate M-PIV. We purified the propeptide of PIV and confirmed that the propeptide can bind to and inhibit PIV. We suggest that PIV is post-secretionally activated through the extracellular degradation of the propeptide by LasB, a QS-dependent protease.

  2. Promysalin Elicits Species-Selective Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Targeting Succinate Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Colleen E; Steele, Andrew D; Fetzer, Christian; Khowsathit, Jittasak; Van Tyne, Daria; Moynié, Lucile; Gilmore, Michael S; Karanicolas, John; Sieber, Stephan A; Wuest, William M

    2018-02-07

    Natural products have served as an inspiration to scientists both for their complex three-dimensional architecture and exquisite biological activity. Promysalin is one such Pseudomonad secondary metabolite that exhibits narrow-spectrum antibacterial activity, originally isolated from the rhizosphere. We herein utilize affinity-based protein profiling (AfBPP) to identify succinate dehydrogenase (Sdh) as the biological target of the natural product. The target was further validated in silico, in vitro, in vivo, and through the selection, and sequencing, of a resistant mutant. Succinate dehydrogenase plays an essential role in primary metabolism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the only enzyme that is involved both in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and in respiration via the electron transport chain. These findings add credence to other studies that suggest that the TCA cycle is an understudied target in the development of novel therapeutics to combat P. aeruginosa, a significant pathogen in clinical settings.

  3. Mathematical model for the growth of P. aeruginosa and four mutator strains in sub-MIC concentration of Ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Madsen, Henrik

    growing under sub-MIC Ciprofloxacin concentration (0.1 μg/ml), in order to describe the growth pattern under the presence of antibiotic. Data available for the modelling process is bioscreen measurements of the bacterial content as a function of time for each bacteria strain growing in LB media...... is that the presence of antibiotic results in selection of mutators in the lungs of CF patients, as these bacteria has a higher fitness under the presence of antibiotics. The goal of this study is to model the growth of P. aeruginosa and four different mutator strains (PAO1 mutT, mutY, mutM and mutM-mutY mutants) when......P. aeruginosa causes very critical and complicated infections, for which treatment is strongly dependent on successful antibiotic treatment. Therefore the evolution of antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa does have serious consequences. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by the chronic P...

  4. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin

    2015-01-01

    tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further...... increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed...... to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth....

  5. Quorum-sensing regulation of the biofilm matrix genes (pel) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuragi, Yumiko; Kolter, Roberto

    2007-07-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been previously shown to play an important role in the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (D. G. Davies et al., Science 280:295-298, 1998). Although QS regulation of swarming and DNA release has been shown to play important roles in biofilm development, regulation of genes directly involved in biosynthesis of biofilm matrix has not been described. Here, transcription of the pel operon, essential for the production of a glucose-rich matrix exopolysaccharide, is shown to be greatly reduced in lasI and rhlI mutants. Chemical complementation of the lasI mutant with 3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone restores pel transcription to the wild-type level and biofilm formation ability. These findings thus connect QS signaling and transcription of genes responsible for biofilm matrix biosynthesis.

  6. Discovery and biophysical characterization of 2-amino-oxadiazoles as novel antagonists of PqsR, an important regulator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender, Michael; Klein, Tobias; Henn, Claudia; Kirsch, Benjamin; Maurer, Christine K; Kail, Dagmar; Ritter, Christiane; Dolezal, Olan; Steinbach, Anke; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2013-09-12

    The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs alkyl quinolones for cell-to-cell communication. The Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) regulates various virulence factors via interaction with the transcriptional regulator PqsR. Therefore, we consider the development of PqsR antagonists a novel strategy to limit the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. A fragment identification approach using surface plasmon resonance screening led to the discovery of chemically diverse PqsR ligands. The optimization of the most promising hit (5) resulted in the oxadiazole-2-amine 37 showing pure antagonistic activity in Escherichia coli (EC50 = 7.5 μM) and P. aeruginosa (EC50 = 38.5 μM) reporter gene assays. 37 was able to diminish the production of the PQS precursor HHQ in a PqsH-deficient P. aeruginosa mutant. The level of the major virulence factor pyocyanin was significantly reduced in wild-type P. aeruginosa. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis in combination with isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR INPHARMA experiments revealed that the identified ligands bind to the same site of PqsR by adopting different binding modes. These findings will be utilized in a future fragment-growing approach aiming at novel therapeutic options for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  7. Identification of two gene clusters and a transcriptional regulator required for Pseudomonas aeruginosa glycine betaine catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Matthew J; Szwergold, Benjamin S; Hogan, Deborah A

    2008-04-01

    Glycine betaine (GB), which occurs freely in the environment and is an intermediate in the catabolism of choline and carnitine, can serve as a sole source of carbon or nitrogen in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Twelve mutants defective in growth on GB as the sole carbon source were identified through a genetic screen of a nonredundant PA14 transposon mutant library. Further growth experiments showed that strains with mutations in two genes, gbcA (PA5410) and gbcB (PA5411), were capable of growth on dimethylglycine (DMG), a catabolic product of GB, but not on GB itself. Subsequent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with 1,2-(13)C-labeled choline indicated that these genes are necessary for conversion of GB to DMG. Similar experiments showed that strains with mutations in the dgcAB (PA5398-PA5399) genes, which exhibit homology to genes that encode other enzymes with demethylase activity, are required for the conversion of DMG to sarcosine. Mutant analyses and (13)C NMR studies also confirmed that the soxBDAG genes, predicted to encode a sarcosine oxidase, are required for sarcosine catabolism. Our screen also identified a predicted AraC family transcriptional regulator, encoded by gbdR (PA5380), that is required for growth on GB and DMG and for the induction of gbcA, gbcB, and dgcAB in response to GB or DMG. Mutants defective in the previously described gbt gene (PA3082) grew on GB with kinetics similar to those of the wild type in both the PAO1 and PA14 strain backgrounds. These studies provided important insight into both the mechanism and the regulation of the catabolism of GB in P. aeruginosa.

  8. Label-free molecular imaging of bacterial communities of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Nameera; Polisetti, Sneha; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Dunham, Sage J. B.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Shrout, Joshua D.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms, such as those formed by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are complex, matrix enclosed, and surface-associated communities of cells. Bacteria that are part of a biofilm community are much more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than their free-floating counterparts. P. aeruginosa biofilms are associated with persistent and chronic infections in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and HIV-AIDS. P. aeruginosa synthesizes and secretes signaling molecules such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) which are implicated in quorum sensing (QS), where bacteria regulate gene expression based on population density. Processes such as biofilms formation and virulence are regulated by QS. This manuscript describes the powerful molecular imaging capabilities of confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in conjunction with multivariate statistical tools such as principal component analysis (PCA) for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of signaling molecules, secondary metabolites and virulence factors in biofilm communities of P. aeruginosa. Our observations reveal that the laboratory strain PAO1C synthesizes and secretes 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxides and 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinolones in high abundance, while the isogenic acyl homoserine lactone QS-deficient mutant (ΔlasIΔrhlI) strain produces predominantly 2-alkyl-quinolones during biofilm formation. This study underscores the use of CRM, along with traditional biological tools such as genetics, for studying the behavior of microbial communities at the molecular level.

  9. Enzyme-mediated quenching of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS promotes biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by increasing iron availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Tettmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2-alkyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H-quinolone 2,4-dioxygenase HodC was previously described to cleave the Pseudomonas quinolone signal, PQS, which is exclusively used in the complex quorum sensing (QS system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen employing QS to regulate virulence and biofilm development. Degradation of PQS by exogenous addition of HodC to planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa attenuated production of virulence factors, and reduced virulence in planta. However, proteolytic cleavage reduced the efficacy of HodC. Here, we identified the secreted protease LasB of P. aeruginosa to be responsible for HodC degradation. In static biofilms of the P. aeruginosa PA14 lasB::Tn mutant, the catalytic activity of HodC led to an increase in viable biomass in newly formed but also in established biofilms, and reduced the expression of genes involved in iron metabolism and siderophore production, such as pvdS, pvdL, pvdA and pvdQ. This is likely due to an increase in the levels of bioavailable iron by degradation of PQS, which is able to sequester iron from the surrounding environment. Thus, HodC, despite its ability to quench the production of virulence factors, is contraindicated for combating P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  10. Identification of quorum-sensing regulated proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arevalo-Ferro, C.; Hentzer, Morten; Reil, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is the major pathogen in cystic fibrosis. The bacterium utilizes two interrelated quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which rely......-controlled protein spots of the surface fraction, confirming the high specificity of the compound. Importantly, 20 novel QS-regulated proteins were identified, many of which are involved in iron utilization, suggesting a link between quorum sensing and the iron regulatory system. Two of these proteins, PhuR and Has......Ap, are components of the two distinct haem-uptake systems present in P. aeruginosa. In agreement with the finding that both proteins are positively regulated by the QS cascade, we show that the lasI rhlI double mutant grows poorly with haemoglobin as the only iron source when compared with the wild type...

  11. Activity of MK-7655 combined with imipenem against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, David M; Warner, Marina; Mushtaq, Shazad

    2013-10-01

    MK-7655 is a novel inhibitor of class A and C β-lactamases. We investigated its potential to protect imipenem. Chequerboard MICs were determined by CLSI agar dilution: (i) for Enterobacteriaceae with carbapenemases; (ii) for Enterobacteriaceae with carbapenem resistance contingent on combinations of impermeability together with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase or AmpC enzyme; and (iii) for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other non-fermenters. At a concentration of 4 mg/L, MK-7655 reduced imipenem MICs for Enterobacteriaceae with KPC carbapenemases from 16-64 mg/L to 0.12-1 mg/L. Synergy also was seen for Enterobacteriaceae with impermeability-mediated carbapenem resistance, with weaker synergy seen for isolates with the OXA-48 enzyme. On the other hand, MK-7655 failed to potentiate imipenem against Enterobacteriaceae with metallo-carbapenemases. In the case of P. aeruginosa, where endogenous AmpC confers slight protection versus imipenem, 4 mg/L MK-7655 reduced the MIC of imipenem for all isolates, except those with metallo-carbapenemases: the MICs of imipenem fell from 1-2 mg/L to 0.25-0.5 mg/L for imipenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa and from 16-64 mg/L to 1-4 mg/L for OprD-deficient strains. No potentiation was seen for chryseobacteria or for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. MK-7655 potentiated imipenem against Enterobacteriaceae with KPC carbapenemases or combinations of β-lactamase and impermeability, but not those with metallo-carbapenemases. It augmented the activity of imipenem against P. aeruginosa in general and OprD mutants in particular.

  12. UDP-N-Acetylmuramic Acid l-Alanine Ligase (MurC) Inhibition in a tolC Mutant Escherichia coli Strain Leads to Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Humnabadkar, Vaishali; Prabhakar, K. R.; Narayan, Ashwini; Sharma, Sreevalli; Guptha, Supreeth; Manjrekar, Praveena; Chinnapattu, Murugan; Ramachandran, Vasanthi; Hameed, Shahul P.; Ravishankar, Sudha; Chatterji, Monalisa

    2014-01-01

    The Mur ligases play an essential role in the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and hence are attractive antibacterial targets. A screen of the AstraZeneca compound library led to the identification of compound A, a pyrazolopyrimidine, as a potent inhibitor of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa MurC. However, cellular activity against E. coli or P. aeruginosa was not observed. Compound A was active against efflux pump mutants of both strains. Experiments using an E. coli tol...

  13. Mannitol enhances antibiotic sensitivity of persister bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barraud

    Full Text Available The failure of antibiotic therapies to clear Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the key mortality factor for cystic fibrosis (CF patients, is partly attributed to the high tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Mannitol has previously been found to restore aminoglycoside sensitivity in Escherichia coli by generating a proton-motive force (PMF, suggesting a potential new strategy to improve antibiotic therapy and reduce disease progression in CF. Here, we used the commonly prescribed aminoglycoside tobramycin to select for P. aeruginosa persister cells during biofilm growth. Incubation with mannitol (10-40 mM increased tobramycin sensitivity of persister cells up to 1,000-fold. Addition of mannitol to pre-grown biofilms was able to revert the persister phenotype and improve the efficacy of tobramycin. This effect was blocked by the addition of a PMF inhibitor or in a P. aeruginosa mutant strain unable to metabolise mannitol. Addition of glucose and NaCl at high osmolarity also improved the efficacy of tobramycin although to a lesser extent compared to mannitol. Therefore, the primary effect of mannitol in reverting biofilm associated persister cells appears to be an active, physiological response, associated with a minor contribution of osmotic stress. Mannitol was tested against clinically relevant strains, showing that biofilms containing a subpopulation of persister cells are better killed in the presence of mannitol, but a clinical strain with a high resistance to tobramycin was not affected by mannitol. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to improvements in lung function by facilitating mucus clearance in CF, mannitol also affects antibiotic sensitivity in biofilms and does so through an active, physiological response.

  14. The LasB Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acts in Concert with Alkaline Protease AprA To Prevent Flagellin-Mediated Immune Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilag, Fiordiligie; Lorenz, Anne; Krueger, Jonas; Klawonn, Frank; Weiss, Siegfried; Häussler, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing severe and persistent infections in various eukaryotic hosts. It encodes a wide array of virulence factors and employs several strategies to evade immune detection. In the present study, we screened the Harvard Medical School transposon mutant library of P. aeruginosa PA14 for bacterial factors that modulate interleukin-8 responses in A549 human airway epithelial cells. We found that in addition to the previously identified alkaline protease AprA, the elastase LasB is capable of degrading exogenous flagellin under calcium-replete conditions and prevents flagellin-mediated immune recognition. Our results indicate that the production of two proteases with anti-flagellin activity provides a failsafe mechanism for P. aeruginosa to ensure the maintenance of protease-dependent immune-modulating functions. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Gauging and visualizing c-di-GMP levels in pseudomonas aeruginosa using fluorescence-based biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has shown that the molecule c-di-GMP is an important second messenger regulating various functions in bacteria. In particular, the implication of c-di-GMP as a positive regulator of adhesion and biofilm formation has gained momentum as a highly relevant research topic, as detailed...... knowledge about the underlying regulatory mechanisms may enable the development of measures to control biofilms in both industrial and medical settings. Accordingly, it is in many cases of interest to measure the c-di-GMP level in bacteria under specific conditions or in specific mutant strains. We have...... developed a collection of fluorescence-based c-di-GMP biosensors capable of gauging the c-di-GMP level in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and closely related bacteria. Here, we describe protocols for the use of these biosensors in gauging and visualizing cellular c-di-GMP levels of P. aeruginosa both in in vitro...

  16. Chromosomal mechanisms of aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, S; Oh, H; Jalal, S

    2009-01-01

    pump protein MexY was determined by real-time PCR and correlated with susceptibilities to amikacin and tobramycin. The chromosomal genes mexZ, rplY, galU, PA5471 and nuoG, which were found to have a role in the gradual increase in MICs of aminoglycoside antibiotics in laboratory mutants of P....... aeruginosa, were analysed. MexY mRNA overproduction was found in 17/20 isolates collected in 1994 and 1997, and was correlated with decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Alteration of the MexXY-OprM efflux system has been the main mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in CF P......In total, 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients were included in this study. Twenty of these were collected in 1994 and 1997, from six CF patients, and the rest were collected from different CF patients in 2000 and 2001. The relative expression of mRNA for the efflux...

  17. Identification of Five Structurally Unrelated Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a Natural-Derivative Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song-Lin; Chen, Yicai

    2013-01-01

    QSI candidates. Three-dimensional structures of 3,040 natural compounds and their derivatives were obtained, after which molecular docking was performed using the QS receptor LasR as a target. Based on docking scores and molecular masses, 22 compounds were purchased to determine their efficacies...

  18. The Oxidative Stress Agent Hypochlorite Stimulates c-di-GMP Synthesis and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Strempel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to survive under a variety of often harmful environmental conditions due to a multitude of intrinsic and adaptive resistance mechanisms, including biofilm formation as one important survival strategy. Here, we investigated the adaptation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to hypochlorite (HClO, a phagocyte-derived host defense compound and frequently used disinfectant. In static biofilm assays, we observed a significant enhancement in initial cell attachment in the presence of sublethal HClO concentrations. Subsequent LC-MS analyses revealed a strong increase in cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP levels suggesting a key role of this second messenger in HClO-induced biofilm development. Using DNA microarrays, we identified a 26-fold upregulation of ORF PA3177 coding for a putative diguanylate cyclase (DGC, which catalyzes the synthesis of the second messenger c-di-GMP – an important regulator of bacterial motility, sessility and persistence. This DGC PA3177 was further characterized in more detail demonstrating its impact on P. aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation. In addition, cell culture assays attested a role for PA3177 in the response of P. aeruginosa to human phagocytes. Using a subset of different mutants, we were able to show that both Pel and Psl exopolysaccharides are effectors in the PA3177-dependent c-di-GMP network.

  19. Development of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with OprD polymorphisms, particularly the amino acid substitution at codon 170.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jwu-Ching; Kuo, An-Jing; Su, Lin-Hui; Liu, Tsui-Ping; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Su, I-Ning; Wu, Tsu-Lan

    2017-09-01

    Pan-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PSPA) clinical isolates carrying an OprD with loop 7 shortening (the group-1A allele) were found to rapidly develop carbapenem resistance under continuous selection pressure. We further studied whether OprD polymorphisms are associated with the potential to develop carbapenem resistance. OprD amino acid sequences of 126 PSPA clinical isolates were analysed to determine their STs using P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 as the control strain. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed in PAO1 to generate polymorphisms of interest. A disc diffusion method was used to select carbapenem-resistant variants from the mutant strains. Expression levels of oprD were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. MICs of carbapenems were determined by Etest. Forty-eight (38.1%) of the tested isolates carried the group-1A allele. Another two major STs, C1 and C2, both of which harboured an F170L polymorphism, were found in 21 (16.7%) and 39 (31.0%) isolates, respectively. The PAO1 type was also found in 14 (11.1%) isolates. Under continuous selective pressure, isolates of most STs developed carbapenem resistance at different numbers of passaging events; only those belonging to the PAO1 type remained susceptible. However, PAO1 mutants carrying either the oprD group-1A allele or the OprD-F170L polymorphism were able to develop carbapenem resistance. Reduced oprD expression triggered by continuous imipenem challenge was found in PAO1 mutants, but not in the PAO1 WT strain. OprD polymorphisms, particularly the F170L substitution and the specific shortening in loop 7, appear to determine the potential for P. aeruginosa to develop carbapenem resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Identification of Two Gene Clusters and a Transcriptional Regulator Required for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Glycine Betaine Catabolism▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Matthew J.; Szwergold, Benjamin S.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    Glycine betaine (GB), which occurs freely in the environment and is an intermediate in the catabolism of choline and carnitine, can serve as a sole source of carbon or nitrogen in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Twelve mutants defective in growth on GB as the sole carbon source were identified through a genetic screen of a nonredundant PA14 transposon mutant library. Further growth experiments showed that strains with mutations in two genes, gbcA (PA5410) and gbcB (PA5411), were capable of growth on dimethylglycine (DMG), a catabolic product of GB, but not on GB itself. Subsequent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with 1,2-13C-labeled choline indicated that these genes are necessary for conversion of GB to DMG. Similar experiments showed that strains with mutations in the dgcAB (PA5398-PA5399) genes, which exhibit homology to genes that encode other enzymes with demethylase activity, are required for the conversion of DMG to sarcosine. Mutant analyses and 13C NMR studies also confirmed that the soxBDAG genes, predicted to encode a sarcosine oxidase, are required for sarcosine catabolism. Our screen also identified a predicted AraC family transcriptional regulator, encoded by gbdR (PA5380), that is required for growth on GB and DMG and for the induction of gbcA, gbcB, and dgcAB in response to GB or DMG. Mutants defective in the previously described gbt gene (PA3082) grew on GB with kinetics similar to those of the wild type in both the PAO1 and PA14 strain backgrounds. These studies provided important insight into both the mechanism and the regulation of the catabolism of GB in P. aeruginosa. PMID:17951379

  1. Candida albicans ethanol stimulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa WspR-controlled biofilm formation as part of a cyclic relationship involving phenazines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie I Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In chronic infections, pathogens are often in the presence of other microbial species. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common and detrimental lung pathogen in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF and co-infections with Candida albicans are common. Here, we show that P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and phenazine production were strongly influenced by ethanol produced by the fungus C. albicans. Ethanol stimulated phenotypes that are indicative of increased levels of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP, and levels of c-di-GMP were 2-fold higher in the presence of ethanol. Through a genetic screen, we found that the diguanylate cyclase WspR was required for ethanol stimulation of c-di-GMP. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that ethanol stimulates WspR signaling through its cognate sensor WspA, and promotes WspR-dependent activation of Pel exopolysaccharide production, which contributes to biofilm maturation. We also found that ethanol stimulation of WspR promoted P. aeruginosa colonization of CF airway epithelial cells. P. aeruginosa production of phenazines occurs both in the CF lung and in culture, and phenazines enhance ethanol production by C. albicans. Using a C. albicans adh1/adh1 mutant with decreased ethanol production, we found that fungal ethanol strongly altered the spectrum of P. aeruginosa phenazines in favor of those that are most effective against fungi. Thus, a feedback cycle comprised of ethanol and phenazines drives this polymicrobial interaction, and these relationships may provide insight into why co-infection with both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans has been associated with worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis.

  2. Comparative study on the in vitro effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and seaweed alginates on human gut microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaofeng Bai

    Full Text Available Alginates pertain to organic polysaccharides that have been extensively used in food- and medicine-related industries. The present study obtained alginates from an alginate overproducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 mutant by screening transposon mutagenesis libraries. The interaction between bacterial and seaweed alginates and gut microbiota were further studied by using an in vitro batch fermentation system. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC analysis indicated that both bacterial and seaweed alginates can be completely degraded by fecal bacteria isolated from study volunteers, indicating that a minor structural difference between bacterial and seaweed alginates (O-acetylation and lack of G-G blocks didn't affect the digestion of alginates by human microbiota. Although, the digestion of bacterial and seaweed alginates was attributed to different Bacteroides xylanisolvens strains, they harbored similar alginate lyase genes. Genus Bacteroides with alginate-degrading capability were enriched in growth medium containing bacterial or seaweed alginates after in vitro fermentation. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA production in both bacterial and seaweed alginates was also comparable, but was significantly higher than the same medium using starch. In summary, the present study has isolated an alginate-overproducing P. aeruginosa mutant strain. Both seaweed and bacterial alginates were degraded by human gut microbiota, and their regulatory function on gut microbiota was similar.

  3. Comparative study on the in vitro effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and seaweed alginates on human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shaofeng; Chen, Huahai; Zhu, Liying; Liu, Wei; Yu, Hongwei D; Wang, Xin; Yin, Yeshi

    2017-01-01

    Alginates pertain to organic polysaccharides that have been extensively used in food- and medicine-related industries. The present study obtained alginates from an alginate overproducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 mutant by screening transposon mutagenesis libraries. The interaction between bacterial and seaweed alginates and gut microbiota were further studied by using an in vitro batch fermentation system. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis indicated that both bacterial and seaweed alginates can be completely degraded by fecal bacteria isolated from study volunteers, indicating that a minor structural difference between bacterial and seaweed alginates (O-acetylation and lack of G-G blocks) didn't affect the digestion of alginates by human microbiota. Although, the digestion of bacterial and seaweed alginates was attributed to different Bacteroides xylanisolvens strains, they harbored similar alginate lyase genes. Genus Bacteroides with alginate-degrading capability were enriched in growth medium containing bacterial or seaweed alginates after in vitro fermentation. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in both bacterial and seaweed alginates was also comparable, but was significantly higher than the same medium using starch. In summary, the present study has isolated an alginate-overproducing P. aeruginosa mutant strain. Both seaweed and bacterial alginates were degraded by human gut microbiota, and their regulatory function on gut microbiota was similar.

  4. The Extra-Cytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor SigX Modulates Biofilm and Virulence-Related Properties in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, Gwendoline; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Bains, Manjeet; Oxaran, Virginie; Rosay, Thibaut; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Connil, Nathalie; Bazire, Alexis; Maillot, Olivier; Bénard, Magalie; Cornelis, Pierre; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Dufour, Alain; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Orange, Nicole; Déziel, Eric; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    SigX, one of the 19 extra-cytoplasmic function sigma factors of P. aeruginosa, was only known to be involved in transcription of the gene encoding the major outer membrane protein OprF. We conducted a comparative transcriptomic study between the wildtype H103 strain and its sigX mutant PAOSX, which revealed a total of 307 differentially expressed genes that differed by more than 2 fold. Most dysregulated genes belonged to six functional classes, including the “chaperones and heat shock proteins”, “antibiotic resistance and susceptibility”, “energy metabolism”, “protein secretion/export apparatus”, and “secreted factors”, and “motility and attachment” classes. In this latter class, the large majority of the affected genes were down-regulated in the sigX mutant. In agreement with the array data, the sigX mutant was shown to demonstrate substantially reduced motility, attachment to biotic and abiotic surfaces, and biofilm formation. In addition, virulence towards the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was reduced in the sigX mutant, suggesting that SigX is involved in virulence-related phenotypes. PMID:24260387

  5. Sublethal Ciprofloxacin Treatment Leads to Rapid Development of High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance during Long-Term Experimental Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Hengzuang, Wang; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of occurrence and the genetic basis of ciprofloxacin resistance were studied in a long-term evolution experiment (940 generations) in wild-type, reference strain (PAO1) and hypermutable (PAOΔmutS and PAOMY-Mgm) P. aeruginosa populations continuously exposed to sub-MICs (1/4) of ciprofloxacin. A rapid occurrence of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants (MIC of ≥12 μg/ml, representing 100 times the MIC of the original population) were observed in all ciprofloxacin-exposed lineages of PAOΔmutS and PAOMY-Mgm populations after 100 and 170 generations, respectively, and in one of the PAO1 lineages after 240 generations. The genetic basis of resistance was mutations in gyrA (C248T and G259T) and gyrB (C1397A). Cross-resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics was observed in the bacterial populations that evolved during exposure to sublethal concentrations of ciprofloxacin. Our study shows that mutants with high-level ciprofloxacin resistance are selected in P. aeruginosa bacterial populations exposed to sub-MICs of ciprofloxacin. This can have implications for the long-term persistence of resistant bacteria and spread of antibiotic resistance by exposure of commensal bacterial flora to low antibiotic concentrations. PMID:23774442

  6. Role of IL-1β in experimental cystic fibrosis upon P. aeruginosa infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Palomo

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is associated with increased inflammatory responses to pathogen challenge. Here we revisited the role of IL-1β in lung pathology using the experimental F508del-CFTR murine model on C57BL/6 genetic background (Cftr(tm1eur or d/d, on double deficient for d/d and type 1 interleukin-1 receptor (d/d X IL-1R1-/-, and antibody neutralization. At steady state, young adult d/d mice did not show any signs of spontaneous lung inflammation. However, IL-1R1 deficiency conferred partial protection to repeated P. aeruginosa endotoxins/LPS lung instillation in d/d mice, as 50% of d/d mice succumbed to inflammation, whereas all d/d x IL-1R1-/- double mutants survived with lower initial weight loss and less pulmonary collagen and mucus production, suggesting that the absence of IL-1R1 signaling is protective in d/d mice in LPS-induced lung damage. Using P. aeruginosa acute lung infection we found heightened neutrophil recruitment in d/d mice with higher epithelial damage, increased bacterial load in BALF, and augmented IL-1β and TNF-α in parenchyma as compared to WT mice. Thus, F508del-CFTR mice show enhanced IL-1β signaling in response to P. aeruginosa. IL-1β antibody neutralization had no effect on lung homeostasis in either d/d or WT mice, however P. aeruginosa induced lung inflammation and bacterial load were diminished by IL-1β antibody neutralization. In conclusion, enhanced susceptibility to P. aeruginosa in d/d mice correlates with an excessive inflammation and with increased IL-1β production and reduced bacterial clearance. Further, we show that neutralization of IL-1β in d/d mice through the double mutation d/d x IL-1R1-/- and in WT via antibody neutralization attenuates inflammation. This supports the notion that intervention in the IL-1R1/IL-1β pathway may be detrimental in CF patients.

  7. Determination of agmatine using isotope dilution UPLC-tandem mass spectrometry: application to the characterization of the arginine decarboxylase pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurtain, Jennifer L.; Gilbertsen, Adam J.; Kalstabakken, Kyle A.; Williams, Bryan J.

    2018-01-01

    A method has been developed for the direct determination of agmatine in bacterial culture supernatants using isotope dilution ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Agmatine determination in bacterial supernatants is comprised of spiking culture or isolate supernatants with a fixed concentration of uniformly labeled 13C5,15N4-agmatine (synthesized by decarboxylation of uniformly labeled 13C6,15N4-arginine using arginine decarboxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa) as an internal standard, followed by derivatization with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,l,3-benzoxadiazole (NBDF) to improve the reversed-phase chromatographic retention characteristics of agmatine, as well as the selectivity and sensitivity of UPLC-MS/MS detection of this amine in complex biologically derived mixtures. Intrasample precisions for measurement of agmatine in culture supernatants average 4.1 % (relative standard deviation). Calibration curves are linear over the range 5 nM to 10 μM, and the detection limit is estimated at 1.5 nM. To demonstrate the utility of the method, agmatine levels in supernatants of overnight cultures of wild-type (UCBPP-PA14), as well as arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase mutant strains of P. aeruginosa strain UCBPP-PA14 were measured. This method verified that the mutant strains are lacking the specific metabolic capabilities to produce and metabolize agmatine. In addition, measurement of agmatine in supernatants of a panel of clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis revealed that three of the P. aeruginosa isolates hyper-secreted agmatine into the supernatant, hypothesized to be a result of a mutation in the aguA gene. Because agmatine has potential inflammatory activities in the lung, this phenotype may be a virulence factor for P. aeruginosa in the lung environment of cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:25957842

  8. Determination of agmatine using isotope dilution UPLC-tandem mass spectrometry: application to the characterization of the arginine decarboxylase pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalluge, Joseph J; McCurtain, Jennifer L; Gilbertsen, Adam J; Kalstabakken, Kyle A; Williams, Bryan J

    2015-07-01

    A method has been developed for the direct determination of agmatine in bacterial culture supernatants using isotope dilution ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Agmatine determination in bacterial supernatants is comprised of spiking culture or isolate supernatants with a fixed concentration of uniformly labeled (13)C5,(15)N4-agmatine (synthesized by decarboxylation of uniformly labeled (13)C6,(15)N4-arginine using arginine decarboxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa) as an internal standard, followed by derivatization with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBDF) to improve the reversed-phase chromatographic retention characteristics of agmatine, as well as the selectivity and sensitivity of UPLC-MS/MS detection of this amine in complex biologically derived mixtures. Intrasample precisions for measurement of agmatine in culture supernatants average 4.1% (relative standard deviation). Calibration curves are linear over the range 5 nM to 10 μM, and the detection limit is estimated at 1.5 nM. To demonstrate the utility of the method, agmatine levels in supernatants of overnight cultures of wild-type (UCBPP-PA14), as well as arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase mutant strains of P. aeruginosa strain UCBPP-PA14 were measured. This method verified that the mutant strains are lacking the specific metabolic capabilities to produce and metabolize agmatine. In addition, measurement of agmatine in supernatants of a panel of clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis revealed that three of the P. aeruginosa isolates hyper-secreted agmatine into the supernatant, hypothesized to be a result of a mutation in the aguA gene. Because agmatine has potential inflammatory activities in the lung, this phenotype may be a virulence factor for P. aeruginosa in the lung environment of cystic fibrosis patients.

  9. Capsule production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, associated almost exclusively with chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, possess a capsule composed of alginic acid similar to one produced by Azotobacter vinelandii. Recent reports have provided evidence that the biosynthetic pathway for alginate in P. aeruginosa may differ from the pathway proposed for A. vinelandii in that synthesis in P. aeruginosa may occur by way of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Incorporation of isotope from (6-/sup 14/C)glucose into alginate by both P. aueroginosa and A. vinelandii was 10-fold greater than that from either (1-/sup 14/C)/sup -/ or (2-/sup 14/C)glucose, indicating preferential utilization of the bottom half of the glucose molecule for alginate biosynthesis. These data strongly suggest that the Entner-Doudoroff pathway plays a major role in alginate synthesis in both P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. The enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa appear to be unchanged whether alignate is actively produced or not and activities do not differ significantly from nonmucoid strain PAO.

  10. A Metabolic Trade-Off Modulates Policing of Social Cheaters in Populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huicong Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses quorum sensing (QS to regulate the production of public goods such as the secreted protease elastase. P. aeruginosa requires the LasI–LasR QS circuit to induce elastase and enable growth on casein as the sole carbon and energy source. The LasI–LasR system also induces a second QS circuit, the RhlI–RhlR system. During growth on casein, LasR-mutant social cheaters emerge, and this can lead to a population collapse. In a minimal medium containing ammonium sulfate as a nitrogen source, populations do not collapse, and cheaters and cooperators reach a stable equilibrium; however, without ammonium sulfate, cheaters overtake the cooperators and populations collapse. We show that ammonium sulfate enhances the activity of the RhlI–RhlR system in casein medium and this leads to increased production of cyanide, which serves to control levels of cheaters. This enhancement of cyanide production occurs because of a trade-off in the metabolism of glycine: exogenous ammonium ion inhibits the transformation of glycine to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate through a reduction in the expression of the glycine cleavage genes gcvP1 and gcvP2, thereby increasing the availability of glycine as a substrate for RhlR-regulated hydrogen cyanide synthesis. Thus, environmental ammonia enhances cyanide production and stabilizes QS in populations of P. aeruginosa.

  11. Gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infections by Ps. aeruginosa is contra-indicated. In our study only 2,3 % of the Ps. aeruginosa strains were resistant to gentamicin (MIC 25 Ilg/ml). In view of the synergy reported for combined gentamicin and carbeni- cillin therapy," a combination of these two drugs may be recommended in the treatment of all Pseudomonas.

  12. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines that kill Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezairliyan, Brent; Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Yuen, Grace J; Saghatelian, Alan; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches.

  13. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines that kill Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Cezairliyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches.

  14. Effects of quorum-sensing on immunoglobulin G responses in a rat model of chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    WU, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2004-01-01

    Levels of serum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were observed for 106 days in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Significantly weaker responses of serum IgG and IgG1 and a lower ratio of IgGI/IgG2a were found in the rats infected with the quorum-signal-deficient mutant, PAO1 (rhl......I, lasI), compared with the wild-type PAO1. Four out of 15 rats infected with wild-type PAO1 contained bacteria in the lungs on day 106, whereas no bacteria were found in the mutant PAO1 group. The results indicate that quorum signals contribute to the persistence of the infection and influence...

  15. Real-Time Monitoring of nfxB Mutant Occurrence and Dynamics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Exposed to Subinhibitory Concentrations of Ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaborskytė, Greta; Andersen, Jens Bo; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are frequently treated with ciprofloxacin (CIP); however, resistance rapidly develops. One of the primary resistance mechanisms is the overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ pump due to a mutation in nfxB, encoding the transcriptional repressor...

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Trent and zinc homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Corey B; Harrison, Mark D; Huygens, Flavia

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative pathogen and the major cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. The mechanisms that P. aeruginosa strains use to regulate intracellular zinc have an effect on infection, antibiotic resistance and the propensity to form biofilms. However, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa strains of variable infectivity has not been compared. In this study, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa Trent, a highly infectious clinical strain, was compared to that of a laboratory P. aeruginosa strain, ATCC27853. Trent was able to tolerate higher concentrations of additional zinc in rich media than ATCC27853. Further, pre-adaptation to additional zinc enhanced the growth of Trent at non-inhibitory concentrations but the impact of pre-adaption on the growth of ATCC27853 under the same conditions was minimal. The results establish clear differences in zinc-induced responses in Trent and ATCC27853, and how zinc homeostasis can be a promising target for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies for P. aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Flow environment and matrix structure interact to determine spatial competition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadell, Carey D; Ricaurte, Deirdre; Yan, Jing; Drescher, Knut; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2017-01-13

    Bacteria often live in biofilms, which are microbial communities surrounded by a secreted extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that hydrodynamic flow and matrix organization interact to shape competitive dynamics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Irrespective of initial frequency, in competition with matrix mutants, wild-type cells always increase in relative abundance in planar microfluidic devices under simple flow regimes. By contrast, in microenvironments with complex, irregular flow profiles - which are common in natural environments - wild-type matrix-producing and isogenic non-producing strains can coexist. This result stems from local obstruction of flow by wild-type matrix producers, which generates regions of near-zero shear that allow matrix mutants to locally accumulate. Our findings connect the evolutionary stability of matrix production with the hydrodynamics and spatial structure of the surrounding environment, providing a potential explanation for the variation in biofilm matrix secretion observed among bacteria in natural environments.

  18. Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Activity and Machine Learning Classification Analysis of Essential Oils from Different Mediterranean Plants against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artini, Marco; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Papa, Rosanna; Božović, Mijat; Sabatino, Manuela; Garzoli, Stefania; Vrenna, Gianluca; Tilotta, Marco; Pepi, Federico; Ragno, Rino; Selan, Laura

    2018-02-23

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism and opportunistic pathogen that can cause persistent infections due to its peculiar antibiotic resistance mechanisms and to its ability to adhere and form biofilm. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of biofilm formation has recently increased. The aim of this study was to seek new non-biocidal agents able to inhibit biofilm formation, in order to counteract virulence rather than bacterial growth and avoid the selection of escape mutants. Herein, different essential oils extracted from Mediterranean plants were analyzed for their activity against P. aeruginosa . Results show that they were able to destabilize biofilm at very low concentration without impairing bacterial viability. Since the action is not related to a bacteriostatic/bactericidal activity on P. aeruginosa , the biofilm change of growth in presence of the essential oils was possibly due to a modulation of the phenotype. To this aim, application of machine learning algorithms led to the development of quantitative activity-composition relationships classification models that allowed to direct point out those essential oil chemical components more involved in the inhibition of biofilm production. The action of selected essential oils on sessile phenotype make them particularly interesting for possible applications such as prevention of bacterial contamination in the community and in healthcare environments in order to prevent human infections. We assayed 89 samples of different essential oils as P. aeruginosa anti-biofilm. Many samples inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm at concentrations as low as 48.8 µg/mL. Classification of the models was developed through machine learning algorithms.

  19. Novel multiscale modeling tool applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Biggs

    Full Text Available Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool.

  20. Novel multiscale modeling tool applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Matthew B; Papin, Jason A

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet) as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM) and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool.

  1. Membrane-anchored MucR mediates nitrate-dependent regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yajie

    2015-04-29

    Alginates exhibit unique material properties suitable for medical and industrial applications. However, if produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, it is an important virulence factor in infection of cystic fibrosis patients. The alginate biosynthesis machinery is activated by c-di-GMP imparted by the inner membrane protein, MucR. Here, it was shown that MucR impairs alginate production in response to nitrate in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent site-specific mutagenesis of MucR revealed that the second MHYT sensor motif (MHYT II, amino acids 121–124) of MucR sensor domain was involved in nitrate sensing. We also showed that both c-di-GMP synthesizing and degrading active sites of MucR were important for alginate production. Although nitrate and deletion of MucR impaired alginate promoter activity and global c-di-GMP levels, alginate yields were not directly correlated with alginate promoter activity or c-di-GMP levels, suggesting that nitrate and MucR modulate alginate production at a post-translational level through a localized pool of c-di-GMP. Nitrate increased pel promoter activity in the mucR mutant while in the same mutant the psl promoter activity was independent of nitrate. Nitrate and deletion of mucR did not impact on swarming motility but impaired attachment to solid surfaces. Nitrate and deletion of mucR promoted the formation of biofilms with increased thickness, cell density, and survival. Overall, this study provided insight into the functional role of MucR with respect to nitrate-mediated regulation of alginate biosynthesis. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  2. The pvc operon regulates the expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Qaisar

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial structures encoded by the cup gene clusters (cupB and cupC contribute to its attachment to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa pvcABCD gene cluster encodes enzymes that synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin, paerucumarin. Paerucumarin has already been characterized chemically, but this is the first report elucidating its role in bacterial biology. We examined the relationship between the pvc operon and the cup gene clusters in the P. aeruginosa strain MPAO1. Mutations within the pvc genes compromised biofilm development and significantly reduced the expression of cupB1-6 and cupC1-3, as well as different genes of the cupB/cupC two-component regulatory systems, roc1/roc2. Adjacent to pvc is the transcriptional regulator ptxR. A ptxR mutation in MPAO1 significantly reduced the expression of the pvc genes, the cupB/cupC genes, and the roc1/roc2 genes. Overexpression of the intact chromosomally-encoded pvc operon by a ptxR plasmid significantly enhanced cupB2, cupC2, rocS1, and rocS2 expression and biofilm development. Exogenously added paerucumarin significantly increased the expression of cupB2, cupC2, rocS1 and rocS2 in the pvcA mutant. Our results suggest that pvc influences P. aeruginosa biofilm development through the cup gene clusters in a pathway that involves paerucumarin, PtxR, and different cup regulators.

  3. Conjugating recombinant proteins to Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoProtein A: a strategy for enhancing immunogenicity of malaria vaccine candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Feng; Wu, Yimin; Muratova, Olga; Zhou, Hong; Dobrescu, Gelu; Duggan, Peter; Lynn, Lambert; Song, Guanhong; Zhang, Yanling; Reiter, Karine; MacDonald, Nicholas; Narum, David L.; Long, Carole A.; Miller, Louis H.; Saul, Allan

    2007-01-01

    Conjugation of polysaccharides to carrier proteins has been a successful approach for producing safe and effective vaccines. In an attempt to increase the immunogenicity of two malarial vaccine candidate proteins of Plasmodium falciparum, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) for blood stage vaccines and surface protein 25 (Pfs25) for mosquito stage vaccines, each was chemically conjugated to the mutant, nontoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoProtein A (rEPA). AMA1 is a large (66 kD) relatively good i...

  4. The Impact of ExoS on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Internalization by Epithelial Cells Is Independent of fleQ and Correlates with Bistability of Type Three Secretion System Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroken, Abby R; Chen, Camille K; Evans, David J; Yahr, Timothy L; Fleiszig, Suzanne M J

    2018-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is internalized into multiple types of epithelial cell in vitro and in vivo and yet is often regarded as an exclusively extracellular pathogen. Paradoxically, ExoS, a type three secretion system (T3SS) effector, has antiphagocytic activities but is required for intracellular survival of P. aeruginosa and its occupation of bleb niches in epithelial cells. Here, we addressed mechanisms for this dichotomy using invasive (ExoS-expressing) P. aeruginosa and corresponding effector-null isogenic T3SS mutants, effector-null mutants of cytotoxic P. aeruginosa with and without ExoS transformation, antibiotic exclusion assays, and imaging using a T3SS-GFP reporter. Except for effector-null PA103, all strains were internalized while encoding ExoS. Intracellular bacteria showed T3SS activation that continued in replicating daughter cells. Correcting the fleQ mutation in effector-null PA103 promoted internalization by >10-fold with or without ExoS. Conversely, mutating fleQ in PAO1 reduced internalization by >10-fold, also with or without ExoS. Effector-null PA103 remained less well internalized than PAO1 matched for fleQ status, but only with ExoS expression, suggesting additional differences between these strains. Quantifying T3SS activation using GFP fluorescence and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that T3SS expression was hyperinducible for strain PA103Δ exoUT versus other isolates and was unrelated to fleQ status. These findings support the principle that P. aeruginosa is not exclusively an extracellular pathogen, with internalization influenced by the relative proportions of T3SS-positive and T3SS-negative bacteria in the population during host cell interaction. These data also challenge current thinking about T3SS effector delivery into host cells and suggest that T3SS bistability is an important consideration in studying P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE P. aeruginosa is often referred to as an extracellular

  5. Formation of hydroxyl radicals contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Peter Ø; Briales, Alejandra; Brochmann, Rikke P; Wang, Hengzhuang; Kragh, Kasper N; Kolpen, Mette; Hempel, Casper; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic-tolerant, biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa has long been recognized as a major cause of chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. The mechanisms involved in the activity of antibiotics on biofilm are not completely clear. We have investigated whether the proposed induction of cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals (OH˙) during antibiotic treatment of planktonically grown cells may contribute to action of the commonly used antibiotic ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa biofilms. For this purpose, WT PAO1, a catalase deficient ΔkatA and a ciprofloxacin resistant mutant of PAO1 (gyrA), were grown as biofilms in microtiter plates and treated with ciprofloxacin. Formation of OH˙ and total amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and viability was estimated. Formation of OH˙ and total ROS in PAO1 biofilms treated with ciprofloxacin was shown but higher levels were measured in ΔkatA biofilms, and no ROS production was seen in the gyrA biofilms. Treatment with ciprofloxacin decreased the viability of PAO1 and ΔkatA biofilms but not of gyrA biofilms. Addition of thiourea, a OH˙ scavenger, decreased the OH˙ levels and killing of PAO1 biofilm. Our study shows that OH˙ is produced by P. aeruginosa biofilms treated with ciprofloxacin, which may contribute to the killing of biofilm subpopulations. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of biofilm-associated cluster (bac in Pseudomonas aeruginosa involved in biofilm formation and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Macé

    Full Text Available Biofilms are prevalent in diseases caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic and nosocomial pathogen. By a proteomic approach, we previously identified a hypothetical protein of P. aeruginosa (coded by the gene pA3731 that was accumulated by biofilm cells. We report here that a Delta pA3731 mutant is highly biofilm-defective as compared with the wild-type strain. Using a mouse model of lung infection, we show that the mutation also induces a defect in bacterial growth during the acute phase of infection and an attenuation of the virulence. The pA3731 gene is found to control positively the ability to swarm and to produce extracellular rhamnolipids, and belongs to a cluster of 4 genes (pA3729-pA3732 not previously described in P. aeruginosa. Though the protein PA3731 has a predicted secondary structure similar to that of the Phage Shock Protein, some obvious differences are observed compared to already described psp systems, e.g., this unknown cluster is monocistronic and no homology is found between the other proteins constituting this locus and psp proteins. As E. coli PspA, the amount of the protein PA3731 is enlarged by an osmotic shock, however, not affected by a heat shock. We consequently named this locus bac for biofilm-associated cluster.

  7. Evidence of MexT-independent overexpression of MexEF-OprN multidrug efflux pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of metabolic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayush Kumar

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexEF-OprN efflux pump confers resistance to clinically significant antibiotics. Regulation of mexEF-oprN operon expression is multifaceted with the MexT activator being one of the most prominent regulatory proteins.We have exploited the impaired metabolic fitness of a P. aeruginosa mutant strain lacking several efflux pump of the resistance nodulation cell division superfamily and the TolC homolog OpmH, and isolated derivatives (large colony variants that regained fitness by incubation on nutrient-rich medium in the absence of antibiotics. Although the mexEF-oprN operon is uninducible in this mutant due to a 8-bp mexT insertion present in some P. aeruginosa PAO1 strains, the large colony variants expressed high levels of MexEF-OprN. Unlike large colony variants obtained after plating on antibiotic containing medium which expressed mexEF-oprN in a MexT-dependent fashion as evidenced by clean excision of the 8-bp insertion from mexT, mexEF-oprN expression was MexT-independent in the large colony variants obtained by plating on LB alone since the mexT gene remained inactivated. A search for possible regulators of mexEF-oprN expression using transposon mutagenesis and genomic library expression approaches yielded several candidates but proved inconclusive.Our results show that antibiotic and metabolic stress lead to up-regulation of MexEF-OprN expression via different mechanisms and that MexEF-OprN does not only extrude antimicrobials but rather serves other important metabolic functions.

  8. LexA Binds to Transcription Regulatory Site of Cell Division Gene ftsZ in Toxic Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Takashi; Morimoto, Daichi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Takashi

    2018-05-17

    Previously, we showed that DNA replication and cell division in toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa are coordinated by transcriptional regulation of cell division gene ftsZ and that an unknown protein specifically bound upstream of ftsZ (BpFz; DNA-binding protein to an upstream site of ftsZ) during successful DNA replication and cell division. Here, we purified BpFz from M. aeruginosa strain NIES-298 using DNA-affinity chromatography and gel-slicing combined with gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of BpFz was identified as TNLESLTQ, which was identical to that of transcription repressor LexA from NIES-843. EMSA analysis using mutant probes showed that the sequence GTACTAN 3 GTGTTC was important in LexA binding. Comparison of the upstream regions of lexA in the genomes of closely related cyanobacteria suggested that the sequence TASTRNNNNTGTWC could be a putative LexA recognition sequence (LexA box). Searches for TASTRNNNNTGTWC as a transcriptional regulatory site (TRS) in the genome of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 showed that it was present in genes involved in cell division, photosynthesis, and extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis. Considering that BpFz binds to the TRS of ftsZ during normal cell division, LexA may function as a transcriptional activator of genes related to cell reproduction in M. aeruginosa, including ftsZ. This may be an example of informality in the control of bacterial cell division.

  9. Alkaline protease contributes to pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Eigo; Lee, Jae Man; Mon, Hiroaki; Morishita, Mai; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa

    2017-04-01

    The role of the alkaline protease (AprA) in pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. AprA was overproduced when a plasmid carrying the aprA gene was introduced to an aprA-deletion mutant strain, EG03; thus, aprA-complemented EG03 was used as an overproducing strain. The complemented strain produced higher pyocyanin than the mutant strain in all commercially available media evaluated. Particularly, pyocyanin production was higher in the complemented than in the parental strain in brain-heart infusion and tryptic soy broths. These results suggested that protein degradation products by AprA were utilized for pyocyanin production. Protein-rich media were used in subsequent validation studies. Similar results were obtained when the basal medium was supplemented with casein or skim milk as the sole organic nitrogen source. However, gelatin failed to induce abundant pyocyanin production in the complemented strain, despite the presence of protein degradation products by AprA as assessed by SDS-PAGE. Thus, gelatin degradation products may not be suitable for pyocyanin synthesis. In conclusion, AprA could contribute to pyocyanin production in the presence of several proteins or peptides. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Complexity of resistance mechanisms to imipenem in intensive care unit strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Damien; Richardot, Charlotte; Müller, Emeline; Robert-Nicoud, Marjorie; Llanes, Catherine; Plésiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can become resistant to carbapenems by both intrinsic (mutation-driven) and transferable (β-lactamase-based) mechanisms. Knowledge of the prevalence of these various mechanisms is important in intensive care units (ICUs) in order to define optimal prevention and therapeutic strategies. A total of 109 imipenem-non-susceptible (MIC >4 mg/L) strains of P. aeruginosa were collected in June 2010 from the ICUs of 26 French public hospitals. Their resistance mechanisms were characterized by phenotypic, enzymatic, western blotting and molecular methods. Single or associated imipenem resistance mechanisms were identified among the 109 strains. Seven isolates (6.4%) were found to produce a metallo-β-lactamase (one VIM-1, four VIM-2, one VIM-4 and one IMP-29). Porin OprD was lost in 94 (86.2%) strains as a result of mutations or gene disruption by various insertion sequences (ISPa1635, ISPa1328, IS911, ISPs1, IS51, IS222 and ISPa41). Thirteen other strains were shown to be regulatory mutants in which down-regulation of oprD was coupled with overexpressed efflux pumps CzcCBA (n = 1), MexXY (n = 9) and MexEF-OprN (n = 3). The lack of OprD was due to disruption of the oprD promoter by ISPsy2 in one strain and alteration of the porin signal sequence in another. Imipenem resistance in ICU P. aeruginosa strains may result from multiple mechanisms involving metallo-β-lactamase gene acquisition and genetic events (mutations and ISs) inactivating oprD, turning down its expression while increasing efflux activities or preventing insertion of porin OprD in the outer membrane. This diversity of mechanisms allows P. aeruginosa, more than any other nosocomial pathogen, to rapidly adapt to carbapenems in ICUs.

  11. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N.; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials

  12. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Jaenicke, Elmar [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Jakob Welder Weg 26, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schnell, Robert [Karolinska Institutet, 17 177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brenk, Ruth, E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  13. Determination quercetin content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of genotype mutant Samosir shallots irradiated by gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinuraya, M.; Hanafiah, D. S.; Romulo, A.; Barus, A.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the research was to study the variation in antioxidant and antimicrobial activity as well as the total quercetin content of the fifth generation genotypes mutant Samosir shallot irradiated by gamma rays. The studies conducted included the assessment of quercetin content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity in shallot bulbs after long-term storage (6 months in the room temperature). Quercetin content of 20 selected genotype mutants of irradiated shallot bulbs along with untreated populations were calculated using quercetin (QU) as a standard. Antioxidant activities of 8 genotype mutant were determined using DPPH. Antimicrobial activity of bulb extracts were tested against six bacteria including Staphylococcus aurous, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae and oneyeastCandida albicans. The results showed that population of genotype mutants irradiated with dosage 2Gy, 4 Gy, 5 Gy and 6 Gy have higher quercetin content than control samples. None of the genotype mutants exhibited antibacterial inhibitory against all microorganism tested except for the sample number 2 and 6 (bulbs generated from the plants irradiated by gamma rays with dosage at 2 Gy and 6 Gy). There was also none of the genotypes observed exhibited significant antioxidant efficacy.

  14. Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Activity and Machine Learning Classification Analysis of Essential Oils from Different Mediterranean Plants against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Artini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism and opportunistic pathogen that can cause persistent infections due to its peculiar antibiotic resistance mechanisms and to its ability to adhere and form biofilm. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of biofilm formation has recently increased. The aim of this study was to seek new non-biocidal agents able to inhibit biofilm formation, in order to counteract virulence rather than bacterial growth and avoid the selection of escape mutants. Herein, different essential oils extracted from Mediterranean plants were analyzed for their activity against P. aeruginosa. Results show that they were able to destabilize biofilm at very low concentration without impairing bacterial viability. Since the action is not related to a bacteriostatic/bactericidal activity on P. aeruginosa, the biofilm change of growth in presence of the essential oils was possibly due to a modulation of the phenotype. To this aim, application of machine learning algorithms led to the development of quantitative activity–composition relationships classification models that allowed to direct point out those essential oil chemical components more involved in the inhibition of biofilm production. The action of selected essential oils on sessile phenotype make them particularly interesting for possible applications such as prevention of bacterial contamination in the community and in healthcare environments in order to prevent human infections. We assayed 89 samples of different essential oils as P. aeruginosa anti-biofilm. Many samples inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm at concentrations as low as 48.8 µg/mL. Classification of the models was developed through machine learning algorithms.

  15. Phosphate limitation induces the intergeneric inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Serratia marcescens isolated from paper machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Pei-An; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Graumann, Peter L; Tu, Jenn

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate is an essential nutrient for heterotrophic bacteria, affecting bacterioplankton in aquatic ecosystems and bacteria in biofilms. However, the influence of phosphate limitation on bacterial competition and biofilm development in multispecies populations has received limited attention in existing studies. To address this issue, we isolated 13 adhesive bacteria from paper machine aggregates. Intergeneric inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa WW5 by Serratia marcescens WW4 was identified under phosphate-limited conditions, but not in Luria–Bertani medium or M9 minimal medium. The viable numbers of the pure S. marcescens WW4 culture decreased over 3 days in the phosphate-limited medium; however, the mortality of S. marcescens WW4 was significantly reduced when it was co-cultured with P. aeruginosa WW5, which appeared to sustain the S. marcescens WW4 biofilm. In contrast, viable P. aeruginosa WW5 cells immediately declined in the phosphate-limited co-culture. To identify the genetic/inhibitory element(s) involved in this process, we inserted a mini-Tn5 mutant of S. marcescens WW4 that lacked inhibitory effect. The results showed that an endonuclease bacteriocin was involved in this intergeneric inhibition by S. marcescens WW4 under phosphate limitation. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of nutrient limitation in bacterial interactions and provides a strong candidate gene for future functional characterisation. PMID:23398522

  16. SuhB Is a Regulator of Multiple Virulence Genes and Essential for Pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kewei; Xu, Chang; Jin, Yongxin; Sun, Ziyu; Liu, Chang; Shi, Jing; Chen, Gukui; Chen, Ronghao; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT During initial colonization and chronic infection, pathogenic bacteria encounter distinct host environments. Adjusting gene expression accordingly is essential for the pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has evolved complicated regulatory networks to regulate different sets of virulence factors to facilitate colonization and persistence. The type III secretion system (T3SS) and motility are associated with acute infections, while biofilm formation and the type VI secretion system (T6SS) are associated with chronic persistence. To identify novel regulatory genes required for pathogenesis, we screened a P. aeruginosa transposon (Tn) insertion library and found suhB to be an essential gene for the T3SS gene expression. The expression of suhB was upregulated in a mouse acute lung infection model, and loss of suhB resulted in avirulence. Suppression of T3SS gene expression in the suhB mutant is linked to a defective translation of the T3SS master regulator, ExsA. Further studies demonstrated that suhB mutation led to the upregulation of GacA and its downstream small RNAs, RsmY and RsmZ, triggering T6SS expression and biofilm formation while inhibiting the T3SS. Our results demonstrate that an in vivo-inducible gene, suhB, reciprocally regulates genes associated with acute and chronic infections and plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. PMID:24169572

  17. Molecular Determinants of the Thickened Matrix in a Dual-Species Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehoon; Lee, Kang-Mu; Kim, Donggeun; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that inhabit various surfaces and are surrounded by extracellular matrices (ECMs). Clinical microbiologists have shown that the majority of chronic infections are caused by biofilms, following the introduction of the first biofilm infection model by J. W. Costerton and colleagues (J. Lam, R. Chan, K. Lam, and J. W. Costerton, Infect Immun 28:546-556, 1980). However, treatments for chronic biofilm infections are still limited to surgical removal of the infected sites. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis are two frequently identified bacterial species in biofilm infections; nevertheless, the interactions between these two species, especially during biofilm growth, are not clearly understood. In this study, we observed phenotypic changes in a dual-species biofilm of P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis , including a dramatic increase in biofilm matrix thickness. For clear elucidation of the spatial distribution of the dual-species biofilm, P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis were labeled with red and green fluorescence, respectively. E. faecalis was located at the lower part of the dual-species biofilm, while P. aeruginosa developed a structured biofilm on the upper part. Mutants with altered exopolysaccharide (EPS) productions were constructed in order to determine the molecular basis for the synergistic effect of the dual-species biofilm. Increased biofilm matrix thickness was associated with EPSs, not extracellular DNA. In particular, Pel and Psl contributed to interspecies and intraspecies interactions, respectively, in the dual-species P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis biofilm. Accordingly, targeting Pel and Psl might be an effective part of eradicating P. aeruginosa polymicrobial biofilms. IMPORTANCE Chronic infection is a serious problem in the medical field. Scientists have observed that chronic infections are closely associated with biofilms, and the vast majority of infection-causing biofilms are polymicrobial. Many studies

  18. RpoN Modulates Carbapenem Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa through Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal and PqsE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiji; Amoh, Takashi; Ono, Tsuneko; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to rapidly modulate its response to antibiotic stress and persist in the presence of antibiotics is closely associated with the process of cell-to-cell signaling. The alternative sigma factor RpoN (σ54) is involved in the regulation of quorum sensing (QS) and plays an important role in the survival of stationary-phase cells in the presence of carbapenems. Here, we demonstrate that a ΔrpoN mutant grown in nutrient-rich medium has increased expression of pqsA, pqsH, and pqsR throughout growth, resulting in the increased production of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). The link between pqsA and its role in carbapenem tolerance was studied using a ΔrpoN ΔpqsA mutant, in which the carbapenem-tolerant phenotype of the ΔrpoN mutant was abolished. In addition, we demonstrate that another mechanism leading to carbapenem tolerance in the ΔrpoN mutant is mediated through pqsE. Exogenously supplied PQS abolished the biapenem-sensitive phenotype of the ΔrpoN ΔpqsA mutant, and overexpression of pqsE failed to alter the susceptibility of the ΔrpoN ΔpqsA mutant to biapenem. The mutations in the ΔrpoN ΔrhlR mutant and the ΔrpoN ΔpqsH mutant led to susceptibility to biapenem. Comparison of the changes in the expression of the genes involved in QS in wild-type PAO1 with their expression in the ΔrpoN mutant and the ΔrpoN mutant-derived strains demonstrated the regulatory effect of RpoN on the transcript levels of rhlR, vqsR, and rpoS. The findings of this study demonstrate that RpoN negatively regulates the expression of PQS in nutrient-rich medium and provide evidence that RpoN interacts with pqsA, pqsE, pqsH, and rhlR in response to antibiotic stress. PMID:27431228

  19. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type I-F CRISPR-Cas Adaptation Determined Using a Biofilm Enrichment Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heussler, Gary E; Miller, Jon L; Price, Courtney E; Collins, Alan J; O'Toole, George A

    2016-11-15

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas (CRISPR-associated protein) systems are diverse and found in many archaea and bacteria. These systems have mainly been characterized as adaptive immune systems able to protect against invading mobile genetic elements, including viruses. The first step in this protection is acquisition of spacer sequences from the invader DNA and incorporation of those sequences into the CRISPR array, termed CRISPR adaptation. Progress in understanding the mechanisms and requirements of CRISPR adaptation has largely been accomplished using overexpression of cas genes or plasmid loss assays; little work has focused on endogenous CRISPR-acquired immunity from viral predation. Here, we developed a new biofilm-based assay system to enrich for Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with new spacer acquisition. We used this assay to demonstrate that P. aeruginosa rapidly acquires spacers protective against DMS3vir, an engineered lytic variant of the Mu-like bacteriophage DMS3, through primed CRISPR adaptation from spacers present in the native CRISPR2 array. We found that for the P. aeruginosa type I-F system, the cas1 gene is required for CRISPR adaptation, recG contributes to (but is not required for) primed CRISPR adaptation, recD is dispensable for primed CRISPR adaptation, and finally, the ability of a putative priming spacer to prime can vary considerably depending on the specific sequences of the spacer. Our understanding of CRISPR adaptation has expanded largely through experiments in type I CRISPR systems using plasmid loss assays, mutants of Escherichia coli, or cas1-cas2 overexpression systems, but there has been little focus on studying the adaptation of endogenous systems protecting against a lytic bacteriophage. Here we describe a biofilm system that allows P. aeruginosa to rapidly gain spacers protective against a lytic bacteriophage. This approach has allowed us to probe the requirements for CRISPR adaptation in

  20. Cross-Regulation between the phz1 and phz2 Operons Maintain a Balanced Level of Phenazine Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinna Cui

    Full Text Available Gene duplication often provides selective advantages for the survival of microorganisms in adapting to varying environmental conditions. P. aeruginosa PAO1 possesses two seven-gene operons [phz1 (phzA1B1C1D1E1F1G1 and phz2 (phzA2B2C2D2E2F2G2] that are involved in the biosynthesis of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and its derivatives. Although the two operons are highly homologous and their functions are well known, it is unclear how the two phz operons coordinate their expressions to maintain the phenazine biosynthesis. By constructing single and double deletion mutants of the two phz operons, we found that the phz1-deletion mutant produced the same or less amount of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin in GA medium than the phz2-knockout mutant while the phz1-phz2 double knockout mutant did not produce any phenazines. By generating phzA1 and phzA2 translational and transcriptional fusions with a truncated lacZ reporter, we found that the expression of the phz1 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and did not alter at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz2 operon. Surprisingly, the expression the phz2 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and only moderately at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz1 operon. Our findings suggested that a complex cross-regulation existed between the phz1 and phz2 operons. By mediating the upregulation of one phz operon expression while the other was deleted, this crosstalk would maintain the homeostatic balance of phenazine biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  1. Effect of Ti doping on magnetic properties and magnetoresistance in LaSr2Mn2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, J.; Che, P.; Wang, J.P.; Lu, M.F.; Liu, J.F.; Cao, X.Q.; Meng, J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Ti substitution for Mn on magnetic and transport properties has been investigated for layered manganese oxides LaSr 2 Mn 2-x Ti x O 7 . Titanium doping hampered the canted antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange at low temperature and their Neel temperature (T N ) decreased from 138 K (x = 0) to 106 K (x = 0.1). Meanwhile, spin glass, charge ordering and metal-insulator transition are suppressed by Ti addition. This can be attributed to Mn-site disorder caused by random substitution of Ti 4+ . The suppression of charge ordering leads to magntetoresistance (MR) ratio increase and MR reaches maximum at x = 0.3. The resistivity increases obviously with x increasing because of double exchange interaction channel broken by Ti 4+ addition. The resistivity of all samples in low temperature range fits to the Mott's variable range hopping (VRH) model, while it fits to nearest neighbor hopping of small polarons model in high temperature range. We also found that both disorder and distortion in A-site and B-site will induce the similar effect to electrical and magnetic properties

  2. Cell wall glycans and soluble factors determine the interactions between the hyphae of Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alexandra; Barnes, Julia D; Mackenzie, Kevin S; Odds, Frank C; Gow, Neil A R

    2008-10-01

    The fungus, Candida albicans, and the bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are opportunistic human pathogens that have been coisolated from diverse body sites. Pseudomonas aeruginosa suppresses C. albicans proliferation in vitro and potentially in vivo but it is the C. albicans hyphae that are killed while yeast cells are not. We show that hyphal killing involves both contact-mediated and soluble factors. Bacterial culture filtrates contained heat-labile soluble factors that killed C. albicans hyphae. In cocultures, localized points of hyphal lysis were observed, suggesting that adhesion and subsequent bacteria-mediated cell wall lysis is involved in the killing of C. albicans hyphae. The glycosylation status of the C. albicans cell wall affected the rate of contact-dependent killing because mutants with severely truncated O-linked, but not N-linked, glycans were hypersensitive to Pseudomonas-mediated killing. Deletion of HWP1, ALS3 or HYR1, which encode major hypha-associated cell wall proteins, had no effect on fungal susceptibility.

  3. UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid l-alanine ligase (MurC) inhibition in a tolC mutant Escherichia coli strain leads to cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humnabadkar, Vaishali; Prabhakar, K R; Narayan, Ashwini; Sharma, Sreevalli; Guptha, Supreeth; Manjrekar, Praveena; Chinnapattu, Murugan; Ramachandran, Vasanthi; Hameed, Shahul P; Ravishankar, Sudha; Chatterji, Monalisa

    2014-10-01

    The Mur ligases play an essential role in the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and hence are attractive antibacterial targets. A screen of the AstraZeneca compound library led to the identification of compound A, a pyrazolopyrimidine, as a potent inhibitor of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa MurC. However, cellular activity against E. coli or P. aeruginosa was not observed. Compound A was active against efflux pump mutants of both strains. Experiments using an E. coli tolC mutant revealed accumulation of the MurC substrate and a decrease in the level of product upon treatment with compound A ,: indicating inhibition of MurC enzyme in these cells. Such a modulation was not observed in the E. coli wild-type cells. Further, overexpression of MurC in the E. coli tolC mutant led to an increase in the compound A MIC by ≥16-fold, establishing a correlation between MurC inhibition and cellular activity. In addition, estimation of the intracellular compound A level showed an accumulation of the compound over time in the tolC mutant strain. A significant compound A level was not detected in the wild-type E. coli strain even upon treatment with high concentrations of the compound. Therefore, the lack of MIC and absence of MurC inhibition in wild-type E. coli were possibly due to suboptimal compound concentration as a consequence of a high efflux level and/or poor permeativity of compound A. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Selective proteomic analysis of antibiotic-tolerant cellular subpopulations in pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babin, Brett M.; Atangcho, Lydia; van Eldijk, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    involved in central carbon metabolism. We differentiated the immediate proteomic response, characterized by an increase in flagellar motility, from the long-term adaptive strategy, which included the upregulation of purine synthesis. This targeted, selective analysis of a bacterial subpopulation...... amino acid tagging (BONCAT) method to enable selective proteomic analysis of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm subpopulation. Through controlled expression of a mutant methionyl-tRNA synthetase, we targeted BONCAT labeling to cells in the regions of biofilm microcolonies that showed increased tolerance...... demonstrates how the study of proteome dynamics can enhance our understanding of biofilm heterogeneity and antibiotic tolerance. IMPORTANCE Bacterial growth is frequently characterized by behavioral heterogeneity at the single-cell level. Heterogeneity is especially evident in the physiology of biofilms...

  5. Antinociceptive principle from Curcuma aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Al-Amin, Mohammad; Sayem, Abu Sadat Md.; Siragee, Ismail Hossain; Tunan, Asif Mahmud; Hassan, Fahima; Kabir, Md. Mohiuddin; Sultana, Gazi Nurun Nahar

    2015-01-01

    Background The rhizome of Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb (Zingiberaceae) has been used as a traditional folk medicine for the treatment of rheumatic disorders in Bangladesh. The aim of the current study was the bioassay-guided isolation and purification of an antinociceptive principle from the methanol extract of C. aeruginosa rhizomes. Methods The antinociceptive activity was determined using acetic acid induced writhing and formalin induced licking in the Swiss albino mice to investigate central a...

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate is refractory to Th1 immune response and impedes host immune clearance in a mouse model of acute lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    . The effect of alginate production on pathogenicity was investigated by using an acute lung infection mouse model that compared a non-mucoid P. aeruginosa strain, PAO1, to its constitutive alginate-overproducing derivative, Alg(+) PAOmucA22, and an alginate-defective strain, Alg(-) PAOalgD. Bacterial......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic respiratory pathogen that accounts for most of the morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In CF-affected lungs, the bacteria undergo conversion from a non-mucoid to a non-tractable mucoid phenotype, due to overproduction of alginate...... suspensions were instilled into the left bronchus and examined 24 and 48 h post-infection. The highest bacterial loads and the most severe lung pathology were observed with strain Alg(-) PAOalgD at 24 h post-infection, which may have been due to an increase in expression of bacterial elastase by the mutant...

  7. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    protected animal models from developing chronic lung infection by P. aeruginosa. In the present study, the effects of ginseng on the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms were further investigated in vitro and in vivo. Ginseng aqueous extract at concentrations of 0.5-2.0% did not inhibit the growth of P......Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming...

  8. Elongation factor P is dispensable in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balibar, Carl J; Iwanowicz, Dorothy; Dean, Charles R

    2013-09-01

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is a highly conserved ribosomal initiation factor responsible for stimulating formation of the first peptide bond. Its essentiality has been debated and may differ depending on the organism. Here, we demonstrate that EF-P is dispensable in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa under laboratory growth conditions. Although knockouts are viable, growth rates are diminished compared with wild-type strains. Despite this cost in fitness, these mutants are not more susceptible to a wide range of antibiotics; including ribosome targeting antibiotics, such as lincomycin, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin, which have been shown previously to disrupt EF-P function in vitro. In Pseudomonas, knockout of efp leads to an upregulation of mexX, a phenotype previously observed with other genetic lesions affecting ribosome function and that can be induced by the treatment with antibiotics affecting protein synthesis.

  9. Introduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into a Hospital via Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kominos, Spyros D.; Copeland, Charles E.; Grosiak, Barbara; Postic, Bosko

    1972-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from tomatoes, radishes, celery, carrots, endive, cabbage, cucumbers, onions, and lettuce obtained from the kitchen of a general hospital, with tomatoes yielding both highest frequencies of isolation and highest counts. Presence of P. aeruginosa on the hands of kitchen personnel and cutting boards and knives which they used suggests acquisition of the organism through contact with these vegetables. It is estimated that a patient consuming an average portion of tomato salad might ingest as many as 5 × 103 colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa. Pyocine types of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical specimens were frequently identical to those recovered from vegetables, thus implicating tomatoes and other vegetables as an important source and vehicle by which P. aeruginosa colonizes the intestinal tract of patients. PMID:4628795

  10. Occurrence of pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguntibeju, O.O.; Nwobu, R.A.U.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection. Results: Out of the 60 bacterial isolates found in post-operative wound infection, 20 (33.3%) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Staphylococcus aureus 13(21.7%), Klebsiella species 10(16.7%), Escherichia coli 7(11.7%), Atypical coliform 4(6.7%), Proteus species 4(6.7%), Streptococcus pyogenes 1(1.7%) and Enterococcus faecalis 1(1.7%) in the order. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was higher in female than male, ratio 3:2 and was found more among young and elderly debilitated patients. The in vitro sensitivity pattern of 20 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed colistin (100%), gentamicin (75%), streptomycin (30%), and tetracycline (10%). Conclusion: The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an agent of nosocomial infection is re-emphasised. (author)

  11. Motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to SOS-inducible biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappa, Shakinah T; Maredia, Reshma; Phipps, Kara; Haskins, William E; Weitao, Tao

    2013-12-01

    DNA-damaging antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin induce biofilm formation and the SOS response through autocleavage of SOS-repressor LexA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the biofilm-SOS connection remains poorly understood. It was investigated with 96-well and lipid biofilm assays. The effects of ciprofloxacin were examined on biofilm stimulation of the SOS mutant and wild-type strains. The stimulation observed in the wild-type in which SOS was induced was reduced in the mutant in which LexA was made non-cleavable (LexAN) and thus SOS non-inducible. Therefore, the stimulation appeared to involve SOS. The possible mechanisms of inducible biofilm formation were explored by subproteomic analysis of outer membrane fractions extracted from biofilms. The data predicted an inhibitory role of LexA in flagellum function. This premise was tested first by functional and morphological analyses of flagellum-based motility. The flagellum swimming motility decreased in the LexAN strain treated with ciprofloxacin. Second, the motility-biofilm assay was performed, which tested cell migration and biofilm formation. The results showed that wild-type biofilm increased significantly over the LexAN. These results suggest that LexA repression of motility, which is the initial event in biofilm development, contributes to repression of SOS-inducible biofilm formation. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel indole compound that inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth by targeting MreB is a substrate for MexAB-OprM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Gregory T; Doyle, Timothy B; Du, Qun; Duncan, Leonard; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E; Lynch, A Simon

    2007-10-01

    Drug efflux systems contribute to the intrinsic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to many antibiotics and biocides and hamper research focused on the discovery and development of new antimicrobial agents targeted against this important opportunistic pathogen. Using a P. aeruginosa PAO1 derivative bearing deletions of opmH, encoding an outer membrane channel for efflux substrates, and four efflux pumps belonging to the resistance nodulation/cell division class including mexAB-oprM, we identified a small-molecule indole-class compound (CBR-4830) that is inhibitory to growth of this efflux-compromised strain. Genetic studies established MexAB-OprM as the principal pump for CBR-4830 and revealed MreB, a prokaryotic actin homolog, as the proximal cellular target of CBR-4830. Additional studies establish MreB as an essential protein in P. aeruginosa, and efflux-compromised strains treated with CBR-4830 transition to coccoid shape, consistent with MreB inhibition or depletion. Resistance genetics further suggest that CBR-4830 interacts with the putative ATP-binding pocket in MreB and demonstrate significant cross-resistance with A22, a structurally unrelated compound that has been shown to promote rapid dispersion of MreB filaments in vivo. Interestingly, however, ATP-dependent polymerization of purified recombinant P. aeruginosa MreB is blocked in vitro in a dose-dependent manner by CBR-4830 but not by A22. Neither compound exhibits significant inhibitory activity against mutant forms of MreB protein that bear mutations identified in CBR-4830-resistant strains. Finally, employing the strains and reagents prepared and characterized during the course of these studies, we have begun to investigate the ability of analogues of CBR-4830 to inhibit the growth of both efflux-proficient and efflux-compromised P. aeruginosa through specific inhibition of MreB function.

  13. High-resolution time series of Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene expression and rhamnolipid secretion through growth curve synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier João B

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online spectrophotometric measurements allow monitoring dynamic biological processes with high-time resolution. Contrastingly, numerous other methods require laborious treatment of samples and can only be carried out offline. Integrating both types of measurement would allow analyzing biological processes more comprehensively. A typical example of this problem is acquiring quantitative data on rhamnolipid secretion by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa cell growth can be measured by optical density (OD600 and gene expression can be measured using reporter fusions with a fluorescent protein, allowing high time resolution monitoring. However, measuring the secreted rhamnolipid biosurfactants requires laborious sample processing, which makes this an offline measurement. Results Here, we propose a method to integrate growth curve data with endpoint measurements of secreted metabolites that is inspired by a model of exponential cell growth. If serial diluting an inoculum gives reproducible time series shifted in time, then time series of endpoint measurements can be reconstructed using calculated time shifts between dilutions. We illustrate the method using measured rhamnolipid secretion by P. aeruginosa as endpoint measurements and we integrate these measurements with high-resolution growth curves measured by OD600 and expression of rhamnolipid synthesis genes monitored using a reporter fusion. Two-fold serial dilution allowed integrating rhamnolipid measurements at a ~0.4 h-1 frequency with high-time resolved data measured at a 6 h-1 frequency. We show how this simple method can be used in combination with mutants lacking specific genes in the rhamnolipid synthesis or quorum sensing regulation to acquire rich dynamic data on P. aeruginosa virulence regulation. Additionally, the linear relation between the ratio of inocula and the time-shift between curves produces high-precision measurements of

  14. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasion and cytotoxicity are independent events, both of which involve protein tyrosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D J; Frank, D W; Finck-Barbançon, V; Wu, C; Fleiszig, S M

    1998-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates exhibit invasive or cytotoxic phenotypes. Cytotoxic strains acquire some of the characteristics of invasive strains when a regulatory gene, exsA, that controls the expression of several extracellular proteins, is inactivated. exsA mutants are not cytotoxic and can be detected within epithelial cells by gentamicin survival assays. The purpose of this study was to determine whether epithelial cell invasion precedes and/or is essential for cytotoxicity. This was tested by measuring invasion (gentamicin survival) and cytotoxicity (trypan blue staining) of PA103 mutants deficient in specific exsA-regulated proteins and by testing the effect of drugs that inhibit invasion for their effect on cytotoxicity. A transposon mutant in the exsA-regulated extracellular factor exoU was neither cytotoxic nor invasive. Furthermore, several of the drugs that inhibited invasion did not prevent cytotoxicity. These results show that invasion and cytotoxicity are mutually exclusive events, inversely regulated by an exsA-encoded invasion inhibitor(s). Both involve host cell protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity, but they differ in that invasion requires Src family tyrosine kinases and calcium-calmodulin activity. PTK inhibitor drugs such as genistein may have therapeutic potential through their ability to block both invasive and cytotoxicity pathways via an action on the host cell.

  16. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chitinase, a gradually secreted protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folders, J; Algra, J; Roelofs, M S; van Loon, L C; Tommassen, J; Bitter, W

    2001-12-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes many proteins into its extracellular environment via the type I, II, and III secretion systems. In this study, a gene, chiC, coding for an extracellular chitinolytic enzyme, was identified. The chiC gene encodes a polypeptide of 483 amino acid residues, without a typical N-terminal signal sequence. Nevertheless, an N-terminal segment of 11 residues was found to be cleaved off in the secreted protein. The protein shows sequence similarity to the secreted chitinases ChiC of Serratia marcescens, ChiA of Vibrio harveyi, and ChiD of Bacillus circulans and consists of an activity domain and a chitin-binding domain, which are separated by a fibronectin type III domain. ChiC was able to bind and degrade colloidal chitin and was active on the artificial substrates carboxymethyl-chitin-Remazol Brilliant Violet and p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose, but not on p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N-acetylglucosamine, indicating that it is an endochitinase. Expression of the chiC gene appears to be regulated by the quorum-sensing system of P. aeruginosa, since this gene was not expressed in a lasIR vsmI mutant. After overnight growth, the majority of the ChiC produced was found intracellularly, whereas only small amounts were detected in the culture medium. However, after several days, the cellular pool of ChiC was largely depleted, and the protein was found in the culture medium. This release could not be ascribed to cell lysis. Since ChiC did not appear to be secreted via any of the known secretion systems, a novel secretion pathway seems to be involved.

  17. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  18. The Crc protein participates in down-regulation of the Lon gene to promote rhamnolipid production and rhl quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nana; Ding, Shuting; Chen, Feifei; Zhang, Xue; Xia, Yongjie; Di, Hongxia; Cao, Qiao; Deng, Xin; Wu, Min; Wong, Catherine C L; Tian, Xiao-Xu; Yang, Cai-Guang; Zhao, Jing; Lan, Lefu

    2015-05-01

    Rhamnolipid acts as a virulence factor during Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Here, we show that deletion of the catabolite repression control (crc) gene in P. aeruginosa leads to a rhamnolipid-negative phenotype. This effect is mediated by the down-regulation of rhl quorum sensing (QS). We discover that a disruption of the gene encoding the Lon protease entirely offsets the effect of crc deletion on the production of both rhamnolipid and rhl QS signal C4-HSL. Crc is unable to bind lon mRNA in vitro in the absence of the RNA chaperon Hfq, while Crc contributes to Hfq-mediated repression of the lon gene expression at a posttranscriptional level. Deletion of crc, which results in up-regulation of lon, significantly reduces the in vivo stability and abundance of the RhlI protein that synthesizes C4-HSL, causing the attenuation of rhl QS. Lon is also capable of degrading the RhlI protein in vitro. In addition, constitutive expression of rhlI suppresses the defects of the crc deletion mutant in rhamnolipid, C4-HSL and virulence on lettuce leaves. This study therefore uncovers a novel posttranscriptional regulatory cascade, Crc-Hfq/Lon/RhlI, for the regulation of rhamnolipid production and rhl QS in P. aeruginosa. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. Mechanism of antibiotic resistance and target of the humoral immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and the occurrence of high beta-lactamase producing strains and between the MIC of the beta-lactams and the levels of beta-lactamase expression. Partially derepressed mutants, characterized by high basal levels of beta-lactamase with the possibility...... of induction to even higher levels during treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics, were the most frequent phenotype found among resistant Danish P. aeruginosa CF isolates. We have also shown that the high alginate producing P. aeruginosa isolates, that characterize the chronic lung infection in CF patients......, are more susceptible to antibiotics and produce less beta-lactamase than the non-mucoid paired isolates. We propose that the non-mucoid isolates are exposed to a relatively higher antibiotic pressure than the mucoid isolates and therefore, they become easily antibiotic resistant and in consequence produce...

  1. Experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino sinusitis in mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S.; Hammer, A. S.; Høiby, N.

    2017-01-01

    The nasal and sinus cavities in children may serve as reservoirs for microorganisms that cause recurrent and chronic lung infections. This study evaluates whether the mink can be used as an animal model for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis since there is no suitable...... in the infected mink shows features of carbohydrate expression comparable to what has been described in the respiratory system after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in humans. It is suggested that the mink is suitable for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis....

  2. Current therapies for pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamarellou, Helen; Kanellakopoulou, Kyriaki

    2008-04-01

    Based on the worldwide prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains of Pseudomas aeruginosa and the fact that no newer antipseudomonal agents are available, this article aims to investigate therapeutic solutions for combating infections caused by P aeruginosa, including multidrug-resistant strains. The article focuses mainly on colistin, the re-emerging old antibiotic that possesses prominent antipseudomonal activity in vitro and on doripenem, a newer carbapenem that seems to be close to its global marketing. Regarding older antipseudomonal antibiotics that have been reviewed extensively, only newer aspects on their use are considered in this article.

  3. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S using a yeast phenotypic screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Arnoldo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that is a key factor in the mortality of cystic fibrosis patients, and infection represents an increased threat for human health worldwide. Because resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is increasing, new inhibitors of pharmacologically validated targets of this bacterium are needed. Here we demonstrate that a cell-based yeast phenotypic assay, combined with a large-scale inhibitor screen, identified small molecule inhibitors that can suppress the toxicity caused by heterologous expression of selected Pseudomonas aeruginosa ORFs. We identified the first small molecule inhibitor of Exoenzyme S (ExoS, a toxin involved in Type III secretion. We show that this inhibitor, exosin, modulates ExoS ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in vitro, suggesting the inhibition is direct. Moreover, exosin and two of its analogues display a significant protective effect against Pseudomonas infection in vivo. Furthermore, because the assay was performed in yeast, we were able to demonstrate that several yeast homologues of the known human ExoS targets are likely ADP-ribosylated by the toxin. For example, using an in vitro enzymatic assay, we demonstrate that yeast Ras2p is directly modified by ExoS. Lastly, by surveying a collection of yeast deletion mutants, we identified Bmh1p, a yeast homologue of the human FAS, as an ExoS cofactor, revealing that portions of the bacterial toxin mode of action are conserved from yeast to human. Taken together, our integrated cell-based, chemical-genetic approach demonstrates that such screens can augment traditional drug screening approaches and facilitate the discovery of new compounds against a broad range of human pathogens.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa diversity in distinct paediatric patient groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G.A.; Ent, C.K. van der; Wolfs, T.F.

    2008-01-01

    the other groups. A group of clonal isolates was observed among patients from the CF-chronic and CF-1 groups. These or different clonal isolates were not encountered among the three other patient groups. No characteristic resistance pattern could be identified among isolates from the distinct patient groups......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen that often infects patients who are either immunocompromised or have local defects in host defences. It is known that cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are sometimes infected with certain clonal isolates. It is not clear whether these clonal isolates also infect non......-CF patients and whether clonality of isolates occurs in other patient groups. The aim of this study was to investigate P. aeruginosa diversity and the occurrence of clones within five distinct paediatric patient groups susceptible to P. aeruginosa infection. P. aeruginosa isolates were cultured from 157...

  7. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  8. Secretory IgA as a diagnostic tool for Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanaes, Kasper; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa sinusitis may be the focus for intermittent lung colonization in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The sinusitis may induce elevated IgA levels in nasal secretion and saliva against P. aeruginosa. METHODS: 120 CF patients chronically infected, intermittently...... colonized or without P. aeruginosa in the lungs participated in this cross-sectional study. IgA and IgG against P. aeruginosa sonicate and alginate were measured in nasal secretions, saliva, and in serum by ELISA. RESULTS: The intermittently colonized patients had significantly higher IgA levels in nasal...... secretions and saliva than those without P. aeruginosa in the lungs, indicating that P. aeruginosa sinusitis may precede intermittent colonization and chronic infection of the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: Specific IgA against P. aeruginosa in nasal secretions and saliva can contribute to differentiation between...

  9. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  10. Prevalence and analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chinchillas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoyama Naoki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger are popular as pets and are often used as laboratory animals for various studies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious agent that causes otitis media, pneumonia, septicaemia enteritis, and sudden death in chinchillas. This bacterium is also a leading cause of nosocomial infections in humans. To prevent propagation of P. aeruginosa infection among humans and animals, detailed characteristics of the isolates, including antibiotic susceptibility and genetic features, are needed. In this study, we surveyed P. aeruginosa distribution in chinchillas bred as pets or laboratory animals. We also characterized the isolates from these chinchillas by testing for antibiotic susceptibility and by gene analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41.8% of the 67 chinchillas included in the study. Slide agglutination and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discriminated 5 serotypes and 7 unique patterns, respectively. For the antibiotic susceptibility test, 40.9% of isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, 77.3% to ciprofloxacin, 77.3% to imipenem, and 72.7% to ceftazidime. DNA analyses confirmed that none of the isolates contained the gene encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases; however, 2 of the total 23 isolates were found to have a gene similar to the pilL gene that has been identified in the pathogenicity island of a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa. Conclusions P. aeruginosa is widely spread in chinchillas, including strains with reduced susceptibility to the antibiotics and highly virulent strains. The periodic monitoring should be performed to help prevent the propagation of this pathogen and reduce the risk of infection from chinchillas to humans.

  11. Structure and Function of the PiuA and PirA Siderophore-Drug Receptors from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynié, Lucile; Luscher, Alexandre; Rolo, Dora; Pletzer, Daniel; Tortajada, Antoni; Weingart, Helge; Braun, Yvonne; Page, Malcolm G P; Naismith, James H; Köhler, Thilo

    2017-04-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria presents an efficient barrier to the permeation of antimicrobial molecules. One strategy pursued to circumvent this obstacle is to hijack transport systems for essential nutrients, such as iron. BAL30072 and MC-1 are two monobactams conjugated to a dihydroxypyridone siderophore that are active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of these molecules in A. baumannii We identified two novel TonB-dependent receptors, termed Ab -PiuA and Ab -PirA, that are required for the antimicrobial activity of both agents. Deletion of either piuA or pirA in A. baumannii resulted in 4- to 8-fold-decreased susceptibility, while their overexpression in the heterologous host P. aeruginosa increased susceptibility to the two siderophore-drug conjugates by 4- to 32-fold. The crystal structures of PiuA and PirA from A. baumannii and their orthologues from P. aeruginosa were determined. The structures revealed similar architectures; however, structural differences between PirA and PiuA point to potential differences between their cognate siderophore ligands. Spontaneous mutants, selected upon exposure to BAL30072, harbored frameshift mutations in either the ExbD3 or the TonB3 protein of A. baumannii , forming the cytoplasmic-membrane complex providing the energy for the siderophore translocation process. The results of this study provide insight for the rational design of novel siderophore-drug conjugates against problematic Gram-negative pathogens. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  13. Ap-PCR typing of carbapenem sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study the antibiotic susceptibility of 51 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical samples were detected by the disc diffusion test. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa strains were found as respectively 55% amicacin, 43% aztreonam, 75% netilmycin, 68% sefepim, 73% ceftazidim, 76% ciproflaxacin, 37% gentamicin, ...

  14. Mutant with diphtheria toxin receptor and acidification function but defective in entry of toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Kenji; Hayes, H.; Mekada, Eisuke; Uchida, Tsuyoshi

    1987-01-01

    A mutant of Chinese hamster ovary cells, GE1, that is highly resistant to diphtheria toxin was isolated. The mutant contains 50% ADP-ribosylatable elongation factor 2, but its protein synthesis was not inhibited by the toxin even at concentrations above 100 μg/ml. 125 I-labeled diphtheria toxin was associated with GE1 cells as well as with the parent cells but did not block protein synthesis of GE1 cells even when the cells were exposed to low pH in the presence or absence of NH 4 Cl. The infections of GE1 cells and the parent cells by vesicular stomatitis virus were similar. GE1 cells were cross-resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and so were about 1,000 times more resistant to this toxin than the parent cells. Hybrids of GE1 cells and the parent cells or mutant cells lacking a functional receptor were more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than GE1 cells. These results suggest that entry of diphtheria toxin into cells requires a cellular factor(s) in addition to those involved in receptor function and acidification of endosomes and that GE1 cells do not express this cellular factor. This character is recessive in GE1 cells

  15. A Carbenicillin R Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of 64 carbenicillin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains 40 transferred this resistance to Escherichia coli. R factor RP-638 isolated from Ps. aeruginosa strain 638 conferred resistance to ampicillin, carbenicillin, kanamycin, neomycin and tetracycline. This R factor was transferred at frequencies 01 10-7 to 10-4 between ...

  16. Interactions between the antimicrobial agent triclosan and the bloom-forming cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiaolong; Tu, Yenan; Song, Chaofeng; Li, Tiancui; Lin, Juan; Wu, Yonghong; Liu, Jiantong; Wu, Chenxi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Triclosan inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of M. aeruginosa at environmental relevant level. • TEM imaging showed destruction of M. aeruginosa cell ultrastructure during triclosan exposure. • Triclosan can be biotransformed by M. aeruginosa with methylation as a major pathway. • Presence of M. aeruginosa enhanced the photodegradation of triclosan. - Abstract: Cyanobacteria can co-exist in eutrophic waters with chemicals or other substances derived from personal care products discharged in wastewater. In this work, we investigate the interactions between the antimicrobial agent triclosan (TCS) and the bloom-forming cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa. M. aeruginosa was very sensitive to TCS with the 96 h lowest observed effect concentration of 1.0 and 10 μg/L for inhibition of growth and photosynthetic activity, respectively. Exposure to TCS at environmentally relevant levels (0.1–2.0 μg/L) also affected the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the generation of reduced glutathione (GSH), while microcystin production was not affected. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination showed the destruction of M. aeruginosa cell ultrastructure during TCS exposure. TCS however, can be biotransformed by M. aeruginosa with methylation as a major biotransformation pathway. Furthermore, the presence of M. aeruginosa in solution promoted the photodegradation of TCS. Overall, our results demonstrate that M. aeruginosa plays an important role in the dissipation of TCS in aquatic environments but high residual TCS can exert toxic effects on M. aeruginosa.

  17. Interactions between the antimicrobial agent triclosan and the bloom-forming cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaolong [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wuhan Zhongke Hydrobiological Environment Engineering Co., Ltd, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tu, Yenan; Song, Chaofeng; Li, Tiancui; Lin, Juan [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu, Yonghong [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Liu, Jiantong [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, Chenxi, E-mail: chenxi.wu@ihb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Triclosan inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of M. aeruginosa at environmental relevant level. • TEM imaging showed destruction of M. aeruginosa cell ultrastructure during triclosan exposure. • Triclosan can be biotransformed by M. aeruginosa with methylation as a major pathway. • Presence of M. aeruginosa enhanced the photodegradation of triclosan. - Abstract: Cyanobacteria can co-exist in eutrophic waters with chemicals or other substances derived from personal care products discharged in wastewater. In this work, we investigate the interactions between the antimicrobial agent triclosan (TCS) and the bloom-forming cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa. M. aeruginosa was very sensitive to TCS with the 96 h lowest observed effect concentration of 1.0 and 10 μg/L for inhibition of growth and photosynthetic activity, respectively. Exposure to TCS at environmentally relevant levels (0.1–2.0 μg/L) also affected the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the generation of reduced glutathione (GSH), while microcystin production was not affected. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination showed the destruction of M. aeruginosa cell ultrastructure during TCS exposure. TCS however, can be biotransformed by M. aeruginosa with methylation as a major biotransformation pathway. Furthermore, the presence of M. aeruginosa in solution promoted the photodegradation of TCS. Overall, our results demonstrate that M. aeruginosa plays an important role in the dissipation of TCS in aquatic environments but high residual TCS can exert toxic effects on M. aeruginosa.

  18. Carbapenem Susceptibility and Multidrug-Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Hany; Hanora, Amro; Abdalla, Salah; Shawky, Alaa; Saad, Alaa

    2016-11-01

    Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious concern for antimicrobial therapy, as the common isolates exhibit variable grades of resistance, involving beta-lactamase enzymes, beside native defense mechanisms. The present study was designed to determine the occurrence of Metallo-β- Lactamases (MBL) and Amp C harboring P. aeruginosa isolates from Suez Canal university hospital in Ismailia, Egypt. A total of 147 P. aeruginosa isolates, recovered from 311 patients during a 10-month period, were collected between May 2013 and February 2014; the isolates were collected from urine, wound and sputum. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined by agar dilution methods was ≥2 μg/mL for meropenem and imipenem. Identification of P. aeruginosa was confirmed using API 20NE. Metallo-β- Lactamases and Amp C were detected based on different phenotypic methods. Overall, 26.5% of P. aeruginosa isolates (39/147) were carbapenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 64.1% (25/39) were MBL producers, these isolates were screened by the combined disc and disc diffusion methods to determine the ability of MBL production. Both MBL and Amp C harbored P. aeruginosa isolates were 28% (7/25). Sixty-four percent of P. aeruginosa isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) (16/25). The sensitivity toward polymyxin, imipenem, norfloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam and gentamicin was 99%, 91%, 88%, 82% and 78%, respectively. The resistance rate towards cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam and meropenem was 98.6%, 86%, 71.4%, 34% and 30%, respectively. Multidrug resistance was significantly associated with MBL production in P. aeruginosa . Early detection of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa and hospital antibiotic policy prescription helps proper antimicrobial therapy and avoidance of dissemination of these multidrug resistance isolates.

  19. A Rapid Phenotypic Whole Cell Screening Approach for the Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors that Counter Beta-lactamase Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collia, Deanna; Bannister, Thomas D.; Tan, Hao; Jin, Shouguang; Langaee, Taimour; Shumate, Justin; Scampavia, Louis; Spicer, Timothy P.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is prevalent in hospitals and continues to develop resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics. Historically, β-lactam antibiotics have been the first line of therapeutic defense. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of P. aeruginosa, such as AmpC β-lactamase overproducing mutants, limits the effectiveness of current antibiotics. Among AmpC hyper producing clinical isolates, inactivation of AmpG, which is essential for the expression of AmpC, increases bacterial sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. We hypothesize that inhibition of AmpG activity will enhance the efficacy of β-lactams against P. aeruginosa. Here, using a highly drug resistant AmpC inducible laboratory strain PAO1, we describe an ultra-high throughput whole cell turbidity assay designed to identify small molecule inhibitors of the AmpG. We screened 645K compounds to identify compounds with the ability to inhibit bacterial growth in the presence of Cefoxitin; an AmpC inducer, and identified 2,663 inhibitors which were also tested in the absence of Cefoxitin to determine AmpG specificity. The Z′ and S:B were robust at 0.87 ± 0.05 and 2.2 ± 0.2, respectively. Through a series of secondary and tertiary studies, including a novel luciferase based counterscreen, we ultimately identified 8 potential AmpG specific inhibitors. PMID:28850797

  20. Bacteriophage Infectivity Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Saline Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Scarascia, Giantommaso

    2018-05-02

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous member of marine biofilm, and reduces thiosulfate to produce toxic hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, lytic bacteriophages were isolated and applied to inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa in planktonic mode at different temperature, pH, and salinity. Bacteriophages showed optimal infectivity at a multiplicity of infection of 10 in saline conditions, and demonstrated lytic abilities over all tested temperature (25, 30, 37, and 45°C) and pH 6–9. Planktonic P. aeruginosa exhibited significantly longer lag phase and lower specific growth rates upon exposure to bacteriophages. Bacteriophages were subsequently applied to P. aeruginosa-enriched biofilm and were determined to lower the relative abundance of Pseudomonas-related taxa from 0.17 to 5.58% in controls to 0.01–0.61% in treated microbial communities. The relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Pseudoalteromonas, and Planococcaceae decreased, possibly due to the phage-induced disruption of the biofilm matrix. Lastly, when applied to mitigate biofouling of ultrafiltration membranes, bacteriophages were determined to reduce the transmembrane pressure increase by 18% when utilized alone, and by 49% when used in combination with citric acid. The combined treatment was more effective compared with the citric acid treatment alone, which reported ca. 30% transmembrane pressure reduction. Collectively, the findings demonstrated that bacteriophages can be used as a biocidal agent to mitigate undesirable P. aeruginosa-associated problems in seawater applications.

  1. Why Does the Healthy Cornea Resist Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David J.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To provide our perspective on why the cornea is resistant to infection based on our research results with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Perspective We focus on our current understanding of the interplay between bacteria, tear fluid and the corneal epithelium that determine health as the usual outcome, and propose a theoretical model for how contact lens wear might change those interactions to enable susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. Methods Use of “null-infection” in vivo models, cultured human corneal epithelial cells, contact lens-wearing animal models, and bacterial genetics help to elucidate mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa survive at the ocular surface, adheres, and traverses multilayered corneal epithelia. These models also help elucidate the molecular mechanisms of corneal epithelial innate defense. Results and Discussion Tear fluid and the corneal epithelium combine to make a formidable defense against P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Part of that defense involves the expression of antimicrobials such as β-defensins, the cathelicidin LL-37, cytokeratin-derived antimicrobial peptides, and RNase7. Immunomodulators such as SP-D and ST2 also contribute. Innate defenses of the cornea depend in part on MyD88, a key adaptor protein of TLR and IL-1R signaling, but the basal lamina represents the final barrier to bacterial penetration. Overcoming these defenses involves P. aeruginosa adaptation, expression of the type three secretion system, proteases, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on contact lenses. Conclusion After more than two decades of research focused on understanding how contact lens wear predisposes to P. aeruginosa infection, our working hypothesis places blame for microbial keratitis on bacterial adaptation to ocular surface defenses, combined with changes to the biochemistry of the corneal surface caused by trapping bacteria and tear fluid against the cornea under the lens. PMID:23601656

  2. Chromosomally Encoded mcr-5 in Colistin non-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snesrud, Erik; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I; Jones, Anthony R; Hinkle, Mary K; Mc Gann, Patrick

    2018-05-29

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) of historical Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates identified a chromosomal copy of mcr-5 within a Tn 3 -like transposon in P. aeruginosa MRSN 12280. The isolate was non-susceptible to colistin by broth microdilution and genome analysis revealed no mutations known to confer colistin resistance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of mcr in colistin non-susceptible P. aeruginosa .

  3. Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in sputum headspace through volatile organic compound analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goeminne Pieter C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic pulmonary infection is the hallmark of Cystic Fibrosis lung disease. Searching for faster and easier screening may lead to faster diagnosis and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa. Our aim was to analyze and build a model to predict the presence of P. aeruginosa in sputa. Methods Sputa from 28 bronchiectatic patients were used for bacterial culturing and analysis of volatile compounds by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Data analysis and model building were done by Partial Least Squares Regression Discriminant analysis (PLS-DA. Two analysis were performed: one comparing P. aeruginosa positive with negative cultures at study visit (PA model and one comparing chronic colonization according to the Leeds criteria with P. aeruginosa negative patients (PACC model. Results The PA model prediction of P. aeruginosa presence was rather poor, with a high number of false positives and false negatives. On the other hand, the PACC model was stable and explained chronic P. aeruginosa presence for 95% with 4 PLS-DA factors, with a sensitivity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 86% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Conclusion Our study shows the potential for building a prediction model for the presence of chronic P. aeruginosa based on volatiles from sputum.

  4. Evaluation of a FRET-peptide substrate to predict virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy E Kaman

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a number of proteases that are associated with virulence and disease progression. A substrate able to detect P. aeruginosa-specific proteolytic activity could help to rapidly alert clinicians to the virulence potential of individual P. aeruginosa strains. For this purpose we designed a set of P. aeruginosa-specific fluorogenic substrates, comprising fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-labeled peptides, and evaluated their applicability to P. aeruginosa virulence in a range of clinical isolates. A FRET-peptide comprising three glycines (3xGly was found to be specific for the detection of P. aeruginosa proteases. Further screening of 97 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates showed a wide variation in 3xGly cleavage activity. The absence of 3xGly degradation by a lasI knock out strain indicated that 3xGly cleavage by P. aeruginosa could be quorum sensing (QS-related, a hypothesis strengthened by the observation of a strong correlation between 3xGly cleavage, LasA staphylolytic activity and pyocyanin production. Additionally, isolates able to cleave 3xGly were more susceptible to the QS inhibiting antibiotic azithromycin (AZM. In conclusion, we designed and evaluated a 3xGly substrate possibly useful as a simple tool to predict virulence and AZM susceptibility.

  5. Effects of Iron on DNA Release and Biofilm Development by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Barken, Kim Bundvig; Skindersø, Mette Elena

    2007-01-01

    Extracellular DNA is one of the major matrix components in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. It functions as an intercellular connector and plays a role in stabilization of the biofilms. Evidence that DNA release in P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms is controlled by the las-rhl and pqs quorum-sensing sy......Extracellular DNA is one of the major matrix components in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. It functions as an intercellular connector and plays a role in stabilization of the biofilms. Evidence that DNA release in P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms is controlled by the las-rhl and pqs quorum......-sensing systems has been previously presented. This paper provides evidence that DNA release in P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms is also under iron regulation. Experiments involving cultivation of P. aeruginosa in microtitre trays suggested that pqs expression, DNA release and biofilm formation were favoured in media...

  6. Substrate Specificities of MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, and MexXY-OprM Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Nobuhisa; Sakagawa, Eiko; Ohya, Satoshi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Tsujimoto, Hideto; Nishino, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    To find the exact substrate specificities of three species of tripartite efflux systems of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, and MexXY-OprM, we constructed a series of isogenic mutants, each of which constitutively overproduced one of the three efflux systems and lacked the other two, and their isogenic mutants, which lacked all these systems. Comparison of the susceptibilities of the constructed mutants to 52 antimicrobial agents belonging to various groups suggested the following substrate specificities. All of the efflux systems extrude a wide variety of antimicrobial agent groups, i.e., quinolones, macrolides, tetracyclines, lincomycin, chloramphenicol, most penicillins (all but carbenicillin and sulbenicillin), most cephems (all but cefsulodin and ceftazidime), meropenem, and S-4661, but none of them extrude polymyxin B or imipenem. Extrusion of aminoglycosides is specific to MexXY-OprM, and extrusion of a group of the β-lactams, i.e., carbenicillin, sulbenicillin, ceftazidime, moxalactam, and aztreonam, is specific to MexAB-OprM. Moreover, MexAB-OprM and MexCD-OprJ extrude novobiocin, cefsulodin, and flomoxef, while MexXY-OprM does not. These substrate specificities are distinct from those reported previously. PMID:11083635

  7. Genome-wide mapping of the RNA targets of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa riboregulatory protein RsmN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Manuel; Silistre, Hazel; Lovelock, Laura; Wright, Victoria J; Chan, Kok-Gan; Hong, Kar-Wai; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel; Heeb, Stephan

    2018-04-30

    Pseudomonads typically carry multiple non-identical alleles of the post-transcriptional regulator rsmA. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, RsmN is notable in that its structural rearrangement confers distinct and overlapping functions with RsmA. However, little is known about the specificities of RsmN for its target RNAs and overall impact on the biology of this pathogen. We purified and mapped 503 transcripts directly bound by RsmN in P. aeruginosa. About 200 of the mRNAs identified encode proteins of demonstrated function including some determining acute and chronic virulence traits. For example, RsmN reduces biofilm development both directly and indirectly via multiple pathways, involving control of Pel exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and c-di-GMP levels. The RsmN targets identified are also shared with RsmA, although deletion of rsmN generally results in less pronounced phenotypes than those observed for ΔrsmA or ΔrsmArsmNind mutants, probably as a consequence of different binding affinities. Targets newly identified for the Rsm system include the small non-coding RNA CrcZ involved in carbon catabolite repression, for which differential binding of RsmN and RsmA to specific CrcZ regions is demonstrated. The results presented here provide new insights into the intricacy of riboregulatory networks involving multiple but distinct RsmA homologues.

  8. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    in the contact area of A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, but not A. fumigatus. In addition, other metabolites with UV chromophores similar to the phenazines were only found in the contact zone between Aspergillus and Pseudomonas. No change in secondary metabolite profiles were seen for the Aspergilli, when......Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen, commonly infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Aspergilli, especially Aspergillus fumigatus, are also frequently isolated from CF patients. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different...... Aspergillus species. Methods: A suspension of fungal spores was streaked onto WATM agar plates. After 24 hours incubation at 37 °C, a P. aeruginosa overnight culture was streaked out perpendicular to the fungal streak. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for five days, examined and plugs were extracted...

  9. Serotyping and analysis of produced pigments kinds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković-Nedeljković Nataša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is devided into 20 serotypes on the base of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme. P. aeruginosa serotyping is important because of few reasons but epidemiological is the most important. The aim of the study was serotyping of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, analysing of single clinical isolates P. aeruginosa present in the particular samples, and analysing of pyocianin and fluorescin production in different isolates of P. aeruginosa. Methods. A total of 223 isolates of P. aeruginosa, isolated in the microbiological laboratory of the Health Center “Aleksinac”, Aleksinac, were examinated. P. aeruginosa isolates were put on the pseudomonas isolation agar, pseudomonas agar base, acetamid agar, asparagin prolin broth, pseudomonas asparagin broth, Bushnnell-Haas agar, cetrimid agar base, King A and King B plates, plates for pyocianin production, plates for fluorescin production and tripticasa soya agar (Himedia. Polyvalent and monovalent serums were used in the agglutination (Biorad. Pigment production was analysed on the bases of growth on the plates for pyocianin and fluorescin production. Results. Serologically, we identificated the serovars as follows: O1, O3, O4, O5, O6, O7, O8, O10, O11 and O12. O1 (38% was the most often serovar, then O11 (19% and O6 (8.6%. A total of 18.6% (42 isolates did not agglutinate with any serum, whereas 21 isolates agglutinated only with polyvalent serum. The majority of P. aeruginosa isolates produced fluorescin, 129 (58.54%, 53 (22.94% produced pyocianin whereas 49 (21.21% isolates produced both pigments. Conclusion. P. aeruginosa was isolated most of the from urine, sputum and other materials. The majority often serovars were O1, O6 and O11. The most of isolates produced fluorescin (58.54%, while 22.94% producted pyocianin and 21.21% both pigments.

  10. [Risk factors for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, resistant to carbapenem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghibu, Laura; Miftode, Egidia; Teodor, Andra; Bejan, Codrina; Dorobăţ, Carmen Mihaela

    2010-01-01

    Since their introduction in clinical practice,carbapenems have been among the most powerful antibiotics for treating serious infections cased by Gram-negative nosocomial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The emergence of betalactamases with carbapenem-hydrolyzing activity is of major clinical concern. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial infection. Risk factors for colonization with carbapenems-resistant Pseudomonas in hospital are: history of P. aeruginosa infection or colonization within the previous year, (length of hospital stay, being bedridden or in the ICU, mechanical ventilation, malignant disease, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have all been identified as independent risk factors for MDR P. aeruginosa infection. Long-term-care facilities are also reservoirs of resistant bacteria. Risk factors for colonization of LTCF residents with resistant bacteria included age > 86 years, antibiotic treatment in the previous 3 months, indwelling devices, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, physical disability, and the particular LTCF unit.

  11. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic...... fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials...

  12. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....... This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic...

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection facilitates acute colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Wolfs, Tom F W; Ciofu, Oana

    2009-01-01

    virus infections in facilitating colonization and infection with P. aeruginosa. A study was undertaken to determine whether respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection could facilitate the initiation of an acute infection with P. aeruginosa in vivo. Balb/c mice were infected intranasally with P......Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals and patients ventilated mechanically and is the major pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, in which it causes chronic infections. Epidemiological, in vitro and animal data suggest a role for respiratory....... These results suggest that RSV can facilitate the initiation of acute P. aeruginosa infection without the RSV infection being clinically apparent. This could have implications for treatment strategies to prevent opportunistic P. aeruginosa lung infection....

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses T3SS to inhibit diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldufsky, Josef; Wood, Stephen J; Jayaraman, Vijayakumar; Majdobeh, Omar; Chen, Lin; Qin, Shanshan; Zhang, Chunxiang; DiPietro, Luisa A; Shafikhani, Sasha H

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are responsible for more hospitalizations than any other complication of diabetes. Bacterial infection is recognized as an important factor associated with impaired healing in diabetic ulcers. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently detected Gram-negative pathogen in diabetic ulcers. P. aeruginosa infection has been shown to impair healing in diabetic wounds in a manner that correlates with its ability to form biofilm. While the majority of infections in diabetic ulcers are biofilm associated, 33% of infections are nonbiofilm in nature. P. aeruginosa is the most prevalent Gram-negative pathogen in all diabetic wound types, which suggests that the deleterious impact of P. aeruginosa on healing in diabetic wounds goes beyond its ability to form biofilm and likely involves other factors. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) virulence structure is required for the pathogenesis of all P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, suggesting that it may also play a role in the inhibition of wound repair in diabetic skin ulcers. We evaluated the role of T3SS in mediating P. aeruginosa-induced tissue damage in the wounds of diabetic mice. Our data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa establishes a robust and persistent infection in diabetic wounds independent of its ability to form biofilm and causes severe wound damage in a manner that primarily depends on its T3SS. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  15. [Susceptibility and resistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobial agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero Delgado, M C; García-Mayorgas, A D; Rodríguez, F; Ibarra, A; Casal, M

    2007-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic microorganism that is frequently the cause of nosocomial infections. Multiple mechanisms are involved in its natural and acquired resistance to many of the antimicrobial agents commonly used in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to assess the susceptibility and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa strains isolated in Hospital Reina Sofia between 2000 and 2005, as well as to analyze the differences between intrahospital and extrahospital isolates in 2005 and to compare the results with those obtained in other studies. A total of 3,019 strains of P. aeruginosa from different hospitals and nonhospital settings were evaluated, taking into consideration their degree of sensitivity to different antibiotics. The MICs were determined by means of the Wider I automated system (Soria Melguizo), taking into consideration the criteria of susceptibility and resistance recommended by MENSURA. Results of the analysis showed that P. aeruginosa maintained similar levels of antimicrobial susceptibility during the period 2000-2005, with increased susceptibility to amikacin, gentamicin and tobramycin. There were also important differences in the degree of susceptibility between intrahospital and extrahospital strains, except for imipenem and fosfomycin. The intrahospital difference in susceptibility was also evaluated, emphasizing the importance of periodically studying susceptibility and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa in each setting in order to evaluate different therapeutic guidelines, as it is not always advisable to extrapolate data from different regions. These differences can be explained by the different use of antibiotics in each center and the geographic variations of the resistance mechanisms of P. aeruginosa.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa disrupts Caenorhabditis elegans iron homeostasis, causing a hypoxic response and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirienko, Natalia V; Kirienko, Daniel R; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Wählby, Carolina; Ruvkun, Gary; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-04-17

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes serious human infections, but effective treatments and the mechanisms mediating pathogenesis remain elusive. Caenorhabditis elegans shares innate immune pathways with humans, making it invaluable to investigate infection. To determine how P. aeruginosa disrupts host biology, we studied how P. aeruginosa kills C. elegans in a liquid-based pathogenesis model. We found that P. aeruginosa-mediated killing does not require quorum-sensing pathways or host colonization. A chemical genetic screen revealed that iron chelators alleviate P. aeruginosa-mediated killing. Consistent with a role for iron in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, the bacterial siderophore pyoverdin was required for virulence and was sufficient to induce a hypoxic response and death in the absence of bacteria. Loss of the C. elegans hypoxia-inducing factor HIF-1, which regulates iron homeostasis, exacerbated P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, further linking hypoxia and killing. As pyoverdin is indispensable for virulence in mice, pyoverdin-mediated hypoxia is likely to be relevant in human pathogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Alessandra Lo Sciuto

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery.

  18. Colistin-Tobramycin Combinations Are Superior to Monotherapy Concerning the Killing of Biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, G.; Yang, Liang; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Antibiotic combination therapy might be more efficient than single antibiotics to combat Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis. We tested the ability of colistin sulphatetobramycin combinations and single antibiotics to kill P. aeruginosa...... biofilms. Methods. P. aeruginosa biofilms were generated in vitro and in rat lungs. In a pilot study, 5 patients with cystic fibrosis inhaled colistin and then tobramycin for 4 weeks. The changes in P. aeruginosa counts and lung function were assessed before and after therapy. Results. Antibiotic...... combination therapy significantly reduced the number of P. aeruginosa cells in P. aeruginosa biofilm models in vitro. When rats were challenged with 1 x 10(7) cfu of P. aeruginosa, which was embedded in alginate beads, mortality rates, lung pathologic findings, and bacterial colony-forming unit counts were...

  19. An Antipersister Strategy for Treatment of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeva, Martina; Gutu, Alina D; Hebert, Wesley; Wager, Jeffrey D; Yonker, Lael M; O'Toole, George A; Ausubel, Frederick M; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial persisters are a quasidormant subpopulation of cells that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment. The combination of the aminoglycoside tobramycin with fumarate as an antibacterial potentiator utilizes an antipersister strategy that is aimed at reducing recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections by enhancing the killing of P. aeruginosa persisters. Stationary-phase cultures of P. aeruginosa were used to generate persister cells. A range of tobramycin concentrations was tested with a range of metabolite concentrations to determine the potentiation effect of the metabolite under a variety of conditions, including a range of pH values and in the presence of azithromycin or cystic fibrosis (CF) patient sputum. In addition, 96-well dish biofilm and colony biofilm assays were performed, and the cytotoxicity of the tobramycin-fumarate combination was determined utilizing a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Enhanced killing of up to 6 orders of magnitude of P. aeruginosa persisters over a range of CF isolates, including mucoid and nonmucoid strains, was observed for the tobramycin-fumarate combination compared to killing with tobramycin alone. Furthermore, significant fumarate-mediated potentiation was seen in the presence of azithromycin or CF patient sputum. Fumarate also reduced the cytotoxicity of tobramycin-treated P. aeruginosa to human epithelial airway cells. Finally, in mucoid and nonmucoid CF isolates, complete eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilm was observed in the colony biofilm assay due to fumarate potentiation. These data suggest that a combination of tobramycin with fumarate as an antibacterial potentiator may be an attractive therapeutic for eliminating recurrent P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients through the eradication of bacterial persisters. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. PAMDB: a comprehensive Pseudomonas aeruginosa metabolome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiliang; Brewer, Luke K; Jones, Jace W; Nguyen, Angela T; Marcu, Ana; Wishart, David S; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G; Kane, Maureen A; Wilks, Angela

    2018-01-04

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosaMetabolome Database (PAMDB, http://pseudomonas.umaryland.edu) is a searchable, richly annotated metabolite database specific to P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa is a soil organism and significant opportunistic pathogen that adapts to its environment through a versatile energy metabolism network. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa is a model organism for the study of biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and bioremediation processes, each of which are dependent on unique pathways and metabolites. The PAMDB is modelled on the Escherichia coli (ECMDB), yeast (YMDB) and human (HMDB) metabolome databases and contains >4370 metabolites and 938 pathways with links to over 1260 genes and proteins. The database information was compiled from electronic databases, journal articles and mass spectrometry (MS) metabolomic data obtained in our laboratories. For each metabolite entered, we provide detailed compound descriptions, names and synonyms, structural and physiochemical information, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MS spectra, enzymes and pathway information, as well as gene and protein sequences. The database allows extensive searching via chemical names, structure and molecular weight, together with gene, protein and pathway relationships. The PAMBD and its future iterations will provide a valuable resource to biologists, natural product chemists and clinicians in identifying active compounds, potential biomarkers and clinical diagnostics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells.

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    Emily F A van 't Wout

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA. Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded protein response" (UPR. Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host.

  2. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van ‘t Wout, Emily F. A.; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Boxtel, Ria; Dalton, Lucy E.; Clarke, Hanna J.; Tommassen, Jan; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to “ER stress” and activation of the “unfolded protein response” (UPR). Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR) which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host. PMID:26083346

  3. A Genotypic Analysis of Five P. aeruginosa Strains after Biofilm Infection by Phages Targeting Different Cell Surface Receptors

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    Diana P. Pires

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance constitutes one of the most serious threats to the global public health and urgently requires new and effective solutions. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses increasingly recognized as being good alternatives to traditional antibiotic therapies. In this study, the efficacy of phages, targeting different cell receptors, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and planktonic cell cultures was evaluated over the course of 48 h. Although significant reductions in the number of viable cells were achieved for both cases, the high level of adaptability of the bacteria in response to the selective pressure caused by phage treatment resulted in the emergence of phage-resistant variants. To further investigate the genetic makeup of phage-resistant variants isolated from biofilm infection experiments, some of these bacteria were selected for phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Whole genome sequencing was performed on five phage-resistant variants and all of them carried mutations affecting the galU gene as well as one of pil genes. The sequencing analysis further revealed that three of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 variants carry large deletions (>200 kbp in their genomes. Complementation of the galU mutants with wild-type galU in trans restored LPS expression on the bacterial cell surface of these bacterial strains and rendered the complemented strains to be sensitive to phages. This provides unequivocal evidence that inactivation of galU function was associated with resistance to the phages that uses LPS as primary receptors. Overall, this work demonstrates that P. aeruginosa biofilms can survive phage attack and develop phage-resistant variants exhibiting defective LPS production and loss of type IV pili that are well adapted to the biofilm mode of growth.

  4. Gene ercA, encoding a putative iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase, is involved in regulation of ethanol utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Niels; Görisch, Helmut; Mern, Demissew S

    2013-09-01

    Several two-component regulatory systems are known to be involved in the signal transduction pathway of the ethanol oxidation system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 17933. These sensor kinases and response regulators are organized in a hierarchical manner. In addition, a cytoplasmic putative iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (Fe-ADH) encoded by ercA (PA1991) has been identified to play an essential role in this regulatory network. The gene ercA (PA1991) is located next to ercS, which encodes a sensor kinase. Inactivation of ercA (PA1991) by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette created mutant NH1. NH1 showed poor growth on various alcohols. On ethanol, NH1 grew only with an extremely extended lag phase. During the induction period on ethanol, transcription of structural genes exa and pqqABCDEH, encoding components of initial ethanol oxidation in P. aeruginosa, was drastically reduced in NH1, which indicates the regulatory function of ercA (PA1991). However, transcription in the extremely delayed logarithmic growth phase was comparable to that in the wild type. To date, the involvement of an Fe-ADH in signal transduction processes has not been reported.

  5. Clinical and Morphological Studies on Spontaneous Cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in Birds

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    I Dinev1, S Denev2* and G Beev2

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, pathoanatomical, histological, and bacteriological studies were performed on broiler chickens, growing broiler parents, and growing egg layers, in three different poultry farms, after an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The method of contamination of the birds was established. Several local and systemic clinico-morphological forms of spontaneous P. aeruginosa infections in various categories of stock birds were described: cases of P. aeruginosa infection resulting from injection of contaminated vaccines; case of P. aeruginosa infections through contaminated aerosol vaccine and cases of pododermatitis, periarthritis and arthritis in broiler chickens associated with P. aeruginosa infection. In different cases mortality range between 0.5 and 50%. The results showed that apart from embryonic mortality in hatcheries, and septicemic infections in newly hatched chickens, the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa was associated with localized and systemic lesions in this category, as well as in young and growing birds. On one hand, these results have a theoretical significance, contributing for the confirmation and expansion of the wide array of clinico-morphological forms of P. aeruginosa infections in birds. On the other hand, the knowledge on these forms has a purely practical significance in the diagnostics of P. aeruginosa infections by poultry pathologists and veterinary practitioners.

  6. Catalase (KatA) Plays a Role in Protection against Anaerobic Nitric Oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Mahtani, Harry K.; Li, Qian; VanderWielen, Bradley D.; Makris, Thomas M.; Rogers, Melanie; McDaniel, Cameron; Lipscomb, John D.; Irvin, Randall T.; Schurr, Michael J.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Kovall, Rhett A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a common bacterial pathogen, responsible for a high incidence of nosocomial and respiratory infections. KatA is the major catalase of PA that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen intermediate generated during aerobic respiration. Paradoxically, PA displays elevated KatA activity under anaerobic growth conditions where the substrate of KatA, H2O2, is not produced. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and define the role of KatA in PA during anaerobiosis using genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. We demonstrated that anaerobic wild-type PAO1 cells yielded higher levels of katA transcription and expression than aerobic cells, whereas a nitrite reductase mutant ΔnirS produced ∼50% the KatA activity of PAO1, suggesting that a basal NO level was required for the increased KatA activity. We also found that transcription of the katA gene was controlled, in part, by the master anaerobic regulator, ANR. A ΔkatA mutant and a mucoid mucA22 ΔkatA bacteria demonstrated increased sensitivity to acidified nitrite (an NO generator) in anaerobic planktonic and biofilm cultures. EPR spectra of anaerobic bacteria showed that levels of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC), indicators of NO stress, were increased significantly in the ΔkatA mutant, and dramatically in a ΔnorCB mutant compared to basal levels of DNIC in PAO1 and ΔnirS mutant. Expression of KatA dramatically reduced the DNIC levels in ΔnorCB mutant. We further revealed direct NO-KatA interactions in vitro using EPR, optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. KatA has a 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme that binds NO without prior reduction of the heme iron (K d ∼6 μM). Collectively, we conclude that KatA is expressed to protect PA against NO generated during anaerobic respiration. We proposed that such protective effects of KatA may involve buffering of free NO when potentially toxic concentrations of

  7. A comparative study of coastal and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Anusree V. Nair

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium having a versatile metabolic potential and great ecological and clinical significance. The geographical distribution of P. aeruginosahas revealed the existence of an unbiased genetic arrangement in terrestrial isolates. In contrast, there are very few reports about P. aeruginosa strains from marine environments. The present work was aimed at studying the distribution of P. aeruginosa in coastal waters along the Indian Peninsula and understanding the environmental influence on genotypic, metabolic and phenotypic characteristics by comparing marine and clinical isolates. Of the 785 marine isolates obtained on selective media, only 32 (~4.1% were identified as P. aeruginosa, based on their fatty acid methyl ester profiles. A low Euclidian distance value (P. aeruginosa. While biogeographical separation was not evident based solely on phenotypic and metabolic typing, genomic and metatranscriptomic studies are more likely to show differences between these isolates. Thus, newer and more insightful methods are required to understand the ecological distribution of this complex group of bacteria.

  8. Influence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis

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    Kiran Chawla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8% patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3% and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008, greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007, a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03, and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis.

  9. The resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in relationship to phenotypic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Veronica N; Déraspe, Maxime; McLaughlin, Robert E; Whiteaker, James D; Roy, Paul H; Alm, Richard A; Corbeil, Jacques; Gardner, Humphrey

    2015-01-01

    Many clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause infections that are difficult to eradicate due to their resistance to a wide variety of antibiotics. Key genetic determinants of resistance were identified through genome sequences of 390 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, obtained from diverse geographic locations collected between 2003 and 2012 and were related to microbiological susceptibility data for meropenem, levofloxacin, and amikacin. β-Lactamases and integron cassette arrangements were enriched in the established multidrug-resistant lineages of sequence types ST111 (predominantly O12) and ST235 (O11). This study demonstrates the utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) in defining relevant resistance elements and highlights the diversity of resistance determinants within P. aeruginosa. This information is valuable in furthering the design of diagnostics and therapeutics for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin ExoU induces a PAF-dependent impairment of alveolar fibrin turnover secondary to enhanced activation of coagulation and increased expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the course of mice pneumosepsis

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    Suassuna José HR

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ExoU, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxin with phospholipase A2 activity, was shown to induce vascular hyperpermeability and thrombus formation in a murine model of pneumosepsis. In this study, we investigated the toxin ability to induce alterations in pulmonary fibrinolysis and the contribution of the platelet activating factor (PAF in the ExoU-induced overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. Methods Mice were intratracheally instilled with the ExoU producing PA103 P. aeruginosa or its mutant with deletion of the exoU gene. After 24 h, animal bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF were analyzed and lung sections were submitted to fibrin and PAI-1 immunohistochemical localization. Supernatants from A549 airway epithelial cells and THP-1 macrophage cultures infected with both bacterial strains were also analyzed at 24 h post-infection. Results In PA103-infected mice, but not in control animals or in mice infected with the bacterial mutant, extensive fibrin deposition was detected in lung parenchyma and microvasculature whereas mice BALF exhibited elevated tissue factor-dependent procoagulant activity and PAI-1 concentration. ExoU-triggered PAI-1 overexpression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In in vitro assays, PA103-infected A549 cells exhibited overexpression of PAI-1 mRNA. Increased concentration of PAI-1 protein was detected in both A549 and THP-1 culture supernatants. Mice treatment with a PAF antagonist prior to PA103 infection reduced significantly PAI-1 concentrations in mice BALF. Similarly, A549 cell treatment with an antibody against PAF receptor significantly reduced PAI-1 mRNA expression and PAI-1 concentrations in cell supernatants, respectively. Conclusion ExoU was shown to induce disturbed fibrin turnover, secondary to enhanced procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity during P. aeruginosa pneumosepsis, by a PAF-dependent mechanism. Besides its possible pathophysiological relevance, in

  11. Cystic fibrosis-niche adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduces virulence in multiple infection hosts.

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    Nicola Ivan Lorè

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to thrive in diverse ecological niches and to cause serious human infection. P. aeruginosa environmental strains are producing various virulence factors that are required for establishing acute infections in several host organisms; however, the P. aeruginosa phenotypic variants favour long-term persistence in the cystic fibrosis (CF airways. Whether P. aeruginosa strains, which have adapted to the CF-niche, have lost their competitive fitness in the other environment remains to be investigated. In this paper, three P. aeruginosa clonal lineages, including early strains isolated at the onset of infection, and late strains, isolated after several years of chronic lung infection from patients with CF, were analysed in multi-host model systems of acute infection. P. aeruginosa early isolates caused lethality in the three non-mammalian hosts, namely Caenorhabditis elegans, Galleria mellonella, and Drosophila melanogaster, while late adapted clonal isolates were attenuated in acute virulence. When two different mouse genetic background strains, namely C57Bl/6NCrl and Balb/cAnNCrl, were used as acute infection models, early P. aeruginosa CF isolates were lethal, while late isolates exhibited reduced or abolished acute virulence. Severe histopathological lesions, including high leukocytes recruitment and bacterial load, were detected in the lungs of mice infected with P. aeruginosa CF early isolates, while late isolates were progressively cleared. In addition, systemic bacterial spread and invasion of epithelial cells, which were detected for P. aeruginosa CF early strains, were not observed with late strains. Our findings indicate that niche-specific selection in P. aeruginosa reduced its ability to cause acute infections across a broad range of hosts while maintaining the capacity for chronic infection in the CF host.

  12. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDb (https://scabusa.org/FgMutantDb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Thomas T; Basenko, Evelina; Harb, Omar; Brown, Neil A; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Bregitzer, Phil P

    2018-06-01

    There is no comprehensive storage for generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or data associated with these mutants. Instead, researchers relied on several independent and non-integrated databases. FgMutantDb was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web that will function as a centralized source of information on F. graminearum mutants. FgMutantDb aids in the maintenance and sharing of mutants within a research community. It will serve also as a platform for disseminating prepublication results as well as negative results that often go unreported. Additionally, the highly curated information on mutants in FgMutantDb will be shared with other databases (FungiDB, Ensembl, PhytoPath, and PHI-base) through updating reports. Here we describe the creation and potential usefulness of FgMutantDb to the F. graminearum research community, and provide a tutorial on its use. This type of database could be easily emulated for other fungal species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis: outcomes and response to corticosteroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Aileen; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Lalitha, Prajna; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Ray, Kathryn J; Glidden, David; Zegans, Michael E; McLeod, Stephen D; Lietman, Thomas M; Acharya, Nisha R

    2012-01-25

    To compare the clinical course and effect of adjunctive corticosteroid therapy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa with those of all other strains of bacterial keratitis. Subanalyses were performed on data collected in the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT), a large randomized controlled trial in which patients were treated with moxifloxacin and were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 adjunctive treatment arms: corticosteroid or placebo (4 times a day with subsequent reduction). Multivariate analysis was used to determine the effect of predictors, organism, and treatment on outcomes, 3-month best-spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), and infiltrate/scar size. The incidence of adverse events over a 3-month follow-up period was compared using Fisher's exact test. SCUT enrolled 500 patients. One hundred ten patients had P. aeruginosa ulcers; 99 of 110 (90%) enrolled patients returned for follow-up at 3 months. Patients with P. aeruginosa ulcers had significantly worse visual acuities than patients with other bacterial ulcers (P = 0.001) but showed significantly more improvement in 3-month BSCVA than those with other bacterial ulcers, adjusting for baseline characteristics (-0.14 logMAR; 95% confidence interval, -0.23 to -0.04; P = 0.004). There was no significant difference in adverse events between P. aeruginosa and other bacterial ulcers. There were no significant differences in BSCVA (P = 0.69), infiltrate/scar size (P = 0.17), and incidence of adverse events between patients with P. aeruginosa ulcers treated with adjunctive corticosteroids and patients given placebo. Although P. aeruginosa corneal ulcers have a more severe presentation, they appear to respond better to treatment than other bacterial ulcers. The authors did not find a significant benefit with corticosteroid treatment, but they also did not find any increase in adverse events. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00324168.).

  14. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in normal and athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Espersen, F; Pedersen, S S

    1993-01-01

    We have compared a chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in alginate beads in normal and athymic rats with an acute infection with free live P. aeruginosa bacteria. The following parameters were observed and described: mortality, macroscopic and microscopic pathologic changes...

  15. Activation of the lectin pathway of complement in experimental human keratitis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osthoff, Michael; Brown, Karl D; Kong, David C M; Daniell, Mark; Eisen, Damon P

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) microbial keratitis (MK) is a sight-threatening disease. Previous animal studies have identified an important contribution of the complement system to the clearance of P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition receptor of the lectin pathway of complement, has been implicated in the host defense against P. aeruginosa. However, studies addressing the role of the lectin pathway in P. aeruginosa MK are lacking. Hence, we sought to determine the activity of the lectin pathway in human MK caused by P. aeruginosa. Primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) from cadaveric donors were exposed to two different P. aeruginosa strains. Gene expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, MBL, and other complement proteins was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and MBL synthesis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and intracellular flow cytometry. MBL gene expression was not detected in unchallenged HCECs. Exposure of HCECs to P. aeruginosa resulted in rapid induction of the transcriptional expression of MBL, IL-6, and IL-8. In addition, expression of several complement proteins of the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, were upregulated after 5 h of challenge, including MBL-associated serine protease 1. However, MBL protein secretion was not detectable 18 h after challenge with P. aeruginosa. MK due to P. aeruginosa triggers activation of MBL and the lectin pathway of complement. However, the physiologic relevance of this finding is unclear, as corresponding MBL oligomer production was not observed.

  16. Cooperative pathogenicity in cystic fibrosis: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia modulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence in mixed biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna ePompilio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken in order to understand more about the interaction occurring between S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa, which are frequently co-isolated from CF airways. For this purpose, S. maltophilia RR7 and P. aeruginosa RR8 strains, co-isolated from the lung of a chronically infected CF patient during a pulmonary exacerbation episode, were evaluated for reciprocal effect during planktonic growth, adhesion and biofilm formation onto both polystyrene and CF bronchial cell monolayer, motility, as well as for gene expression in mixed biofilms. P. aeruginosa significantly affected S. maltophilia growth in both planktonic and biofilm cultures, due to an inhibitory activity probably requiring direct contact. Conversely, no effect was observed on P. aeruginosa by S. maltophilia. Compared with monocultures, the adhesiveness of P. aeruginosa on CFBE41o- cells was significantly reduced by S. maltophilia, which probably acts by reducing P. aeruginosa's swimming motility. An opposite trend was observed for biofilm formation, confirming the findings obtained using polystyrene. When grown in mixed biofilm with S. maltophilia, P. aeruginosa significantly over-expressed aprA, and algD - codifying for protease and alginate, respectively - while the quorum sensing related rhlR and lasI genes were down-regulated. The induced alginate expression by P. aeruginosa might be responsible for the protection of S. maltophilia against tobramycin activity we observed in mixed biofilms. Taken together, our results suggest that the existence of reciprocal interference of S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa in CF lung is plausible. In particular, S. maltophilia might confer some selective fitness advantage to P. aeruginosa under the specific conditions of chronic infection or, alternatively, increase the virulence of P. aeruginosa thus leading to pulmonary exacerbation.

  17. Hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark

    research has been performed in this field and most published work is more than 25 years old. The studies presented in this thesis aim at elucidating varying aspects of the disease: Article I investigates the relationships of P. aeruginosa isolated from mink hemorrhagic pneumonia using pulsed field gel...... electrophoresis (PFGE) and a commercial typing system based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on chosen strains. The results presented in this article show that 70% of P. aeruginosa isolated from outbreaks of hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink consist of unique strains, while the remaining 30% belongs to either...... in hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa and E. coli in diagnostic material. The distribution of the two pathogens is visualized using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two histological patterns were observed in the work presented in Article II; one was very hemorrhagic with few bacteria while...

  18. Role of the interplay between quorum sensing regulator VqsR and the Pseudomonas quinolone signal in mediating carbapenem tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viducic, Darija; Murakami, Keiji; Amoh, Takashi; Ono, Tsuneko; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2017-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates its response to environmental conditions through activation of a quorum sensing (QS) system. In this study, we investigated the regulatory interaction between the QS transcriptional regulator VqsR and the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) through integration of sigma factor RpoS, and we addressed whether one of the pathways controlling carbapenem tolerance can be attributed to VqsR. We demonstrate that vqsR expression at the transcriptional level is regulated by pqsA, pqsR, and pqsE. Assessment of the transcriptional expression of vqsR, lasI, rhlI, and qscR in ΔpqsA and ΔpqsAΔrpoS mutants provided insight into pqsA- and rpoS-dependent regulation of vqsR and vqsR-controlled genes. Exogenously supplemented PQS reversed expression of vqsR and vqsR-controlled genes in the ΔpqsA mutant to wild-type levels, but failed to increase expression levels of lasI and qscR in the ΔpqsAΔrpoS mutant to levels observed in wild-type PAO1. The ΔvqsR mutant showed reduced survival when challenged with carbapenems compared to wild-type PAO1. Introduction of a pqsA mutation into the ΔvqsR mutant completely abolished its carbapenem-sensitive phenotype. We conclude that a regulatory link between PQS and vqsR exists, and that RpoS is important in their interaction. We also demonstrate that VqsR affects carbapenem tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, P.O.; Burmolle, M.

    2005-01-01

    to otherwise lethal doses of antibiotics and are protected from bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). P. aeruginosa controls the expression of many of its virulence factors by means of a cell-cell communication system termed quorum sensing (QS). In the present report it is demonstrated...... that biofilm bacteria in which QS is blocked either by mutation or by administration of QS inhibitory drugs are sensitive to treatment with tobramycin and H2O2, and are readily phagocytosed by PMNs, in contrast to bacteria with functional QS systems. In contrast to the wild-type, QS-deficient biofilms led...... to an immediate respiratory-burst activation of the PMNs in vitro. In vivo QS-deficient mutants provoked a higher degree of inflammation. It is suggested that quorum signals and QS-inhibitory drugs play direct and opposite roles in this process. Consequently, the faster and highly efficient clearance of QS-deficient...

  20. Arsenate biotransformation by Microcystis aeruginosa under different nitrogen and phosphorus levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Feifei; Du, Miaomiao; Yan, Changzhou

    2018-04-01

    The arsenate (As(V)) biotransformation by Microcystis aeruginosa in a medium with different concentrations of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) has been studied under laboratory conditions. When 15μg/L As(V) was added, N and P in the medium showed effective regulation on arsenic (As) metabolism in M. aeruginosa, resulting in significant differences in the algal growth among different N and P treatments. Under 0.2mg/L P treatment, increases in N concentration (4-20mg/L) significantly stimulated the cell growth and therefore indirectly enhanced the production of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), the main As metabolite, accounting for 71%-79% of the total As in the medium. Meanwhile, 10-20mg/L N treatments accelerated the ability of As metabolization by M. aeruginosa, leading to higher contents of DMA per cell. However, As(V) uptake by M. aeruginosa was significantly impeded by 0.5-1.0mg/L P treatment, resulting in smaller rates of As transformation in M. aeruginosa as well as lower contents of As metabolites in the medium. Our data demonstrated that As(V) transformation by M. aeruginosa was significantly accelerated by increasing N levels, while it was inhibited by increasing P levels. Overall, both P and N play key roles in As(V) biotransformation processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Balneotherapy is a potential risk factor for Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Deutsch

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The practice of immersion in burn patient has been abandoned in many parts of the world but in Brazil it is still common. The aim of this study was to ascertain if balneotherapy is a risk factor for Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in thermally injured patients. Eighteen patients from a Burn Center were studied for 14 weeks for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples were collected by swabbing the exudate of wounds, before and after giving bath to the patients and from balneotherapy table. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to determine bacterial genetic relatedness. Thirty-seven P. aeruginosa isolates were detected from 292 swabs collected from patients' burn surface area and from the balneotherapy table. Profile analysis of P. aeruginosa DNA fragmentation showed 10 clones among the 37 strains analyzed. Type A is the most prevalent clone, with 23 strains distributed into eight subtypes. These were present in the swabs collected, before and after the patients' bath, from the surface of the bath table, suggesting that there was cross-contamination between the patients in different ways. This work demonstrates that balneotherapy is a risk factor in the Burn Center studied, because the same clone was found among P. aeruginosa isolates collected at various points and times.

  2. Comparative activities of ciprofloxacin, ticarcillin, and tobramycin against experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Schiff, J B; Small, G J; Pennington, J E

    1984-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of ciprofloxacin, an investigational quinoline derivative, was compared with those of ticarcillin and tobramycin in guinea pigs with experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Guinea pigs challenged with tracheal instillations of 10(8) CFU of P. aeruginosa developed acute pneumonia, for which survival rates were: controls, 0%; ticarcillin treatment, 37%; ciprofloxacin treatment, 57%; and tobramycin treatment, 69%. Intrapulmonary killing of P. aeruginosa was greate...

  3. Anti-quorum sensing activity of Psidium guajava L. flavonoids against Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavi, Halkare Suryanarayana; Arun, Ananthapadmanabha Bhagwath; Rekha, Punchapady-Devasya

    2014-05-01

    Psidium guajava L., which has been used traditionally as a medicinal plant, was explored for anti-quorum sensing (QS) activity. The anti-QS activity of the flavonoid (FL) fraction of P. guajava leaves was determined using a biosensor bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Detailed investigation of the effects of the FL-fraction on QS-regulated violacein production in C. violaceum ATCC12472 and pyocyanin production, proteolytic, elastolytic activities, swarming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was performed using standard methods. Possible mechanisms of QS-inhibition were studied by assessing violacein production in response to N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthesis in the presence of the FL-fraction in C. violaceum ATCC31532 and by evaluating the induction of violacein in the mutant C. violaceum CV026 by AHL extracted from the culture supernatants of C. violaceum 31532. Active compounds in the FL-fraction were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Inhibition of violacein production by the FL-fraction in a C. violaceum CV026 biosensor bioassay indicated possible anti-QS activity. The FL-fraction showed concentration-dependent decreases in violacein production in C. violaceum 12472 and inhibited pyocyanin production, proteolytic and elastolytic activities, swarming motility and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Interestingly, the FL-fraction did not inhibit AHL synthesis; AHL extracted from cultures of C. violaceum 31532 grown in the presence of the FL-fraction induced violacein in the mutant C. violaceum CV026. LC-MS analysis revealed the presence of quercetin and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside in the FL-fraction. Both quercetin and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside inhibited violacein production in C. violaceum 12472, at 50 and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Results of this study provide scope for further research to exploit these active molecules as anti-QS agents. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing

  4. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T; Ko, Seung-Hyun B; Mortensen, Joel E; Lam, Joseph S; Muruve, Daniel A; Hassett, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite ([Formula: see text], pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to [Formula: see text]. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to [Formula: see text], but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with [Formula: see text] plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM [Formula: see text], and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to [Formula: see text] in biofilms. [Formula: see text] sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, [Formula: see text] as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains.

  5. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  6. Cloning and Characterization of EF-Tu and EF-Ts from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie O. Palmer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have cloned genes encoding elongation factors EF-Tu and EF-Ts from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and expressed and purified the proteins to greater than 95% homogeneity. Sequence analysis indicated that P. aeruginosa EF-Tu and EF-Ts are 84% and 55% identical to E. coli counterparts, respectively. P. aeruginosa EF-Tu was active when assayed in GDP exchange assays. Kinetic parameters for the interaction of EF-Tu with GDP in the absence of EF-Ts were observed to be = 33 μM, = 0.003 s−1, and the specificity constant was  s−1 μM−1. In the presence of EF-Ts, these values were shifted to = 2 μM, = 0.005 s−1, and the specificity constant was  s−1 μM−1. The equilibrium dissociation constants governing the binding of EF-Tu to GDP ( were 30–75 nM and to GTP ( were 125–200 nM. EF-Ts stimulated the exchange of GDP by EF-Tu 10-fold. P. aeruginosa EF-Tu was active in forming a ternary complex with GTP and aminoacylated tRNA and was functional in poly(U-dependent binding of Phe-tRNAPhe at the A-site of P. aeruginosa ribosomes. P. aeruginosa EF-Tu was active in poly(U-programmed polyphenylalanine protein synthesis system composed of all P. aeruginosa components.

  7. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes restrict growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have increased susceptibility to chronic lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the ecophysiology within the CF lung during infections is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the in vivo growth physiology of P. aeruginosa within lungs...... of chronically infected CF patients. A novel, quantitative peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH)-based method was used to estimate the in vivo growth rates of P. aeruginosa directly in lung tissue samples from CF patients and the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in infected lungs...... in a mouse model. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa within CF lungs did not correlate with the dimensions of bacterial aggregates but showed an inverse correlation to the concentration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surrounding the bacteria. A growth-limiting effect on P. aeruginosa by PMNs was also...

  8. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa......, but that the silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...... planktonic bacteria. These observations strongly indicate that the concentration of silver in currently available wound dressings is much too low for treatment of chronic biofilm wounds. It is suggested that clinicians and manufacturers of the said wound dressings consider whether they are treating wounds...

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 pathogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirienko, Natalia V; Cezairliyan, Brent O; Ausubel, Frederick M; Powell, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple model host for studying the interaction between bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the metazoan innate immune system. Powerful genetic and molecular tools in both C. elegans and P. aeruginosa facilitate the identification and analysis of bacterial virulence factors as well as host defense factors. Here we describe three different assays that use the C. elegans-P. aeruginosa strain PA14 host-pathogen system. Fast Killing is a toxin-mediated death that depends on a diffusible toxin produced by PA14 but not on live bacteria. Slow Killing is due to an active infection in which bacteria colonize the C. elegans intestinal lumen. Liquid Killing is designed for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries for anti-infective compounds. Each assay has unique features and, interestingly, the PA14 virulence factors involved in killing are different in each assay.

  10. RAPD- and ERIC-Based Typing of Clinical and Environmental Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auda, Ibtesam Ghadban; Al-Kadmy, Israa M S; Kareem, Sawsan Mohammed; Lafta, Aliaa Khyuon; A'Affus, Mustafa Hussein Obeid; Khit, Ibrahim Abd Aloahd; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of nosocomial infection in children and adults, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality due to its ability to acquire drug resistance. The ability of P. aeruginosa in the environment to cause infection in individuals has been reported previously; henceforth, surveillance of the emergence and transmission of P. aeruginosa strains among patients is important for infection control in a clinical setup. Various gene-typing methods have been used for epidemiological typing of P. aeruginosa isolates for the purpose of surveillance. In this work, the suitability and comparability of two typing methods, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR fingerprinting, were studied to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical and environmental sources. Forty-four clinical and environmental bacterial isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected between October 2015 and January 2016. DNA extraction, ERIC-PCR and RAPD-PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis, and phylogenetic analyses were carried using the unweighted pair-group method with mean. RAPD typing revealed less clonality among clinical isolates, whereas the ERIC method showed greater similarity in comparison with RAPD. Environmental isolates, however, showed greater similarity using RAPD compared with ERIC typing. With only a few exceptions, most clinical isolates were distinct from environmental isolates, irrespective of the typing method. In conclusion, both the RAPD and ERIC typing methods proved to be good tools in understanding clonal diversity. The results also suggest that there is no relationship between clinical and environmental isolates. The absence of clonality among the clinical isolates may indicate that most P. aeruginosa infection cases could be endemic and not epidemic and that endemic infections may be due to nonclonal strains of P. aeruginosa.

  11. Ultraviolet-B lethal damage on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degiorgi, C.F.; Fernandez, R.O.; Pizarro, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has shown an increased sensitivity compared with that of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae, when they were exposed to 0.4 kJ/m2 of ultraviolet-B radiation. The rapid decay in cell viability observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa after the irradiation was influenced by factors such as culture media and the presence of pyocyanine during the irradiation. The radioinduced lethal damage could be prevented by photoreactivating treatment, indicating that pyrimidine dimer formation was the mechanism causing bacterial death. The results indicate that several environmental conditions may act as protective agents against ultraviolet-B-induced damage

  12. Tracking down antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a wastewater network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Slekovec

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56 and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54 were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5% contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×10(6 CFU/l or/kg. Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination.

  13. Anaerobic Corrosion of 304 Stainless Steel Caused by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Jia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous bacterium capable of forming problematic biofilms in many environments. They cause biocorrosion of medical implants and industrial equipment and infrastructure. Aerobic corrosion of P. aeruginosa against stainless steels has been reported by some researchers while there is a lack of reports on anaerobic P. aeruginosa corrosion in the literature. In this work, the corrosion by a wild-type P. aeruginosa (strain PAO1 biofilm against 304 stainless steel (304 SS was investigated under strictly anaerobic condition for up to 14 days. The anaerobic corrosion of 304 SS by P. aeruginosa was reported for the first time. Results showed that the average sessile cell counts on 304 SS coupons after 7- and 14-day incubations were 4.8 × 107 and 6.2 × 107 cells/cm2, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy corroborated the sessile cell counts. The X-ray diffraction analysis identified the corrosion product as iron nitride, confirming that the corrosion was caused by the nitrate reducing biofilm. The largest pit depths on 304 SS surfaces after the 7- and 14-day incubations with P. aeruginosa were 3.9 and 7.4 μm, respectively. Electrochemical tests corroborated the pitting data.

  14. Quorum-sensing regulator RhlR but not its autoinducer RhlI enables Pseudomonas to evade opsonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Samantha; Franchet, Adrien; Hakkim, Abdul; Chen, Jing; Drenkard, Eliana; Yu, Shen; Schirmeier, Stefanie; Li, Zi; Martins, Nelson; Ausubel, Frederick M; Liégeois, Samuel; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2018-03-09

    When Drosophila melanogaster feeds on Pseudomonas aeruginosa , some bacteria cross the intestinal barrier and eventually proliferate in the hemocoel. This process is limited by hemocytes through phagocytosis. P. aeruginosa requires the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR to elude the cellular immune response of the fly. RhlI synthesizes the autoinducer signal that activates RhlR. Here, we show that rhlI mutants are unexpectedly more virulent than rhlR mutants, both in fly and in nematode intestinal infection models, suggesting that RhlR has RhlI-independent functions. We also report that RhlR protects P. aeruginosa from opsonization mediated by the Drosophila thioester-containing protein 4 (Tep4). RhlR mutant bacteria show higher levels of Tep4- mediated opsonization, as compared to rhlI mutants, which prevents lethal bacteremia in the Drosophila hemocoel. In contrast, in a septic model of infection, in which bacteria are introduced directly into the hemocoel, Tep4 mutant flies are more resistant to wild-type P. aeruginosa, but not to the rhlR mutant. Thus, depending on the infection route, the Tep4 opsonin can either be protective or detrimental to host defense. © 2018 The Authors.

  15. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This work investigated the prevalence and antibiotics sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from ... skin triggers coagulation and an acute inflammatory response ... agents with anti-pseudomonal activity, life-threatening.

  16. [The effect of biyuanshu oral liquid on the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Chen, Haihong; Wang, Shengqing

    2012-07-01

    To observe the effect of biyuanshu oral liquid on the formation of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm was established by plate culture and detected by Scanning electron microscopy and AgNO3 staining. After treated with different dosages of biyuanshu oral liquid and erythromycin, the pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were observed by AgNO3 staining and the number of viable bacteria were measured by serial dilution. The pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms could be detected by SEM at the seventh culture day and it was consistent with the detection of AgNO3 staining. The biyuanshu oral liquid and erythromycin have the effect on inhibiting the formation of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. But with the already formed pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms the inhibition was not significant. The serial dilution method showed that the viable counts of bacteria of biyuanshu oral liquid and erythromycin treated groups were significantly lower than those untreated groups (P formation of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro.

  17. Interference of Pseudomonas aeruginosa signalling and biofilm formation for infection control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Høiby, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the best described bacterium with regards to quorum sensing (QS), in vitro biofilm formation and the development of antibiotic tolerance. Biofilms composed of P. aeruginosa are thought to be the underlying cause of many chronic infections, including those in wounds...... and in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in QS, QS-enabled virulence, biofilm formation and biofilm-enabled antibiotic tolerance. We now have substantial knowledge of the multicellular behaviour of P. aeruginosa in vitro. A major...

  18. Virulence Genes Profile of Multidrug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Iranian Children with UTIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Heidary

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Virulent and resistant strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is one of the most important cause of UTIs in pediatrics. The present study was carried to investigate the frequency of virulence factors in the multi-drug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from pediatrics hospitalized due to the UTIs. One - hundred and forty three urine samples were collected from pediatric patients suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured and those that were P. aeruginosa positive were analyzed for the presence of putative virulence genes. Seventy one out of 143 samples (49.65% were positive for P. aeruginosa. Monthly, sex and age-dependent prevalence were seen for P. aeruginosa. Bacterial strains had the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (95.77%, gentamicin (92.95% and ciprofloxacin (81.69%. Of 71 P. aeruginosa isolates, 12 strains were resistant to more than 9 antibiotics (16.90%. The most commonly detected virulence factors in the cases of urethral infections were exoU and plcH while those of pyelonephritis and cystitis were were exoS and lasB. Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized pediatrics with UTIs in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of UTIs. Such information can help in identifying these virulence genes as useful diagnostic markers for clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from UTIs.

  19. Mutants induced in winter rye (Secale cereale L.): Short straw-mutant No. 2714 and late-senescence mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muszynski, S; Darlewska, M [Department of Plant Breeding and Seed Science, Warsaw Agricultural University, Warsaw (Poland)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutants were induced by treating dormant seeds with ionizing radiation (fast neutrons) or chemicals (N-nitroso-N-ethyl urea or sodium azide). Among several mutants obtained, of special value is the short-straw mutant No. 2714 and a late senescent mutant. (author)

  20. Facultative control of matrix production optimizes competitive fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas S; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C; Sørensen, Søren J; Xavier, Joao B; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2015-12-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Effects of antibiotics on quorum sensing in pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersø, Mette Elena; Alhede, Morten; Phipps, Richard Kerry

    2008-01-01

    in animal infection models. Treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa with the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) has been demonstrated to improve the clinical outcome. Several studies indicate that AZM may accomplish its beneficial action in CF patients....... Three of the antibiotics tested, AZM, ceftazidime (CFT), and ciprofloxacin (CPR), were very active in the assay and were further examined for their effects on QS-regulated virulence factor production in P. aeruginosa. The effects of the three antibiotics administered at subinhibitory concentrations were...... by impeding QS, thereby reducing the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. This led us to investigate whether QS inhibition is a common feature of antibiotics. We present the results of a screening of 12 antibiotics for their QS-inhibitory activities using a previously described QS inhibitor selector 1 strain...

  2. Outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia in a haematology department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack; Christensen, Nikolas; Sørensen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    the outbreak and 12 months later. The audits were conducted by the method of direct observation. RESULTS: Several PFGE types were involved with no clear association to isolates from environmental samples. The audit revealed poor hygiene related to the handling of central venous catheters. After optimising......INTRODUCTION: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. In Denmark, an increase in P. aeruginosa isolates from blood cultures from a haematology department prompted a hygienic audit in 2007. METHODS: Blood cultures...... catheter hygiene, the number of P. aeruginosa bacteraemia cases fell significantly. CONCLUSION: Since no clear association between patient and environmental genotype was established, it was suspected that central venous catheters were the main portal of entry. This was further supported by a simultaneous...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Fiandaca, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    therapy, explanted lungs from 3 intensively treated chronically P. aeruginosa infected CF patients and routine sputum from 77 chronically P. aeruginosa infected CF patients. All samples were investigated microscopically using hematoxylin-eosin (HE), Gram and alcian-blue stain, PNA FISH...

  4. Resistencia a carbapenemes en aislamientos de Pseudomonas aeruginosa: un ejemplo de interacción entre distintos mecanismos Carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates: an example of interaction between different mechanisms

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    Gisela Santella

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar la proteína de membrana externa ausente en los aislamientos resistentes y determinar tanto las causas de su ausencia en la membrana, como la presencia de otros mecanismos de resistencia a carbapenemes en aislamientos clínicos de Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MÉTODOS: Se estudió un brote de 20 aislamientos de P. aeruginosa previamente caracterizados como productores de la metalobetalactamasa IMP-13. Estos aislamientos presentaron igual expresión de la enzima IMP-13, pero solo cinco de ellos fueron resistentes a carbapenemes. En esos cinco aislamientos resistentes se confirmó la ausencia de una proteína de membrana externa. Se secuenciaron oprD y ampC; se identificaron las proteínas de membrana externa por desorción/ionización láser asistida por matriz/espectometría de masa tiempo de vuelo (MALDI-TOF; se determinó el nivel de expresión de oprD, de AmpC y de los sistemas de eflujo tipo Mex, por reacción en cadena de polimerasa en tiempo real, y por último, se determinó la contribución del déficit de oprD a la resistencia a carbapenemes. RESULTADOS: La proteína de la membrana externa ausente en el grupo R (resistentes a ambos carbapenemes fue identificada como OprD-TS, pero no se observaron variaciones en su expresión. El gen oprD presentó mutaciones en los cinco aislamientos resistentes. Se observó la misma producción de la enzima tipo AmpC PDC-5 y del sistema de eflujo Mex AB-OprM entre los aislamientos sensibles y resistentes a carbapenemes. Se analizó cómo la presencia conjunta de IMP-13 y el déficit de oprD contribuyen al aumento de la resistencia. CONCLUSIONES: Distintos mecanismos contribuyen a la resistencia de aislamientos productores de IMP-13 a carbapenemes. La posibilidad de no detectar estos aislamientos productores de IMP-13 representa un riesgo latente de selección de mutantes con mecanismos de resistencia que se suman para aumentar la resistencia a carbapenemes.OBJECTIVE: To identify the

  5. Glycolipid-Dependent, Protease Sensitive Internalization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Into Cultured Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Aufaugh; Carter, William G; Lingwood, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    Internalization of PAK strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa into human respiratory epithelial cell lines and HeLa cervical cancer cells in vitro was readily demonstrable via a gentamycin protection assay. Depletion of target cell glycosphingolipids (GSLs) using a glucosyl ceramide synthase inhibitor, P4, completely prevented P. aeruginosa internalization. In contrast, P4 treatment had no effect on the internalization of Salmonella typhimurium into HeLa cells. Internalized P. aeruginosa were within membrane vacuoles, often containing microvesicles, between the bacterium and the limiting membrane. P. aeruginosa internalization was markedly enhanced by target cell pretreatment with the exogenous GSL, deacetyl gangliotetraosyl ceramide (Gg4). Gg4 binds the lipid raft marker, GM1 ganglioside. Target cell pretreatment with TLCK, but not other (serine) protease inhibitors, prevented both P. aeruginosa host cell binding and internalization. NFkB inhibition also prevented internalization. A GSL-containing lipid-raft model of P. aeruginosa host cell binding/internalization is proposed PMID:21270937

  6. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen on Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptibility to imipenem and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Flavia Luna; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; Lancellotti, Marcelo; de Hollanda, Luciana Maria; de Araújo Lima, Bruna; Linares, Edlaine; Augusto, Ohara; Brocchi, Marcelo; Giorgio, Selma

    2015-01-01

    The seriousness to treat burn wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa led us to examine whether the effect of the carbapenem antibiotic imipenem is enhanced by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). The effects of HBO (100% O2, 3 ATA, 5 h) in combination with imipenen on bacterial counts of six isolates of P. aeruginosa and bacterial ultrastructure were investigated. Infected macrophages were exposed to HBO (100% O2, 3 ATA, 90 min) and the production of reactive oxygen species monitored. HBO enhanced the effects of imipenen. HBO increased superoxide anion production by macrophages and likely kills bacteria by oxidative mechanisms. HBO in combination with imipenem can be used to kill P. aeruginosa in vitro and such treatment may be beneficial for the patients with injuries containing the P. aeruginosa.

  7. The role of type III secretion system and lens material on adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Elizabeth P; Tsay, Ruey-Yug; Chia, Jean-San; Wu, Semon; Lee, Jing-Wen; Hu, Fung-Rong

    2012-09-21

    To determine the distribution of invasive and cytotoxic genotypes among ocular isolates of P. aeruginosa and investigate the influence of the type III secretion system (T3SS) on adhesion to conventional, cosmetic, and silicone hydrogel contact lenses (CL). Clinical isolates from 2001 to 2010 were analyzed by multiplex PCR for exoS, exoU, and exoT genes. Bacterial adhesion to etafilcon, nelfilcon (gray colored), balafilcon, and galyfilcon CL with or without artificial tear fluid (ATF) incubation were compared. Surface characteristics were determined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Among 87 total isolates, 64 strains were from microbial keratitis cases. CL-related microbial keratitis (CLMK) isolates were mostly of the cytotoxic genotype (expressing exoU) (P = 0.002). No significant differences were found in bacterial adhesion to all types of CL between the genotypes under T3SS-inducing conditions. A trend for least bacterial adhesion of galyfilcon compared to the other CL was noted for both genotypes. Needle complex pscC mutants adhered less to all materials than the wild type (P bacteria adhering on CL surfaces. CLMK isolates were mostly of cytotoxic genotype. Different genotypes did not significantly differ in its adhesion to various CL. T3SS and other adhesins are involved in bacteria-contact lens adhesion through complex interactions. Contact lens materials may also play an important role in the adherence of both genotypes of P. aeruginosa.

  8. Within-host microevolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Italian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Dolce, Daniela; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and a more complete understanding of P. aeruginosa within-host genomic evolution, transmission, and population genomics may provide a basis for improving intervention strate...

  9. YfiBNR mediates cyclic di-GMP dependent small colony variant formation and persistence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob G Malone

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During long-term cystic fibrosis lung infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes genetic adaptation resulting in progressively increased persistence and the generation of adaptive colony morphotypes. This includes small colony variants (SCVs, auto-aggregative, hyper-adherent cells whose appearance correlates with poor lung function and persistence of infection. The SCV morphotype is strongly linked to elevated levels of cyclic-di-GMP, a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that regulates the transition between motile and sessile, cooperative lifestyles. A genetic screen in PA01 for SCV-related loci identified the yfiBNR operon, encoding a tripartite signaling module that regulates c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent analysis determined that YfiN is a membrane-integral diguanylate cyclase whose activity is tightly controlled by YfiR, a small periplasmic protein, and the OmpA/Pal-like outer-membrane lipoprotein YfiB. Exopolysaccharide synthesis was identified as the principal downstream target for YfiBNR, with increased production of Pel and Psl exopolysaccharides responsible for many characteristic SCV behaviors. An yfi-dependent SCV was isolated from the sputum of a CF patient. Consequently, the effect of the SCV morphology on persistence of infection was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using the YfiN-mediated SCV as a representative strain. The SCV strain exhibited strong, exopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to nematode scavenging and macrophage phagocytosis. Furthermore, the SCV strain effectively persisted over many weeks in mouse infection models, despite exhibiting a marked fitness disadvantage in vitro. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics significantly decreased both the number of suppressors arising, and the relative fitness disadvantage of the SCV mutant in vitro, suggesting that the SCV persistence phenotype may play a more important role during antimicrobial chemotherapy. This study establishes Yfi

  10. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from positive blood cultures by quantitative PCR

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    Cattoir Vincent

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for numerous bloodstream infections associated with severe adverse outcomes in case of inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy. The present study was aimed to develop a novel quantitative PCR (qPCR assay, using ecfX as the specific target gene, for the rapid and accurate identification of P. aeruginosa from positive blood cultures (BCs. Methods Over the period August 2008 to June 2009, 100 BC bottles positive for gram-negative bacilli were tested in order to evaluate performances of the qPCR technique with conventional methods as gold standard (i.e. culture and phenotypic identification. Results Thirty-three strains of P. aeruginosa, 53 strains of Enterobactericaeae, nine strains of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and two other gram-negative species were isolated while 3 BCs were polymicrobial including one mixture containing P. aeruginosa. All P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were detected by qPCR except a single strain in mixed culture. Performances of the qPCR technique were: specificity, 100%; positive predictive value, 100%; negative predictive value, 98.5%; and sensitivity, 97%. Conclusions This reliable technique may offer a rapid (

  11. Trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Megan; Biberacher, Sonja; Park, Suk-Youl; Rajan, Siji; Korhonen, Pasi; Gasser, Robin B; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Coster, Mark J; Hofmann, Andreas

    2018-04-24

    The opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been recognized as an important pathogen of clinical relevance and is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. The presence of a glycolytic enzyme in Pseudomonas, which is known to be inhibited by trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P) in other organisms, suggests that these bacteria may be vulnerable to the detrimental effects of intracellular T6P accumulation. In the present study, we explored the structural and functional properties of trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP) in P. aeruginosa in support of future target-based drug discovery. A survey of genomes revealed the existence of 2 TPP genes with either chromosomal or extrachromosomal location. Both TPPs were produced as recombinant proteins, and characterization of their enzymatic properties confirmed specific, magnesium-dependent catalytic hydrolysis of T6P. The 3-dimensional crystal structure of the chromosomal TPP revealed a protein dimer arising through β-sheet expansion of the individual monomers, which possess the overall fold of halo-acid dehydrogenases.-Cross, M., Biberacher, S., Park, S.-Y., Rajan, S., Korhonen, P., Gasser, R. B., Kim, J.-S., Coster, M. J., Hofmann, A. Trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  12. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor

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    Adam Gilbertsen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this promoter element can produce a titratable induction of its gene products in response to agmatine, and utilized this discovery to make a luminescent agmatine biosensor in P. aeruginosa. The genome of the P. aeruginosa lab strain UCBPP-PA14 was altered to remove both its ability to synthesize or destroy agmatine, and insertion of the luminescent reporter construct allows it to produce light in proportion to the amount of exogenous agmatine applied from ~100 nM to 1mM. Furthermore it does not respond to related compounds including arginine or putrescine. To demonstrate potential applications the biosensor was used to detect agmatine in spent supernatants, to monitor the development of arginine decarboxylase over time, and to detect agmatine in the spinal cords of live mice.

  13. Fate and effects of octylphenol in a Microcystis aeruginosa culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Mafalda S.; Stoichev, Teodor; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, Vitor M.; Vasconcelos, M.Teresa S.D.

    2009-01-01

    Octylphenol (OP) is a xenobiotic with endocrine disrupting properties found in freshwaters worldwide. Its effects have been studied in organisms with nuclear receptors but effects on phytoplankton communities are poorly characterized, despite the fact that these organisms are constantly exposed to this compound. For this reason fate and effects of OP in the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa were assessed from 10 nM to 5 μM OP concentration. Up to a test concentration of 250 nM, OP removal increased significantly in the presence of cyanobacteria, the compound half-life in the absence of cells being 15 days against 9 days in the presence of the cells. Only 4% of the total OP removed was found bound to the cells, indicating an active metabolization of the compound. Moreover, the role of the exudates produced by M. aeruginosa, in the OP removal from culture medium, was assessed. Culture medium with exudates, resulting from a 7-day growth of M. aeruginosa, spiked with 50 nM OP, showed a higher half-life (22 days). Compared to culture medium without exudates, it can be hypothesized that higher organic matter concentrations make the hydrolysis or photolysis of OP more difficult. In culture media, the cells of M. aeruginosa could compensate and even counteract this, as OP half-life was shortened. At higher OP levels (1.25 and 5 μM) M. aeruginosa growth was impaired, indicating toxic effects. This shortage of biomass prevented the M. aeruginosa-assisted OP withdrawal from the culture media

  14. Fate and effects of octylphenol in a Microcystis aeruginosa culture medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Mafalda S. [CIMAR/CIIMAR, Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental and FCUP, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: abaptista@fc.up.pt; Stoichev, Teodor; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, Vitor M.; Vasconcelos, M.Teresa S.D. [CIMAR/CIIMAR, Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental and FCUP, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-04-09

    Octylphenol (OP) is a xenobiotic with endocrine disrupting properties found in freshwaters worldwide. Its effects have been studied in organisms with nuclear receptors but effects on phytoplankton communities are poorly characterized, despite the fact that these organisms are constantly exposed to this compound. For this reason fate and effects of OP in the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa were assessed from 10 nM to 5 {mu}M OP concentration. Up to a test concentration of 250 nM, OP removal increased significantly in the presence of cyanobacteria, the compound half-life in the absence of cells being 15 days against 9 days in the presence of the cells. Only 4% of the total OP removed was found bound to the cells, indicating an active metabolization of the compound. Moreover, the role of the exudates produced by M. aeruginosa, in the OP removal from culture medium, was assessed. Culture medium with exudates, resulting from a 7-day growth of M. aeruginosa, spiked with 50 nM OP, showed a higher half-life (22 days). Compared to culture medium without exudates, it can be hypothesized that higher organic matter concentrations make the hydrolysis or photolysis of OP more difficult. In culture media, the cells of M. aeruginosa could compensate and even counteract this, as OP half-life was shortened. At higher OP levels (1.25 and 5 {mu}M) M. aeruginosa growth was impaired, indicating toxic effects. This shortage of biomass prevented the M. aeruginosa-assisted OP withdrawal from the culture media.

  15. Contribution of efflux pumps in fluroquinolone resistance in multi-drug resistant nosocomial isolates of Pseudomanas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north east India

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    D Choudhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the leading opportunistic pathogen and its ability to acquire resistance against series of antimicrobial agents confine treatment option for nosocomial infections. Increasing resistance to fluroquinolone (FQ agents has further worsened the scenario. The major mechanism of resistance to FQs includes mutation in FQs target genes in bacteria (DNA gyrase and/or topoisomerases and overexpression of antibiotic efflux pumps. Objective: We have investigated the role of efflux pump mediated FQ resistance in nosocomial isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north eastern part of India. Materials and Methods: A total of 234 non-duplicate, consecutive clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from a tertiary referral hospital of north-east India. An efflux pump inhibitor (EPI, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP based method was used for determination of efflux pump activity and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed for molecular characterisation of efflux pump. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC reduction assay was also performed for all the isolates. Results and Conclusion: A total number of 56 (23% have shown efflux mediated FQ resistance. MexAB-OprM efflux system was predominant type. This is the first report of efflux pump mediated FQ resistance from this part of the world and the continued emergence of these mutants with such high MIC range from this part of the world demands serious awareness, diagnostic intervention, and proper therapeutic option.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  17. Virus-Induced Type I Interferon Deteriorates Control of Systemic Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection

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    Katja Merches

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type I interferon (IFN-I predisposes to bacterial superinfections, an important problem during viral infection or treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-α. IFN-I-induced neutropenia is one reason for the impaired bacterial control; however there is evidence that more frequent bacterial infections during IFN-α-treatment occur independently of neutropenia. Methods: We analyzed in a mouse model, whether Pseudomonas aeruginosa control is influenced by co-infection with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. Bacterial titers, numbers of neutrophils and the gene-expression of liver-lysozyme-2 were determined during a 24 hours systemic infection with P. aeruginosa in wild-type and Ifnar-/- mice under the influence of LCMV or poly(I:C. Results: Virus-induced IFN-I impaired the control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was associated with neutropenia and loss of lysozyme-2-expression in the liver, which had captured P. aeruginosa. A lower release of IFN-I by poly(I:C-injection also impaired the bacterial control in the liver and reduced the expression of liver-lysozyme-2. Low concentration of IFN-I after infection with a virulent strain of P. aeruginosa alone impaired the bacterial control and reduced lysozyme-2-expression in the liver as well. Conclusion: We found that during systemic infection with P. aeruginosa Kupffer cells quickly controlled the bacteria in cooperation with neutrophils. Upon LCMV-infection this cooperation was disturbed.

  18. Interactions between Microcystis aeruginosa and coexisting amoxicillin contaminant at different phosphorus levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Shi; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Baoyu

    2015-10-30

    Microcystis aeruginosa was cultured with 0.05-5 mg L(-1) of phosphorus and exposed to 200-500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin for seven days. Amoxicillin presented no significant effect (p>0.05) on the growth of M. aeruginosa at phosphorus levels of 0.05 and 0.2 mg L(-1), but stimulated algal growth as a hormesis effect at phosphorus levels of 1 and 5 mg L(-1). Phosphorus and amoxicillin affected the contents of chlorophyll-a, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and malondialdehyde, the expression of psbA and rbcL, as well as the activities of adenosinetriphosphatase and glutathione S-transferase in similar manners, but regulated the production and release of microcystins and the activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in different ways. Increased photosynthesis activity was related with the ATP consumption for the stress response to amoxicillin, and the stress response was enhanced as the phosphorus concentration increased. The biodegradation of amoxicillin by M. aeruginosa increased from 11.5% to 28.2% as the phosphorus concentration increased. Coexisting amoxicillin aggravated M. aeruginosa pollution by increasing cell density and concentration of microcystins, while M. aeruginosa alleviated amoxicillin pollution via biodegradation. The interactions between M. aeruginosa and amoxicillin were significantly regulated by phosphorus (p<0.05) and led to a complicated situation of combined pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 2-Aminoacetophenone as a potential breath biomarker for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the cystic fibrosis lung

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    Laing Richard

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are associated with progressive life threatening decline of lung function in cystic fibrosis sufferers. Growth of Ps. aeruginosa releases a "grape-like" odour that has been identified as the microbial volatile organic compound 2-aminoacetophenone (2-AA. Methods We investigated 2-AA for its specificity to Ps. aeruginosa and its suitability as a potential breath biomarker of colonisation or infection by Solid Phase Micro Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS. Results Cultures of 20 clinical strains of Ps. aeruginosa but not other respiratory pathogens had high concentrations of 2-AA in the head space of in vitro cultures when analysed by GC/MS. 2-AA was stable for 6 hours in deactivated glass sampling bulbs but was not stable in Tedlar® bags. Optimisation of GC/MS allowed detection levels of 2-AA to low pico mol/mol range in breath. The 2-AA was detected in a significantly higher proportion of subjects colonised with Ps. aeruginosa 15/16 (93.7% than both the healthy controls 5/17 (29% (p Ps. aeruginosa 4/13(30.7% (p Ps. aeruginosa in sputum and/or BALF was 93.8% (95% CI, 67-99 and 69.2% (95% CI, 38-89 respectively. The peak integration values for 2-AA analysis in the breath samples were significantly higher in Ps. aeruginosa colonised subjects (median 242, range 0-1243 than the healthy controls (median 0, range 0-161; p Ps. aeruginosa (median 0, range 0-287; p Conclusions Our results report 2-AA as a promising breath biomarker for the detection of Ps. aeruginosa infections in the cystic fibrosis lung.

  20. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase and Pseudomonas keratitis using a thiol-based peptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, F R; Paterson, C A; Gray, R D; Wells, J T

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase is a zinc metalloproteinase which is released during P. aeruginosa infections. Pseudomonas keratitis, which occurs following contact lens-induced corneal trauma, can lead to rapid, liquefactive necrosis of the cornea. This destruction has been attributed to the release of both host-derived enzymes and the bacterial products P. aeruginosa elastase, alkaline protease, exotoxin A, and lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor, HSCH2 (DL...

  1. Polysaccharides serve as scaffold of biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lung infection by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major pathologic features in patients with cystic fibrosis. Mucoid P. aeruginosa is notorious for its biofilm forming capability and resistance to immune attacks. In this study, the roles of extracellular polymeric substances f...

  2. Application of bacteriophages to selectively remove Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water and wastewater filtration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Hunt, Heather K; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-09-01

    Water and wastewater filtration systems often house pathogenic bacteria, which must be removed to ensure clean, safe water. Here, we determine the persistence of the model bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in two types of filtration systems, and use P. aeruginosa bacteriophages to determine their ability to selectively remove P. aeruginosa. These systems used beds of either anthracite or granular activated carbon (GAC), which were operated at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 45 min. The clean bed filtration systems were loaded with an instantaneous dose of P. aeruginosa at a total cell number of 2.3 (± 0.1 [standard deviation]) × 10(7) cells. An immediate dose of P. aeruginosa phages (1 mL of phage stock at the concentration of 2.7 × 10(7) PFU (Plaque Forming Units)/mL) resulted in a reduction of 50% (± 9%) and >99.9% in the effluent P. aeruginosa concentrations in the clean anthracite and GAC filters, respectively. To further evaluate the effects of P. aeruginosa phages, synthetic stormwater was run through anthracite and GAC biofilters where mixed-culture biofilms were present. Eighty five days after an instantaneous dose of P. aeruginosa (2.3 × 10(7) cells per filter) on day 1, 7.5 (± 2.8) × 10(7) and 1.1 (± 0.5) × 10(7) P. aeruginosa cells/g filter media were detected in the top layer (close to the influent port) of the anthracite and GAC biofilters, respectively, demonstrating the growth and persistence of pathogenic bacteria in the biofilters. A subsequent 1-h dose of phages, at the concentration of 5.1 × 10(6) PFU/mL and flow rate of 1.6 mL/min, removed the P. aeruginosa inside the GAC biofilters and the anthracite biofilters by 70% (± 5%) and 56% (± 1%), respectively, with no P. aeruginosa detected in the effluent, while not affecting ammonia oxidation or the ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community inside the biofilters. These results suggest that phage treatment can selectively remove pathogenic bacteria with minimal impact on beneficial

  3. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. New results from one small trial sug...... patients without P. aeruginosa infection did not improve lung function. Here I review the recent advances in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections with a focus on inhalation treatments targeted at prophylaxis and chronic suppressive therapy....

  4. Swimming Motility Mediates the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Induced by Flagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Madison Floyd

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe infections often characterized by robust neutrophilic infiltration. Neutrophils provide the first line of defense against P. aeruginosa. Aside from their defense conferred by phagocytic activity, neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs to immobilize bacteria. Although NET formation is an important antimicrobial process, the details of its mechanism are largely unknown. The identity of the main components of P. aeruginosa responsible for triggering NET formation is unclear. In this study, our focus was to identify the main bacterial factors mediating NET formation and to gain insight into the underlying mechanism. We found that P. aeruginosa in its exponential growth phase promoted strong NET formation in human neutrophils while its NET-inducing ability dramatically decreased at later stages of bacterial growth. We identified the flagellum as the primary component of P. aeruginosa responsible for inducing NET extrusion as flagellum-deficient bacteria remained seriously impaired in triggering NET formation. Purified P. aeruginosa flagellin, the monomeric component of the flagellum, does not stimulate NET formation in human neutrophils. P. aeruginosa-induced NET formation is independent of the flagellum-sensing receptors TLR5 and NLRC4 in both human and mouse neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that flagellar motility, not flagellum binding to neutrophils per se, mediates NET release induced by flagellated bacteria. Immotile, flagellar motor-deficient bacterial strains producing paralyzed flagella did not induce NET formation. Forced contact between immotile P. aeruginosa and neutrophils restored their NET-inducing ability. Both the motAB and motCD genetic loci encoding flagellar motor genes contribute to maximal NET release; however the motCD genes play a more important role. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa and superoxide production by neutrophils were also

  5. Caracterización, por RAPD-PCR, de aislados de Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtenidos de pacientes con fibrosis quística RAPD-PCR characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains obtained from cystic fibrosis patients

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    Maribel Ortiz-Herrera

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a las cepas de P aeruginosa aisladas de lavados broncoalveolares de pacientes con fibrosis quística a lo largo de un periodo de tres años. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio prospectivo, de seguimiento de una población de pacientes con fibrosis quística. Se utilizó la técnica de la amplificación del ADN empleando PCR con bajas condiciones de especificidad (Random amplified polymorphic DNA, RAPD-PCR para la amplificación del ADN de cepas de P aeruginosa aisladas de lavados broncoalveolares de cinco pacientes con fibrosis quística, provenientes del Servicio de Neumología y Cirugía del Tórax del Instituto Nacional de Pediatría de la Ciudad de México, en el periodo de junio de 1996 a junio de 2002; se establecieron los patrones de amplificación de cada aislamiento, lo que permitió la identificación precisa de todas las cepas aisladas y el estudio de la epidemiología de P aeruginosa en los pacientes seleccionados con dicha enfermedad. RESULTADOS: Se definieron 18 patrones de amplificación del ADN que permitieron identificar a cada cepa de P aeruginosa aislada en las diferentes muestras de lavado broncoalveolar; no se encontró relación entre el fenotipo de P aeruginosa (mucoide o no mucoide y el genotipo de cada aislamiento, ya que cepas con fenotipos distintos mostraron patrones de amplificación semejantes; en nuestros pacientes se identificaron cepas con patrones de amplificación distintos a partir de una misma muestra, lo que sugiere la presencia de infecciones simultáneas por más de una cepa de P aeruginosa; se demostró que dos hermanos con la enfermedad compartían cepas con genotipos semejantes, lo que sugiere una contaminación cruzada entre ambos, y se demostró el aislamiento de cepas de P aeruginosa con genotipos semejantes a lo largo de los periodos estudiados. CONCLUSIONES: La identificación mediante la caracterización genotípica de las cepas de P aeruginosa aisladas de los pacientes con

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...... and DNA. In CF lungs, the polysaccharide alginate is the major part of the P. aeruginosa biofilm matrix. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and resist phagocytosis, as well as other components of the innate and the adaptive immune system....... As a consequence, a pronounced antibody response develops, leading to immune complex-mediated chronic inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chronic inflammation is the major cause of the lung tissue damage in CF. Biofilm growth in CF lungs is associated with an increased frequency...

  7. A case of failed eradication of cystic fibrosis-related sinus colonisation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Linnane, Barry

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen associated with cystic fibrosis that has potential to decrease lung function and cause respiratory failure. Paranasal sinuses are increasingly recognised as potential reservoirs for intermittent colonisation by P. aeruginosa. This case documents investigation and outcome of P. aeruginosa recurrence in a male paediatric patient over an eight year period.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pool Water: Evidences and Perspectives for a New Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Guida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently isolated in swimming pool settings. Nine recreational and rehabilitative swimming pools were monitored according to the local legislation. The presence of P. aeruginosa was correlated to chlorine concentration. The ability of the isolates to form a biofilm on plastic materials was also investigated. In 59.5% of the samples, microbial contamination exceeded the threshold values. P. aeruginosa was isolated in 50.8% of these samples. The presence of P. aeruginosa was not correlated with free or total chlorine amount (R2 < 0.1. All the isolates were moderate- to strong-forming biofilm (Optical Density O.D.570 range 0.7–1.2. To control biofilm formation and P. aeruginosa colonization, Quantum FreeBioEnergy© (QFBE, FreeBioEnergy, Brisighella, Italy, has been applied with encouraging preliminary results. It is a new, promising control strategy based on the change of an electromagnetic field which is responsible for the proliferation of some microorganisms involved in biofilm formation, such as P. aeruginosa.

  9. Mutant Prevention Concentrations of Imipenem and Meropenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dahdouh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of the MPC of carbapenems against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. and to assess its possible relationship with mechanisms of resistance. Detection of the mechanisms of resistance was performed using Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing, Double Disk Synergy, disk antagonism, addition of NaCl to the medium, addition of PBA or EDTA to Carbapenem disks, addition of PBA to Cefoxitin disks, and CCCP test for 10 Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. The MIC and MPC were determined using the broth macrodilution and plate dilution methods, respectively. Four Acinetobacter baumannii strains produced MBL. Two of them produced Oxacillinase and one produced ESBL. Two Pseudomonas spp. isolates produced both KPC and MBL. The resistant Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. strains had higher MPC values than susceptible ones. However, the Mutant Selection Window was found to be dependent on the degree of resistance but not on a particular mechanism of resistance. The usefulness of the MPC was found to be dependent on its value. Based on our data, we recommend determining the MPC for each isolate before using it during treatment. Furthermore, the use of T>MSW instead of T>MIC is suggested.

  10. Inhibitory effects of sanguinarine against the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843 and possible mechanisms of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Jihai [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Liu, Deming [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Crop Germplasm Innovation and Resource Utilization, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gong, Daoxin; Zeng, Qingru; Yan, Zhiyong [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gu, Ji-Dong, E-mail: jdgu@hku.hk [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Toxicology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Sanguinarine was found as a strong algicidal biologically derived substance. •Sanguinarine can induce oxidative stress in the cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. •Photosystem is a target of toxicity of sanguinarine on M. aeruginosa. •Sanguinarine can induce DNA damage and inhibit cell division. -- Abstract: Sanguinarine showed strong inhibitory effect against Microcystis aeruginosa, a typical water bloom-forming and microcystins-producing cyanobacterium. The EC50 of sanguinarine against the growth of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 was 34.54 ± 1.17 μg/L. Results of chlorophyll fluorescence transient analysis indicated that all the electron donating side, accepting side, and the reaction center of the Photosystem II (PS II) were the targets of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 upon exposure indicated that sanguinarine induced oxidative stress in the active growing cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843. Further results of gene expression analysis indicated that DNA damage and cell division inhibition were also involved in the inhibitory action mechanism of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The inhibitory characteristics of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa suggest that the ecological- and public health-risks need to be evaluated before its application in cyanobacterial bloom control to avoid devastating events irreversibly.

  11. Análise epidemiológica de isolados clínicos de Pseudomonas aeruginosa provenientes de hospital universitário Epidemiologic analysis of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from an university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo José Valença Cordeiro Pires

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: A Pseudomonas aeruginosa é um patógeno oportunista que tem se destacado quanto à prevalência em casos de infecções hospitalares. Sua ampla resistência aos diversos grupos de antimicrobianos garante a este microrganismo um papel de destaque entre as bactérias mais prevalentes associadas à infecção nosocomial. O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar um levantamento epidemiológico da P. aeruginosa, bem como do seu perfil de susceptibilidade aos antimicrobianos no Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo baseado no livro de registro de secreções diversas do laboratório de bacteriologia do Hospital das Clínicas no período compreendido entre janeiro a junho de 2008. Entre os registros, identificamos aqueles que foram positivos para a P. aeruginosa, analisando sua origem e perfil de susceptibilidade aos antimicrobianos utilizados na rotina daquele laboratório. RESULTADOS: As bactérias mais freqüentes, isoladas das secreções diversas, foram P. aeruginosa (26% e S. aureus (25%. Quanto à origem, a P. aeruginosa foi isolada principalmente de infecções respiratórias, pois 33% das amostras positivas para esta bactéria foram provinientes de secreções traqueais e 21% nasais. Os antimicrobianos mais eficazes contra a P. aeruginosa foram: amicacina, imipenem, meropenem e aztreonam. CONCLUSÕES: Estes resultados mostram uma alta prevalência de P. aeruginosa, no Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco. Apesar de apresentar grande resistência a antimicrobianos mais antigos como as cefalosporinas de primeira e segunda geração, assim como cloranfenicol, em geral, este patógeno demonstrou boa sensibilidade às drogas utilizadas na rotina deste hospital.OBJECTIVES: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an increasingly prevalent opportunistic pathogen in hospital infection cases. Its high resistance rates to many antimicrobials has given this

  12. [Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exometabolites on planktonic and biofilm cultures of Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M V; Karpunina, T I; Maslennikova, I L; Nesterova, L Iu; Demakov, V A

    2012-01-01

    Study the effect of P. aeruginosa exometabolites on planktonic and biofilm cultures of bioluminescent E. coli strain. E. coli K12 TG1 (pF1 lux+ Ap(r)) recombinant bioluminescent strain, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 reference strain and 2 nosocomial isolates were used. Pyocyanin and pyoverdin content in supernatant of P. aeruginosa over-night cultures was evaluated according to E. Deziel et al. (2001). Planktonic and biofilm cultures of E. coli were obtained in 96-well plates (LB, statically, 37 degrees C), optical density of plankton, film biomass (OD600, OD580) and bioluminescence in plankton and biofilm were evaluated in microplate reader Infiniti M200 (Tecan, Austria). P. aeruginosa exometabolites increased the duration of lag-phase in E. coli, and short term exposition inhibited luminescence of planktonic cells. These effects are determined by bactericidal action ofpyocyanin and pyoverdin. Supernatants ofover-night cultures of P. aeruginosa inhibit formation of biofilm and disrupt the formed biofilm of E. coli. Effect of pyocyanin and pyoverdin on these processes is not established, other factors may have higher significance. Bioluminescence of E. coli K12 TGI that reflects the energetic status of the cell allows to evaluate and prognose the character of coexistence of P. aeruginosa in combined with E. coli planktonic and biofilm culture.

  13. Pseudomonas cepacia adherence to respiratory epithelial cells is enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiman, L.; Cacalano, G.; Prince, A.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas cepacia are both opportunistic pathogens of patients with cystic fibrosis. The binding characteristics of these two species were compared to determine if they use similar mechanisms to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. P. cepacia 249 was shown to be piliated, but there was no detectable homology between P. aeruginosa pilin gene probes and P. cepacia genomic DNA. P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa did not appear to compete for epithelial receptors. In the presence of purified P. aeruginosa pili, the adherence of 35S-labeled strain 249 to respiratory epithelial monolayers was unaffected, while that of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was decreased by 55%. The binding of P. cepacia 249 and 715j was increased by 2.4-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, in the presence of an equal inoculum of PAO1. Interbacterial agglutination contributed to the increased adherence of P. cepacia, as the binding of 249 was increased twofold in the presence of irradiated PAO1. PAO1 exoproducts had a marked effect in enhancing the ability of the P. cepacia strains to adhere to the epithelial monolayers. A PAO1 supernatant increased the binding of 249 by eightfold and that of 715j by fourfold. Thus, there appears to be a synergistic relationship between P. aeruginosa and P. cepacia in which PAO1 exoproducts modify the epithelial cell surface, exposing receptors and facilitating increased P. cepacia attachment

  14. A Novel Insight into Dehydroleucodine Mediated Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mustafi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa to conventional treatments demands the search for novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of dehydroleucodine (DhL, a sesquiterpene lactone obtained from Artemisia (A. douglasiana, was screened against several pathogenic virulence effectors of P. aeruginosa. In vitro, minimum inhibitory concentration of DhL was determined against P. aeruginosa strains PAO1, PA103, PA14, and multidrug resistant clinical strain, CDN118. Results showed that DhL was active against each strain where PAO1 and PA103 showed higher susceptibility (MIC 0.48 mg/mL as compared to PA14 (MIC 0.96 mg/mL and CDN118 (MIC 0.98 mg/mL. Also, when PAO1 strain was grown in the presence of DhL (MIC50, 0.12 mg/mL, a delay in the generation time was noticed along with significant inhibition of secretory protease and elastase activities, interruption in biofilm attachment phase in a stationary culture, and a significant decline in Type III effector ExoS. At MIC50, DhL treatment increased the sensitivity of P. aeruginosa towards potent antibiotics. Furthermore, treatment of P. aeruginosa with DhL prevented toxin-induced apoptosis in macrophages. These observations suggest that DhL activity was at the bacterial transcriptional level. Hence, antimicrobial activity of DhL may serve as leads in the development of new anti-Pseudomonas pharmaceuticals.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoU augments neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Michael A; Lanter, Bernard B; Yonker, Lael M; Eaton, Alex D; Pirzai, Waheed; Gronert, Karsten; Bonventre, Joseph V; Hurley, Bryan P

    2017-08-01

    Excessive neutrophil infiltration of the lungs is a common contributor to immune-related pathology in many pulmonary disease states. In response to pathogenic infection, airway epithelial cells produce hepoxilin A3 (HXA3), initiating neutrophil transepithelial migration. Migrated neutrophils amplify this recruitment by producing a secondary gradient of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). We sought to determine whether this two-step eicosanoid chemoattractant mechanism could be exploited by the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ExoU, a P. aeruginosa cytotoxin, exhibits phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity in eukaryotic hosts, an enzyme critical for generation of certain eicosanoids. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neutrophil transepithelial migration, we evaluated the impact of ExoU expression on eicosanoid generation and function. We conclude that ExoU, by virtue of its PLA2 activity, augments and compensates for endogenous host neutrophil cPLA2α function, leading to enhanced transepithelial migration. This suggests that ExoU expression in P. aeruginosa can circumvent immune regulation at key signaling checkpoints in the neutrophil, resulting in exacerbated neutrophil recruitment.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoU augments neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Pazos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Excessive neutrophil infiltration of the lungs is a common contributor to immune-related pathology in many pulmonary disease states. In response to pathogenic infection, airway epithelial cells produce hepoxilin A3 (HXA3, initiating neutrophil transepithelial migration. Migrated neutrophils amplify this recruitment by producing a secondary gradient of leukotriene B4 (LTB4. We sought to determine whether this two-step eicosanoid chemoattractant mechanism could be exploited by the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ExoU, a P. aeruginosa cytotoxin, exhibits phospholipase A2 (PLA2 activity in eukaryotic hosts, an enzyme critical for generation of certain eicosanoids. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neutrophil transepithelial migration, we evaluated the impact of ExoU expression on eicosanoid generation and function. We conclude that ExoU, by virtue of its PLA2 activity, augments and compensates for endogenous host neutrophil cPLA2α function, leading to enhanced transepithelial migration. This suggests that ExoU expression in P. aeruginosa can circumvent immune regulation at key signaling checkpoints in the neutrophil, resulting in exacerbated neutrophil recruitment.

  17. CHANGES IN THE MORPHOLOGY AND POLYSACCHARIDE CONTENT OF MICROCYSTIS AERUGINOSA (CYANOBACTERIA) DURING FLAGELLATE GRAZING(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Kong, Fanxiang; Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Min; Xing, Peng; Cao, Huansheng

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the changes in the morphology and polysaccharide content of Microcystis aeruginosa (Kütz.) Kütz. during flagellate grazing, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to grazing Ochromonas sp. for a period of 9 d under controlled laboratory conditions. M. aeruginosa responded actively to flagellate grazing and formed colonies, most of which were made up of several or dozens of cells, suggesting that flagellate grazing may be one of the biotic factors responsible for colony formation in M. aeruginosa. When colonies were formed, the cell surface ultrastructure changed, and the polysaccharide layer on the surface of the cell wall became thicker. This change indicated that synthesis and secretion of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) of M. aeruginosa cells increased under flagellate grazing pressure. The contents of soluble extracellular polysaccharide (sEPS), bound extracellular polysaccharide (bEPS), and total polysaccharide (TPS) in colonial cells of M. aeruginosa increased significantly compared with those in single cells. This finding suggested that the increased amount of EPS on the cell surface may play a role in keeping M. aeruginosa cells together to form colonies. © 2008 Phycological Society of America.

  18. Direct evaluation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm mediators in a chronic infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Matthew S; Pang, Bing; Hong, Wenzhou; Waligora, Elizabeth A; Juneau, Richard A; Armbruster, Chelsie E; Weimer, Kristen E D; Murrah, Kyle; Mann, Ethan E; Lu, Haiping; Sprinkle, April; Parsek, Matthew R; Kock, Nancy D; Wozniak, Daniel J; Swords, W Edward

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms contribute to Pseudomonas aeruginosa persistence in a variety of diseases, including cystic fibrosis, burn wounds, and chronic suppurative otitis media. However, few studies have directly addressed P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo. We used a chinchilla model of otitis media, which has previously been used to study persistent Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae infections, to show that structures formed in vivo are biofilms of bacterial and host origin within a matrix that includes Psl, a P. aeruginosa biofilm polysaccharide. We evaluated three biofilm and/or virulence mediators of P. aeruginosa known to affect biofilm formation in vitro and pathogenesis in vivo--bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), flagella, and quorum sensing--in a chinchilla model. We show that c-di-GMP overproduction has a positive impact on bacterial persistence, while quorum sensing increases virulence. We found no difference in persistence attributed to flagella. We conclude from these studies that a chinchilla otitis media model provides a means to evaluate pathogenic mediators of P. aeruginosa and that in vitro phenotypes should be examined in multiple infection systems to fully understand their role in disease.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm, a Programmed Bacterial Life for Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehoon; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-06-28

    A biofilm is a community of microbes that typically inhabit on surfaces and are encased in an extracellular matrix. Biofilms display very dissimilar characteristics to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment and influence our lives tremendously in both positive and negative ways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium known to produce robust biofilms. P. aeruginosa biofilms cause severe problems in immunocompromised patients, including those with cystic fibrosis or wound infection. Moreover, the unique biofilm properties further complicate the eradication of the biofilm infection, leading to the development of chronic infections. In this review, we discuss the history of biofilm research and general characteristics of bacterial biofilms. Then, distinct features pertaining to each stage of P. aeruginosa biofilm development are highlighted. Furthermore, infections caused by biofilms on their own or in association with other bacterial species ( i.e. , multispecies biofilms) are discussed in detail.

  20. Necrotizing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Maharaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cavities are not typically associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. CAP due to P. aeruginosa is rare and even less commonly causes necrotizing pneumonia. We report a case of P. aeruginosa CAP that progressed to necrotizing pneumonia and was eventually fatal. Procalcitonin (PCT has been well investigated in guiding antibiotic therapy (especially CAP in adults. In this case, PCT at presentation and sequentially was negative. We discuss this caveat and present hypotheses as to the sensitivity and specificity of PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in these patients. To better characterize P. aeruginosa CAP, we undertook a review of cases indexed in PubMed from 2001 to 2016 (n=9. The data reveal that risk factors for P. aeruginosa CAP include smoking, alcohol use, obstructive lung disease, sinusitis, and hot tub use. The route of infection for P. aeruginosa CAP remains unknown. One of the most interesting findings on reviewing cases was that P. aeruginosa CAP involves the right upper lobe in the vast majority. We suggest that when physicians in the community see patients with distinctly upper lobe necrotizing or cavitary pneumonia, they should consider P. aeruginosa in their differential diagnosis. Further studies are needed to clarify route of infection, role of PCT and CRP, and optimal therapy including drug and duration.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Badami Nagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  2. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an obligate aerobic, motile, gram negative bacillus.which is able to grow and survive in almost any environment and resistant to temperature extremes. It is involved in the etiology of several diseases i.

  4. Effects of ambroxol on biofilm adhesion and viability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing defective strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi LU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of ambroxol on the biofilm viability and pristine adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild (PAO1 and quorum sensing defective strain (QS, gene deletion of ∆lasI and ∆rhlI. Methods The biofilm was treated by different concentrations (0, 1.875, 3.75mg/ml of ambroxol. The number of colony was measured with agar plate, multifunction fluorometer was used to measure the fluorescence intensity of PAO1 and QS strains at the bottom of 96-well plate. The adhesion ratio (% was calculated to determine the effects of ambroxol on bacterial biofilm adhesion. Results Ambroxol treatment reduced the survival rate of the mutant strains compared to that of wild strain, even though the QS strain had increased the adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared to that of wild strain (P<0.05. Conclusion Ambroxol has a property of significantly antagonizing quorum-sensing system, suggesting that it might be of importance in treatment against chronic Pseudomonasaeruginosainfections.

  5. Cross-regulation by CrcZ RNA controls anoxic biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Petra; Tata, Muralidhar; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Häussler, Susanne; Bläsi, Udo

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) can thrive in anaerobic biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we show that CrcZ is the most abundant PA14 RNA bound to the global regulator Hfq in anoxic biofilms grown in cystic fibrosis sputum medium. Hfq was crucial for anoxic biofilm formation. This observation complied with an RNAseq based transcriptome analysis and follow up studies that implicated Hfq in regulation of a central step preceding denitrification. CrcZ is known to act as a decoy that sequesters Hfq during relief of carbon catabolite repression, which in turn alleviates Hfq-mediated translational repression of catabolic genes. We therefore inferred that CrcZ indirectly impacts on biofilm formation by competing for Hfq. This hypothesis was supported by the findings that over-production of CrcZ mirrored the biofilm phenotype of the hfq deletion mutant, and that deletion of the crcZ gene augmented biofilm formation. To our knowledge, this is the first example where competition for Hfq by CrcZ cross-regulates an Hfq-dependent physiological process unrelated to carbon metabolism.

  6. Lipopolysaccharides of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raziuddin, S.; Siegelman, H.W.; Tornabene, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of two isolates of Microcystis aeruginosa were extracted with phenol/water and purified. Cesium chloride gradient ultracentrifugation of these preparations yielded only one fraction. The LPS contained significant amounts of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid, glucose, 3-deoxy sugars, glucosamine, fatty acids, fatty acid esters, hexoses, and phosphate. Heptose, a characteristic sugar component of the polysaccharide moiety of LPS of most gram-negative bacteria was absent. Lipopolysaccharides and lipid A hydrolysate of LPS preparations were active in mouse lethality and Limulus lysate gelation. The lipid A moiety was slightly less active in toxicity and Limulus lysate gelation assay than the intact LPS. The LPS and lipid A moiety of the two isolates of M. aeruginosa were less active in toxicity in mice and Limulus test than LPS of Salmonella abortus equi. 37 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  7. Tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in in-vitro biofilms to high-level peracetic acid disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbobola, A B; Sherry, L; Mckay, W G; Ramage, G; Williams, C

    2017-10-01

    Biofilm has been suggested as a cause of disinfection failures in flexible endoscopes where no lapses in the decontamination procedure can be identified. To test this theory, the activity of peracetic acid, one of the widely used disinfectants in the reprocessing of flexible endoscopes, was evaluated against both planktonic and sessile communities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the ability of P. aeruginosa biofilm to survive high-level peracetic acid disinfection. The susceptibility of planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa and biofilms aged 24, 48, 96, and 192 h to peracetic acid was evaluated by estimating their viability using resazurin viability and plate count methods. The biomass of the P. aeruginosa biofilms was also quantified using Crystal Violet assay. Planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa were treated with 5-30 ppm concentration of peracetic acid in the presence of 3.0 g/L of bovine serum albumin (BSA) for 5 min. Biofilms of P. aeruginosa were also treated with various peracetic acid concentrations (100-3000 ppm) for 5 min. Planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa were eradicated by 20 ppm of peracetic acid, whereas biofilms showed an age-dependent tolerance to peracetic acid, and 96 h biofilm was only eradicated at peracetic acid concentration of 2500 ppm. Ninety-six-hour P. aeruginosa biofilm survives 5 min treatment with 2000 ppm of peracetic acid, which is the working concentration used in some endoscope washer-disinfectors. This implies that disinfection failure of flexible endoscopes might occur when biofilms build up in the lumens of endoscopes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Comparative In Vitro Efficacy of Doripenem and Imipenem Against Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wali, N.; Mirza, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the in vitro efficacy of doripenem and imipenem against multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa from various clinical specimens. Study Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from November 2012 to November 2013. Methodology: MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from various clinical samples were included in the study. Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against doripenem and imipenem was performed by E-test strip and agar dilution methods. The results were interpreted as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Results: The maximum number of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from pure pus and pus swabs. In vitro efficacy of doripenem was found to be more effective as compared to imipenem against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa with both E-test strip and agar dilution methods. Overall, p-values of 0.014 and 0.037 were observed when susceptibility patterns of doripenem and imipenem were evaluated with E-test strip and agar dilution methods. Conclusion: In vitro efficacy of doripenem was found to be better against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa as compared to imipenem when tested by both E-test and agar dilution methods. (author)

  9. Strain- and Substrate-Dependent Redox Mediator and Electricity Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosire, Erick M; Blank, Lars M; Rosenbaum, Miriam A

    2016-08-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important, thriving member of microbial communities of microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BES) through the production of versatile phenazine redox mediators. Pure culture experiments with a model strain revealed synergistic interactions of P. aeruginosa with fermenting microorganisms whereby the synergism was mediated through the shared fermentation product 2,3-butanediol. Our work here shows that the behavior and efficiency of P. aeruginosa in mediated current production is strongly dependent on the strain of P. aeruginosa We compared levels of phenazine production by the previously investigated model strain P. aeruginosa PA14, the alternative model strain P. aeruginosa PAO1, and the BES isolate Pseudomonas sp. strain KRP1 with glucose and the fermentation products 2,3-butanediol and ethanol as carbon substrates. We found significant differences in substrate-dependent phenazine production and resulting anodic current generation for the three strains, with the BES isolate KRP1 being overall the best current producer and showing the highest electrochemical activity with glucose as a substrate (19 μA cm(-2) with ∼150 μg ml(-1) phenazine carboxylic acid as a redox mediator). Surprisingly, P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed very low phenazine production and electrochemical activity under all tested conditions. Microbial fuel cells and other microbial bioelectrochemical systems hold great promise for environmental technologies such as wastewater treatment and bioremediation. While there is much emphasis on the development of materials and devices to realize such systems, the investigation and a deeper understanding of the underlying microbiology and ecology are lagging behind. Physiological investigations focus on microorganisms exhibiting direct electron transfer in pure culture systems. Meanwhile, mediated electron transfer with natural redox compounds produced by, for example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa might enable an entire microbial

  10. Glycan involvement in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautto, Liisa; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Everest-Dass, Arun; Leong, Andrea; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark D P; Packer, Nicolle H; Peterson, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    The human eye is constantly bathed by tears, which protect the ocular surface via a variety of mechanisms. The O-linked glycans of tear mucins have long been considered to play a role in binding to pathogens and facilitating their removal in the tear flow. Other conjugated glycans in tears could similarly contribute to pathogen binding and removal but have received less attention. In the work presented here we assessed the contribution of glycan moieties, in particular the protein attached N-glycans, presented by the broad complement of tear proteins to the adhesion of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of microbial keratitis and ulceration of the cornea. Our adhesion assay involved immobilising the macromolecular components of tears into the wells of a polyvinyl difluoride (PVDF) microtitre filter plate and probing the binding of fluorescently labelled bacteria. Three P. aeruginosa strains were studied: a cytotoxic strain (6206) and an invasive strain (6294) from eye infections, and an invasive strain (320) from a urinary tract infection (UTI). The ocular isolates adhered two to three times more to human tears than to human saliva or porcine gastric mucin, suggesting ocular niche-specific adaptation. Support for the role of the N-glycans carried by human tear proteins in the binding and removal of P. aeruginosa from the eye was shown by: 1) pre-incubation of the bacteria with free component sugars, galactose, mannose, fucose and sialyl lactose (or combination thereof) inhibiting adhesion of all the P. aeruginosa strains to the immobilised tear proteins, with the greatest inhibition of binding of the ocular cytotoxic 6206 and least for the invasive 6294 strain; 2) pre-incubation of the bacteria with N-glycans released from the commercially available human milk lactoferrin, an abundant protein that carries N-linked glycans in tears, inhibiting the adhesion to tears of the ocular bacteria by up to 70%, which was significantly more

  11. [Immunization with Bifidobacterium bifidum-vectored OprI vaccine of Pseudomonas aeruginosa enhances inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Wengui

    2017-08-01

    Objective To study the pulmonary bacterial loads, splenocyte proliferation, distributions of T cell subsets and cell apoptosis in mice immunized with Bifidobacterium bifidum-vectored OprI (Bb-OprI) vaccine of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and challenged with P. aeruginosa PA01 strain. Methods BALB/c mice were immunized with 5×10 9 CFUs of vaccine by intragastric administration, 3 times a week for 3 weeks, and challenged intranasally with 5×10 6 CFUs of PA01 strain at the fourth week after the first immunization. At the second week after the challenge, all mice were sacrificed to separate their lungs and spleens, and the pulmonary bacterial loads were counted. The proliferation of the splenocytes was determined by MTT assay. The splenic CD4 + , CD8 + T cell subsets and the apoptotic rate of splenocytes were detected by flow cytometry. Results The number of pulmonary bacterial colonies in the mice immunized with the vaccine and challenged with PA01 strain decreased, while the proliferation of splenocytes and the proportion of CD4 + T cells markedly increased, and the apoptosis of splenocytes was notably reduced. Conclusion The intragastric vaccination of recombinant Bb-OprI vaccine can increase the proportion of CD4 + T cells and enhance the inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente em unidade de cuidados intensivos: desafios que procedem? Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente en una unidad de cuidados intensivos: desafíos que proceden? Multi-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa among patients from an intensive care unit: persistent challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Verônica Guilherme Ferrareze

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a ocorrência de infecção hospitalar por Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente em pacientes hospitalizados em uma unidade de cuidados intensivos. MÉTODO: estudo retrospectivo realizado de outubro de 2003 a setembro de 2004 em um hospital de emergências. RESULTADOS: Totalizou-se 68 portadores de bactérias multiresistentes sendo 10 (14,7% de P. aeruginosa. Destes, 8 pacientes eram do sexo masculino, as médias de idade e de internação foram respectivamente de 57 anos a média de idade, 43,7 a média de dias de internação e 7 pacientes morreram. Isolaram-se 8 cepas no sangue, cinco na urina, duas em cateteres venosos e uma no líquor, das quais sete sensíveis somente a polimixina e três ao imipenem. CONCLUSÃO: O perfil microbiológico deve ser avaliado periodicamente visto que é específico de uma unidade ou instituição, e demanda ações correlatas.OBJETIVOS: Evaluar la ocurrencia de infección hospitalaria por Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente en pacientes hospitalizados en una unidad de cuidados intensivos. MÉTODO: estudio retrospectivo realizado de octubre del 2003 a setiembre del 2004 en un hospital de emergencias. RESULTADOS: Se tuvo un total de 68 portadores de bacterias multiresistentes de las cuales 10 (14,7% de P. aeruginosa. De éstos, 8 pacientes eran del sexo masculino, los promedios de edad y de internamiento fueron respectivamente de 57 años y 43,7 de días de internamiento y 7 pacientes murieron. Se aislaron 8 cepas en la sangre, cinco en la orina, dos en catéteres venosos y una en el licor, de ellas siete eran sensibles sólo a la polimixina y tres al imipenem. CONCLUSIÓN: El perfil microbiológico debe ser evaluado periódicamente dado que es específico de una unidad o institución, y demanda acciones correlatas.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence of multi-resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa infection among patients from an Intensive Care Unit. METHODS: This retrospective study was

  13. The genome and structural proteome of YuA, a new Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage resembling M6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim; Sykilinda, Nina; Briers, Yves; Roucourt, Bart; Lavigne, Rob; Robben, Johan; Domashin, Artem; Miroshnikov, Konstantin; Volckaert, Guido; Hertveldt, Kirsten

    2008-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage YuA (Siphoviridae) was isolated from a pond near Moscow, Russia. It has an elongated head, encapsulating a circularly permuted genome of 58,663 bp, and a flexible, noncontractile tail, which is terminally and subterminally decorated with short fibers. The YuA genome is neither Mu- nor lambda-like and encodes 78 gene products that cluster in three major regions involved in (i) DNA metabolism and replication, (ii) host interaction, and (iii) phage particle formation and host lysis. At the protein level, YuA displays significant homology with phages M6, phiJL001, 73, B3, DMS3, and D3112. Eighteen YuA proteins were identified as part of the phage particle by mass spectrometry analysis. Five different bacterial promoters were experimentally identified using a promoter trap assay, three of which have a sigma54-specific binding site and regulate transcription in the genome region involved in phage particle formation and host lysis. The dependency of these promoters on the host sigma54 factor was confirmed by analysis of an rpoN mutant strain of P. aeruginosa PAO1. At the DNA level, YuA is 91% identical to the recently (July 2007) annotated phage M6 of the Lindberg typing set. Despite this level of DNA homology throughout the genome, both phages combined have 15 unique genes that do not occur in the other phage. The genome organization of both phages differs substantially from those of the other known Pseudomonas-infecting Siphoviridae, delineating them as a distinct genus within this family.

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hospital Outbreak Driven by a Contaminated Disinfectant-Soap Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanini, Simone; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Puro, Vincenzo; Martini, Lorena; Imperi, Francesco; Piselli, Pierluca; Montanaro, Marco; Paoletti, Simonetta; Visca, Paolo; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection represents a main cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. This study describes a fatal epidemic of P. aeruginosa that occurred in a hematology unit in Italy. Methods Retrospective cohort study, prospective surveillance, auditing, extensive testing on healthcare workers and environmental investigation were performed to define the dynamics and potential causes of transmission. RAPD, macrorestriction analyses and sequence typing were used to define relationships between P. aeruginosa isolates. Results Eighteen cases of infection were identified in the different phases of the investigation. Of these, five constitute a significant molecular cluster of infection. A P. aeruginosa strain with the same genetic fingerprint and sequence type (ST175) as clinical isolates strain was also isolated from a heavily contaminated triclosan soap dispenser. Discussion and Conclusions Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that patients became indirectly infected, e.g., during central venous catheter handling through contaminated items, and that the triclosan soap dispenser acted as a common continuous source of P. aeruginosa infection. Since P. aeruginosa is intrinsically unsusceptible to triclosan, the use of triclosan-based disinfectant formulations should be avoided in those healthcare settings hosting patients at high risk of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:21359222

  15. Regulation and function of versatile aerobic and anaerobic respiratory metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eArai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitously distributed opportunistic pathogen that inhabits soil and water as well as animal-, human-, and plant-host-associated environments. The ubiquity would be attributed to its very versatile energy metabolism. P. aeruginosa has a highly branched respiratory chain terminated by multiple terminal oxidases and denitrification enzymes. Five terminal oxidases for aerobic respiration have been identified in the P. aeruginosa cells. Three of them, the cbb3-1 oxidase, the cbb3-2 oxidase, and the aa3 oxidase, are cytochrome c oxidases and the other two, the bo3 oxidase and the cyanide-insensitive oxidase, are quinol oxidases. Each oxidase has a specific affinity for oxygen, efficiency of energy coupling, and tolerance to various stresses such as cyanide and reactive nitrogen species. These terminal oxidases are used differentially according to the environmental conditions. P. aeruginosa also has a complete set of the denitrification enzymes that reduce nitrate to molecular nitrogen via nitrite, nitric oxide (NO, and nitrous oxide. These nitrogen oxides function as alternative electron acceptors and enable P. aeruginosa to grow under anaerobic conditions. One of the denitrification enzymes, NO reductase, is also expected to function for detoxification of NO produced by the host immune defense system. The control of the expression of these aerobic and anaerobic respiratory enzymes would contribute to the adaptation of P. aeruginosa to a wide range of environmental conditions including in the infected hosts. Characteristics of these respiratory enzymes and the regulatory system that controls the expression of the respiratory genes in the P. aeruginosa cells are overviewed in this article.

  16. HD-GYP domain proteins regulate biofilm formation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, Robert P.; Lucey, Jean; O'Donovan, Karen

    2009-01-01

    residues (YN-GYP). Here we have investigated the role of these proteins in biofilm formation, virulence factor synthesis and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Mutation of PA4108 and PA4781 led to an increase in the level of cyclic-di-GMP in P. aeruginosa, consistent with the predicted activity of the encoded......2572 had a negative influence on swarming that was cryptic and was revealed only after removal of an uncharacterized C-terminal domain. Mutation of PA4108, PA4781 and PA2572 had distinct effects on biofilm formation and architecture of P. aeruginosa. All three proteins contributed to virulence of P...

  17. Sensitivity patterns of pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates obtained from clinical specimens in peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, S.H.; Khan, M.Z.U.; Naeem, M.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a highly virulent opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections.Affected patients are often hospitalized in an intensive care unit, and are immuno-compromised as a result of disease and treatment. Suspected P. aeruginosa require timely, adequate and empirical antibiotic therapy to ensure improved outcomes. The purpose of the study was to find the sensitivity and resistance pattern of P. aeruginosa to various groups of drugs, in clinical isolates collected from two major tertiary care hospitals of Peshawar. Methods: Different clinical isolate were taken from patients admitted in various wards of Khyber Teaching Hospital and Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar. Results: A total of 258 clinical isolates were positive for P. aeruginosa out of 2058 clinical isolates. Pseudomonas showed high degree of resistance to third generation Cephalosporins (Ceftazidime, and Ceftriaxone) and moderate degree of resistance to Quinolones and Aminoglycosides (Ofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin and Amikacin). Low resistance was observed to different combinations (Cefoperazone + Sulbactum, Piperacillin + Tazobactum). Meropenem and Imipenem had negligible resistance. Conclusion: There is growing resistance to different classes of antibiotics. Combination drugs are useful approach for empirical treatment in suspected Pseudomonas infection. Imipenem and Meropenem are extremely effective but should be in reserve. (author)

  18. Cysteamine re-establishes the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by macrophages bearing the cystic fibrosis-relevant F508del-CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Eleonora; Monzani, Romina; Villella, Valeria R; Esposito, Speranza; Saluzzo, Francesca; Rossin, Federica; D'Eletto, Manuela; Tosco, Antonella; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Izzo, Valentina; Maiuri, Maria C; Kroemer, Guido; Raia, Valeria; Maiuri, Luigi

    2017-01-12

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal monogenic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections and colonization, mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, resulting in unresolved airway inflammation. CF is caused by mutations in the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, which functions as a chloride channel in epithelial cells, macrophages, and other cell types. Impaired bacterial handling by macrophages is a feature of CF airways, although it is still debated how defective CFTR impairs bacterial killing. Recent evidence indicates that a defective autophagy in CF macrophages leads to alterations of bacterial clearance upon infection. Here we use bone marrow-derived macrophages from transgenic mice to provide the genetic proof that defective CFTR compromises both uptake and clearance of internalized Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We demonstrate that the proteostasis regulator cysteamine, which rescues the function of the most common F508del-CFTR mutant and hence reduces lung inflammation in CF patients, can also repair the defects of CF macrophages, thus restoring both bacterial internalization and clearance through a process that involves upregulation of the pro-autophagic protein Beclin 1 and re-establishment of the autophagic pathway. Altogether these results indicate that cysteamine restores the function of several distinct cell types, including that of macrophages, which might contribute to its beneficial effects on CF.

  19. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  20. Comparison of high-resolution computed tomography findings between Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and Cytomegalovirus pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Okada, Fumito; Takata, Shoko; Ono, Asami; Sato, Haruka; Mori, Hiromu; Nakayama, Tomoko; Ando, Yumiko; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi

    2014-01-01

    To compare pulmonary high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia to HRCT findings in patients with Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia. We studied 124 patients (77 men, 47 women; age range, 20-89 years; mean age, 65.4 years) with P. aeruginosa pneumonia and 44 patients (22 men, 22 women; age range, 36-86 years; mean age, 63.2 years) with CMV pneumonia. CT findings of consolidation (p < 0.005), bronchial wall thickening (p < 0.001), cavity (p < 0.05), and pleural effusion (p < 0.001) were significantly more frequent in patients with P. aeruginosa pneumonia than in those with CMV pneumonia. Centrilobular nodules, a crazy-paving appearance, and nodules were significantly more frequent in patients with CMV pneumonia than in those with P. aeruginosa pneumonia (all p < 0.001). Pulmonary HRCT findings, such as bronchial wall thickening, crazy-paving appearance, and nodules may be useful in distinguishing between P. aeruginosa pneumonia and CMV pneumonia. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of high-resolution computed tomography findings between Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and Cytomegalovirus pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Okada, Fumito; Takata, Shoko; Ono, Asami; Sato, Haruka; Mori, Hiromu [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yufu, Oita (Japan); Nakayama, Tomoko [Oita Red Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oita (Japan); Ando, Yumiko [Oita Nishibeppu National Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oita (Japan); Hiramatsu, Kazufumi [Oita University Hospital, Hospital Infection Control Center, Oita (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    To compare pulmonary high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia to HRCT findings in patients with Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia. We studied 124 patients (77 men, 47 women; age range, 20-89 years; mean age, 65.4 years) with P. aeruginosa pneumonia and 44 patients (22 men, 22 women; age range, 36-86 years; mean age, 63.2 years) with CMV pneumonia. CT findings of consolidation (p < 0.005), bronchial wall thickening (p < 0.001), cavity (p < 0.05), and pleural effusion (p < 0.001) were significantly more frequent in patients with P. aeruginosa pneumonia than in those with CMV pneumonia. Centrilobular nodules, a crazy-paving appearance, and nodules were significantly more frequent in patients with CMV pneumonia than in those with P. aeruginosa pneumonia (all p < 0.001). Pulmonary HRCT findings, such as bronchial wall thickening, crazy-paving appearance, and nodules may be useful in distinguishing between P. aeruginosa pneumonia and CMV pneumonia. (orig.)

  2. Effect of fluid motion on colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis aeruginosa, generally occurring in large colonies under natural conditions, mainly exists as single cells in laboratory cultures. The mechanisms involved in colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa and their roles in algal blooms remain unknown. In this study, based on previous research findings that fluid motion may stimulate the colony formation in green algae, culture experiments were conducted under axenic conditions in a circular water chamber where the flow rate, temperature, light, and nutrients were controlled. The number of cells of Microcystis aeruginosa, the number of cells per colony, and the colonial characteristics in various growth phases were observed and measured. The results indicated that the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa, which was not observed under stagnant conditions, was evident when there was fluid motion, with the number of cells per largest colony reaching 120 and the proportion of the number of cells in colonial form to the total number of cells and the mean number of cells per colony reaching their peak values at a flow rate of 35 cm/s. Based on the analysis of colony formation process, fluid motion stimulates the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa in the lag growth phase, while flushes and disaggregates the colonies in the exponential growth phase. The stimulation effect in the lag growth phase may be attributable to the involvement of fluid motion in a series of physiological processes, including the uptake of trace elements and the synthesis and secretion of polysaccharides. In addition, the experimental groups exhibiting typical colonial characteristics in the lag growth phase were found to have higher cell biomass in the later phase.

  3. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Eva; Cots, Francesc; Sala, Maria; Comas, Mercè; Belvis, Francesc; Riu, Marta; Salvadó, Margarita; Grau, Santiago; Horcajada, Juan P; Montero, Maria Milagro; Castells, Xavier

    2012-05-23

    We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain). All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros). In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively). P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact.

  4. Diversity of Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Determinants in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Associated with Fresh Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Allydice-Francis, Kashina; Brown, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    With the increased focus on healthy eating and consuming raw vegetables, this study assessed the extent of contamination of fresh vegetables by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Jamaica and examined the antibiotic susceptibility profiles and the presence of various virulence associated determinants of P. aeruginosa. Analyses indicated that vegetables from retail markets and supermarkets were widely contaminated by P. aeruginosa; produce from markets were more frequently contaminated, but the differen...

  5. Electrochemical sensors for identifying pyocyanin production in clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismaet, Hunter J; Pinto, Ameet J; Goluch, Edgar D

    2017-11-15

    In clinical practice, delays in obtaining culture results impact patient care and the ability to tailor antibiotic therapy. Despite the advancement of rapid molecular diagnostics, the use of plate cultures inoculated from swab samples continues to be the standard practice in clinical care. Because the inoculation culture process can take between 24 and 48h before a positive identification test can be run, there is an unmet need to develop rapid throughput methods for bacterial identification. Previous work has shown that pyocyanin can be used as a rapid, redox-active biomarker for identifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical infections. However, further validation is needed to confirm pyocyanin production occurs in all clinical strains of P. aeruginosa. Here, we validate this electrochemical detection strategy using clinical isolates obtained from patients with hospital-acquired infections or with cystic fibrosis. Square-wave voltammetric scans of 94 different clinical P. aeruginosa isolates were taken to measure the concentration of pyocyanin. The results showed that all isolates produced measureable concentrations of pyocyanin with production rates correlated with patient symptoms and comorbidity. Further bioinformatics analysis confirmed that 1649 genetically sequenced strains (99.9%) of P. aeruginosa possess the two genes (PhzM and PhzS) necessary to produce pyocyanin, supporting the specificity of this biomarker. Confirming the production of pyocyanin by all clinically-relevant strains of P. aeruginosa is a significant step towards validating this strategy for rapid, point-of-care diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An outbreak of hospital-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection caused by contaminated bottled water in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmanns, T; Oppert, M; Martin, M; Amorosa, R; Zuschneid, I; Frei, U; Rüden, H; Weist, K

    2008-05-01

    This study describes an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections caused by contaminated bottled still water (BSW) in six intensive care units (ICUs) of a German university hospital. Clinical and environmental samples from these units were cultured and genotyped by amplified fragment-length polymorphism and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. Microbiological results were reviewed on a weekly basis to determine the number of P. aeruginosa infections and colonisations of ICU patients. Clinical specimens from 19 ICU patients--15 infections and four colonisations--yielded the same strain of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, four of 103 environmental samples also yielded P. aeruginosa. However, only a P. aeruginosa strain isolated from unopened BSW was genetically identical to the P. aeruginosa strain isolated from the patients. In the 42-week period before the outbreak, the mean weekly number of new ICU patients infected or colonised with P. aeruginosa was 46.9 (95% CI 40.7-53.1)/1000 bed-days. During the 6-week period of the outbreak, the weekly number of new patients with P. aeruginosa was 88.9 (95% CI 54.3-122.2)/1000 bed-days. This number returned to the previous level after removal of the BSW. Thus, the microbiological and epidemiological findings revealed that the outbreak was related to BSW contaminated with P. aeruginosa. It was concluded that all untested BSW should be removed from ICUs.

  7. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Peek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL’s published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs.

  8. Ocorrência de linhagens de Pseudomonas aeruginosa cloro resistentes em águas de diferentes origens = Ocurrence of chlorine resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from different water sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glícia Maria Torres Calazans

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa é conhecida por sua versatilidade metabólica e extrema capacidade de adaptação a diferentes ambientes, inclusive aquáticos. Para desinfecção de águas, o cloro e agentes que contêm cloro continuam sendo os mais usados no mundo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resistência ao cloro de linhagens de P. aeruginosa, isoladas de amostras de águas de diversos ambientes. Foram testados diferentes tempos de contato (1, 5, 10, 20, 30 e 40 minutos e soluções aquosas de cloro, com concentrações definidascom base na legislação vigente no país para água potável: 0,5; 1,0 e 2,0 ppm. O teste de resistência ao cloro foi desenvolvido por meio da exposição direta das bactérias às soluções. Os resultados revelaram que P. aeruginosa, isoladas de diferentes fontes de água, têm ahabilidade de sobreviver a diferentes concentrações de cloro. Na concentração de 1 ppm, a maioria das linhagens não foi inibida. As linhagens mais resistentes ao cloro também apresentaram relação de multirresistência à maioria dos antibióticos testados.The nutritional versatility and the adaptability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to different environments, including water, are well known. Chlorine and other chlorine agents are used as water disinfecting all around the world. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible chlorine resistance amongst P. aeruginosa strains isolated from different aquatic sources by using different contact time (1, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes in solutions with known chlorine concentrations according current legislation in the country to potable water: 0.5; 1.0 and 2.0 ppm. The chlorine resistance test was done by direct exposure of P. aeruginosa under a solution with known chlorine concentration. Results showed that P. aeruginosa strains isolated from different aquatic sources are able tosurvive in different chlorine concentrations. At 1 ppm, most of them were not inhibited. It was also observed

  9. A diagnostic PCR assay for the detection of an Australian epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lung infection with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with worsening lung function, increased hospitalisation and reduced life expectancy. A virulent clonal strain of P. aeruginosa (Australian epidemic strain I; AES-I) has been found to be widespread in CF patients in eastern Australia. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify genetic sequences that are present in the AES-I strain but absent from the sequenced reference strain PAO1. We used PCR to evaluate the distribution of several of the AES-I loci amongst a collection of 188 P. aeruginosa isolates which was comprised of 35 AES-I isolates (as determined by PFGE), 78 non-AES-I CF isolates including other epidemic CF strains as well as 69 P. aeruginosa isolates from other clinical and environmental sources. Results We have identified a unique AES-I genetic locus that is present in all 35 AES-I isolates tested and not present in any of the other 153 P. aeruginosa strains examined. We have used this unique AES-I locus to develop a diagnostic PCR and a real-time PCR assay to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa and AES-I in patient sputum samples. Conclusions We have developed diagnostic PCR assays that are 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the P. aeruginosa strain AES-I. We have also shown that Whatman FTA® Elute cards may be used with PCR-based assays to rapidly detect the presence of P. aeruginosa strains in CF sputum. PMID:20637114

  10. A diagnostic PCR assay for the detection of an Australian epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Anna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lung infection with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF and is associated with worsening lung function, increased hospitalisation and reduced life expectancy. A virulent clonal strain of P. aeruginosa (Australian epidemic strain I; AES-I has been found to be widespread in CF patients in eastern Australia. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH was employed to identify genetic sequences that are present in the AES-I strain but absent from the sequenced reference strain PAO1. We used PCR to evaluate the distribution of several of the AES-I loci amongst a collection of 188 P. aeruginosa isolates which was comprised of 35 AES-I isolates (as determined by PFGE, 78 non-AES-I CF isolates including other epidemic CF strains as well as 69 P. aeruginosa isolates from other clinical and environmental sources. Results We have identified a unique AES-I genetic locus that is present in all 35 AES-I isolates tested and not present in any of the other 153 P. aeruginosa strains examined. We have used this unique AES-I locus to develop a diagnostic PCR and a real-time PCR assay to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa and AES-I in patient sputum samples. Conclusions We have developed diagnostic PCR assays that are 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the P. aeruginosa strain AES-I. We have also shown that Whatman FTA® Elute cards may be used with PCR-based assays to rapidly detect the presence of P. aeruginosa strains in CF sputum.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  12. Plant-expressed pyocins for control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas Paškevičius

    Full Text Available The emergence, persistence and spread of antibiotic-resistant human pathogenic bacteria heralds a growing global health crisis. Drug-resistant strains of gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are especially dangerous and the medical and economic burden they impose underscore the critical need for finding new antimicrobials. Recent studies have demonstrated that plant-expressed bacteriocins of the colicins family can be efficient antibacterials against all major enteropathogenic strains of E. coli. We extended our studies of colicin-like bacteriocins to pyocins, which are produced by strains of P. aeruginosa for ecological advantage against other strains of the same species. Using a plant-based transient expression system, we expressed six different pyocins, namely S5, PaeM, L1, L2, L3 and one new pyocin, PaeM4, and purified them to homogeneity. Among these pyocins, PaeM4 demonstrated the broadest spectrum of activity by controlling 53 of 100 tested clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. The activity of plant-made pyocins was confirmed in the agar drop, liquid culture susceptibility and biofilm assays, and in the Galleria mellonella animal infection model.

  13. Evolution and diversification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the paranasal sinuses of cystic fibrosis children have implications for chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Rau, Martin Holm; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2012-01-01

    that the paranasal sinuses constitute an important niche for the colonizing bacteria in many patients. The paranasal sinuses often harbor distinct bacterial subpopulations, and in the early colonization phases there seems to be a migration from the sinuses to the lower airways, suggesting that independent adaptation...... and evolution take place in the sinuses. Importantly, before the onset of chronic lung infection, lineages with mutations conferring a large fitness benefit in CF airways such as mucA and lasR as well as small colony variants and antibiotic-resistant clones are part of the sinus populations. Thus, the paranasal...

  14. In-vivo expression profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections reveals niche-specific and strain-independent transcriptional programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bielecki

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a threatening, opportunistic pathogen causing disease in immunocompromised individuals. The hallmark of P. aeruginosa virulence is its multi-factorial and combinatorial nature. It renders such bacteria infectious for many organisms and it is often resistant to antibiotics. To gain insights into the physiology of P. aeruginosa during infection, we assessed the transcriptional programs of three different P. aeruginosa strains directly after isolation from burn wounds of humans. We compared the programs to those of the same strains using two infection models: a plant model, which consisted of the infection of the midrib of lettuce leaves, and a murine tumor model, which was obtained by infection of mice with an induced tumor in the abdomen. All control conditions of P. aeruginosa cells growing in suspension and as a biofilm were added to the analysis. We found that these different P. aeruginosa strains express a pool of distinct genetic traits that are activated under particular infection conditions regardless of their genetic variability. The knowledge herein generated will advance our understanding of P. aeruginosa virulence and provide valuable cues for the definition of prospective targets to develop novel intervention strategies.

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-09

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation.

  16. In vitro susceptibility of aural isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to commonly used ototopical antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohar, J E; Kenna, M A; Wadowsky, R M

    1996-03-01

    The choice of antimicrobial agents used to treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of the ear is quite empiric. Yet in spite of this, very little has been published examining susceptibility patterns of aural isolates of P. aeruginosa. Recently, increasing concern has emerged over the development of resistance to many of the commonly used ototopical preparations with activity against P. aeruginosa. This concern stems from the fact that these preparations have been in use for a long time, and P. aeruginosa is known to develop resistance fairly readily. We prospectively studied the susceptibilities of aural isolates of P. aeruginosa in 231 consecutive children who were seen in the outpatient Pediatric Otolaryngology Department at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh during the years 1992 and 1993. The agents tested included neomycin, polymyxin B, colistin, and norfloxacin. We found that only 17.8% of the isolates were sensitive to neomycin, as opposed to > 95% for each of the other agents tested (polymyxin B, 99.6%; colistin, 97.4%; and norfloxacin, 98.3%). This difference proved to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). Given the concern of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity and the high rate of neomycin resistance, we believe that further investigation of other alternative ototopic agents with activity against P. aeruginosa is warranted.

  17. Bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, M. A.; Irannajad, M.; Azadmehr, A. R.; Meshkini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Bioleaching is an environmentally friendly method for extraction of metal from ores. In this study, bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a heterotrophic bacterium that can produce various organic acids in an appropriate culture medium, and these acids can operate as leaching agents. The parameters, such as particle size, glucose percentage in the culture medium, bioleaching time, and solid/liquid ratio were optimized. Optimum bioleaching conditions were found as follows: particle size of 150-177 μm, glucose percentage of 6%, bioleaching time of 8 d, and solid/liquid ratio of 1:80. Under these conditions, 53% of copper was extracted.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia among Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Patients: Relation to Initial Antibiotic Therapy and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migiyama, Yohei; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kaku, Norihito; Harada, Yosuke; Yamada, Koichi; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Matsuda, Junichi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kohrogi, Hirotsugu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. However, P. aeruginosa bacteremia in immunocompetent patients has also been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of P. aeruginosa bacteremia in relation to the immune status of the patients. The medical records of 126 adult patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia in Nagasaki University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed between January 2003 and December 2012. Of 126 patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia, 60 patients (47.6%) were classified as immunocompetent. Mortality in immunocompetent patients tended to be lower than in immunocompromised patients (7-day mortality, 8% vs. 30%, P antibiotic therapy (HR: 0.21, P immunocompromised, but not immunocompetent patients, initial appropriate antibiotic therapy was associated with lower mortality (30-day mortality 20.5% vs. 66.7%, P < 0.01 by log-rank test).

  19. Relationship between cystic fibrosis respiratory tract bacterial communities and age, genotype, antibiotics and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Lemon, Katherine P; Martin, Thomas R; Allgaier, Martin; Kembel, Steven W; Knapp, Alixandra A; Lory, Stephen; Brodie, Eoin L; Lynch, Susan V; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Green, Jessica L; Maurer, Brian A; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    Polymicrobial bronchopulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) cause progressive lung damage and death. Although the arrival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa often heralds a more rapid rate of pulmonary decline, there is significant inter-individual variation in the rate of decline, the causes of which remain poorly understood. By coupling culture-independent methods with ecological analyses, we discovered correlations between bacterial community profiles and clinical disease markers in respiratory tracts of 45 children with CF. Bacterial community complexity was inversely correlated with patient age, presence of P. aeruginosa and antibiotic exposure, and was related to CF genotype. Strikingly, bacterial communities lacking P. aeruginosa were much more similar to each other than were those containing P. aeruginosa, regardless of antibiotic exposure. This suggests that community composition might be a better predictor of disease progression than the presence of P. aeruginosa alone and deserves further study.

  20. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy.

  1. Survival, recovery and microcystin release of Microcystis aeruginosa in cold or dark condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Gan, Nanqin; Liu, Jin; Zheng, Lingling; Li, Lin; Song, Lirong

    2017-03-01

    Microcystis often dominates phytoplankton in eutrophic lakes and must survive a long period of cold or dark conditions. However, the survival strategies of Microcystis to withstand cold or dark stress are less well known. In this study, we conducted experiments on the responses of two toxic Microcystis aeruginosa strains (FACHB-905 and FACHB-915) and their microcystin release in conditions of low temperature (15°C or 4°C, with illumination) or darkness, and subsequent recovery in standard conditions (25°C with illumination). On exposure to 15°C, a small decrease in cell viability was observed, but the cell number increased gradually, suggesting that M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 cells seem in general tolerant in 15°C. Interestingly, our results show that a higher carotenoid content and microcystin release potentially enhance the fitness of surviving cells at 15°C. M. aeruginosa cells exposed to lower temperature light stress (4°C) did not completely lose viability and retained the ability to reinitiate growth. In darkness, the maximum quantum yield ( F v/ F m) and the maximum electron transport rate (ETRmax) values and cell viability of M. aeruginosa cells gradually decreased with time. During the recovery period, the photosynthetic efficiency of M. aeruginosa reverted to the normal level. Additionally, M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 exposed to low temperature had increased caspase-3-like activity and DNA fragmentation, which suggests the occurrence of a type of cell death in M. aeruginosa cells under cold stress similar to programmed cell death. Overall, our findings could confer certain advantages on the Microcystis for surviving cold or dark conditions encountered in the annual cycle, and help explain its repeated occurrence in water blooms in large and shallow lakes.

  2. Synergistic Efficacy of Aedes aegypti Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin A2 and Tetracycline against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaojun; Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Liu, Qingzhong; Kim, Wooseong; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Zhang, Rijun; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance has created an urgent need for alternative drugs with new mechanisms of action. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates that could address the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, either alone or in combination with conventional antibiotics. We studied the antimicrobial efficacy and bactericidal mechanism of cecropin A2, a 36-residue α-helical cationic peptide derived from Aedes aegypti cecropin A, focusing on the common pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The peptide showed little hemolytic activity and toxicity toward mammalian cells, and the MICs against most clinical P. aeruginosa isolates were 32 to 64 μg/ml, and its MICs versus other Gram-negative bacteria were 2 to 32 μg/ml. Importantly, cecropin A2 demonstrated synergistic activity against P. aeruginosa when combined with tetracycline, reducing the MICs of both agents by 8-fold. The combination was also effective in vivo in the P. aeruginosa/Galleria mellonella model (P < 0.001). We found that cecropin A2 bound to P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharides, permeabilized the membrane, and interacted with the bacterial genomic DNA, thus facilitating the translocation of tetracycline into the cytoplasm. In summary, the combination of cecropin A2 and tetracycline demonstrated synergistic antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo, offering an alternative approach for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:28483966

  3. RNAi screen reveals an Abl kinase-dependent host cell pathway involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F Pielage

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of approximately 80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa-induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections.

  4. Royal Jelly Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adherence and Reduces Excessive Inflammatory Responses in Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Susilowati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium and causes respiratory infection especially in elderly patients. Royal jelly has been used worldwide as a traditional remedy and as a nutrient; however, the effect against P. aeruginosa is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze antibacterial, antiadherent, and anti-inflammatory effects of royal jelly against P. aeruginosa. Wild-type strain PAO1 and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were used for antibacterial assay and antiadherent assay to abiotic surface and epithelial cells, which are pharynx (Detroit 562 and lung (NCI-H292 epithelial cells. In anti-inflammatory assay, epithelial cells were pretreated with royal jelly before bacterial exposure to investigate its inhibitory effect on interleukin (IL-8 and macrophage inflammatory protein-3α/CCL20 overproduction. Although royal jelly did not have antibacterial activity at concentration of 50% w/v, antiadherent activity was confirmed on the abiotic surface and epithelial cells under concentration of 25%. Pretreatment with royal jelly significantly inhibited overproduction of IL-8 and CCL20 from both cells. These results demonstrated that royal jelly inhibits P. aeruginosa adherence and protects epithelial cells from excessive inflammatory responses against P. aeruginosa infection. Our findings suggested that royal jelly may be a useful supplement as complementary and alternative medicine for preventing respiratory infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  5. A case of orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kusunoki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Orbital apex syndrome is commonly been thought to have a poor prognosis. Many cases of this syndrome have been reported to be caused by paranasal sinus mycosis. We encountered a very rare case (60-year-old woman of sinusitis with orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. She had received insulin and dialysis for diabtes and diabetic nephropathy, moreover anticoagulants after heart by-pass surgery. She underwent endoscopic sinus operation and was treated with antibiotics, but her loss of left vision did not improve. Recently, sinusitis cases due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reported to be a increasing. Therefore, we should consider the possibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as mycosis as infections of the sinus, especially inpatients who are immunocompromised body.

  6. Pseudomoniasis phytotherapy: A review on most important Iranian medicinal plants effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Bahmani; Mahmoud Rafieian-Kopaei; Hassan Hassanzadazar; Morovat Taherikalani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium found in water and soil. It is a normal flora in skin and gastrointestinal tract of human beings. P. aeruginosa as an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections having multiple pathogenic factors and shows high rate of resistance to different antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify the most important native medicinal plants of Iran effective on P. aeruginosa.Materials and Methods: ...

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pool Water: Evidences and Perspectives for a New Control Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Guida, Marco; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Gall?, Francesca; Gesuele, Renato; Valeriani, Federica; Liguori, Renato; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Liguori, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently isolated in swimming pool settings. Nine recreational and rehabilitative swimming pools were monitored according to the local legislation. The presence of P. aeruginosa was correlated to chlorine concentration. The ability of the isolates to form a biofilm on plastic materials was also investigated. In 59.5% of the samples, microbial contamination exceeded the threshold values. P. aeruginosa was isolated in 50.8% of these samples. The presence of P. aerugi...

  8. Early aggressive eradication therapy for intermittent Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway colonization in cystic fibrosis patients: 15 years experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.R.; Pressler, T.; Høiby, Niels

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 1989, CF-patients intermittently colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been treated with inhaled colistin and oral ciprofloxacin in the Copenhagen CF-centre. The study evaluates 15 years results of this treatment. METHODS: All isolates of P. aeruginosa from CF-patients inte......BACKGROUND: Since 1989, CF-patients intermittently colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been treated with inhaled colistin and oral ciprofloxacin in the Copenhagen CF-centre. The study evaluates 15 years results of this treatment. METHODS: All isolates of P. aeruginosa from CF......-patients intermittently colonized with P. aeruginosa from 1989 to 2003 were identified All anti-P. aeruginosa treatments were evaluated for antibiotics used, treatment duration, pseudomonas-free interval and development of chronic infection. All P. aeruginosa isolates were assessed for resistance and for non......-mucoid or mucoid phenotype. RESULTS: 146 CF-patients were included in the study (1106 patient-years). 99 patients had first ever isolate during the study period. Median observation time 7 years (0.1-14.9). 12 patients developed chronic infection. A Kaplan Meyer plot showed protection from chronic infection in up...

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Alters Growth Activity, Autolysis, and Antibiotic Tolerance in a Human Host-Adapted Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Christensen, Anne-Mette; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among members of polymicrobial infections or between pathogens and the commensal flora may determine disease outcomes. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are important opportunistic human pathogens and are both part of the polymicrobial infection communities in human...... hosts. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro interaction between S. aureus and a collection of P. aeruginosa isolates representing different evolutionary steps of a dominant lineage, DK2, that have evolved through decades of growth in chronically infected patients. While the early adapted P....... aeruginosa DK2 strains outcompeted S. aureus during coculture on agar plates, we found that later P. aeruginosa DK2 strains showed a commensal-like interaction, where S. aureus was not inhibited by P. aeruginosa and the growth activity of P. aeruginosa was enhanced in the presence of S. aureus. This effect...

  10. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin that hijacks the host ubiquitin proteolytic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Bomberger

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen chronically infecting the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, pneumonia, cystic fibrosis (CF, and bronchiectasis. Cif (PA2934, a bacterial toxin secreted in outer membrane vesicles (OMV by P. aeruginosa, reduces CFTR-mediated chloride secretion by human airway epithelial cells, a key driving force for mucociliary clearance. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism whereby Cif reduces CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Cif redirected endocytosed CFTR from recycling endosomes to lysosomes by stabilizing an inhibitory effect of G3BP1 on the deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB, USP10, thereby reducing USP10-mediated deubiquitination of CFTR and increasing the degradation of CFTR in lysosomes. This is the first example of a bacterial toxin that regulates the activity of a host DUB. These data suggest that the ability of P. aeruginosa to chronically infect the lungs of patients with COPD, pneumonia, CF, and bronchiectasis is due in part to the secretion of OMV containing Cif, which inhibits CFTR-mediated chloride secretion and thereby reduces the mucociliary clearance of pathogens.

  11. Antiplasmid Potential of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Against Multidrug ResistancePseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    ZirakFaqe Ahmed Abdulrahman

    2014-01-01

    This study concerned with the isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from various clinical cases in human which include (burn, wound and urine) that admitted to Emergency hospital and internal lab of teaching hospital in Erbil city. Forty isolates of P. aeruginosa from out of 120 samples were identified by using cultured, morphological and biochemical tests in addition to vitek machine. According to the resistance of the isolates to these antibiotics they showed variation in their resistance; th...

  12. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies augment bacterial clearance in a murine pneumonia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K.; Christophersen, L.; Bjarnsholt, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral prophylactic therapy by gargling with pathogen-specific egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) may reduce the initial airway colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. IgY antibodies impart passive immunization and we investigated the effects of anti......-P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies on bacterial eradication in a murine pneumonia model. Methods: P. aeruginosa pneumonia was established in Balb/c mice and the effects of prophylactic IgY administration on lung bacteriology, clinical parameters and subsequent inflammation were compared to controls. Results......: Prophylactic administration of IgY antibodies targeting P. aeruginosa significantly reduced the bacterial burden by 2-log 24 h post-infection compared to controls and was accompanied by significantly reduced clinical symptom scores and successive inflammatory cytokine profile indicative of diminished lung...

  13. Biosorption of uranium by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU: Characterization and comparison studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Faison, B.D.; Reeves, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium (as UO 2 2+ and/or its cationic hydroxo complexes) was characterized with respect to its sorptive activity. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa CSU was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H + competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe 3+ loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe 3+ . Thus, a two-state process in which iron and uranium are removed in consecutive steps was proposed for efficient use of the biomass as a biosorbent in uranium removal from mine wastewater, especially acidic leachates

  14. Anti-infective properties of Lactobacillus fermentum against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Parvathi; Nisha, N; Dinesh, Kavitha R; Kumar, Anil V; Biswas, Raja

    2011-01-01

    Surgical wounds and implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are often difficult to treat because of limited susceptibility of several of these strains to conventional antibiotics. As a result, there is a constant need for new alternative drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial properties of Lactobacillus fermentum, a probiotic bacterium, which we have isolated from colonic biopsies. The inhibition of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa growth was evaluated by coincubating with L. fermentum strains. Growth inhibition was tested for several of their clinical isolates using agar well diffusion assays. For biofilm assay S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were grown on the glass slides and in 96-well plates in presence of 2.5 μg/ml culture filtrate of L. fermentum. Biofilms were photographed using confocal microscope or stained with 0.1% crystal violet. Reduction in the cytotoxicity of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa was observed in presence of 2.5 μg/ml L. fermentum-spent media. Using in vitroexperiments, we showed that L. fermentum-secreted compound(s) inhibits the growth, cytotoxicity and biofilm formation of several S. aureus and P. aeruginosa strains. Compound(s) present in the culture supernatant of L. fermentum may have promising applications in treating hospital-acquired infections. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. C-di-GMP regulates antimicrobial peptide resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Rybtke, Morten Theil

    2013-01-01

    Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is an intracellular second messenger which controls the life styles of many bacteria. A high intracellular level of c-di-GMP induces a biofilm lifestyle, whereas a low intracellular level of c-di-GMP stimulates dispersal of biofilms and promotes...... a planktonic lifestyle. Here, we used expression of different reporters to show that planktonic cells (PCells), biofilm cells (BCells) and cells dispersed from biofilms (DCells) had distinct intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Proteomics analysis showed that the low intracellular c-di-GMP level of DCells induced...... the expression of proteins required for the virulence and development of antimicrobial peptide resistance in P. aeruginosa. In accordance, P. aeruginosa cells with low c-di-GMP levels were found to be more resistant to colistin than P. aeruginosa cells with high c-di-GMP levels. This contradicts the current...

  16. Mitophagy confers resistance to siderophore-mediated killing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirienko, Natalia V; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ruvkun, Gary

    2015-02-10

    In the arms race of bacterial pathogenesis, bacteria produce an array of toxins and virulence factors that disrupt core host processes. Hosts mitigate the ensuing damage by responding with immune countermeasures. The iron-binding siderophore pyoverdin is a key virulence mediator of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but its pathogenic mechanism has not been established. Here we demonstrate that pyoverdin enters Caenorhabditis elegans and that it is sufficient to mediate host killing. Moreover, we show that iron chelation disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and triggers mitophagy both in C. elegans and mammalian cells. Finally, we show that mitophagy provides protection both against the extracellular pathogen P. aeruginosa and to treatment with a xenobiotic chelator, phenanthroline, in C. elegans. Although autophagic machinery has been shown to target intracellular bacteria for degradation (a process known as xenophagy), our report establishes a role for authentic mitochondrial autophagy in the innate immune defense against P. aeruginosa.

  17. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Eva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. Methods A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain. All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Results Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros. In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively. Conclusions P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact.

  18. Epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis and the possible role of contamination by dental equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Giwercman, B; Ojeniyi, B

    1997-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often suffer from Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection yet the source of this organism is not known. In order to determine whether CF patients might be contaminated with P. aeruginosa from dental equipment, a total of 103 water samples from 25 dental sessions...... samples (5.5%) from nine sessions (11%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. In one case, genotypically identical (RFLP, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) P. aeruginosa strains were found both in water from the dental equipment and in the CF patients sputum. This indicates a small risk for acquiring P...

  19. Comparative In Vitro Efficacy of Doripenem and Imipenem Against Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Nadia; Mirza, Irfan Ali

    2016-04-01

    To compare the in vitro efficacy of doripenem and imipenem against multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa from various clinical specimens. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from November 2012 to November 2013. MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from various clinical samples were included in the study. Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against doripenem and imipenem was performed by E-test strip and agar dilution methods. The results were interpreted as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines. The maximum number of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from pure pus and pus swabs. In vitro efficacy of doripenem was found to be more effective as compared to imipenem against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa with both E-test strip and agar dilution methods. Overall, p-values of 0.014 and 0.037 were observed when susceptibility patterns of doripenem and imipenem were evaluated with E-test strip and agar dilution methods. In vitro efficacy of doripenem was found to be better against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosaas compared to imipenem when tested by both E-test and agar dilution methods.

  20. Comparative Pharmacodynamics and Antimutant Potentials of Doripenem and Imipenem with Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an In Vitro Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Deborah; Greer, Kenneth; Portnoy, Yury A.; Zinner, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    To compare the antipseudomonal efficacy of doripenem and imipenem as well as their abilities to restrict the enrichment of resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, multiple-dosing regimens of each drug were simulated at comparable values of the cumulative percentages of a 24-h period that the drug concentration exceeds the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (T>MIC) and ratios of the 24-hour area under the curve (AUC24) to the MIC. Three clinical isolates of ciprofloxacin-resistant P. aeruginosa (MIC of doripenem, 1 μg/ml; MICs of imipenem, 1, 2, and 2 μg/ml) were exposed to thrice-daily doripenem or imipenem for 3 days at AUC24/MIC ratios of from 50 to 170 h (doripenem) and from 30 to 140 h (imipenem). The antimicrobial effects for susceptible and resistant subpopulations of bacteria were expressed by the areas between control growth and time-kill curves (IEs) and areas under the bacterial mutant concentration curves (AUBCMs), respectively. With each antibiotic, the IE and AUBCM versus log AUC24/MIC relationships were bacterial strain independent. At similar AUC24/MIC ratios, doripenem was slightly less efficient than imipenem against susceptible and resistant subpopulations of bacteria. However, doripenem appeared to be somewhat more efficient than imipenem at clinically achievable AUC24s related to the means of the MICs for the three studied strains and had higher antimutant potentials for two of the three strains. PMID:22203591

  1. Distinct pathogenesis and host responses during infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoqui, Javier E; Troemel, Emily R; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; Luhachack, Lyly G; Cezairliyan, Brent O; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2010-07-01

    The genetically tractable model host Caenorhabditis elegans provides a valuable tool to dissect host-microbe interactions in vivo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus utilize virulence factors involved in human disease to infect and kill C. elegans. Despite much progress, virtually nothing is known regarding the cytopathology of infection and the proximate causes of nematode death. Using light and electron microscopy, we found that P. aeruginosa infection entails intestinal distention, accumulation of an unidentified extracellular matrix and P. aeruginosa-synthesized outer membrane vesicles in the gut lumen and on the apical surface of intestinal cells, the appearance of abnormal autophagosomes inside intestinal cells, and P. aeruginosa intracellular invasion of C. elegans. Importantly, heat-killed P. aeruginosa fails to elicit a significant host response, suggesting that the C. elegans response to P. aeruginosa is activated either by heat-labile signals or pathogen-induced damage. In contrast, S. aureus infection causes enterocyte effacement, intestinal epithelium destruction, and complete degradation of internal organs. S. aureus activates a strong transcriptional response in C. elegans intestinal epithelial cells, which aids host survival during infection and shares elements with human innate responses. The C. elegans genes induced in response to S. aureus are mostly distinct from those induced by P. aeruginosa. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, heat-killed S. aureus activates a similar response as live S. aureus, which appears to be independent of the single C. elegans Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) protein. These data suggest that the host response to S. aureus is possibly mediated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Because our data suggest that neither the P. aeruginosa nor the S. aureus-triggered response requires canonical TLR signaling, they imply the existence of unidentified mechanisms for pathogen detection in C. elegans, with

  2. Distinct pathogenesis and host responses during infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier E Irazoqui

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetically tractable model host Caenorhabditis elegans provides a valuable tool to dissect host-microbe interactions in vivo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus utilize virulence factors involved in human disease to infect and kill C. elegans. Despite much progress, virtually nothing is known regarding the cytopathology of infection and the proximate causes of nematode death. Using light and electron microscopy, we found that P. aeruginosa infection entails intestinal distention, accumulation of an unidentified extracellular matrix and P. aeruginosa-synthesized outer membrane vesicles in the gut lumen and on the apical surface of intestinal cells, the appearance of abnormal autophagosomes inside intestinal cells, and P. aeruginosa intracellular invasion of C. elegans. Importantly, heat-killed P. aeruginosa fails to elicit a significant host response, suggesting that the C. elegans response to P. aeruginosa is activated either by heat-labile signals or pathogen-induced damage. In contrast, S. aureus infection causes enterocyte effacement, intestinal epithelium destruction, and complete degradation of internal organs. S. aureus activates a strong transcriptional response in C. elegans intestinal epithelial cells, which aids host survival during infection and shares elements with human innate responses. The C. elegans genes induced in response to S. aureus are mostly distinct from those induced by P. aeruginosa. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, heat-killed S. aureus activates a similar response as live S. aureus, which appears to be independent of the single C. elegans Toll-Like Receptor (TLR protein. These data suggest that the host response to S. aureus is possibly mediated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. Because our data suggest that neither the P. aeruginosa nor the S. aureus-triggered response requires canonical TLR signaling, they imply the existence of unidentified mechanisms for pathogen detection in C

  3. Combined effects of nitrogen content in media and Ochromonas sp. grazing on colony formation of cultured Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou YANG

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the combined effects of nitrogen content in media and flagellate grazing on colony formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, we added Ochromonas sp. to M. aeruginosa cultured in different nitrogen content media for 7 days. Results showed that M. aeruginosa could be efficiently ingested by Ochromonas sp., no matter what nitrogen content media M. aeruginosa was cultured in. Colony formation was observed in M. aeruginosa in all Ochromonas sp. grazing treatments during the experiment. In contrast, M. aeruginosa populations in the controls were strongly dominated by unicellular and paired cell forms, and no colonies were observed. Among all Ochromonas sp. grazing treatments, the mean numbers of cells per particle of M. aeruginosa increased with decreased nitrogen concentration (except 0% N, therefore colony formation of M. aeruginosa can be enhanced under lower nitrogen conditions. This suggests that both nitrogen content and Ochromonas sp. grazing combine to affect M. aeruginosa colony formation. Three-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant interaction between time (day 1, 3, 5, and 7, treatment (with and without Ochromonas sp. grazing and N content (0%, 10%, 25%, and 100% N on the mean numbers of cells per particle, i.e. the extent of colony formation. At the end of the experiment, the influence of nitrogen content (except 0% N on the numbers of cells per particle followed a rectangular hyperbolic response. The experiments demonstrated that there exists a combined effect of nitrogen concentration and flagellate grazing on colony formation of M. aeruginosa under laboratory conditions.

  4. Subinhibitory concentration of kanamycin induces the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type VI secretion system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerith Jones

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium found in natural environments including plants, soils and warm moist surfaces. This organism is also in the top ten of nosocomial pathogens, and prevalent in cystic fibrosis (CF lung infections. The ability of P. aeruginosa to colonize a wide variety of environments in a lasting manner is associated with the formation of a resistant biofilm and the capacity to efficiently outcompete other microorganisms. Here we demonstrate that sub-inhibitory concentration of kanamycin not only induces biofilm formation but also induces expression of the type VI secretion genes in the H1-T6SS cluster. The H1-T6SS is known for its role in toxin production and bacterial competition. We show that the antibiotic induction of the H1-T6SS only occurs when a functional Gac/Rsm pathway is present. These observations may contribute to understand how P. aeruginosa responds to antibiotic producing competitors. It also suggests that improper antibiotic therapy may enhance P. aeruginosa colonization, including in the airways of CF patients.

  5. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Sternberg, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents...... which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea...... epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent...

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of the recA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokjohn, T.A.; Miller, R.V.

    1985-08-01

    The recA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO has been isolated and introduced into Escherichia coli K-12. Resistance to killing by UV irradiation was restored in several RecA-E. coli K-12 hosts by the P. aeruginosa gene, as was resistance to methyl methanesulfonate. Recombination proficiency was also restored, as measured by HfrH-mediated conjugation and by the ability to propagate Fec-phage lambda derivatives. The cloned P. aeruginosa recA gene restored both spontaneous and mitomycin C-stimulated induction of lambda prophage in lysogens of a recA strain of E. coli K-12.

  7. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, P. Ø.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant......-treated biofilm. Garlic extract was administered as treatment for a mouse pulmonary infection model. Mice were treated with garlic extract or placebo for 7 days, with the initial 2 days being prophylactic before P. aeruginosa was instilled in the left lung of the mice. Bacteriology, mortality, histopathology...... and phagocytosis by PMNs, as well as leading to an improved outcome of pulmonary infections....

  8. Crystal structure of secretory protein Hcp3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, Jerzy; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-03-01

    The Type VI secretion pathway transports proteins across the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterial pathogen infecting humans, uses the type VI secretion pathway to export specific effector proteins crucial for its pathogenesis. The HSI-I virulence locus encodes for several proteins that has been proposed to participate in protein transport including the Hcp1 protein, which forms hexameric rings that assemble into nanotubes in vitro. Two Hcp1 paralogues have been identified in the P. aeruginosa genome, Hsp2 and Hcp3. Here, we present the structure of the Hcp3 protein from P. aeruginosa. The overall structure of the monomer resembles Hcp1 despite the lack of amino-acid sequence similarity between the two proteins. The monomers assemble into hexamers similar to Hcp1. However, instead of forming nanotubes in head-to-tail mode like Hcp1, Hcp3 stacks its rings in head-to-head mode forming double-ring structures.

  9. Generalized Growth of Estuarine, Household and Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly E. Diaz; Susanna K. Remold; Ogochukwu Onyiri; Maura Bozeman; Peter A. Raymond; Paul E. Turner; Paul E. Turner

    2018-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen of particular concern to immune-compromised people, such as cystic fibrosis patients and burn victims. These bacteria grow in built environments including hospitals and households, and in natural environments such as rivers and estuaries. However, there is conflicting evidence whether recent environments like the human lung and open ocean affect P. aeruginosa growth performance in alternate environments. We hypothesized that bacteria recentl...

  10. Activity of Bacteriophages in Removing Biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fong, Stephanie A.; Drilling, Amanda; Morales, Sandra; Cornet, Marjolein E.; Woodworth, Bradford A.; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Psaltis, Alkis J.; Vreugde, Sarah; Wormald, Peter-John

    2017-01-01

    Introduction:Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are prevalent amongst chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) sufferers. Many P. aeruginosa strains form biofilms, leading to treatment failure. Lytic bacteriophages (phages) are viruses that infect, replicate within, and lyse bacteria, causing bacterial death.

  11. Evolutionary insight from whole-genome sequencing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-01-01

    is suggested to be due to the large genetic repertoire of P. aeruginosa and its ability to genetically adapt to the host environment. Here, we review the recent work that has applied whole-genome sequencing to understand P. aeruginosa population genomics, within-host microevolution and diversity, mutational...

  12. Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Chicken Cathelicidin-2 Is Immunogenically Silent, Preventing Lung Inflammation In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorens, Maarten; Banaschewski, Brandon J. H.; Baer, Brandon J.; Yamashita, Cory; van Dijk, Albert; Veldhuizen, Ruud A. W.; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of antibiotic resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major concern in the treatment of bacterial pneumonia. In the search for novel anti-infective therapies, the chicken-derived peptide cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2) has emerged as a potential candidate, with strong broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and the ability to limit inflammation by inhibiting Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 activation. However, as it is unknown how CATH-2 affects inflammation in vivo, we investigated how CATH-2-mediated killing of P. aeruginosa affects lung inflammation in a murine model. First, murine macrophages were used to determine whether CATH-2-mediated killing of P. aeruginosa reduced proinflammatory cytokine production in vitro. Next, a murine lung model was used to analyze how CATH-2-mediated killing of P. aeruginosa affects neutrophil and macrophage recruitment as well as cytokine/chemokine production in the lung. Our results show that CATH-2 kills P. aeruginosa in an immunogenically silent manner both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with CATH-2-killed P. aeruginosa showed reduced neutrophil recruitment to the lung as well as inhibition of cytokine and chemokine production, compared to treatment with heat- or gentamicin-killed bacteria. Together, these results show the potential for CATH-2 as a dual-activity antibiotic in bacterial pneumonia, which can both kill P. aeruginosa and prevent excessive inflammation. PMID:28947647

  13. A mutant of a mutant of a mutant of a ...: Irradiation of progressive radiation-induced mutants in a mutation-breeding programme with Chrysanthenum morifolium RAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broertjes, C.; Koene, P.; Veen, J.W.H. van.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation-induced sports in Chrysanthemum morifolium RAM. have been reported for several years. It has become an everyday practice to produce flower-colour mutants from outstanding cross-breeding products, even before they are distributed for the commercial production of cut flowers. One of the most successful and recent examples is that of cv. Horim, of which hundreds of mutants were produced by successive use of radiation-induced mutants in the mutation-breeding programme. Over about 4 years a variety of flower-colour mutants was obtained, not only largely including the outstanding characteristics of the original cultivar but sometimes even with an appreciable improvement in quality and yield. It is expected that the latter types, the Miros group, will soon completely supersede the spontaneous or raditation-induced Horim sports and mutants and take over the leading position of the Horim group in the production of all-year-round (AYR) cut-flowers. (orig.)

  14. Evolution and adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms driven by mismatch repair system-deficient mutators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela M Luján

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen causing chronic airway infections, especially in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. The majority of the CF patients acquire P. aeruginosa during early childhood, and most of them develop chronic infections resulting in severe lung disease, which are rarely eradicated despite intensive antibiotic therapy. Current knowledge indicates that three major adaptive strategies, biofilm development, phenotypic diversification, and mutator phenotypes [driven by a defective mismatch repair system (MRS], play important roles in P. aeruginosa chronic infections, but the relationship between these strategies is still poorly understood. We have used the flow-cell biofilm model system to investigate the impact of the mutS associated mutator phenotype on development, dynamics, diversification and adaptation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Through competition experiments we demonstrate for the first time that P. aeruginosa MRS-deficient mutators had enhanced adaptability over wild-type strains when grown in structured biofilms but not as planktonic cells. This advantage was associated with enhanced micro-colony development and increased rates of phenotypic diversification, evidenced by biofilm architecture features and by a wider range and proportion of morphotypic colony variants, respectively. Additionally, morphotypic variants generated in mutator biofilms showed increased competitiveness, providing further evidence for mutator-driven adaptive evolution in the biofilm mode of growth. This work helps to understand the basis for the specific high proportion and role of mutators in chronic infections, where P. aeruginosa develops in biofilm communities.

  15. Pseudomoniasis phytotherapy: a review on most important Iranian medicinal plants effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Hassanzadazar, Hassan; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2016-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium found in water and soil. It is a normal flora in skin and gastrointestinal tract of human beings. P. aeruginosa as an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections having multiple pathogenic factors and shows high rate of resistance to different antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify the most important native medicinal plants of Iran effective on P. aeruginosa. All required information was obtained by searching keywords such as P. aeruginosa , medicinal plant extracts or essential oils in published articles in authentic scientific databases such as Science Direct, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, Google scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID) and Magiran. According to the literature review, our results showed 12 different native medicinal plants were effective against P. aeruginosa in Iran including Eucalyptus camadulensis, Marticaria chamomilla, Ferula gummosa Boiss, Lawsonia inermis, Ocimumgra tissimum, Allium sativum, Satureja hortensis L, Satureja bachtiarica Bunge, Satureja khuzestanica (Jamzad), Thymus daenensis Celak, Thymus carmanicus Jalals and Camellia sinensis. Phytochemical analysis has shown that bioactive compounds of medicinal plants with their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties can be good alternatives for the synthetic medicines in food and drug industry.

  16. Enterobacter aerogenes metabolites enhance Microcystis aeruginosa biomass recovery for sustainable bioflocculant and biohydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Zhou, Mo; Ju, Hanyu; Zhang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Jiquan; Sun, Caiyun

    2018-04-07

    We report a recycling bioresource involving harvesting of Microcystis aeruginosa using the bioflocculant (MBF-32) produced by Enterobacter aerogenes followed by the recovery of the harvested M. aeruginosa as the main substrate for the sustainable production of MBF-32 and biohydrogen. The experimental results indicate that the efficiency of bioflocculation exceeded 90% under optimal conditions. The harvested M. aeruginosa was further recycled as the main substrate for the supply of necessary elements. The highest yield (3.6±0.1g/L) of MBF-32 could be obtained from 20g/L of wet biomass of M. aeruginosa with an additional 20g/L of glucose as the extra carbon source. The highest yield of biohydrogen was 35mL of H 2 /g (dw) algal biomass, obtained from 20g/L of wet biomass of M. aeruginosa with an additional 10g/L of glycerol. Transcriptome analyses indicated that MBF-32 was mainly composed of polysaccharide and tyrosine/tryptophan proteins. Furthermore, NADH synthase and polysaccharide export-related genes were found to be up-regulated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in a culture collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.S. Zanetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in our culture collection did not grow or grew poorly and showed lysis on the culture plates when removed from the collection and inoculated on MacConkey agar. One hypothesis was that bacteriophages had infected and killed those clinical isolates. To check the best storage conditions to maintain viable P. aeruginosa for a longer time, clinical isolates were stored at various temperatures and were grown monthly. We investigated the presence of phage in 10 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa stored in our culture collection. Four strains of P. aeruginosa were infected by phages that were characterized by electron microscopy and isolated to assess their ability to infect. The best condition to maintain the viability of the strains during storage was in water at room temperature. Three Siphoviridae and two Myoviridae phages were visualized and characterized by morphology. We confirmed the presence of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates, and their ability to infect and lyse alternative hosts. Strain PAO1, however, did not show lysis to any phage. Mucoid and multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa showed lysis to 50% of the phages tested.

  18. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertinellys TEIXEIRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC, aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD, and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH, is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137 were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, mainly from discharges (96/137. The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively. Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49, followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49. The aac(6´-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  19. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  20. Different Dose-Dependent Modes of Action of C-Type Natriuretic Peptide on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florie Desriac

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP, a peptide produced by lungs, is able to impact Pseudomonas aeruginosa physiology. In the present work, the effect of CNP at different concentrations on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation was studied and the mechanisms of action of this human hormone on P. aeruginosa were deciphered. CNP was shown to inhibit dynamic biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner without affecting the bacterial growth at any tested concentrations. The most effective concentrations were 1 and 0.1 µM. At 0.1 µM, the biofilm formation inhibition was fully dependent on the CNP sensor protein AmiC, whereas it was only partially AmiC-dependent at 1 µM, revealing the existence of a second AmiC-independent mode of action of CNP on P. aeruginosa. At 1 µM, CNP reduced both P. aeruginosa adhesion on glass and di-rhamnolipid production and also increased the bacterial membrane fluidity. The various effects of CNP at 1 µM and 0.1 µM on P. aeruginosa shown here should have major consequences to design drugs for biofilm treatment or prevention.

  1. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  2. Diversity of metabolic profiles of cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa during the early stages of lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant pathogen infecting the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. During the intermittent colonization phase, P. aeruginosa resembles environmental strains but later evolves to the chronic adapted phenotype characterized by resistance to antibiotics and mutat......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant pathogen infecting the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. During the intermittent colonization phase, P. aeruginosa resembles environmental strains but later evolves to the chronic adapted phenotype characterized by resistance to antibiotics...

  3. The impact of nosocomially-acquired resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in a burn unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis D; Shankowsky, Heather A; Swanson, Todd; Lee, Jonathan; Tredget, Edward E

    2007-07-01

    Nosocomially-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains a serious cause of infection and septic mortality in burn patients. This study was conducted to quantify the impact of nosocomially-transmitted resistant P. aeruginosa in a burn population. Using a TRACS burn database, 48 patients with P. aeruginosa resistant to gentamicin were identified (Pseudomonas group). Thirty-nine were case-matched to controls without resistant P. aeruginosa cultures (control group) for age, total body surface area, admission year, and presence of inhalation injury. Mortality and various morbidity endpoints were examined, as well as antibiotic costs. There was a significantly higher mortality rate in the Pseudomonas group (33% vs. 8%, p products used (packed cells 51.1 +/- 8.0 vs. 21.1 +/- 3.4, p < 0.01; platelets 11.9 +/- 3.0 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.7, p < 0.01) were all significantly higher in the Pseudomonas group. Cost of antibiotics was also significantly higher ($2,658.52 +/- $647.93 vs. $829.22 +/- $152.82, p < 0.01). Nosocomial colonization or infection, or both, of burn patients with aminoglycoside-resistant P. aeruginosa is associated with significantly higher morbidity, mortality, and cost of care. Increased resource consumption did not prevent significantly higher mortality rates when compared with that of control patients. Thus, prevention, identification, and eradication of nosocomial Pseudomonas contamination are critical for cost-effective, successful burn care.

  4. Glucocorticoids can affect Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) internalization and intracellular calcium concentration in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rashida; Shahror, Rami; Karpati, Ferenc; Roomans, Godfried M

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are anti-inflammatory agents, but their use in cystic fibrosis (CF) is controversial. In CF, the early colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is mainly due to nonmucoid strains that can internalize, and induce apoptosis in the epithelial cells. Uptake of P. aeruginosa by the epithelial cells and subsequent apoptosis may prevent colonization of P. aeruginosa in CF airways. In the airway epithelia, several other biological effects, including an anti-secretory role by decreasing intracellular Ca(2+) concentration have been described for this anti-inflammatory drug. However, the effects of GCs on the nonmucoid P. aeruginosa internalization and intracellular Ca(2+) in CF bronchial epithelial cells have not been evaluated. We used cultured human CF bronchial airway epithelial cell (CFBE) monolayers to determine P. aeruginosa internalization, apoptosis, and intracellular Ca(2+)concentration in CF bronchial epithelial cells. Cells were treated with IL-6, IL-8, dexamethasone, betamethasone, or budesonide. GCs in co-treatments with IL-6 reversed the effect of IL-6 by decreasing the internalization of P. aeruginosa in the CFBE cells. GCs decreased the extent of apoptosis in CFBE cells infected with internalized P. aeruginosa, and increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. These findings suggest that if internalization of P. aeruginosa reduces infection, GC therapy would increase the risk of pulmonary infection by decreasing the internalization of P. aeruginosa in CF cells, but GCs may improve airway hydration by increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Whether the benefits of GC treatment outweigh the negative effects is questionable, and further clinical studies need to be carried out.

  5. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-08-23

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30 March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. The authors independently selected trials, assessed them and extracted data. Six trials were identified. Two trials were excluded since they were not randomised and one old, small trial because it was not possible to assess whether is was randomised. The three included trials comprised 483, 476 and 37 patients, respectively. No data have been published from one of the large trials, but the company stated in a press release that the trial failed to confirm the results from an earlier study and that further clinical development was suspended. In the other large trial, relative risk for chronic infection was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.55 to 1.49), and in the small trial, the risk was also close to one. In the large trial, one patient was reported to have died in the observation period. In that trial, 227 adverse events (4 severe) were registered in the vaccine group and 91 (1 severe) in the control group. In this large trial of a vaccine developed against flagella antigens, antibody titres against the epitopes contained in the vaccine were higher in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group (P Vaccines against

  6. Dissemination of metallo-β-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Egypt: mutation in blaVIM-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Hany; Hanora, Amro; Abdalla, Salah; Shaeky, Alaa; Saad, Alaa

    2017-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected from Suez Canal University Hospital in Ismailia, Egypt. Antibiotic susceptibility testing and phenotypic and genotypic screening for MBLs were performed on 147 isolates of P. aeruginosa. MICs were determined by agar dilution method for carbapenem that was ≥2 μg/mL for meropenem. MBL genes were detected by multiplex and monoplex PCR for P. aeruginosa-harbored plasmids. Mutation profile of sequenced MBL genes was screened using online software Clustal Omega. Out of 147 P. aeruginosa, 39 (26.5%) were carbapenem-resistant isolates and 25 (64%) were confirmed to be positive for MBLs. The susceptibility rate of P. aeruginosa toward polymyxin B and norfloxacin was 99% and 88%, respectively. Identification of collected isolates by API analysis and constructed phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA showed that the isolates were related to P. aeruginosa species. The frequency of blaGIM-1, blaSIM-1, and blaSPM-1 was 52%, 48%, and 24%, respectively. BlaVIM and blaIMP-like genes were 20% and 4% and the sequences confirm the isolate to be blaVIM-1, blaVIM-2, blaVIM-4, and blaIMP-1. Three mutations were identified in blaVIM-4 gene. Our study emphasizes the high occurrence of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa-producing MBL enzymes. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    negative bacilli in patients with impaired host defences emphasizes the need for information on the antibiotic susceptibility of the organisms that infects such patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming increasingly resistant to ...

  8. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Souto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05. In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p < 0.01. Smokers presenting P. aeruginosa and high frequencies of supragingival plaque were more likely to present CP than PH. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are frequently detected in the oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis.

  9. Antibiotic Sensitivity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa of Diabetic Patient’s Foot Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiwi Apridamayanti; Khairunnisa Azani Meilinasary; Rafika Sari

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients are at risk to have the diabetic ulcer. The main reason for DM’s patient with ulcer complication to be treated and healed in hospital is bacterial infection. One of many bacteria that infects diabetic ulcer is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This conditian can be treated by antibiotic. The using antibiotic is often inaccurate causing the microbe resistance. To choose the right antibiotic, it needs to test the antibiotic’s sensitivity towards Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The...

  10. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lol system as a lipoprotein sorting mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shin-Ya; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-05-04

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or the outer membrane depending on the residue that is present next to the N-terminal acylated Cys. Asp at position 2 causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane. In contrast, the accompanying study (9) revealed that the residues at positions 3 and 4 determine the membrane specificity of lipoproteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since the five Lol proteins involved in the sorting of E. coli lipoproteins are conserved in P. aeruginosa, we examined whether or not the Lol proteins of P. aeruginosa are also involved in lipoprotein sorting but utilize different signals. The genes encoding LolCDE, LolA, and LolB homologues were cloned and expressed. The LolCDE homologue thus purified was reconstituted into proteoliposomes with lipoproteins. When incubated in the presence of ATP and a LolA homologue, the reconstituted LolCDE homologue released lipoproteins, leading to the formation of a LolA-lipoprotein complex. Lipoproteins were then incorporated into the outer membrane depending on a LolB homologue. As revealed in vivo, lipoproteins with Lys and Ser at positions 3 and 4, respectively, remained in proteoliposomes. On the other hand, E. coli LolCDE released lipoproteins with this signal and transferred them to LolA of not only E. coli but also P. aeruginosa. These results indicate that Lol proteins are responsible for the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, as in the case of E. coli, but respond differently to inner membrane retention signals.

  11. The effects of hydrogen peroxide on the circadian rhythms of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the principal bloom-forming cyanobacteria present in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems. M. aeruginosa produces cyanotoxins, which can harm human and animal health. Many metabolic pathways in M. aeruginosa, including photosynthesis and microcystin synthesis, are controlled by its circadian rhythms. However, whether xenobiotics affect the cyanobacterial circadian system and change its growth, physiology and biochemistry is unknown. We used real-time PCR to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 on the expression of clock genes and some circadian genes in M. aeruginosa during the light/dark (LD cycle. RESULTS: The results revealed that H(2O(2 changes the expression patterns of clock genes (kaiA, kaiB, kaiC and sasA and significantly decreases the transcript levels of kaiB, kaiC and sasA. H(2O(2 treatment also decreased the transcription of circadian genes, such as photosynthesis-related genes (psaB, psbD1 and rbcL and microcystin-related genes (mcyA, mcyD and mcyH, and changed their circadian expression patterns. Moreover, the physiological functions of M. aeruginosa, including its growth and microcystin synthesis, were greatly influenced by H(2O(2 treatment during LD. These results indicate that changes in the cyanobacterial circadian system can affect its physiological and metabolic pathways. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that a xenobiotic can change the circadian expression patterns of its clock genes to influence clock-controlled gene regulation, and these influences are evident at the level of cellular physiology.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection alters the macrophage phenotype switching process during wound healing in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sinuo; Li, Renren; Cheng, Chun; Xu, Jing-Ying; Jin, Caixia; Gao, Furong; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jieping; Zhang, Jingfa; Wang, Hong; Lu, Lixia; Xu, Guo-Tong; Tian, Haibin

    2018-03-07

    Macrophages play critical roles in wound healing process. They switch from "classically activated" (M1) phenotype in the early inflammatory phase to "alternatively activated" (M2) phenotype in the later healing phase. However, the dynamic process of macrophage phenotype switching in diabetic wounds burdened with bacteria is unclear. In this report, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, frequently detected in diabetic foot ulcers, was inoculated into cutaneous wounds of db/db diabetic mice to mimic bacterium-infected diabetic wound healing. We observed that P. aeruginosa infection impaired diabetic wound healing and quickly promoted the expression of pro-inflammatory genes (M1 macrophage markers) tumor necrosis factor-α (tnf-α), interleukin-1β (il-1β) and il-6 in wounds. The expression of markers of M2 macrophages, including il-10, arginase-1, and ym1 were also upregulated. In addition, similar gene expression patterns were observed in macrophages isolated directly from wounds. Immunostaining showed that P. aeruginosa infection increased both the ratios of M1 and M2 macrophages in wounds compared with that in control groups, which was further confirmed by in vitro culturing macrophages with P. aeruginosa and skin fibroblast conditioned medium. However, the ratios of the expression levels of pro-inflammatory genes to anti-inflammatory gene il-10 was increased markedly in P. aeruginosa infected wounds and macrophages compared with that in control groups, and P. aeruginosa prolonged the presence of M1 macrophages in the wounds. These data demonstrated that P. aeruginosa in diabetic wounds activates a mixed M1/M2 macrophage phenotype with an excessive activation of M1 phenotype or relatively inadequate activation of M2 phenotype. © 2018 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  13. The anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibody Panobacumab is efficacious on acute pneumonia in neutropenic mice and has additive effects with meropenem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Secher

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa infections are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients due to antibiotic resistance. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the anti-P. aeruginosa serotype O11 lipopolysaccharide monoclonal antibody Panobacumab in a clinically relevant murine model of neutropenia induced by cyclophosphamide and in combination with meropenem in susceptible and meropenem resistant P. aeruginosa induced pneumonia. We observed that P. aeruginosa induced pneumonia was dramatically increased in neutropenic mice compared to immunocompetent mice. First, Panobacumab significantly reduced lung inflammation and enhanced bacterial clearance from the lung of neutropenic host. Secondly, combination of Panobacumab and meropenem had an additive effect. Third, Panobacumab retained activity on a meropenem resistant P. aeruginosa strain. In conclusion, the present data established that Panobacumab contributes to the clearance of P. aeruginosa in neutropenic hosts as well as in combination with antibiotics in immunocompetent hosts. This suggests beneficial effects of co-treatment even in immunocompromised individuals, suffering most of the morbidity and mortality of P. aeruginosa infections.

  14. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  15. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla López-Causapé

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms.

  16. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Causapé, Carla; Cabot, Gabriel; Del Barrio-Tofiño, Ester; Oliver, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility) between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms.

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa B3 Strains Isolated from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient Undergoing Antibiotic Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Jochumsen, Nicholas; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently establishes chronic infections in the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four P. aeruginosa B3 strains isolated from a chronically infected CF patient undergoing antibiotic chemotherapy.......Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently establishes chronic infections in the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four P. aeruginosa B3 strains isolated from a chronically infected CF patient undergoing antibiotic chemotherapy....

  18. Sequestration and Distribution Characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and Its Role in Colony Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiangdong; Yan, Ran; Li, Fenxiang; Dai, Wei; Jiao, Kewei; Zhou, Qixing; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the sequestration and distribution characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and its role in Microcystis colony formation, M. aeruginosa was exposed to six different Cd(II) concentrations for 10 days. Cd(II) exposure caused hormesis in the growth of M. aeruginosa . Low concentrations of Cd(II) significantly induced formation of small Microcystis colonies ( P bEPS) contents of M. aeruginosa significantly ( P 93% of Cd(II) was sequestrated in the groups with lower added concentrations of Cd(II). More than 80% of the sequestrated Cd(II) was bioadsorbed by bEPS. The Pearson correlation coefficients of exterior and interior factors related to colony formation of M. aeruginosa revealed that Cd(II) could stimulate the production of IPS and bEPS via increasing Cd(II) bioaccumulation and bioadsorption. Increased levels of cross-linking between Cd(II) and bEPS stimulated algal cell aggregation, which eventually promoted the formation of Microcystis colonies.

  19. Activity of Bacteriophages in Removing Biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Fong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are prevalent amongst chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS sufferers. Many P. aeruginosa strains form biofilms, leading to treatment failure. Lytic bacteriophages (phages are viruses that infect, replicate within, and lyse bacteria, causing bacterial death.Aim: To assess the activity of a phage cocktail in eradicating biofilms of ex vivo P.aeruginosa isolates from CRS patients.Methods: P. aeruginosa isolates from CRS patients with and without cystic fibrosis (CF across three continents were multi-locus sequence typed and tested for antibiotic resistance. Biofilms grown in vitro were treated with a cocktail of four phages (CT-PA. Biofilm biomass was measured after 24 and 48 h, using a crystal violet assay. Phage titrations were performed to confirm replication of the phages. A linear mixed effects model was applied to assess the effects of treatment, time, CF status, and multidrug resistance on the biomass of the biofilm.Results: The isolates included 44 strain types. CT-PA treatment significantly reduced biofilm biomass at both 24 and 48 h post-treatment (p < 0.0001, regardless of CF status or antibiotic resistance. Biomass was decreased by a median of 76% at 48 h. Decrease in biofilm was accompanied by a rise in phage titres for all except one strain.Conclusion: A single dose of phages is able to significantly reduce biofilms formed in vitro by a range of P.aeruginosa isolates from CRS patients. This represents an exciting potential and novel targeted treatment for P. aeruginosa biofilm infections and multidrug resistant bacteria.

  20. Phenotypic characterization and colistin susceptibilities of carbapenem-resistant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Srujana; Maurya, Vijeta; Gaind, Rajni; Deb, Monorama

    2013-11-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobcter spp. are important nosocomial pathogens and carbapenem resistance is an emerging threat. Therapeutic options for infections with these isolates include colistin. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of carbapenem resistance in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. bloodstream isolates, phenotypically characterize the resistance mechanisms and evaluate the in vitro activity of colistin. Consecutive 145 (95 P.aeruginosa and 50 Acinetobacter spp.) non-repeat isolates were included. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed per CLSI guidelines. MIC for carbapenems and colistin was performed using Etest. Isolates showing reduced susceptibility or resistance to the carbapenems were tested for metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production using imipenem-EDTA combined disk and MBL Etest. Carbapenem resistance was observed in 40% P. aeruginosa and 66.0% Acinetobacter spp. Carbapenem-resistant (CA-R) isolates were significantly (p carbapenem-susceptible isolates. Approximately half of the CA-R strains were multidrug-resistant, and 3.1-5.5% were resistant to all antibiotics tested. MBL was found in 76.3% and 69.7% of the P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., respectively. Colistin resistance was observed in three (6.0%) Acinetobacter isolates and eight (8.4%) P. aeruginosa. MIC50 for carbapenems were two to four times higher for MBL-positive compared to MBL-negative isolates, but no difference was seen in MIC for colistin. Carbapenem resistance was observed to be mediated by MBL in a considerable number of isolates. Colistin is an alternative for infections caused by CA-R isolates; however, MIC testing should be performed whenever clinical use of colistin is considered.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Vacunas: un reto a la investigación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C. Esnard

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, patógeno gramnegativo versátil y oportunista debido a su gran adaptabilidad fisiológica, potencial metabólico y mecanismos de virulencia, es causa frecuente a escala mundial de severas o letales infecciones en pacientes hospitalizados. El empeño por lograr terapias alternativas para prevenir o combatir las infecciones producidas por P. aeruginosa ha ocupado a investigadores de todo el mundo desde la segunda mitad del pasado siglo y actualmente se continúan reportando trabajos que respaldan los ensayos de candidatos vacunales, fundamentalmente a partir de antígenos proteicos, mayoritariamente basados en la construcción de vacunas recombinantes. En este artículo se presenta una revisión de trabajos publicados sobre las investigaciones desarrolladas en diferentes países, con el objetivo de obtener candidatos vacunales para la prevención o tratamiento de las infecciones causadas por Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a partir de la década de los años 50 del siglo XX hasta el 2003.

  2. Rapid identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Samy; El Kholy, Iman; Hagagy, Nashwa; El Alfay, Sahar; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel

    2015-01-02

    Twenty clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients admitted to The General Hospital in Ismailia Governorate (Egypt) were examined in this study. We analysed P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 (as a control strain) and 19 of the isolates after digestion with SpeI restriction endonuclease. After this we conducted a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and typed the obtained 10 unique patterns, designated as A, A1, B, B1, C, C1, D, D1, E and F. We evaluated the genetic relatedness between all strains, based on ≥87% band identity. As a result, the isolates were grouped in the 10 clusters as follows: patterns A, A1, B, B1, C contained two strains each and patterns C1, D, D1, E contained a single strain each; the five remaining strains were closely related (genomic pattern F). One isolate belonged to antibiotype 'b'. The genotype patterns of the P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 control strain and isolate no. 11 were closely related and had two different antibiotypes 'd' and 'c', respectively.

  3. In vivo Host Environment Alters Pseudomonas aeruginosa Susceptibility to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaolei; Dong, Yuanyuan; Fan, Zheng; Liu, Chang; Xia, Bin; Shi, Jing; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2017-01-01

    During host infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinately regulates the expression of numerous genes to adapt to the host environment while counteracting host clearance mechanisms. As infected patients take antibiotics, the invading bacteria encounter antibiotics in the host milieu. P. aeruginosa is highly resistant to antibiotics due to multiple chromosomally encoded resistant determinants. And numerous in vitro studies have demonstrated the regulatory mechanisms of antibiotic resistance related genes in response to antibiotics. However, it is not well-known how host environment affects bacterial response to antibiotics. In this study, we found that P. aeruginosa cells directly isolated from mice lungs displayed higher susceptibility to tobramycin than in vitro cultured bacteria. In vitro experiments demonstrated that incubation with A549 and differentiated HL60 (dHL60) cells sensitized P. aeruginosa to tobramycin. Further studies revealed that reactive oxygen species produced by the host cells contributed to the increased bacterial susceptibility. At the same concentration of tobramycin, presence of A549 and dHL60 cells resulted in higher expression of heat shock proteins, which are known inducible by tobramycin. Further analyses revealed decreased membrane potential upon incubation with the host cells and modification of lipopolysaccharide, which contributed to the increased susceptibility to tobramycin. Therefore, our results demonstrate that contact with host cells increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin. PMID:28352614

  4. Vaccination promotes TH1-like inflammation and survival in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. A new prophylactic principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Cryz, S J; Hougen, H P

    1997-01-01

    The ongoing lung tissue damage in chronically Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has been shown to be caused by elastase liberated from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), which dominate the chronic inflammation in these patients. Most CF patients, however, contract...... the chronic lung infection with P. aeruginosa after a one-year period (median) of intermittent colonization. Therefore, prevention of the onset of the chronic infection or prevention of the dominance of the inflammation by PMNs would be important goals for a vaccine strategy against P. aeruginosa in CF....... In a rat model of acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia we studied whether it was possible to improve the initial bacterial clearance and diminish the inflammatory response by vaccination prior to challenge with free, live P. aeruginosa. The vaccines studied were PAO 579 sonicate, O-polysaccharide toxin A (TA...

  5. Platelet 3H-serotonin releasing immune complexes induced by pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permin, H.; Stahl Skov, P.; Norn, S.; Hoeiby, N.; Schioetz, P.O.

    1982-01-01

    In vitro formation of immune complexes was studied by 3 H-serotonin release from human platelets by P. aeruginosa antigens in the presence of serum from 22 cyctic fibrosis patients, chronically infected with mucoid P. aeruginosa (CF+P) and with a pronounced antibody response against these bacteria, and in 24 patients without P. aeruginosa (CF-P). All CF+P patients responded with 3 H-serotonin release (16-34%), whereas CF-P patients released less than 15%. In the group of CF+P patients the number of P. aeruginosa precipitins was correlated to the serotonin titer. Time courses indicated that 3 H-serotonin release was maximal between 2 and 5 min, and that no further release was observed up to 20 min. There was a gradual increase in 3 H-serotonin release with higher platelet concentrations. The response was not changed by complement inactivation, and fractionation of serum demonstrated that the serotonin release was dependent on the presence of the immunoglobulin fraction. These experiments support the suggestion of a type III reaction being involved in the lung damage in CF+P patients and also suggest a possible involvement of serotonin in the inflammatory reaction during chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection. (author)

  6. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa host-adaptation in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rau, Martin Holm

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of transition from an environmental lifestyle to a host-associated lifestyle, as exemplified in the life-long airway infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Long-term infection is associated with extensive genetic adaptation of P...... the framework upon which this thesis is based. Early P. aeruginosa colonization of the CF airways is the period in which the outcome of infection is determined, i.e. if the bacteria are eventually eradicated or persist. In three patient cases the evolutionary events from initiation of infection were explored...... to unravel the early adaptive processes possibly securing bacterial persistence. In this early stage, clinical isolates displayed few adaptive events however these included phenotypes often observed in late chronic infection isolates including the conversion to a mucoid phenotype and increased antibiotic...

  8. Glycine metabolism by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: hydrogen cyanide biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castric, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a synthetic medium is stimulated by the presence of glycine. Methionine enhances this stimulation but will not substitute for glycine as a stimulator of cyanogenesis. Threonine and phenylalanine are effective substitutes for glycine in the stimulation of HCN production. Glycine, threonine, and serine are good radioisotope precursors of HCN, but methionine and phenylalanine are not. Cell extracts of P. aeruginosa convert [ 14 C]threonine to [ 14 C]glycine. H14CN is produced with low dilution of label from either [1- 14 C]glycine or [2- 14 C]glycine, indicating a randomization of label either in the primary or secondary metabolism of glycine. When whole cells were fed [1,2- 14 C]glycine, cyanide and bicarbonate were the only radioactive extracellular products observed

  9. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY Antibodies Induce Specific Bacterial Aggregation and Internalization in Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K.; Christophersen, L.; Bjarnsholt, T.

    2015-01-01

    with P. aeruginosa by augmenting the phagocytic competence of PMNs may postpone the deteriorating chronic biofilm infection. Anti-P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies significantly increase the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing of P. aeruginosa in vitro. The mode of action...... is attributed to IgY-facilitated formation of immobilized bacteria in aggregates, as visualized by fluorescence microscopy and the induction of increased bacterial hydrophobicity. Thus, the present study demonstrates that avian egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) targeting P. aeruginosa modify bacterial fitness...

  10. Molecular detection of an atypical, highly resistant, clonal Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate in cystic fibrosis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Deirdre

    2013-03-01

    The identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates in sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can be challenging due to the multitude of phenotypic changes isolates undergo during adaptation to the microenvironment of the CF lung.

  11. Comparative evaluation of ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, and ofloxacin in experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kemmerich, B; Small, G J; Pennington, J E

    1986-01-01

    The therapeutic activity of ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, and ofloxacin was evaluated in guinea pigs with acute and chronic experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Intratracheal instillations of P. aeruginosa resulted in fatal pneumonia in all untreated animals within 36 h. Among treatment groups (80 mg/kg [body weight] per day), cumulative survival rates were: 47%, ciprofloxacin; 55%, enoxacin; and 42%, ofloxacin. These rates were not significantly different. Intrapulmonary killing of P. a...

  12. The interaction between nitrobenzene and Microcystis aeruginosa and its potential to impact water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiquan; Cui, Fuyi; Ma, Hua; Fan, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Zhiwei; Hou, Zhenling; Liu, Dongmei; Jia, Xuebin

    2013-08-01

    The potential water quality problems caused by the interaction between nitrobezene (NB) and Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated by studying the growth inhibition, the haloacetic acids formation potential (HAAFP) and the secretion of microcystin-LR (MC-LR). The results showed that NB can inhibit the growth of M. aeruginosa, and the value of EC50 increased with the increase of initial algal density. Although NB can hardly react with chlorine to form HAAs, the presence of NB can enhance the HAAFP productivity. The secretion of the intracellular MC-LR is constant under the steady experimental conditions. However, the presence of NB can reduce the MC-LR productivity of M. aeruginosa. Overall, the increased disinfection risk caused by the interaction has more important effect on the safety of drinking water quality than the benefit of the decreased MC-LR productivity, and should be serious considered when the water contained NB and M. aeruginosa is used as drinking water source. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High-dose continuous infusion beta-lactam antibiotics for the treatment of resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Brad; Henning, Stacey A; Childs, Richard; Holland, Steven M; Anderson, Victoria L; Morris, John C; Wilson, Wyndham H; Drusano, George L; Walsh, Thomas J

    2010-05-01

    To report a case series of high-dose continuous infusion beta-lactam antibiotics for the treatment of resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. Continuous infusion ceftazidime or aztreonam was administered to achieve target drug concentrations at or above the minimum inhibitory concentration, when possible, in 3 patients with P. aeruginosa infections. The maximal calculated target drug concentration was 100 mg/L. In the first patient, with primary immunodeficiency, neutropenia, and aggressive cutaneous T-cell lymphoma/leukemia, continuous infusion ceftazidime (6.5-9.6 g/day) was used to successfully treat multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia. In the second patient, with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, continuous infusion aztreonam (8.4 g/day) was used to successfully treat multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa wound infections. In the third patient, with severe aplastic anemia, continuous infusion ceftazidime (7-16.8 g/day) was used to treat P. aeruginosa pneumonia and bacteremia. In each patient, bacteremia cleared, infected wounds healed, and pneumonia improved in response to continuous infusion ceftazidime or aztreonam. Treatment strategies for multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections are limited. A novel treatment strategy, when no other options are available, is the continuous infusion of existing beta-lactam antibiotics to maximize their pharmacodynamic activity. High-dose continuous infusion ceftazidime or aztreonam was used for the successful treatment of resistant systemic P. aeruginosa infections in 3 chronically immunocompromised patients. Continuous infusion beta-lactam antibiotics are a potentially useful treatment strategy for resistant P. aeruginosa infections in immunocompromised patients.

  14. Risk factors for colonization and infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients hospitalized in intensive care units in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, S.; Georget, A.; Asselineau, J.; Venier, A-G.; Leroyer, C.; Rogues, A. M.; Thiébaut, R.

    2018-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.aeruginosa) remains a prominent nosocomial pathogen responsible for high morbi-mortality in intensive care units (ICUs). P.aeruginosa transmission is known to be partly endogenous and exogenous. Main factors have been highlighted but the precise role of environment in regard to antibiotics use remained unclear. Objective To assess the role of environment, medical care and individual risks factors for P. aeruginosa colonization and infection. Study design and setting A French multicentric prospective study involved ten ICUs for a five months period. Every adult patient newly hospitalized in ICUs with no P. aeruginosa carriage up to 48 hours after admission was included and weekly screened before discharge or death. Screening swabs were either rectal, sputum or oropharyngeal samples. Hydric environment was also sampled each week. Data on patient clinical features, environmental and device exposures, and antibiotics supports were regularly collected. Multivariate analysis was performed with a multistate model. Results The overall prevalence of P. aeruginosa carriage was 15.3% (201/1314). Risk factors associated with patient colonization were: use of inactive antibiotics against P. aeruginosa (HR = 1.60 [1.15–2.21] pinfection (HR = 0.64 [0.41–1.01] p = 0.05). Interaction between hydric environment antibiotics support was not statistically associated with patient colonization. Conclusion Hydric contamination and antibiotics pressure seem to remain key independent risk factors in P. aeruginosa colonization. These results advocate the need to carry on preventive and targeted interventions toward healthcare associated infections. PMID:29522559

  15. Influence of glyphosate in planktonic and biofilm growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Schneider Lima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the impact of different concentrations of glyphosate (Rondup® on planktonic and biofilm growth of P. aeruginosa. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures of P. aeruginosa ATCC®15442 inoculated in MHB + glyphosate (0.845 ppm, 1.690 ppm, 8.45 ppm, 16.90 ppm, 84.50 ppm, 169 ppm, 845 ppm, and 1690 ppm and cultured in normoxia and anoxia, following their OD560nm every hour for 24 h. Biofilms of adapted cells were formed in the presence of glyphosate (0.845 to 1690 ppm in normoxia and anoxia for 36 h. Glyphosate at concentrations higher than 84.5 ppm reduces the cell density of planktonic aerobic cultures (p 0.05, and more pronounced over 169 ppm. Anaerobic biofilms have their growth more readily favored (p < 0.05, regardless of concentration. In a concentration-dependent manner, glyphosate interferes with the growth ability of P. aeruginosa ATCC®15442.

  16. Emergence of Imipenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates from Egypt Coharboring VIM and IMP Carbapenemases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Domany, Ramadan Ahmed; Emara, Mohamed; El-Magd, Mohammed A; Moustafa, Walaa H; Abdeltwab, Nesma M

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important human pathogen and the leading cause of nosocomial infections. P. aeruginosa is characterized by massive intrinsic resistance to a multiple classes of antibiotics with carbapenems being the most potent inhibitor of P. aeruginosa and considered the first choice for its treatment. Therefore, it is crucial to investigate novel mechanisms of resistance of P. aeruginosa to carbapenems for achieving successful therapy. A total of 114 P. aeruginosa isolates from two university hospitals in Egypt were recruited in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that 50 isolates (43.8%) exhibited multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype, of them 14 isolates (12.2%) were imipenem (IPM)-resistant. Of these 14 isolates, 13 isolates (11.4%) exhibited the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) phenotype. MBLs encoding genes, VIM and IMP, were identified by PCR. PCR results revealed that four isolates harbored the VIM gene alone, one isolate harbored IMP gene alone, and four isolates harbored both genes. The correct size of PCR products of VIM and IMP genes (390 and 188 bp, respectively) were sequenced to confirm results of PCR and to look for any possible polymorphism among MBL genes of tested isolates. Data analysis of these sequences showed 100% identity of nucleotide sequences of MBL genes among tested Egyptian patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of IMP carbapenemase-encoding gene in Africa and the first detection of the emergence of P. aeruginosa coproducing VIM and IMP genes in Egypt.

  17. Carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible: a worrisome phenotype among Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Eloiza Helena; Xavier, Danilo Elias; Petrolini, Fernanda Villas-Boas; Cordeiro-Moura, Jhonatha Rodrigo; Araujo, Maria Rita Elmor de; Gales, Ana Cristina

    The mechanisms involved in the uncommon resistance phenotype, carbapenem resistance and broad-spectrum cephalosporin susceptibility, were investigated in 25 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that exhibited this phenotype, which were recovered from three different hospitals located in São Paulo, Brazil. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined by CLSI broth microdilution. β-lactamase-encoding genes were investigated by PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Carbapenem hydrolysis activity was investigated by spectrophotometer and MALDI-TOF assays. The mRNA transcription level of oprD was assessed by qRT-PCR and the outer membrane proteins profile was evaluated by SDS-PAGE. Genetic relationship among P. aeruginosa isolates was assessed by PFGE. Carbapenems hydrolysis was not detected by carbapenemase assay in the carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible P. aueruginosa clinical isolates. OprD decreased expression was observed in all P. aeruginosa isolates by qRT-PCR. The outer membrane protein profile by SDS-PAGE suggested a change in the expression of the 46kDa porin that could correspond to OprD porin. The isolates were clustered into 17 genotypes without predominance of a specific PFGE pattern. These results emphasize the involvement of multiple chromosomal mechanisms in carbapenem-resistance among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, alert for adaptation of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates under antimicrobial selective pressure and make aware of the emergence of an uncommon phenotype among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: characteristics of eradicated and persistent isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G. A.; van der Ent, C. K.; Molin, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 567574 Abstract Despite intensive eradication therapy, some CF patients with early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection rapidly develop a chronic infection. To elucidate factors associated with this persistence, bacterial characteristics of early P. aeruginosa isolates...

  19. Two genetic loci produce distinct carbohydrate-rich structural components of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lisa; Kolter, Roberto

    2004-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms, which are cellular aggregates encased in an extracellular matrix. Molecular genetics studies of three common autoaggregative phenotypes, namely wrinkled colonies, pellicles, and solid-surface-associated biofilms, led to the identification of two loci, pel and psl, that are involved in the production of carbohydrate-rich components of the biofilm matrix. The pel gene cluster is involved in the production of a glucose-rich matrix material in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 (L. Friedman and R. Kolter, Mol. Microbiol. 51:675-690, 2004). Here we investigate the role of the pel gene cluster in P. aeruginosa strain ZK2870 and identify a second genetic locus, termed psl, involved in the production of a mannose-rich matrix material. The 11 predicted protein products of the psl genes are homologous to proteins involved in carbohydrate processing. P. aeruginosa is thus able to produce two distinct carbohydrate-rich matrix materials. Either carbohydrate-rich matrix component appears to be sufficient for mature biofilm formation, and at least one of them is required for mature biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa strains PA14 and ZK2870. Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

  20. Within-host evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals adaptation toward iron acquisition from hemoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær; Khademi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    the within-host evolution of the transmissible P. aeruginosa DK2 lineage. We found positive selection for promoter mutations leading to increased expression of the phu system. By mimicking conditions of the CF airways in vitro, we experimentally demonstrate that increased expression of phuR confers a growth...... advantage in the presence of hemoglobin, thus suggesting that P. aeruginosa evolves toward iron acquisition from hemoglobin. To rule out that this adaptive trait is specific to the DK2 lineage, we inspected the genomes of additional P. aeruginosa lineages isolated from CF airways and found similar adaptive...... might therefore be a promising strategy for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients. IMPORTANCE Most bacterial pathogens depend on scavenging iron within their hosts, which makes the battle for iron between pathogens and hosts a hallmark of infection. Accordingly, the ability...

  1. Quorum quenching by an N-acyl-homoserine lactone acylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sio, CF; Otten, LG; Cool, RH; Diggle, SP; Braun, PG; Daykin, M; Camara, M; Williams, P; Quax, WJ; Bos, R

    The virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is controlled by an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum-sensing system. During functional analysis of putative acylase genes in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome, the PA2385 gene was found to encode an acylase

  2. Arsenic efflux from Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yan

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton plays an important role in arsenic speciation, distribution, and cycling in freshwater environments. Little information, however, is available on arsenic efflux from the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes. This study investigated M. aeruginosa arsenic efflux and speciation by pre-exposing it to 10 µM arsenate or arsenite for 24 h during limited (12 h and extended (13 d depuration periods under phosphate enriched (+P and phosphate depleted (-P treatments. Arsenate was the predominant species detected in algal cells throughout the depuration period while arsenite only accounted for no greater than 45% of intracellular arsenic. During the limited depuration period, arsenic efflux occurred rapidly and only arsenate was detected in solutions. During the extended depuration period, however, arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA were found to be the two predominant arsenic species detected in solutions under -P treatments, but arsenate was the only species detected under +P treatments. Experimental results also suggest that phosphorus has a significant effect in accelerating arsenic efflux and promoting arsenite bio-oxidation in M. aeruginosa. Furthermore, phosphorus depletion can reduce arsenic efflux from algal cells as well as accelerate arsenic reduction and methylation. These findings can contribute to our understanding of arsenic biogeochemistry in aquatic environments and its potential environmental risks under different phosphorus levels.

  3. Functional study of elafin cleaved by Pseudomonas aeruginosa metalloproteinases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guyot, Nicolas

    2010-06-01

    Elafin is a 6-kDa innate immune protein present at several epithelial surfaces including the pulmonary epithelium. It is a canonical protease inhibitor of two neutrophil serine proteases [neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3] with the capacity to covalently bind extracellular matrix proteins by transglutamination. In addition to these properties, elafin also possesses antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases on elafin function. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO1-conditioned medium and two purified Pseudomonas metalloproteases, pseudolysin (elastase) and aeruginolysin (alkaline protease), are able to cleave recombinant elafin. Pseudolysin was shown to inactivate the anti-NE activity of elafin by cleaving its protease-binding loop. Interestingly, antibacterial properties of elafin against PAO1 were found to be unaffected after pseudolysin treatment. In contrast to pseudolysin, aeruginolysin failed to inactivate the inhibitory properties of elafin against NE. Aeruginolysin cleaves elafin at the amino-terminal Lys6-Gly7 peptide bond, resulting in a decreased ability to covalently bind purified fibronectin following transglutaminase activity. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that elafin is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage at alternative sites by P. aeruginosa metalloproteinases, which can affect different biological functions of elafin.

  4. Contamination of hospital tap water: the survival and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on conventional and 'antimicrobial' outlet fittings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, C F; Moore, G; Thompson, K-A; Webb, J; Walker, J T

    2017-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections have been linked to contaminated hospital taps, highlighting the potential for tap outlet fittings (OF) to harbour biofilm. P. aeruginosa may be transferred to OFs via contaminated cleaning cloths. Suggested interventions include flushing regimens and alternative OF designs. To investigate the transfer of P. aeruginosa from a contaminated cleaning cloth to conventional and 'antimicrobial/antibiofilm' OFs and to determine whether this contamination persists and/or leads to contamination of tap water. Microfibre cloths contaminated with P. aeruginosa (10 8  cfu/mL) were used to wipe four different types of OF [one of conventional design (OF-A) and three marketed as 'antimicrobial' and/or 'antibiofilm' (OF- B, -C and -D)]. OFs were inserted into an experimental water distribution system for up to 24 h. Survival was assessed by culture. Single and multiple water samples were collected and cultured for P. aeruginosa. The median number of P. aeruginosa transferred from cloth to OF was 5.7 × 10 5  cfu (OF-A), 1.9 × 10 6  cfu (OF-B), 1.4 × 10 5  cfu (OF-C) and 2.9 × 10 6  cfu (OF-D). Numbers declined on all OFs during the 24 h period with log reductions ranging from 3.5 (OF-C) to 5.2 (OF-B; P > 0.05). All water samples delivered immediately after OF contamination contained P. aeruginosa at ≥10 cfu per 100 mL. Contamination of water delivered from OF-A persisted despite continued flushing. Water delivered from OF-B did not contain P. aeruginosa beyond the first flush. Contaminated cleaning cloths may transfer P. aeruginosa to OFs, leading to contamination of tap water. Although not removing the potential for contamination, 'antimicrobial/antibiofilm' OFs may prevent P. aeruginosa from continually contaminating water delivered from the outlet. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation......, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose......Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause...

  6. Regulation of Initial Attachment of P. aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    shown to play a role in promoting biofilm formation in diverse P. aeruginosa strains (Friedman and Kolter , 2004; Jackson et al., 2004; Ryder et al...34House of Biofilm Cells". J. Bacteriol. 189: 7945-7947. Friedman, L., and Kolter , R. (2004) Genes involved in matrix formation in Pseudomonas

  7. Profile of Virulence Factors in the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains of Human Urinary Tract Infections (UTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Asghar; Honarmand, Ramin

    2015-12-01

    Putative virulence factors are responsible for the pathogenicity of UTIs caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Resistance of P. aeruginosa to commonly used antibiotics is caused by the extreme overprescription of those antibiotics. The goal of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of virulence factors and the antibiotic resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa isolates in UTI cases in Iran. Two hundred and fifty urine samples were collected from patients who suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured immediately, and those that were P. aeruginosa-positive were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Of the 250 urine samples analyzed, 8 samples (3.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of P. aeruginosa in male and female patients was 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively, (P = 0.035). In patients less than 10 years old, it was 4.2%, and in patients more than 55 years old, it was 4.2%. These were the most commonly infected groups. The highest levels of resistance were seen against ampicillin (87.5%), norfloxacin (62.5%), gentamycin (62.5%), amikacin (62.5%), and aztreonam (62.5%), while the lowest were seen for meropenem (0%), imipenem (12.5%), and polymyxin B (12.5%). LasB (87.5%), pclH (75%), pilB (75%), and exoS (75%) were the most commonly detected virulence factors in the P. aeruginosa isolates. It is logical to first prescribe meropenem, imipenem, and polymyxin B in cases of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Medical practitioners should be aware of the presence of levels of antibiotic resistance in hospitalized UTI patients in Iran.

  8. Annual Surveillance Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    2017 Section B – Antimicrobial Resistance and Use Regional Multidrug Resistance The 2016 annual incidence rate of P. aeruginosa among all MHS...characteristics, prescription practices, and antibiotic resistance patterns observed for P. aeruginosa infections in calendar year (CY) 2016. Multiple...decreased and the majority of infections occurred in those over 65 years of age. Regional distribution of infections and drug resistance followed the

  9. Comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from mink by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne Sofie; Pedersen, Karl; Andersen, Thomas Holmen

    2003-01-01

    Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical infections in mink were subjected to serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SpeI. A total of 212 isolates of P aeruginosa from the year 1998 to 2001 were included in this study: 168 isolates from mink obtained from 74 farm out...

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans reveals novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    The susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to different virulent phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa makes the worms an excellent model for studying host-pathogen interactions. Including the recently described liquid killing, five different killing assays are now available offering superb

  11. Estrogen aggravates inflammation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in cystic fibrosis mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagnon Stéphane

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, females have worse pulmonary function and survival than males, primarily due to chronic lung inflammation and infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa. A role for gender hormones in the causation of the CF "gender gap" has been proposed. The female gender hormone 17β-estradiol (E2 plays a complex immunomodulatory role in humans and in animal models of disease, suppressing inflammation in some situations while enhancing it in others. Helper T-cells were long thought to belong exclusively to either T helper type 1 (Th1 or type 2 (Th2 lineages. However, a distinct lineage named Th17 is now recognized that is induced by interleukin (IL-23 to produce IL-17 and other pro-inflammatory Th17 effector molecules. Recent evidence suggests a central role for the IL-23/IL-17 pathway in the pathogenesis of CF lung inflammation. We used a mouse model to test the hypothesis that E2 aggravates the CF lung inflammation that occurs in response to airway infection with P. aeruginosa by a Th17-mediated mechanism. Results Exogenous E2 caused adult male CF mice with pneumonia due to a mucoid CF clinical isolate, the P. aeruginosa strain PA508 (PA508, to develop more severe manifestations of inflammation in both lung tissue and in bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL fluid, with increased total white blood cell counts and differential and absolute cell counts of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils. Inflammatory infiltrates and mucin production were increased on histology. Increased lung tissue mRNA levels for IL-23 and IL-17 were accompanied by elevated protein levels of Th17-associated pro-inflammatory mediators in BAL fluid. The burden of PA508 bacteria was increased in lung tissue homogenate and in BAL fluid, and there was a virtual elimination in lung tissue of mRNA for lactoferrin, an antimicrobial peptide active against P. aeruginosa in vitro. Conclusions Our data show that E2 increases the

  12. Lessons Learned from Surveillance of Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a Large Academic Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett H. Heintz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This research report assessed the differences in resistance rates and antimicrobial usage-versus-susceptibility relationships of Pseudomonas aeruginosa found in various hospital patient care areas. A simplified case control study was also performed to identify patient-specific risk factors associated with cefepime-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. Last, we determined the consequence of combining mucoid and non-mucoid derived antimicrobial susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa into hospital antibiograms. Overall, susceptibility rates remained lower in the intensive care units (ICUs compared to the non-ICU patient care areas, except for cefepime over the last time period. Cefepime utilization and antimicrobial-resistance rates among P. aeruginosa isolates had a significant relationship. Decreased meropenem exposure was associated with lower resistance rates relative to cefepime. Risk factors independently associated with cefepime-resistant P. aeruginosa were structural lung disease, ICU admission, recent third generation cephalosporin use, frequent hospital admission and non-urine isolates. Large and statistically significant differences were observed between non-mucoid and combined percent susceptibility data for aminoglycosides. To control antimicrobial resistance and optimize initial empiric antimicrobial therapy, antimicrobial susceptibility and utilization patterns in specific patient care areas should be monitored and risk factors for antimicrobial resistance should be assessed. Mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa should not be included into antimicrobial susceptibility data as this may underestimate activity of most antipseudomonal agents.

  13. Occurrence of Microcystis aeruginosa and microcystins in Río de la Plata river (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Andrinolo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first report on microcystins producer blooms of Microcystis aeruginosa in the Argentinean coast of the Río de la Plata river, the most important drinking water supply of Argentina. The distribution of toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis cf. aeruginosa blooms in the Argentinean coast of the Rio de la Plata river was studied from December 2003 and January 2006. Microcystis aeruginosa persisted in the river with values ranged between 0 - 7.8 10(4 cells ml-1. Samples of two Microcystis aeruginosa water blooms were collected at La Plata river and were analyzed by the mouse bioassay and by high-performance liquid chromatography with Diode-array and MS detector. The samples showed high hepatotoxicity in mouse bioassay and, in accordance, important amount of microcystins. The bloom samples contained microcystins LR and a variant of microcystin with a molecular ion [M+H]+= 1037.8 m/z as major components. The total toxin content found in these samples was 0.94μg/mg and 0.69μg/mg of lyophilised cells. We conclude that the presence of toxic clones of Microcystis aeruginosa in the Argentinean coast of the Río de la Plata is an actual sanitary and environmental problem and that further studies are necessary to make the risk assessment.

  14. In vitro efficacy of doripenem against pseudomonas aeruginosa and acinetobacter baumannii by e-test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilani, M.; Munir, T.; Latif, M.; Rehman, S.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the in vitro efficacy of doripenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii using Epsilometer strips. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad, from May 2014 to September 2014. Methodology: A total of 60 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected from various clinical samples received from Military Hospital were included in the study. The specimens were inoculated onto blood, MacConkey and chocolate agars. The isolates were identified using Gram staining, motility, catalase test, oxidase test and API 20NE (Biomeriux, France). Organisms identified as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were included in the study. Bacterial suspensions equivalent to 0.5 McFarland turbidity standard of the isolates were prepared and applied on Mueller Hinton agar. Epsilometer strip was placed in the center of the plate and incubated for 18-24 hours. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was taken to be the point where the epsilon intersected the E-strip. MIC of all the isolates was noted. Results: For Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, MIC50 was 12 micro g/mL and MIC90 was 32 micro g/mL. For Acinetobacter baumannii MIC 50 and MIC90 was 32 micro g/mL. Conclusion: Doripenem is no more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in our setting. (author)

  15. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from keratitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, JA; Kilian, Mogens

    2003-01-01

    keratitis, endophthalmitis, contact lens associated red eye (CLARE), and contact lens storage cases showed MIC values below 1 mg/l. Several allelic forms of gyrA and a single variation in the mexR gene product were detected in 10 ciprofloxacin susceptible strains. CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority of eye......AIM: To examine the ciprofloxacin susceptibility of 106 Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye isolates from the United Kingdom, Denmark, India, the United States, and Australia, and to determine the molecular mechanisms of resistance. METHODS: Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was tested by an agar dilution method...... isolates of P aeruginosa from European countries are fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin and the concentration of ciprofloxacin eye drops used for local treatment (3000 mg/l) exceeds MIC values for strains recorded as resistant. Mutations in more than one target gene were associated with higher MIC values....

  16. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from keratitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, JA; Kilian, Mogens

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To examine the ciprofloxacin susceptibility of 106 Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye isolates from the United Kingdom, Denmark, India, the United States, and Australia, and to determine the molecular mechanisms of resistance. METHODS: Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was tested by an agar dilution method...... keratitis, endophthalmitis, contact lens associated red eye (CLARE), and contact lens storage cases showed MIC values below 1 mg/l. Several allelic forms of gyrA and a single variation in the mexR gene product were detected in 10 ciprofloxacin susceptible strains. CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority of eye...... isolates of P aeruginosa from European countries are fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin and the concentration of ciprofloxacin eye drops used for local treatment (3000 mg/l) exceeds MIC values for strains recorded as resistant. Mutations in more than one target gene were associated with higher MIC values....

  17. Face Masks and Cough Etiquette Reduce the Cough Aerosol Concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in People with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michelle E; Stockwell, Rebecca E; Johnson, Graham R; Ramsay, Kay A; Sherrard, Laura J; Jabbour, Nassib; Ballard, Emma; O'Rourke, Peter; Kidd, Timothy J; Wainwright, Claire E; Knibbs, Luke D; Sly, Peter D; Morawska, Lidia; Bell, Scott C

    2018-02-01

    People with cystic fibrosis (CF) generate Pseudomonas aeruginosa in droplet nuclei during coughing. The use of surgical masks has been recommended in healthcare settings to minimize pathogen transmission between patients with CF. To determine if face masks and cough etiquette reduce viable P. aeruginosa aerosolized during coughing. Twenty-five adults with CF and chronic P. aeruginosa infection were recruited. Participants performed six talking and coughing maneuvers, with or without face masks (surgical and N95) and hand covering the mouth when coughing (cough etiquette) in an aerosol-sampling device. An Andersen Cascade Impactor was used to sample the aerosol at 2 meters from each participant. Quantitative sputum and aerosol bacterial cultures were performed, and participants rated the mask comfort levels during the cough maneuvers. During uncovered coughing (reference maneuver), 19 of 25 (76%) participants produced aerosols containing P. aeruginosa, with a positive correlation found between sputum P. aeruginosa concentration (measured as cfu/ml) and aerosol P. aeruginosa colony-forming units. There was a reduction in aerosol P. aeruginosa load during coughing with a surgical mask, coughing with an N95 mask, and cough etiquette compared with uncovered coughing (P masks during coughing; yet, participants rated the surgical masks as more comfortable (P = 0.013). Cough etiquette provided approximately half the reduction of viable aerosols of the mask interventions during voluntary coughing. Talking was a low viable aerosol-producing activity. Face masks reduce cough-generated P. aeruginosa aerosols, with the surgical mask providing enhanced comfort. Cough etiquette was less effective at reducing viable aerosols.

  18. RESEARCH IN SENSITIVITY TO ANTIBIOTICS, ANTISEPTICS IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Nazarchuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infections caused by Pseudomonas are one of the topical issues of medicine. Objective. The aim of the research was to study sensityvity to antibiotics, antiseptics of P. aeruginosa clinical strains that cause infectious complications in patients with burns. Methods. Microbiological study of biological material, received from 435 patients with burns of the 3rd-4th stages (2011-2015 years. In early terms of burn disease 127 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from patients. Standard methods were used to identify clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa by their morphological, tinctirial, culture and biochemical properties. The research of antimicrobial action of antiseptics, antibiotics against Pseudomonas were carried out by means of standard methods according to the Directive of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine (No. 167 from 05.04.2007 р. and guidelines of National Committee of Clinical and Laboratory Study (NCCLS, 2002. Results. It was established that P. aeruginosa caused infectious complications in 23.9% of patients among other pathogens. Clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were found to be low sensitive to amoxicillin/clavulanate (30.76%, ceftazidime (25.92%, cefoperazonum/sulbactam (46.15%, aztreonam (51.85%, tobramycin (38.46%, amicacin (70.34%, doxiciclini (26.92%, fluoroquinolones (59.26%. The analitical progistic criteria of decrease of sensitivity to ceftazidime, cefepim, meropenem and gatifloxacin were found in P. aeruginosa. This pathogen was determined to be sensitive to decasan ®, antimicrobial composition of decamethoxine ®, iodine pvidone. Conclusions. Clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, being highly resistant to antibiotics, are also very sensitive to antiseptics decasan ®, antimicrobial of decamethoxine®, povidone iodine.

  19. Effects of lead(II) on the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and colony formation of cultured Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Shu-lin; Dai, Wei; Xing, Ke-zhing; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lead(II) on the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), including bound extracellular polysaccharides (bEPS) and soluble extracellular polysaccharides (sEPS), and the colony formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to four concentrations (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L) of lead(II) for 10 d under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L lead(II) stimulated M. aeruginosa growth throughout the experiment while 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth in the first 2 d exposure and then stimulated it. As compared to the control group, significant increases in the bEPS and sEPS production were observed in 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) treatments (P bEPS production, which conversely promoted colony formation, suggesting that heavy metals might be contributing to the bloom-forming of M. aeruginosa in natural conditions.

  20. Multiple roles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa TBCF10839 PilY1 in motility, transport and infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Yu-Sing Tammy; Brandes, Gudrun; Rakhimova, Elza

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the most important mammalian host defence cells against infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Screening of a signature tagged mutagenesis library of the non-piliated P. aeruginosa strain TBCF10839 uncovered that transposon inactivation of its pilY1 gene rendere...

  1. Development of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during two decades of antipseudomonal treatment at the Danish CF Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Pedersen, S S

    1994-01-01

    resistance in P. aeruginosa strains isolated from Danish CF patients over a period of 18 years by testing the in vitro efficacy of carbenicillin, piperacillin, ceftazidime, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin against P. aeruginosa strains collected in 1973 (51 strains), 1980 (80 strains), 1985 (58 strains...... was found between the MIC and the number of antipseudomonal courses of antibiotics. The proportion of resistant in vivo selected P. aeruginosa strains, presumed to be stably derepressed producers of chromosomal beta-lactamase, also increased significantly during the period studied. Our results confirm...... that the beta-lactamase production is an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa....

  2. Removal of Microcystis aeruginosa using hydrodynamic cavitation: performance and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Song, Yuan; Yu, Shuili

    2014-10-01

    Algal blooms are a seasonal problem in eutrophic water bodies, and novel approaches to algal removal are required. The effect of hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) on the removal of Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated using a laboratory scale device. Samples treated by HC were subsequently grown under illuminated culture conditions. The results demonstrated that a short treatment with HC could effectively settle naturally growing M. aeruginosa without breaking cells. Algal cell density and chlorophyll-a of a sample treated for 10 min were significantly decreased by 88% andv 94%, respectively, after 3 days culture. Various HC operating parameters were investigated, showing that inhibition of M. aeruginosa growth mainly depended on treatment time and pump pressure. Electron microscopy confirmed that sedimentation of algae was attributable to the disruption of intracellular gas vesicles. Damage to the photosynthetic apparatus also contributed to the inhibition of algal growth. Free radicals produced by the cavitation process could be as an indirect indicator of the intensity of HC treatment, although they inflicted minimal damage on the algae. In conclusion, we suggest that HC represents a potentially highly effective and sustainable approach to the removal of algae from water systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation the antinociceptive, antipyretic and antiinflammatory activities of Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb. extracts in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunee Khamjun

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Curcuma aeruginosa (C. aeruginosa Roxb. (Zingiberaceae is known in Thai as Waan-Ma-Haa-Mek. The rhizomes of this plant have been used as a component of Thai herbal medicinal recipes used for decreasing dysmenorrhea. In the present study, the analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory actions of this plant were investigated in experimental animals. The rhizomes of C. aeruginosa were extracted with chloroform, methanol and water to give chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts, respectively. The effects of the three extracts on nociceptive response using writhing, hot plate and formalin tests in mice were performed. The antipyretic activity in yeast-induced fever and the anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenin-induced edema in rats, were examined. The LD50 value of orally administered the chloroform extract and methanol extract in mice was 3.03 g/kg. No dead mice were observed after oral administration of aqueous extract at the dose of 10 g/kg. Oral administration of the chloroform extract and the methanol extract of C. aeruginosa rhizomes (100-400 mg/kg significantly decreased the number of writhings and stretchings induced by acetic acid. Only the chloroform extract suppressed the licking activity of the late phase in the formalin test in mice. All extracts of C. aeruginosa rhizomes had no effects on heat-induced pain in mice, yeast-induced fever and carrageenin-induced edema in rats. These results suggest that the chloroform extract of C. aeruginosa rhizome possesses analgesic effect via a different mechanism from that of the aspirin.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Three Methods for Determination of Imipenem Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Tanaz Zabihi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available "> Background: These days, the antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates toimipenem has significantly increased. Therefore the study of resistance to imipenem in thisorganism to imipenem in determining the appropriate treatment is crucial and necessary. The goalof this study is to compare three phenotypic methods of E-test, disk diffusion and micro brothdilution in the study of resistance to imipenem in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.Methods: Within a 6-month interval, 120 clinical specimens were collected and evaluated. Allisolates were identified as P. aeruginosa by standard biochemical tests and amplification of 16SrRNA gene. Three phenotypic methods of E-test, disk diffusion, and micro broth dilution wereused to determine imipenem resistance in P. aeruginosa isolates.Results: Of the 96 P. aeruginosa isolates studied for their resistance to imipenem by the use ofE-test, disk diffusion and micro broth dilution methods, 38.5% of the strains in micro broth dilutionmethod and 33.3% in the two methods of E-test and disk diffusion were resistant to imipenem. Therate of sensitivity and specificity of disk diffusion and E-test methods were 100%, 90.1%, and theywere 100% and 83.1% for micro broth dilution, respectively.Conclusions: With regard to the results obtained from the comparison of the three methods100% agreement were observed among the antimicrobial susceptibility results obtained by the Etest and disk diffusion methods (P ≥ 0.05. Therefore, the use of disk diffusion method can bean appropriate replacement for E-test method with regard to its being easy and cost-effective.

  5. VE-cadherin cleavage by LasB protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa facilitates type III secretion system toxicity in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Golovkine

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the vascular system by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa occurs during bacterial dissemination in the body or in blood-borne infections. Type 3 secretion system (T3SS toxins from Pa induce a massive retraction when injected into endothelial cells. Here, we addressed the role of type 2 secretion system (T2SS effectors in this process. Mutants with an inactive T2SS were much less effective than wild-type strains at inducing cell retraction. Furthermore, secretomes from wild-types were sufficient to trigger cell-cell junction opening when applied to cells, while T2SS-inactivated mutants had minimal activity. Intoxication was associated with decreased levels of vascular endothelial (VE-cadherin, a homophilic adhesive protein located at endothelial cell-cell junctions. During the process, the protein was cleaved in the middle of its extracellular domain (positions 335 and 349. VE-cadherin attrition was T3SS-independent but T2SS-dependent. Interestingly, the epithelial (E-cadherin was unaffected by T2SS effectors, indicating that this mechanism is specific to endothelial cells. We showed that one of the T2SS effectors, the protease LasB, directly affected VE-cadherin proteolysis, hence promoting cell-cell junction disruption. Furthermore, mouse infection with Pa to induce acute pneumonia lead to significant decreases in lung VE-cadherin levels, whereas the decrease was minimal with T2SS-inactivated or LasB-deleted mutant strains. We conclude that the T2SS plays a pivotal role during Pa infection of the vascular system by breaching the endothelial barrier, and propose a model in which the T2SS and the T3SS cooperate to intoxicate endothelial cells.

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility...... metabolism activity and the endogenous formation of reactive O2 radicals (ROS). In this study we aimed to apply hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) in order to sensitize anoxic P. aeruginosa agarose-biofilms established to mimic situations with intense O2 consumption by the host response in the cystic...... fibrosis (CF) lung. Application of HBOT resulted in enhanced bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin at clinically relevant durations and was accompanied by indications of restored aerobic respiration, involvement of endogenous lethal oxidative stress and increased bacterial growth. The findings highlight...

  7. Identification of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that are highly disruptive to the intestinal epithelial barrier

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    Shevchenko Olga

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections are increasingly recognized worldwide. In this study, we focused on the virulence of multi-drug resistant clinical strains P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelial barrier, since P. aeruginosa can cause lethal sepsis from within the intestinal tract of critically ill and immuno-compromised patients via mechanisms involving disruption of epithelial barrier function. Methods We screened consecutively isolated multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains for their ability to disrupt the integrity of human cultured intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 and correlated these finding to related virulence phenotypes such as adhesiveness, motility, biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity. Results Results demonstrated that the majority of the multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains were attenuated in their ability to disrupt the barrier function of cultured intestinal epithelial cells. Three distinct genotypes were found that displayed an extreme epithelial barrier-disrupting phenotype. These strains were characterized and found to harbor the exoU gene and to display high swimming motility and adhesiveness. Conclusion These data suggest that detailed phenotypic analysis of the behavior of multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelium has the potential to identify strains most likely to place patients at risk for lethal gut-derived sepsis. Surveillance of colonizing strains of P. aeruginosa in critically ill patients beyond antibiotic sensitivity is warranted.

  8. Analisis Kemiripan 20 Aksesi Temu Ireng (Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb. Berdasarkan Warna Rimpang, Hasil Ekstrak, dan Kandungan Fitokimia

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    Waras Nurcholis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTCurcuma aeruginosa Roxb., popularly known as “temu ireng”, is considered as a potential source of medicinal plant for pharmacological activities. However, varieties of C. aeruginosa are still limited in Indonesia so it needs more accessions for improvement and development of new varieties. Rhizome colors, phytochemical contents and extract yield from 20 promising lines of C. aeruginosa were investigated by qualitative method for rhizome colors and phytochemical contents, and maceration method using 70% ethanol for yield extract. Similarity analysis was used for cluster analysis based on rhizome colors, phytochemical contents and yield extract. Blue was the color characterization of rhizome C. aeruginosa. The extract yield for 20 promising lines of C. aeruginosa varied from 7.92 to 19.71%, with KN and BH promising lines having the lowest and highest value, respectively. All promising lines of C. aeruginosa contain saponin and triterpenoid. Based on similarity analysis, all promising lines could be divided into 3 clusters. Cluster I consisted of 14 promising lines i.e. WG, SH, KA, GD, BH, KP, NW, PW, MB, PR, PT, KN, MD, and PK. Cluster II consisted of 4 promising lines i.e. LC, CB, KL, and GK. Cluster III consisted of 2 promising lines i.e. KD and SG. Keywords: promising lines, saponin, triterpenoid

  9. An extra early mutant of pigeonpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravikesavan, R.; Kalaimagal, T.; Rathnaswamy, R.

    2001-01-01

    The redgram (Cajanus cajan (L.) Huth) variety 'Prabhat DT' was gamma irradiated with 100, 200, 300 and 400 Gy doses. Several mutants have been identified viz., extra early mutants, monostem mutants, obcordifoliate mutants and bi-stigmatic mutants. The extra early mutant was obtained when treated with 100 Gy dose. The mutant was selfed and forwarded from M 2 to M 4 generation. In the M 4 generation the mutant line was raised along with the parental variety. Normal cultural practices were followed and the biometrical observations were recorded. It was observed that for the characters viz., total number of branches per plant, number of pods per plants, seeds per pod, 100 seed weight and seed yield per plant there was no difference between the mutant and parent variety. Whereas, regarding the days to flowering and maturity the mutants were earlier than the parents. The observation was recorded from two hundred plants each. The mutant gives the same yield in 90 days as that of the parent variety in 107 days, which make it an economic mutant

  10. SERS spectroscopy for detection of hydrogen cyanide in breath from children colonised with P. aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Skou, Peter Bæk; Rindzevicius, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    ) nanochip optimised for detection of trace amounts of the P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was mounted inside a Tedlar bag, which the patient breathed into. The SERS chip was then analysed in a Raman spectrometer, investigating the C≡N peak at 2131 cm-1 and correlated with sputum cultures. One...... new P. aeruginosa colonisation occurred during the trial period. The C≡N peak intensity was enhanced in this sample in contrast to the subject's 3 other samples. Three additional patients had intense C≡N SERS signals from their breath, but no P. aeruginosa was cultured from their sputum...

  11. Inhibition and dispersal of Agrobacterium tumefaciens biofilms by a small diffusible Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoproduct(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbing, Michael E; Fuqua, Clay

    2012-06-01

    Environmental biofilms often contain mixed populations of different species. In these dense communities, competition between biofilm residents for limited nutrients such as iron can be fierce, leading to the evolution of competitive factors that affect the ability of competitors to grow or form biofilms. We have discovered a compound(s) present in the conditioned culture fluids of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that disperses and inhibits the formation of biofilms produced by the facultative plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The inhibitory activity is strongly induced when P. aeruginosa is cultivated in iron-limited conditions, but it does not function through iron sequestration. In addition, the production of the biofilm inhibitory activity is not regulated by the global iron regulatory protein Fur, the iron-responsive extracytoplasmic function σ factor PvdS, or three of the recognized P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing systems. In addition, the compound(s) responsible for the inhibition and dispersal of A. tumefaciens biofilm formation is likely distinct from the recently identified P. aeruginosa dispersal factor, cis-2-decenoic acid (CDA), as dialysis of the culture fluids showed that the inhibitory compound was larger than CDA and culture fluids that dispersed and inhibited biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens had no effect on biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa.

  12. Standardized chemical synthesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin

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    Rajkumar Cheluvappa

    2014-01-01

    As we have extracted pyocyanin both from P. aeruginosa cultures, and via chemical synthesis; we know the procedural and product-quality differences. We endorse the relative ease, safety, and convenience of using the chemical synthesis described here. Crucially, our “naturally endotoxin-free” pyocyanin can be extracted easily without using infectious bacteria.

  13. Peptidoglycan transpeptidase inhibition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli by Penicillins and Cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B A; Jevons, S; Brammer, K W

    1979-04-01

    Peptidoglycan transpeptidase activity has been studied in cells of Escherichia coli 146 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 56 made permeable to exogenous, nucleotide-sugar peptidoglycan precursors by ether treatment. Transpeptidase activity was inhibited, in both organisms, by a range of penicillins and cephalosporins, the Pseudomonas enzyme being more sensitive to inhibition in each case. Conversely, growth of E. coli 146 was more susceptible to these antibiotics than growth of P. aeruginosa 56. Furthermore, similar transpeptidase inhibition values were ob-obtained for the four penicillins examined against the Pseudomonas enzyme, although only two of these (carbenicillin and pirbenicillin) inhibited the growth of this organism. We therefore conclude that the high resistance of P. aeruginosa 56 to growth inhibition by most beta-lactam antibiotics cannot be due to an insensitive peptidoglycan transpeptidase.

  14. Comparative genomics reveals diversified CRISPR-Cas systems of globally distributed Microcystis aeruginosa, a freshwater bloom-forming cyanobacterium

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    Chen eYang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the most common and dominant bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwater lakes around the world. Microcystis cells can produce toxic secondary metabolites, such as microcystins, which are harmful to human health. Two M. aeruginosa strains were isolated from two highly eutrophic lakes in China and their genomes were sequenced. Comparative genomic analysis was performed with the 12 other available M. aeruginosa genomes and closely related unicellular cyanobacterium. Each genome of M. aeruginosa containing at least one clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR locus and total 71 loci were identified, suggesting it is ubiquitous in M. aeruginosa genomes. In addition to the previously reported subtype I-D cas gene sets, three CAS subtypes I-A, III-A and III-B were identified and characterized in this study. Seven types of CRISPR direct repeat have close association with CAS subtype, confirming that different and specific secondary structures of CRISPR repeats are important for the recognition, binding and process of corresponding cas gene sets. Homology search of the CRISPR spacer sequences provides a history of not only resistance to bacteriophages and plasmids known to be associated with M. aeruginosa, but also the ability to target much more exogenous genetic material in the natural environment. These adaptive and heritable defense mechanisms play a vital role in keeping genomic stability and self-maintenance by restriction of horizontal gene transfer. Maintaining genomic stability and modulating genomic plasticity are both important evolutionary strategies for M. aeruginosa in adaptation and survival in various habitats.

  15. Role of inducers in detection of blaPDC-mediated oxyimino-cephalosporin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Birson Ingti

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: P. aeruginosa harbouring inducible (chromosomal and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase is a matter of concern as it may limit therapeutic option. Using cefoxitin-ceftazidime-based test is simple and may be used for detecting inducible AmpC β-lactamase amongst P. aeruginosa.

  16. Mutant heterosis in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In the variety TKM6 a high yielding semidwarf mutant has been induced. This TKM6 mutant was used in test crosses with a number of other varieties and mutants to examine the extent of heterosis of dwarfs in rice and to select superior crosses. An excerpt of the published data is given. It appears from the backcross of the mutant with its original variety, that an increase in number of productive tillers occurs in the hybrid, leading to a striking grain yield increase, while the semi-dwarf culm length (the main mutant character) reverts to the normal phenotype. In the cross with IR8 on the other hand, there is only a minimal increase in tiller number but a substantial increase in TGW leading to more than 30% yield increase over the better parent

  17. Allelopathic interactions of linoleic acid and nitric oxide increase the competitive ability of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hao; Lavoie, Michel; Fan, Xiaoji; Tan, Hana; Liu, Guangfu; Xu, Pengfei; Fu, Zhengwei; Paerl, Hans W; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-08-01

    The frequency and intensity of cyanobacterial blooms are increasing worldwide with major societal and economic costs. Interactions between toxic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algal competitors can affect toxic bloom formation, but the exact mechanisms of interspecies interactions remain unknown. Using metabolomic and proteomic profiling of co-cultures of the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa with a green alga as well as of microorganisms collected in a Microcystis spp. bloom in Lake Taihu (China), we disentangle novel interspecies allelopathic interactions. We describe an interspecies molecular network in which M. aeruginosa inhibits growth of Chlorella vulgaris, a model green algal competitor, via the release of linoleic acid. In addition, we demonstrate how M. aeruginosa takes advantage of the cell signaling compound nitric oxide produced by C. vulgaris, which stimulates a positive feedback mechanism of linoleic acid release by M. aeruginosa and its toxicity. Our high-throughput system-biology approach highlights the importance of previously unrecognized allelopathic interactions between a broadly distributed toxic cyanobacterial bloom former and one of its algal competitors.

  18. Pentachlorophenol induction of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa mexAB-oprM efflux operon: involvement of repressors NalC and MexR and the antirepressor ArmR.

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    Lisa M Starr

    Full Text Available Pentachlorophenol (PCP induced expression of the NalC repressor-regulated PA3720-armR operon and the MexR repressor-controlled mexAB-oprM multidrug efflux operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PCP's induction of PA3720-armR resulted from its direct modulation of NalC, the repressor's binding to PA3720-armR promoter-containing DNA as seen in electromobility shift assays (EMSAs being obviated in the presence of this agent. The NalC binding site was localized to an inverted repeat (IR sequence upstream of PA3720-armR and overlapping a promoter region whose transcription start site was mapped. While modulation of MexR by the ArmR anti-repressor explains the upregulation of mexAB-oprM in nalC mutants hyperexpressing PA3720-armR, the induction of mexAB-oprM expression by PCP is not wholly explainable by PCP induction of PA3720-armR and subsequent ArmR modulation of MexR, inasmuch as armR deletion mutants still showed PCP-inducible mexAB-oprM expression. PCP failed, however, to induce mexAB-oprM in a mexR deletion strain, indicating that MexR was required for this, although PCP did not modulate MexR binding to mexAB-oprM promoter-containing DNA in vitro. One possibility is that MexR responds to PCP-generated in vivo effector molecules in controlling mexAB-oprM expression in response to PCP. PCP is an unlikely effector and substrate for NalC and MexAB-OprM--its impact on NalC binding to the PA3720-armR promoter DNA occurred only at high µM levels--suggesting that it mimics an intended phenolic effector/substrate(s. In this regard, plants are an abundant source of phenolic antimicrobial compounds and, so, MexAB-OprM may function to protect P. aeruginosa from plant antimicrobials that it encounters in nature.