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Sample records for aeruginosa biofilm development

  1. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.;

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  2. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    OpenAIRE

    Luyan Ma; Matthew Conover; Haiping Lu; Parsek, Matthew R.; Kenneth Bayles; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organis...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Displays Multiple Phenotypes during Development as a Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Karin; Anne K. Camper; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Costerton, J. William; Davies, David G

    2002-01-01

    Complementary approaches were employed to characterize transitional episodes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development using direct observation and whole-cell protein analysis. Microscopy and in situ reporter gene analysis were used to directly observe changes in biofilm physiology and to act as signposts to standardize protein collection for two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and protein identification in chemostat and continuous-culture biofilm-grown populations. Using these appro...

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  5. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Ma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organism for the study of biofilms. The extracellular polymeric substance of P. aeruginosa biofilms is an ill-defined mix of polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Here, we directly visualize the product of the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl exopolysaccharide at different stages of biofilm development. During attachment, Psl is anchored on the cell surface in a helical pattern. This promotes cell-cell interactions and assembly of a matrix, which holds bacteria in the biofilm and on the surface. Chemical dissociation of Psl from the bacterial surface disrupted the Psl matrix as well as the biofilm structure. During biofilm maturation, Psl accumulates on the periphery of 3-D-structured microcolonies, resulting in a Psl matrix-free cavity in the microcolony center. At the dispersion stage, swimming cells appear in this matrix cavity. Dead cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA are also concentrated in the Psl matrix-free area. Deletion of genes that control cell death and autolysis affects the formation of the matrix cavity and microcolony dispersion. These data provide a mechanism for how P. aeruginosa builds a matrix and subsequently a cavity to free a portion of cells for seeding dispersal. Direct visualization reveals that Psl is a key scaffolding matrix component and opens up avenues for therapeutics of biofilm-related complications.

  6. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.;

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular polymers can facilitate the non-specific attachment of bacteria to surfaces and hold together developing biofilms. This study was undertaken to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the architecture of biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 and its alginate...... biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...... that the production of alginate is not critical for biofilm formation. Observation over a period of 5 days indicated a three-stage development pattern consisting of initiation, establishment and maturation. Furthermore, this study showed that phenotypically distinguishable biofilms can be...

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display a...... remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because the...... use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  8. The Psl economy in early P. aeruginosa biofilm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Tseng, Boo Shan; Jin, Fan; Gibiansky, Max; Harrison, Joe; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    Psl from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is a mannose- and galactose-rich exopolysaccharide (EPS). It has been shown that Psl plays an important role in bacterial surface adhesion. Here, we examine role of Psl in controlling motility and microcolony formation during early biofilm development, by translating video microscopy movies into searchable databases of bacterial trajectories. We use a massively-parallel cell tracking algorithm to extract the full motility history of every cell in a large community. We find that at early stages of growth, P. aeruginosa motility is guided by Psl and self-organize in a manner analogous to a capitalist economic system, resulting in a power law bacterial distribution where a small number of bacteria are extremely ``rich'' in communally produced Psl. By comparing overproducers and underproducers of Psl, we find that local Psl levels determine post-division cell fates: High local Psl levels drive the formation of sessile microcolonies that grow exponentially.

  9. Multiple roles of biosurfactants in structural biofilm development by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2007-01-01

    . aeruginosa rhl4 mutants were defective in migration-dependent development of mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in the later phase of biofilm formation. Experiments involving three-color-coded mixed-strain P. aeruginosa biofilms demonstrated that the wild-type and rhl4 and pil4 mutant strains formed...

  10. Involvement of bacterial migration in the development of complex multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Mikkel; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the developmental process from single cells scattered on a surface to complex multicellular biofilm structures is essential in order to create strategies to control biofilm development. In order to study bacterial migration patterns during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm...... development, we have performed an investigation with time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms formed by various combinations of colour-coded P. aeruginosa wild type and motility mutants. We show that mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms can form in a sequential...... process involving a non-motile bacterial subpopulation and a migrating bacterial subpopulation. The non-motile bacteria form the mushroom stalks by growth in certain foci of the biofilm. The migrating bacteria form the mushroom caps by climbing the stalks and aggregating on the tops in a process which is...

  11. Involvement of bacterial migration in the development of complex multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Mikkel; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren;

    2003-01-01

    development, we have performed an investigation with time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms formed by various combinations of colour-coded P. aeruginosa wild type and motility mutants. We show that mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms can form in a sequential...... process involving a non-motile bacterial subpopulation and a migrating bacterial subpopulation. The non-motile bacteria form the mushroom stalks by growth in certain foci of the biofilm. The migrating bacteria form the mushroom caps by climbing the stalks and aggregating on the tops in a process which...

  12. Development and antimicrobial susceptibility studies of in vitro monomicrobial and polymicrobial biofilm models with Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Manavathu, Elias K.; Vager, Dora L; Vazquez, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixed microbial infections of the respiratory tracts with P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus capable of producing biofilms are commonly found in cystic fibrosis patients. The primary objective of this study was to develop an in vitro model for P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus polymicrobial biofilm to study the efficacy of various antimicrobial drugs alone and in combinations against biofilm-embedded cells. Simultaneous static cocultures of P. aeruginosa and sporelings were used for the d...

  13. Clustering of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptomes from planktonic cultures, developing and mature biofilms reveals distinct expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saqi Mansoor

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a genetically complex bacterium which can adopt and switch between a free-living or biofilm lifestyle, a versatility that enables it to thrive in many different environments and contributes to its success as a human pathogen. Results Transcriptomes derived from growth states relevant to the lifestyle of P. aeruginosa were clustered using three different methods (K-means, K-means spectral and hierarchical clustering. The culture conditions used for this study were; biofilms incubated for 8, 14, 24 and 48 hrs, and planktonic culture (logarithmic and stationary phase. This cluster analysis revealed the existence and provided a clear illustration of distinct expression profiles present in the dataset. Moreover, it gave an insight into which genes are up-regulated in planktonic, developing biofilm and confluent biofilm states. In addition, this analysis confirmed the contribution of quorum sensing (QS and RpoS regulated genes to the biofilm mode of growth, and enabled the identification of a 60.69 Kbp region of the genome associated with stationary phase growth (stationary phase planktonic culture and confluent biofilms. Conclusion This is the first study to use clustering to separate a large P. aeruginosa microarray dataset consisting of transcriptomes obtained from diverse conditions relevant to its growth, into different expression profiles. These distinct expression profiles not only reveal novel aspects of P. aeruginosa gene expression but also provide a growth specific transcriptomic reference dataset for the research community.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide inhibits Candida albicans hyphae formation and alters gene expression during biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, H M H N; K Cheung, B P; Watt, R M; Jin, L J; Samaranayake, L P

    2013-02-01

    Elucidation of bacterial and fungal interactions in multispecies biofilms will have major impacts on understanding the pathophysiology of infections. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on Candida albicans hyphal development and transcriptional regulation, (ii) investigate protein expression during biofilm formation, and (iii) propose likely molecular mechanisms for these interactions. The effect of LPS on C. albicans biofilms was assessed by XTT-reduction and growth curve assays, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Changes in candidal hypha-specific genes (HSGs) and transcription factor EFG1 expression were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, respectively. Proteome changes were examined by mass spectrometry. Both metabolic activities and growth rates of LPS-treated C. albicans biofilms were significantly lower (P yeasts in test biofilms compared with the controls. SEM and CLSM further confirmed these data. Significantly upregulated HSGs (at 48 h) and EFG1 (up to 48 h) were noted in the test biofilms (P < 0.05) but cAMP levels remained unaffected. Proteomic analysis showed suppression of candidal septicolysin-like protein, potential reductase-flavodoxin fragment, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, hypothetical proteins Cao19.10301(ATP7), CaO19.4716(GDH1), CaO19.11135(PGK1), CaO19.9877(HNT1) by P. aeruginosa LPS. Our data imply that bacterial LPS inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation and hyphal development. The P. aeruginosa LPS likely target glycolysis-associated mechanisms during candidal filamentation. PMID:23194472

  15. Distinct roles of extracellular polymeric substances in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yang;

    2011-01-01

    polysaccharides are also essential for subpopulation interactions and macrocolony formation in the later stages of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation. Pel and Psl polysaccharides have different impacts on Pseudomonas quinolone signal‐mediated extracellular DNA release in P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Psl...

  16. Influence of O Polysaccharides on Biofilm Development and Outer Membrane Vesicle Biogenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Kathleen; Park, Amber J.; Hao, Youai; Brewer, Dyanne; Lam, Joseph S.; Khursigara, Cezar M.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic human pathogen known for its ability to adapt to changes in its environment during the course of infection. These adaptations include changes in the expression of cell surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS), biofilm development, and the production of a protective extracellular exopolysaccharide matrix. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been identified as an important component of the extracellular matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms and are thought to...

  17. The catabolite repression control protein Crc plays a role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Gao, Qingguo;

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria form complex surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. Biofilm cells differentiate into subpopulations which display tolerance towards antimicrobial agents. However, the signal transduction pathways regulating subpopulation differentiation in biofilms are largely unelucidated. In t....... In the present study, we show that the catabolite repression control protein Crc regulates the metabolic state of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in biofilms, and plays an important role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in P. aeruginosa biofilms....

  18. Iron and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, Ehud; Vasil, Michael L.; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2005-01-01

    Iron serves as a signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development. We examined the influence of mutations in known and putative iron acquisition-signaling genes on biofilm morphology. In iron-sufficient medium, mutants that cannot obtain iron through the high-affinity pyoverdine iron acquisition system form thin biofilms similar to those formed by the parent under low iron conditions. If an iron source for a different iron acquisition system is provided to a pyoverdine mutant, normal biof...

  19. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.;

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa, but that the...... silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...... planktonic bacteria. These observations strongly indicate that the concentration of silver in currently available wound dressings is much too low for treatment of chronic biofilm wounds. It is suggested that clinicians and manufacturers of the said wound dressings consider whether they are treating wounds...

  20. Biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, many researchers have written numerous articles about microbial biofilms. Biofilm is a complex community of microorganisms and an example of bacterial group behavior. Biofilm is usually considered a sessile mode of life derived from the attached growth of microbes to surfaces, and most biofilms are embedded in self-produced extracellular matrix composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), such as polysaccharides, extracellular DNAs (eDNA), and proteins. Dispersal, a mode of biofilm detachment indicates active mechanisms that cause individual cells to separate from the biofilm and return to planktonic life. Since biofilm cells are cemented and surrounded by EPSs, dispersal is not simple to do and many researchers are now paying more attention to this active detachment process. Unlike other modes of biofilm detachment such as erosion or sloughing, which are generally considered passive processes, dispersal occurs as a result of complex spatial differentiation and molecular events in biofilm cells in response to various environmental cues, and there are many biological reasons that force bacterial cells to disperse from the biofilms. In this review, we mainly focus on the spatial differentiation of biofilm that is a prerequisite for dispersal, as well as environmental cues and molecular events related to the biofilm dispersal. More specifically, we discuss the dispersal-related phenomena and mechanisms observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic human pathogen and representative model organism for biofilm study. PMID:26832663

  1. The galactophilic lectin, LecA, contributes to biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggle, Stephen P; Stacey, Rachael E; Dodd, Christine; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Winzer, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    LecA (PA-IL) is a cytotoxic lectin and adhesin produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa which binds hydrophobic galactosides with high specificity and affinity. By using a lecA-egfp translation fusion and immunoblot analysis of the biofilm extracellular matrix, we show that lecA is expressed in biofilm-grown cells. In static biofilm assays on both polystyrene and stainless steel, biofilm depth and surface coverage was reduced by mutation of lecA and enhanced in the LecA-overproducing strain PAO-P47. Biofilm surface coverage by the parent strain, PAO-P47 but not the lecA mutant on steel coupons was also inhibited by growth in the presence of either isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) or p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-galactoside (NPG). Furthermore, mature wild-type biofilms formed in the absence of these hydrophobic galactosides could be dispersed by the addition of IPTG. In contrast, addition of p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-fucose (NPF) which has a high affinity for the P. aeruginosa LecB (PA-IIL) lectin had no effect on biofilm formation or dispersal. Planktonic growth of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was unaffected by the presence of IPTG, NPG or NPF, nor was the strain able to utilize these sugars as carbon sources, suggesting that the observed effects on biofilm formation were due to the competitive inhibition of LecA-ligand binding. Similar results were also obtained for biofilms grown under dynamic flow conditions on steel coupons, suggesting that LecA contributes to P. aeruginosa biofilm architecture under different environmental conditions. PMID:16689730

  2. Clustering of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptomes from planktonic cultures, developing and mature biofilms reveals distinct expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Saqi Mansoor; Hurst Jacob M; Papakonstantinopoulou Anastasia; Paccanaro Alberto; Waite Richard D; Littler Eddie; Curtis Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a genetically complex bacterium which can adopt and switch between a free-living or biofilm lifestyle, a versatility that enables it to thrive in many different environments and contributes to its success as a human pathogen. Results Transcriptomes derived from growth states relevant to the lifestyle of P. aeruginosa were clustered using three different methods (K-means, K-means spectral and hierarchical clustering). The culture conditions used fo...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    biofilms, which protect the aggregated, biopolymer-embedded bacteria from the detrimental actions of antibiotic treatments and host immunity. A key component in the protection against innate immunity is rhamnolipid, which is a quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factor. QS is a cell-to-cell signaling...... mechanism used to coordinate expression of virulence and protection of aggregated biofilm cells. Rhamnolipids are known for their ability to cause hemolysis and have been shown to cause lysis of several cellular components of the human immune system, for example, macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  4. A Novel Signaling Network Essential for Regulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development

    OpenAIRE

    Petrova, Olga E.; Sauer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    The important human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been linked to numerous biofilm-related chronic infections. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm formation following the transition to the surface attached lifestyle is regulated by three previously undescribed two-component systems: BfiSR (PA4196-4197) harboring an RpoD-like domain, an OmpR-like BfmSR (PA4101-4102), and MifSR (PA5511-5512) belonging to the family of NtrC-like transcriptional regulators. These two-component systems become s...

  5. Dynamics of development and dispersal in sessile microbial communities: examples from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida model biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Gjermansen, Morten; Kreft, J.-U.;

    2006-01-01

    Surface-associated microbial communities in many cases display dynamic developmental patterns. Model biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in laboratory flow-chamber setups represent examples of such behaviour. Dependent on the experimental conditions the bacteria in...... organisms do not possess comprehensive genetic programs for biofilm development. Instead the bacteria appear to have evolved a number of different mechanisms to optimize surface colonization, of which they express a subset in response to the prevailing environmental conditions. These mechanisms include the...... ability to regulate cellular adhesiveness and migration in response to micro-environmental signals including those secreted by the bacteria themselves....

  6. Biofilm Formation by Hyperpiliated Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Poney; Burrows, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Under static growth conditions, hyperpiliated, nontwitching pilT and pilU mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa formed dense biofilms, showing that adhesion, not twitching motility, is necessary for biofilm initiation. Under flow conditions, the pilT mutant formed mushroom-like structures larger than those of the wild type but the pilU mutant was defective in biofilm formation. Therefore, twitching motility affects the development of biofilm structure, possibly through modulation of detachment.

  7. [Structural components and peculiarities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, O B; Avdieieva, L V

    2010-01-01

    Peculiarities of the structural organization of bacterial biofilm during its formation and disintegration have been investigated on the model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCM B-900 (ATCC 9027). It was shown, that development of the biofilm in a stationary system on glass was a two-vector process with changes in time and space. P. aeruginosa UCM B-900 biofilm is formed from single cells, passes through the stages of base components, net structure, islands and comes to the end with integration into a complete monolayer. The biofilm degradation repeats the stages of its formation in the reverse sequence. PMID:20812507

  8. The action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in intrinsic drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi; JIA Wen-xiang; ZENG Wei; YANG Wei-qing; CHENG Xi; LI Xue-ru; WANG Lan-lan; KANG Mei; ZHANG Zai-rong

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in studying the relationship between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance to drugs. However, the relationship still remains unclear in the macroscopic bacterial growth. Our study is to illuminate the change of bacterial drug resistance of gyrA mutant and active efflux pump during the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilms. Methods The strains of type Ⅱ topoisomerase gene mutant (gyrA mutant) and multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pump were clinical isolates and detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The process of bacterial biofilms development was observed by scanning electron microscope. Triparental mating experiments were performed to transfer report gene of green fluorescent protein (GFP) into P. aeruginosa biofilms strains and followed by analysis of bacterial survival rate between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance.Results The fluorescent strains with pGFPuv could develop mature biofilms on Teflon surface. Before a period of 72 hours, the survival rate of biofilms bacteria and intrinsic resistance strains in ciprofloxacin solution was significantly different (P0.05). The carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and azithromycin could significantly reduce the drug resistance of biofilm strains and efflux pump strains.Conclusions In the development of P. aeruginosa biofilms, the strains of gyrA mutation and MDR efflux could be conferred with new level of drug resistance. When co-cultured mutated strains with biofilm strains, biofilms may play a major role in bacterial resistance. But after 72 hours incubation (a mature biofilms had been developed), there was no clearly difference between the number of mutant strains and biofilm strains.

  9. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.;

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... synthesis was restricted to a narrow band in the part of the biofilm adjacent to the source of oxygen. The zone of active GFP expression was approximately 60 Am wide in colony biofilms and 30 Am wide in flow cell biofilms. The region of the biofilm in which cells were capable of elongation was mapped by...... treating colony biofilms with carbenicillin, which blocks cell division, and then measuring individual cell lengths by transmission electron microscopy. Cell elongation was localized at the air interface of the biofilm. The heterogeneous anabolic patterns measured inside these biofilms were likely a result...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and...

  11. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics combined with an increasing acknowledgement of the role of biofilms in chronic infections has led to a growing interest in new antimicrobial strategies that target the biofilm mode of growth. In the aggregated biofilm mode, cell-to-cell communication...... alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  12. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P;

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  13. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich were awarded the Nobel price in 1908. Since then, numerous studies have unraveled a multitude of mechanistically different immune responses to intruding microorganisms. However, in the vast majority of these studies, the underlying infectious agents have appeared....... Although the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  14. Interaction between biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin.

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuda, H; Ajiki, Y; Koga, T.; Kawada, H; Yokota, T.

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between bacterial biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin, a macrolide having no anti-P. aeruginosa activity, were investigated. P. aeruginosa incubated for 10 days on membrane filters formed biofilms on the surfaces of the filters. The biofilms were characterized by dense colonizations of bacteria and thick membranous structures that covered the colonies. Treatment of the biofilms with a relatively low concentration of clarithromycin for 5 days resulted in a...

  15. Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Heydorn, Arne; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Lambertsen, Lotte Munch; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    for P. aeruginosa initial attachment or biofilm formation, but the cell appendages had roles in biofilm development, as wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants formed biofilms with different structures. Dynamics and selection during biofilm formation were investigated by tagging the wild type and...... flagella/type IV mutants with Yfp and Cfp and performing time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy in mixed colour biofilms. The initial microcolony formation occurred by clonal growth, after which wild-type P. aeruginosa bacteria spread over the substratum by means of twitching motility. The wild......-type biofilms were dynamic compositions with extensive motility, competition and selection occurring during development. Bacterial migration prevented the formation of larger microcolonial structures in the wild-type biofilms. The results are discussed in relation to the current model for P. aeruginosa biofilm...

  16. Dynamics and spatial distribution of beta-lactamase expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N.; Hentzer, Morten; Andersen, Jens Bo; Ciofu, O.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Høiby, N.

    2004-01-01

    The development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics is a problem in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. The main resistance mechanism is high-level expression of the chromosomally encoded AmpC beta-lactamase of P. aeruginosa...... cells growing in biofilms. Several genes have been shown to influence the level of ampC expression, but little is known about the regulation of ampC expression in P. aeruginosa biofilms. To study the expression of ampC in P. aeruginosa biofilms, we constructed a reporter that consisted of the fusion of...... the ampC promoter to gfp(ASV) encoding an unstable version of the green fluorescent protein. In vitro biofilms of P. aeruginosa were exposed to the beta-lactam antibiotics imipenem and ceftazidime. Sub-MICs of imipenem significantly induced the monitor system of the biofilm bacteria in the peripheries...

  17. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jensen, Peter Ø; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael Christian; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity of...... extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host. The...... immune response leading to this chronic inflammation is described. Finally, novel treatment strategies againstP. aeruginosa are described including, quorum-sensing inhibition and induced biofilm-dispersion. The tolerance towards currently available antimicrobials calls for development of alternative...

  18. A peptide from human β thymosin as a platform for the development of new anti-biofilm agents for Staphylococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Domenico; Spinello, Angelo; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Cascioferro, Stella; Barone, Giampaolo; Vitale, Maria; Arizza, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    Conventional antibiotics might fail in the treatment of biofilm-associated infections causing infection recurrence and chronicity. The search for antimicrobial peptides has been performed with the aim to discover novel anti-infective agents active on pathogens in both planktonic and biofilm associated forms. The fragment 9-19 of human thymosin β4 was studied through 1 μs MD simulation. Two main conformations of the peptide were detected, both constituted by a central hydrophobic core and by the presence of peripheral charged residues suggesting a possible mechanism of interaction with two models of biological membranes, related to eukaryotic or bacterial membrane respectively. In addition, the peptide was chemically synthesized and its antimicrobial activity was tested in vitro against planktonic and biofilm form of a group of reference strains of Staphylococcus spp. and one P. aeruginosa strain. The human thymosin β4 fragment EIEKFDKSKLK showed antibacterial activity against staphylococcal strains and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 at concentrations from 12.5 to 6.2 mg/ml and inhibited biofilm formation at sub-inhibitory concentrations (3.1-0.75 mg/ml). The activity of the fragment in inhibiting biofilm formation, could be due to the conformations highlighted by the MD simulations, suggesting its interaction with the bacterial membrane. Human thymosin β4 fragment can be considered a promising lead compound to develop novel synthetic or recombinant derivatives with improved pharmaceutical potential. PMID:27339305

  19. N-acetylcysteine inhibit biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Youning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in chronic respiratory tract infections. It typically makes a biofilm, which makes treatment of these infections difficult. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC on biofilms produced by P. aeruginosa. Results We found that minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of NAC for most isolates of P. aeruginosa were 10 to 40 mg/ml, the combination of NAC and ciprofloxacin (CIP demonstrated either synergy (50% or no interaction (50% against the P. aeruginosa strains. NAC at 0.5 mg/ml could detach mature P. aeruginosa biofilms. Disruption was proportional to NAC concentrations, and biofilms were completely disrupted at 10 mg/ml NAC. Analysis using COMSTAT software also showed that PAO1 biofilm biomass decreased and its heterogeneity increased as NAC concentration increased. NAC and ciprofloxacin showed significant killing of P. aeruginosa in biofilms at 2.5 mg/ml and > 2 MIC, respectively (p p P. aeruginosa also decreased by 27.64% and 44.59% at NAC concentrations of 0.5 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml. Conclusions NAC has anti-bacterial properties against P. aeruginosa and may detach P. aeruginosa biofilms. Use of NAC may be a new strategy for the treatment of biofilm-associated chronic respiratory infections due to P. aeruginosa, although it would be appropriate to conduct clinical studies to confirm this.

  20. Involvement of quorum sensing genes in biofilm development and degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa N6P6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangwani, Neelam; Kumari, Supriya; Das, Surajit

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm-forming and acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa N6P6 was isolated from seawater after selective enrichment with two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), viz. phenanthrene and pyrene. AHL synthesis was detected qualitatively using bioreporter strains. This marine bacterium putatively synthesized N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone and N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone, which were identified by TLC, GC-MS, and HPLC. Two quorum sensing (QS) genes coding for AHL synthase, i.e., lasI and rhlI, were identified in the bacterium. lasI and rhlI gene expression was studied during biofilm mode of growth at different phases using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The expression of lasI increased with increase in biofilm growth. In contrast, the expression of rhlI decreased during log phase of biofilm growth. The changes in lasI/rhlI expression level had significant effects (Pbiofilm architecture and subsequent PAH degradation rate. Degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene by P. aeruginosa N6P6 was affected by biofilm growth and lasI expression. The respective phenanthrene degradation for 15, 24, 48, and 72 h old biofilm after 7 days was 21.5, 54.2, 85.6, and 85.7%. However, the corresponding pyrene degradation was 15, 18.28, 47.56, and 46.48%, respectively, after 7 days. A significant positive correlation (Pbiofilm formation, and pyocyanin production reduced significantly which confirmed the pivotal role of QS in biodegradation of PAHs. The findings suggest that AHLs play a pivotal role during biofilm development and subsequent bioremediation of PAHs. PMID:26245683

  1. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming of...... P. aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.25%. Oral administration of ginseng extracts in mice promoted phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by airway phagocytes, but did not affect phagocytosis of a PAO1-filM mutant. Our study suggests that ginseng treatment may help to eradicate the biofilm...

  2. Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    , and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  3. Evolution and adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms driven by mismatch repair system-deficient mutators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela M Luján

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen causing chronic airway infections, especially in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. The majority of the CF patients acquire P. aeruginosa during early childhood, and most of them develop chronic infections resulting in severe lung disease, which are rarely eradicated despite intensive antibiotic therapy. Current knowledge indicates that three major adaptive strategies, biofilm development, phenotypic diversification, and mutator phenotypes [driven by a defective mismatch repair system (MRS], play important roles in P. aeruginosa chronic infections, but the relationship between these strategies is still poorly understood. We have used the flow-cell biofilm model system to investigate the impact of the mutS associated mutator phenotype on development, dynamics, diversification and adaptation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Through competition experiments we demonstrate for the first time that P. aeruginosa MRS-deficient mutators had enhanced adaptability over wild-type strains when grown in structured biofilms but not as planktonic cells. This advantage was associated with enhanced micro-colony development and increased rates of phenotypic diversification, evidenced by biofilm architecture features and by a wider range and proportion of morphotypic colony variants, respectively. Additionally, morphotypic variants generated in mutator biofilms showed increased competitiveness, providing further evidence for mutator-driven adaptive evolution in the biofilm mode of growth. This work helps to understand the basis for the specific high proportion and role of mutators in chronic infections, where P. aeruginosa develops in biofilm communities.

  4. In situ growth rates and biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations in chronic lung infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, L.; Haagensen, J.A.; Jelsbak, L.; Sternberg, C.; Høiby, Niels; Molin, S.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    The growth dynamics of bacterial pathogens within infected hosts are a fundamental but poorly understood feature of most infections. We have focused on the in situ distribution and growth characteristics of two prevailing and transmissible Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones that have caused chronic lung...... matrix, whereas nonmucoid variants were present mainly as dispersed cells. To obtain estimates of the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in CF lungs, we used quantitative FISH to indirectly measure growth rates of bacteria in sputum samples (reflecting the in vivo lung conditions). The concentration of r......-phase subpopulation seemed to be present in sputa. This was found for both mucoid and nonmucoid variants despite their different organizations in sputum. The results suggest that the bacterial population may be confronted with selection forces that favor optimized growth activities. This scenario constitutes a new...

  5. Manuka honey treatment of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa results in the emergence of isolates with increased honey resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Camplin, Aimee L; Maddocks, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical grade manuka honeys are well known to be efficacious against Pseudomonas aeruginosa being bactericidal and inhibiting the development of biofilms; moreover manuka honey effectively kills P. aeruginosa embedded within an established biofilm. Sustained honey resistance has not been previously documented for planktonic or biofilm P. aeruginosa. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentrations for manuka honey and antibiotics were determined using broth micro-dilution methods. Minimum...

  6. Serratia secondary metabolite prodigiosin inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development by producing reactive oxygen species that damage biological molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder eKimyon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prodigiosin is a heterocyclic bacterial secondary metabolite belonging to the class of tripyrrole compounds, synthesized by various types of bacteria including Serratia species. Prodigiosin has been the subject of intense research over the last decade for its ability to induce apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. Reports suggest that prodigiosin promotes oxidative damage to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA in the presence of copper ions and consequently leads to inhibition of cell-cycle progression and cell death. However, prodigiosin has not been previously implicated in biofilm inhibition. In this study, the link between prodigiosin and biofilm inhibition through the production of redox active metabolites is presented. Our study showed that prodigiosin (500 µM (extracted from Serratia marcescens culture and a prodigiosin/copper(II (100 µM each complex have strong RNA and dsDNA cleaving properties while they have no pronounced effect on protein. Results support a role for oxidative damage to biomolecules by H2O2 and hydroxyl radical generation. Further, it was demonstrated that reactive oxygen species scavengers significantly reduced the DNA and RNA cleaving property of prodigiosin. P. aeruginosa cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm integrity were significantly altered due to the cleavage of nucleic acids by prodigiosin or the prodigiosin/copper(II complex. In addition, prodigiosin also facilitated the bactericidal activity. The ability of prodigiosin to cause nucleic acid degradation offers novel opportunities to interfere with extracellular DNA dependent bacterial biofilms.

  7. In Vitro Analysis of Tobramycin-Treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms on Cystic Fibrosis-Derived Airway Epithelial Cells▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Gregory G.; Moreau-Marquis, Sophie; Stanton, Bruce A.; O'Toole, George A.

    2008-01-01

    P. aeruginosa forms biofilms in the lungs of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF); however, there have been no effective model systems for studying biofilm formation in the CF lung. We have developed a tissue culture system for growth of P. aeruginosa biofilms on CF-derived human airway cells that promotes the formation of highly antibiotic-resistant microcolonies, which produce an extracellular polysaccharide matrix and require the known abiotic biofilm formation genes flgK and pilB. Treatm...

  8. Induction of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Jensen, E T; Høiby, N;

    1991-01-01

    Imipenem induced high levels of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Piperacillin also induced beta-lactamase production in these biofilms but to a lesser degree. The combination of beta-lactamase production with other protective properties of the biofilm mode of growth...

  9. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-10-01

    A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm-based infections that are difficult to eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic cells. Developing treatments against biofilms requires an understanding of bacterial biofilm-specific physiological traits. Research efforts have started to elucidate the intricate mechanisms underlying biofilm development. However, many aspects of these mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we addressed questions regarding biofilm metabolism using a genome-scale kinetic model of the P. aeruginosa metabolic network and gene expression profiles. Specifically, we computed metabolite concentration differences between known mutants with altered biofilm formation and the wild-type strain to predict drug targets against P. aeruginosa biofilms. We also simulated the altered metabolism driven by gene expression changes between biofilm and stationary growth-phase planktonic cultures. Our analysis suggests that the synthesis of important biofilm-related molecules, such as the quorum-sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal and the exopolysaccharide Psl, is regulated not only through the expression of genes in their own synthesis pathway, but also through the biofilm-specific expression of genes in pathways competing for precursors to these molecules. Finally, we investigated why mutants defective in anthranilate degradation have an impaired ability to form biofilms. Alternative to a previous hypothesis that this biofilm reduction is caused by a decrease in energy production, we proposed that the dysregulation of the synthesis of secondary metabolites derived from anthranilate and chorismate is what impaired the biofilms of these mutants. Notably, these insights generated through our kinetic model-based approach are not accessible from previous constraint-based model analyses of P. aeruginosa biofilm

  10. Control of Candida albicans Metabolism and Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phenazines

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Diana K.; Grahl, Nora; Okegbe, Chinweike; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Jacobs, Nicholas J.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans has developmental programs that govern transitions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and between unattached and biofilm lifestyles. Here, we report that filamentation, intercellular adherence, and biofilm development were inhibited during interactions between Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through the action of P. aeruginosa-produced phenazines. While phenazines are toxic to C. albicans at millimolar concentrations, we found that lower concentra...

  11. Rapid development in vitro and in vivo of resistance to ceftazidime in biofilm-growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N; Ciofu, O; Skovgaard, L T; Høiby, N

    2000-01-01

    isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (MICceftazidime-basal/induced beta-lactamase activity: PAO 579= 0.8 mg/l-19/550 milliunits, 19676A=50 mg/l-38/957 milliunits, 17107B=100 mg/l-504/947 milliunits) were studied. After 1 or 2 weeks of continuous or intermittent (4 h/day) administration......(-1) compared to 6.0-10(-5) in the control biofilm. The same trend was observed after continuous administration of ceftazidime. MICceftazidime of the more resistant variants was increased 500-fold for PAO 579 and 8-fold for 19676A, and the specific basal beta-lactamase activities from 19 to 1,400 units for PAO......,300 units for 17107B. It was shown that, during treatment with ceftazidime, biofilm-growing P. aeruginosa had the capacity to develop resistance due to the production of chromosomal beta-lactamase....

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular products inhibit staphylococcal growth, and disrupt established biofilms produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Yang, Liang; Qu, Di;

    2009-01-01

    in overnight cultures had no effect on established P. aeruginosa biofilms and planktonic growth. These findings reveal that P. aeruginosa extracellular products are important microbial competition factors that overcome competition with S. epidermidis, and the results may provide clues for the development...

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26729873

  14. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Gandee, Leah; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Zimmern, Philippe; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model.

  15. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model. (paper)

  16. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  17. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  18. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.; Heydorn, Arne; Molin, Søren; Givskov, Michael Christian; Parsek, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com......During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic...... abiotic surface. Biofilms formed by an alginate- overproducing strain exhibit a highly structured architecture and are significantly more resistant to the antibiotic tobramycin than a biofilm formed by an isogenic nonmucoid strain. These results suggest that an important consequence of the conversion to...... mucoidy is an altered biofilm architecture that shows increasing resistance to antimicrobial treatments....

  19. Evolution and Adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Driven by Mismatch Repair System-Deficient Mutators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luján, Adela M.; Maciá, María D.; Yang, Liang;

    2011-01-01

    , which are rarely eradicated despite intensive antibiotic therapy. Current knowledge indicates that three major adaptive strategies, biofilm development, phenotypic diversification, and mutator phenotypes [driven by a defective mismatch repair system (MRS)], play important roles in P. aeruginosa chronic...... infections, but the relationship between these strategies is still poorly understood. We have used the flow-cell biofilm model system to investigate the impact of the mutS associated mutator phenotype on development, dynamics, diversification and adaptation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Through competition...... diversification, evidenced by biofilm architecture features and by a wider range and proportion of morphotypic colony variants, respectively. Additionally, morphotypic variants generated in mutator biofilms showed increased competitiveness, providing further evidence for mutator-driven adaptive evolution in the...

  20. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang;

    2016-01-01

    acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a 'last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm...... subpopulations, with colistin-tolerant cells using type IV pili to migrate onto the top of the colistin-killed biofilm. The colistin-tolerant cells employ quorum sensing (QS) to initiate the formation of new colistin-tolerant subpopulations, highlighting multicellular behaviour in antibiotic tolerance...... development. The macrolide erythromycin, which has been previously shown to inhibit the motility and QS of P. aeruginosa, boosts biofilm eradication by colistin. Our work provides insights on the mechanisms underlying the formation of antibiotic-tolerant populations in bacterial biofilms and indicates...

  1. The Pel Polysaccharide Can Serve a Structural and Protective Role in the Biofilm Matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Colvin, Kelly M.; Gordon, Vernita D.; Murakami, Keiji; Borlee, Bradley R; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial extracellular polysaccharides are a key constituent of the extracellular matrix material of biofilms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a model organism for biofilm studies and produces three extracellular polysaccharides that have been implicated in biofilm development, alginate, Psl and Pel. Significant work has been conducted on the roles of alginate and Psl in biofilm development, however we know little regarding Pel. In this study, we demonstrate that Pel can serve two functions in bio...

  2. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    efficient dosing regimen and to minimize the development of antimicrobial tolerance and resistance in biofilm infections. Unfortunately, most previous PK/PD studies of antibiotics have been done on planktonic cells, and extrapolation of the results on biofilms is problematic as bacterial biofilms differ...... from planktonic grown cells in the growth rate, gene expression, and metabolism. Here, we set up several protocols for the studies of PK/PD of antibiotics in biofilm infections of P. aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo. It should be underlined that none of the protocols in biofilms have yet been......Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish an...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  4. Use of In-Biofilm Expression Technology To Identify Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development†

    OpenAIRE

    Finelli, Antonio; Gallant, Claude V.; Jarvi, Keith; Burrows, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms form complex three-dimensional architecture and are tolerant of antibiotics and other antimicrobial compounds. In this work, an in vivo expression technology system, originally designed to study virulence-associated genes in complex mammalian environments, was used to identify genes up-regulated in P. aeruginosa grown to a mature (5-day) biofilm. Five unique cloned promoters unable to promote in vitro growth in the absence of purines after recovery from ...

  5. Synergistic effect of fosfomycin and fluoroquinolones against Pseudomonas aeruginosa growing in a biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikuniya,Takeshi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Ulifloxacin is the active form of the prodrug prulifloxacin and shows a highly potent antipseudomonal activity. In this study, we examined the combined effect of fosfomycin and ulifloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa growing in a biofilm using a modified Robbins device with artificial urine, and compared it to that of the combination of fosfomycin and ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin. An ATP bioluminescence assay was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the agents against sessile cells in a mature biofilm developed on a silicon disk. The total bioactivity of P. aeruginosa growing in a biofilm that had not been fully eradicated by fosfomycin or any of the fluoroquinolones alone at 10 times the MIC decreased after combination treatment with fosfomycin and fluoroquinolones. Morphological changes occurred in a time-dependent fashion; namely, swollen and/or rounding cells emerged within a couple of hours after combination treatment, marking the initial stage in the process leading to the destruction of the biofilms. We could not find any difference among the 3 fluoroquinolones with regard to their synergistic effects when administered with fosfomycin. The combination treatment of fosfomycin and fluoroquinolones with highly potent antipseudomonal activities was effective in eradicating sessile cells of P. aeruginosa in the biofilm and promises to be beneficial against biofilm-associated infectious diseases.

  6. Biofilm development and enhanced stress resistance of a model, mixed-species community biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kai Wei Kelvin; Periasamy, Saravanan; Mukherjee, Manisha; Xie, Chao; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Most studies of biofilm biology have taken a reductionist approach, where single-species biofilms have been extensively investigated. However, biofilms in nature mostly comprise multiple species, where interspecies interactions can shape the development, structure and function of these communities differently from biofilm populations. Hence, a reproducible mixed-species biofilm comprising Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas protegens and Klebsiella pneumoniae was adapted to study how interspe...

  7. Imaging Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Extracellular Polymer Scaffolds with Amphiphilic Carbon Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritenberg, Margarita; Nandi, Sukhendu; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Dandela, Rambabu; Meijler, Michael M; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-05-20

    Biofilm formation is a critical facet of pathogenesis and resilience of human, animal, and plant bacteria. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) constitute the physical scaffolding for bacterial biofilms and thus play central roles in their development and virulence. We show that newly synthesized amphiphilic fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) readily bind to the EPS scaffold of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major biofilm-forming pathogen, resulting in unprecedented microscopic visualization of the EPS structural features. Fluorescence microscopy analysis utilizing the C-dots reveals that the P. aeruginosa EPS matrix exhibits a remarkable dendritic morphology. The experiments further illuminate the growth kinetics of the EPS and the effect of external factors such as temperature. We also show that the amphiphilic C-dot platform enabled screening of substances disrupting biofilm development, specifically quorum sensing inhibitors. PMID:26882175

  8. Pattern formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsek, Matthew R.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are capable of forming elaborate multicellular communities called biofilms. Pattern formation in biofilms depends on cell proliferation and cellular migration in response to the available nutrients and other external cues, as well as on self-generated intercellular signal molecules and the...... production of an extracellular matrix that serves as a structural 'scaffolding' for the biofilm cells. Pattern formation in biofilms allows cells to position themselves favorably within nutrient gradients and enables buildup and maintenance of physiologically distinct subpopulations, which facilitates...... survival of one or more subpopulations upon environmental insult, and therefore plays an important role in the innate tolerance displayed by biofilms toward adverse conditions....

  9. Community-based interference against integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into human salivary microbial biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X; Hu, W; He, J; Guo, L; Lux, R; Shi, W

    2011-12-01

    As part of the human gastrointestinal tract, the oral cavity represents a complex biological system and harbors diverse bacterial species. Unlike the gut microbiota, which is often considered a health asset, studies of the oral commensal microbiota have been largely limited to their implication in oral conditions such as dental caries and periodontal disease. Less emphasis has been given to their potential beneficial roles, especially the protective effects against oral colonization by foreign or pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we used salivary microbiota derived from healthy human subjects to investigate protective effects against colonization and integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, into developing or pre-formed salivary biofilms. When co-cultivated in saliva medium, P. aeruginosa persisted in the planktonic phase, but failed to integrate into the salivary microbial community during biofilm formation. Furthermore, in saliva medium supplemented with sucrose, the oral microbiota inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa by producing lactic acid. More interestingly, while pre-formed salivary biofilms were able to prevent P. aeruginosa colonization, the same biofilms recovered from mild chlorhexidine gluconate treatment displayed a shift in microbial composition and showed a drastic reduction in protection. Our study indicates that normal oral communities with balanced microbial compositions could be important in effectively preventing the integration of foreign or pathogenic bacterial species, such as P. aeruginosa. PMID:22053962

  10. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity of...

  11. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna;

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P...

  12. Dynamics of Mutator and Antibiotic-Resistant Populations in a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macià, María D.; Pérez, José L.; Molin, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm growth, antibiotic resistance, and mutator phenotypes are key components of chronic respiratory infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. We examined the dynamics of mutator and antibiotic-resistant populations in P. aeruginosa flow-cell biofilms, using fluorescently...... monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the numbers of viable cells and resistant mutants (4- and 16-fold MICs) were determined. Despite optimized pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters, CIP treatment did not suppress resistance development in P. aeruginosa biofilms. One.......01 proportion, took over the whole biofilm after only 2 days of CIP treatment outnumbering PAO1 by 3 log at t4. Our results show that mutational mechanisms play a major role in biofilm antibiotic resistance and that theoretically optimized PK/PD parameters fail to suppress resistance development, suggesting...

  13. Differentiation and distribution of colistin- and sodium dodecyl sulfate-tolerant cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Klausen, M; Ernst, RK;

    2007-01-01

    During Pseudomonas aeruginosa flow cell biofilm development, the cell population differentiates into a nonmotile subpopulation which forms microcolonies and a migrating subpopulation which eventually colonizes the top of the microcolonies, resulting in the development of mushroom-shaped multicell......During Pseudomonas aeruginosa flow cell biofilm development, the cell population differentiates into a nonmotile subpopulation which forms microcolonies and a migrating subpopulation which eventually colonizes the top of the microcolonies, resulting in the development of mushroom......-targeting antibacterial agents. All biofilm-associated cells were sensitive to the antibacterial agents when tested in standard plate assays. A mutation eliminating the production of type IV pili, and hence surface-associated motility, prevented the formation of regular mushroom-shaped structures in the flow cell...

  14. Mechanical destruction of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by ultrasound exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Halverson, Larry J.; Middendorf, Jill; Rusk, Ben

    2012-10-01

    Medical implants are prone to colonization by bacterial biofilms, which are highly resistant to antibiotics. Normally, surgery is required to replace the infected implant. One promising non-invasive treatment option is to destroy the biofilm with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. In our study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms were grown on graphite disks in a flow chamber for three days prior to exposing them to ultrasound pulses of varying duration or burst period. The pulses were 20 cycles in duration at a frequency of 1.1 MHz from a spherically focused transducer (f/1, 63 mm focal length), creating peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the disk surface of 30 and 13 MPa, respectively. P. aeruginosa were tagged with GFP and cells killed by HIFU were visualized using propidium iodide, which permeates membranes of dead cells, to aid determining the extent of biofilm destruction and whether cells are alive or dead. Our results indicate that a 30-s exposure and 6-ms pulse period or those combinations with the same number of pulses, were sufficient to destroy the biofilm and to kill the remaining cells. Reducing the number of pulses decreased biofilm destruction, leaving more dead and live bacteria on the surface.

  15. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  16. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl, pellicle Formation (Pel and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  17. Control of Candida albicans metabolism and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Diana K; Grahl, Nora; Okegbe, Chinweike; Dietrich, Lars E P; Jacobs, Nicholas J; Hogan, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans has developmental programs that govern transitions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and between unattached and biofilm lifestyles. Here, we report that filamentation, intercellular adherence, and biofilm development were inhibited during interactions between Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through the action of P. aeruginosa-produced phenazines. While phenazines are toxic to C. albicans at millimolar concentrations, we found that lower concentrations of any of three different phenazines (pyocyanin, phenazine methosulfate, and phenazine-1-carboxylate) allowed growth but affected the development of C. albicans wrinkled colony biofilms and inhibited the fungal yeast-to-filament transition. Phenazines impaired C. albicans growth on nonfermentable carbon sources and led to increased production of fermentation products (ethanol, glycerol, and acetate) in glucose-containing medium, leading us to propose that phenazines specifically inhibited respiration. Methylene blue, another inhibitor of respiration, also prevented the formation of structured colony biofilms. The inhibition of filamentation and colony wrinkling was not solely due to lowered extracellular pH induced by fermentation. Compared to smooth, unstructured colonies, wrinkled colony biofilms had higher oxygen concentrations within the colony, and wrinkled regions of these colonies had higher levels of respiration. Together, our data suggest that the structure of the fungal biofilm promotes access to oxygen and enhances respiratory metabolism and that the perturbation of respiration by bacterial molecules such as phenazines or compounds with similar activities disrupts these pathways. These findings may suggest new ways to limit fungal biofilms in the context of disease. IMPORTANCE Many of the infections caused by Candida albicans, a major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, involve both morphological transitions and the formation of surface-associated biofilms. Through the

  18. Inhibitory activity of Iranian plant extracts on growth and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansouri, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a drug resistance opportunistic bacterium. Biofilm formation is key factor for survivalof P. aeruginosa in various environments. Polysaccharides may be involved in biofilm formation. The purpose of thisstudy was to evaluate antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities of seven plant extracts with known alpha-glucosidaseinhibitory activities on different strains of P. aeruginosa.Methodology and results: Plants were extracted with methanol by the maceration method. Antimicrobial activities weredetermined by agar dilution and by growth yield as measured by OD560nm of the Luria Bertani broth (LB culture with orwithout extracts. In agar dilution method, extracts of Quercus infectoria inhibited the growth of all, while Myrtuscommunis extract inhibited the growth of 3 out of 8 bacterial strains with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 1000μg/mL. All extracts significantly (p≤0.003 reduced growth rate of the bacteria in comparison with the control withoutextracts in LB broth at sub-MIC concentrations (500 μg/mL. All plant extracts significantly (p≤0.003 reduced biofilmformation compared to the controls. Glycyrrhiza glabra and Q. infectoria had the highest anti-biofilm activities. Nocorrelation between the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity with growth or the intensity of biofilm formation was found.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: Extracts of Q. infectoria and M. communis had the most antimicrobial,while Q. infectoria and G. glabra had the highest anti-biofilm activities. All plant extracts had anti-biofilm activities withmarginal effect on growth, suggesting that the mechanisms of these activities are unrelated to static or cidal effects.Further work to understand the relation between antimicrobial and biofilm formation is needed for development of newmeans to fight the infectious caused by this bacterium in future.

  19. Inhibitory activity of Iranian plant extracts on growth and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    S Mansouri; Safa, A.; Najar, S. G.; Najar, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a drug resistance opportunistic bacterium. Biofilm formation is key factor for survivalof P. aeruginosa in various environments. Polysaccharides may be involved in biofilm formation. The purpose of thisstudy was to evaluate antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities of seven plant extracts with known alpha-glucosidaseinhibitory activities on different strains of P. aeruginosa.Methodology and results: Plants were extracted with methanol by the maceration method. ...

  20. Colistin-Tobramycin Combinations Are Superior to Monotherapy Concerning the Killing of Biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, G.; Yang, Liang; Wu, H.;

    2010-01-01

    biofilms. Methods. P. aeruginosa biofilms were generated in vitro and in rat lungs. In a pilot study, 5 patients with cystic fibrosis inhaled colistin and then tobramycin for 4 weeks. The changes in P. aeruginosa counts and lung function were assessed before and after therapy. Results. Antibiotic...... combination therapy significantly reduced the number of P. aeruginosa cells in P. aeruginosa biofilm models in vitro. When rats were challenged with 1 x 10(7) cfu of P. aeruginosa, which was embedded in alginate beads, mortality rates, lung pathologic findings, and bacterial colony-forming unit counts were...

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Forms Biofilms in Acute Infection Independent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 h of infection in thermally injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections as well. Using light, electron, and confocal scanning laser microscopy, P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burn...

  2. Anti-biofilm activities from marine cold adapted bacteria against staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna ePapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules.The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules.The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules

  3. Tracking the Dynamic Relationship between Cellular Systems and Extracellular Subproteomes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Amber J; Murphy, Kathleen; Surette, Matthew D; Bandoro, Christopher; Krieger, Jonathan R; Taylor, Paul; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2015-11-01

    The transition of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa from free-living bacteria into surface-associated biofilm communities represents a viable target for the prevention and treatment of chronic infectious disease. We have established a proteomics platform that identified 2443 and 1142 high-confidence proteins in P. aeruginosa whole cells and outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs), respectively, at three time points during biofilm development (ProteomeXchange identifier PXD002605). The analysis of cellular systems, specifically the phenazine biosynthetic pathway, demonstrates that whole-cell protein abundance correlates to end product (i.e., pyocyanin) concentrations in biofilm but not in planktonic cultures. Furthermore, increased cellular protein abundance in this pathway results in quantifiable pyocyanin in early biofilm OMVs and OMVs from both growth modes isolated at later time points. Overall, our data indicate that the OMVs being released from the surface of the biofilm whole cells have unique proteomes in comparison to their planktonic counterparts. The relative abundance of OMV proteins from various subcellular sources showed considerable differences between the two growth modes over time, supporting the existence and preferential activation of multiple OMV biogenesis mechanisms under different conditions. The consistent detection of cytoplasmic proteins in all of the OMV subproteomes challenges the notion that OMVs are composed of outer membrane and periplasmic proteins alone. Direct comparisons of outer-membrane protein abundance levels between OMVs and whole cells shows ratios that vary greatly from 1:1 and supports previous studies that advocate the specific inclusion, or "packaging", of proteins into OMVs. The quantitative analysis of packaged protein groups suggests biogenesis mechanisms that involve untethered, rather than absent, peptidoglycan-binding proteins. Collectively, individual protein and biological system analyses of biofilm OMVs

  4. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by-products against single and mixed biofilms : the role of Gram- bacteria in the biofilm consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Maria Olívia; Machado, Idalina; Lopes, Susana Patrícia

    2010-01-01

    Since bacteria are permanently acquiring resistance to chemicals, the development of novel strategies for biofilm control is needed. Certain microorganisms represent an important source of novel bioactive compounds with marked antibacterial activity, as the secondary metabolites. This work aimed to investigate the antimicrobial effect of P.aeruginosa by-products on planktonic and sessile growth of several pathogenic bacteria. Supernatants from P.aeruginosa planktonic cultures (iso...

  5. Characterization of biofilm-like structures formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a synthetic mucus medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley Cecily L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accumulation of thick stagnant mucus provides a suitable environment for the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus within the lung alveoli of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. These infections cause significant lung damage, leading to respiratory failure and death. In an artificial mucin containing medium ASM+, P. aeruginosa forms structures that resemble typical biofilms but are not attached to any surface. We refer to these structures as biofilm like structures (BLS. Using ASM+ in a static microtiter plate culture system, we examined the roles of mucin, extracellular DNA, environmental oxygen (EO2, and quorum sensing (QS in the development of biofilm-like structures (BLS by P. aeruginosa; and the effect of EO2 and P. aeruginosa on S. aureus BLS. Results Under 20% EO2, P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 produced BLS that resemble typical biofilms but are confined to the ASM+ and not attached to the surface. Levels of mucin and extracellular DNA within the ASM+ were optimized to produce robust well developed BLS. At 10% EO2, PAO1 produced thicker, more developed BLS, while under 0% EO2, BLS production was diminished. In contrast, the S. aureus strain AH133 produced well-developed BLS only under 20% EO2. In PAO1, loss of the QS system genes rhlI and rhlR affected the formation of BLS in ASM+ in terms of both structure and architecture. Whether co-inoculated into ASM+ with AH133, or added to established AH133 BLS, PAO1 eliminated AH133 within 48–56 h. Conclusions The thick, viscous ASM+, which contains mucin and extracellular DNA levels similar to those found in the CF lung, supports the formation of biofilm-like structures similar to the aggregates described within CF airways. Alterations in environmental conditions or in the QS genes of P. aeruginosa, as occurs naturally during the progression of CF lung infection, affect the architecture and quantitative structural features of these BLS. Thus, ASM+ provides an

  6. Raffinose, a plant galactoside, inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation via binding to LecA and decreasing cellular cyclic diguanylate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Shin; Cha, Eunji; Kim, YunHye; Jeon, Young Ho; Olson, Betty H; Byun, Youngjoo; Park, Hee-Deung

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation on biotic or abiotic surfaces has unwanted consequences in medical, clinical, and industrial settings. Treatments with antibiotics or biocides are often ineffective in eradicating biofilms. Promising alternatives to conventional agents are biofilm-inhibiting compounds regulating biofilm development without toxicity to growth. Here, we screened a biofilm inhibitor, raffinose, derived from ginger. Raffinose, a galactotrisaccharide, showed efficient biofilm inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa without impairing its growth. Raffinose also affected various phenotypes such as colony morphology, matrix formation, and swarming motility. Binding of raffinose to a carbohydrate-binding protein called LecA was the cause of biofilm inhibition and altered phenotypes. Furthermore, raffinose reduced the concentration of the second messenger, cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), by increased activity of a c-di-GMP specific phosphodiesterase. The ability of raffinose to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and its molecular mechanism opens new possibilities for pharmacological and industrial applications. PMID:27141909

  7. Laser irradiation effect on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms isolated from venous leg ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffoni, Marina; Bessa, Lucinda J; Grande, Rossella; Di Giulio, Mara; Mongelli, Matteo; Ciarelli, Antonio; Cellini, Luigina

    2012-10-01

    Chronic wounds, including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers, represent a significant cause of morbidity in developed countries, predominantly in older patients. The aetiology of these wounds is probably multifactorial, but the role of bacteria in their pathogenesis is still unclear. Moreover, the presence of bacterial biofilms has been considered an important factor responsible for wounds chronicity. We aimed to investigate the laser action as a possible biofilm eradicating strategy, in order to attempt an additional treatment to antibiotic therapy to improve wound healing. In this work, the effect of near-infrared (NIR) laser was evaluated on mono and polymicrobial biofilms produced by two pathogenic bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus PECHA10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PECHA9, both isolated from a chronic venous leg ulcer. Laser effect was assessed by biomass measurement, colony forming unit count and cell viability assay. It was shown that the laser treatment has not affected the biofilms biomass neither the cell viability, although a small disruptive action was observed in the structure of all biofilms tested. A reduction on cell growth was observed in S. aureus and in polymicrobial biofilms. This work represents an initial in vitro approach to study the influence of NIR laser treatment on bacterial biofilms in order to explain its potentially advantageous effects in the healing process of chronic infected wounds. PMID:22182280

  8. Escherichia coli BdcA controls biofilm dispersal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Rhizobium meliloti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Thomas K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we showed that BdcA controls Escherichia coli biofilm dispersal by binding the ubiquitous bacterial signal cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP; upon reducing the concentration of c-di-GMP, the cell shifts to the planktonic state by increasing motility, decreasing aggregation, and decreasing production of biofilm adhesins. Findings Here we report that BdcA also increases biofilm dispersal in other Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Rhizobium meliloti. BdcA binds c-di-GMP in these strains and thereby reduces the effective c-di-GMP concentrations as demonstrated by increases in swimming motility and swarming motility as well as by a reduction in extracellular polysaccharide production. We also develop a method to displace existing biofilms by adding BdcA via conjugation from E. coli in mixed-species biofilms. Conclusion Since BdcA shows the ability to control biofilm dispersal in diverse bacteria, BdcA has the potential to be used as a tool to disperse biofilms for engineering and medical applications.

  9. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Manash C.; Padmani Sandhu; Priya Gupta; Prasenjit Rudrapaul; Utpal C. De; Prosun Tribedi; Yusuf Akhter; Surajit Bhattacharjee

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combin...

  10. An examination of potential differences in biofilm production among different genotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiljević Zorica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have examined if there is any difference in biofilm production among different genotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The study investigated 526 non-duplicate P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical specimens and from a hospital environment. Isolates were grouped into thirty-five genotypes based on an identical ERIC2-band pattern. Biofilm formation was quantified by the microtiter plate test and all strains were classified into the following categories: no biofilm producers (0, weak (+, moderate (+, or strong (+++ biofilm producers. Only 2.45% of examined strains were not biofilm producers. Among biofilm producers, 39.26% were strong biofilm producers, 34.36% were moderate biofilm producers, while 23.93% were weak biofilm producers. Although the majority of strong biofilm producers were in genotype groups 2 and 3, the degree of in vitro biofilm formation in our study was not significantly affected by the genotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we demonstrated that the degree of in vitro biofilm formation is not significantly affected by the genotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175039 i br. 143036

  11. Phenolic compounds affect production of pyocyanin, swarming motility and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin Ugurlu; Aysegul Karahasan Yagci; Seyhan Ulusoy; Burak Aksu; Gulgun Bosgelmez-Tinaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of plant-derived phenolic compounds (i.e. caffeic acid, cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and vanillic acid) on the production of quorum sensing regulated virulence factors such as pyocyanin, biofilm formation and swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates. Methods: Fourteen clinical P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from urine samples and P. aeruginosa PA01 strain were included in the study. The antibacterial effects of phenolic comp...

  12. Pattern differentiation in co-culture biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Markussen, Trine;

    2011-01-01

    -culture biofilms. By growing co-culture biofilms of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa mutants in a flow-chamber system and observing them using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 facilitates S. aureus microcolony formation. In contrast, P. aeruginosa mucA and rpoN mutants do...... not facilitate S. aureus microcolony formation and tend to outcompete S. aureus in co-culture biofilms. Further investigations reveal that extracellular DNA (eDNA) plays an important role in S. aureus microcolony formation and that P. aeruginosa type IV pili are required for this process, probably through...... their ability to bind to eDNA. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa is able to protect S. aureus against Dictyostelium discoideum phagocytosis in co-culture biofilms....

  13. Efflux as a glutaraldehyde resistance mechanism in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Amit; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Bibby, Kyle J

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in microbial biofilm control is biocide resistance. Phenotypic adaptations and physical protective effects have been historically thought to be the primary mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance in bacterial biofilms. Recent studies indicate the presence of genetic mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance, but very little is known about the contributory genetic factors. Here, we demonstrate that efflux pumps contribute to glutaraldehyde resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The RNA-seq data show that efflux pumps and phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis metabolic pathways were induced upon glutaraldehyde exposure. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of efflux pumps potentiates glutaraldehyde activity, suggesting that efflux activity contributes to glutaraldehyde resistance. Additionally, induction of known modulators of biofilm formation, including phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis, may contribute to biofilm resistance and resilience. Fundamental understanding of the genetic mechanism of biocide resistance is critical for the optimization of biocide use and development of novel disinfection strategies. Our results reveal genetic components involved in glutaraldehyde resistance and a potential strategy for improved control of biofilms. PMID:25824217

  14. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Genome Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Head, Nathan E.; Yu, Hongwei

    2004-01-01

    Chronic lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms are associated with refractory and fatal pneumonia in cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, a group of genomically diverse P. aeruginosa isolates were compared with the reference strain PAO1 to assess the roles of motility, twitching, growth rate, and overproduction of a capsular polysaccharide (alginate) in biofilm formation. In an in vitro biofilm assay system, P. aeruginosa displayed strain-specific biofilm formation that was not ...

  15. Inhibitory effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles on pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hassani Sangani; Mahboobeh Nakhaei Moghaddam; Mohammad Mahdi Forghanifard

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Bacterial biofilm formation causes many persistent and chronic infections. The matrix protects biofilm bacteria from exposure to innate immune defenses and antibiotic treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biofilm formation of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on biofilm. Materials and Methods: After collecting bacteria from clinical samples of hospitalized patients, the ability of organisms were...

  16. Statistical Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development: Impact of Mutations in Genes Involved in Twitching Motility, Cell-to-Cell Signaling, and Stationary-Phase Sigma Factor Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Kato, Junichi;

    2002-01-01

    developments of the biofilms were quantified by the computer program COMSTAT (A. Heydorn, A. T. Nielsen, M. Hentzer, C. Sternberg, M. Givskov, B. K. Ersboll, and S. Molin, Microbiology 146:2395-2407, 2000). Two structural key variables, average thickness and roughness, formed the basis for an analysis of...

  17. In vivo pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of colistin and imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana;

    2012-01-01

    planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells in vivo. Colistin showed concentration-dependent killing, while imipenem showed time-dependent killing on both planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells in vivo. The parameter best correlated to the elimination of bacteria in lung by colistin was the area under the...... concentration was above the MBIC (T(MBIC)) for biofilm cells. However, the AUC/MIC of imipenem showed a better correlation with the efficacy of imipenem for biofilm infections (R(2) = 0.89) than planktonic cell infections (R(2) = 0.38). The postantibiotic effect (PAE) of colistin and imipenem was shorter in...

  18. Antibacterial, anti-swarming and anti-biofilm formation activities of Chamaemelum nobile against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kazemian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractINTRODUCTION:Chamomile ( Chamaemelum nobile is widely used throughout the world, and has anti-inflammatory, deodorant, bacteriostatic, antimicrobial, carminative, sedative, antiseptic, anti-catarrhal, and spasmolytic properties. Because of the increasing incidence of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of natural antibacterial sources such as medical herbs for the treatment of infectious diseases is necessary. Extracts from different plant parts such as the leaves, flowers, fruit, and bark of Combretum albiflorum, Laurus nobilis , and Sonchus oleraceus were found to possess anti-quorum sensing (QS activities. In this study, we evaluated the effect of C. nobile against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formationMETHODS:The P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from patients with different types of infection, including wound infection, septicemia, and urinary tract infection. The flowers of C. nobile were dried and the extract was removed using a rotary device and then dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide at pH 7.4. The microdilution method was used to evaluate the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of this extract on P. aeruginosa , and biofilm inhibition was assayed.RESULTS:Eighty percent of the isolated samples (16/20 could form a biofilm, and most of these were isolated from wound infections. The biofilm inhibitory concentration of the C. nobile extract was 6.25-25mg/ml, whereas the MIC was 12.5-50mg/ml.CONCLUSIONS:The anti-QS property of C. nobile may play an important role in its antibacterial activity, thus offering an additional strategy in the fight against bacterial infections. However, molecular investigation is required to explore the exact mechanisms of the antibacterial action and functions of this phytocompound.

  19. Effect of biosurfactants on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a BioFlux channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz De Rienzo, M A; Stevenson, P S; Marchant, R; Banat, I M

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that biosurfactants play a role both in maintaining channels between multicellular structures in biofilms and in dispersal of cells from biofilms. A combination of caprylic acid (0.01 % v/v) together with rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) was applied to biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144 and a mixed culture under BioFlux flowthrough conditions and caused disruption of the biofilms. The biofilms were also treated with a combination of rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) and sophorolipids (0.01 %). Control treatments with PBS 1× had no apparent effect on biofilm disruption. The Gram-positive bacterium (S. aureus ATCC 9144) was more sensitive than P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 in terms of disruption and viability as shown by Live/Dead staining. Disruption of biofilms of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 was minimal. Oxygen consumption by biofilms, after different treatments with biosurfactants, confirms that sophorolipid on its own is unable to kill/inhibit cells of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442, and even when used in combination with rhamnolipids, under static conditions, no decrease in the cell viability was observed. Cells in biofilms exposed to mono-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) showed behaviour typical of exposure to bacteriostatic compounds, but when exposed to di-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v), they displayed a pattern characteristic of bactericidal compounds. PMID:26825819

  20. An examination of potential differences in biofilm production among different genotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiljević Zorica; Jovčić B.; Ćirković Ivana; Đukić Slobodanka

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we have examined if there is any difference in biofilm production among different genotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The study investigated 526 non-duplicate P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical specimens and from a hospital environment. Isolates were grouped into thirty-five genotypes based on an identical ERIC2-band pattern. Biofilm formation was quantified by the microtiter plate test and all strains were classified into the follo...

  1. A spider web strategy of type IV pili-mediated migration to build a fibre-like Psl polysaccharide matrix in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shiwei; Parsek, Matthew R.; Wozniak, Daniel J; Ma, Luyan Z.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial motilities participate in biofilm development. However, it is unknown how/if bacterial motility affects formation of the biofilm matrix. Psl polysaccharide is a key biofilm matrix component of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we report that type IV pili (T4P)-mediated bacterial migration leads to the formation of a fibre-like Psl matrix. Deletion of T4P in wild type and flagella-deficient strains results in loss of the Psl-fibres and reduction of biofilm biomass in flow cell biofilms as...

  2. Polysaccharides serve as scaffold of biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lung infection by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major pathologic features in patients with cystic fibrosis. Mucoid P. aeruginosa is notorious for its biofilm forming capability and resistance to immune attacks. In this study, the roles of extracellular polymeric substances f...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis: insights into pathogenic processes and treatment strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassett, Daniel J; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Irvin, Randall T;

    2010-01-01

    CF airway mucus can be infected by opportunistic microorganisms, notably Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Once organisms are established as biofilms, even the most potent antibiotics have little effect on their viability, especially during late-stage chronic infections. Better understanding of the mechani...... mechanisms used by P. aeruginosa to circumvent host defenses and therapeutic intervention strategies is critical for advancing novel treatment strategies....

  4. Heterogeneity of biofilms formed by nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Baoleri; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Ciofu, O.; Andersen, Jens Bo; Hoiby, N.; Molin, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Biofilms are thought to play a key role in the occurrence of lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, 20 nonmucoid P. aeruginosa isolates collected during different periods of chronic infection from eight CF patients were assessed with respect...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm aggravates skin inflammatory response in BALB/c mice in a novel chronic wound model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars J;

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds are presumed to persist in the inflammatory state, preventing healing. Emerging evidence indicates a clinical impact of bacterial biofilms in soft tissues, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilms. To further investigate this, we developed a chronic PA biofilm wound infection...... model in C3H/HeN and BALB/c mice. The chronic wound was established by an injection of seaweed alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa PAO1 beneath a third-degree thermal lesion providing full thickness skin necrosis, as in human chronic wounds. Cultures revealed growth of PA, and both alginate with or without...... PAO1 generated a polymorphonuclear-dominated inflammation early after infection. However, both at days 4 and 7, there were a more acute polymorphonuclear-dominated and higher degree of inflammation in the PAO1 containing group (p <0.05). Furthermore, PNA-FISH and supplemented DAPI staining showed...

  6. Effects of Chlorine Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm and Analysis of Related Gene Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekeç, Özge; Gökalsın, Barış; Karaltı, İskender; Kayhan, Figen Esin; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine is deployed worldwide to clean waters and prevent water-originated illnesses. However, chlorine has a limited disinfection capacity against biofilms. Microorganisms form biofilms to protect themselves from biological threats such as disinfectant chemicals. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and its biofilm form attaches to surfaces, living buried into exopolysaccharides, can be present in all watery environments including tap water and drinking water. This research aimed to study the biofilm trigger mechanism of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, which is known to form biofilm in water supply systems and human body, under chlorine stress levels. In addition to biofilm staining, certain genes that are relevant to the stress condition were selected for gene expression analysis. The bacteria cultures were grown under chlorine stress with concentrations of 0.5, 0.7 and 1 mg/l. Six gene regions were determined related to biofilm and stress response: rpoS, bifA, migA, katB, soxR, and algC. Biofilm formation was analyzed by basic fuchsin staining, and gene expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. According to the results, highest biofilm production was observed in P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild strain under no stress conditions. Higher biofilm amounts were observed for bacteria under 0.5 and 0.7 mg/l chlorine stress compared to 1 mg/l chlorine stress. PMID:27146505

  7. The effects of D-Tyrosine combined with amikacin on the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Pengfei; Chen, Lihua; Liu, Hongbo; Zou, Yaru; Luo, Zhen; Koronfel, Asmaa; Wu, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The biofilm formation of microorganisms causes persistent tissue infections resistant to treatment with antimicrobial agents. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly isolated from the airways of patients with chronic fibrosis (CF) and often forms biofilms, which are extremely hard to eradicate and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Recent studies have shown that D-amino acids (D-AAs) inhibited and disrupted biofilm formation by causing the release of the protein component of the polymeric matrix. However, the effects of D-AAs combined with common antibiotics on biofilms have rarely been studied. The current study first determined whether D-AAs disrupted the biofilms of PAO1 and the clinical airway isolates of P. aeruginosa. It was then determined whether combinations of D-Tyr (the most effective one) and the antibiotic amikacin (AMK) enhanced the activity against these biofilms. The results of the current study showed that D-Tyr is the most effective among those that disassemble the D-amino acids (D-leucine, D-methionine, D-Tyrptophan, and D-tryptophan), and D-Tyr at concentrations higher than 5 mM significantly reduced the biofilm biomass of P. aeruginosa (p < 0.05) without influencing bacterial growth. It was also revealed that D-Tyr improved the efficacy of AMK to combat P. aeruginosa biofilms, as indicated by a reduction in the minimal biofilm-inhibiting concentration (MBIC50 and MBIC90) without a change in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of planktonic bacteria. Thus, the findings indicated that D-Tyr supplementation overcame the resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to AMK, which might be helpful for preventing AMK overuse when this specific D-Tyr is recommended for combatting these biofilms. Also, toxicity of the liver and kidney from AMK could be potentially mitigated by co-delivery with D-Tyr. PMID:26188263

  8. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, K.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg;

    2002-01-01

    of important virulence factors, indicating a general effect on target genes of the las quorum sensing circuit. The furanone was applied to P. aeruginosa biofilms established in biofilm flow chambers. The Gfp-based analysis reveals that the compound penetrates microcolonies and blocks cell signalling and quorum...

  9. In vitro efficacy of octenidine and polihexanide against biofilms composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebert, Jörg

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The removal and inactivation of biofilms through wound cleansing solutions with and without antimicrobial supplements (octenidine dihydrochloride, polihexanide have been investigated in a laboratory model with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plastic slides of polycarbonate grown over with P. aeruginosa for 1 week were incubated with the cleansing solutions for 60 min. Removal and inactivation of the biofilm were determined by staining with crystal violet and by plating, respectively. No inhibition occurred by supplementing the cleansing solutions with octenidine or polyhexanide. By using octenidine and polihexanide a pronounced decrease in colony numbers of the biofilm was achieved compared to pure salt solutions (NaCl, Ringer.

  10. Ambroxol inhibits mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenlei; Yu, Jialin; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli; Li, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals. Because it forms biofilms, which protect against host immune attack and increase resistance to conventional antibiotics, mucoid P. aeruginosa is nearly impossible to eradicate. Moreover, mucoid conversion of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to poor outcomes. This conversion is mainly due to mucA gene mutation, which is thought to be induced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the reactive oxygen species they release. Ambroxol, a mucolytic agent with antioxidant characteristics, is used clinically, and this compound has recently been demonstrated to possess anti-biofilm properties. In this study, we found that ambroxol inhibits the H2 O2 -mediated conversion of P. aeruginosa from a non-mucoid to a mucoid phenotype, an effect that is due to its antioxidant property against H2 O2 . Furthermore, the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms was increased in vitro when used in combination with ambroxol. PMID:27102839

  11. Rhamnolipid but not motility is associated with the initiation of biofilm seeding dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA17

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jingjing Wang; Bing Yu; Deying Tian; Ming Ni

    2013-03-01

    Seeding dispersal is an active detachment exhibit in aging Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. Yet, effect factors of this process in the biofilm of clinical isolated mucoid P. aeruginosa strain remain to be better characterized. In our previous work, one mucoid P. earuginosa strain PA17 was isolated from a patient with recurrent pulmonary infection. In this study, confocal scanning laser microscope combined with LIVE/DEAD viability staining revealed that PA17 biofilm exhibited earlier seeding dispersal than non-mucoid PAO1. We further compared the motility and the expression of motility-associated gene during biofilm development between PA17 and PAO1. PA17 was found to be impaired in all three kinds of motility compared to PAO1. Moreover, we investigated the expression of rhamnolipid-associated genes in PA17 and PAO1 biofilm. The expression of these genes was in accordance with the process of seeding dispersal. Our results indicated that rhamnolipid but not motility is associated with the initiation of seeding dispersal of PA17 biofilm.

  12. Beneficial biofilms in marine aquaculture? Linking points of biofilm formation mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Wesseling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For marine aquaculture it is suggested that a specific substrate coated with a beneficial biofilm could prevent fish egg clutches from pathogenic infestations and improve the water quality and health of adult fish while, at the same time, minimising the need for the application of antibiotics. In marine biotopes, the habitat of Pseudoalteromonas species (a strain with suggested beneficial properties, biofilms are mostly discussed in the context of fouling processes. Hence research focuses on unravelling the mechanisms of biofilm formation aiming to prevent formation or to destroy existing biofilms. Initially in this review, particular components of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative model organism that is responsible for nosocomial infections and considered as a food spoiling agent, are described (extracellular appendages, role of matrix components, cell-cell signalling to get an advanced understanding of biofilm formation. The aim of this treatise is to seek linking points for biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas sp., respectively. Furthermore, approaches are discussed for how biofilm formation can be realized to improve fish (larvae rearing by species of the genus Pseudoalteromonas.

  13. Effect of Cinnamomum burmannii Nees ex Bl. and Massoia aromatica Becc. Essential Oils on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Utami Tunjung Pratiwi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that can be found in almost every habitat. They can be attached to a surface and protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules that substantially protect microorganisms from environmental effects. The aim of this research is to explore the potency of essential oils from Cinnamomum burmannii Nees ex Bl. and Massoia aromatica Becc. against planktonic growth and biofilm formation of, two opportunistic pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I. Essential oil from C. burmannii  and M. aromatica showed a 50% inhibition of  P. aeruginosa and S. aureus planktonic growth (PMIC50 at concentration of 0.12 % v/v. Essential oil from C. burmannii and M.  aromatica showed capability to inhibit 50% (MBIC50 of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus biofilm formation at concentration of 0.03 % v/v, whereas higher concentration (0.12 % v/v was needed by C. burmannii and M. aromatica oil to disrupt 50% of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus established biofilm. The analysis by GC-MS showed cinnamic aldehyde (92.02 % to be the major component of C. burmannii essential oil, whereas Massoialactone (92.05 % was the main constituent of M. aromatica essential oil. The results obtained in this study have made the oil of C. burmannii and M. aromatica oil as an interesting source for antibiofilm agents in the development of new strategies to treat infections caused by P. aeruginosa and  S. aureus biofilm.Industrial Relevance. Instead of freely swimming in solution (planktonic, in nature microbial tends to adhere to surfaces, and develop microbial biofilms. Microbial biofilms are exhibits resistance to both antimicrobial drugs and the host defence systems, which often results in persistent and difficult-to-treat infections. This makes the discovery of anti-infective agents which are active against planktonic and biofilm microbial represents an important goal. Plant is an interesting source for finding

  14. Development and maturation of Escherichia coli K-12 biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Haagensen, J.A.J.; Schembri, Mark;

    2003-01-01

    The development and maturation of E. coli biofilms in flow-chambers was investigated. We found that the presence of transfer constitutive IncF plasmids induced biofilm development forming structures resembling those reported for Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The development occurred in a step-wise pro......The development and maturation of E. coli biofilms in flow-chambers was investigated. We found that the presence of transfer constitutive IncF plasmids induced biofilm development forming structures resembling those reported for Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The development occurred in a step....... We further provide evidence that flagella, type 1 fimbriae, curli and Ag43 are all dispensable for the observed biofilm maturation. In addition, our results indicate that cell-to-cell signalling mediated by autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is not required for differentiation of E. coli within a biofilm community....... We suggest on the basis of these results that E. coli K-12 biofilm development and maturation is dependent on cell-cell adhesion factors, which may act as inducers of self-assembly processes that result in differently structured biofilms depending on the adhesive properties on the cell surface....

  15. Biofilm development in membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Savnik, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Prevention of biofilm development and its removal has crucial meaning in membrane reactor. Biofilm causes pore blocking on membranes, which causes a drop in efficiency of mixed liquor filtration and consequently deteriorates the efficiency of whole membrane bioreactor. This thesis deals with factors that affect biofilm development in membrane bioreactors. Structure and growth of biofilm are presented from its initial attachment of individual particles, their parameters of adhesion, hydrodynam...

  16. Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and ...

  17. Regulatory and metabolic networks for the adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms to urinary tract-like conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Tielen

    Full Text Available Biofilms of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are one of the major causes of complicated urinary tract infections with detrimental outcome. To develop novel therapeutic strategies the molecular adaption strategies of P. aeruginosa biofilms to the conditions of the urinary tract were investigated thoroughly at the systems level using transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and enzyme activity analyses. For this purpose biofilms were grown anaerobically in artificial urine medium (AUM. Obtained data were integrated bioinformatically into gene regulatory and metabolic networks. The dominating response at the transcriptome and proteome level was the adaptation to iron limitation via the broad Fur regulon including 19 sigma factors and up to 80 regulated target genes or operons. In agreement, reduction of the iron cofactor-dependent nitrate respiratory metabolism was detected. An adaptation of the central metabolism to lactate, citrate and amino acid as carbon sources with the induction of the glyoxylate bypass was observed, while other components of AUM like urea and creatinine were not used. Amino acid utilization pathways were found induced, while fatty acid biosynthesis was reduced. The high amounts of phosphate found in AUM explain the reduction of phosphate assimilation systems. Increased quorum sensing activity with the parallel reduction of chemotaxis and flagellum assembly underscored the importance of the biofilm life style. However, reduced formation of the extracellular polysaccharide alginate, typical for P. aeruginosa biofilms in lungs, indicated a different biofilm type for urinary tract infections. Furthermore, the obtained quorum sensing response results in an increased production of virulence factors like the extracellular lipase LipA and protease LasB and AprA explaining the harmful cause of these infections.

  18. Inhibitory effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles on pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassani Sangani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Bacterial biofilm formation causes many persistent and chronic infections. The matrix protects biofilm bacteria from exposure to innate immune defenses and antibiotic treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biofilm formation of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs on biofilm. Materials and Methods: After collecting bacteria from clinical samples of hospitalized patients, the ability of organisms were evaluated to create biofilm by tissue culture plate (TCP assay. ZnO NPs were synthesized by sol gel method and the efficacy of different concentrations (50- 350 µg/ml of ZnO NPs was assessed on biofilm formation and also elimination of pre-formed biofilm by using TCP method. Results:The average diameter of synthesized ZnO NPs was 20 nm. The minimum inhibitory concentration of nanoparticles was 150- 158 μg/ml and the minimum bactericidal concentration was higher (325 µg/ml. All 15 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were able to produce biofilm. Treating the organisms with nanoparticles at concentrations of 350 μg/ml resulted in more than 94% inhibition in OD reduction%. Molecular analysis showed that the presence of mRNA of pslA gene after treating bacteria with ZnO NPs for 30 minutes. Conclusion: The results showed that ZnO NPs can inhibit the establishment of P. aeruginosa biofilms and have less effective in removing pre-formed biofilm. However the tested nanoparticles exhibited anti-biofilm effect, but mRNA of pslA gene could be still detected in the medium by RT-PCR technique after 30 minutes treatment with ZnO.

  19. The Formation of Biofilms by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A Review of the Natural and Synthetic Compounds Interfering with Control Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiry Rasamiravaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium responsible for both acute and chronic infections. Beyond its natural resistance to many drugs, its ability to form biofilm, a complex biological system, renders ineffective the clearance by immune defense systems and antibiotherapy. The objective of this report is to provide an overview (i on P. aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle cycle, (ii on the main key actors relevant in the regulation of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa including QS systems, GacS/GacA and RetS/LadS two-component systems and C-di-GMP-dependent polysaccharides biosynthesis, and (iii finally on reported natural and synthetic products that interfere with control mechanisms of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa without affecting directly bacterial viability. Concluding remarks focus on perspectives to consider biofilm lifestyle as a target for eradication of resistant infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  20. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.;

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com......During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic...

  1. Influence of glyphosate in planktonic and biofilm growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Schneider Lima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the impact of different concentrations of glyphosate (Rondup® on planktonic and biofilm growth of P. aeruginosa. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures of P. aeruginosa ATCC®15442 inoculated in MHB + glyphosate (0.845 ppm, 1.690 ppm, 8.45 ppm, 16.90 ppm, 84.50 ppm, 169 ppm, 845 ppm, and 1690 ppm and cultured in normoxia and anoxia, following their OD560nm every hour for 24 h. Biofilms of adapted cells were formed in the presence of glyphosate (0.845 to 1690 ppm in normoxia and anoxia for 36 h. Glyphosate at concentrations higher than 84.5 ppm reduces the cell density of planktonic aerobic cultures (p 0.05, and more pronounced over 169 ppm. Anaerobic biofilms have their growth more readily favored (p < 0.05, regardless of concentration. In a concentration-dependent manner, glyphosate interferes with the growth ability of P. aeruginosa ATCC®15442.

  2. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation......Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause......, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose...

  3. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    , on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose......Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause...... skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation...

  4. Study on Hydro-Alcoholic Extract Effect of Pomegranate Peel on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Habibipour

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Microorganisms form biomass as biofilm in response to many factors, in order to adapt to hostile extracellular environments and biocides. Using different herbal compounds are of those strategies to deal with biofilm. It has been proved that plants extracts such as pomegranate, raspberry and chamomile essential oils have anti-biofilm effects. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of black peel pomegranate ex-tract on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation. Materials & Methods: In this experimental research the anti-biofilm effect, reducing the amount of biofilm formation and growth kinetics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different treatments was measured by microtiter and plate colorimetric crystal violet method. Biofilm formation was also examined using a microscope. Statistical analysis of data obtained from the reading of the ELISA was performed using SPSS software, P value 0.05. Results: Findings of this study showed that bacteria cannot form any biofilm in first 6 hours of incubation, in all treatments. The amount of biofilm formation after 12 hours in 0.01 and 0.05 g/ mL treatments were medium. Among treatments, after 18 and 24 hours of incubation 0.001 g/ mL concentration of pomegranate peel extract had medium and strong inhibitory effect on biofilm formation, respectively. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that biofilm formation and biofilm reduction percent-age is directly related to the duration of exposure of bacteria that could be due to the different phases of growth. Growth kinetics study also revealed that in the majority of treatments the growth was incremental up to about 15 hours and decrement afterwards due to the effective-ness of different treatments. After 18 hours, treatments have greatest influence on biofilm formation. The foregoing has been fully confirmed by the results of microscopic slides. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2015; 22 (3: 195-202

  5. Synergistic effect of fosfomycin and fluoroquinolones against Pseudomonas aeruginosa growing in a biofilm.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikuniya, Takeshi; Kato, Yoshihisa; Kariyama, Reiko; Monden, Koichi; Hikida, Muneo; Kumon, Hiromi

    2005-01-01

    Ulifloxacin is the active form of the prodrug prulifloxacin and shows a highly potent antipseudomonal activity. In this study, we examined the combined effect of fosfomycin and ulifloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) growing in a biofilm using a modified Robbins device with artificial urine, and compared it to that of the combination of fosfomycin and ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin. An ATP bioluminescence assay was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the agents ag...

  6. A quorum-sensing inhibitor blocks Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Miller, Laura C.; Siryaporn, Albert; Drescher, Knut; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we prepare synthetic molecules and analyze them for inhibition of the Pseudomonas quorum-sensing receptors LasR and RhlR. Our most effective compound, meta-bromo-thiolactone, not only prevents virulence factor expression and biofilm formation but also protects Caenorhabditis elegans and human A549 lung epithelial cells from quorum-sensing–mediated killing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This anti–quorum-sensing molecule is capable of influencing P. aeruginosa virulence in tissue cul...

  7. Expeditive synthesis of trithiotriazine-cored glycoclusters and inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Smadhi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Readily accessible, low-valency glycoclusters based on a triazine core bearing D-galactose and L-fucose epitopes are able to inhibit biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These multivalent ligands are simple to synthesize, are highly soluble, and can be either homofunctional or heterofunctional. The galactose-decorated cluster shows good affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin lecA. They are convenient biological probes for investigating the roles of lecA and lecB in biofilm formation.

  8. Reinforcement of the bactericidal effect of ciprofloxacin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by hyperbaric oxygen treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Mousavi, Nabi; Sams, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    diffusive supply for aerobic respiration during ciprofloxacin treatment. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates that biofilm reoxygenation by HBOT can significantly enhance the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa. Combining ciprofloxacin treatment with HBOT thus clearly has potential...... mechanisms affecting antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms remain unclear, accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of several bactericidal antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin is enhanced by stimulation of the aerobic respiration of pathogens, and that lack of O2 increases their tolerance. Reoxygenation...... of O2-depleted biofilms may thus improve susceptibility to ciprofloxacin possibly by restoring aerobic respiration. We tested such a strategy using reoxygenation of O2-depleted P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 agarose-embedded biofilms by hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) (100% O2, 2.8bar), enhancing the...

  9. Disinfection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm contaminated tube lumens with ultraviolet C light emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Ladefoged, Søren D; Tvede, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    , however, be applied to obtain 99.9% disinfection rates. The major reason was that besides cells the mature biofilm contained absorbing and scattering particulates, which made the biofilm opaque. The potential of UVC light emitting diodes (LED) for disinfection purposes in catheter-like tubes contaminated...... with biofilm was investigated. It was shown that UVC light propagation was possible through both Teflon and catheter tubes (silicone). The disinfection efficiency of the diodes was demonstrated on tubes contaminated artificially with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. The tubes were connected to a flow system...... and biofilms were produced during a 3 day period. Tubes in lengths of 10 (Teflon, silicone) and 20 cm (Teflon) were contaminated. Tubes for control and for UVC treatment were contaminated in parallel. Biofilms were sampled from the total inner surface of the tubes. Colony counts on the control samples were...

  10. Biofilms and type III secretion are not mutually exclusive in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H; Bond, N J; Skindersoe, M E;

    2009-01-01

    fast growth. Conversely, chronic infections are often associated with the biofilm mode of growth, low virulence and slow growth that resembles that of planktonic cells in stationary phase. Biofilm formation and type III secretion have been shown to be reciprocally regulated, and it has been suggested......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that causes acute and chronic infections in immunocompromised individuals. It is also a model organism for bacterial biofilm formation. Acute infections are often associated with planktonic or free-floating cells, high virulence and...... that factors related to acute infection may be incompatible with biofilm formation. In a previous proteomic study of the interrelationships between planktonic cells, colonies and continuously grown biofilms, we showed that biofilms under the growth conditions applied are more similar to planktonic...

  11. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; de, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-03-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis isolates of similar RAPD genotype exhibit diversity in biofilm forming ability in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elborn Stuart J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is considered to grow in a biofilm in cystic fibrosis (CF chronic lung infections. Bacterial cell motility is one of the main factors that have been connected with P. aeruginosa adherence to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. In this investigation, we employed molecular and microscopic methods to determine the presence or absence of motility in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, and statistically correlated this with their biofilm forming ability in vitro. Results Our investigations revealed a wide diversity in the production, architecture and control of biofilm formation. Of 96 isolates, 49% possessed swimming motility, 27% twitching and 52% swarming motility, while 47% were non-motile. Microtitre plate assays for biofilm formation showed a range of biofilm formation ability from biofilm deficient phenotypes to those that formed very thick biofilms. A comparison of the motility and adherence properties of individual strains demonstrated that the presence of swimming and twitching motility positively affected biofilm biomass. Crucially, however, motility was not an absolute requirement for biofilm formation, as 30 non-motile isolates actually formed thick biofilms, and three motile isolates that had both flagella and type IV pili attached only weakly. In addition, CLSM analysis showed that biofilm-forming strains of P. aeruginosa were in fact capable of entrapping non-biofilm forming strains, such that these 'non-biofilm forming' cells could be observed as part of the mature biofilm architecture. Conclusions Clinical isolates that do not produce biofilms in the laboratory must have the ability to survive in the patient lung. We propose that a synergy exists between isolates in vivo, which allows "non biofilm-forming" isolates to be incorporated into the biofilm. Therefore, there is the potential for strains that are apparently non-biofilm forming in vitro to participate in biofilm-mediated pathogenesis in the CF

  13. A novel technique using potassium permanganate and reflectance confocal microscopy to image biofilm extracellular polymeric matrix reveals non-eDNA networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Matthew C; Mehta, Ajeet; Mehta, Amar; Nistico, Laura; Hill, Preston J; Falzarano, Anthony R; Wozniak, Daniel J; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Stoodley, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Biofilms are etiologically important in the development of chronic medical and dental infections. The biofilm extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) determines biofilm structure and allows bacteria in biofilms to adapt to changes in mechanical loads such as fluid shear. However, EPS components are difficult to visualize microscopically because of their low density and molecular complexity. Here, we tested potassium permanganate, KMnO4, for use as a non-specific EPS contrast-enhancing stain using confocal laser scanning microscopy in reflectance mode. We demonstrate that KMnO4 reacted with EPS components of various strains of Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, yielding brown MnO2 precipitate deposition on the EPS, which was quantifiable using data from the laser reflection detector. Furthermore, the MnO2 signal could be quantified in combination with fluorescent nucleic acid staining. COMSTAT image analysis indicated that KMnO4 staining increased the estimated biovolume over that determined by nucleic acid staining alone for all strains tested, and revealed non-eDNA EPS networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. In vitro and in vivo testing indicated that KMnO4 reacted with poly-N-acetylglucosamine and Pseudomonas Pel polysaccharide, but did not react strongly with DNA or alginate. KMnO4 staining may have application as a research tool and for diagnostic potential for biofilms in clinical samples. PMID:26536894

  14. Metabolomics-Based Screening of Biofilm-Inhibitory Compounds against Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Burdock Leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Zaixiang Lou; Yuxia Tang; Xinyi Song; Hongxin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Screening of anti-biofilm compounds from the burdock leaf based on metabolomics is reported here. The crystal violet assay indicated 34% ethanol elution fraction of burdock leaf could completely inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 1 mg·mL−1. Then, the chemical composition of burdock leaf fraction was analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and 11 active compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, ursolic aci...

  15. Increased bactericidal activity of colistin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in anaerobic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kolpen, Mette; Appeldorff, Cecilie F.; Brandt, Sarah; Mousavi, Nabi; Kragh, Kasper N.; Aydogan, Sevtap; Uppal, Haleema A.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Ciofu, Oana; Høiby, Niels; Jensen, Peter Ø.

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance towards antibiotics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is recognized as a major cause of therapeutic failure of chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This lung infection is characterized by antibiotic-tolerant biofilms in mucus with zones of O2 depletion mainly due to polymorphonuclear leukocytic activity. In contrast to the main types of bactericidal antibiotics, it has not been possible to establish an association between the bactericidal effects of colistin and...

  16. Electrolytic Generation of Oxygen Partially Explains Electrical Enhancement of Tobramycin Efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Philip S.; Wattanakaroon, Wanida; Goodrum, Lu; Fortun, Susana M.; McLeod, Bruce R.

    1999-01-01

    The role of electrolysis products, including protons, hydroxyl ions, reactive oxygen intermediates, oxygen, hydrogen, and heat, in mediating electrical enhancement of killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by tobramycin (the bioelectric effect) was investigated. The log reduction in biofilm viable cell numbers compared to the numbers for the untreated positive control effected by antibiotic increased from 2.88 in the absence of electric current to 5.58 in the presence of electric current....

  17. Excretions/Secretions from Bacteria-Pretreated Maggot Are More Effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Ke-chun; Sun, Xin-juan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lan; Cai, Ying; Chen, Yin-chen; Luo, Ning; Yu, Jian-Hua; Cai, Da-Yong; Wang, Ai-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background Sterile larvae—maggots of the green bottle blowfly Lucilia sericata are employed as a treatment tool for various types of chronic wounds. Previous studies reported that excretions/secretions (ES) of the sterile larvae could prevent and remove the biofilms of various species of bacteria. In the present study we assessed the effect of ES from the larvae pretreated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the bacteria biofilms. Methods and Findings We investigated the effects of ES from the mag...

  18. Interspecies signalling via the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia diffusible signal factor influences biofilm formation and polymyxin tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, R.P.; Fouhy, Y.; Garcia, B.F.; Watt, S.A.; Niehaus, K.; Yang, Liang; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Dow, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Interspecies signalling through the action of diffusible signal molecules can influence the behaviour of organisms growing in polymicrobial communities. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa occur ubiquitously in the environment and can be found together in diverse niches...... including the rhizosphere of plants and the cystic fibrosis lung. In mixed species biofilms, S. maltophilia substantially influenced the architecture of P. aeruginosa structures, which developed as extended filaments. This effect depended upon the synthesis of the diffusible signal factor (DSF) by S....... maltophilia and could be mimicked by the addition of synthetic DSF. This response of P. aeruginosa to DSF required PA1396, a sensor kinase with an input domain of related amino acid sequence to the sensory input domain of RpfC, which is responsible for DSF perception in xanthomonads. Mutation of PA1396 or...

  19. Roles of type IV pili, flagellum-mediated motility and extracellular DNA in the formation of mature multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, Kim B; Pamp, Sünje J; Yang, Liang;

    2008-01-01

    When grown as a biofilm in laboratory flow chambers Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop mushroom-shaped multicellular structures consisting of distinct subpopulations in the cap and stalk portions. We have previously presented evidence that formation of the cap portion of the mushroom......-shaped structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms occurs via bacterial migration and depends on type IV pili (Mol Microbiol 50: 61-68). In the present study we examine additional factors involved in the formation of this multicellular substructure. While pilA mutants, lacking type IV pili, are deficient in mushroom cap...

  20. The metabolically active subpopulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms survives exposure to membrane-targeting antimicrobials via distinct molecular mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Nilsson, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are reported to be inherently refractory toward antimicrobial attack and, therefore, cause problems in industrial and medical settings. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms contain subpopulations that exhibit high metabolic activity and subpopulations that exhibit low metabolic activity. We...... have found that membrane-targeting antimicrobials such as colistin, EDTA, SDS, and chlorhexidine specifically kill the inactive subpopulation in P. aeruginosa biofilms, whereas the active subpopulation survives exposure to these compounds. Because treatment of P. aeruginosa biofilms with the membrane......, but does not depend on the pmr, mexAB-oprM, mexPQ-opmE, or muxABC-opmB genes. Tolerance to SDS and EDTA in P. aeruginosa biofilms is linked to metabolically active cells, but does not depend on the pmr, mexAB, mexCD, mexPQ, or muxABC genes. Our data suggest that the active subpopulation in P...

  1. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kübra Çevik

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods:The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acidonbiofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa  PAK01,P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03 were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results:The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84% and kojic acid (68% presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Response and Resistance to Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Is Linked to the Redox-Active Molecule Phenazine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mai-Prochnow

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen displaying high antibiotic resistance. Its resistance is in part due to its outstanding ability to form biofilms on a range of biotic and abiotic surfaces leading to difficult-to-treat, often long-term infections. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is a new, promising antibacterial treatment to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Plasma is ionized gas that has antibacterial properties through the generation of a mix of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS, excited molecules, charged particles and UV photons. Our results show the efficient removal of P. aeruginosa biofilms using a plasma jet (kINPen med, with no viable cells detected after 5 min treatment and no attached biofilm cells visible with confocal microscopy after 10 min plasma treatment. Because of its multi-factorial action, it is widely presumed that the development of bacterial resistance to plasma is unlikely. However, our results indicate that a short plasma treatment (3 min may lead to the emergence of a small number of surviving cells exhibiting enhanced resistance to subsequent plasma exposure. Interestingly, these cells also exhibited a higher degree of resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Whole genome comparison between surviving cells and control cells revealed 10 distinct polymorphic regions, including four belonging to the redox active, antibiotic pigment phenazine. Subsequently, the interaction between phenazine production and CAP resistance was demonstrated in biofilms of transposon mutants disrupted in different phenazine pathway genes which exhibited significantly altered sensitivity to CAP.

  3. Metabolomics-Based Screening of Biofilm-Inhibitory Compounds against Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Burdock Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaixiang Lou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Screening of anti-biofilm compounds from the burdock leaf based on metabolomics is reported here. The crystal violet assay indicated 34% ethanol elution fraction of burdock leaf could completely inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 1 mg·mL−1. Then, the chemical composition of burdock leaf fraction was analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS and 11 active compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, ursolic acid, rutin, cynarin, luteolin, crocin, benzoic acid, and Tenacissoside I were identified. Lastly, UPLC-MS analysis was employed to obtain the metabolic fingerprints of burdock leaf fractions before and after inhibiting the biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The metabolic fingerprints were transformed to data, analyzed with PLS-DA (partial least squares discriminant analysis and the peaks whose area was significantly changed were found out. Thus, 81 compounds were screened as potential anti-biofilm ingredients. Among them, rutin, ursolic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and quercetin were identified and confirmed as the main anti-biofilm compounds in burdock leaf. The study provided basic anti-biofilm profile data for the compounds in burdock leaf, as well as provided a convenient method for fast screening of anti-biofilm compounds from natural plants.

  4. Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Heydorn, Arne; Ragas, Paula Cornelia;

    2003-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Gfp-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants in flow chambers irrigated with citrate minimal medium was characterized by the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy and comstat image analysis. Flagella and type IV pili were not necessary...

  5. N-acylhomoserine-lactone-mediated communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia in mixed biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K.; Hentzer, Morten; Geisenberger, O.;

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are capable of forming mixed biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria employ quorum-sensing systems, which rely on N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to co- ordinate expression of virulence factors with the...

  6. N-acylhomoserine-lactone-mediated communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia in mixed biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K; Hentzer, Morten; Geisenberger, O;

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are capable of forming mixed biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria employ quorum-sensing systems, which rely on N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to co-ordinate expression of virulence factors with the forma...

  7. Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of colistin and imipenem on mucoid and nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana;

    2011-01-01

    The time course of activity of colistin and imipenem against mucoid and nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa growing in a biofilm showed that compared with those for planktonic bacteria, the kinetics of colistin and imipenem retained the concentration- and time-dependent killing, respectively, but...

  8. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of 2707 Hyper-Duplex Stainless Steel by Marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huabing; Zhou, Enze; Zhang, Dawei; Xu, Dake; Xia, Jin; Yang, Chunguang; Feng, Hao; Jiang, Zhouhua; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2016-02-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a serious problem in many industries because it causes huge economic losses. Due to its excellent resistance to chemical corrosion, 2707 hyper duplex stainless steel (2707 HDSS) has been used in the marine environment. However, its resistance to MIC was not experimentally proven. In this study, the MIC behavior of 2707 HDSS caused by the marine aerobe Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Electrochemical analyses demonstrated a positive shift in the corrosion potential and an increase in the corrosion current density in the presence of the P. aeruginosa biofilm in the 2216E medium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis results showed a decrease in Cr content on the coupon surface beneath the biofilm. The pit imaging analysis showed that the P. aeruginosa biofilm caused a largest pit depth of 0.69 μm in 14 days of incubation. Although this was quite small, it indicated that 2707 HDSS was not completely immune to MIC by the P. aeruginosa biofilm.

  9. N-acylhomoserine-lactone-mediated communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia in mixed biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K.; Hentzer, Morten; Geisenberger, O.;

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are capable of forming mixed biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria employ quorum-sensing systems, which rely on N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to co- ordinate expression of virulence factors with the form...

  10. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, K.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Heydorn, Arne; Andersen, Jens Bo; Parsek, M.R.; Rice, S.A.; Eberl, L.; Molin, Søren; Høiby, N.; Kjelleberg, S.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2002-01-01

    ). Gfp-based reporter technology has been applied for non-destructive, single-cell-level detection of quorum sensing in laboratory-based P. aeruginosa biofilms. It is reported that a synthetic halogenated furanone compound, which is a derivative of the secondary metabolites produced by the Australian...

  11. In vitro production of biofilm in a flow cell system in a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and determination of efficiency of ciprofloxacin against them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soham Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microorganisms develop biofilm on various medical devices. The process is particularly relevant in public health since biofilm associated organisms are much more resistant to antibiotics and have a potential to cause infections in patients with indwelling medical devices. Materials and Methods: To determine the efficiency of an antibiotic against the biofilm it is inappropriate to use traditional technique of determining Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC on the free floating laboratory phenotype. Thus we have induced formation of biofilm in two strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which showed heavy growth of biofilm in screening by Tube method in a flow cell system and determined their antibiotic susceptibility against ciprofloxacin by agar dilution method in the range (0.25 mg/ml to 8 mg/ml. The MIC value of ciprofloxacin for the biofilm produced organism was compared with its free form and a standard strain as control on the same plates. Observations: Both the biofilm produced strains showed a higher resistance (MIC > 8 mg/ml than its free form, which were 2 μg/ml for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 4 mg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus. Thus biofilm can pose a threat in the patient treatment.

  12. HD-GYP domain proteins regulate biofilm formation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, Robert P.; Lucey, Jean; O'Donovan, Karen;

    2009-01-01

    residues (YN-GYP). Here we have investigated the role of these proteins in biofilm formation, virulence factor synthesis and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Mutation of PA4108 and PA4781 led to an increase in the level of cyclic-di-GMP in P. aeruginosa, consistent with the predicted activity of the encoded...... proteins as cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterases. Mutation of both genes led to reduced swarming motility but had differing effects on production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, pyoverdin and ExoS. Mutation of PA2572 had no effect on cyclic-di-GMP levels and did not influence swarming motility. However, PA......2572 had a negative influence on swarming that was cryptic and was revealed only after removal of an uncharacterized C-terminal domain. Mutation of PA4108, PA4781 and PA2572 had distinct effects on biofilm formation and architecture of P. aeruginosa. All three proteins contributed to virulence of P...

  13. Effect of plant phenolic compounds on biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyuta, Vladimir; Zaitseva, Julia; Lobakova, Elena; Zagoskina, Natalia; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Khmel, Inessa

    2013-11-01

    In the natural environment, bacteria predominantly exist in matrix-enclosed multicellular communities associated with various surfaces, referred to as biofilms. Bacteria in biofilms are extremely resistant to antibacterial agents thus causing serious problems for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, we showed that different plant phenolic compounds, at concentrations that did not or weakly suppressed bacterial growth, increased the capacity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to form biofilms. Biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was enhanced 3- to 7-fold under the action of vanillin and epicatechin, and 2- to 2.5-fold in the presence of 4-hydroxybenzoic, gallic, cinnamic, sinapic, ferulic, and chlorogenic acids. At higher concentrations, these compounds displayed an inhibiting effect. Similar experiments carried out for comparison with Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 showed the same pattern. Vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzoic, and gallic acids at concentrations within the range of 40 to 400 μg/mL increased the production of N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone in P. aeruginosa PAO1 which suggests a possible relationship between stimulation of biofilm formation and Las Quorum Sensing system of this bacterium. Using biosensors to detect N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL), we demonstrated that the plant phenolics studied did not mimic AHLs. PMID:23594262

  14. Mannitol enhances antibiotic sensitivity of persister bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barraud

    Full Text Available The failure of antibiotic therapies to clear Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the key mortality factor for cystic fibrosis (CF patients, is partly attributed to the high tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Mannitol has previously been found to restore aminoglycoside sensitivity in Escherichia coli by generating a proton-motive force (PMF, suggesting a potential new strategy to improve antibiotic therapy and reduce disease progression in CF. Here, we used the commonly prescribed aminoglycoside tobramycin to select for P. aeruginosa persister cells during biofilm growth. Incubation with mannitol (10-40 mM increased tobramycin sensitivity of persister cells up to 1,000-fold. Addition of mannitol to pre-grown biofilms was able to revert the persister phenotype and improve the efficacy of tobramycin. This effect was blocked by the addition of a PMF inhibitor or in a P. aeruginosa mutant strain unable to metabolise mannitol. Addition of glucose and NaCl at high osmolarity also improved the efficacy of tobramycin although to a lesser extent compared to mannitol. Therefore, the primary effect of mannitol in reverting biofilm associated persister cells appears to be an active, physiological response, associated with a minor contribution of osmotic stress. Mannitol was tested against clinically relevant strains, showing that biofilms containing a subpopulation of persister cells are better killed in the presence of mannitol, but a clinical strain with a high resistance to tobramycin was not affected by mannitol. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to improvements in lung function by facilitating mucus clearance in CF, mannitol also affects antibiotic sensitivity in biofilms and does so through an active, physiological response.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research i...

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Flow Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Many microbial cells have the ability to form sessile microbial communities defined as biofilms that have altered physiological and pathological properties compared to free living microorganisms. Biofilms in nature are often difficult to investigate and reside under poorly defined conditions(1). ...

  17. Biofilms: a developing microscopic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Sandra Patricia

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities composed by different microbiota embebbed in a special adaptive environment. These communities show different characteristics such as heterogeneity, diversity in microenvironments, capacity to resist antimicrobial therapy and ability to allow bacterial communication. These characteristics convert them in complex organizations that are difficult to eradicate in their own environment. In the man, biofilms are associated to a great number of slow-development infectious processes which greatly difficulties their eradication. In the industry and environment, biofilms are centered in processes known as biofouling and bioremediation. The former is the contamination of a system due to the microbial activity of a biofilm. The latter uses biofilms to improve the conditions of a contaminated system. The study of biofilms is a new and exciting field which is constantly evolving and whose implications in medicine and industry would have important repercussions for the humankind.

  18. In vitro activity of ceftolozane/tazobactam against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the planktonic and biofilm states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez Perez, Antonio L; Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M; Kohner, Peggy C; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Patel, Robin

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of life-threatening infections, some of which are associated with planktonic and others with biofilm states. Herein, we tested the combination of the novel cephalosporin, ceftolozane, with the β-lactamase inhibitor, tazobactam, against planktonic and biofilm forms of 54 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, using cefepime as a comparator. MIC values were determined following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) values were determined using biofilm-laden pegged lids incubated in antimicrobial challenge plates containing varying concentrations of ceftolozane/tazobactam. Pegged lids were then incubated in growth recovery plates containing cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth to determine the minimum biofilm bactericidal concentration (MBBC). Ceftolozane/tazobactam was highly active against planktonic P. aeruginosa, with all 54 isolates studied testing susceptible (MIC ≤4/4μg/mL). On the other hand, 51/54 biofilm P. aeruginosa had MBICs ≥16/4μg/mL, and all 54 isolates had MBBCs >32μg/mL. Of the 54 isolates, 45 (83.3%) tested susceptible to cefepime, with the MIC50/MIC90 being 4/16μg/mL, respectively, and the MBIC90 and MBBC90 both being >256μg/mL. Although ceftolozane/tazobactam is a promising antimicrobial agent for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections, it is not highly active against P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:27130477

  19. Physiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilms as revealed by transcriptome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Albert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptome analysis was applied to characterize the physiological activities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown for three days in drip-flow biofilm reactors. Conventional applications of transcriptional profiling often compare two paired data sets that differ in a single experimentally controlled variable. In contrast this study obtained the transcriptome of a single biofilm state, ranked transcript signals to make the priorities of the population manifest, and compared ranki ngs for a priori identified physiological marker genes between the biofilm and published data sets. Results Biofilms tolerated exposure to antibiotics, harbored steep oxygen concentration gradients, and exhibited stratified and heterogeneous spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity. Transcriptional profiling was performed and the signal intensity of each transcript was ranked to gain insight into the physiological state of the biofilm population. Similar rankings were obtained from data sets published in the GEO database http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo. By comparing the rank of genes selected as markers for particular physiological activities between the biofilm and comparator data sets, it was possible to infer qualitative features of the physiological state of the biofilm bacteria. These biofilms appeared, from their transcriptome, to be glucose nourished, iron replete, oxygen limited, and growing slowly or exhibiting stationary phase character. Genes associated with elaboration of type IV pili were strongly expressed in the biofilm. The biofilm population did not indicate oxidative stress, homoserine lactone mediated quorum sensing, or activation of efflux pumps. Using correlations with transcript ranks, the average specific growth rate of biofilm cells was estimated to be 0.08 h-1. Conclusions Collectively these data underscore the oxygen-limited, slow-growing nature of the biofilm population and are consistent with antimicrobial tolerance due

  20. The use of bacteriophages for P. aeruginosa biofilm control

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant opportunistic pathogen frequently associated with several nosocomial infections and, worryingly, this bacterium shows a low antibiotic susceptibility. One of its virulence factors is related with the ability to adhere to surfaces and also human epithelium and form virulent biofllms. This work describes the isolation and characterization of lytic phages capable to infect antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa strains. It is also described herein the potential o...

  1. Magnesium limitation is an environmental trigger of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation is a conserved strategy for long-term bacterial survival in nature and during infections. Biofilms are multicellular aggregates of cells enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. The RetS, GacS and LadS sensors control the switch from a planktonic to a biofilm mode of growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we detail our approach to identify environmental triggers of biofilm formation by investigating environmental conditions that repress expression of the biofilm repressor RetS. Mg(2+ limitation repressed the expression of retS leading to increased aggregation, exopolysaccharide (EPS production and biofilm formation. Repression of retS expression under Mg(2+ limitation corresponded with induced expression of the GacA-controlled small regulatory RNAs rsmZ and rsmY and the EPS biosynthesis operons pel and psl. We recently demonstrated that extracellular DNA sequesters Mg(2+ cations and activates the cation-sensing PhoPQ two-component system, which leads to increased antimicrobial peptide resistance in biofilms. Here we show that exogenous DNA and EDTA, through their ability to chelate Mg(2+, promoted biofilm formation. The repression of retS in low Mg(2+ was directly controlled by PhoPQ. PhoP also directly controlled expression of rsmZ but not rsmY suggesting that PhoPQ controls the equilibrium of the small regulatory RNAs and thus fine-tunes the expression of genes in the RetS pathway. In summary, Mg(2+ limitation is a biologically relevant environmental condition and the first bonafide environmental signal identified that results in transcriptional repression of retS and promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm formation.

  2. Antimicrobial targets localize to the extracellular vesicle-associated proteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in a biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CezarMKhursigara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are particularly resistant to antimicrobial therapies. These surface-attached communities are protected against host defenses’ and pharmacotherapy by a self-produced matrix that surrounds and fortifies them. Recent proteomic evidence also suggests that some bacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, undergo modifications within a biofilm that make them uniquely resistant compared to their planktonic (free-living counterparts. This study examines 50 proteins in the resistance subproteome of both surface-associated and free-living P. aeruginosa PAO1 over three time points. Proteins were grouped into categories based on their roles in antimicrobial: i binding, ii efflux, iii resistance, and iv susceptibility. In addition, the extracellular outer membrane vesicle-associated proteome is examined and compared between the two growth modes. We show that in whole cells between 12-24% of the proteins are present at significantly different abundance levels over time, with some proteins being unique to a specific growth mode; however, the total abundance levels in the four categories remain consistent. In contrast, marked differences are seen in the protein content of the outer membrane vesicles, which contain a greater number of drug-binding proteins in vesicles purified from late-stage biofilms. These results show how the method of analysis can impact the interpretation of proteomic data (i.e. individual proteins vs. systems, and highlight the advantage of using protein-based methods to identify potential antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in extracellular sample components. Furthermore, this information has the potential to inform the development of specific antipseudomonal therapies that quench possible drug-sequestering vesicle proteins. This strategy could serve as a novel approach for combating the high-level of antimicrobial resistance in P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  3. Photodynamic therapy for the eradication of biofilms formed by catheter associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Teresa Orlandi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as a major opportunistic pathogen causing catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs associated with high mortality and morbidity. In this study 18 P. aeruginosa isolates from urine of catheterized patients were evaluated for in vitro biofilm formation.All the tested strains showed the ability to form biofilm more thicker than those formed by a cohort of 29 blood culture strains belonging to the same species. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT is a novel antimicrobial treatment that exploits a photosensitizer (PS and visible light to induce lethal oxidative damages in bacterial cells and could be used as local antimicrobial approach in CA-UTIs. Here we tested the susceptibility of planktonic and sessile cultures of P. aeruginosa strains, the model strain PAO1 and CA-UTI isolates, to photodynamic inactivation with a di cationic porphyrinic photosensitizer, the 5, 15-di (N-benzyl-4-pyridynium-porphyrin di chloride.Although Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regarded as a difficult target for antimicrobial chemotherapy, satisfactory bactericidal activities on both planktonic and biofilm cultures were observed.

  4. Role of dose concentration in biocide efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobe, K J; Zahller, J; Stewart, P S

    2002-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa entrapped in alginate gel beads to form artificial biofilms resisted killing by chlorine, glutaraldehyde, 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilopropionamide (DBNPA), and an alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium compound (ADBAC). The degree of resistance was quantified by a resistance factor that compared killing times for biofilm and planktonic cells in response to the same concentration of antimicrobial agent. Resistance factors averaged 120 for chlorine, 34 for glutaraldehyde, 29 for DBNPA, and 1900 for ADBAC. In every case, resistance factors decreased with increasing concentration of the antimicrobial agent. An independent analysis of the concentration dependence of the apparent rates of killing of planktonic and biofilm bacteria showed that elevating the treatment concentration increased bacterial killing more in the biofilm than it did in a suspension culture. Calculation of a transport modulus comparing the rates of biocide reaction and diffusion suggested that at least part of the biofilm resistance to chlorine, glutaraldehdye, and DBNPA could be attributed to incomplete or slow penetration of these agents into the biofilm. Time-kill curves were nonlinear for biofilm bacteria in some cases. The shapes of these curves implicated retarded antimicrobial penetration for chlorine and glutaraldehyde and the presence of a tolerant subpopulation for DBNPA and ADBAC. The results indicate that treating biofilms with a concentrated dose of biocide is more effective than using prolonged doses of a lower concentration. PMID:12080421

  5. c-di-GMP and its Effects on Biofilm Formation and Dispersion: a Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Dae-Gon; O'Toole, George A

    2015-04-01

    Since its initial discovery as an allosteric factor regulating cellulose biosynthesis in Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the list of functional outputs regulated by c-di-GMP has grown. We have focused this article on one of these c-di-GMP-regulated processes, namely, biofilm formation in the organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The majority of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases encoded in the P. aeruginosa genome still remain uncharacterized; thus, there is still a great deal to be learned about the link between c-di-GMP and biofilm formation in this microbe. In particular, while a number of c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes have been identified that participate in reversible and irreversible attachment and biofilm maturation, there is a still a significant knowledge gap regarding the c-di-GMP output systems in this organism. Even for the well-characterized Pel system, where c-di-GMP-mediated transcriptional regulation is now well documented, how binding of c-di-GMP by PelD stimulates Pel production is not understood in any detail. Similarly, c-di-GMP-mediated control of swimming, swarming and twitching also remains to be elucidated. Thus, despite terrific advances in our understanding of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and the role of c-di-GMP in this process since the last version of this book (indeed there was no chapter on c-di-GMP!) there is still much to learn. PMID:26104694

  6. Characterising novel anti-biofilm targets for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the cystic fibrosis lung

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Ronan

    2014-01-01

    The global rise in antibiotic resistance is a significant problem facing healthcare professionals. In particular within the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, bacteria can establish chronic infection and resistance to a wide array of antibiotic therapies. One of the principle pathogens associated with chronic infection in the CF lung is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa can establish chronic infection in the CF lung partly through the use of the biofilm mode of growth. This biofilm mode of growth...

  7. Development and maturation of Escherichia coli K-12 biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Haagensen, J.A.J.; Schembri, Mark; Zechner, E.L.; Molin, Søren

    2003-01-01

    The development and maturation of E. coli biofilms in flow-chambers was investigated. We found that the presence of transfer constitutive IncF plasmids induced biofilm development forming structures resembling those reported for Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The development occurred in a step....... We suggest on the basis of these results that E. coli K-12 biofilm development and maturation is dependent on cell-cell adhesion factors, which may act as inducers of self-assembly processes that result in differently structured biofilms depending on the adhesive properties on the cell surface.......-wise process: (i) attachment of cells to the substratum, (ii) clonal growth and microcolony formation, and (iii) differentiation into expanding structures rising 70-100 mum into the water phase. The first two steps were the same in the plasmid-carrying and plasmid-free strains, whereas the third step only...

  8. Antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effect of a novel BODIPY photosensitizer against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlandi, Viviana Teresa; Rybtke, Morten; Caruso, Enrico;

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) combines the use of organic dyes (photosensitizers, PSs) and visible light in order to elicit a photo-oxidative stress which causes bacterial death. GD11, a recently synthesized PS belonging to the boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) class, was demonstrated to be efficient...... against planktonic cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, causing a 7 log unit reduction of viable cells when administered at 2.5 μM. The effectiveness of GD11 against P. aeruginosa biofilms grown in flow-cells and microtiter trays was also demonstrated. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of flow...

  9. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, Kathrin; Rasmussen, Thomas B;

    2002-01-01

    Novel molecular tools have been constructed which allow for in situ detection of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The reporter responds to AHL activation of LasR by expression of an unstable version of the green-fluorescent protein (Gfp...... macroalga Delisea pulchra, is capable of interfering with AHL-mediated quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa. It is demonstrated that the furanone compound specifically represses expression of a PlasB-gfp reporter fusion without affecting growth or protein synthesis. In addition, it reduces the production of...

  10. Mannitol Does Not Enhance Tobramycin Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Cystic Fibrosis Model System of Biofilm Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Price

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a human genetic disease that results in the accumulation of thick, sticky mucus in the airways, which results in chronic, life-long bacterial biofilm infections that are difficult to clear with antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is correlated with worsening lung disease and P. aeruginosa transitions to an antibiotic tolerant state during chronic infections. Tobramycin is an aminoglycoside currently used to combat lung infections in individuals with CF. While tobramycin is effective at eradicating P. aeruginosa in the airways of young patients, it is unable to completely clear the chronic P. aeruginosa infections in older patients. A recent report showed that co-addition of tobramycin and mannitol enhanced killing of P. aeruginosa grown in vitro as a biofilm on an abiotic surface. Here we employed a model system of bacterial biofilms formed on the surface of CF-derived airway cells to determine if mannitol would enhance the antibacterial activity of tobramycin against P. aeruginosa grown on a more clinically relevant surface. Using this model system, which allows the growth of robust biofilms with high-level antibiotic tolerance analogous to in vivo biofilms, we were unable to find evidence for enhanced antibacterial activity of tobramycin with the addition of mannitol, supporting the observation that this type of co-treatment failed to reduce the P. aeruginosa bacterial load in a clinical setting.

  11. Alginate is not a significant component of the extracellular polysaccharide matrix of PA14 and PAO1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak, Daniel J.; Wyckoff, Timna J. O.; Starkey, Melissa; Keyser, Rebecca; Azadi, Parastoo; O'Toole, George A.; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2003-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Such infections are extremely difficult to control because the bacteria exhibit a biofilm-mode of growth, rendering P. aeruginosa resistant to antibiotics and phagocytic cells. During the course of infection, P. aeruginosa usually undergoes a phenotypic switch to a mucoid colony, which is characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Alginate overproducti...

  12. A three-phase in-vitro system for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion and biofilm formation upon hydrogel contact lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohlmann Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly associated with contact lens (CL -related eye infections, for which bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation upon hydrogel CLs is a specific risk factor. Whilst P. aeruginosa has been widely used as a model organism for initial biofilm formation on CLs, in-vitro models that closely reproduce in-vivo conditions have rarely been presented. Results In the current investigation, a novel in-vitro biofilm model for studying the adherence of P. aeruginosa to hydrogel CLs was established. Nutritional and interfacial conditions similar to those in the eye of a CL wearer were created through the involvement of a solid:liquid and a solid:air interface, shear forces and a complex artificial tear fluid. Bioburdens varied depending on the CL material and biofilm maturation occurred after 72 h incubation. Whilst a range of biofilm morphologies were visualised including dispersed and adherent bacterial cells, aggregates and colonies embedded in extracellular polymer substances (EPS, EPS fibres, mushroom-like formations, and crystalline structures, a compact and heterogeneous biofilm morphology predominated on all CL materials. Conclusions In order to better understand the process of biofilm formation on CLs and to test the efficacy of CL care solutions, representative in-vitro biofilm models are required. Here, we present a three-phase biofilm model that simulates the environment in the eye of a CL wearer and thus generates biofilms which resemble those commonly observed in-situ.

  13. Predictive Computer Models for Biofilm Detachment Properties in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Nick G.; Harro, Janette M.; Stoodley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial biofilm communities are protected against environmental extremes or clearance by antimicrobial agents or the host immune response. They also serve as a site from which microbial populations search for new niches by dispersion via single planktonic cells or by detachment by protected biofilm aggregates that, until recently, were thought to become single cells ready for attachment. Mathematically modeling these events has provided investigators with testable hypotheses for further study. Such was the case in the recent article by Kragh et al. (K. N. Kragh, J. B. Hutchison, G. Melaugh, C. Rodesney, A. E. Roberts, Y. Irie, P. Ø. Jensen, S. P. Diggle, R. J. Allen, V. Gordon, and T. Bjarnsholt, mBio 7:e00237-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00237-16), in which investigators were able to identify the differential competitive advantage of biofilm aggregates to directly attach to surfaces compared to the single-celled planktonic populations. Therefore, as we delve deeper into the properties of the biofilm mode of growth, not only do we need to understand the complexity of biofilms, but we must also account for the properties of the dispersed and detached populations and their effect on reseeding. PMID:27302761

  14. Predictive Computer Models for Biofilm Detachment Properties in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Nick G; Harro, Janette M; Stoodley, Paul; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm communities are protected against environmental extremes or clearance by antimicrobial agents or the host immune response. They also serve as a site from which microbial populations search for new niches by dispersion via single planktonic cells or by detachment by protected biofilm aggregates that, until recently, were thought to become single cells ready for attachment. Mathematically modeling these events has provided investigators with testable hypotheses for further study. Such was the case in the recent article by Kragh et al. (K. N. Kragh, J. B. Hutchison, G. Melaugh, C. Rodesney, A. E. Roberts, Y. Irie, P. Ø. Jensen, S. P. Diggle, R. J. Allen, V. Gordon, and T. Bjarnsholt, mBio 7:e00237-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00237-16), in which investigators were able to identify the differential competitive advantage of biofilm aggregates to directly attach to surfaces compared to the single-celled planktonic populations. Therefore, as we delve deeper into the properties of the biofilm mode of growth, not only do we need to understand the complexity of biofilms, but we must also account for the properties of the dispersed and detached populations and their effect on reseeding. PMID:27302761

  15. Characterization of membrane lipidome changes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during biofilm growth on glass wool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayette Benamara

    Full Text Available Bacteria cells within biofilms are physiologically distinct from their planktonic counterparts. In particular they are more resistant to detrimental environmental conditions. In this study, we monitored the evolution of the phospholipid composition of the inner and outer membranes of P. aeruginosa during the biofilm formation (i.e., from 1-, 2-, to 6-day-old biofilm. Lipidome analyses were performed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In addition to the lipidomic analysis, the fatty acid composition was analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We found that the lipidome alterations of the inner and the outer membranes varied with the biofilm age. These alterations in phospholipid compositions reflect a higher diversity in sessile organisms than in planktonic counterparts. The diversity is characterized by the presence of PE 30∶1, PE 31∶0 and PG 31∶0 for the lower masses as well as PE 38∶1, 38∶2, 39∶1, 39∶2 and PG 38∶0, 38∶1, 38∶2, 39∶1, 39∶2 for the higher masses. However, this lipidomic feature tends to disappear with the biofilm age, in particular the high mass phospholipids tend to disappear. The amount of branched chains phospholipids mainly located in the outer membrane decreased with the biofilm age, whereas the proportion of cyclopropylated phospholipids increased in both membranes. In bacteria present in oldest biofilms, i.e., 6-day-old, the phospholipid distribution moved closer to that of planktonic bacteria.

  16. Characterization of membrane lipidome changes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during biofilm growth on glass wool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamara, Hayette; Rihouey, Christophe; Abbes, Imen; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Hardouin, Julie; Jouenne, Thierry; Alexandre, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria cells within biofilms are physiologically distinct from their planktonic counterparts. In particular they are more resistant to detrimental environmental conditions. In this study, we monitored the evolution of the phospholipid composition of the inner and outer membranes of P. aeruginosa during the biofilm formation (i.e., from 1-, 2-, to 6-day-old biofilm). Lipidome analyses were performed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In addition to the lipidomic analysis, the fatty acid composition was analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We found that the lipidome alterations of the inner and the outer membranes varied with the biofilm age. These alterations in phospholipid compositions reflect a higher diversity in sessile organisms than in planktonic counterparts. The diversity is characterized by the presence of PE 30∶1, PE 31∶0 and PG 31∶0 for the lower masses as well as PE 38∶1, 38∶2, 39∶1, 39∶2 and PG 38∶0, 38∶1, 38∶2, 39∶1, 39∶2 for the higher masses. However, this lipidomic feature tends to disappear with the biofilm age, in particular the high mass phospholipids tend to disappear. The amount of branched chains phospholipids mainly located in the outer membrane decreased with the biofilm age, whereas the proportion of cyclopropylated phospholipids increased in both membranes. In bacteria present in oldest biofilms, i.e., 6-day-old, the phospholipid distribution moved closer to that of planktonic bacteria. PMID:25265483

  17. Increased bactericidal activity of colistin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mette, Kolpen; Appeldorff, Cecilie F; Brandt, Sarah;

    2016-01-01

    polymorphonuclear leukocytic activity. In contrast to the main types of bactericidal antibiotics, it has not been possible to establish an association between the bactericidal effects of colistin and the production of detectable levels of OH⋅ on several strains of planktonic P. aeruginosa. Therefore we propose that...... production of OH⋅ may not contribute significantly to the bactericidal activity of colistin on P. aeruginosa biofilm. Thus, we investigated the effect of colistin treatment on biofilm of wildtype PAO1, a catalase deficient mutant (ΔkatA) and a colistin resistant CF isolate cultured in microtiter plates in...... normoxic- or anoxic atmosphere with 1 mM nitrate. The killing of bacteria during colistin treatment was measured by CFU counts and the OH⋅ formation was measured by 3'-(p-hydroxylphenyl fluorescein) fluorescein (HPF) fluorescence. Validation of the assay was done by hydrogenperoxide treatment. OH...

  18. Association of biofilm production with multidrug resistance among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeetendra Gurung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Given choice, bacteria prefer a community-based, surface-bound colony to an individual existence. The inclination for bacteria to become surface bound is so ubiquitous in diverse ecosystems that it suggests a strong survival strategy and selective advantage for surface dwellers over their free-ranging counterparts. Virtually any surface, biotic or abiotic (animal, mineral, or vegetable is suitable for bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Thus, a biofilm is "a functional consortium of microorganisms organized within an extensive exopolymeric matrix." Materials and Methods: The present study was undertaken to detect biofilm production from the repertoire stocks of Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa obtained from clinical specimens. The tube method was performed to qualitatively detect biofilm production. Results: A total of 109 isolates of both organisms were included in the study, out of which 42% (46/109 isolates showed biofilm detection. Among the biofilm producers, 57% of P. aeruginosa and 73% of A. baumannii showed multidrug resistance (MDR pattern which was statistically significant in comparison to nonbiofilm producers (P < 0.001. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the only study to have tested the biofilm production in both P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii in a single study. Biofilm production and MDR pattern were found to be significantly higher in A. baumannii than P. aeruginosa. Antibiotic resistance was significantly higher among biofilm producing P. aeruginosa than non producers. Similarly, antibiotic resistance was significantly higher among biofilm producing A. baumannii than non producers.

  19. Impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing on biofilm persistence in an in vivo intraperitoneal foreign-body infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise D; Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Ø; Rasmussen, Thomas B; Christophersen, Lars; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Kumar, Naresh; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael Christian; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes chronic biofilm-based infections in host organisms. P. aeruginosa employs quorum sensing (QS) to control expression of its virulence, and to establish and maintain chronic infections. Under such conditions, the biofilm mode of...... growth contributes significantly to P. aeruginosa tolerance to the action of the innate and adaptive defence system and numerous antibiotics. In the present study, an in vivo foreign-body infection model was established in the peritoneal cavity of mice. Experimental data showed that QS-deficient P...

  20. Microbial pathogenesis and biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Høiby, N.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim;

    2004-01-01

    cycles of different microorganisms will eventually lead to improved treatments. Several bacteria have evolved specific strategies for virulent colonization of humans in addition to their otherwise harmless establishment as environmental inhabitants. In many such cases biofilm development seems to play a...... of polysaccharides. A recent striking finding is that DNA released from biofilm cells may be important as an initial matrix former [3]. At later times other EPS molecules may add to the shape and quality of the mature biofilm structure. Figure 1 summarizes the principle stepsinvolved in the...

  1. Formation of hydroxyl radicals contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ø.; Briales, Alejandra; Brochmann, Rikke Prejh;

    2014-01-01

    induction of cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals (OH˙) during antibiotic treatment of planktonically grown cells may contribute to action of the commonly used antibiotic ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa biofilms. For this purpose, WT PAO1, a catalase deficient ΔkatA and a ciprofloxacin resistant mutant of PAO1 (gyr......A), were grown as biofilms in microtiter plates and treated with ciprofloxacin. Formation of OH˙ and total amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and viability was estimated. Formation of OH˙ and total ROS in PAO1 biofilms treated with ciprofloxacin was shown but higher levels were measured...... in ΔkatA biofilms, and no ROS production was seen in the gyrA biofilms. Treatment with ciprofloxacin decreased the viability of PAO1 and ΔkatA biofilms but not of gyrA biofilms. Addition of thiourea, a OH˙ scavenger, decreased the OH˙ levels and killing of PAO1 biofilm. Our study shows that OH˙ is...

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms exposed to imipenem exhibit changes in global gene expression and beta-lactamase and alginate production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N.; Schuster, M.; Hentzer, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    The lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are commonly colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Chronic endobronchial P. aeruginosa infections are impossible to eradicate with antibiotics, but intensive suppressive antibiotic therapy is essential to maintain the lung function of CF patients....... The treatment often includes beta-lactam antibiotics. How these antibiotics influence gene expression in the surviving biofilm population of P. aeruginosa is not clear. Thus, we used the microarray technology to study the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of a beta-lactam antibiotic, imipenem......, on gene expression in biofilm populations. Many genes showed small but statistically significant differential expression in response to imipenem. We identified 34 genes that were induced or repressed in biofilms exposed to imipenem more than fivefold compared to the levels of induction or repression...

  3. The novel effect of cis-2-decenoic acid on biofilm producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Soheili

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are a main cause of many chronic infections and mortalities, such as dental caries, cystic fibrosis, osteoradionecrosis, urinary tract infections and native valve endocarditis. These polymeric matrices are sessile communities with different rules from those forms via known planktonic bacteria. One of the important biofilm-producing human pathogens is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which causes death in the majority of people who suffer from cystic fibrosis, AIDS, burns and neutropenic cancer. To find a method for controlling the growth and resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilm, this study investigated the dispersion induction of this microorganism with a diffusible signal factor (DSF, cis-2-decenoic acid (CDA, in combination with Tobramycin as a useful antibiotic. Our findings confirmed that although CDA did not act as a dispersion inducer in this experiment, it did show an antimicrobial effect and decreased the MIC of Tobramycin. These results suggested that research on the probable new effects of DSF molecules will result in advances in the control of biofilm infections.

  4. Effects of Combined Treatment with Sansanmycin and Macrolides on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Formation of Biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE LI; YUN-YING XIE; RU-XIAN CHEN; HONG-ZHANG XU; GUO-JI ZHANG; JIN-ZHE LI; XIAO-MIAN LI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of combined treatment with sansanmycin and macrolides on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and formation of biofilm. Methods Micro-dilution method was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of sansanmycin, gentamycin, carbenicillin, polymyxin B, roxithromycin, piperacillin, and tazobactam. PA1 and PA27853 biofilms were observed under optical microscope after staining and under SEM after treatment with sansanmycin at different dosages and combined treatment with sansanmycin and roxithromycin. Viable bacteria in PA1 and PA27853 biofilms were counted after treatment with sansanmycin at different dosages or combined treatment with sansanmycin and roxithromycin. Results The MIC of sansanmycin was lower than that of gentamycin and polymyxin B, but was higher than that of carbenicillin. Roxithromycin enhanced the penetration of sansanmycin to PA1 and PA27853 strains through biofilms. PA1 and PA27853 biofilms were gradually cleared with the increased dosages of sansanmycin or with the combined sansanmycin and roxithromycin. Conclusion Sub-MIC levels of roxithromycin and sansanmycin substantially inhibit the generation of biofilms and proliferation of bacteria. Therefore, combined antibiotics can be used in treatment of intractable bacterial infection.

  5. Biofilm accumulation model that predicts antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    A computer model of biofilm dynamics was adapted to incorporate the activity of an antimicrobial agent on bacterial biofilm. The model was used to evaluate the plausibility of two mechanisms of biofilm antibiotic resistance by qualitative comparison with data from a well-characterized experimental system (H. Anwar, J. L. Strap, and J. W. Costerton, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 36:1208-1214, 1992). The two mechanisms involved either depletion of the antibiotic by reaction with biomass or phys...

  6. Regulation of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by quorum sensing%群体感应对铜绿假单胞菌生物被膜形成的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄媛媛; 宋水山

    2011-01-01

    生物被膜是一种与浮游细胞相对应的生长方式,由细菌和自身分泌的包外基质组成.铜绿假单胞菌是研究这一生长方式的模式生物.在过去十年,对铜绿假单胞菌生物被膜的研究已取得显著进展.群体感应(QS)的细胞沟通机制在铜绿假单胞菌生物被膜形成中发挥着重要作用.介绍生物被膜的特点,并重点讨论了QS和生物被膜之间的关系.%Compared with planktonic cells, bacterial biofilm is a kind of particular colonial life style which consists of bacteria and their extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a model organism for studying biofilm formation. Over the past decade, significant strides have been made towards understanding biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quorum sensing (QS)has been found to play a role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation. This paper introduced the biofilm characteristics,focusing on the relationship between QS and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

  7. Phenotypic Characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Development

    OpenAIRE

    Allegrucci, Magee; Hu, F.Z.; Shen, K.; J. Hayes; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Post, J Christopher; Sauer, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is among the most common pathogens associated with chronic otitis media with effusion, which has been hypothesized to be a biofilm disease. S. pneumoniae has been shown to form biofilms, however, little is known about the developmental process, the architecture, and the changes that occur upon biofilm development. In the current study we made use of a continuous-culture biofilm system to characterize biofilm development of 14 different S. pneumoniae strains representi...

  8. High beta-Lactamase Levels Change the Pharmacodynamics of beta-Lactam Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hengzhuang; Ciofu, Oana; Yang, Liang;

    2013-01-01

    , microtiter plates, and on alginate beads were treated with different concentrations of ceftazidime and imipenem. The kinetics of antibiotics on the biofilms was investigated in vitro by time-kill methods. Time-dependent killing of ceftazidime was observed in PAO1 biofilms, but concentration-dependent killing......Resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics is a frequent problem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This resistance is mainly due to the hyperproduction of chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase and biofilm formation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the...... activity of ceftazidime was observed for beta-lactamase-overproducing biofilms of P. aeruginosa in all three models. Ceftazidime showed time-dependent killing on planktonic PAO1 and PA Delta DDh2Dh3. This difference is probably due to the special distribution and accumulation in the biofilm matrix of beta...

  9. An investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth on novel nanocellulose fibre dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Lydia C; Khan, Saira; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Wright, Chris J; Hill, Katja E; Thomas, David W

    2016-02-10

    Nanocellulose from wood is a novel biomaterial, which is highly fibrillated at the nanoscale. This affords the material a number of advantages, including self-assembly, biodegradability and the ability to absorb and retain moisture, which highlights its potential usefulness in clinical wound-dressing applications. In these in vitro studies, the wound pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was used to assess the ability of two nanocellulose materials to impair bacterial growth (nanocelluloses had a relatively small fraction of residual fibres (nanocellulose films and increased cell death when compared to a commercial control wound dressing, Aquacel(®). Nanocellulose suspensions inhibited bacterial growth, whilst UV-vis spectrophotometry and laser profilometry also revealed the ability of nanocellulose to form smooth, translucent films. Atomic force microscopy studies of the surface properties of nanocellulose demonstrated that PAO1 exhibited markedly contrasting morphology when grown on the nanocellulose film surfaces compared to an Aquacel(®) control dressing (p<0.05). This study highlights the potential utility of these biodegradable materials, from a renewable source, for wound dressing applications in the prevention and treatment of biofilm development. PMID:26686120

  10. Presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa influences biofilm formation and surface protein expression of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Ting, Yen Peng

    2015-11-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can individually colonize and infect their hosts, the commensalistic effect of the two is more tenacious and lethal. In this study, it was shown that in co-culture with P. aeruginosa, a sub-population of S. aureus exhibited improved resistance to kanamycin by selection of small colony variant (SCV) phenotype. Additionally, biofilm formation by the two bacteria was denser in the co-culture, compared with biofilm formed in individual pure cultures. Using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy for single cells, it was demonstrated that S. aureus cultured in the presence of P. aeruginosa bound more tenaciously to substrates. Surface-shaved peptides were isolated and identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight and a homology search program spider. Results indicated that serine-rich adhesin, extracellular matrix binding protein and other putative adhesion proteins could be responsible for the enhanced attachment of S. aureus in the co-culture. Besides, several other proteins were differentially expressed, indicating the occurrence of a range of other interactions. Of particular interest was a multidrug resistant protein named ABC transporter permease which is known to expel xenobiotics out of the cells. Positive regulation of this protein could be involved in the SCV selection of S. aureus in the co-culture. PMID:25925222

  11. Pathogenic effects of biofilm with chronic pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Yan; Yiqiang Chen; Zhijun Song; Hong Wu; Jinliang Kong; Xuejun Qin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish an animal model of P.aeruginosa biofilm associated with chronic pulmonary infection and investigate the pathogenic effects of biofilm. Methods: Experiments in vitro, measuring the MICS, MBCS of ievofloxacin(LFX), ceftazidime(CAZ) in PAO579 in alginate beads and planktonic PAO579. Rats were challenged with 0.1 ml of PAO579(109CFU/ml) in alginate beads or 0.1 ml of planktonic PAO579(109CFU/ml), 3,7,14 days after challenging, bacteriological, pathological features were observed. Results: The MICS, MBCS of LFX, CAZ in PAO579 in alginate beads were higher than those in planktonic PAO579 in vitro. CFU/lung in alginate beads group was significantly higher than that in planktonic bacteria group(P = 0.002, P =0.004, P = 0.002, respectively); macroscopic lung pathology and the inflammation in alginate beads group were significantly more severe compared to those in planktonic bacteria group in vivo. Conclusion: P.aeruginosa biofilm protected bacterium from killing of antibiotics and might mediate the host immune damage in the lung tissue and made bacterium evade the host immune defense.

  12. Effects of quorum sensing autoinducer degradation gene on virulence and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The aiiA gene from Bacillus thuringiensis was cloned into the Pseudomonas/E. coli shuttle vector and transformed into Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1. Western blotting showed that the AiiA protein was expressed in PAO1. After induction by IPTG for 6 h and 18 h, expression of the aiiA gene in PAO1 completely degraded the quorum sensing autoinducers N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs): N-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL) and N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (BHL). The re- duced amount of AHLs in PAO1 was also correlated with decreased expression and production of several virulence factors such as elastase and pyocyanin. AiiA expression also influenced bacterial swarming motility. Most importantly, our studies indicated that aiiA played significant roles in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and dispersion, as observed by the differences of the biofilm formation on liquid and solid surfaces, and biofilm structures under a scanning electron microscope.

  13. Effects of quorum sensing autoinducer degradation gene on virulence and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yao; DAI Yue; ZHANG Yong; HU YangBo; YANG BaoYu; CHEN ShiYun

    2007-01-01

    The aiiA gene from Bacillus thuringiensis was cloned into the Pseudomonas/E. coli shuttle vector and transformed into Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1. Western blotting showed that the AiiA protein was expressed in PAO1. After induction by IPTG for 6 h and 18 h, expression of the aiiA gene in PAO1completely degraded the quorum sensing autoinducers N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs):N-oxododecanoyI-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL) and N-butyryI-L-homoserine lactone (BHL). The reduced amount of AHLs in PAO1 was also correlated with decreased expression and production of several virulence factors such as elastase and pyocyanin. AiiA expression also influenced bacterial swarming motility. Most importantly, our studies indicated that aiiA played significant roles in P.aeruginosa biofilm formation and dispersion, as observed by the differences of the biofilm formation on liquid and solid surfaces, and biofilm structures under a scanning electron microscope.

  14. Virulence Phenotype, Physicochemical Properties and Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Polyethylene Used In Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazlane Zineb

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Potable water piping has been demonstrated to serve as a reservoir for opportunistic pathogens bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this report, we describe the characterization of P. aeruginosa strains isolated from water intended for human consumption by the presence of virulence factors. These strains expressed their suitability for adhesion and the formation of biofilms on polyethylene (PE. Also In this work, we were able to elucidate the factors intervening in adhesion and biofilm formation by showing the role of the substrate, the environment and bacteria. Strong correlation was observed between physicochemical properties especially the electron donor property and the surface percentage covered by cells. These results indicate that this property plays a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa adherence on the PE surface. In addition, if no relationship was found between the adhesion results and hydrophobicity, it means that this property was not involved in the adhesion process of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the PE surface.

  15. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Translocon Is Required for Biofilm Formation at the Epithelial Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Cindy S; Rangel, Stephanie M; Almblad, Henrik; Kierbel, Arlinet; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Hauser, Alan R; Engel, Joanne N

    2014-01-01

    -associated aggregation on the surface of polarized epithelial cells and at early time points in a murine model of acute pneumonia. In contrast, the translocon was not required for aggregation on abiotic surfaces, suggesting a novel function for the type III secretion system during cell-associated aggregation...... about biofilm formation at the epithelial barrier. We have previously shown that when added to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells, P. aeruginosa rapidly forms cell-associated aggregates within 60 minutes of infection. By confocal microscopy we now show that cell-associated aggregates...... exhibit key characteristics of biofilms, including the presence of extracellular matrix and increased resistance to antibiotics compared to planktonic bacteria. Using isogenic mutants in the type III secretion system, we found that the translocon, but not the effectors themselves, were required for cell...

  16. Effect of nitrofurans and NO generators on biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Julia; Granik, Vladimir; Belik, Alexandr; Koksharova, Olga; Khmel, Inessa

    2009-06-01

    Antibacterial drugs in the nitrofuran series, such as nitrofurazone, furazidin, nitrofurantoin and nifuroxazide, as well as the nitric oxide generators sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide mononitrate in concentrations that do not suppress bacterial growth, were shown to increase the capacity of pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370 to form biofilms. At 25-100microg/ml, nitrofurans 2-2.5-fold enhanced biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1, and NO donors 3-6-fold. For B. cenocepacia 370, the enhancement was 2-5-fold (nitrofurans) and 4.5-fold (sodium nitroprusside), respectively. PMID:19460431

  17. Microbial pathogenesis and biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Høiby, N.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Molin, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Microbial infections constitute a major cause of premature death in large parts of the world, and for several years we have seen an alarming tendency towards increasing problems of controlling such infections by antibiotic treatments. It is hoped that an improved understanding of the infectious...... been termed 'maturation', which is thought to be mediated by a differentiation process. Maturation into late stages of biofilm development resulting in stable and robust structures may require the formation of a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are most often assumed to consist...... of polysaccharides. A recent striking finding is that DNA released from biofilm cells may be important as an initial matrix former [3]. At later times other EPS molecules may add to the shape and quality of the mature biofilm structure. Figure 1 summarizes the principle stepsinvolved in the...

  18. Surface-Mediated Release of a Small-Molecule Modulator of Bacterial Biofilm Formation: A Non-Bactericidal Approach to Inhibiting Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Broderick, Adam H.; Breitbach, Anthony S.; Frei, Reto; Blackwell, Helen E.; Lynn, David M.

    2013-01-01

    We report an approach to preventing bacterial biofilm formation that is based on the surface-mediated release of 5,6-dimethyl-2-aminobenzimidazole (DMABI), a potent and non-bactericidal small-molecule inhibitor of bacterial biofilm growth. Our results demonstrate that DMABI can be encapsulated in thin films of a model biocompatible polymer [poly(lactide-co-glycolide), PLG] and be released in quantities that inhibit the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by up to 75–90% on surfaces t...

  19. Single-cell twitching chemotaxis in developing biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Nuno M; Foster, Kevin R; Durham, William M

    2016-06-01

    Bacteria form surface-attached communities, known as biofilms, which are central to bacterial biology and how they affect us. Although surface-attached bacteria often experience strong chemical gradients, it remains unclear whether single cells can effectively perform chemotaxis on surfaces. Here we use microfluidic chemical gradients and massively parallel automated tracking to study the behavior of the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during early biofilm development. We show that individual cells can efficiently move toward chemoattractants using pili-based "twitching" motility and the Chp chemosensory system. Moreover, we discovered the behavioral mechanism underlying this surface chemotaxis: Cells reverse direction more frequently when moving away from chemoattractant sources. These corrective maneuvers are triggered rapidly, typically before a wayward cell has ventured a fraction of a micron. Our work shows that single bacteria can direct their motion with submicron precision and reveals the hidden potential for chemotaxis within bacterial biofilms. PMID:27222583

  20. Phenotypes of non-attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates resemble surface attached biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Alhede

    Full Text Available For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse conditions. However, microscopic investigations of samples isolated from sites of chronic infections seem to suggest that some bacteria do not need to be attached to surfaces in order to establish chronic infections. In this study we employed scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently of age, both aggregates and flow-cell biofilm had the same slow growth rate as a stationary phase shaking cultures. Internal structures of the aggregates matrix components and their capacity to survive otherwise lethal treatments with antibiotics (referred to as tolerance and resistance to phagocytes were also found to be strikingly similar to flow-cell biofilms. Our data indicate that the tolerance of both biofilms and non-attached aggregates towards antibiotics is reversible by physical disruption. We provide evidence that the antibiotic tolerance is likely to be dependent on both the physiological states of the aggregates and particular matrix components. Bacterial surface-attachment and subsequent biofilm formation are considered hallmarks of the capacity of microbes to cause persistent infections. We have observed non-attached aggregates in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients; otitis media; soft tissue fillers and non-healing wounds, and we propose that aggregated cells exhibit enhanced survival in the hostile host environment, compared with non

  1. The Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Inhibits Biofilm Development of Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Inaba, Tomohiro; Oura, Hiromu; Morinaga, Kana; Toyofuku, Masanori; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria often thrive in natural environments through a sessile mode of growth, known as the biofilm. Biofilms are well-structured communities and their formation is tightly regulated. However, the mechanisms by which interspecies interactions alter the formation of biofilms have not yet been elucidated in detail. We herein demonstrated that a quorum-sensing signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the Pseudomonas quinolone signal; PQS) inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans. Although t...

  2. A Phytoanticipin Derivative, Sodium Houttuyfonate, Induces in Vitro Synergistic Effects with Levofloxacin against Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has become the main deadly factor in infections, as bacteria can protect themselves by hiding in a self-constructed biofilm. Consequently, more attention is being paid to the search for “non-antibiotic drugs” to solve this problem. Phytoanticipins, the natural antibiotics from plants, could be a suitable alternative, but few works on this aspect have been reported. In this study, a preliminary study on the synergy between sodium houttuyfonate (SH and levofloxacin (LFX against the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was performed. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC of LFX and SH, anti-biofilm formation and synergistic effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and quantification of alginate were determined by the microdilution method, crystal violet (CV assay, checkerboard method, and hydroxybiphenyl colorimetry. The biofilm morphology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was observed by fluorescence microscope and scanning electric microscope (SEM. The results showed that: (i LFX and SH had an obvious synergistic effect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC values of 0.25 μg/mL and 128 μg/mL, respectively; (ii ½ × MIC SH combined with 2 × MIC LFX could suppress the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa effectively, with up to 73% inhibition; (iii the concentration of alginate decreased dramatically by a maximum of 92% after treatment with the combination of antibiotics; and (iv more dead cells by fluorescence microscope and more removal of extracellular polymeric structure (EPS by SEM were observed after the combined treatment of LFX and SH. Our experiments demonstrate the promising future of this potent antimicrobial agent against biofilm-associated infections.

  3. Synergistic Activities of an Efflux Pump Inhibitor and Iron Chelators against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth and Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Liang; Molin, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (PA beta N) was paired with iron chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl, acetohydroxamic acid, and EDTA to assess synergistic activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth and biofilm formation. All of the tested iron chelators synergistically...

  4. Next Generation Biofilm Inhibitors for Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Synthesis and Rational Design Approaches

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Majik, M.S.; Parvatkar, P.T.

    The bacterial biofilms and the emergence of multiple drug resistance have become a major threat for current medical treatment of nosocomial infections. It has been estimated that about 65-80% of microbial infections in the developed countries...

  5. Impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing on biofilm persistence in an in vivo intraperitoneal foreign-body infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise Dahl; Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Ø;

    2007-01-01

    growth contributes significantly to P. aeruginosa tolerance to the action of the innate and adaptive defence system and numerous antibiotics. In the present study, an in vivo foreign-body infection model was established in the peritoneal cavity of mice. Experimental data showed that QS-deficient P......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes chronic biofilm-based infections in host organisms. P. aeruginosa employs quorum sensing (QS) to control expression of its virulence, and to establish and maintain chronic infections. Under such conditions, the biofilm mode of...... the placebo-treated group. These results were obtained with both an inbred (BALB/c) and an outbred (NMRI) mouse strain. The present results support a model by which functional QS systems play a pivotal role in the ability of bacteria to resist clearing by the innate immune system and strongly suggest...

  6. Effects of crude plant extracts of Senecio calvus on biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian FLORIAN-CARRILLO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Senecio calvus, a traditional medicinal plant native of Peruvian Andes was used to evaluate its activity against biofilm formation. Crude extracts were tested against cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, two bacteria that use different signals of QS. Briefly, cultures in growth phase were mixed with crude extracts of aerial parts of S. calvus to determine the degree of inhibition of biofilms, subinhibitory concentrations were used where corresponded as previously established by a minimum inhibitory concentration test (MIC by microtitration method. Results indicate a mean inhibition of 92.9% and 76.4% in two of the extracts for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 55.5% as maximum mean inhibition percentage for Escherichia coli which indicates that Senecio calvus is a candidate for isolation of inhibitory molecules of biofilms.

  7. Effect of bacterial interference on biofilm development by Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno; Sabia, Carla; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Borella, Paola; Messi, Patrizia

    2008-12-01

    In the ecology of Legionella pneumophila a crucial role may be played by its relationship with the natural flora; thus we investigated the interactions between Legionella and other aquatic bacteria, particularly within biofilms. Among 80 aquatic bacteria screened for the production of bacteriocin-like substances (BLSs), 66.2% of them were active against L. pneumophila. The possible effect of some of these aquatic bacteria on the development and stability of L. pneumophila biofilms was studied. Pseudomonas fluorescens, the best BLS producer, showed the greatest negative effect on biofilm formation and strongly enhanced the detachment of Legionella. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Pseudomonas putida, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, although producing BLSs at different levels, were less active in the biofilm experiments. Acinetobacter lwoffii did not produce any antagonistic compound and was the only one able to strongly enhance L. pneumophila biofilm. Our results highlight that BLS production may contribute to determining the fate of L. pneumophila within ecological niches. The interactions observed in this study are important features of L. pneumophila ecology, which knowledge may lead to more effective measures to control the persistence of the germ in the environment. PMID:18769851

  8. Enzyme multilayer coatings inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on urinary catheters

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Kristina; Fernandes, Margarida M.; Mendoza, Ernest; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria use a signaling mechanism called quorum sensing (QS) to form complex communities of surface-attached cells known as biofilms. This protective mode of growth allows them to resist antibiotic treatment and originates the majority of hospital-acquired infections. Emerging alternatives to control biofilm-associated infections and multidrug resistance development interfere with bacterial QS pathways, exerting less selective pressure on bacterial population. In this study, biologically sta...

  9. Biofilms and Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Signaling: Lessons from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Martina; Filloux, Alain

    2016-06-10

    The cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) second messenger represents a signaling system that regulates many bacterial behaviors and is of key importance for driving the lifestyle switch between motile loner cells and biofilm formers. This review provides an up-to-date compendium of c-di-GMP pathways connected to biofilm formation, biofilm-associated motilities, and other functionalities in the ubiquitous and opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa This bacterium is frequently adopted as a model organism to study bacterial biofilm formation. Importantly, its versatility and adaptation capabilities are linked with a broad range of complex regulatory networks, including a large set of genes involved in c-di-GMP biosynthesis, degradation, and transmission. PMID:27129226

  10. Decreased Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on nanomodified endotracheal tubes: a dynamic lung model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Mary C; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious complication of mechanical ventilation that has been shown to be associated with increased mortality rates and medical costs in the pediatric intensive care unit. Currently, there is no cost-effective solution to the problems posed by VAP. Endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that are resistant to bacterial colonization and that inhibit biofilm formation could provide a novel solution to the problems posed by VAP. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate differences in the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on unmodified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ETTs and on ETTs etched with a fungal lipase, Rhizopus arrhizus, to create nanoscale surface features. These differences were evaluated using an in vitro model of the pediatric airway to simulate a ventilated patient in the pediatric intensive care unit. Each experiment was run for 24 hours and was supported by computational models of the ETT. Dynamic conditions within the ETT had an impact on the location of bacterial growth within the tube. These conditions also quantitatively affected bacterial growth especially within the areas of tube curvature. Most importantly, experiments in the in vitro model revealed a 2.7 log reduction in the number (colony forming units/mL) of P. aeruginosa on the nanoroughened ETTs compared to the untreated PVC ETTs after 24 hours. This reduction in total colony forming units/mL along the x-axis of the tube was similar to previous studies completed for Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, this dynamic study showed that lipase etching can create surface features of nanoscale roughness on PVC ETTs that decrease bacterial attachment of P. aeruginosa without the use of antibiotics and may provide clinicians with an effective and inexpensive tool to combat VAP. PMID:27563242

  11. Bifunctional silica nanoparticles for the exploration of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauline, L; Gressier, M; Roques, C; Hammer, P; Ribeiro, S J L; Caiut, J M A; Menu, M-J

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent silica nanoparticles are frequently employed for biotechnology applications mainly because of their easy functionalization, photo-stability, and biocompatibility. Bifunctional silica nanoparticles (BSNPs) are described here as new efficient tools for investigating complex biological systems such as biofilms. Photoluminescence is brought about by the incorporation of a silylated ruthenium(II) complex. The surface properties of the silica particles were designed by reaction with amino-organosilanes, quaternary ammonium-organosilanes, carboxylate-organosilanes and hexamethyldisilazane. BSNPs were characterized extensively by DRIFT, (13)C and (29)Si solid state NMR, XPS, and photoluminescence. Zeta potential and contact angle measurements exhibited various surface properties (hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance and electric charge) according to the functional groups. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) measurements showed that the spatial distribution of these nanoparticles inside a biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 depends more on their hydrophilic/hydrophobic characteristics than on their size. CLSM observations using two nanosized particles (25 and 68 nm) suggest that narrow diffusion paths exist through the extracellular polymeric substances matrix. PMID:23805884

  12. Efficacy of different carrier gases for barrier discharge plasma generation compared to chlorhexidine on the survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in biofilm in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, R; Hübner, N-O; Bender, C; Koban, I; Horn, S; Bekeschus, S; Weltmann, K-D; Kocher, T; Kramer, A; Assadian, O

    2014-01-01

    Because of its antimicrobial properties, nonthermal plasma could serve as an alternative to chemical antisepsis in wound treatment. Therefore, this study investigated the inactivation of biofilm-embedded Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG81 by a surface barrier-discharged (SBD) plasma for 30, 60, 150 and 300 s. In order to optimize the efficacy of the plasma, different carrier gases (argon, argon admixed with 1% oxygen, and argon with increased humidity up to approx. 80%) were tested and compared against 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) exposure for 600 s. The antimicrobial efficacy was determined by calculating the difference between the numbers of colony-forming units (CFU) of treated and untreated biofilms. Living bacteria were distinguished from dead by fluorescent staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both SBD plasmas and CHG showed significant antimicrobial effects compared to the untreated control. However, plasma treatment led to a higher antimicrobial reduction (argon plasma 4.9 log10 CFU/cm(2), argon with admixed oxygen 3 log10 CFU/cm(2), and with increased gas humidity 2.7 log10 CFU/cm(2) after 300 s) compared to CHG. In conclusion, SBD plasma is suitable as an alternative to CHG for inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in biofilm. Further development of SBD plasma sources and research on the role of carrier gases and humidity may allow their clinical application for wound management in the future. PMID:24434726

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outcompetes other bacteria in the manifestation and maintenance of a biofilm in polyvinylchloride tubing as used in dental devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Christoph Gert; Nagl, Markus; Nogler, Michael; Coraça-Huber, Débora Cristina

    2016-05-01

    In a PVC tube as a model system for dental devices, Pseudomonas aeruginosa outcompetes Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae for the biofilm formation. P. aeruginosa has advantage over the other strains due to higher tolerance for low-nutrient situations or direct killing by the production of soluble factors like pyocyanin. PMID:26980595

  14. Macrolides decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of anti-pseudomonal agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients in biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Larissa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofilm production is an important mechanism for bacterial survival and its association with antimicrobial resistance represents a challenge for the patient treatment. In this study we evaluated the in vitro action of macrolides in combination with anti-pseudomonal agents on biofilm-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered from cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Results A total of 64 isolates were analysed. The biofilm inhibitory concentration (BIC results were consistently higher than those obtained by the conventional method, minimal inhibitory concentration, (MIC for most anti-pseudomonal agents tested (ceftazidime: P = 0.001, tobramycin: P = 0.001, imipenem: P P = 0.005. When macrolides were associated with the anti-pseudomonal agents, the BIC values were reduced significantly for ceftazidime (P  0.001 and tobramycin (P  0.001, regardless the concentration of macrolides. Strong inhibitory quotient was observed when azithromycin at 8 mg/L was associated with all anti-pseudomonal agents tested in biofilm conditions. Conclusions P. aeruginosa from CF patients within biofilms are highly resistant to antibiotics but macrolides proved to augment the in vitro activity of anti-pseudomonal agents.

  15. Potential novel therapeutic strategies in cystic fibrosis: antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity of natural and designed α-helical peptides against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pompilio Arianna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of cystic fibrosis-associated lung infections is hampered by the presence of multi-drug resistant pathogens, many of which are also strong biofilm producers. Antimicrobial peptides, essential components of innate immunity in humans and animals, exhibit relevant in vitro antimicrobial activity although they tend not to select for resistant strains. Results Three α-helical antimicrobial peptides, BMAP-27 and BMAP-28 of bovine origin, and the artificial P19(9/B peptide were tested, comparatively to Tobramycin, for their in vitro antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity against 15 Staphylococcus aureus, 25 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 27 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains from cystic fibrosis patients. All assays were carried out in physical-chemical experimental conditions simulating a cystic fibrosis lung. All peptides showed a potent and rapid bactericidal activity against most P. aeruginosa, S. maltophilia and S. aureus strains tested, at levels generally higher than those exhibited by Tobramycin and significantly reduced biofilm formation of all the bacterial species tested, although less effectively than Tobramycin did. On the contrary, the viability-reducing activity of antimicrobial peptides against preformed P. aeruginosa biofilms was comparable to and, in some cases, higher than that showed by Tobramycin. Conclusions The activity shown by α-helical peptides against planktonic and biofilm cells makes them promising “lead compounds” for future development of novel drugs for therapeutic treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease.

  16. Development of a simplified biofilm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sushovan; Mazumder, Debabrata

    2015-11-01

    A simplified approach for analyzing the biofilm process in deriving an easy model has been presented. This simplified biofilm model formulated correlations between substrate concentration in the influent/effluent and at biofilm-liquid interface along with substrate flux and biofilm thickness. The model essentially considered the external mass transport according to Fick's Law, steady state substrate as well as biomass balance for attached growth microorganisms. In substrate utilization, Monod growth kinetics has been followed incorporating relevant boundary conditions at the liquid-biofilm interface and at the attachment surface. The numerical solution of equations was accomplished using Runge-Kutta method and accordingly an integrated computer program was developed. The model has been successfully applied in a distinct set of trials with varying range of representative input variables. The model performance was compared with available existing methods and it was found an easy, accurate method that can be used for process design of biofilm reactor.

  17. Assessment of the working range and effect of sodium dichloroisocyanurate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Nicolae, Alexandru M; Laursen, Andrew E; Foucher, Daniel A; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Hausner, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) is a chemical agent that acts against microorganisms in a manner similar to that of sodium hypochlorite by releasing free available chlorine. NaDCC has been approved by the WHO for the emergency treatment of water and by the US EPA for routine treatment of water. Previous studies assessing the effectiveness of NaDCC for the treatment of water implied that NaDCC should have a wide array of disinfecting effects beyond the treatment of planktonic cells in potable water. In this study the biocidal effects of NaDCC against Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in different growth modes including planktonic cells and biofilms were explored. The data showed that a 60% dilution of the standard NaDCC solution was effective in the treatment of both P. aeruginosa planktonic cells and biofilms. PMID:22263660

  18. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of Tyrosine Phosphatase Related to Biofilm Formation A (TpbA) from the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Kun Xu; Shanshan Li; Wen Yang; Kan Li; Yuwei Bai; Yueyang Xu; Jin Jin; Yingying Wang; Mark Bartlam

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are important for cell communication and growth in most bacteria, and are responsible for a number of human clinical infections and diseases. TpbA (PA3885) is a dual specific tyrosine phosphatase (DUSP) that negatively regulates biofilm formation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by converting extracellular quorum sensing signals into internal gene cascade reactions that result in reduced biofilm formation. We have determined the three-dimensional crystal stru...

  19. Delivery of tobramycin coupled to iron oxide nanoparticles across the biofilm of mucoidal Pseudonomas aeruginosa and investigation of its efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Kopciuch, Michael; Olszá½¹wka, Zuzia; Wawrzyniec, Stephen J.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Plumley, John B.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Huber, Dale L.; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterium is a deadly pathogen, leading to respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis and nosocomial pneumonia, and responsible for high mortality rates in these diseases. P. aeruginosa has inherent as well as acquired resistance to many drug classes. In this paper, we investigate the effectiveness of two classes; aminoglycoside (tobramycin) and fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin) administered alone, as well as conjugated to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles. P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to quickly alter its genetics to impart resistance to the presence of new, unrecognized treatments. As a response to this impending public health threat, we have synthesized and characterized magnetite nanoparticles capped with biodegradable short-chain carboxylic acid derivatives conjugated to common antibiotic drugs. The functionalized nanoparticles may carry the drug past the mucus and biofilm layers to target the bacterial colonies via magnetic gradient-guided transport. Additionally, the magnetic ferrofluid may be used under application of an oscillating magnetic field to raise the local temperature, causing biofilm disruption, slowed growth, and mechanical disruption. These abilities of the ferrofluid would also treat multi-drug resistant strains, which appear to be increasing in many nosocomial as well as acquired opportunistic infections. In this in vitro model, we show that the iron oxide alone can also inhibit bacterial growth and biofilm formation.

  20. Influence of clove oil on certain quorum-sensing-regulated functions and biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fohad Mabood Husain; Iqbal Ahmad; Mohammad Asif; Qudsia Tahseen

    2013-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence, biofilm formation and survival of many pathogenic bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This signalling pathway is considered as novel and promising target for anti-infective agents. In the present investigation, effect of the Sub-MICs of clove oil on QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation was evaluated against P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF-38 strain. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of the clove oil demonstrated statistically significant reduction of las- and rhl-regulated virulence factors such as LasB, total protease, chitinase and pyocyanin production, swimming motility and exopolysaccharide production. The biofilm forming capability of PAO1 and A. hydrophila WAF-38 was also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner at all tested sub-MIC values. Further, the PAO1-preinfected Caenorhabditis elegans displayed an enhanced survival when treated with 1.6% v/v of clove oil. The above findings highlight the promising anti-QS-dependent therapeutic function of clove oil against P. aeruginosa.

  1. Candida albicans ethanol stimulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa WspR-controlled biofilm formation as part of a cyclic relationship involving phenazines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie I Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In chronic infections, pathogens are often in the presence of other microbial species. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common and detrimental lung pathogen in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF and co-infections with Candida albicans are common. Here, we show that P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and phenazine production were strongly influenced by ethanol produced by the fungus C. albicans. Ethanol stimulated phenotypes that are indicative of increased levels of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP, and levels of c-di-GMP were 2-fold higher in the presence of ethanol. Through a genetic screen, we found that the diguanylate cyclase WspR was required for ethanol stimulation of c-di-GMP. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that ethanol stimulates WspR signaling through its cognate sensor WspA, and promotes WspR-dependent activation of Pel exopolysaccharide production, which contributes to biofilm maturation. We also found that ethanol stimulation of WspR promoted P. aeruginosa colonization of CF airway epithelial cells. P. aeruginosa production of phenazines occurs both in the CF lung and in culture, and phenazines enhance ethanol production by C. albicans. Using a C. albicans adh1/adh1 mutant with decreased ethanol production, we found that fungal ethanol strongly altered the spectrum of P. aeruginosa phenazines in favor of those that are most effective against fungi. Thus, a feedback cycle comprised of ethanol and phenazines drives this polymicrobial interaction, and these relationships may provide insight into why co-infection with both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans has been associated with worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis.

  2. The antimicrobial action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa byproducts in the control of single and mixed biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Susana Patrícia; Machado, Idalina; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2010-01-01

    Since bacteria are continuously acquiring resistance to conventional chemical agents, it is urgently needed the development of new strategies for biofilm control. It is well recognised that certain microorganisms represent an important source of novel biologically active compounds, with pronounced antibacterial activity, as secondary metabolites. Such substances are accepted to be essential for their producers, inhibiting other bacteria that compete for common resource...

  3. Quorum quenching activity in cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria isolated from Pterocarpus santalinus Linn., and its effect on quorum sensing regulated biofilm in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P S; Ravishankar Rai, V

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing mechanism allows the microorganisms to resist the antibiotic treatment by forming biofilms. Quorum quenching is one of the mechanisms to control the development of drug resistance in microbes. Endophyte bacteria are beneficial to plant growth as they support the immune system against the pathogen attack. The endophytic bacteria present in Pterocarpus santalinus were screened for the presence of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) degrading bacteria using biosensor strains and further confirmed by quantifying the violacein production. Cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria, Bacillus firmus PT18 and Enterobacter asburiae PT39 exhibited potent AHL degrading ability by inhibiting about 80% violacein production in biosensor strain. Furthermore, when the cell-free lysate was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PAO1-JP2 biofilm it resulted in significant (p<0.01) inhibition of biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition was confirmed by visualization of biofilm slides under fluorescence microscopy, which showed decrease in total biomass formation in treated slides. Isolation and amplification of the gene (aiiA) indicated that the presence of AHL lactonase in cell-free lysate and sequence alignment indicated that AiiA contains a "HXHXDH" zinc-binding motif that is being conserved in several groups of metallohydrolases. Therefore, the study shows the potential of AHLs degradation by AHL lactonase present in cell-free lysate of isolated endophytic bacteria and inhibition of quorum sensing regulated biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:24268182

  4. The Study of Synergistic Effects of n.butanolic Cyclamen coum Extract and Ciprofloxacin on inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ahya abdi ali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm are the major causes of death in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. Some studies revealed that biofilms are resistant to several antibiotics because of their impermeable structures. In order to re-sensitize bacteria to different antibiotics, biofilm formation should be inhibited. In this research, evaluation of antibiofilm activity of n-butanolic Cyclamen coum extract as a medici­nal plant from Myrsinaceae family, in combination with ciprofloxacin was carried out.   Materials and method s: The biofilm formation ability by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and one clinically isolated P. aeruginosa (PA214 was confirmed by microtiter plate method. Extraction of the tubers of Cyclamen coum was done by fractionation method . The antibiofilm and antibacterial properties of n-butanolic C. coum extract (which includes saponin compounds alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin by using microdilution and crystal violet methods were examined. The cytotoxicity effect of the n-butanolic extract on HT-29 cells was assayed by MTT (3- (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl -2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide test.   Results : The biofilm formation ability by P. aeruginosa strains was quantitatively confirmed. Saponin content of the n-butanolic C.coum extract was 156 µg/mL. The extract revealed antibacterial activity against the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa strains. The combination of n-butanolic C.coum extract and ciprofloxacin significantly inhibited P.aeruginosa biofilm formation (ΣFBIC = 0.5. The n-butanolic C.coum extract showed insignificant cytotoxic effect against HT-29 human cancer cell line after 48 hours and 72 hours incubation .   Discussion and conclusion : It can be concluded that n-butanolic C.coum extract in combination with ciprofloxacin significantly revealed antibiofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilm however, further clinical investigations are required.

  5. Antibiotic penetration and bacterial killing in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Bao; Christophersen, Lars; Thomsen, Kim;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Treating biofilm infections successfully is a challenge. We hypothesized that biofilms may be considered as independent compartments with particular pharmacokinetics. We therefore studied the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of tobramycin in a seaweed alginate-embedded biofilm mo...

  6. 黄芩苷对铜绿假单胞菌生物膜的影响%Effect of Baicalin on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Biofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王贵年; 范莹; 王龙梓; 吴娟

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of baicalin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro. Methods Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cuhured in Luria - Bertani medium - aspirate sputum pipe system to establish biofilm formation. Biofilm was observed in AgNO3 staining. Viable bacterial counts were determined by serial dilution. MICs were measured by doubling dilution.Results The biofilm was inhibited and destructed by 15. 65mg/L of baicalin. Conclusion Baicalin displayed potent activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.%目的 研究黄芩苷对体外铜绿假单胞菌(pseudomonas aeruginosa,Pa)生物膜(biofilm,BF)的影响.方法 选取临床分离呼吸道Pa,采用LB肉汤-吸痰管系统培养BF,建立体外BF模型,银染法观察BF变化.将黄芩苷作用于BF,连续稀释法进行活菌计数,微量稀释法测定最低抑菌浓度(MIC).结果 15.65mg/L的黄芩苷即可抑制和破坏BF.结论 黄芩苷对体外铜绿假单胞菌生物膜有较强的抑制作用.

  7. Phage ΦPan70, a Putative Temperate Phage, Controls Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Planktonic, Biofilm and Burn Mouse Model Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela V. Holguín

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the Multi-Drug-Resistant organisms most frequently isolated worldwide and, because of a shortage of new antibiotics, bacteriophages are considered an alternative for its treatment. Previously, P. aeruginosa phages were isolated and best candidates were chosen based on their ability to form clear plaques and their host range. This work aimed to characterize one of those phages, ΦPan70, preliminarily identified as a good candidate for phage-therapy. We performed infection curves, biofilm removal assays, transmission-electron-microscopy, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis, and studied the in vivo ΦPan70 biological activity in the burned mouse model. ΦPan70 was classified as a member of the Myoviridae family and, in both planktonic cells and biofilms, was responsible for a significant reduction in the bacterial population. The burned mouse model showed an animal survival between 80% and 100%, significantly different from the control animals (0%. However, analysis of the ΦPan70 genome revealed that it was 64% identical to F10, a temperate P. aeruginosa phage. Gene annotation indicated ΦPan70 as a new, but possible temperate phage, therefore not ideal for phage-therapy. Based on this, we recommend genome sequence analysis as an early step to select candidate phages for potential application in phage-therapy, before entering into a more intensive characterization.

  8. Development of resistance to chemical disinfection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchin, George L.

    1999-01-01

    Two long-term experiments have been conducted aboard the Mir Space Station to evaluate the development of resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chemical disinfection by polyiodide quaternary ammonium strong base resin disinfectants. The first preliminary experiment was launched aboard STS 79 and a second more extensive experiment aboard STS 86. During both experiments, after two months in a microgravity environment, aqueous suspensions of P. aeruginosa contained viable bacteria after having the iodinated resin added to them. In the second experiment identical ground based controls did not exhibit a similar phenomenon. Also in the second experiment, individual colonies from the surviving bacteria were evaluated for resistance to aqueous iodine disinfection. Compared to individual colonies from the original inoculum no resistance was observed. The data are consistent with slow development of a resistant biofilm in the bacterial suspensions flown aboard the Mir Space Station.

  9. Bioguided Fractionation Shows Cassia alata Extract to Inhibit Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Takashi Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant extracts have a long history to be used in folk medicine. Cassia alata extracts are known to exert antibacterial activity but details on compounds and mechanism of action remain poorly explored. We purified and concentrated the aqueous leaf extract of C. alata by reverse phase-solid phase extraction and screened the resulting CaRP extract for antimicrobial activity. CaRP extract exhibited antimicrobial activity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, and Bacillus subtilis. CaRP also inhibited biofilm formation of S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa. Several bacterial growth-inhibiting compounds were detected when CaRP extract was fractionated by TLC chromatography coupled to bioautography agar overlay technique. HPLC chromatography of CaRP extract yielded 20 subfractions that were tested by bioautography for antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Five bioactive fractions were detected and chemically characterized, using high-resolution mass spectrometry (qTOF-MS/MS. Six compounds from four fractions could be characterized as kaempferol, kaempferol-O-diglucoside, kaempferol-O-glucoside, quercetin-O-glucoside, rhein, and danthron. In the Salmonella/microsome assay CaRP showed weak mutagenicity (MI<3 only in strain TA98, pointing to a frameshift mutation activity. These results indicate that C. alata leaf extract contains a minimum of 7 compounds with antimicrobial activity and that these together or as single substance are active in preventing formation of bacterial biofilm, indicating potential for therapeutic applications.

  10. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produ...

  11. The composition and compression of biofilms developed on ultrafiltration membranes determine hydraulic biofilm resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlon, Nicolas; Grütter, Alexander; Brandenberger, Fabienne; Sutter, Anja; Kuhlicke, Ute; Neu, Thomas R; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at identifying how to improve the level of permeate flux stabilisation during gravity-driven membrane filtration without control of biofilm formation. The focus was therefore on understanding (i) how the different fractions of the biofilms (inorganics particles, bacterial cells, EPS matrix) influence its hydraulic resistance and (ii) how the compression of biofilms impacts its hydraulic resistance, i.e., can water head be increased to increase the level of permeate flux stabilisation. Biofilms were developed on ultrafiltration membranes at 88 and 284 cm water heads with dead-end filtration for around 50 days. A larger water head resulted in a smaller biofilm permeability (150 and 50 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for biofilms grown at 88 cm and 284 cm water head, respectively). Biofilms were mainly composed of EPS (>90% in volume). The comparison of the hydraulic resistances of biofilms to model fouling layers indicated that most of the hydraulic resistance is due to the EPS matrix. The compressibility of the biofilm was also evaluated by subjecting the biofilms to short-term (few minutes) and long-term variations of transmembrane pressures (TMP). A sudden change of TMP resulted in an instantaneous and reversible change of biofilm hydraulic resistance. A long-term change of TMP induced a slow change in the biofilm hydraulic resistance. Our results demonstrate that the response of biofilms to a TMP change has two components: an immediate variation of resistance (due to compression/relaxation) and a long-term response (linked to biofilm adaptation/growth). Our results provide relevant information about the relationship between the operating conditions in terms of TMP, the biofilm structure and composition and the resulting biofilm hydraulic resistance. These findings have practical implications for a broad range of membrane systems. PMID:27318448

  12. Molecular basis of in-vivo biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Otto, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are involved in a multitude of serious chronic infections. In recent years, modeling biofilm infection in vitro led to the identification of microbial determinants governing biofilm development. However, we lack information as to whether biofilm formation mechanisms identified in vitro have relevance for biofilm-associated infection. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation using staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to illustrate key points, as their bi...

  13. Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Foreign-Body Biofilm Infections through Reduction of the Cyclic Di-GMP Level in the Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise D.; van Gennip, Maria; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Wu, Hong; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Alhede, Morten; Høiby, Niels; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2013-01-01

    be used for biofilm control in vivo. We constructed a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in which a reduction in the c-di-GMP level can be achieved via induction of the Escherichia coli YhjH c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. Initial experiments showed that induction of yhjH expression led to dispersal of the...

  14. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of Tyrosine Phosphatase related to Biofilm formation A (TpbA) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Koveal, Dorothy; Jayasundera, Thusitha B.; Wood, Thomas K.; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the Tyrosine Phosphatase related to Biofilm formation A (TpbA) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been determined based on triple-resonance experiments using uniformly [13C,15N]-labeled protein. This assignment is the first step towards the determination of the 3-dimensional structure of TpbA.

  15. The effects of hyperosmosis or high pH on a dual-species biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa : an in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, S. V.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Ozok, A. R.; Exterkate, R. A. M.; van Marle, J.; Wesselink, P. R.; de Soet, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    van der Waal SV, van der Sluis LWM, Ozok AR, Exterkate RAM, van Marle J, Wesselink PR, de Soet JJ. The effects of hyperosmosis or high pH on a dual-species biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an in vitro study. International Endodontic Journal, 44, 11101117, 2011. Aim To inv

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Fiandaca, Mark J; Pedersen, Jette; Hansen, Christine Rønne; Andersen, Claus Bøgelund; Pressler, Tacjana; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels

    2009-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the appearance and location of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung and in sputum. Samples include preserved tissues of CF patients who died due to chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection prior to the advent of intensive antibiotic...

  17. Immobilization of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NY3 and their application in the removal of hydrocarbons from highly concentrated oil-containing wastewater on the laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Maiqian; Nie, Hongyun; He, Meili; Lin, Yingying; Wang, Lei; Jin, Pengkang; Zhang, SenYuan

    2016-05-15

    To explore the potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NY3 for the treatment of highly concentrated crude oil-contaminated water, the immobilization of strain NY3 on the surface of polyurethane foam (PUF), the conditions for using these biofilms and the possibility of recovering the used biofilms were studied. The results demonstrated that the biofilm formation process for strain NY3 was quick and easy. Under optimum conditions, the biomass immobilized on the PUF surface could reach 488.32 mg dry cell/g dry PUF. The results demonstrated that when the degradation time was 12 h, the average oil removal rate in 2 g crude oil/L contaminated water was approximately 90% for 40d. Meanwhile, the biofilms could be recovered for reuse. The recovery ability and the high and steady oil removal rate facilitated the application of the biofilms for the removal of concentrated oil from wastewater. PMID:26963906

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses type III secretion system to kill biofilm-associated amoebae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Carsten; Moreno, Ana Maria; Alhede, Morten;

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria and protozoa coexist in a wide range of biofilm communities of natural, technical and medical importance. Generally, this interaction is characterized by the extensive grazing activity of protozoa on bacterial prey populations. We hypothesized that the close spatial coexistence in biofilms...... findings suggest that conserved virulence pathways and specifically the T3SS play a central role in bacteria- protozoa interactions in biofilms and may be instrumental for the environmental persistence and evolution of opportunistic bacterial pathogens....

  19. Liquid Flow in Biofilm Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Stoodley, Paul; deBeer, Dirk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    1994-01-01

    A model biofilm consisting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Klebsiella pneumoniae was developed to study the relationships between structural heterogeneity and hydrodynamics. Local fluid velocity in the biofilm system was measured by a noninvasive method of particle image velocimetry, using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Velocity profiles were measured in conduit and porous medium reactors in the presence and absence of biofilm. Liquid flow was observed within biof...

  20. Development of biofilm-targeted antimicrobial wound dressing for the treatment of chronic wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shiow-Fern; Leow, Hon-Lunn

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that microbial biofilms are largely responsible for the recalcitrance of many wound infections to conventional antibiotics. It was proposed that the efficacy of antibiotics could be optimized via the inhibition of bacterial biofilm growth in wounds. The combination of antibiofilm agent and antibiotics into a wound dressing may be a plausible strategy in wound infection management. Xylitol is an antibiofilm agent that has been shown to inhibit the biofilm formation. The purpose of this study was to develop an alginate film containing xylitol and gentamicin for the treatment of wound infection. Three films, i.e. blank alginate film (SA), alginate film with xylitol (F5) and alginate film with xylitol and gentamicin (AG), were prepared. The films were studied for their physical properties, swelling ratio, moisture absorption, moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR), mechanical and rheology properties, drug content uniformity as well as in vitro drug release properties. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm in vitro studies on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were also performed. The results showed that AG demonstrates superior mechanical properties, rheological properties and a higher MVTR compared with SA and F5. The drug flux of AG was higher than that of commercial gentamicin cream. Furthermore, antimicrobial studies showed that AG is effective against both S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, and the antibiofilm assays demonstrated that the combination was effective against biofilm bacteria. In summary, alginate films containing xylitol and gentamicin may potentially be used as new dressings for the treatment of wound infection. PMID:25758412

  1. Synergistic effect of membrane-active peptides polymyxin B and gramicidin S on multidrug-resistant strains and biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berditsch, Marina; Jäger, Thomas; Strempel, Nikola; Schwartz, Thomas; Overhage, Jörg; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of severe hospital-acquired infections. Currently, polymyxin B (PMB) is a last-resort antibiotic for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, despite its undesirable side effects. The delivery of drug combinations has been shown to reduce the required therapeutic doses of antibacterial agents and thereby their toxicity if a synergistic effect is present. In this study, we investigated the synergy between two cyclic antimicrobial peptides, PMB and gramicidin S (GS), against different P. aeruginosa isolates, using a quantitative checkerboard assay with resazurin as a growth indicator. Among the 28 strains that we studied, 20 strains showed a distinct synergistic effect, represented by a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of ≤0.5. Remarkably, several clinical P. aeruginosa isolates that grew as small-colony variants revealed a nonsynergistic effect, as indicated by FICIs between >0.5 and ≤0.70. In addition to inhibiting the growth of planktonic bacteria, the peptide combinations significantly decreased static biofilm growth compared with treatment with the individual peptides. There was also a faster and more prolonged effect when the combination of PMB and GS was used compared with single-peptide treatments on the metabolic activity of pregrown biofilms. The results of the present study define a synergistic interaction between two cyclic membrane-active peptides toward 17 multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa and biofilms of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. Thus, the application of PMB and GS in combination is a promising option for a topical medication and in the prevention of acute and chronic infections caused by multidrug-resistant or biofilm-forming P. aeruginosa. PMID:26077259

  2. Disrupting the mixed-species biofilm of Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO using bacteriophages alone or in combination with xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhibber, Sanjay; Bansal, Shruti; Kaur, Sukhmandir

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the potential of bacteriophages alone as well as in combination with xylitol for tackling mixed-species biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. When mixed-species biofilm was established on polycarbonate discs, P. aeruginosa formed the base layer which was physically shielded on the top by K. pneumoniae. Thereafter, mixed-species biofilm was treated with bacteriophages. K. pneumoniae-specific depolymerase-producing phage KPO1K2 caused significant reduction in the count of Klebsiella. In contrast, P. aeruginosa-specific non-depolymerase-producing phage Pa29 failed to cause any reduction in the count of Pseudomonas. However, application of both phages together resulted in significant reduction in the count of both organisms. This suggests that depolymerase produced by phage KPO1K2 hydrolysed the top layer of K. pneumoniae and guided the entry of Pa29 to reach P. aeruginosa lying underneath. This phenomenon was confirmed when K. pneumoniae-specific non-depolymerase-producing phage NDP was used along with Pa29. Pa29 could not penetrate and reach its host bacterium. Xylitol worked synergistically along with the phage, resulting in a significant decrease in counts of both organisms. Disruption of mixed species biofilm by phage and xylitol was confirmed on the basis of the amount of protein and DNA released. This phage-based approach to altering the structural pattern and disrupting the mixed species biofilm is the first of its kind. It can be used as a topical application, a coating for foreign bodies or for aerosol delivery to tackle infections where both pathogens coexist in a biofilm mode. PMID:25922418

  3. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa CreBC two-component system plays a major role in the response to β-lactams, fitness, biofilm growth, and global regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, Laura; Moyà, Bartolomé; Juan, Carlos; Mulet, Xavier; Blázquez, Jesús; Oliver, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous versatile environmental microorganism with a remarkable ability to grow under diverse environmental conditions. Moreover, P. aeruginosa is responsible for life-threatening infections in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis patients, as the extraordinary capacity of this pathogen to develop antimicrobial resistance dramatically limits our therapeutic arsenal. Its large genome carries an outstanding number of genes belonging to regulatory systems, including multiple two-component sensor-regulator systems that modulate the response to the different environmental stimuli. Here, we show that one of two systems, designated CreBC (carbon source responsive) and BlrAB (β-lactam resistance), might be of particular relevance. We first identified the stimuli triggering the activation of the CreBC system, which specifically responds to penicillin-binding protein 4 (PBP4) inhibition by certain β-lactam antibiotics. Second, through an analysis of a large comprehensive collection of mutants, we demonstrate an intricate interconnection between the CreBC system, the peptidoglycan recycling pathway, and the expression of the concerning chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC. Third, we show that the CreBC system, and particularly its effector inner membrane protein CreD, plays a major role in bacterial fitness and biofilm development, especially in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of β-lactams. Finally, global transcriptomics reveals broad regulatory functions of CreBC in basic physiological aspects, particularly anaerobic respiration, in both the presence and absence of antibiotics. Therefore, the CreBC system is envisaged as a potentially interesting target for improving the efficacy of β-lactams against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:24936599

  4. The inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by micafungin and the enhancement of antimicrobial agent effectiveness in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoyan, Kohar Annie B; Bazzi, Wael; Hadi, Usamah; Matar, Ghassan M

    2016-08-01

    Micafungin inhibits biofilm formation by impeding 1,3-β-D-glucan synthesis in Candida albicans. Since Pseudomonas aeruginosa also has 1,3-β-D-glucan in its cell wall, this study assessed the effects of antibacterial agents in vitro and in vivo on micafungin-treated biofilm-forming P. aeruginosa isolates. After treatment with micafungin as well as with a panel of four antibacterial agents, biofilm production was significantly reduced as measured by spectrophotometry. The relative mRNA transcription levels for the genes encoding pellicles (pelC) and cell wall 1,3-β-D-glucan (ndvB), which were measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), significantly decreased with micafungin treatment. In vivo, the survival rates of P. aeruginosa-infected BALB/c mice significantly increased after combined treatment with micafungin and each of the antibacterial agents. Of these treatments, the combination of micafungin with levofloxacin had the highest survival rate; this combination was the most effective treatment against P. aeruginosa-induced infection. PMID:27347641

  5. Efflux as a Glutaraldehyde Resistance Mechanism in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Vikram, Amit; Jennifer M Bomberger; Kyle J Bibby

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in microbial biofilm control is biocide resistance. Phenotypic adaptations and physical protective effects have been historically thought to be the primary mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance in bacterial biofilms. Recent studies indicate the presence of genetic mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance, but very little is known about the contributory genetic factors. Here, we demonstrate that efflux pumps contribute to glutaraldehyde resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescen...

  6. Antimicrobial dressing efficacy against mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm on porcine skin explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Priscilla L; Yang, Qingping; Davis, Stephen; Sampson, Edith M; Azeke, John I; Hamad, Afifa; Schultz, Gregory S

    2015-08-01

    An ex vivo porcine skin explant biofilm model that preserves key properties of biofilm attached to skin at different levels of maturity (0-3 days) was used to assess the efficacy of commercially available antimicrobial dressings and topical treatments. Assays were also performed on the subpopulation of antibiotic tolerant biofilm generated by 24 hours of pre-treatment with gentamicin (120× minimal inhibitory concentration) prior to agent exposure. Five types of antimicrobial agents (iodine, silver, polyhexamethylene biguanide, honey and ethanol) and four types of moisture dressings (cotton gauze, sodium carboxymethylcellulose fibre, calcium alginate fibre and cadexomer beads) were assessed. Time-release silver gel and cadexomer iodine dressings were the most effective in reducing mature biofilm [between 5 and 7 logarithmic (log) of 7-log total], whereas all other dressing formulations reduced biofilm between 0·3 and 2 log in 24 or 72 hours with a single exposure. Similar results were found after 24-hour exposure to silver release dressings using an in vivo pig burn wound model, demonstrating correlation between the ex vivo and in vivo models. Results of this study indicate that commonly used microbicidal wound dressings vary widely in their ability to kill mature biofilm and the efficacy is influenced by time of exposure, number of applications, moisture level and agent formulation (sustained release). PMID:24028432

  7. Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid Promotes Bacterial Biofilm Development via Ferrous Iron Acquisition▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yun; Wilks, Jessica C.; Danhorn, Thomas; Ramos, Itzel; Croal, Laura; Newman, Dianne K.

    2011-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms, which render it more resistant to antimicrobial agents. Levels of iron in excess of what is required for planktonic growth have been shown to promote biofilm formation, and therapies that interfere with ferric iron [Fe(III)] uptake combined with antibiotics may help treat P. aeruginosa infections. However, use of these therapies presumes that iron is in the Fe(III) state in the context of infection. Here we report the ability o...

  8. Expression of Fap amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, and P. putida results in aggregation and increased biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten S.; Søndergaard, Mads T; Nilsson, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    The fap operon, encoding functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap), is present in most pseudomonads, but so far the expression and importance for biofilm formation has only been investigated for P. fluorescens strain UK4. In this study, we demonstrate the capacity of P. aeruginosa PAO1, P. fluorescens...... Pf-5, and P. putida F1 to express Fap fibrils, and investigated the effect of Fap expression on aggregation and biofilm formation. The fap operon in all three Pseudomonas species conferred the ability to express Fap fibrils as shown using a recombinant approach. This Fap overexpression consistently...

  9. The chemical digestion of Ti6Al7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting reduces significantly ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam F; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Secewicz, Anna; Pawlak, Andrzej; Smutnicka, Danuta; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we reported the impact of hydrofluoric and nitric acid used for chemical polishing of Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds on decrease of the number of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm forming cells. Herein, we tested impact of the aforementioned substances on biofilm of Gram-negative microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, dangerous pathogen responsible for plethora of implant-related infections. The Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds were manufactured using Selective Laser Melting method. Scaffolds were subjected to chemical polishing using a mixture of nitric acid and fluoride or left intact (control group). Pseudomonal biofilm was allowed to form on scaffolds for 24 hours and was removed by mechanical vortex shaking. The number of pseudomonal cells was estimated by means of quantitative culture and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The presence of nitric acid and fluoride on scaffold surfaces was assessed by means of IR and rentgen spetorscopy. Quantitative data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test (P ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that application of chemical polishing correlates with significant drop of biofilm-forming pseudomonal cells on the manufactured Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds ( p = 0.0133, Mann-Whitney test) compared to the number of biofilm-forming cells on non-polished scaffolds. As X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of fluoride and nitrogen on the surface of scaffold, we speculate that drop of biofilm forming cells may be caused by biofilm-supressing activity of these two elements. PMID:27150429

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and slime excretion on antibiotic-loaded bone cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neut, D; Hendriks, JGE; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Background Infection is an infrequent but serious complication of prosthetic joint surgery. These infections will usually not clear until the implant is removed and re-implantation has a high failure rate, especially when Pseudomonas aeruginosa is involved. Material and methods We examined Pseudomon

  11. Phenotypes of Non-Attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa Aggregates Resemble Surface Attached Biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    physiological states of the aggregates and particular matrix components. Bacterial surface-attachment and subsequent biofilm formation are considered hallmarks of the capacity of microbes to cause persistent infections. We have observed non-attached aggregates in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients; otitis......For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse...... age, both aggregates and flow-cell biofilm had the same slow growth rate as a stationary phase shaking cultures. Internal structures of the aggregates matrix components and their capacity to survive otherwise lethal treatments with antibiotics (referred to as tolerance) and resistance to phagocytes...

  12. Ligand Binding Reduces Conformational Flexibility in the Active Site of Tyrosine Phosphatase Related to Biofilm Formation A (TpbA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Koveal, Dorothy; Clarkson, Michael W.; Wood, Thomas K.; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    TpbA is a periplasmic dual specificity phosphatase (DUSP) that controls biofilm formation in the pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While DUSPs are known to regulate important cellular functions in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, very few structures of bacterial DUSPs are available. Here, we present the solution structure of TpbA in the ligand-free open conformation, along with an analysis of the structural and dynamic changes that accompany ligand/phosphate binding. While TpbA ad...

  13. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further...... increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to...... TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth....

  14. Effects of Photoactivated Titanium Dioxide Nanopowders and Coating on Planktonic and Biofilm Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polo, Andrea; Diamanti, Maria Vittoria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    We exploited the ability of photocatalytic titanium dioxide (TiO(2) ) as an agent for the biofilm control. Two photocatalytic systems were investigated: a 3g/l suspension of TiO(2) nanopowder in demineralised water and glass slides coated with a TiO(2) thin film, achieved by sol-gel deposition. A...

  15. Phenolic compounds affect production of pyocyanin, swarming motility and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Ugurlu

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: We may suggest that if swarming and consecutive biofilm formation could be inhibited by the natural products as shown in our study, the bacteria could not attach to the surfaces and produce chronic infections. Antimicrobials and natural products could be combined and the dosage of antimicrobials could be reduced to overcome antimicrobial resistance and drug side effects.

  16. Disinfection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm contaminated tube lumens with ultraviolet C light emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Ladefoged, S.D.; Tvede, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms on long-term catheters are a major source of infection. Exposure to ultraviolet C (UVC - 265 nm) light was shown in an earlier study to reduce the number of bacteria substantially on ex vivo treated urinary patient catheters. Very large doses ( long treatment times) should, how...

  17. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of 2707 Hyper-Duplex Stainless Steel by Marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Huabing Li; Enze Zhou; Dawei Zhang; Dake Xu; Jin Xia; Chunguang Yang; Hao Feng; Zhouhua Jiang; Xiaogang Li; Tingyue Gu; Ke Yang

    2016-01-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a serious problem in many industries because it causes huge economic losses. Due to its excellent resistance to chemical corrosion, 2707 hyper duplex stainless steel (2707 HDSS) has been used in the marine environment. However, its resistance to MIC was not experimentally proven. In this study, the MIC behavior of 2707 HDSS caused by the marine aerobe Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Electrochemical analyses demonstrated a positive shift...

  18. Controlling Biofilm Formation by Inhibiting the Quorum-Sensing Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using the Ethanolic Extracts of Piper nigrum (Piperaceae Fruit, Punica granatum (Lythraceae Pericarp, and Pisum sativum (Fabaceae Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Dazal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogen that exhibit biofilm formation through quorum-sensing, which is a bacterial cell-to-cell communication that regulates the production of many virulence factors. The inhibition of biofilm formation is a viable option for bacterial eradication. The antibacterial effect of Piper nigrum is related to the presence of phenolic and flavonoid components. Punica granatum has been reported to possess a wide range of biological actions, with tannins and alkaloids stated to be the reason of its antibacterial property. Pisum sativum, on the other hand, contains various constituents, but the tannins and phenolic compounds stated as responsible for its antibacterial property. The minimum inhibitory concentration using the susceptibility testing of P. nigrum, P. granatum, P. sativum ethanolic extracts were 6.67×10-4 g/mL, 2.1978×10-5 g/mL, and 6.25×10-4 g/mL, respectively. On the swarming assay, P. granatum and P. sativum inhibits swarming motility at concentrations of 2.1978×10-2 up to 2.1978×10-4 g/mL, and 6.25×10-2 to 6.25×10-3 g/mL, respectively. The P. nigrum extract did not inhibit the motility.

  19. Bifunctional silica nanoparticles for the exploration of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mauline, Léïla; Gressier, Marie; Roques, Christine; Hammer, Peter,; Ribeiro, Sidney J. L.; Caiut, José Maurício A.; Menu, Marie-Joëlle

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent silica nanoparticles are frequently employed for biotechnology applications mainly because of their easy functionalization, photo-stability, and biocompatibility. Bifunctional silica nanoparticles (BSNPs) are described here as new efficient tools for investigating complex biological systems such as biofilms. Photoluminescence is brought about by the incorporation of a silylated ruthenium (II) complex. The surface properties of the silica particles were designed by reaction with am...

  20. Facultative control of matrix production optimizes competitive fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Lin, Yu Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R.;

    2015-01-01

    to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure...... formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities....

  1. Temporal and Stochastic Control of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Development

    OpenAIRE

    Moormeier, Derek E.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Bayles, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm communities contain distinct microniches that result in metabolic heterogeneity and variability in gene expression. Previously, these niches were visualized within Staphylococcus aureus biofilms by observing differential expression of the cid and lrg operons during tower formation. In the present study, we examined early biofilm development and identified two new stages (designated “multiplication” and “exodus”) that were associated with changes in matrix composition and a di...

  2. Development of potent inhibitors of pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Laura C.; O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Zhang, Zinan; Siryaporn, Albert; Silpe, Justin E.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new approaches for the treatment of antimicrobial-resistant infections is an urgent public health priority. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogen, in particular, is a leading source of infection in hospital settings, with few available treatment options. In the context of an effort to develop antivirulence strategies to combat bacterial infection, we identified a series of highly effective small molecules that inhibit the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence fact...

  3. Current Trends in Development of Liposomes for Targeting Bacterial Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukavina, Zora; Vanić, Željka

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm targeting represents a great challenge for effective antimicrobial therapy. Increased biofilm resistance, even with the elevated concentrations of very potent antimicrobial agents, often leads to failed therapeutic outcome. Application of biocompatible nanomicrobials, particularly liposomally-associated nanomicrobials, presents a promising approach for improved drug delivery to bacterial cells and biofilms. Versatile manipulations of liposomal physicochemical properties, such as the bilayer composition, membrane fluidity, size, surface charge and coating, enable development of liposomes with desired pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. This review attempts to provide an unbiased overview of investigations of liposomes destined to treat bacterial biofilms. Different strategies including the recent advancements in liposomal design aiming at eradication of existing biofilms and prevention of biofilm formation, as well as respective limitations, are discussed in more details. PMID:27231933

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa CreBC Two-Component System Plays a Major Role in the Response to β-Lactams, Fitness, Biofilm Growth, and Global Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Zamorano, Laura; Moyà, Bartolomé; Juan, Carlos; Mulet, Xavier; Blázquez, Jesús; Oliver, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous versatile environmental microorganism with a remarkable ability to grow under diverse environmental conditions. Moreover, P. aeruginosa is responsible for life-threatening infections in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis patients, as the extraordinary capacity of this pathogen to develop antimicrobial resistance dramatically limits our therapeutic arsenal. Its large genome carries an outstanding number of genes belonging to regulatory systems, includi...

  5. Development of a high-throughput Candida albicans biofilm chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Srinivasan

    Full Text Available We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed "nano-biofilms". The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of biofilm formation was determined using a microarray scanner from changes in fluorescence intensities due to FUN 1 metabolic processing. This staining technique was also adapted for antifungal susceptibility testing, which demonstrated that, similar to regular biofilms, cells within the on-chip biofilms displayed elevated levels of resistance against antifungal agents (fluconazole and amphotericin B. Thus, results from structural analyses and antifungal susceptibility testing indicated that despite miniaturization, these biofilms display the typical phenotypic properties associated with the biofilm mode of growth. In its final format, the C. albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip is composed of 768 equivalent and spatially distinct nano-biofilms on a single slide; multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Compared to current methods for the formation of microbial biofilms, namely the 96-well microtiter plate model, this fungal biofilm chip has advantages in terms of miniaturization and automation, which combine to cut reagent use and analysis time, minimize labor intensive steps, and dramatically reduce assay costs. Such a chip should accelerate the antifungal drug discovery process by enabling rapid, convenient and inexpensive screening of hundreds-to-thousands of compounds simultaneously.

  6. Characterizing temporal development of biofilm porosity using artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluchamy, Raaja Raajan Angathevar; Beyenal, Haluk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    We used artificial neural networks (ANN) to compute parameters characterising biofilm structure from biofilm images and to interpolate a limited number of experimental data characterising the effects of nutrient concentration and flow velocity on the areal porosity of biofilms. ANN were trained using a set of experimental data characterising structural parameters of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC #700829), Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC #700830) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC #700831) for various flow velocities and glucose concentrations. We used 80% of the data to train ANN and 10% of the data to validate the results, which is routinely carried out as a countermeasure against overtraining. Trained ANN were used to interpolate into the data set and evaluate the missing 10% of the data. To compare ANN accuracy in evaluating the missing data with the accuracies achieved using other interpolation algorithms, we used spline, cubic, linear and nearest-neighbour interpolation algorithms to evaluate the missing data. ANN estimates were consistently closer to the experimental data than the estimates made using the other methods. PMID:18587172

  7. Inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus and Its Biofilm by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Dependent on the Source, Phenotype and Growth Conditions of the Bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A G Ferreira

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus (Af and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa are leading fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, in many clinical situations. Relevant to this, their interface and co-existence has been studied. In some experiments in vitro, Pa products have been defined that are inhibitory to Af. In some clinical situations, both can be biofilm producers, and biofilm could alter their physiology and affect their interaction. That may be most relevant to airways in cystic fibrosis (CF, where both are often prominent residents. We have studied clinical Pa isolates from several sources for their effects on Af, including testing involving their biofilms. We show that the described inhibition of Af is related to the source and phenotype of the Pa isolate. Pa cells inhibited the growth and formation of Af biofilm from conidia, with CF isolates more inhibitory than non-CF isolates, and non-mucoid CF isolates most inhibitory. Inhibition did not require live Pa contact, as culture filtrates were also inhibitory, and again non-mucoid>mucoid CF>non-CF. Preformed Af biofilm was more resistant to Pa, and inhibition that occurred could be reproduced with filtrates. Inhibition of Af biofilm appears also dependent on bacterial growth conditions; filtrates from Pa grown as biofilm were more inhibitory than from Pa grown planktonically. The differences in Pa shown from these different sources are consistent with the extensive evolutionary Pa changes that have been described in association with chronic residence in CF airways, and may reflect adaptive changes to life in a polymicrobial environment.

  8. Bioluminescence imaging of fungal biofilm development in live animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Kucharíková, Soňa; Van Dijck, Patrick; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Fungal biofilms formed on various types of medical implants represent a major problem for hospitalized patients. These biofilms and related infections are usually difficult to treat because of their resistance to the classical antifungal drugs. Animal models are indispensable for investigating host-pathogen interactions and for identifying new antifungal targets related to biofilm development. A limited number of animal models is available that can be used for testing novel antifungal drugs in vivo against C. albicans, one of the most common pathogens causing fungal biofilms. Fungal load in biofilms in these models is traditionally analyzed postmortem, requiring host sacrifice and enumeration of microorganisms from individual biofilms in order to evaluate the amount of colony forming units and the efficacy of antifungal treatment. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) made compatible with small animal models for in vivo biofilm formation is a valuable noninvasive tool to follow-up biofilm development and its treatment longitudinally, reducing the number of animals needed for such studies. Due to the nondestructive and noninvasive nature of BLI, the imaging procedure can be repeated in the same animal, allowing follow-up of the biofilm growth in vivo without removing the implanted device or detaching the biofilm from its substrate. The method described here introduces BLI of C. albicans biofilm formation in vivo on subcutaneously implanted catheters in mice. One of the main challenges to overcome for BLI of fungi is the hampered intracellular substrate delivery through the fungal cell wall, which is managed by using extracellularly located Gaussia luciferase. Although detecting a quantifiable in vivo BLI signal from biofilms formed on the inside of implanted catheters is challenging, BLI proved to be a practical tool in the study of fungal biofilms. This method describing the use of BLI for in vivo follow-up of device-related fungal biofilm formation has the potential for

  9. Disturbance Frequency Determines Morphology and Community Development in Multi-Species Biofilm at the Landscape Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Milferstedt, Kim; Santa-Catalina, Gaelle; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Escudié, Renaud; Bernet, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Many natural and engineered biofilm systems periodically face disturbances. Here we present how the recovery time of a biofilm between disturbances (expressed as disturbance frequency) shapes the development of morphology and community structure in a multi-species biofilm at the landscape scale. It was hypothesized that a high disturbance frequency favors the development of a stable adapted biofilm system while a low disturbance frequency promotes a dynamic biofilm response. Biofilms were gro...

  10. Biofilm development on metal surfaces in tropical marine waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, F.P.; Bhosle, N.B.

    environments. However, little is known about biofilm bacteria developed on metal surfaces, especially immersed in tropical marine waters. Similarly, not much is known about the nature of organic matter deposited on the surfaces over the period of immersion...

  11. Development and optimization of a competitive binding assay for the galactophilic low affinity lectin LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Ines; Rikker, Sebastian; Hauck, Dirk; Ponader, Daniela; Boden, Sophia; Sommer, Roman; Hartmann, Laura; Titz, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    Infections with the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa result in a high mortality among immunocompromised patients and those with cystic fibrosis. The pathogen can switch from planktonic life to biofilms, and thereby shields itself against antibiotic treatment and host immune defense to establish chronic infections. The bacterial protein LecA, a C-type lectin, is a virulence factor and an integral component for biofilm formation. Inhibition of LecA with its carbohydrate ligands results in reduced biofilm mass, a potential Achilles heel for treatment. Here, we report the development and optimization of a fluorescence polarization-based competitive binding assay with LecA for application in screening of potential inhibitors. As a consequence of the low affinity of d-galactose for LecA, the fluorescent ligand was optimized to reduce protein consumption in the assay. The assay was validated using a set of known inhibitors of LecA and IC50 values in good agreement with the known Kd values were obtained. Finally, we employed the optimized assay to screen sets of synthetic thio-galactosides and natural blood group antigens and report their structure-activity relationship. In addition, we evaluated a multivalent fluorescent assay probe for LecA and report its applicability in an inhibition assay. PMID:27488655

  12. Biofilm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvíderová, Jana

    Berlin: Springer, 2015 - (Amils, R.; Gargaud, M.; Cernicharo Quintanilla, J.; James Claves, H.; Irvine, W.; Pinti, D.; Viso, M.), s. 1-3 ISBN 978-3-642-27833-4 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biofilm * microbial mat * astrobiology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms exposed to imipenem exhibit changes in global gene expression and beta-lactamase and alginate production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Niels; Schuster, Martin; Hentzer, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    , on gene expression in biofilm populations. Many genes showed small but statistically significant differential expression in response to imipenem. We identified 34 genes that were induced or repressed in biofilms exposed to imipenem more than fivefold compared to the levels of induction or repression...

  14. Real-Time Microscopic Observation of Candida Biofilm Development and Effects Due to Micafungin and Fluconazole

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Miyagawa, Susumu; Takeda, On; Hakariya, Masateru; Matsumoto, Satoru; Ohno, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2013-01-01

    To understand the process of Candida biofilm development and the effects of antifungal agents on biofilms, we analyzed real-time data comprising time-lapse images taken at times separated by brief intervals. The growth rate was calculated by measuring the change of biofilm thickness every hour. For the antifungal study, 5-h-old biofilms of Candida albicans were treated with either micafungin (MCFG) or fluconazole (FLCZ). MCFG began to suppress biofilm growth a few minutes after the initiation...

  15. Calcium transcriptionally regulates the biofilm machinery of Xylella fastidiosa to promote continued biofilm development in batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Chen, Hongyu; McCarty, Sara E; Liu, Lawrence Y; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    The functions of calcium (Ca) in bacteria are less characterized than in eukaryotes, where its role has been studied extensively. The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa has several virulence features that are enhanced by increased Ca concentrations, including biofilm formation. However, the specific mechanisms driving modulation of this feature are unclear. Characterization of biofilm formation over time showed that 4 mM Ca supplementation produced denser biofilms that were still developing at 96 h, while biofilm in non-supplemented media had reached the dispersal stage by 72 h. To identify changes in global gene expression in X. fastidiosa grown in supplemental Ca, RNA-Seq of batch culture biofilm cells was conducted at three 24-h time intervals. Results indicate that a variety of genes are differentially expressed in response to Ca, including genes related to attachment, motility, exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, peptidoglycan synthesis, regulatory functions, iron homeostasis, and phages. Collectively, results demonstrate that Ca supplementation induces a transcriptional response that promotes continued biofilm development, while biofilm cells in nonsupplemented media are driven towards dispersion of cells from the biofilm structure. These results have important implications for disease progression in planta, where xylem sap is the source of Ca and other nutrients for X. fastidiosa. PMID:26913481

  16. Investigating biofilm structure developing on carriers from lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactors based on light microscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Felz, Simon; Wagner, Michael; Lackner, Susanne; Horn, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on characterizing the structure of biofilms developed on carriers used in lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactors. Both light microscopy (2D) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were employed to track the biofilm development on carriers of different geometry and under different aeration rates. Biofilm structure was further characterized with respect to average biofilm thickness, biofilm growth velocity, biomass volume, compartment filling degree, surface area, etc. The results showed that carriers with a smaller compartment size stimulated a quick establishment of biofilms. Low aeration rates favored fast development of biofilms. Comparison between the results derived from 2D and 3D images revealed comparable results with respect to average biofilm thickness and compartment filling degree before the carrier compartments were fully willed with biomass. However, 3D imaging with OCT was capable of visualizing and quantifying the heterogeneous structure of biofilms, which cannot be achieved using 2D imaging. PMID:26476614

  17. The efficacy of immediate versus delayed antibiotic administration on bacterial growth and biofilm production of selected strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Gandee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The treatment of urinary tract infections (UTI with antibiotics is commonly used, but recurrence and antibiotic resistance have been growing and concerning clinicians. We studied whether the rapid onset of a protective biofilm may be responsible for the lack of effectiveness of antibiotics against selected bacteria. Materials and Methods Two established uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains, UTI89 and CFT073, and two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, PA01 and Boston-41501, were studied to establish a reliable biofilm formation process. Bacterial growth (BG was determined by optical density at 600 nm (OD 600 using a spectrophotometer, while biofilm formation (BF using crystal violet staining was measured at OD 550. Next, these bacterial strains were treated with clinically relevant antibiotics, ciprofloxacin HCl (200 ng/mL and 2 μg/mL, nitrofurantoin (20 μg/mL and 40 μg/mL and ampicillin (50 μg/mL at time points of 0 (T0 or after 6 hours of culture (T6. All measurements, including controls (bacteria -1% DMSO, were done in triplicates and repeated three times for consistency. Results The tested antibiotics effectively inhibited both BG and BF when administered at T0 for UPEC strains, but not when the antibiotic administration started 6 hours later. For Pseudomonas strains, only Ciprofloxacin was able to significantly inhibit bacterial growth at T0 but only at the higher concentration of 2 μg/mL for T6. Conclusion When established UPEC and Pseudomonas bacteria were allowed to culture for 6 hours before initialization of treatment, the therapeutic effect of selected antibiotics was greatly suppressed when compared to immediate treatment, probably as a result of the protective nature of the biofilm.

  18. The absence of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprF protein leads to increased biofilm formation through variation in c-di-GMP level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeline eBouffartigues

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OprF is the major outer membrane porin in bacteria belonging to the Pseudomonas genus. In previous studies, we have shown that OprF is required for full virulence expression of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we describe molecular insights on the nature of this relationship and report that the absence of OprF leads to increased biofilm formation and production of the Pel exopolysaccharide. Accordingly, the level of c-di-GMP, a key second messenger in biofilm control, is elevated in an oprF mutant. By decreasing c-di-GMP levels in this mutant, both biofilm formation and pel gene expression phenotypes were restored to wild-type levels. We further investigated the impact on two small RNAs, which are associated with the biofilm lifestyle, and found that expression of rsmZ but not of rsmY was increased in the oprF mutant and this occurs in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. Finally, the extracytoplasmic function (ECF sigma factors AlgU and SigX displayed higher activity levels in the oprF mutant. Two genes of the SigX regulon involved in c-di-GMP metabolism, PA1181 and adcA (PA4843, were up-regulated in the oprF mutant, partly explaining the increased c-di-GMP level. We hypothesized that the absence of OprF leads to a cell envelope stress that activates SigX and results in a c-di-GMP elevated level due to higher expression of adcA and PA1181. The c-di-GMP level can in turn stimulate Pel synthesis via increased rsmZ sRNA levels and pel mRNA, thus affecting Pel-dependent phenotypes such as cell aggregation and biofilm formation. This work highlights the connection between OprF and c-di-GMP regulatory networks, likely via SigX (ECF, on the regulation of biofilm phenotypes.

  19. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life is...... believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  20. Nitritation performance and biofilm development of co- and counter-diffusion biofilm reactors: Modeling and experimental comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Rongchang; Terada, Akihiko; Lackner, Susanne;

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the start-up performance and biofilm development in two different biofilm reactors with aim of obtaining partial nitritation. The reactors were both operated under oxygen limited conditions, but differed in geometry. While substrates (O-2, NH3) co-diffused in ...

  1. Mechanistic insights into c-di-GMP–dependent control of the biofilm regulator FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Bruno Y.; Krasteva, Petya V.; Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S.; Sondermann, Holger; Navarro, Marcos V.A. S. (UWASH); (U. Sao Paulo); (Cornell); (CNRS-UMR)

    2016-07-05

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen that can cause fatal chronic infections, relies on the intracellular second-messenger c-di-GMP to form robust multicellular biofilms during host tissue colonization. c-di-GMP is sensed directly by the transcription regulator FleQ, which inversely regulates flagellar motility and exopolysaccharide secretion to secure a planktonic to sessile life-form transition. FleQ belongs to the diverse family of AAA+ ATPase enhancer-binding proteins, but how its noncanonical function on transcriptional regulation is controlled by c-di-GMP remains enigmatic. Here, we report structural and functional data that identify an unusual mode of c-di-GMP recognition accompanied by a major quaternary structure reorganization. Our analyses offer a consensus to previous studies and unique insights into the mechanism of action of FleQ and FleQ-like proteins.

  2. Candida albicans biofilm development in vitro for photodynamic therapy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a phototherapy based on the use of a photo sensitizer (PS) in the presence of low intensity light with resonant wavelength of absorption of the PS and biological systems that can raise awareness, generating reactive oxygen species. Studies show that PDT has a lethal effect on Candida albicans. The biofilm formed by C. albicans is the cause of infections associated with medical devices such as catheters, with a proven resistance to antifungal agents, and the removal of the catheter colonized almost always is necessary. However, few studies in literature report the behavior and response of biofilm organized by C. albicans against PDT. The aims of this study were to develop a methodology for in vitro biofilm formation of C. albicans, evaluate the sensitivity of the biofilm of C. albicans to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using PS as the methylene blue (MB) and hypocrellin B: La+3 (HBLa+3) and analyze the biofilm by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). For biofilm formation, discs were made from elastomeric silicone catheters. The PS were dissolved in solution of PBS, and the MB had two different concentrations tested in the biofilm: 100μM and 1mM; HBLa+3 only one of 10μM. The irradiation of both dyes with the microorganism was done by two different LEDs, one with red emission at λ = 630nm ± 20nm and the other one blue emission at λ = 460nm ± 30nm. We performed a curve of survival fraction versus time of irradiation of each sample with biofilm and suspension of the microorganism in the yeast form to verify the susceptibility of the front PDT. The yeast showed 100% reduction using both PS, but at different times of irradiation (30s to HBLa+3 and 6 min for the MB at 100μM). When the therapy was applied in biofilm, the MB 100μM did not show any significant reduction, while at concentration of 1mM was reduced by 100% after 6 min of irradiation. The HBLa+3 biofilm group showed a lower reduction in the concentration of 10μM in

  3. Acoustic Wave Monitoring of Biofilm Development in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilm development in porous media can result in significant changes to the hydrogeological properties of subsurface systems with implications for fluid flow and contaminant transport. As such, a number of numerical models and simulations have been developed in an attempt to qua...

  4. Effect of Cinnamon Oil on Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Manmohit Kalia; Vivek Kumar Yadav; Pradeep Kumar Singh; Deepmala Sharma; Himanshu Pandey; Shahid Suhail Narvi; Vishnu Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a system of stimuli and responses in bacterial cells governed by their population density, through which they regulate genes that control virulence factors and biofilm formation. Despite considerable research on QS and the discovery of new antibiotics, QS-controlled biofilm formation by microorganisms in clinical settings has remained a problem because of nascent drug resistance, which requires screening of diverse compounds for anti-QS activities. Cinnamon is a dietary...

  5. Development of a High-Throughput Candida albicans Biofilm Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Anand; Uppuluri, Priya; Lopez-Ribot, Jose; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed “nano-biofilms”. The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of bi...

  6. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Molin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP reductase (ENR from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent. EGCG treatment was further shown to be able to attenuate the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa.

  7. In Vitro Efficacy of Nonantibiotic Treatments on Biofilm Disruption of Gram-Negative Pathogens and an In Vivo Model of Infectious Endometritis Utilizing Isolates from the Equine Uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Ryan A; McCue, Patrick M; Borlee, Grace I; Loncar, Kristen D; Hennet, Margo L; Borlee, Bradley R

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the ability of the equine clinical treatments N-acetylcysteine, EDTA, and hydrogen peroxide to disrupt in vitro biofilms and kill equine reproductive pathogens (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Klebsiella pneumoniae) isolated from clinical cases. N-acetylcysteine (3.3%) decreased biofilm biomass and killed bacteria within the biofilms of E. coli isolates. The CFU of recoverable P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae isolates were decreased, but the biofilm biomass was unchanged. Exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1%) decreased the biofilm biomass and reduced the CFU of E. coli isolates, K. pneumoniae isolates were observed to have a reduction in CFU, and minimal effects were observed for P. aeruginosa isolates. Chelating agents (EDTA formulations) reduced E. coli CFU but were ineffective at disrupting preformed biofilms or decreasing the CFU of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae within a biofilm. No single nonantibiotic treatment commonly used in equine veterinary practice was able to reduce the CFU and biofilm biomass of all three Gram-negative species of bacteria evaluated. An in vivo equine model of infectious endometritis was also developed to monitor biofilm formation, utilizing bioluminescence imaging with equine P. aeruginosa isolates from this study. Following infection, the endometrial surface contained focal areas of bacterial growth encased in a strongly adherent "biofilm-like" matrix, suggesting that biofilms are present during clinical cases of infectious equine endometritis. Our results indicate that Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the equine uterus are capable of producing a biofilm in vitro, and P. aeruginosa is capable of producing biofilm-like material in vivo. PMID:26719448

  8. Antimikrobiální peptidy z jedu divoce žijící včely odstraňují biofilm a působí synergicky s antibiotiky proti Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nešuta, Ondřej; Monincová, Lenka; Voburka, Zdeněk; Bednárová, Lucie; Slaninová, Jiřina; Čeřovský, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 5 (2013), s. 429-430. ISSN 0009-2770. [Mezioborové setkání mladých biologů, biochemiků a chemiků /13./. 14.5.2013-17.5.2013, Žďár nad Sázavou] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antimicrobial peptides * Pseudomonas aeruginosa * Staphylococcus aureus * synergism * biofilm Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  9. Development and validation of a microfluidic reactor for biofilm monitoring via optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mariana T.; Roy, Varnika; Bentley, William E.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2011-05-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and verification of a microfluidic platform for optical monitoring of bacterial biofilms. Biofilm formation characterizes the majority of infections caused by bacteria that are developing increased resistance to traditional antibiotic treatment, necessitating the development of reliable tools not only for study of biofilm growth, but also for in situ examination of the response to applied stimuli. The presented platform was used to continuously and non-invasively observe the dependence of Escherichia coli biofilm formation on bacterial signaling by monitoring the change in biofilm optical density over the growth period. Results were corroborated by measurement of biofilm morphological properties via confocal microscopy, and statistical analysis was applied to verify the repeatability of observed optical and morphological differences in the biofilms formed. The presented platform will be used to characterize biofilm formation and response in drug discovery applications.

  10. Development and validation of a microfluidic reactor for biofilm monitoring via optical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design, fabrication, and verification of a microfluidic platform for optical monitoring of bacterial biofilms. Biofilm formation characterizes the majority of infections caused by bacteria that are developing increased resistance to traditional antibiotic treatment, necessitating the development of reliable tools not only for study of biofilm growth, but also for in situ examination of the response to applied stimuli. The presented platform was used to continuously and non-invasively observe the dependence of Escherichia coli biofilm formation on bacterial signaling by monitoring the change in biofilm optical density over the growth period. Results were corroborated by measurement of biofilm morphological properties via confocal microscopy, and statistical analysis was applied to verify the repeatability of observed optical and morphological differences in the biofilms formed. The presented platform will be used to characterize biofilm formation and response in drug discovery applications

  11. How Staphylococcus aureus biofilms develop their characteristic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Periasamy, Saravanan; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Duong, Anthony C.; Bach, Thanh-Huy L.; Tan, Vee Y.; Chatterjee, Som S.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Otto, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms cause significant problems in the environment and during the treatment of infections. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm formation are poorly understood. There is a particular lack of knowledge about biofilm maturation processes, such as biofilm structuring and detachment, which are deemed crucial for the maintenance of biofilm viability and the dissemination of cells from a biofilm. Here, we identify the phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) surfactant peptides as key biofi...

  12. Tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide colistin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is linked to metabolically active cells, and depends on the pmr and mexAB-oprM genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Gjermansen, Morten; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2008-01-01

    antimicrobial peptide colistin. On the contrary, biofilm cells exhibiting low metabolic activity were killed by colistin. We demonstrate that the subpopulation of metabolically active cells is able to adapt to colistin by inducing a specific adaptation mechanism mediated by the pmr operon, as well as an...... unspecific adaptation mechanism mediated by the mexAB-oprM genes. Mutants defective in either pmr-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification or in mexAB-oprM-mediated antimicrobial efflux were not able to develop a tolerant subpopulation in biofilms. In contrast to the observed pattern of colistin...... physiologically distinct subpopulations by combined antimicrobial treatment with either ciprofloxacin and colistin or tetracycline and colistin almost completely eradicated all biofilm cells....

  13. Laboratory investigation of the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) resistance of a novel Cu-bearing 2205 duplex stainless steel in the presence of an aerobic marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jin; Yang, Chunguang; Xu, Dake; Sun, Da; Nan, Li; Sun, Ziqing; Li, Qi; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) resistance of a novel Cu-bearing 2205 duplex stainless steel (2205 Cu-DSS) against an aerobic marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm was investigated. The electrochemical test results showed that Rp increased and icorr decreased sharply after long-term immersion in the inoculation medium, suggesting that 2205 Cu-DSS possessed excellent MIC resistance to the P. aeruginosa biofilm. Fluorescence microscope images showed that 2205 Cu-DSS possessed a strong antibacterial ability, and its antibacterial efficiency after one and seven days was 7.75% and 96.92%, respectively. The pit morphology comparison after 14 days between 2205 DSS and 2205 Cu-DSS demonstrated that the latter showed a considerably reduced maximum MIC pit depth compared with the former (1.44 μm vs 9.50 μm). The experimental results suggest that inhibition of the biofilm was caused by the copper ions released from the 2205 Cu-DSS, leading to its effective mitigation of MIC by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26194639

  14. Biological kinetics parameters in a pure culture biofilm developed in an airlift reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, F. A.; Vieira, M. J.; Melo, L. F.

    2000-01-01

    A diffusion-reaction model was fitted to data obtained with Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms developed in an airlift reactor under different limiting substrate conditions, in order to determine the biofilm kinetic constants and the substrate concentration profiles within the biological films. Model predicted concentration profiles within the biofilms demonstrate that all films were completely penetrated by the substrate and that the reaction rate inside the biofilms was of zero ...

  15. Factors Regulating Microbial Biofilm Development in a System with Slowly Flowing Seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Karsten

    1982-01-01

    Microbial biofilm development was followed under growth conditions similar to those of a projected salinity power plant. Microscope glass cover slips were piled in biofilm reactors to imitate the membrane stacks in such a plant. A staining technique closely correlating absorbance values with biofilm dry weight was used for the study. Generally, the biofilms consisted of solitary and filamentous bacteria which were evenly distributed with considerable amounts of various protozoa and entrapped ...

  16. Molecular Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz

    In this study, I sought to identify genes regulating the global molecular program for development of sessile multicellular communities, also known as biofilm, of the eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Yeast biofilm has a clinical interest, as biofilms can cause chronic...

  17. Effect of pH on biologic degradation of Microcystis aeruginosa by alga-lysing bacteria in sequencing batch biofilm reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongjing LI; Mengli HAO; Jingxian LIU; Chen CHEN1; Zhengqiu FAN; Xiangrong WANG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of pH on biological degradation of Microcystis aeruginosa by alga-lysing bacteria in laboratory-scale sequencing batch biofilm reactors (SBBRs) was investigated. After 10 d filming with waste activated sludge, the biological film could be formed, and the bioreactors in which laid polyolefin resin filler were used to treat algal culture. By comparing the removal efficiency of chlorophyll a at different aerobic time, the optimum time was determined as 5 h. Under pH 6.5, 7.5, and 8.5 conditions, the removal rates of Microcystis aeruginosa were respectively 75.9%, 83.6%, and 78.3% (in term of chlorophyll a), and that of Chemical Oxygen Demand (CODMn) were 30.6%, 35.8%, and 33.5%. While the removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen (NH+ -N) were all 100%. It was observed that the sequence of the removal efficiencies of algae, NH+ -N and organic matter were pH 7.5 〉 pH 8.5 〉 pH 6.5. The results showed that the dominant alga-lysing bacteria in the SBBRs was strain HM-01, which was identified as Bacillus sp. by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis, and compar- ison with sequences in the GenBank nucleotide database. The algicidal activated substance which HM-01 strain excreted could withstand high temperature and pressure, also had better hydrophily and stronger polarity.

  18. Experimental study on effect of mesna on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm%巯乙磺酸钠对铜绿假单胞菌生物被膜作用的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈盛; 余加林; 罗则佳; 何念海; 孙凤军

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of mesna on the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm, and study the effect of mesna on P. aeruginosa biofilm. METHODS The broth microdilution method was performed to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration of mesna to PAO1, then a biofilm model of Pseudo-monas aeruginosa in vitro was established , the appearance of biofilm was detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM ) to assess the effect of mesna on the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm; the bacteria colony counts in biofilm was measured by agar plate after the biofilm was treated by mesna, biofilm structure was observed under confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), and the parameters of biofilm structure were analyzed through pictures from CLSM with image structure analyzer (ISA) software. RESULTS The MIC value against PAO1 was 10mg/mL for mesna. In the process of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, scanning electron microscope showed that the mucoid materials among bacteria was significantly reduced and the thickness of biofilm was decreased in mesna group. In comparison with normal saline group, viable counts in biofilms in the mesna treatment group were less than those in the saline group, and the high-dose group (4. 06 ± 0. 12) had less positive effect than did the low-dose group(5. 84 ± 0. 24)(P<0. 05). Confocal laser scanning microscope showed that the biofilm was thinner and more scattered than the saline control group. The results of ISA showed that with the treatment of mesna, biofilm was decreased in thickness, average diffusion distance (ADD) and textual entropy (TE) in comparison with the saline control group(P<0. 05),however areal porosity(AP) was increased (P< 0. 05) , and the high-doses group was more significant than the low-doses group (P<0. 05). CONCLUSION Mesna can inhibit the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm and disrupt the structure of P. aeruginosa biofilm.%目的 研究巯乙磺酸钠(Mesna)对铜绿假单胞菌生物被

  19. APPLICATIONS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY IN DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMATERIALS: NANOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOFILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Berry, T.; Narayan, R.

    2010-11-29

    Biotechnology is the application of biological techniques to develop new tools and products for medicine and industry. Due to various properties including chemical stability, biocompatibility, and specific activity, e.g. antimicrobial properties, many new and novel materials are being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. Many of these materials are less than 100 nanometers in size. Nanotechnology is the engineering discipline encompassing designing, producing, testing, and using structures and devices less than 100 nanometers. One of the challenges associated with biomaterials is microbial contamination that can lead to infections. In recent work we have examined the functionalization of nanoporous biomaterials and antimicrobial activities of nanocrystalline diamond materials. In vitro testing has revealed little antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria and associated biofilm formation that enhances recalcitrance to antimicrobial agents including disinfectants and antibiotics. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies further demonstrated properties and characteristics of the material with regard to biofilm formation.

  20. NANOTECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTION FOR IMPROVING THE ANTIBIOTIC EFFICIENCY AGAINST BIOFILMS DEVELOPED BY GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIAL STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng-Shiang Huang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available At present bacteria involved in biofilm associated infections display the highest rates of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria, which made that treatment options to be limited, and determined the researchers to find out alternative treatments to antibiotics. In the recent years nanomaterials gained much attention in medicine, particularly in the fight to bacteria resistant to antibiotics by acting as drug delivery devices. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs have raised much interest during the recent years due to their potential applications in medicine. In the present study we synthesized MNPd functionalized with antibiotics for the study of their antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Gram-negative bacteria, frequently resistant to antibiotics, involved in biofilm infections in order to investigate their capacity to serve as potential drug delivery systems in the fight to these important opportunist pathogens.

  1. Modulation of crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm development on urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, David J; Morgan, Sheridan D

    2006-05-01

    The crystalline biofilms formed by Proteus mirabilis can seriously complicate the care of patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization. The generation of alkaline urine by the bacterial urease causes calcium and magnesium phosphates to precipitate from urine and accumulate in the catheter biofilm, blocking the flow of urine from the bladder. The pH at which these salts crystallize from a urine sample, the nucleation pH (pH(n)), can be elevated by diluting the urine and by increasing its citrate content. The aim of this study was to examine whether manipulation of pH(n) in these ways modulated the rate at which crystalline biofilm developed. Experiments in laboratory models of the catheterized bladder infected with P. mirabilis showed that when the bladder was supplied with a concentrated urine (pH(n) 6.7) at a low fluid output (720 ml per 24 h), catheters blocked at 19-31 h. Diluting this urine 1:4 increased the pH(n) to 7.5 and models supplied with this urine at 2880 ml per 24 h took 110-137 h to block. When models were supplied with urine containing citrate at 1.5 mg ml(-1) or above (pH(n) 8.3-9.1), the catheters drained freely for the full 7 day experimental period. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the catheter biofilms that developed in urine with high pH(n) values were devoid of crystalline formations. These observations should encourage a clinical trial to examine the effect of increasing a patient's fluid intake with citrate-containing drinks on the encrustation and blockage of catheters. PMID:16585633

  2. Quantitative Evaluation of Bacteria Adherent and in Biofilm on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube-Coated Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Pantanella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm is a common bacterial lifestyle, and it plays a crucial role in human health, causing biofilm-mediated infections. Recently, to counteract biofilm development, new nano-structured biomaterials have been proposed. However, data about the antibacterial properties of nano-structured surfaces are fragmentary and controversial, and, in particular, the susceptibility of nano-structured materials to colonization and biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens has not been yet thoroughly considered. Here, the ability of the pathogenic Streptococcus mutans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adhere and form biofilm on surfaces coated with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs was analyzed. Our results showed that the surfaces of SWCNTs-coated glass beads (SWCNTs-GBs were colonized at the same extent of uncoated GBs both by S. mutans and P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that single wall SWCNTs-coated surfaces are not suitable to counteract bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  3. Common β-lactamases inhibit bacterial biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Gallant, Claude V.; Daniels, Craig; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Ghosh, Anindya S.; Young, Kevin D; Kotra, Lakshmi P.; Burrows, Lori L.

    2005-01-01

    β-Lactamases, which evolved from bacterial penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) involved in peptidoglycan (PG) synthesis, confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. While investigating the genetic basis of biofilm development by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we noted that plasmid vectors encoding the common β-lactamase marker TEM-1 caused defects in twitching motility (mediated by type IV pili), adherence and biofilm formation without affecting growth rates. Similarly, strains of Escherichia coli car...

  4. Effects of Iron Chelators on the Formation and Development of Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazik, Hasan; Penner, John C; Ferreira, Jose A; Haagensen, Janus A J; Cohen, Kevin; Spormann, Alfred M; Martinez, Marife; Chen, Vicky; Hsu, Joe L; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2015-10-01

    Iron acquisition is crucial for the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus. A. fumigatus biofilm formation occurs in vitro and in vivo and is associated with physiological changes. In this study, we assessed the effects of Fe chelators on biofilm formation and development. Deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DFS), and deferoxamine (DFM) were tested for MIC against a reference isolate via a broth macrodilution method. The metabolic effects (assessed by XTT [2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt]) on biofilm formation by conidia were studied upon exposure to DFP, DFM, DFP plus FeCl3, or FeCl3 alone. A preformed biofilm was exposed to DFP with or without FeCl3. The DFP and DFS MIC50 against planktonic A. fumigatus was 1,250 μM, and XTT gave the same result. DFM showed no planktonic inhibition at concentrations of ≤2,500 μM. By XTT testing, DFM concentrations of biofilms forming in A. fumigatus or preformed biofilms (P biofilm formation (P Biofilm formation with 625 μM DFP plus any concentration of FeCl3 was lower than that in the controls (P biofilms, DFP in the range of ≥625 to 1,250 μM was inhibitory compared to the controls (P biofilm formation (P biofilm increased with 2,500 μM FeCl3 only (P biofilms of A. fumigatus clinical isolates to DFP were noted. In conclusion, iron stimulates biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. Chelators can inhibit or enhance biofilms. Chelation may be a potential therapy for A. fumigatus, but we show here that chelators must be chosen carefully. Individual isolate susceptibility assessments may be needed. PMID:26239975

  5. Applying insights from biofilm biology to drug development - can a new approach be developed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Ciofu, Oana; Molin, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    Most of the research on bacterial pathogenesis has focused on acute infections, but much less is known about the pathogenesis of infections caused by bacteria that grow as aggregates in biofilms. These infections tend to be chronic as they resist innate and adaptive immune defence mechanisms as w...... pathology, and discuss how a deep insight into the physical and biological characteristics of biofilms can inform therapeutic strategies and molecular targets for the development of anti-biofilm drugs.......Most of the research on bacterial pathogenesis has focused on acute infections, but much less is known about the pathogenesis of infections caused by bacteria that grow as aggregates in biofilms. These infections tend to be chronic as they resist innate and adaptive immune defence mechanisms as...... well as antibiotics, and the treatment of biofilm infections presents a considerable unmet clinical need. To date, there are no drugs that specifically target bacteria in biofilms; however, several approaches are in early-stage development. Here, we review current insights into biofilm physiology and...

  6. Coexistence of Antibiotic-Producing and Antibiotic-Sensitive Bacteria in Biofilms Is Mediated by Resistant Bacteria▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Narisawa, Naoki; Haruta, Shin; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic-sensitive bacteria have been found to coexist with antibiotic-producing bacteria in biofilms, but little is known about how the former develop in such an environment. Here we isolated pyocyanin-sensitive bacteria belonging to the genus Brevibacillus from a biofilm derived from soil extract and based on the preestablished biofilm of a pyocyanin producer, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain P1. In addition, pyocyanin-resistant strains belonging to the genus Raoultella were isolated from th...

  7. Continuous Drip Flow System to Develop Biofilm of E. faecalis under Anaerobic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate a structurally mature E. faecalis biofilm developed under anaerobic/dynamic conditions in an in vitro system. Methods. An experimental device was developed using a continuous drip flow system designed to develop biofilm under anaerobic conditions. The inoculum was replaced every 24 hours with a fresh growth medium for up to 10 days to feed the system. Gram staining was done every 24 hours to control the microorganism purity. Biofilms developed under the system were evaluated under the scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results. SEM micrographs demonstrated mushroom-shaped structures, corresponding to a mature E. faecalis biofilm. In the mature biofilm bacterial cells are totally encased in a polymeric extracellular matrix. Conclusions. The proposed in vitro system model provides an additional useful tool to study the biofilm concept in endodontic microbiology, allowing for a better understanding of persistent root canal infections.

  8. Extracellular DNA formation during biofilm development by freshwater bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter;

    2011-01-01

    a transient peak at 6 hours, and in Rheinheimera the concentration peaked at 12 hours and remained high. Interestingly, the Rheinheimera biofilm dispersed immediately after the eDNA concentration peaked. The antimicrobial effect of eDNA was tested in growth experiments, and Rheinheimera was strongly......Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been shown to be important for biofilm formation, both in the initial step of biofilm formation (attachment), and for securing the structural stability of the mature biofilm. It is unclear whether a general consensus exists for when in biofilm formation the presence of...... eDNA is most important. In this study, we investigated the significance of eDNA during biofilm formation in four freshwater isolates. The aim was to relate the quantity and timing of eDNA production to the isolates’ ability to form biofilms. eDNA and biofilm biomass was quantified over time during...

  9. Current Trends in Development of Liposomes for Targeting Bacterial Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Zora Rukavina; Željka Vanić

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm targeting represents a great challenge for effective antimicrobial therapy. Increased biofilm resistance, even with the elevated concentrations of very potent antimicrobial agents, often leads to failed therapeutic outcome. Application of biocompatible nanomicrobials, particularly liposomally-associated nanomicrobials, presents a promising approach for improved drug delivery to bacterial cells and biofilms. Versatile manipulations of liposomal physicochemical properties, such as the b...

  10. Chemoinformatics-assisted development of new anti-biofilm compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dürig, Anna; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk;

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with a large number of infections. Biofilm-dwelling bacteria are particularly resistant to antibiotics, making it hard to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. Here, we use a novel cross-disciplinary approach combining microbiology and chemoinformatics to...... identify new and efficient anti-biofilm drugs. We found that ellagic acid (present in green tea) significantly inhibited biofilm formation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae. Based on ellagic acid, we performed in silico screening of the Chinese Natural Product Database to predict a 2nd-generation list of...

  11. ANALYSIS OF CHROMATE UPTAKE IN BACTERIAL BIOFILMS DEVELOPED ON ABIOTIC SUPPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Aditi Bhattacharya

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms also practice community living and form biofilms developed on preferred surfaces. The sessile and planktonic organisms show differences in hydrophobicity as determined by the BATH index. The saccharides of the EPS produced was determined using the phenol-sulphuric acid method and Rhamnolipids using the Orcinol method. Dye released from stained biofilms is also indicative of the density of the biofilm. Motility was reduced on formation of cell aggregates in m...

  12. Assessing biofilm development in drinking water distribution systems by Machine Learning methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Martínez, Eva

    2016-01-01

    [EN] One of the main challenges of drinking water utilities is to ensure high quality supply, in particular, in chemical and microbiological terms. However, biofilms invariably develop in all drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs), despite the presence of residual disinfectant. As a result, water utilities are not able to ensure total bacteriological control. Currently biofilms represent a real paradigm in water quality management for all DWDSs. Biofilms are complex communities of microo...

  13. Development and Validation of an In Vivo Candida albicans Biofilm Denture Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Marchillo, Karen; Spiegel, Carol A.; Andes, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The most common form of oral candidiasis, denture-associated stomatitis, involves biofilm growth on an oral prosthetic surface. Cells in this unique environment are equipped to withstand host defenses and survive antifungal therapy. Studies of the biofilm process on dentures have primarily been limited to in vitro models. We developed a rodent acrylic denture model and characterized the Candida albicans and mixed oral bacterial flora biofilm formation, architecture, and drug resistance in viv...

  14. A simple and low-cost biofilm quantification method using LED and CMOS image sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Junhee; Lee, Junghoon; Kwak, Soo Hwan; Oh, Sangwoo; Paek, Se-Hwan; Ha, Un-Hwan; Seo, Sungkyu

    2014-12-01

    A novel biofilm detection platform, which consists of a cost-effective red, green, and blue light-emitting diode (RGB LED) as a light source and a lens-free CMOS image sensor as a detector, is designed. This system can measure the diffraction patterns of cells from their shadow images, and gather light absorbance information according to the concentration of biofilms through a simple image processing procedure. Compared to a bulky and expensive commercial spectrophotometer, this platform can provide accurate and reproducible biofilm concentration detection and is simple, compact, and inexpensive. Biofilms originating from various bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), were tested to demonstrate the efficacy of this new biofilm detection approach. The results were compared with the results obtained from a commercial spectrophotometer. To utilize a cost-effective light source (i.e., an LED) for biofilm detection, the illumination conditions were optimized. For accurate and reproducible biofilm detection, a simple, custom-coded image processing algorithm was developed and applied to a five-megapixel CMOS image sensor, which is a cost-effective detector. The concentration of biofilms formed by P. aeruginosa was detected and quantified by varying the indole concentration, and the results were compared with the results obtained from a commercial spectrophotometer. The correlation value of the results from those two systems was 0.981 (N = 9, P CMOS image-sensor platform. PMID:25455019

  15. I. Development of Metal-Mediated SPOT-Synthesis Methods for the Efficient Construction of Small-Molecule Macroarrays. II. Design and Synthesis of Novel Bacterial Biofilm Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Reto

    I. The use of small molecule probes to explore biological phenomena has become a valuable tool in chemical biology. As a result, methods that permit the rapid synthesis and biological evaluation of such compounds are highly sought-after. The small molecule macroarray represents one such approach for the synthesis and identification of novel bioactive agents. Macroarrays are readily constructed via the SPOT-synthesis technique on planar cellulose membranes, yielding spatially addressed libraries of ˜10-1000 unique compounds. We sought to expand the arsenal of chemical reactions compatible with this solid-phase platform, and developed highly efficient SPOT-synthesis protocols for the Mizoroki-Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura, and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. We demonstrated that these metal-mediated reactions can be implemented, either individually or sequentially, for the efficient construction of small molecules in high purity on rapid time scales. Utilizing these powerful C-C and C-N bond forming coupling reactions, we constructed a series of macroarrays based on novel stilbene, phenyl-naphthalene, and triazole scaliblds. Subsequent biological testing of the stilbene and phenyl-naphthalene libraries revealed several potent antagonists and agonists, respectively, of the quorum sensing (QS) receptor LuxR in Vibrio fischeri. II. Bacteria living within biofilms are notorious for their resistance to known antibiotic agents, and constitute a major human health threat. Methods to attenuate biofilm growth would have a significant impact on the management of bacterial infections. Despite intense research efforts, small molecules capable of either inhibiting or dispersing biolilms remain scarce. We utilized natural products with purported anti-biofilm or QS inhibitory activity as sources of structural insight to guide the synthesis of novel biofilm modulators with improved activities. These studies revealed 2-aminobenzimidazole derivatives as highly potent

  16. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W.; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T.; Ko, Seung-Hyun B.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Lam, Joseph S.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite (A-NO2−, pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to A-NO2−. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to A-NO2−, but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with A-NO2− plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM A-NO2−, and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to A-NO2− in biofilms. A-NO2− sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, A-NO2− as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains. PMID:27064218

  17. Correlative Imaging of Structural and Elemental Composition of Bacterial Biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron-based phase contrast tomography (holotomography) and scanning hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) are combined to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structural and corresponding elemental distribution of bacterial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples were fixed without contrast agents or microtomal sectioning. Within an intact microbial community single bacteria are clearly resolved, and their morphology can be directly visualized together with the elemental content. Such 3D set of complementary information at cellular level is essential for gaining a deeper understanding of biofilm evolution aiming to develop potential strategies on biofilm growth control and prevention

  18. Correlative Imaging of Structural and Elemental Composition of Bacterial Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Heine, R.; Xu, F.; Suhonen, H.; Helfen, L.; Rosenhahn, A.; Gorniak, T.; Kirchen, S.; Schwartz, T.; Baumbach, T.

    2013-10-01

    Synchrotron-based phase contrast tomography (holotomography) and scanning hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) are combined to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structural and corresponding elemental distribution of bacterial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples were fixed without contrast agents or microtomal sectioning. Within an intact microbial community single bacteria are clearly resolved, and their morphology can be directly visualized together with the elemental content. Such 3D set of complementary information at cellular level is essential for gaining a deeper understanding of biofilm evolution aiming to develop potential strategies on biofilm growth control and prevention.

  19. Control of Biofilms with the Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia N. H. Marques

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms in organized structures attached to surfaces. Importantly, biofilms are a major cause of bacterial infections in humans, and remain one of the most significant challenges to modern medical practice. Unfortunately, conventional therapies have shown to be inadequate in the treatment of most chronic biofilm infections based on the extraordinary innate tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics. Antagonists of quorum sensing signaling molecules have been used as means to control biofilms. QS and other cell-cell communication molecules are able to revert biofilm tolerance, prevent biofilm formation and disrupt fully developed biofilms, albeit with restricted effectiveness. Recently however, it has been demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a small messenger molecule cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA that shows significant promise as an effective adjunctive to antimicrobial treatment of biofilms. This molecule is responsible for induction of the native biofilm dispersion response in a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and in yeast, and has been shown to reverse persistence, increase microbial metabolic activity and significantly enhance the cidal effects of conventional antimicrobial agents. In this manuscript, the use of cis-2-decenoic acid as a novel agent for biofilm control is discussed. Stimulating the biofilm dispersion response as a novel antimicrobial strategy holds significant promise for enhanced treatment of infections and in the prevention of biofilm formation.

  20. Development and optimization of biofilm based algal cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin Anthony

    This dissertation describes research done on biofilm based algal cultivation systems. The system that was developed in this work is the revolving algal biofilm cultivation system (RAB). A raceway-retrofit, and a trough-based pilot-scale RAB system were developed and investigated. Each of the systems significantly outperformed a control raceway pond in side-by-side tests. Furthermore the RAB system was found to require significantly less water than the raceway pond based cultivation system. Lastly a TEA/LCA analysis was conducted to evaluate the economic and life cycle of the RAB cultivation system in comparison to raceway pond. It was found that the RAB system was able to grow algae at a lower cost and was shown to be profitable at a smaller scale than the raceway pond style of algal cultivation. Additionally the RAB system was projected to have lower GHG emissions, and better energy and water use efficiencies in comparison to a raceway pond system. Furthermore, fundamental research was conducted to identify the optimal material for algae to attach on. A total of 28 materials with a smooth surface were tested for initial cell colonization and it was found that the tetradecane contact angle of the materials had a good correlation with cell attachment. The effects of surface texture were evaluated using mesh materials (nylon, polypropylene, high density polyethylene, polyester, aluminum, and stainless steel) with openings ranging from 0.05--6.40 mm. It was found that both surface texture and material composition influence algal attachment.

  1. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relati...

  2. Co-occurence of filamentation defects and impaired biofilms in Candida albicans protein kinase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidou, Nina; Morrissey, John Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Pathogenicity of Candida albicans is linked with its developmental stages, notably the capacity switch from yeast-like to hyphal growth, and to form biofilms on surfaces. To better understand the cellular processes involved in C. albicans development, a collection of 63 C. albicans protein kinase mutants was screened for biofilm formation in a microtitre plate assay. Thirty-eight mutants displayed some degree of biofilm impairment, with 20 categorised as poor biofilm formers. All the poor biofilm formers were also defective in the switch from yeast to hyphae, establishing it as a primary defect. Five genes, VPS15, IME2, PKH3, PGA43 and CEX1, encode proteins not previously reported to influence hyphal development or biofilm formation. Network analysis established that individual components of some processes, most interestingly MAP kinase pathways, are not required for biofilm formation, most likely indicating functional redundancy. Mutants were also screened for their response to bacterial supernatants and it was found that Pseudomonas aeruginosa supernatants inhibited biofilm formation in all mutants, regardless of the presence of homoserine lactones (HSLs). In contrast, Candida morphology was only affected by supernatant containing HSLs. This confirms the distinct HSL-dependent inhibition of filamentation and the HSL-independent impairment of biofilm development by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26472756

  3. Quantification of biofilm accumulation by an optical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bakke, Rune; Kalvenes, Sigmund; Kommedal, Roald

    2001-01-01

    Methods for non-invasive, in situ, measurements of biofilm optical density and biofilm optical thickness were evaluated based on Pseudomonas aeruginosa experiments. Biofilm optical density, measured as intensity reduction of a light beam transmitted through the biofilm, correlates with biofilm mass, measured as total carbon and as cell mass. The method is more sensitive and less labor intensive than other commonly used methods for determining extent of biofilm mass accumulation. Biofilm optic...

  4. In vitro and in vivo generation and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-dispersed cells via c-di-GMP manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Hultqvist, Louise D; Yuan, Mingjun; Rybtke, Morten; Nielsen, Thomas E; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a global secondary bacterial messenger that controls the formation of drug-resistant multicellular biofilms. Lowering the intracellular c-di-GMP content can disperse biofilms, and it is proposed as a biofilm eradication strategy...... biofilms by reducing the intracellular c-di-GMP content through modulation of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Unlike conventional protocols that demonstrate biofilm dispersal by biomass quantification, our protocols enable physiological characterization of the dispersed cells. Biomarkers of dispersed cells are...

  5. Developed Fungal-Bacterial Biofilms as A Novel Tool for Bioremoval of Hexavelant Chromium from Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herath, Lasantha; Rajapaksha, R. M. A. U.; Vithanage, M.;

    2014-01-01

    Remediation measures for hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] are required for a safe environment. As a recent development in microbiology, bacterial biofilms are being studied as effective bioremediation agents. When bacteria are in fungal surface-attached biofilm mode, they are called fungal...

  6. Quorum sensing-controlled biofilm development in Serratia liquefaciens MG1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labbate, M.; Queek, S.Y.; Koh, K.S.; Rice, S.A.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kjelleberg, S.

    2004-01-01

    aggregates and differentiated cell chains. Signal-based complementation of this mutant resulted in a biofilm with the wild-type architecture. Two quorum-sensing-regulated genes (bsmA and bsmB) involved in biofilm development were identified, and we propose that these genes are engaged in fine-tuning the...

  7. Antibacterial Effect of Dental Adhesive Containing Dimethylaminododecyl Methacrylate on the Development of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suping Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial bonding agents and composites containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM have been recently developed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of novel adhesives containing different mass fractions of DMADDM on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans biofilm at different developmental stages. Different mass fractions of DMADDM were incorporated into adhesives and S. mutans biofilm at different developmetal stages were analyzed by MTT assays, lactic acid measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. Exopolysaccharides (EPS staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm extracellular matrix. Dentin microtensile strengths were also measured. Cured adhesives containing DMADDM could greatly reduce metabolic activity and lactic acid production during the development of S. mutans biofilms (p < 0.05. In earlier stages of biofilm development, there were no significant differences of inhibitory effects between the 2.5% DMADDM and 5% DMADDM group. However, after 72 h, the anti-biofilm effects of adhesives containing 5% DMADDM were significantly stronger than any other group. Incorporation of DMADDM into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength. In conclusion, adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited the growth, lactic acid production and EPS metabolism of S. mutans biofilm at different stages, with no adverse effect on its dentin adhesive bond strength. The bonding agents have the potential to control dental biofilms and combat tooth decay, and DMADDM is promising for use in a wide range of dental adhesive systems and restoratives.

  8. Building spatially-structured biofilms with single-cell control using laser trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodesney, Christopher; Hutchison, Jaime; Kaushik, Karishma; Le, Henry; Hurwitz, Daniel; Irie, Yasuhiko; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are sessile communities of microbes adhered to each other and to an interface. Biofilm infections are notoriously difficult to eradicate, and this arises in part from phenotypic changes due to the spatial structure of the biofilm. Spatial structure controls the microenvironment and intercellular associations, which in turn controls gene expression, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. There are few tools available for elucidating the role of spatial structure in biofilms. We present a method for controlling the positions of bacteria on a surface using optical trapping without impinging cell viability. Initial positions propagate into the developing biofilm, creating spatial structure. The native growth, motility, and surface adhesion of positioned cells are preserved, as shown for model organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate statistically-significant effects of spatial structure on the growth of monoculture P. aeruginosa biofilms and for co-culture biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Because the laser trap we use is very basic and the other equipment required is inexpensive and standard, we believe that our technique will be a widely-usable tool for biological and physical collaborators at many types of institutions.

  9. Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates maintain the biofilm formation capacity and the gene expression profiles during the chronic lung infection of CF patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Bao le ri; Schjerling, Charlotte K.; Kirkby, Nikolai;

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic diversifications of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) promote long-term survival of bacteria during chronic lung infection. Twelve clonally related, sequential mucoid and non-mucoid paired P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from three...

  10. The cabABC Operon Essential for Biofilm and Rugose Colony Development in Vibrio vulnificus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hwan Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A transcriptome analysis identified Vibrio vulnificus cabABC genes which were preferentially expressed in biofilms. The cabABC genes were transcribed as a single operon. The cabA gene was induced by elevated 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP and encoded a calcium-binding protein CabA. Comparison of the biofilms produced by the cabA mutant and its parent strain JN111 in microtiter plates using crystal-violet staining demonstrated that CabA contributed to biofilm formation in a calcium-dependent manner under elevated c-di-GMP conditions. Genetic and biochemical analyses revealed that CabA was secreted to the cell exterior through functional CabB and CabC, distributed throughout the biofilm matrix, and produced as the biofilm matured. These results, together with the observation that CabA also contributes to the development of rugose colony morphology, indicated that CabA is a matrix-associated protein required for maturation, rather than adhesion involved in the initial attachment, of biofilms. Microscopic comparison of the structure of biofilms produced by JN111 and the cabA mutant demonstrated that CabA is an extracellular matrix component essential for the development of the mature biofilm structures in flow cells and on oyster shells. Exogenously providing purified CabA restored the biofilm- and rugose colony-forming abilities of the cabA mutant when calcium was available. Circular dichroism and size exclusion analyses revealed that calcium binding induces CabA conformational changes which may lead to multimerization. Extracellular complementation experiments revealed that CabA can assemble a functional matrix only when exopolysaccharides coexist. Consequently, the combined results suggested that CabA is a structural protein of the extracellular matrix and multimerizes to a conformation functional in building robust biofilms, which may render V. vulnificus to survive in hostile environments and reach a concentrated infective dose.

  11. Design of a Simple Model of Candida albicans Biofilms Formed under Conditions of Flow: Development, Architecture and Drug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Uppuluri, Priya; Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Ribot, Jose Lopez

    2009-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilms on most medical devices are exposed to a flow of body fluids that provide water and nutrients to the fungal cells. While C. albicans biofilms grown in vitro under static conditions have been exhaustively studied, the same is not true for biofilms developed under continuous flow of replenishing nutrients. Here, we describe a simple flow biofilm (FB) model that can be built easily with materials commonly available in most microbiological laboratories. We demonstrate th...

  12. Impact of Chloramination on the Development of Laboratory-Grown Biofilms Fed with Filter-Pretreated Groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Fangqiong; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the continuous impact of monochloramine disinfection on laboratory-grown biofilms through the characterization of biofilm architecture and microbial community structure. Biofilm development and disinfection were achieved using CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) biofilm reactor systems with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coupons as the substratum and sand filter-pretreated groundwater as the source of microbial seeding and growth nutrient. After 2 weeks of growth, ...

  13. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enz...

  14. Self-organization of bacterial biofilms is facilitated by extracellular DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Gloag, Erin S; Turnbull, Lynne; Huang, Alan; Vallotton, Pascal; Wang, Huabin; Nolan, Laura M.; Mililli, Lisa; Hunt, Cameron; Lu, Jing; Osvath, Sarah R.; Monahan, Leigh G.; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Charles, Ian G.; Wand, Matt P; Gee, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Twitching motility-mediated biofilm expansion is a complex, multicellular behavior that enables the active colonization of surfaces by many species of bacteria. In this study we have explored the emergence of intricate network patterns of interconnected trails that form in actively expanding biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We have used high-resolution, phase-contrast time-lapse microscopy and developed sophisticated computer vision algorithms to track and analyze individual cell movements...

  15. Impact of Chloramination on the Development of Laboratory-Grown Biofilms Fed with Filter-Pretreated Groundwater

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Fangqiong

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the continuous impact of monochloramine disinfection on laboratory-grown biofilms through the characterization of biofilm architecture and microbial community structure. Biofilm development and disinfection were achieved using CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) biofilm reactor systems with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coupons as the substratum and sand filter-pretreated groundwater as the source of microbial seeding and growth nutrient. After 2 weeks of growth, the biofilms were subjected to chloramination for 8 more weeks at concentrations of 7.5±1.4 to 9.1±0.4 mg Cl2 L-1. Control reactors received no disinfection during the development of biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis indicated that chloramination could lead to 81.4-83.5% and 86.3-95.6% reduction in biofilm biomass and thickness, respectively, but could not eliminate biofilm growth. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis indicated that microbial community structures between chloraminated and non-chloraminated biofilms exhibited different successional trends. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis further revealed that chloramination could select members of Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria as the dominant populations, whereas natural development leads to the selection of members of Nitrospira and Bacteroidetes as dominant biofilm populations. Overall, chloramination treatment could alter the growth of multi-species biofilms on the PVC surface, shape the biofilm architecture, and select a certain microbial community that can survive or proliferate under chloramination.

  16. Rock physics models for constraining quantitative interpretation of ultrasonic data for biofilm growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadhrami, Fathiya Mohammed

    This study examines the use of rock physics modeling for quantitative interpretation of seismic data in the context of microbial growth and biofilm formation in unconsolidated sediment. The impetus for this research comes from geophysical experiments by Davis et al. (2010) and Kwon and Ajo-Franklin et al. (2012). These studies observed that microbial growth has a small effect on P-wave velocities (VP) but a large effect on seismic amplitudes. Davis et al. (2010) and Kwon and Ajo-Franklin et al. (2012) speculated that the amplitude variations were due to a combination of rock mechanical changes from accumulation of microbial growth related features such as biofilms. A more definite conclusion can be drawn by developing rock physics models that connect rock properties to seismic amplitudes. The primary objective of this work is to provide an explanation for high amplitude attenuation due to biofilm growth. The results suggest that biofilm formation in the Davis et al. (2010) experiment exhibit two growth styles: a loadbearing style where biofilm behaves like an additional mineral grain and a non-loadbearing mode where the biofilm grows into the pore spaces. In the loadbearing mode, the biofilms contribute to the stiffness of the sediments. We refer to this style as "filler." In the non-loadbearing mode, the biofilms contribute only to change in density of sediments without affecting their strength. We refer to this style of microbial growth as "mushroom." Both growth styles appear to be changing permeability more than the moduli or the density. As the result, while the VP velocity remains relatively unchanged, the amplitudes can change significantly depending on biofilm saturation. Interpreting seismic data from biofilm growths in term of rock physics models provide a greater insight into the sediment-fluid interaction. The models in turn can be used to understand microbial enhanced oil recovery and in assisting in solving environmental issues such as creating bio

  17. Biofilm development by potentially pathogenic non-pigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Roblas Ricardo; Ayala Guillermo; Kinnari Teemu J; Martín-de-Hijas Nieves Z; Esteban Jaime; Gadea Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background A study to evaluate the biofilm-development ability in three different media (Middlebrook 7H9, sterile tap water and PBS-5% glucose) was performed with 19 collection strains from 15 different species on non-pigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria (NPRGM). A microtiter plate assay was developed to evaluate the percentage of covered surface of the microtiter plate wells in different days from day 1 to day 69. Results All strains were able to develop biofilm in all the tested ...

  18. Management of dental unit waterline biofilms in the 21st century.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Mary J

    2011-10-01

    Dental chair units (DCUs) use water to cool and irrigate DCU-supplied instruments and tooth surfaces, and provide rinsewater during dental treatment. A complex network of interconnected plastic dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) supply water to these instruments. DUWLs are universally prone to microbial biofilm contamination seeded predominantly from microorganisms in supply water. Consequently, DUWL output water invariably becomes contaminated by high densities of microorganisms, principally Gram-negative environmental bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella species, but sometimes contain human-derived pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Patients and staff are exposed to microorganisms from DUWL output water and to contaminated aerosols generated by DCU instruments. A wide variety of approaches, many unsuccessful, have been proposed to control DUWL biofilm. More recently, advances in biofilm science, chemical DUWL biofilm treatment agents, DCU design, supply water treatment and development of automated DUWL biofilm control systems have provided effective long-term solutions to DUWL biofilm control.

  19. A novel planar flow cell for studies of biofilm heterogeneity and flow-biofilm interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas S.; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yang; Lee, Jisun; Packman, Aaron I.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities growing on surfaces, and are ubiquitous in nature, in bioreactors, and in human infection. Coupling between physical, chemical, and biological processes is known to regulate the development of biofilms; however, current experimental systems do not provide sufficient control of environmental conditions to enable detailed investigations of these complex interactions. We developed a novel planar flow cell that supports biofilm growth under complex two-dimensional fluid flow conditions. This device provides precise control of flow conditions and can be used to create well-defined physical and chemical gradients that significantly affect biofilm heterogeneity. Moreover, the top and bottom of the flow chamber are transparent, so biofilm growth and flow conditions are fully observable using non-invasive confocal microscopy and high-resolution video imaging. To demonstrate the capability of the device, we observed the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under imposed flow gradients. We found a positive relationship between patterns of fluid velocity and biofilm biomass because of faster microbial growth under conditions of greater local nutrient influx, but this relationship eventually reversed because high hydrodynamic shear leads to the detachment of cells from the surface. These results reveal that flow gradients play a critical role in the development of biofilm communities. By providing new capability for observing biofilm growth, solute and particle transport, and net chemical transformations under user-specified environmental gradients, this new planar flow cell system has broad utility for studies of environmental biotechnology and basic biofilm microbiology, as well as applications in bioreactor design, environmental engineering, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology, and biomedical research. PMID:21656713

  20. A new approach for development of kinetics of wastewater treatment in aerobic biofilm reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S.; Sarkar, S.; Mazumder, D.

    2016-02-01

    Biofilm process is widely used for the treatment of a variety of wastewater especially containing slowly biodegradable substances. It provides resistance against toxic environment and is capable of retaining biomass under continuous operation. Development of kinetics is very much pertinent for rational design of a biofilm process for the treatment of wastewater with or without inhibitory substances. A simple approach for development of such kinetics for an aerobic biofilm reactor has been presented using a novel biofilm model. The said biofilm model is formulated from the correlations between substrate concentrations in the influent/effluent and at biofilm liquid interface along with substrate flux and biofilm thickness complying Monod's growth kinetics. The methodology for determining the kinetic coefficients for substrate removal and biomass growth has been demonstrated stepwise along with graphical representations. Kinetic coefficients like K, k, Y, b t, b s, and b d are determined either from the intercepts of X- and Y-axis or from the slope of the graphical plots.

  1. Flow velocity impact on biofilm development in subsurface environments - A laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, D.; Boisson, A.; Aquilina, L.; Bour, O.; Davy, P.

    2012-12-01

    Biofilm development is the result of complex interactions between structural, physical, chemical and biological properties. Natural circulation of chemically rich water in subsurface environments both promotes and limits biofilm growth, with a strong impact on its shape and reactivity. Understanding the interaction between hydrodynamic processes and biofilm properties requires more experimental and modeling investigations. We propose an experimental approach to study the relationship between hydrodynamic parameters and reactivity at the pore-scale. The experimental set-up allows monitoring denitrification process for nitrate rich site water passing continuously through plastic tubes for several flow velocities. This idealized 1D flow experiment enables to reproduce pore-scale interactions between flow velocity and biological activities in natural conditions. The observed dynamic of nitrate transformation is related to different evolution of the biofilm structure and illustrates the impact of flow velocity on biofilm growth and shape. It leads to identify several regimes at the different phases of the biofilm development where flow velocity is a determinant factor for biofilm stability and performance.

  2. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri type IV Pilus is required for twitching motility, biofilm development, and adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunger, German; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Andrade, Maxuel O; Jones, Jeffrey B; Farah, Chuck S

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial type IV pili (T4P) are long, flexible surface filaments that consist of helical polymers of mostly pilin subunits. Cycles of polymerization, attachment, and depolymerization mediate several pilus-dependent bacterial behaviors, including twitching motility, surface adhesion, pathogenicity, natural transformation, escape from immune system defense mechanisms, and biofilm formation. The Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain 306 genome codes for a large set of genes involved in T4P biogenesis and regulation and includes several pilin homologs. We show that X. citri subsp. citri can exhibit twitching motility in a manner similar to that observed in other bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Xylella fastidiosa and that this motility is abolished in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri knockout strains in the genes coding for the major pilin subunit PilAXAC3241, the ATPases PilBXAC3239 and PilTXAC2924, and the T4P biogenesis regulators PilZXAC1133 and FimXXAC2398. Microscopy analyses were performed to compare patterns of bacterial migration in the wild-type and knockout strains and we observed that the formation of mushroom-like structures in X. citri subsp. citri biofilm requires a functional T4P. Finally, infection of X. citri subsp. citri cells by the bacteriophage (ΦXacm4-11 is T4P dependent. The results of this study improve our understanding of how T4P influence Xanthomonas motility, biofilm formation, and susceptibility to phage infection. PMID:25180689

  3. Streptococcus mutans protein synthesis during mixed-species biofilm development by high-throughput quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marlise I; Xiao, Jin; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M; Yates, John R; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v) was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA) and glucan-binding (gbpB) during this transition (P<0.05). Furthermore, S. mutans up-regulates specific adaptation mechanisms to cope with acidic environments (F1F0-ATPase system, fatty acid biosynthesis, branched chain amino acids metabolism), and molecular chaperones (GroEL). Interestingly, the protein levels and gene expression are in general augmented when S. mutans form mixed-species biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms) demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm maintenance in the

  4. Streptococcus mutans protein synthesis during mixed-species biofilm development by high-throughput quantitative proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise I Klein

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA and glucan-binding (gbpB during this transition (P<0.05. Furthermore, S. mutans up-regulates specific adaptation mechanisms to cope with acidic environments (F1F0-ATPase system, fatty acid biosynthesis, branched chain amino acids metabolism, and molecular chaperones (GroEL. Interestingly, the protein levels and gene expression are in general augmented when S. mutans form mixed-species biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm

  5. msaABCR operon positively regulates biofilm development by repressing proteases and autolysis in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Sahukhal, Gyan S; Batte, Justin L.; Elasri, Mohamed O.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes nosocomial and community-acquired infections. One of the most important aspects of staphylococcal infections is biofilm development within the host, which renders the bacterium resistant to the host’s immune response and antimicrobial agents. Biofilm development is very complex and involves several regulators that ensure cell survival on surfaces within the extracellular polymeric matrix. Previously, we identified the msaABCR op...

  6. Efficacy of dental unit waterlines disinfectants on a polymicrobial biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Damien; Girardot, Marion; Bertaux, Joanne; Verdon, Julien; Imbert, Christine

    2016-03-15

    Due to their high surface-volume ratio, their laminar flow and frequent stagnation periods, dental unit waterlines (DUWL) foster the attachment of microorganisms and the development of biofilm, resulting in the continuous contamination of the outlet water from dental units; this contamination may be responsible for a potential risk of infection due to the exposure of patients and medical staff to droplet inhalation or splashed water. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of three disinfectants recommended by dental unit manufacturers -Calbenium(©), Oxygenal 6(©) and Sterispray(©) - was evaluated. A dynamic model simulating DUWL conditions was developed and polymicrobial biofilms containing bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), fungi (Candida albicans) and Free Living Amoeba (FLA: Vermamoeba vermiformis) were allowed to form. The ability of disinfectants to reduce biofilm formation or to eradicate an already formed biofilm was evaluated. Results showed the various effects of the tested disinfectants according to their composition, concentration and the targeted species. V. vermiformis was resistant to disinfectants, regardless of the tested concentrations and the concentrations recommended by manufacturers were not the most appropriate. Results also showed that Calbenium(©) was the most effective disinfectant to reduce already formed biofilms; its maximum efficiency was observed from 0.5% on both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans compared to 2 and 3% respectively for Sterispray(©). The maximum efficiency of Oxygenal(©) was observed from 3% on P. aeruginosa but Oxygenal(©) was unable to totally eliminate C. albicans in the tested conditions, contrary to other disinfectants. Calbenium(©) was able to prevent biofilm formation efficiently even if it displayed no prophylactic activity against V. vermiformis. Overall, the FLA survival may contribute to maintaining other species. Finally the tested disinfectants were partially active against sessile microorganisms

  7. The Novel Two-Component Regulatory System BfiSR Regulates Biofilm Development by Controlling the Small RNA rsmZ through CafA▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Petrova, Olga E.; Sauer, Karin

    2010-01-01

    The formation of biofilms by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a developmental process governed by a novel signal transduction system composed of three two-component regulatory systems (TCSs), BfiSR, BfmSR, and MifSR. Here, we show that BfiSR-dependent arrest of biofilm formation coincided with reduced expression of genes involved in virulence, posttranslational/transcriptional modification, and Rhl quorum sensing but increased expression of rhlAB and the small regulatory R...

  8. Environmental switching during biofilm development in a cold seep system and functional determinants of species sorting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2015-11-28

    The functional basis for species sorting theory remains elusive, especially for microbial community assembly in deep sea environments. Using artificial surface-based biofilm models, our recent work revealed taxonomic succession during biofilm development in a newly defined cold seep system, the Thuwal cold seeps II, which comprises a brine pool and the adjacent normal bottom water (NBW) to form a metacommunity via the potential immigration of organisms from one patch to another. Here, we designed an experiment to investigate the effects of environmental switching between the brine pool and the NBW on biofilm assembly, which could reflect environmental filtering effects during bacterial immigration to new environments. Analyses of 16S rRNA genes of 71 biofilm samples suggested that the microbial composition of biofilms established in new environments was determined by both the source community and the incubation conditions. Moreover, a comparison of 18 metagenomes provided evidence for biofilm community assembly that was based primarily on functional features rather than taxonomic identities; metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism were the major species sorting determinants for the succession of biofilm communities. Genome binning and pathway reconstruction of two bacterial species (Marinobacter sp. and Oleispira sp.) further demonstrated metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism as functional traits conferring the survival of habitat generalists in both the brine pool and NBW. The results of the present study sheds new light on microbial community assembly in special habitats and bridges a gap in species sorting theory.

  9. ANALYSIS OF CHROMATE UPTAKE IN BACTERIAL BIOFILMS DEVELOPED ON ABIOTIC SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Bhattacharya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms also practice community living and form biofilms developed on preferred surfaces. The sessile and planktonic organisms show differences in hydrophobicity as determined by the BATH index. The saccharides of the EPS produced was determined using the phenol-sulphuric acid method and Rhamnolipids using the Orcinol method. Dye released from stained biofilms is also indicative of the density of the biofilm. Motility was reduced on formation of cell aggregates in mature biofilms. The extent of light penetration through the biofilms indicates the extent of stacking, its cohesive or incrusting nature, determined using a light meter. Chromium has wide industrial use and hexavalent chromate is toxic on account of its higher solubility. Among the different processes and approaches being used by microorganisms for chromate remediation, the use of biofilms may be a good alternative for bioremediation of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium. Chromate uptake was studied in suspended or free living daughter cells that have originated out of a single mature biofilm. FTIR spectra of loaded and unloaded biomass can be used to determine the functional groups responsible for biosorption of chromium

  10. Environmental switching during biofilm development in a cold seep system and functional determinants of species sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Renmao; Bo, Yang; Cao, Huiluo; Cai, Lin; Chen, Lianguo; Zhou, Guowei; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Xixiang; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The functional basis for species sorting theory remains elusive, especially for microbial community assembly in deep-sea environments. Using artificial surface-based biofilm models, our recent work revealed taxonomic succession during biofilm development in a newly defined cold seep system, the Thuwal cold seeps II, which comprises a brine pool and the adjacent normal bottom water (NBW) to form a metacommunity via the potential immigration of organisms from one patch to another. Here, we designed an experiment to investigate the effects of environmental switching between the brine pool and the NBW on biofilm assembly, which could reflect environmental filtering effects during bacterial immigration to new environments. Analyses of 16S rRNA genes of 71 biofilm samples suggested that the microbial composition of biofilms established in new environments was determined by both the source community and the incubation conditions. Moreover, a comparison of 18 metagenomes provided evidence for biofilm community assembly that was based primarily on functional features rather than taxonomic identities; metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism were the major species sorting determinants for the succession of biofilm communities. Genome binning and pathway reconstruction of two bacterial species (Marinobacter sp. and Oleispira sp.) further demonstrated metal ion resistance and amino acid metabolism as functional traits conferring the survival of habitat generalists in both the brine pool and NBW. The results of this study shed new light on microbial community assembly in special habitats and bridge a gap in species sorting theory. PMID:26614914

  11. Different carbon isotope fractionation patterns during the development of phototrophic freshwater and marine biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Staal

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural phototrophic biofilms are influenced by a broad array of abiotic and biotic factors and vary over temporal and spatial scales. Different developmental stages can be distinguished and growth rates will vary due to the thickening of the biofilm, which is expected to lead to a limitation of light or mass transport. This study shows that variation in CO2(aq availability leads to a fractionation shift and thereby affects δ13C signatures during biofilm development. For phototrophic freshwater biofilms it was found that the δ13C value became less negative with the thickening of the biofilm, while the opposite trend was found in marine biofilms. Modeling and pH profiling indicated that the trend in the freshwater system was caused by an increase in CO2(aq limitation resulting in an increase of HCO3 as C-source. The opposite trend in the marine system could be explained by a higher heterotrophic biomass and activity causing a higher carbon recycling and thereby lower δ13C values. We conclude that δ13C was more related to the net areal photosynthesis rate and carbon recycling, rather than to the growth rate of the biofilms.

  12. Dynamics of Streptococcus mutans transcriptome in response to starch and sucrose during biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise I Klein

    Full Text Available The combination of sucrose and starch in the presence of surface-adsorbed salivary α-amylase and bacterial glucosyltransferases increase the formation of a structurally and metabolically distinctive biofilm by Streptococcus mutans. This host-pathogen-diet interaction may modulate the formation of pathogenic biofilms related to dental caries disease. We conducted a comprehensive study to further investigate the influence of the dietary carbohydrates on S. mutans-transcriptome at distinct stages of biofilm development using whole genomic profiling with a new computational tool (MDV for data mining. S. mutans UA159 biofilms were formed on amylase-active saliva coated hydroxyapatite discs in the presence of various concentrations of sucrose alone (ranging from 0.25 to 5% w/v or in combination with starch (0.5 to 1% w/v. Overall, the presence of sucrose and starch (suc+st influenced the dynamics of S. mutans transcriptome (vs. sucrose alone, which may be associated with gradual digestion of starch by surface-adsorbed amylase. At 21 h of biofilm formation, most of the differentially expressed genes were related to sugar metabolism, such as upregulation of genes involved in maltose/maltotriose uptake and glycogen synthesis. In addition, the groEL/groES chaperones were induced in the suc+st-biofilm, indicating that presence of starch hydrolysates may cause environmental stress. In contrast, at 30 h of biofilm development, multiple genes associated with sugar uptake/transport (e.g. maltose, two-component systems, fermentation/glycolysis and iron transport were differentially expressed in suc+st-biofilms (vs. sucrose-biofilms. Interestingly, lytT (bacteria autolysis was upregulated, which was correlated with presence of extracellular DNA in the matrix of suc+st-biofilms. Specific genes related to carbohydrate uptake and glycogen metabolism were detected in suc+st-biofilms in more than one time point, indicating an association between presence of starch

  13. Effect of alcohols on filamentation, growth, viability and biofilm development in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin M Chauhan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we report the potential of alcohols as morphogenetic regulators in Candida albicans. All the alcohols tested influenced various modes of growth like planktonic as well as biofilm forms. Viability was affected at high concentrations. Among the alcohols, the response of C. albicans to amyl alcohol (pentanol was noteworthy. Amyl alcohol at a concentration 0.5% which was not inhibitory to growth and viability specifically inhibited morphogenetic switching from yeast to hyphal forms. It also inhibited normal biofilm development favoring yeast dominated biofilms. Based on this study we hypothesize that alcohols produced under anaerobic conditions may not favor biofilm development and support dissemination of yeast cells. Since anaerobic conditions are not found to favor production of quorum sensing molecules like farnesol, the alcohols may play a role in morphogenetic regulation.

  14. Biofilm removal technique using sands as a research tool for accessing microbial attachment on surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms have profound impacts on improved survival of the constituent microorganisms in nature. Biofilms were believed to protect constituent microorganisms from sanitizer treatment, provide a more suitable habitat for microorganisms, and become a site for genetic material exchanges between microorganisms. As we realize more about the significance of biofilm, methods used for biofilm study should be consistently developed and evaluated. To determine microbial attachment on surfaces, usually biofilms are grown on substratum surfaces and removed by vortexing with glass beads or scraping. However, scraping is not as effective as vortexing with glass beads. Another approach is direct-agar overlaying which cannot be used with high density biofilm. In this experiment, we compared effectiveness of glass beads (298±28 μm in diameter and sands (width: 221±55 μm and length: 329±118 μm in removing biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by vortexing method. The results suggested that acid-washed sands, which are significantly less inexpensive than glass beads, were as effective as (P>0.05 analytical grade glass beads in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm removal without inhibiting growth of the organism.

  15. Mycoalgae biofilm: development of a novel platform technology using algae and fungal cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendran, Aravindan; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Microalgae is considered a promising source for biofuel and bioenergy production, bio-remediation and production of high-value bioactive compounds, but harvesting microalgae is a major bottleneck in the algae based processes. The objective of this research is to mimic the growth of natural lichen and develop a novel biofilm platform technology using filamentous fungi and microalgae to form a lichen type of biofilm “mycoalgae” in a supporting polymer matrix. Results The possibility ...

  16. Development of In Vitro Denture Biofilm Models for Studying Denture-related Halitosis and Stomatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Tingxi

    2012-01-01

    Denture stomatitis and denture-related halitosis are two of the most prevalent denture related infectious diseases. The establishment of denture biofilm models for disease-associated pathogens is essential in further investigating the pathogenesis of these diseases. Chapter I and II of this thesis reported the successful development of denture biofilm model for Candida albican, the main pathogen of denterun stomatitis; as well as the denture models for halitosis-related bacteria, including Kl...

  17. Multi-channel microfluidic biosensor platform applied for online monitoring and screening of biofilm formation and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bruchmann

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization of surfaces and interfaces has a major impact on various areas including biotechnology, medicine, food industries, and water technologies. In most of these areas biofilm development has a strong impact on hygiene situations, product quality, and process efficacies. In consequence, biofilm manipulation and prevention is a fundamental issue to avoid adverse impacts. For such scenario online, non-destructive biofilm monitoring systems become important in many technical and industrial applications. This study reports such a system in form of a microfluidic sensor platform based on the combination of electrical impedance spectroscopy and amperometric current measurement, which allows sensitive online measurement of biofilm formation and activity. A total number of 12 parallel fluidic channels enable real-time online screening of various biofilms formed by different Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains and complex mixed population biofilms. Experiments using disinfectant and antibiofilm reagents demonstrate that the biofilm sensor is able to discriminate between inactivation/killing of bacteria and destabilization of biofilm structures. The impedance and amperometric sensor data demonstrated the high dynamics of biofilms as a consequence of distinct responses to chemical treatment strategies. Gene expression of flagellar and fimbrial genes of biofilms grown inside the microfluidic system supported the detected biofilm growth kinetics. Thus, the presented biosensor platform is a qualified tool for assessing biofilm formation in specific environments and for evaluating the effectiveness of antibiofilm treatment strategies.

  18. Multi-channel microfluidic biosensor platform applied for online monitoring and screening of biofilm formation and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchmann, Julia; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E; Schwartz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of surfaces and interfaces has a major impact on various areas including biotechnology, medicine, food industries, and water technologies. In most of these areas biofilm development has a strong impact on hygiene situations, product quality, and process efficacies. In consequence, biofilm manipulation and prevention is a fundamental issue to avoid adverse impacts. For such scenario online, non-destructive biofilm monitoring systems become important in many technical and industrial applications. This study reports such a system in form of a microfluidic sensor platform based on the combination of electrical impedance spectroscopy and amperometric current measurement, which allows sensitive online measurement of biofilm formation and activity. A total number of 12 parallel fluidic channels enable real-time online screening of various biofilms formed by different Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains and complex mixed population biofilms. Experiments using disinfectant and antibiofilm reagents demonstrate that the biofilm sensor is able to discriminate between inactivation/killing of bacteria and destabilization of biofilm structures. The impedance and amperometric sensor data demonstrated the high dynamics of biofilms as a consequence of distinct responses to chemical treatment strategies. Gene expression of flagellar and fimbrial genes of biofilms grown inside the microfluidic system supported the detected biofilm growth kinetics. Thus, the presented biosensor platform is a qualified tool for assessing biofilm formation in specific environments and for evaluating the effectiveness of antibiofilm treatment strategies. PMID:25706987

  19. Lysogenic Conversion and Phage Resistance Development in Phage Exposed Escherichia coli Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram Aertsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three-day old mature biofilms of Escherichia coli were exposed once to either a temperate Shiga-toxin encoding phage (H-19B or an obligatory lytic phage (T7, after which further dynamics in the biofilm were monitored. As such, it was found that a single dose of H-19B could rapidly lead to a near complete lysogenization of the biofilm, with a subsequent continuous release of infectious H-19B particles. On the other hand, a single dose of T7 rapidly led to resistance development in the biofilm population. Together, our data indicates a profound impact of phages on the dynamics within structured bacterial populations.

  20. Subaerial biofilms on granitic historic buildings: microbial diversity and development of phototrophic multi-species cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Nion, D; Rodríguez-Castro, J; López-Rodríguez, M C; Fernández-Silva, I; Prieto, B

    2016-07-01

    Microbial communities of natural subaerial biofilms developed on granitic historic buildings of a World Heritage Site (Santiago de Compostela, NW Spain) were characterized and cultured in liquid BG11 medium. Environmental barcoding through next-generation sequencing (Pacific Biosciences) revealed that the biofilms were mainly composed of species of Chlorophyta (green algae) and Ascomycota (fungi) commonly associated with rock substrata. Richness and diversity were higher for the fungal than for the algal assemblages and fungi showed higher heterogeneity among samples. Cultures derived from natural biofilms showed the establishment of stable microbial communities mainly composed of Chlorophyta and Cyanobacteria. Although most taxa found in these cultures were not common in the original biofilms, they are likely common pioneer colonizers of building stone surfaces, including granite. Stable phototrophic multi-species cultures of known microbial diversity were thus obtained and their reliability to emulate natural colonization on granite should be confirmed in further experiments. PMID:27192622

  1. Lysogenic conversion and phage resistance development in phage exposed Escherichia coli biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moons, Pieter; Faster, David; Aertsen, Abram

    2013-01-01

    In this study, three-day old mature biofilms of Escherichia coli were exposed once to either a temperate Shiga-toxin encoding phage (H-19B) or an obligatory lytic phage (T7), after which further dynamics in the biofilm were monitored. As such, it was found that a single dose of H-19B could rapidly lead to a near complete lysogenization of the biofilm, with a subsequent continuous release of infectious H-19B particles. On the other hand, a single dose of T7 rapidly led to resistance development in the biofilm population. Together, our data indicates a profound impact of phages on the dynamics within structured bacterial populations. PMID:23344561

  2. Sulfur-based denitrification: Effect of biofilm development on denitrification fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Bott, Charles; Nerenberg, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Elemental sulfur (S(o)) can serve as an electron donor for denitrification. However, the mechanisms and rates of S(o)-based denitrification, which depend on a biofilm development on a solid S(o) surface, are not well understood. We used completely-mixed reactors packed with S(o) chips to systematically explore the behavior of S(o)-based denitrification as a function of the bulk nitrate (NO3(-)) concentration and biofilm development. High-purity (99.5%) and agricultural-grade (90% purity) S(o) chips were tested to explore differences in performance. NO3(-) fluxes followed a Monod-type relationship with the bulk NO3(-) concentration. For high-purity S(o), the maximum NO3(-) flux increased from 0.4 gN/m(2)-d at 21 days to 0.9 g N/m(2)-d at around 100 days, but then decreased to 0.65 gN/m(2)-d at 161 days. The apparent (extant) half-saturation constant for NO3(-) KSapp, based on the bulk NO3(-) concentration and NO3(-) fluxes into the biofilm, increased from 0.1 mgN/L at 21 days to 0.8 mgN/L at 161 days, reflecting the increasing mass transfer resistance as the biofilm thickness increased. Nitrite (NO2(-)) accumulation became significant at bulk NO3(-) concentration above 0.2 mgN/L. The behavior of the agricultural-grade S(o) was very similar to the high-purity S(o). The kinetic behavior of S(o)-based denitrification was consistent with substrate counter-diffusion, where the soluble sulfur species diffuse from the S(o) particle into the base of the biofilm, while NO3(-) diffuses into the biofilm from the bulk. Initially, the fluxes were low due to biomass limitation (thin biofilms). As the biofilm thickness increased with time, the fluxes first increased, stabilized, and then decreased. The decrease was probably due to increasing diffusional resistance in the thick biofilm. Results suggest that fluxes comparable to heterotrophic biofilm processes can be achieved, but careful management of biofilm accumulation is important to maintain high fluxes. PMID:27187050

  3. Development of Spatial Distribution Patterns by Biofilm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Bak Christensen, Bjarke;

    2015-01-01

    Confined spatial patterns of microbial distribution are prevalent in nature, such as in microbial mats, soil communities, and water stream biofilms. The symbiotic two-species consortium of Pseudomonas putida and Acinetobacter sp. C6, originally isolated from a creosote-polluted aquifer, has evolved......, as well as the ecology of engineered communities that have the potential for enhanced and sustainable bioprocessing capacity....

  4. Effect of Particulate Contaminants on the Development of Biofilms at Air/Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon

    2016-03-22

    The development of biofilms at air/water or oil/water interfaces has important ramifications on several applications, but it has received less attention than biofilm formation on solid surfaces. A key difference between the growth of biofilms on solid surfaces versus liquid interfaces is the range of complicated boundary conditions the liquid interface can create that may affect bacteria, as they adsorb onto and grow on the interface. This situation is exacerbated by the existence of complex interfaces in which interfacially adsorbed components can even more greatly affect interfacial boundary conditions. In this work, we present evidence as to how particle-laden interfaces impact biofilm growth at an air/water interface. We find that particles can enhance the rate of growth and final strength of biofilms at liquid interfaces by providing sites of increased adhesive strength for bacteria. The increased adhesion stems from creating localized areas of hydrophobicity that protrude in the water phase and provide sites where bacteria preferentially adhere. This mechanism is found to be primarily controlled by particle composition, with particle size providing a secondary effect. This increased adhesion through interfacial conditions creates biofilms with properties similar to those observed when adhesion is increased through biological means. Because of the generally understood ubiquity of increased bacteria attachment to hydrophobic surfaces, this result has general applicability to pellicle formation for many pellicle-forming bacteria. PMID:26943272

  5. Modeling bacterial attachment to surfaces as an early stage of biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moustaid, Fadoua; Eladdadi, Amina; Uys, Lafras

    2013-06-01

    Biofilms are present in all natural, medical and industrial surroundings where bacteria live. Biofilm formation is a key factor in the growth and transport of both beneficial and harmful bacteria. While much is known about the later stages of biofilm formation, less is known about its initiation which is an important first step in the biofilm formation. In this paper, we develop a non-linear system of partial differential equations of Keller-Segel type model in one-dimensional space, which couples the dynamics of bacterial movement to that of the sensing molecules. In this case, bacteria perform a biased random walk towards the sensing molecules. We derive the boundary conditions of the adhesion of bacteria to a surface using zero-Dirichlet boundary conditions, while the equation describing sensing molecules at the interface needed particular conditions to be set. The numerical results show the profile of bacteria within the space and the time evolution of the density within the free-space and on the surface. Testing different parameter values indicate that significant amount of sensing molecules present on the surface leads to a faster bacterial movement toward the surface which is the first step of biofilm initiation. Our work gives rise to results that agree with the biological description of the early stages of biofilm formation. PMID:23906151

  6. Pulse-based non-thermal plasma (NTP) disrupts the structural characteristics of bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, James R; Shen, Fan; Grey, Scott F; Woolverton, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms were constructed in vitro with two pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus using a modified, novel sequential bioreactor system. The structure and stability of bacterial biofilms were evaluated following exposure to non-thermal plasma (NTP) discharge. Mathematical software was used to determine structural changes as biofilms grew over the course of 7 days. Statistical modeling was also performed to assess the ability of NTP to affect the development of the biofilms over different periods of time. Several structural characteristics were significantly affected by NTP discharge whereas others were unaffected. Changes in the three-dimensional structure of the biofilm following introduction of NTP was not limited to one period of development. The mechanism for this phenomenon is not understood but is likely to be a dual, synergistic effect due to the composition of the reactive species and other plasma-associated molecules isolated previously in the NTP discharge used in this study. PMID:23682750

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Pyocin Production Affects Population Dynamics within Mixed-Culture Biofilms▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Waite, Richard D.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptomic and phenotypic studies showed that pyocins are produced in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 aerobic and anaerobic biofilms. Pyocin activity was found to be high in slow-growing anaerobic biofilms but transient in aerobic biofilms. Biofilm coculture of strain PAO1 and a pyocin-sensitive isolate showed that pyocin production had a significant impact on bacterial population dynamics, particularly under anaerobic conditions.

  8. The Role of Sucrose in the Development of Oral Biofilm in a Simulated Mouth System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaidah H. Abdul Rahim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of oral biofilm consisting of early settlers and late settlers in the presence and absence of sucrose using a simulated mouth model was investigated. The experiments were carried out by growing the early settlers’ biofilm consisting of Strep. mitis and Strep. sanguinis and late settlers’ biofilm of Strep. mutans in the simulated mouth system. Experiments using three different nutrient conditions (A, B and C were carried out. In A, sterile saliva was used as the nutrient source in which the early settlers were suspended and pumped into the simulated mouth system and allowed to grow for 24 hrs. In B, 1% of BHI broth was added to the sterile saliva three times a day at 6 hrs interval to demonstrate the effect of glucose on the development of the biofilms. In C, the 1% BHI was supplemented with 1% sucrose in order to show the effect of glucose in the presence of sucrose on the development of the biofilm. The experiments were subsequently repeated with the late settlers. In all the experiments, A serves as the control where the nutrient source is minimal. The data collected were analyzed using Student t-test. From the results obtained, it was observed that both glucose and sucrose enhanced the development of early and late settlers’ biofilms. The growth of late settlers’ biofilm however, was found to be significantly higher in the presence of sucrose (93x106 CFU mL-1 compared to glucose (66x106 CFU mL-1 with a p value <0.05.

  9. Studies of protein adsorption on implant materials in relation to biofilm formation I. Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Polypropylene and High density Polyethylene in presence of serum albumin

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, S Dutta; Maity, P K; Tarafdar, S; Moulik, S P

    2014-01-01

    The surface of biomaterials used as implants are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization and subsequent infection. The amount of protein adsorption on biomaterials, among other factors, can affect the nature and quality of biofilms formed on them. The variation in the adsorption time of the protein on the biomaterial surface produces a phenotypic change in the bacteria by alteration of the production of EPS (exoplysaccharide) matrix. Knowledge of the effects of protein adsorption on implant infection will be very useful in understanding the chemistry of the biomaterial surfaces, which can deter the formation of biofilms. It is observed that the adsorption of BSA on the biomaterial surfaces increases with time and concentration, irrespective of their type and the nature of the EPS matrix of the bacterial biofilm is dependent on the amount of protein adsorbed on the biomaterial surface. The adsorption of protein (BSA) on the biomaterials, polypropylene (PP) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) has been stu...

  10. Characterization of Temporal Protein Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms†

    OpenAIRE

    Southey-Pillig, Christopher J.; Davies, David G; Sauer, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Phenotypic and genetic evidence supporting the notion of biofilm formation as a developmental process is growing. In the present work, we provide additional support for this hypothesis by identifying the onset of accumulation of biofilm-stage specific proteins during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maturation and by tracking the abundance of these proteins in planktonic and three biofilm developmental stages. The onset of protein production was found to correlate with the progression of biofil...

  11. Possible inhibitory molecular mechanism of farnesol on the development of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Hua; Wei, Xin; Ma, Ming; Chen, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Shuang-Bo

    2012-02-01

    Candida albicans biofilm infections are usually treated with azole antifungals such as fluconazole. However, the development of resistance to this drug in C. albicans biofilms is very common, especially in immunocompromised individuals. The upregulation of the sterol biosynthetic pathway gene ERG and the efflux pump genes CDR and MDR may contribute to this azole tolerance in Candida species. We hypothesize that farnesol, an endogenous quorum sensing molecule with possible antimicrobial properties which is also the precursor of ergosterols in C. albicans, may interfere with the development of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans biofilms. To test this hypothesis, MICs were compared and morphology changes were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for farnesol-treated and -untreated and fluconazole-resistant groups. The expression of possible target genes (ERG11, ERG25, ERG6, ERG5, ERG3, ERG1, MDR1, CDR1, and CDR2) in biofilms was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of farnesol. The results showed a decreased MIC of fluconazole and thinner biofilms for the farnesol-treated group, indicating that farnesol inhibited the development of fluconazole resistance. The sterol biosynthetic pathway may contribute to the inhibitory effects of farnesol, as the transcription levels of the ERG11, ERG25, ERG6, ERG3, and ERG1 genes decreased in the farnesol-treated group. PMID:22106223

  12. Enzymes Enhance Biofilm Removal Efficiency of Cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Philipp; Mauerhofer, Stefan; Schneider, Jana; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Rosenberg, Urs; Ren, Qun

    2016-06-01

    Efficient removal of biofilms from medical devices is a big challenge in health care to avoid hospital-acquired infections, especially from delicate devices like flexible endoscopes, which cannot be reprocessed using harsh chemicals or high temperatures. Therefore, milder solutions such as enzymatic cleaners have to be used, which need to be carefully developed to ensure efficacious performance. In vitro biofilm in a 96-well-plate system was used to select and optimize the formulation of novel enzymatic cleaners. Removal of the biofilm was quantified by crystal violet staining, while the disinfecting properties were evaluated by a BacTiter-Glo assay. The biofilm removal efficacy of the selected cleaner was further tested by using European standard (EN) for endoscope cleaning EN ISO 15883, and removal of artificial blood soil was investigated by treating TOSI (Test Object Surgical Instrument) cleaning indicators. Using the process described here, a novel enzymatic endoscope cleaner was developed, which removed 95% of Staphylococcus aureus and 90% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the 96-well plate system. With a >99% reduction of CFU and a >90% reduction of extracellular polymeric substances, this cleaner enabled subsequent complete disinfection and fulfilled acceptance criteria of EN ISO 15883. Furthermore, it efficiently removed blood soil and significantly outperformed comparable commercial products. The cleaning performance was stable even after storage of the cleaner for 6 months. It was demonstrated that incorporation of appropriate enzymes into the cleaner enhanced performance significantly. PMID:27044552

  13. Development of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during two decades of antipseudomonal treatment at the Danish CF Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Pedersen, S S;

    1994-01-01

    At the Danish CF Center patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection were treated 3-4 times a year (from 1976) with a 2-week intravenous antipseudomonal course which included preferentially an aminoglycoside and a beta-lactam antibiotic. We investigated the development of antibiotic...... 1991 (100 strains). All the strains were screened and assayed semiquantitatively for beta-lactamase activity by use of nitrocefin. We found a significant (p < 0.005) increase in the MIC values of the P. aeruginosa strains against piperacillin and ceftazidime. However, no significant correlation was...... found between the MIC and the number of antipseudomonal courses of antibiotics. The proportion of resistant in vivo selected P. aeruginosa strains, presumed to be stably derepressed producers of chromosomal beta-lactamase, also increased significantly during the period studied. Our results confirm that...

  14. Role of a Tannerella forsythia exopolysaccharide synthesis operon in biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Kiyonobu; Inagaki, Satoru; Okuda, Katsuji; Kuramitsu, Howard K; Sharma, Ashu

    2007-04-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe implicated in the development of periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory disease induced by bacterial infections which leads to tooth loss if untreated. Since biofilms formed by periodontal bacteria are considered important in disease progression and pose difficulties in treatment, we sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms of T. forsythia biofilm formation. This was carried out by screening random insertion mutants of T. forsythia for alterations in biofilm development. This approach lead to the identification of an operon involved in exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis. An isogenic mutant of one of the genes, wecC, contained within the operon was constructed. The isogenic wecC mutant showed increased ability to form biofilms as compared to the parent strain. The wecC mutant also formed aggregated microcolonies and showed increased cell-surface associated hydrophobicity as compared to the parent strain. Moreover, biochemical characterization of the wecC mutant indicated that glycosylation of surface glycoproteins was reduced. Therefore, our results suggest that the wecC operon is associated with glycosylation of surface-glycoprotein expression and likely plays an inhibitory role in T. forsythia biofilm formation. PMID:17363213

  15. Anti-biofilm efficacy of low temperature processed AgCl–TiO2 nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofilms are a major concern in the medical settings and food industries due to their high tolerance to antibiotics, biocides and mechanical stress. Currently, the development of novel methods to control biofilm formation is being actively pursued. In the present study, sol–gel coatings of AgCl–TiO2 nanoparticles are presented as potential anti-biofilm agents, wherein TiO2 acts as a good supporting matrix to prevent aggregation of silver and facilitates its controlled release. Low-temperature processed AgCl–TiO2 nanocomposite coatings inhibit biofilm formation by Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro biofilm assay experiments demonstrated that AgCl–TiO2 nanocomposite coated surfaces, inhibited the development of biofilms over a period of 10 days as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The silver release kinetics exhibited an initial high release, followed by a slow and sustained release. The anti-biofilm efficacy of the coatings could be attributed to the release of silver, which prevents the initial bacterial adhesion required for biofilm formation. - Highlights: • Potential of AgCl–TiO2 nanocomposite coating to inhibit biofilm formation is exhibited. • Initial rapid release followed by later slow and sustained release of silver obtained. • TiO2 being porous and inorganic in nature acts as a good supporting matrix

  16. Biofilms and the survival of opportunistic pathogens in recycled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, M.; Ford, T.; Maki, J. S.; Mitchell, R.

    1991-01-01

    Microorganisms are likely to develop an organic film on pipes, water reservoirs and filters used for waste water reclamation during extended missions in space. These biofilms can serve to protect and concentrate potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Our investigation has emphasized the survival strategy of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in distilled water. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were used as test organisms. Cultures were incubated at 10 degrees, 25 degrees, and 37 degrees C. No viable Staphylococcus cells were detected after the first week of incubation. P. aeruginosa, however, survived in distilled water up to 5 months at all three temperatures tested. The starved cells were able to form a biofilm layer on stainless steel. The cells exhibited a negative surface charge. The charge may be involved in the adhesion of this bacterium to metal substrata. We are currently investigating the importance of adhesion in the survival of this and other potential human pathogens found in water recycling systems.

  17. Membrane biofilm development improves COD removal in anaerobic membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam L; Skerlos, Steven J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2015-09-01

    Membrane biofilm development was evaluated to improve psychrophilic (15°C) anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treatment of domestic wastewater. An AnMBR containing three replicate submerged membrane housings with separate permeate collection was operated at three levels of membrane fouling by independently controlling biogas sparging for each membrane unit. High membrane fouling significantly improved permeate quality, but resulted in dissolved methane in the permeate at a concentration two to three times the equilibrium concentration predicted by Henry's law. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA targeting Bacteria and Archaea and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) gene in methanogens indicated that the membrane biofilm was enriched in highly active methanogens and syntrophic bacteria. Restoring fouled membranes to a transmembrane pressure (TMP) near zero by increasing biogas sparging did not disrupt the biofilm's treatment performance, suggesting that microbes in the foulant layer were tightly adhered and did not significantly contribute to TMP. Dissolved methane oversaturation persisted without high TMP, implying that methanogenesis in the biofilm, rather than high TMP, was the primary driving force in methane oversaturation. The results describe an attractive operational strategy to improve treatment performance in low-temperature AnMBR by supporting syntrophy and methanogenesis in the membrane biofilm through controlled membrane fouling. PMID:26238293

  18. Efficient surface functionalization of wound dressings by a phytoactive nanocoating refractory to Candida albicans biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ion; Holban, Alina Maria; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2013-12-01

    The present study reports the fabrication and characterization of a novel nanostructured phyto-bioactive coated rayon/polyester wound dressing (WD) surface refractory to Candida albicans adhesion, colonization and biofilm formation, based on functionalized magnetite nanoparticles and Anethum graveolens (AG) and Salvia officinalis (SO) essential oils (EOs). TEM, XRD, TGA, FT-IR were used for the characterization of the fabricated nanobiocoated WDs. Using magnetic nanoparticles for the stabilization and controlled release of EOs, the activity of natural volatile compounds is significantly enhanced and their effect is stable during time. For this reason the nanobiocoated surfaces exhibited a longer term anti-biofilm effect, maintained for at least 72 h. Besides their excellent anti- adherence properties, the proposed solutions exhibit the advantage of using vegetal natural compounds, which are less toxic and easily biodegradable in comparison with synthetic antifungal drugs, representing thus promising approaches for the development of successful ways to control and prevent fungal biofilms associated infections. PMID:24706124

  19. Unravelling the interactions among microbial populations found in activated sludge during biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Santos, Antonio; Murciano, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms colonize surfaces and develop biofilms through interactions that are not yet thoroughly understood, with important implications for water and wastewater systems. This study investigated the interactions between N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing bacteria, yeasts and protists, and their contribution to biofilm development. Sixty-one bacterial strains were isolated from activated sludge and screened for AHL production, with Aeromonas sp. found to be the dominant AHL producer. Shewanella xiamenensis, Aeromonas allosaccharophila, Acinetobacter junii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa recorded the highest adherence capabilities, with S. xiamenensis being the most effective in surface colonization. Additionally, highly significant interactions (i.e. synergic or antagonistic) were described for dual and multistrain mixtures of bacterial strains (P. aeruginosa, S. xiamenensis, A. junii and Pseudomonas stutzeri), as well as for strongly adherent bacteria co-cultured with yeasts. In this last case, the adhered biomass in co-cultures was lower than the monospecific biofilms of bacteria and yeast, with biofilm observations by microscopy suggesting that bacteria had an antagonist effect on the whole or part of the yeast population. Finally, protist predation by Euplotes sp. and Paramecium sp. on Aeromonas hydrophila biofilms not only failed to reduce biofilm formation, but also recorded unexpected results leading to the development of aggregates of high density and complexity. PMID:27306553

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Burmølle, Mette; Hentzer, Morten; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hougen, Hans Petter; Calum, Henrik; Madsen, Kit G; Moser, Claus; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael Christian

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant to...

  1. Antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase inpatients with cystic fibrosis are markers of the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to beta-lactams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Walter-Rasmussen, J; Pressler, T; Pedersen, S S; Høiby, N

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal beta-lactamase production is considered to be the most important resistance mechanism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against beta-lactams. Recently we have detected serum and sputum antibodies against P. aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase (a beta ab), using immunoblotting techniques. In...

  2. Biofilm development by potentially pathogenic non-pigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Roblas Ricardo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A study to evaluate the biofilm-development ability in three different media (Middlebrook 7H9, sterile tap water and PBS-5% glucose was performed with 19 collection strains from 15 different species on non-pigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria (NPRGM. A microtiter plate assay was developed to evaluate the percentage of covered surface of the microtiter plate wells in different days from day 1 to day 69. Results All strains were able to develop biofilm in all the tested media. Middlebrook 7H9 showed the fastest growth, followed by sterile tap water and PBS-5% glucose. A sigmoid growth curve was detected in all the strains both in Middlebrook 7H9 and in sterile tap water. A difference could be detected for Mycobacterium abscessus in tap water, where it showed faster growth than all the other strains. Conclusion Biofilm development seems to be a property of all the species of NPRGM and it depends on the nutrients present in the medium. The microtiter plate assay described here is a useful tool to evaluate differences in biofilm development among the different species of rapidly growing mycobacteria.

  3. Studies of protein adsorption on implant materials in relation to biofilm formation I. Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Polypropylene and High density Polyethylene in presence of serum albumin

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, S Dutta; Chatterjee, Susmita; Maity, P. K.; Tarafdar, S; Moulik, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    The surface of biomaterials used as implants are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization and subsequent infection. The amount of protein adsorption on biomaterials, among other factors, can affect the nature and quality of biofilms formed on them. The variation in the adsorption time of the protein on the biomaterial surface produces a phenotypic change in the bacteria by alteration of the production of EPS (exoplysaccharide) matrix. Knowledge of the effects of protein adsorption on impl...

  4. Biofilm development during the start-up period of anaerobic biofilm reactors: the biofilm Archaea community is highly dependent on the support material

    OpenAIRE

    Habouzit, Frédéric; Hamelin, Jérôme; Santa-Catalina, Gaelle; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Bernet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the nature of the support material on its colonization by a methanogenic consortium, four substrata made of different materials: polyvinyl chloride, 2 polyethylene and polypropylene were tested during the start-up of lab-scale fixed-film reactors. The reactor performances were evaluated and compared together with the analysis of the biofilms. Biofilm growth was quantified and the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities were characterized by molecular fingerpr...

  5. A study on the long term effect of biofilm produced by biosurfactant producing microbe on medical implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhawathi, Veluchamy; Thirunavukarasu, Kathirvel; Doble, Mukesh, E-mail: mukeshd@iitm.ac.in

    2014-07-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) is used as a long term medical implant. Biofilm forming ability of two pathogenic microorganisms, namely, Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) on this polymer and the differences in the properties of these matrices are studied for a year. There are very few long term studies on biofilms formed on medical implants. After three months, colonies of B. subtilis were two times higher when compared to those of P. aeruginosa. And at the end of one year, they were two orders of magnitude higher than the later. The exopolysaccharide (EPS) and biosurfactant recovered from the polymer surface after three months were 21 and 10.4 μg/cm{sup 2} for B. subtilis and 13 and 8.6 μg/cm{sup 2} for P. aeruginosa. After one year, these were higher in B. subtilis (50 and 37.1 μg/cm{sup 2}, respectively) than in P. aeruginosa (34.1 and 31.8 μg/cm{sup 2}, respectively). B. subtilis consisted of protein controlling the community and sporulation development, while P. aeruginosa had either housekeeping or metabolic proteins. The EPS in the respective biofilm consisted of biosurfactants produced by B. subtilis (surfactins, m/z = 1029 to 1134) and P. aeruginosa (rhamnolipids, m/z = 568 to 705). Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that LDPE incubated with these organisms underwent a weight loss of 4 and 3% after three months and 11.1 and 9.2% after one year, respectively at 435 °C. Laccase and manganese peroxidase were detected in the biofilm which could be involved in the degradation. The biosurfactant of these microorganisms altered the hydrophobicity of the surface, favoring their attachment and proliferation. - Highlights: • Early P.aeru biofilm had genes needed for motility but later for housekeeping. • Early B. sub biofilm had genes needed for its formation but later for maturity. • Cells and matrix components in B. sub biofilm are higher than in P.aeru. • Compositions of these two biofilms are different.

  6. A study on the long term effect of biofilm produced by biosurfactant producing microbe on medical implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) is used as a long term medical implant. Biofilm forming ability of two pathogenic microorganisms, namely, Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) on this polymer and the differences in the properties of these matrices are studied for a year. There are very few long term studies on biofilms formed on medical implants. After three months, colonies of B. subtilis were two times higher when compared to those of P. aeruginosa. And at the end of one year, they were two orders of magnitude higher than the later. The exopolysaccharide (EPS) and biosurfactant recovered from the polymer surface after three months were 21 and 10.4 μg/cm2 for B. subtilis and 13 and 8.6 μg/cm2 for P. aeruginosa. After one year, these were higher in B. subtilis (50 and 37.1 μg/cm2, respectively) than in P. aeruginosa (34.1 and 31.8 μg/cm2, respectively). B. subtilis consisted of protein controlling the community and sporulation development, while P. aeruginosa had either housekeeping or metabolic proteins. The EPS in the respective biofilm consisted of biosurfactants produced by B. subtilis (surfactins, m/z = 1029 to 1134) and P. aeruginosa (rhamnolipids, m/z = 568 to 705). Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that LDPE incubated with these organisms underwent a weight loss of 4 and 3% after three months and 11.1 and 9.2% after one year, respectively at 435 °C. Laccase and manganese peroxidase were detected in the biofilm which could be involved in the degradation. The biosurfactant of these microorganisms altered the hydrophobicity of the surface, favoring their attachment and proliferation. - Highlights: • Early P.aeru biofilm had genes needed for motility but later for housekeeping. • Early B. sub biofilm had genes needed for its formation but later for maturity. • Cells and matrix components in B. sub biofilm are higher than in P.aeru. • Compositions of these two biofilms are different. • So they need diverse

  7. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1–100 mm s−1), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ∼ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ∼ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ∼ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ∼ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments. (paper)

  8. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Alexander K.; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1-100 mm s-1), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ˜ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ˜ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ˜ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ˜ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments.

  9. Antibacterial activity of Espand (Peganum harmala alcoholic extracts against six pathogenic bacteria in planktonic and biofilm forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinab Mohsenipour

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microbial biofilms have attracted interest in recent years because they have become the most important cause of nosocomial infections. This study was aimed to examine the antibacterial activities of Peganum harmala extracts on the development of microbial biofilms and planktonic form of six pathogenic bacteria which include Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the crude extracts against the planktonic form of bacteria were evaluated by using disc diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values were determined by a macrobroth dilution technique. Anti- biofilm effects of the extracts were assessed by microtiter plate method. Results: According to the results, P. harmala extracts could inhibit test bacteria in planktonic form. To inhibit biofilm formation, biofilm metabolic activity and eradication of established biofilms, efficiency of the extracts depended on concentration. The highest inhibitory effects of P. harmala extracts were observed on biofilm formation of S. aureus (90.28% also, the greatest demolish were observed on S. pneumonia biofilm (77.76%. These extracts cause dramatically decrease the metabolic activity of bacteria in biofilm structures, in this case the decrement of B. cereus were highest (69.98% compared to other tested bacteria. Discussion and conclusion: Therefore, it can be suggested that P.harmala extracts applied as antimicrobial agents against testing bacteria particularly in biofilm forms. 

  10. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa chemotaxis methyltransferase CheR1 impacts on bacterial surface sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Schmidt

    Full Text Available The characterization of factors contributing to the formation and development of surface-associated bacterial communities known as biofilms has become an area of intense interest since biofilms have a major impact on human health, the environment and industry. Various studies have demonstrated that motility, including swimming, swarming and twitching, seems to play an important role in the surface colonization and establishment of structured biofilms. Thereby, the impact of chemotaxis on biofilm formation has been less intensively studied. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has a very complex chemosensory system with two Che systems implicated in flagella-mediated motility. In this study, we demonstrate that the chemotaxis protein CheR1 is a methyltransferase that binds S-adenosylmethionine and transfers a methyl group from this methyl donor to the chemoreceptor PctA, an activity which can be stimulated by the attractant serine but not by glutamine. We furthermore demonstrate that CheR1 does not only play a role in flagella-mediated chemotaxis but that its activity is essential for the formation and maintenance of bacterial biofilm structures. We propose a model in which motility and chemotaxis impact on initial attachment processes, dispersion and reattachment and increase the efficiency and frequency of surface sampling in P. aeruginosa.

  11. Synergistic antibacterial efficacy of early combination treatment with tobramycin and quorum-sensing inhibitors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intraperitoneal foreign-body infection mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise; van Gennip, Maria; Jakobsen, Tim H;

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS)-deficient Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms formed in vitro are more susceptible to tobramycin than QS-proficient P. aeruginosa biofilms, and combination treatment with a QS inhibitor (QSI) and tobramycin shows synergistic effects on the killing of in vitro biofilms. We extended...

  12. Pf Filamentous Phage Requires UvrD for Replication in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, Eriel; Campos-Gómez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pf is a lysogenic filamentous phage that promotes biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pf replicates by a rolling circle replication system which depends on a phage-encoded initiator protein and host factors usually involved in chromosome replication. Rep, an accessory replicative DNA helicase, is crucial for replication of filamentous phages in Escherichia coli. In contrast, here we show that, instead of depending on Rep, Pf replication depends on UvrD, an accessory helica...

  13. Magnetite nanoparticles for functionalized textile dressing to prevent fungal biofilms development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ion; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Anghel, Alina Georgiana; Ficai, Anton; Saviuc, Crina; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to improve the antibiofilm properties of textile dressing, tested in vitro against monospecific Candida albicans biofilms. Functionalized magnetite (Fe3O4/C18), with an average size not exceeding 20 nm, has been synthesized by precipitation of ferric and ferrous salts in aqueous solution of oleic acid (C18) and NaOH. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and differential thermal analysis coupled with thermo gravimetric analysis were used as characterization methods for the synthesized Fe3O4/C18. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the architecture of the fungal biofilm developed on the functionalized textile dressing samples and culture-based methods for the quantitative assay of the biofilm-embedded yeast cells. The optimized textile dressing samples proved to be more resistant to C. albicans colonization, as compared to the uncoated ones; these functionalized surfaces-based approaches are very useful in the prevention of wound microbial contamination and subsequent biofilm development on viable tissues or implanted devices.

  14. Observations on the development of the crystalline bacterial biofilms that encrust and block Foley catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D J; Morgan, S D

    2008-08-01

    The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterisation is complicated when the flow of urine through the catheter is blocked by encrustation. The problem results from infection by urease-producing bacteria, especially Proteus mirabilis, and the subsequent formation of crystalline biofilms on the catheter. The aim of this study was to discover how P. mirabilis initiates the development of these crystalline biofilms. The early stages in the formation of the biofilms were observed on a range of Foley catheters in a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that when all-silicone, silicone-coated latex, hydrogel-coated latex, hydrogel/silver-coated latex and nitrofurazone silicone catheters were inserted into bladder models containing P. mirabilis and alkaline urine, their surfaces were rapidly coated with a microcrystalline foundation layer. X-ray microanalysis showed that this material was composed of calcium phosphate. Bacterial colonisation of the foundation layer followed and by 18h the catheters were encrusted by densely populated crystalline P. mirabilis biofilms. These observations have important implications for the development of encrustation-resistant catheters. In the case of silver catheters for example, bacterial cells can attach to the crystalline foundation layer and continue to grow, protected from contact with the underlying silver. If antimicrobials are to be incorporated into catheters to prevent encrustation, it is important that they diffuse into the urine and prevent the rise in pH that triggers crystal formation. PMID:18550219

  15. Multispecies Biofilm Development on Space Station Heat Exhanger Core Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, B. H.; Roth, S. R.; Vega, L. M.; Pickering, K. D.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.; Roman, M. C.

    2007-01-01

    Investigations of microbial contamination of the cooling system aboard the International Space Station (ISS) suggested that there may be a relationship between heat exchanger (HX) materials and the degree of microbial colonization and biofilm formation. Experiments were undertaken to test the hypothesis that biofilm formation is influenced by the type and previous exposure of HX surfaces. Acidovorax delafieldii, Comamonas acidovorans, Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, originally isolated from ISS cooling system fluid, were cultured on R2A agar and suspended separately in fresh filter-sterilized ISS cooling fluid, pH 8.3. Initial numbers in each suspension ranged from 10(exp 6)-10(exp 7) CFU/ml, and a mixture contained greater than 10(exp 7) CFU/ml. Coupons of ISS HX material, previously used on orbit (HXOO) or unused (HXUU), polycarbonate (PC) and 316L polished stainless steel (SS) were autoclaved, covered with multispecies suspension in sterile tubes and incubated in the dark at ambient (22-25 C). Original HX material contained greater than 90% Ni, 4.5% Si, and 3.2% B, with a borate buffer. For approximately 10 weeks, samples of fluid were plated on R2A agar, and surface colonization assessed by SYBR green or BacLight staining and microscopy. Suspension counts for the PC and SC samples remained steady at around 10(exp 7) CFU/ml. HXUU counts declined about 1 log in 21 d then remained steady, and HXOO counts declined 2 logs in 28 d, fluctuated and stabilized about 10(exp 3) CFU/ml from 47-54 d. Predominantly yellow S. paucimobilis predominated on plates from HXOO samples up to 26 d, then white or translucent colonies of other species appeared. All colony types were seen on plates from other samples throughout the trial. Epifluorescence microscopy indicated microbial growth on all surfaces by 21 d, followed by variable colonization. After 54 d, all but the HXOO samples had well

  16. Development of mixed microbial granular biofilms for denitrification of concentrated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate containing wastes are generated at various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle; fuel fabrication and reprocessing. A treatment process for removing nitrate from such concentrated nitrate bearing effluents is needed. Among other available options, biological denitrification is an economical and technically feasible method for nitrate removal. Granular biofilm based sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) may allow designing a compact and high rate processes suitable for the treatment of concentrated effluents. Hence, experiments were carried out in laboratory scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) to develop granular biofilms (composed of mixed microbes) for removing nitrate from the concentrated nitrate containing-media. Microbial granular biofilms, capable of consuming nitrate up to 2710 mg/l nitrate-N, were developed under anaerobic conditions in a 6-litre volume sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The SBR was inoculated with activated sludge flocs and operated with 24-h cycle and 50% volumetric exchange ratio. Synthetic media containing acetate as the energy source and electron donor, at carbon to nitrogen molar ratio of 2:1 and 3:1 was fed into the SBRs. Nitrate-N concentration in the SBR was increased in a step-wise manner starting from 677 to 2710 mg/l (1355 to 5420 mg/l in the feed). Complete removal of influent nitrate occurred within the first few hours of SBR cycle period. Effluent nitrate and nitrite levels (∼3 mg/l nitrate-N or nitrite-N) at the end of SBR cycle period (24 h) were found to be below the discharge limits. Under these conditions biomass predominantly consisted of granular biofilms. Results show the potential of granular biofilm based SBR for converting nitrate to nitrogen gas from concentrated nitrate bearing industrial effluents. (author)

  17. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, H.; Andersen, Jens Bo;

    2003-01-01

    afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate of...... systems and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune......Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has...

  18. Self-organization of bacterial biofilms is facilitated by extracellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloag, Erin S; Turnbull, Lynne; Huang, Alan; Vallotton, Pascal; Wang, Huabin; Nolan, Laura M; Mililli, Lisa; Hunt, Cameron; Lu, Jing; Osvath, Sarah R; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Charles, Ian G; Wand, Matt P; Gee, Michelle L; Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2013-07-01

    Twitching motility-mediated biofilm expansion is a complex, multicellular behavior that enables the active colonization of surfaces by many species of bacteria. In this study we have explored the emergence of intricate network patterns of interconnected trails that form in actively expanding biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We have used high-resolution, phase-contrast time-lapse microscopy and developed sophisticated computer vision algorithms to track and analyze individual cell movements during expansion of P. aeruginosa biofilms. We have also used atomic force microscopy to examine the topography of the substrate underneath the expanding biofilm. Our analyses reveal that at the leading edge of the biofilm, highly coherent groups of bacteria migrate across the surface of the semisolid media and in doing so create furrows along which following cells preferentially migrate. This leads to the emergence of a network of trails that guide mass transit toward the leading edges of the biofilm. We have also determined that extracellular DNA (eDNA) facilitates efficient traffic flow throughout the furrow network by maintaining coherent cell alignments, thereby avoiding traffic jams and ensuring an efficient supply of cells to the migrating front. Our analyses reveal that eDNA also coordinates the movements of cells in the leading edge vanguard rafts and is required for the assembly of cells into the "bulldozer" aggregates that forge the interconnecting furrows. Our observations have revealed that large-scale self-organization of cells in actively expanding biofilms of P. aeruginosa occurs through construction of an intricate network of furrows that is facilitated by eDNA. PMID:23798445

  19. Experimental biofilms within drinking water treatment plant origin; evaluation of nutrient concentration and temperature influences upon their development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca FARKAS

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available From the planktonic free-floating state, microorganisms pass to the solid state, the biofilm, cells being strongly attached to each other and usually to the interface. This changing in cells’ behavior induces surface colonization and complex interactions development within the biofilm. If the biofilm’s role into the natural aquatic habitats is, undoubtedly, a positive one, consisting in water self-purification, drinking water pipe networks biofouling can be responsible for a wide range of water quality and operational problems. This exploratory experiment was performed in order to investigate, in a time interval of 7 days, the influence of certain environmental factors such as nutrient concentration and temperature upon in vitro biofilm’s development, origin in the biofilm of water treatment plant. The method used for in vitro biofilm growth monitoring is the colorimetric measurement of the biomass. Descriptive analyses, including the mean value, variability, trends, correlations and graphic displays were performed. The correlation analysis shown that the biofilm development in the discussed experiment was influenced as by the origin source as by the temperature, time and nutrients concentration. The biomass increment was significantly different for the biofilms with clarifier and sand filter sites origin, grown at 22 oC, while at 8 oC, the differences were not significant from a statistical point of view. For all the dilutions, moments and temperatures considered, the biofilm’s development with clarifier origin registered was significantly higher than the biofilm with sand filter origin.

  20. Anti-biofilm efficacy of low temperature processed AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, Kshipra, E-mail: kshipra_naik21@yahoo.co.in; Kowshik, Meenal, E-mail: meenal@goa.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a major concern in the medical settings and food industries due to their high tolerance to antibiotics, biocides and mechanical stress. Currently, the development of novel methods to control biofilm formation is being actively pursued. In the present study, sol–gel coatings of AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are presented as potential anti-biofilm agents, wherein TiO{sub 2} acts as a good supporting matrix to prevent aggregation of silver and facilitates its controlled release. Low-temperature processed AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coatings inhibit biofilm formation by Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro biofilm assay experiments demonstrated that AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coated surfaces, inhibited the development of biofilms over a period of 10 days as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The silver release kinetics exhibited an initial high release, followed by a slow and sustained release. The anti-biofilm efficacy of the coatings could be attributed to the release of silver, which prevents the initial bacterial adhesion required for biofilm formation. - Highlights: • Potential of AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coating to inhibit biofilm formation is exhibited. • Initial rapid release followed by later slow and sustained release of silver obtained. • TiO{sub 2} being porous and inorganic in nature acts as a good supporting matrix.

  1. D-amino acids trigger biofilm disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Romero, Diego; Cao, Shugeng; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-04-30

    Bacteria form communities known as biofilms, which disassemble over time. In our studies outlined here, we found that, before biofilm disassembly, Bacillus subtilis produced a factor that prevented biofilm formation and could break down existing biofilms. The factor was shown to be a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tyrosine, and D-tryptophan that could act at nanomolar concentrations. D-amino acid treatment caused the release of amyloid fibers that linked cells in the biofilm together. Mutants able to form biofilms in the presence of D-amino acids contained alterations in a protein (YqxM) required for the formation and anchoring of the fibers to the cell. D-amino acids also prevented biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-amino acids are produced by many bacteria and, thus, may be a widespread signal for biofilm disassembly. PMID:20431016

  2. The influence of resin-based dental materials on oral biofilms developement

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Andrei Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based composites (RBCs) are the most widespread restorative dental materials used nowadays. Nanotechnologies allowed the development and improvement of a new generation of RBCs which nevertheless still present many unsolved issues. The most important is secondary caries, which is the recurrence of dental caries in tissues close to the restoration. Dental caries disease is driven by a dysbiotic biofilm colonizing both natural and artificial surfaces. Many approaches have been developed i...

  3. The effect of selected plant extracts on the development of single-species dental biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the effect of a mixture of plant extracts on the adherence and retention of bacteria in dental biofilm. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study:Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from December 2009 to December 2011. Methodology: For determination of adhering ability, experimental pellicle was first treated with the Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) before inoculating it with individual bacterial species ( S. mitis / S. sanguinis / S. mutans). For the determination of retention ability, the procedure was repeated with the experimental pellicle being inoculated first with the individual bacterial species and then treating it with the PEM. These two experiments were repeated with deionized distilled water (negative control) and Thymol (0.64%) (positive control). The bacterial populations in biofilms for the two experiments were expressed as Colony Forming Unit (CFU) / mL x 10/sup 4/ and the corresponding values were expressed as mean +- SD. Results: The effect of the Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) for the two experiments was compared with that of Thymol and deionized distilled water. It was shown that there is a reduced adherence of bacteria to PEM-treated and Thymol (0.064%) treated experimental pellicle compared with the negative control (p < 0.001). It was also found that the retention of bacteria in both treated biofilms is also lower than that of negative control (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) may influence the development of dental biofilm by affecting the adhering and retention capacities of the bacterial species in the dental biofilms. (author)

  4. Structure Guided Development of Novel Thymidine Mimetics targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa Thymidylate Kinase: from Hit to Lead Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jun Yong; Plummer, Mark S.; Starr, Jeremy; Desbonnet, Charlene R.; Soutter, Holly; Chang, Jeanne; Miller, J. Richard; Dillman, Keith; Miller, Alita A.; Roush, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Thymidylate kinase (TMK) is a potential chemotherapeutic target because it is directly involved in the synthesis of an essential component, thymidine triphosphate, in DNA replication. All reported TMK inhibitors are thymidine analogs, which might retard their development as potent therapeutics due to cell permeability and off-target activity against human TMK. A small molecule hit (1, IC50 = 58 μM), which has reasonable inhibition potency against Pseudomonas aeruginosa TMK (PaTMK), was identi...

  5. Development and evaluation of a new PCR assay for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa D genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lødeng, A G G; Ahlén, C; Lysvand, H; Mandal, L H; Iversen, O J

    2006-08-01

    This report describes a new PCR-based assay for the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotype D in occupational saturation diving systems in the North Sea. This genotype has persisted in these systems for 11 years (1993-2003) and represents 18% of isolates from infections analysed during this period. The new PCR assay was based on sequences obtained after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis of a group of isolates related to diving that had been identified previously by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The primer set for the D genotype targets a gene that codes for a hypothetical class 4 protein in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. A primer set able to detect P. aeruginosa at the species level was also designed, based on the 23S-5S rDNA spacer region. The two assays produced 382-bp and 192-bp amplicons, respectively. The PCR assay was evaluated by analysing 100 P. aeruginosa isolates related to diving, representing 28 PFGE genotypes, and 38 clinical and community P. aeruginosa isolates and strains from other species. The assay identified all of the genotype D isolates tested. Two additional diving-relevant genotypes (TP2 and TP27) were also identified, as well as three isolates of non-diving origin. It was concluded that the new PCR assay is a useful tool for early detection and prevention of infections with the D genotype. PMID:16842571

  6. Synchronized dynamics of bacterial niche-specific functions during biofilm development in a cold seep brine pool

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2015-07-14

    The biology of biofilm in deep-sea environments is barely being explored. Here, biofilms were developed at the brine pool (characterized by limited carbon sources) and the normal bottom water adjacent to Thuwal cold seeps. Comparative metagenomics based on 50 Gb datasets identified polysaccharide degradation, nitrate reduction, and proteolysis as enriched functional categories for brine biofilms. The genomes of two dominant species: a novel deltaproteobacterium and a novel epsilonproteobacterium in the brine biofilms were reconstructed. Despite rather small genome sizes, the deltaproteobacterium possessed enhanced polysaccharide fermentation pathways, whereas the epsilonproteobacterium was a versatile nitrogen reactor possessing nar, nap and nif gene clusters. These metabolic functions, together with specific regulatory and hypersaline-tolerant genes, made the two bacteria unique compared with their close relatives including those from hydrothermal vents. Moreover, these functions were regulated by biofilm development, as both the abundance and the expression level of key functional genes were higher in later-stage biofilms, and co-occurrences between the two dominant bacteria were demonstrated. Collectively, unique mechanisms were revealed: i) polysaccharides fermentation, proteolysis interacted with nitrogen cycling to form a complex chain for energy generation; ii) remarkably, exploiting and organizing niche-specific functions would be an important strategy for biofilm-dependent adaptation to the extreme conditions.

  7. Extracellular polymeric substances govern the development of biofilm and mass transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for improved biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinping; Wang, Fang; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Zeng, Jun; Zhao, Qiguo; Jiang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    The hypothesis that extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affect the formation of biofilms for subsequent enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was tested. Controlled formation of biofilms on humin particles and biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene were performed with bacteria and EPS-extracted bacteria of Micrococcus sp. PHE9 and Mycobacterium sp. NJS-P. Bacteria without EPS extraction developed biofilms on humin, in contrast the EPS-extracted bacteria could not attach to humin particles. In the subsequent biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene, the biodegradation rates by biofilms were significantly higher than those of EPS-extracted bacteria. Although, both the biofilms and EPS-extracted bacteria showed increases in EPS contents, only the EPS contents in biofilms displayed significant correlations with the biodegradation efficiencies of phenanthrene and pyrene. It is proposed that the bacterial-produced EPS was a key factor to mediate bacterial attachment to other surfaces and develop biofilms, thereby increasing the bioavailability of poorly soluble PAH for enhanced biodegradation. PMID:26141288

  8. Antimicrobial resistance, respiratory tract infections and role of biofilms in lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2015-01-01

    Lung infection is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis and is mainly dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The biofilm mode of growth makes eradication of the infection impossible, and it causes a chronic inflammation in the airways. The general mechanisms of...... biofilm formation and antimicrobial tolerance and resistance are reviewed. Potential anti-biofilm therapeutic targets such as weakening of biofilms by quorum-sensing inhibitors or antibiotic killing guided by pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics are presented. The vicious circle of...... adaptive evolution of the persisting bacteria imposes important therapeutic challenges and requires development of new drug delivery systems able to reach the different niches occupied by the bacteria in the lung of cystic fibrosis patients....

  9. Development of a web-based platform for the systematic and large-scale study of microbial adhesionand biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, N. F.; Lourenço, Anália; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Veiga, Nuno; Machado, Idalina

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput biofilm studies are rapidly accumulating a large amount of omics-scale data. In other biological areas that deal with large datasets, such as genomics or proteomics, ways for simplifying the visualization and understanding of the obtained results have already been developed. As such, we have started the development of a Web-based platform for analogous management, visualization and exploration of biofilm data. This platform, named Biofomics, is comprised of three m...

  10. Deciphering the Contribution of Biofilm to the Pathogenesis of Peritoneal Dialysis Infections: Characterization and Microbial Behaviour on Dialysis Fluids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Sampaio

    Full Text Available Infections are major complications in peritoneal dialysis (PD with a multifactorial etiology that comprises patient, microbial and dialytic factors. This study aimed at investigating the contribution of microbial biofilms on PD catheters to recalcitrant infections and their interplay with PD related-factors. A prospective observational study was performed on 47 patients attending Centro Hospitalar of Porto and Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho to whom the catheter was removed due to infectious (n = 16 and non-infectious causes (n = 31. Microbial density on the catheter was assessed by culture methods and the isolated microorganisms identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight intact cell mass spectrometry. The effect of conventional and three biocompatible PD solutions on 16 Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CNS and 10 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains planktonic growth and biofilm formation was evaluated. Cultures were positive in 87.5% of the catheters removed due infectious and 90.3% removed due to non-infectious causes. However, microbial yields were higher on the cuffs of catheters removed due to infection vs. non-infection. Staphylococci (CNS and Staphylococcus aureus and P. aeruginosa were the predominant species: 32% and 20% in the infection and 43.3% and 22.7% in the non-infection group, respectively. In general, PD solutions had a detrimental effect on planktonic CNS and P. aeruginosa strains growth. All strains formed biofilms in the presence of PD solutions. The solutions had a more detrimental effect on P. aeruginosa than CNS strains. No major differences were observed between conventional and biocompatible solutions, although in icodextrin solution biofilm biomass was lower than in bicarbonate/lactate solution. Overall, we show that microbial biofilm is universal in PD catheters with the subclinical menace of Staphylococci and P. aeruginosa. Cuffs colonization may significantly contribute to infection. PD solutions

  11. Comparative studies on biofilm development by Aspergillus niger on polyester sheet and muslin cloth

    OpenAIRE

    Nitin Verma; Mukesh C.Bansal; Vivek kumar

    2010-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are naturally adapted to adhere on the surfaces in submerged cultures. Cell adhesion plays a vital role in biofilm development in submerged cultures. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the growth rate of Aspergillus on the polyester sheet and muslin cloth with and without solid support in submerged cultures. The growth of A. niger was observed to be high in polyester sheet when compared with muslin cloth.

  12. Membrane biofilm development improves COD removal in anaerobic membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adam L; Skerlos, Steven J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2015-01-01

    Membrane biofilm development was evaluated to improve psychrophilic (15°C) anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treatment of domestic wastewater. An AnMBR containing three replicate submerged membrane housings with separate permeate collection was operated at three levels of membrane fouling by independently controlling biogas sparging for each membrane unit. High membrane fouling significantly improved permeate quality, but resulted in dissolved methane in the permeate at a concentration tw...

  13. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  14. Bioinspired, dynamic, structured surfaces for biofilm prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Alexander K.

    Bacteria primarily exist in robust, surface-associated communities known as biofilms, ubiquitous in both natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms resist a wide range of biocidal treatments and pose persistent pathogenic threats. Treatment of adherent biofilm is difficult, costly, and, in medical systems such as catheters, frequently impossible. Adding to the challenge, we have discovered that biofilm can be both impenetrable to vapors and extremely nonwetting, repelling even low surface tension commercial antimicrobials. Our study shows multiple contributing factors, including biochemical components and multiscale reentrant topography. Reliant on surface chemistry, conventional strategies for preventing biofilm only transiently affect attachment and/or are environmentally toxic. In this work, we look to Nature's antifouling solutions, such as the dynamic spiny skin of the echinoderm, and we develop a versatile surface nanofabrication platform. Our benchtop approach unites soft lithography, electrodeposition, mold deformation, and material selection to enable many degrees of freedom—material, geometric, mechanical, dynamic—that can be programmed starting from a single master structure. The mechanical properties of the bio-inspired nanostructures, verified by AFM, are precisely and rationally tunable. We examine how synthetic dynamic nanostructured surfaces control the attachment of pathogenic biofilms. The parameters governing long-range patterning of bacteria on high-aspect-ratio (HAR) nanoarrays are combinatorially elucidated, and we discover that sufficiently low effective stiffness of these HAR arrays mechanoselectively inhibits ˜40% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm attachment. Inspired by the active echinoderm skin, we design and fabricate externally actuated dynamic elastomer surfaces with active surface microtopography. We extract from a large parameter space the critical topographic length scales and actuation time scales for achieving

  15. Microbial biofilms are able to destroy hydroxyapatite in the absence of host immunity in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam Feliks; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Smutnicka, Danuta; Kos, Marcin; Smolina, Iryna; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward; Turniak, Michal; Sedghizadeh, Parish P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction It is widely thought that inflammation and osteoclastogenesis result in hydroxyapatite (HA) resorption and sequestra formation during osseous infections, and microbial biofilm pathogens induce the inflammatory destruction of HA. We hypothesized that biofilms associated with infectious bone disease can directly resorb HA in the absence of host inflammation or osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, we developed an in vitro model to test this hypothesis. Materials and Methods Customized HA discs were manufactured as a substrate for growing clinically relevant biofilm pathogens. Single-species biofilms of S.mutans, S.aureus, P.aeruginosa and C.albicans, and mixed-species biofilms of C.albicans + S.mutans were incubated on HA discs for 72 hours to grow mature biofilms. Three different non-biofilm control groups were also established for testing. HA discs were then evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy, micro-CT metrotomography, x-ray spectroscopy and confocal microscopy with planimetric analysis. Additionally, quantitative cultures and pH assessment were performed. ANOVA was used to test for significance between treatment and control groups. Results All investigated biofilms were able to cause significant (P<0.05) and morphologically characteristic alterations in HA structure as compared to controls. The highest number of alterations observed was caused by mixed biofilms of C.albicans + S.mutans. S. mutans biofilm incubated in medium with additional sucrose content was the most detrimental to HA surfaces among single-species biofilms. Conclusion These findings suggest that direct microbial resorption of bone is possible in addition to immune-mediated destruction, which has important translational implications for the pathogenesis of chronic bone infections and for targeted antimicrobial therapeutics. PMID:25544303

  16. Anti-Biofilm and Immunomodulatory Activities of Peptides That Inhibit Biofilms Formed by Pathogens Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César de la Fuente-Núñez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF patients often acquire chronic respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc species. In the CF lung, these bacteria grow as multicellular aggregates termed biofilms. Biofilms demonstrate increased (adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotics, and there are currently no available biofilm-specific therapies. Using plastic adherent, hydroxyapatite and flow cell biofilm models coupled with confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was demonstrated that an anti-biofilm peptide 1018 prevented biofilm formation, eradicated mature biofilms and killed biofilms formed by a wide range of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia clinical isolates. New peptide derivatives were designed that, compared to their parent peptide 1018, showed similar or decreased anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased activity against biofilms formed by the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, some of these new peptide derivatives retained the immunomodulatory activity of 1018 since they induced the production of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 and suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and were non-toxic towards these cells. Peptide 1018 and its derivatives provide promising leads for the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and hyperinflammatory lung disease in CF patients.

  17. Biochemical composition and changes of extracellular polysaccharides (ECPS) produced during microphytobenthic biofilm development (Marennes-Oléron, France).

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre, Guillaume; Graber, Marianne; Rafiliposon, Beby; Dupuy, Christine; Orvain, Francis; De Crignis, Margot; Maugard, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to study the dynamics and biochemical composition of ExtraCellular Polysaccharides (ECPS), a fraction of the Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) produced during the development of a microphytobenthic biofilm in a European intertidal mudflat (Marennes-Oléron Bay, France) during winter. Microphytobenthic biomass was surveyed during four consecutive emersion periods to confirm the biofilm growth. Bacteria abundance was also checked considering the importance o...

  18. The cidA murein hydrolase regulator contributes to DNA release and biofilm development in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Kelly C.; Mann, Ethan E.; Endres, Jennifer L.; Weiss, Elizabeth C.; Cassat, James E.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Bayles, Kenneth W.

    2007-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus cidA and lrgA genes have been shown to affect cell lysis under a variety of conditions during planktonic growth. It is hypothesized that these genes encode holins and antiholins, respectively, and may serve as molecular control elements of bacterial cell lysis. To examine the biological role of cell death and lysis, we studied the impact of the cidA mutation on biofilm development. Interestingly, this mutation had a dramatic impact on biofilm morphology and adherence...

  19. Experimental biofilms within drinking water treatment plant origin; evaluation of nutrient concentration and temperature influences upon their development

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Anca; Brînduşa BOCOS; Tigan, Stefan; Corina MURESAN; Romeo CHIRA

    2009-01-01

    From the planktonic free-floating state, microorganisms pass to the solid state, the biofilm, cells being strongly attached to each other and usually to the interface. This changing in cells’ behavior induces surface colonization and complex interactions development within the biofilm. If the biofilm’s role into the natural aquatic habitats is, undoubtedly, a positive one, consisting in water self-purification, drinking water pipe networks biofouling can be responsible for a wide range of wat...

  20. An in vitro dynamic microcosm biofilm model for caries lesion development and antimicrobial dose-response studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maske, T T; Brauner, K V; Nakanishi, L; Arthur, R A; van de Sande, F H; Cenci, M S

    2016-03-01

    Some dynamic biofilm models for dental caries development are limited as they require multiple experiments and do not allow independent biofilm growth units, making them expensive and time-consuming. This study aimed to develop and test an in vitro dynamic microcosm biofilm model for caries lesion development and for dose-response to chlorhexidine. Microcosm biofilms were grown under two different protocols from saliva on bovine enamel discs for up to 21 days. The study outcomes were as follows: the percentage of enamel surface hardness change, integrated hardness loss, and the CFU counts from the biofilms formed. The measured outcomes, mineral loss and CFU counts showed dose-response effects as a result of the treatment with chlorhexidine. Overall, the findings suggest that biofilm growth for seven days with 0.06 ml min(-1) salivary flow under exposure to 5% sucrose (3 × daily, 0.25 ml min(-1), 6 min) was suitable as a pre-clinical model for enamel demineralization and antimicrobial studies. PMID:26905384

  1. Development of equipment for in situ studies of biofilm in hot water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagh, Lene Karen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik; Schmidt-Jørgensen, Finn

    1999-01-01

    plugs was made of the same material as used in the hot water system and the test plugs were flush with the inner surface of the tank. When the operating shaft was removed from the tank, biofilm could be collected. In the distribution system, biofilm samples were collected from test plugs inserted in...... sampling ports in a by-pass. Heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) revealed 10(4)-10(6) CFU cm(-2) on the test plugs in the hot water system after an exposure period of 7 d. The number of bacteria was not influenced by the location of the plug within each cluster of plugs in the distribution system, or at......New equipment was developed for in situ studies of biofilms in hot water tanks and hot water pipes under normal operation and pressure. Sampling ports were installed in the wall of a hot water tank and through these operating shafts were inserted with a test plug in the end. The surface of the test...

  2. Biohybrid nanostructured iron oxide nanoparticles and Satureja hortensis to prevent fungal biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ion; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Ficai, Anton; Anghel, Alina Georgiana; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous wounds are often superinfected during the healing process and this leads to prolonged convalescence and discomfort. Usage of suitable wound dressings is very important for an appropriate wound care leading to a correct healing. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the influence of a nano-coated wound dressing (WD) on Candida albicans colonization rate and biofilm formation. The modified WD was achieved by submerging the dressing pieces into a nanofluid composed of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles and Satureja hortensis (SO) essential oil (EO). Chemical composition of the EO was established by GC-MS. The fabricated nanostructure was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). The analysis of the colonized surfaces using (Scanning Electron Microscopy) SEM revealed that C. albicans adherence and subsequent biofilm development are strongly inhibited on the surface of wound dressing fibers coated with the obtained nanofluid, comparing with regular uncoated materials. The results were also confirmed by the assay of the viable fungal cells embedded in the biofilm. Our data demonstrate that the obtained phytonanocoating improve the resistance of wound dressing surface to C. albicans colonization, which is often an etiological cause of local infections, impairing the appropriate wound healing. PMID:24009022

  3. Biohybrid Nanostructured Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Satureja hortensis to Prevent Fungal Biofilm Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Carmen Chifiriuc

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous wounds are often superinfected during the healing process and this leads to prolonged convalescence and discomfort. Usage of suitable wound dressings is very important for an appropriate wound care leading to a correct healing. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the influence of a nano-coated wound dressing (WD on Candida albicans colonization rate and biofilm formation. The modified WD was achieved by submerging the dressing pieces into a nanofluid composed of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles and Satureja hortensis (SO essential oil (EO. Chemical composition of the EO was established by GC-MS. The fabricated nanostructure was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA and Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR. The analysis of the colonized surfaces using (Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM revealed that C. albicans adherence and subsequent biofilm development are strongly inhibited on the surface of wound dressing fibers coated with the obtained nanofluid, comparing with regular uncoated materials. The results were also confirmed by the assay of the viable fungal cells embedded in the biofilm. Our data demonstrate that the obtained phytonanocoating improve the resistance of wound dressing surface to C. albicans colonization, which is often an etiological cause of local infections, impairing the appropriate wound healing.

  4. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference

  5. The pvc operon regulates the expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Qaisar

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial structures encoded by the cup gene clusters (cupB and cupC contribute to its attachment to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa pvcABCD gene cluster encodes enzymes that synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin, paerucumarin. Paerucumarin has already been characterized chemically, but this is the first report elucidating its role in bacterial biology. We examined the relationship between the pvc operon and the cup gene clusters in the P. aeruginosa strain MPAO1. Mutations within the pvc genes compromised biofilm development and significantly reduced the expression of cupB1-6 and cupC1-3, as well as different genes of the cupB/cupC two-component regulatory systems, roc1/roc2. Adjacent to pvc is the transcriptional regulator ptxR. A ptxR mutation in MPAO1 significantly reduced the expression of the pvc genes, the cupB/cupC genes, and the roc1/roc2 genes. Overexpression of the intact chromosomally-encoded pvc operon by a ptxR plasmid significantly enhanced cupB2, cupC2, rocS1, and rocS2 expression and biofilm development. Exogenously added paerucumarin significantly increased the expression of cupB2, cupC2, rocS1 and rocS2 in the pvcA mutant. Our results suggest that pvc influences P. aeruginosa biofilm development through the cup gene clusters in a pathway that involves paerucumarin, PtxR, and different cup regulators.

  6. The pvc operon regulates the expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Uzma; Luo, Liming; Haley, Cecily L; Brady, Sean F; Carty, Nancy L; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial structures encoded by the cup gene clusters (cupB and cupC) contribute to its attachment to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa pvcABCD gene cluster encodes enzymes that synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin, paerucumarin. Paerucumarin has already been characterized chemically, but this is the first report elucidating its role in bacterial biology. We examined the relationship between the pvc operon and the cup gene clusters in the P. aeruginosa strain MPAO1. Mutations within the pvc genes compromised biofilm development and significantly reduced the expression of cupB1-6 and cupC1-3, as well as different genes of the cupB/cupC two-component regulatory systems, roc1/roc2. Adjacent to pvc is the transcriptional regulator ptxR. A ptxR mutation in MPAO1 significantly reduced the expression of the pvc genes, the cupB/cupC genes, and the roc1/roc2 genes. Overexpression of the intact chromosomally-encoded pvc operon by a ptxR plasmid significantly enhanced cupB2, cupC2, rocS1, and rocS2 expression and biofilm development. Exogenously added paerucumarin significantly increased the expression of cupB2, cupC2, rocS1 and rocS2 in the pvcA mutant. Our results suggest that pvc influences P. aeruginosa biofilm development through the cup gene clusters in a pathway that involves paerucumarin, PtxR, and different cup regulators. PMID:23646138

  7. Antibiotic resistance of mixed biofilms in cystic fibrosis : impact of emerging microorganisms on treatment of infection

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Susana Patrícia; Ceri, Howard; Azevedo, N. F.; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder associated with multispecies infections where interactions between classical and newly identified bacteria might be crucial to understanding the persistent colonisation in CF lungs. This study investigated the interactions between two emerging species, Inquilinus limosus and Dolosigranulum pigrum, and the conventional CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by evaluating the ability to develop biofilms of mixed populations and then studying their suscepti...

  8. Synergistic interactions in mixed-species biofilms of pathogenic bacteria from the respiratory tract

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Varposhti; Fatemeh Entezari; Mohammad Mehdi Feizabadi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mixed-species biofilms are involved in a wide variety of infections. We studied the synergistic interactions during dual-species biofilm formation among isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Methods Isolates were cultured as single-species and all possible combinations of dual-species biofilms. Results The 61 A. baumannii biofilms increased by 26-fold when cultured with S. maltophilia isolates; 62 A. baumannii biofilms ...

  9. Hydrophobicity of biofilm coatings influences the transport dynamics of polystyrene nanoparticles in biofilm-coated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzel, Michael R; Sand, Stefanie; Whalen, Joann K; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are used in the manufacture of over 2000 industrial and consumer products to enhance their material properties and functions or to enable new nanoparticle-dependent functions. The widespread use of ENPs will result in their release to the subsurface and aquatic environments, where they will interact with indigenous biota. Laboratory column experiments were designed to understand the influence of two different Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on the mobility of polystyrene latex nanoparticles in granular porous media representative of groundwater aquifers or riverbank filtration settings. The transport behavior of 20 nm carboxylate-modified (CLPs) and sulfate (SLPs) polystyrene latex ENPs suspended in NaCl or CaCl2 (1 and 10 mM ionic strength, pH 7) was studied in columns packed with quartz sand coated with biofilms formed by two P. aeruginosa strains that differed in cell surface hydrophobicity (P. aeruginosa 9027™, relatively hydrophilic and P. aeruginosa PAO1, relatively hydrophobic). Biofilm-coated quartz sand retained more of the electrostatically-stabilized latex ENPs than clean, uncoated sand, regardless of the serotype. As IS increased, clear differences in the shape of the ENP breakthrough curves were observed for each type of biofilm coating. ENP breakthrough in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm-coated sand was generally constant with time whereby breakthrough in the P. aeruginosa 9027 biofilm-coated sand showed dynamic behavior. This indicates a fundamental difference in the mechanisms of ENP deposition onto hydrophilic or hydrophobic biofilm coatings due to the hydration properties of these biofilms. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of considering the surface properties of aquifer grain coatings when evaluating ENP fate in natural subsurface environments. PMID:26845456

  10. Probiotic lactobacilli inhibit early stages of Candida albicans biofilm development by reducing their growth, cell adhesion, and filamentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Victor Haruo; Wang, Yi; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus species on different phases of Candida albicans biofilm development. Quantification of biofilm growth and ultrastructural analyses were performed on C. albicans biofilms treated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus planktonic cell suspensions as well as their supernatants. Planktonic lactobacilli induced a significant reduction (p probiotic strain and the biofilm phase. L. rhamnosus supernatants had no significant effect on the mature biofilm (p > 0.05), but significantly reduced the early stages of Candida biofilm formation (p probiotic Lactobacillus on C. albicans entailed both cell-cell interactions and secretion of exometabolites that may impact on pathogenic attributes associated with C. albicans colonization on host surfaces and yeast filamentation. This study clarifies, for the first time, the mechanics of how Lactobacillus species may antagonize C. albicans host colonization. Our data elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms that define the probiotic candicidal activity of lactobacilli, thus supporting their utility as an adjunctive therapeutic mode against mucosal candidal infections. PMID:27087525

  11. Antibiofilm activities of certain biocides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gharavi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can produce biofilm. Biofilm is a complex, three dimensional structure in which microorganisms are attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix made of extracellular polymers. Due to high resistance to antimicrobial agents, biofilms create difficulties in various situations in healthcare. In this study, antibiofilm activities of some biocides in P. aeruginosa were studied."nMaterials and methods: The biofilm production ability of P. aeruginosa strain 214 (a clinical isolate was determined in the presence of six biocides including of ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA, silver nitrate (AgNO3, bismuth ethanedithiol (BisEDT, bismuth dimercaprol (BisBAL, bismuth-2-mercaptoethanol (BisMEO and bismuth propanedithiol (BisPDT using the modified microtiter plate method. Bactericidal activity of the biocides against biofilm and planktonic cells was investigated. In this study, permeation of biocides through alginate layer was evaluated with a sandwich cup method."nResults: The results demonstrated that in the presence of bismuth thiols, biofilm production in MIC and sub MIC concentrations was considerably inhibited. Bismuththiols had lower antibiofilm bactericidal activity than EDTA and silver nitrate. One possible mechanism of biofilm resistance is exopolysaccharide production which prevents the access of antimicrobial agents to cells inside the biofilm. Bismuth thiols could not penetrate, while EDTA and silver nitrate had high penetration rate."nConclusions: Due to the frequent use of silver nitrate and EDTA in various applications, low efficacy in the inhibition of biofilm production, unstudied toxicity of BTs for humans and high efficacy in the inhibition of biofilm production, it is suggested that combinatory effect of BTs with silver nitrate or EDTA on biofilms and biofilm production be investigated.

  12. Investigating the Complex Conductivity Response of Different Biofilm Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atekwana, E. A.; Abdel Aal, G. Z.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Patrauchan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial biofilms are structured communities of microorganisms commonly attached to a surface and embedded in a self-produced matrix. The matrix is composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which commonly include extracellular DNA, proteins, and polysaccharides. In addition, the biofilm structure may contain some other components such as metabolic byproducts and biogenic nanoparticle minerals. Biogeophysical studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements to the growth and development of biofilm in saturated porous media. However, the mechanisms are not very well understood. The overarching goal of this study is to determine the contribution of the different biofilm components to the spectral induced polarization (SIP) signatures in aqueous and/or porous media. We investigated the SIP response of different biofilm components including bacterial cells, alginate (exopolysaccharide), phenazine (redox-active metabolite) and magnetite (semi-conductive particulate matter). The porous media was glass beads with grain diameter of 1 mm. Each of the biofilm components was suspended in a low salt growth medium with electrolytic conductivity of 513 μS/cm. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 cells in suspension and in porous media, we observed the increase in SIP parameters with increasing cell density with a very well defined relaxation peak at a frequency of ~10 Hz, which was predicted by recently developed quantitative models. However, this characteristic relaxation peak was minimized in the presence of porous media. We also observed that cells suspended in alginate enhance the polarization and show a peak frequency at ~10 Hz. The study of alginate gelation in liquid phase and porous media in vitro revealed that solidified (gelated) alginate (from brown algae) increased the magnitude of imaginary conductivity while real conductivity increased very moderately. In contrast, the study of the SIP response within a porous

  13. Antibacterial activity of a newly developed peptide-modified lysin against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang eYang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The global emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria is a growing threat to public health worldwide. Natural bacteriophage lysins are promising alternatives in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens, but not Gram-negative ones, like Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, due to the barriers posed by their outer membranes. Recently, modifying a natural lysin with an antimicrobial peptide was found able to break the barriers, and to kill Gram-negative pathogens. Herein, a new peptide-modified lysin (PlyA was constructed by fusing the cecropin A peptide residues 1–8 (KWKLFKKI with the OBPgp279 lysin and its antibacterial activity was studied. PlyA showed good and broad antibacterial activities against logarithmic phase A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, but much reduced activities against the cells in stationary phase. Addition of outer membrane permeabilizers (EDTA and citric acid could enhance the antibacterial activity of PlyA against stationary phase cells. Finally, no antibacterial activity of PlyA could be observed in some bio-matrices, such as culture media, milk, and sera. In conclusion, we reported here a novel peptide-modified lysin with significant antibacterial activity against both logarithmic (without OMPs and stationary phase (with OMPs A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa cells in buffer, but further optimization is needed to achieve broad activity in diverse bio-matrices.

  14. Pronounced Effect of the Nature of the Inoculum on Biofilm Development in Flow Systems▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kroukamp, Otini; Dumitrache, Romeo G.; Wolfaardt, Gideon M

    2010-01-01

    Biofilm formation renders sessile microbial populations growing in continuous-flow systems less susceptible to variation in dilution rate than planktonic cells, where dilution rates exceeding an organism's maximum growth rate (μmax) results in planktonic cell washout. In biofilm-dominated systems, the biofilm's overall μmax may therefore be more relevant than the organism's μmax, where the biofilm μmax is considered as a net process dependent on the adsorption rate, growth rate, and removal r...

  15. Development and Characterization of an In Vivo Central Venous Catheter Candida albicans Biofilm Model

    OpenAIRE

    Andes, D.; Nett, J.; Oschel, P.; Albrecht, R.; Marchillo, K.; Pitula, A.

    2004-01-01

    Biofilms represent a niche for microorganisms where they are protected from both the host immune system and antimicrobial therapies. Biofilm growth serves as an increasing source of clinical infections. Candida infections are difficult to manage due to their persistent nature and associated drug resistance. Observations made in biofilm research have generally been limited to in vitro models. Using a rat central venous catheter model, we characterized in vivo Candida albicans biofilm developme...

  16. Dendrimers and polyamino-phenolic ligands: activity of new molecules against Legionella pneumophila biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Andreozzi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae. Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration ten-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall two-fold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85% and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection

  17. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems in

  18. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F.; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems

  19. Electrochemical biofilm control: mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istanbullu, Ozlem; Babauta, Jerome; Duc Nguyen, Hung; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been previously demonstrated that an electrical current can be used to control biofilm growth on metal surfaces, the literature results are conflicting and there is no accepted mechanism of action. One of the suggested mechanisms is the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on metal surfaces. However, there are literature studies in which H(2)O(2) could not be detected in the bulk solution. This is most likely because H(2)O(2) was produced at a low concentration near the surface and could not be detected in the bulk solution. The goals of this research were (1) to develop a well-controlled system to explain the mechanism of action of the bioelectrochemical effect on 316L stainless steel (SS) surfaces and (2) to test whether the produced H(2)O(2) can reduce cell growth on metal surfaces. It was found that H(2)O(2) was produced near 316L SS surfaces when a negative potential was applied. The H(2)O(2) concentration increased towards the surface, while the dissolved oxygen decreased when the SS surface was polarized to -600 mV(Ag/AgCl). When polarized and non-polarized surfaces with identical Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms were continuously fed with air-saturated growth medium, the polarized surfaces showed minimal biofilm growth while there was significant biofilm growth on the non-polarized surfaces. Although there was no detectable H(2)O(2) in the bulk solution, it was found that the surface concentration of H(2)O(2) was able to prevent biofilm growth. PMID:22827804

  20. A genetic approach to the development of new therapeutic phages to fight pseudomonas aeruginosa in wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent ("lytic") and temperate ("lysogenic") bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

  1. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pleteneva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic” and temperate (“lysogenic” bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine.

  2. Effects of quorum sensing system lasR/rhlR gene on the expression of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in tracheal intubation model rat with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-qing XIANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of lasR/rhlR gene on Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in rat tracheal intubation model with biofilm infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. aer wild strain (PAO1 and quorum sensing (QS deficient strain (ΔlasRΔrhlR. Methods  Twenty-one SD rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (7 each: ΔlasRΔrhlR-treated group, PAO1-treated group and sterile control group. Biofilms (BF were cultured in vitro, and the BF coated tube (infected respectively with Ps. aer PAO1 strain, ΔlasRΔrhlR strain, or with asepsis was inserted into the trachea to establish the rat model. The rats were sacrificed on the 7th day after intubation. Colony count of lung tissue homogenate (cfu and lung HE staining were performed, and IL-10 content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, TGF-β1 in lung tissue, and the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in lung cells were determined. Results  The bacterial counts were significantly higher in PAO1 and ΔlasRΔrhlR groups than that in sterile control group, and the counts were obviously higher in PAO1 group (10 400.00±6313.70/g lung tissue than that in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (975.00±559.97/g lung tissue, P<0.05. There was no significant pathological changes in lung tissue in sterile control group, while the bronchi and blood vessels in PAO1 group were infiltrated by a large number of inflammatory cells and complicated with alveolar septum thickening and local abscess and necrosis. The pathological changes were milder in ΔlasRΔrhlR group than in PAO1 group; the expression of Foxp3 mRNA was higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than that in sterile control group (0.65±0.32, and it was significantly higher in PAO1 group (4.62±1.07 than in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (2.15±1.43, P<0.05. The accumulated optical density value of TGF-β1 was significantly higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than in sterile control group (3721.66±1412.95, and significantly higher in PAO1 group (65 090.56±33

  3. A new buildup biofilm model that mimics accumulation of material in flexible endoscope channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Luciano, Cristiana; Olson, Nancy; DeGagne, Patricia; Franca, Rodrigo; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Alfa, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new build up biofilm (BBF) model that was based on repeated exposure to test soil containing Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and repeated rounds of fixation to mimic the accumulation of patient material in endoscope channels during reprocessing. The new BBF model is a novel adaptation of the minimum biofilm effective concentration (MBEC) 96-well model where biofilm is formed on plastic pegs. The new MBEC-BBF model was developed over eight days and included four rounds of partial fixation using glutaraldehyde. There was 6.14Log10cfu/cm(2) of E. faecalis and 7.71Log10cfu/cm(2) of P. aeruginosa in the final BBF. Four detergents (two enzymatic and two non-enzymatic) were tested alone or in combination with orthophthalaldehyde, glutaraldehyde or accelerated hydrogen peroxide to determine if BBF could be either removed or the bacteria within the BBF killed. None of the detergents alone could remove the biofilm or reduce the bacterial level in the BBF as determined by viable count and scanning electron microscopy. The combination of detergents and disinfectants tested provided a 3 to 5Log10 reduction in viable bacteria but no combination could provide the expected 6Log10 reduction. Our data indicated that once formed BBF was extremely difficult to eliminate. Future research using the BBF model may help develop new cleaning and disinfection methods that can prevent or eliminate BBF within endoscope channels. PMID:27345713

  4. Effect of pipe material and low level disinfectants on biofilm development in a simulated drinking water distribution system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-ling ZHOU; Yong-ji ZHANG; Gui-bai LI

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of chlorine and chloramines disinfection on biofilm development in a simulated drinking water distribution system was investigated by using heterotrophic bacterial spread plate technique.The experiments were carried out with four annular reactors(ARs)with stainless steel(SS)or copper(Cu)material slides.The results showed that there were fewer bacteria attached to Cu slides without a disinfectant compared with those attached to SS slides.When the water was disinfected with chloramines,the heterotrophic plate counts(HPCs)on the biofilm attached to the Cu slides were significantly lower(by 3.46 log CFU/cm2)than those attached to the SS slides.Likewise,the biofilm HPC numbers on the Cu slides were slightly lower(by 1.19log CFU/cm2) than those on the SS slides disinfected with chlorine.In a quasi-steady state.the HPC levels on Cu slides can be reduced to 3.0 log CFU/cm2 with chlorine and to about 0.9 log CFU/cm2 with chloramines.The addition of chloramines resulted in a more efficient reduction of biofilm heterotrophic bacteria than did chlorine.We concluded that the chlorine and chloramines levels usually employed in water distribution system were not SUfficient to prevent the growth and development of microbial biofilm.The combination of copper pipe slides and chlorarnincs as the disinfectant was the most efficient combination to bring about diminished bacterial levels.

  5. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  6. Regulation of pqs quorum sensing via catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Gao, Qingguo; Chen, Wanying;

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolite repression control protein regulates the Pseudomonas quinolone signal quorum sensing, which further controls synthesis of virulence factor pyocyanin, biofilm formation and survival during infection models. Our study suggests that deregulation of the catabolite repression by P...

  7. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva......-coated hydroxyapatite. The activity of enzymes against bacterial cells in biofilm was measured by fluorescence microscopy and an indirect conductance test in which evolution of carbon dioxide was measured. Glucose oxidase combined with lactoperoxidase was bactericidal against biofilm bacteria but did not remove the...... biofilm from the substrata. A complex mixture of polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes was able to remove bacterial biofilm from steel and polypropylene substrata but did not have a significant bactericidal activity. Combining oxidoreductases with polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes resulted in bactericidal...

  8. Mimicking disinfection and drying of biofilms in contaminated endoscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovaleva, J.; Degener, J. E.; van der Mei, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of peracetic acid-based (PAA) disinfectant with, and without, additional drying on Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, isolated from contaminated flexible endoscopes, in single-and dual-species biofilms were studied. Biofilms w

  9. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  10. Emergent Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis: In Vitro Biofilm Formation and Resilience under Variable Oxygen Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana P. Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent to conventional bacterial pathogens, unusual microbes are emerging from cystic fibrosis (CF airways. Nonetheless, little is known about the contribution of these newly microbes to the resilience of CF-associated biofilms, particularly under variable-oxygen concentrations that are known to occur in vivo in the mucus of CF patients. Two CF-emergent bacterial species, Inquilinus limosus and Dolosigranulum pigrum, and the major pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa were studied in terms of biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibilities under in vitro atmospheres with different oxygen availabilities. All species were able to develop in vitro biofilms under different oxygen-available environments, with D. pigrum accumulating high amounts of biomass and respiratory activities. When established, biofilms were of difficult eradication, with antibiotics losing their effectiveness in comparison with the corresponding planktonic populations. Surprisingly, biofilms of each emergent organism displayed multidrug resistance under aerobic environments, enduring even in low-oxygen atmospheres. This study suggests a potential prospect on the impact of nonconventional organisms I. limosus and D. pigrum on CF lung infections, demonstrating capacity to adapt to biofilm mode of life under restricted-oxygen atmospheres resembling CF airways, which may ultimately endanger the efficacy of currently used antibiotic regimens.

  11. A steady-state biofilm model for simultaneous reduction of nitrate and perchlorate, part 1: model development and numerical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youneng; Zhao, Heping; Marcus, Andrew K; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2012-02-01

    A multispecies biofilm model is developed for simultaneous reduction of nitrate and perchlorate in the H(2)-based membrane biofilm reactor. The one-dimension model includes dual-substrate Monod kinetics for a steady-state biofilm with five solid and five dissolved components. The solid components are autotrophic denitrifying bacteria, autotrophic perchlorate-reducing bacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, inert biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The dissolved components are nitrate, perchlorate, hydrogen (H(2)), substrate-utilization-associated products, and biomass-associated products (BAP). The model explicitly considers four mechanisms involved in how three important operating conditions (H(2) pressure, nitrate loading, and perchlorate loading) affect nitrate and perchlorate removals: (1) competition for H(2), (2) promotion of PRB growth due to having two electron acceptors (nitrate and perchlorate), (3) competition between nitrate and perchlorate reduction for the same resources in the PRB: electrons and possibly reductase enzymes, and (4) competition for space in the biofilm. Two other special features are having H(2) delivered from the membrane substratum and solving directly for steady state using a novel three-step approach: finite-difference for approximating partial differential and/or integral equations, Newton-Raphson for solving nonlinear equations, and an iterative scheme to obtain the steady-state biofilm thickness. An example result illustrates the model's features. PMID:22191376

  12. Bacterial biofilms: prokaryotic adventures in multicellularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kjelleberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms includes both the initial social behavior of undifferentiated cells, as well as cell death and differentiation in the mature biofilm, and displays several striking similarities with higher organisms. Recent advances in the field provide new insight into...... differentiation and cell death events in bacterial biofilm development and propose that biofilms have an unexpected level of multicellularity....

  13. The enrichment of surface passive film on stainless steel during biofilm development in coastal seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eashwar, M; Sreedhar, G; Lakshman Kumar, A; Hariharasuthan, R; Kennedy, J

    2015-01-01

    The surface passive film on UNS S30400 alloy was characterized before and after biofilm development under different regimes of diurnal lighting in quiescent flowing coastal seawater. As exemplified by atomic force microscopy, the passive film grew under all test conditions with conspicuous variations in morphological features. X-ray photon spectroscopy illustrated an enrichment of the outer film by iron oxide and a progressive increase in the iron oxide/chromium oxide ratio with lighting. Mott-Schottky plots reflected the duplex nature of the film, comprising an outer n-type and an inner p-type configuration. The slopes of the plots showed a strong decrease in donor and acceptor densities with biofilm coverage and lighting, thus confirming passive film growth. These results provide new insights that passive film enrichment is an intrinsic process under practical marine conditions, and show that the evolution of the passive film is a key step to sustained passivity and/or its breakdown by microbial mechanisms. PMID:26222313

  14. Development of a CrN/Cu nanocomposite coating on titanium-modified stainless steel for antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, T; George, Rani P; Kuppusami, P; Mangalaraj, D; Bera, Santanu; Mohandas, E; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2012-01-01

    A relatively simple method was developed to fabricate CrN/Cu nanocomposite coatings using pulsed DC magnetron sputtering for application in antibacterial activity. These nanocomposite coatings were applied on titanium (Ti)-modified stainless steel substrata (D-9 alloy) and the antibacterial activity of these coating with respect to the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated qualitatively and quantitatively. Scanning electron microscopy, epifluorescence microscope analyses, and total viable counts confirmed that inclusion of copper in the CrN/Cu nanocomposite coatings provided antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. The quantitative examination of the bacterial activity of P. aeruginosa was estimated by the survival ratio as calculated from the number of viable cells which formed colonies on nutrient agar plates. PMID:22827159

  15. Unsaturated fatty acid, cis-2-decenoic acid, in combination with disinfectants or antibiotics removes pre-established biofilms formed by food-related bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh Sepehr

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by food-related bacteria and food-related pathogenesis are significant problems in the food industry. Even though much disinfection and mechanical procedure exist for removal of biofilms, they may fail to eliminate pre-established biofilms. cis-2 decenoic acid (CDA, an unsaturated fatty acid messenger produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is reportedly capable of inducing the dispersion of established biofilms by multiple types of microorganisms. However, whether CDA has potential to boost the actions of certain antimicrobials is unknown. Here, the activity of CDA as an inducer of pre-established biofilms dispersal, formed by four main food pathogens; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica and E. coli, was measured using both semi-batch and continuous cultures bioassays. To assess the ability of CDA combined biocides treatments to remove pre-established biofilms formed on stainless steel discs, CFU counts were performed for both treated and untreated cultures. Eradication of the biofilms by CDA combined antibiotics was evaluated using crystal violet staining. The effect of CDA combined treatments (antibiotics and disinfectants on biofilm surface area and bacteria viability was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy, digital image analysis and LIVE/DEAD staining. MICs were also determined to assess the probable inhibitory effects of CDA combined treatments on the growth of tested microorganisms' planktonic cells. Treatment of pre-established biofilms with only 310 nM CDA resulted in at least two-fold increase in the number of planktonic cells in all cultures. While antibiotics or disinfectants alone exerted a trivial effect on CFU counts and percentage of surface area covered by the biofilms, combinational treatments with both 310 nM CDA and antibiotics or disinfectants led to approximate 80% reduction in biofilm biomass. These data suggests that combined treatments with CDA would pave the way toward

  16. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  17. Polyphasic analysis of an Azoarcus-Leptothrix-dominated bacterial biofilm developed on stainless steel surface in a gasoline-contaminated hypoxic groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Tibor; Táncsics, András; Szabó, István; Farkas, Milán; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Fábián, Krisztina; Maróti, Gergely; Kriszt, Balázs

    2016-05-01

    Pump and treat systems are widely used for hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater remediation. Although biofouling (formation of clogging biofilms on pump surfaces) is a common problem in these systems, scarce information is available regarding the phylogenetic and functional complexity of such biofilms. Extensive information about the taxa and species as well as metabolic potential of a bacterial biofilm developed on the stainless steel surface of a pump submerged in a gasoline-contaminated hypoxic groundwater is presented. Results shed light on a complex network of interconnected hydrocarbon-degrading chemoorganotrophic and chemolitotrophic bacteria. It was found that besides the well-known hydrocarbon-degrading aerobic/facultative anaerobic biofilm-forming organisms (e.g., Azoarcus, Leptothrix, Acidovorax, Thauera, Pseudomonas, etc.), representatives of Fe(2+)-and Mn(2+)-oxidizing (Thiobacillus, Sideroxydans, Gallionella, Rhodopseudomonas, etc.) as well as of Fe(3+)- and Mn(4+)-respiring (Rhodoferax, Geobacter, Magnetospirillum, Sulfurimonas, etc.) bacteria were present in the biofilm. The predominance of β-Proteobacteria within the biofilm bacterial community in phylogenetic and functional point of view was revealed. Investigation of meta-cleavage dioxygenase and benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) genes indicated that within the biofilm, Azoarcus, Leptothrix, Zoogloea, and Thauera species are most probably involved in intrinsic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Polyphasic analysis of the biofilm shed light on the fact that subsurface microbial accretions might be reservoirs of novel putatively hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species. Moreover, clogging biofilms besides their detrimental effects might supplement the efficiency of pump and treat systems. PMID:26825521

  18. Biofilm Formation by the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans: Development, Architecture, and Drug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Kuhn, Duncan M.; Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Hoyer, Lois L.; McCormick, Thomas; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2001-01-01

    Biofilms are a protected niche for microorganisms, where they are safe from antibiotic treatment and can create a source of persistent infection. Using two clinically relevant Candida albicans biofilm models formed on bioprosthetic materials, we demonstrated that biofilm formation proceeds through three distinct developmental phases. These growth phases transform adherent blastospores to well-defined cellular communities encased in a polysaccharide matrix. Fluorescence and confocal scanning l...

  19. From in vitro to in vivo : establishment of a test system for the biological evaluation of novel quorum sensing inhibitors as anti-infectives against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Christine Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Innovative, efficient anti-infectives are needed because of increasing antibiotic resistance. Thus, strategies have been proposed interfering with bacterial pathogenicity instead of viability such as inhibition of quorum sensing. This intercellular communication system uses signal molecules to coordinate virulence and biofilm formation. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses unique signal molecules such as 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-(1H)-quinolone (PQS). Therefore, compounds should be developed blocking their...

  20. Resilience and recovery: the effect of triclosan exposure timing during development, on the structure and function of river biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J R; Topp, E; Waiser, M J; Tumber, V; Roy, J; Swerhone, G D W; Leavitt, P; Paule, A; Korber, D R

    2015-04-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a ubiquitous antibacterial agent found in soaps, scrubs, and consumer products. There is limited information on hazardous effects of TCS in the environment. Here, rotating annular reactors were used to cultivate river biofilm communities exposed to 1.8 μg l(-1) TCS with the timing and duration of exposure and recovery during development varied. Two major treatment regimens were employed: (i) biofilm development for 2, 4 or 6 weeks prior to TCS exposure and (ii) exposure of biofilms to TCS for 2, 4 or 6 weeks followed by recovery. Biofilms not exposed to TCS were used as a reference condition. Communities cultivated without and then exposed to TCS all exhibited reductions in algal biomass and significant (pbacterial biomass. CLSM imaging of biofilms at 8 weeks revealed unique endpoints in terms of community architecture. Community composition was altered by any exposure to TCS, as indicated by significant shifts in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and exopolymer composition relative to the reference. Bacterial, algal and cyanobacterial components initially exposed to TCS were significantly different from those TCS-free at time zero. Pigment analyses suggested that significant changes in composition of algal and cyanobacterial populations occurred with TCS exposure. Bacterial thymidine incorporation rates were reduced by TCS exposure and carbon utilization spectra shifted in terms substrate metabolism. Direct counts of protozoans indicated that TCS was suppressive, whereas micrometazoan populations were, in some instances, stimulated. These results indicate that even a relatively brief exposure of a river biofilm community to relatively low levels of TCS alters both the trajectory and final community structure. Although some evidence of recovery was observed, removal of TCS did not result in a return to the unexposed reference condition. PMID:25731684

  1. Data Quality in Biofilm High-Throughput Routine Analysis: Intralaboratory Protocol Adaptation and Experiment Reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Paula; Lourenço, Anália; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm research is growing more diverse and dependent on high-throughput technologies, and the large-scale production of results aggravates data substantiation. In particular, experimental protocols are often adapted to meet the needs of a particular laboratory, and no statistical validation of the modified method is provided. This paper discusses the impact of intralaboratory adaptation and non-rigorous documentation of experimental protocols on biofilm data interchange and validation. The case study is a non-standard, but widely used, workflow for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development considering three analysis assays: the crystal violet (CV) assay for biomass quantification, the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt (XTT) assay for respiratory activity assessment, and the colony forming units (CFU) assay for determination of cell viability. The ruggedness of the protocol was assessed by introducing small changes in the biofilm growth conditions, which simulate minor protocol adaptations and non- rigorous protocol documentation. Results show that even minor variations in the biofilm growth conditions may affect the results considerably, and that the biofilm analysis assays lack repeatability. Intralaboratory validation of non-standard protocols is found critical to ensure data quality and enable the comparison of results within and among laboratories. PMID:26651585

  2. Plasma treatment of electrodes significantly enhances the development of anodic electrochemically active biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Plasma pre-treatment of electrodes produces chemical modifications at surface level. • Nitrogen and plasma treatment were studied before inoculation with a mixed microbial consortia. • Plasma treatment accelerates the current development in microbial bio-electrochemical systems. • Plasma enhances the initial attachment of cells. • After treatment, a mature electroactive biofilm is developed in half the time as blank electrodes. -- Abstract: Surface modifications of electrode materials are important for improved performance of microbial bio-electrochemical systems. Here, we studied the effect of pre-treating both glassy carbon and graphite felt electrodes with either an oxygen or a nitrogen plasma before reactor inoculation with a mixed microbial consortia. The plasma produces chemical modifications at the electrode surface level. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle analysis showed that the plasma removes surface contamination, produces ion implantation and renders the hydrophobic surfaces highly hydrophilic. Plasma pre-treatment considerably accelerated the generation of a bio-electrochemical anodic current after inoculation. Nitrogen plasma pre-treatment yielded the best performance, followed closely by oxygen plasma. Plasma pre-treated electrodes reached a plateau of maximum current density twice as fast as untreated electrodes. Analysis of the current development profiles suggests that the plasma pre-treatment is neither producing a preferential attachment of certain types of bacteria over others nor accelerating the extracellular electron transfer rate. The results indicate that the plasma treatment considerably enhances the initial cell adhesion, which results in subsequently faster biofilm development. Plasma pre-treatment of electrodes is an inexpensive, fast, safe and straightforward technique to achieve more rapid start-up of bio-electrochemical processes

  3. A Sensor To Detect the Early Stages in the Development of Crystalline Proteus mirabilis Biofilm on Indwelling Bladder Catheters

    OpenAIRE

    Stickler, D. J.; Jones, S.M.; Adusei, G. O.; Waters, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    A simple sensor has been developed to detect the early stages of urinary catheter encrustation and avoid the clinical crises induced by catheter blockage. In laboratory models of colonization by Proteus mirabilis, the sensor signaled encrustation at an average time of 43 h before catheters were blocked with crystalline biofilm.

  4. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. PMID:20580207

  5. Resilience and recovery: The effect of triclosan exposure timing during development, on the structure and function of river biofilm communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.R., E-mail: john.lawrence@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, SK S7N 3H5 (Canada); Topp, E. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON (Canada); Waiser, M.J.; Tumber, V.; Roy, J.; Swerhone, G.D.W. [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, SK S7N 3H5 (Canada); Leavitt, P. [University of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada); Paule, A. [Global Institute for Water Security, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Korber, D.R. [Food and Bioproduct Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Triclosan negatively affected structure and metabolism of biofilms under all exposure conditions. • Biofilm age, timing and exposure regime alter the effects of triclosan. • Regardless of exposure regime algae and cyanobacteria were the most affected. • Although recovery was evident no community regained the reference condition. • Initial recruitment may be significant in determining community recovery. - Abstract: Triclosan (TCS) is a ubiquitous antibacterial agent found in soaps, scrubs, and consumer products. There is limited information on hazardous effects of TCS in the environment. Here, rotating annular reactors were used to cultivate river biofilm communities exposed to 1.8 μg l{sup −1} TCS with the timing and duration of exposure and recovery during development varied. Two major treatment regimens were employed: (i) biofilm development for 2, 4 or 6 weeks prior to TCS exposure and (ii) exposure of biofilms to TCS for 2, 4 or 6 weeks followed by recovery. Biofilms not exposed to TCS were used as a reference condition. Communities cultivated without and then exposed to TCS all exhibited reductions in algal biomass and significant (p < 0.05) reductions in cyanobacterial biomass. No significant effects were observed on bacterial biomass. CLSM imaging of biofilms at 8 weeks revealed unique endpoints in terms of community architecture. Community composition was altered by any exposure to TCS, as indicated by significant shifts in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and exopolymer composition relative to the reference. Bacterial, algal and cyanobacterial components initially exposed to TCS were significantly different from those TCS-free at time zero. Pigment analyses suggested that significant changes in composition of algal and cyanobacterial populations occurred with TCS exposure. Bacterial thymidine incorporation rates were reduced by TCS exposure and carbon utilization spectra shifted in terms substrate metabolism

  6. Resilience and recovery: The effect of triclosan exposure timing during development, on the structure and function of river biofilm communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Triclosan negatively affected structure and metabolism of biofilms under all exposure conditions. • Biofilm age, timing and exposure regime alter the effects of triclosan. • Regardless of exposure regime algae and cyanobacteria were the most affected. • Although recovery was evident no community regained the reference condition. • Initial recruitment may be significant in determining community recovery. - Abstract: Triclosan (TCS) is a ubiquitous antibacterial agent found in soaps, scrubs, and consumer products. There is limited information on hazardous effects of TCS in the environment. Here, rotating annular reactors were used to cultivate river biofilm communities exposed to 1.8 μg l−1 TCS with the timing and duration of exposure and recovery during development varied. Two major treatment regimens were employed: (i) biofilm development for 2, 4 or 6 weeks prior to TCS exposure and (ii) exposure of biofilms to TCS for 2, 4 or 6 weeks followed by recovery. Biofilms not exposed to TCS were used as a reference condition. Communities cultivated without and then exposed to TCS all exhibited reductions in algal biomass and significant (p < 0.05) reductions in cyanobacterial biomass. No significant effects were observed on bacterial biomass. CLSM imaging of biofilms at 8 weeks revealed unique endpoints in terms of community architecture. Community composition was altered by any exposure to TCS, as indicated by significant shifts in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and exopolymer composition relative to the reference. Bacterial, algal and cyanobacterial components initially exposed to TCS were significantly different from those TCS-free at time zero. Pigment analyses suggested that significant changes in composition of algal and cyanobacterial populations occurred with TCS exposure. Bacterial thymidine incorporation rates were reduced by TCS exposure and carbon utilization spectra shifted in terms substrate metabolism

  7. Oral Biofilm Architecture on Natural Teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M. Barbara M.; Degener, John E.; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Juuti, Jarmo T.; François, Patrice; AlMajidi, Rana; Pietiäinen, Milla; Girard, Myriam; Lindholm, Catharina; Saller, Manfred J.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Kuusela, Pentti; Bokarewa, Maria; Schrenzel, Jacques; Kontinen, Vesa P.; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and acces

  8. BIOFILM DEVELOPMENT IN TIME ON A SILICONE VOICE PROSTHESIS - A CASE-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NEU, TR; DEBOER, CE; VERKERKE, GJ; SCHUTTE, HK; RAKHORST, G; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1994-01-01

    Voice prostheses from silicone elastomers become rapidly colonised by a mixed biofilm of bacteria and yeasts. In this study, microorganisms were isolated from biofilms on explanted prostheses after having been in place for various time intervals ranging from 1 to 67 d. The isolates were examined for

  9. A simple birth-death-migration individual-based model for biofilm development

    OpenAIRE

    Mabrouk, Nabil; Deffuant, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria growth, detachment and surface-associated motility are recongnized to play an important role in microbial biofilm formation. In this paper we we investigate using an individual-based model how these processes interplay to yield complex biofilm spatial patterns.

  10. Development and evaluation of different normalization strategies for gene expression studies in Candida albicans biofilms by real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deforce Dieter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans biofilms are commonly found on indwelling medical devices. However, the molecular basis of biofilm formation and development is not completely understood. Expression analysis of genes potentially involved in these processes, such as the ALS (Agglutinine Like Sequence gene family can be performed using quantitative PCR (qPCR. In the present study, we investigated the expression stability of eight housekeeping genes potentially useful as reference genes to study gene expression in Candida albicans (C. albicans biofilms, using the geNorm Visual Basic Application (VBA for Microsoft Excel. To validate our normalization strategies we determined differences in ALS1 and ALS3 expression levels between C. albicans biofilm cells and their planktonic counterparts. Results The eight genes tested in this study are ranked according to their expression stability (from most stable to least stable as follows: ACT1 (β-actin/PMA1 (adenosine triphosphatase, RIP (ubiquinol cytochrome-c reductase complex component, RPP2B (cytosolic ribosomal acidic protein P2B, LSC2 (succinyl-CoA synthetase β-subunit fragment, IMH3 (inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase fragment, CPA1 (carbamoyl-phosphate synthethase small subunit and GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our data indicate that five genes are necessary for accurate and reliable normalization of gene expression data in C. albicans biofilms. Using different normalization strategies, we found a significant upregulation of the ALS1 gene and downregulation of the ALS3 gene in C. albicans biofilms grown on silicone disks in a continous flow system, the CDC reactor (Centre for Disease Control, for 24 hours. Conclusion In conclusion, we recommend the use of the geometric mean of the relative expression values from the five housekeeping genes (ACT1, PMA1, RIP, RPP2B and LSC2 for normalization, when analysing differences in gene expression levels between C. albicans biofilm

  11. Changes in tolerance to herbicide toxicity throughout development stages of phototrophic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paule, A; Roubeix, V; Lauga, B; Duran, R; Delmas, F; Paul, E; Rols, J L

    2013-11-15

    Ecotoxicological experiments have been performed in laboratory-scale microcosms to investigate the sensitivity of phototrophic biofilm communities to the alachlor herbicide, in relation to the stages of phototrophic biofilm maturation (age of the phototrophic biofilms) and physical structure (intact biofilm versus recolonization). The phototrophic biofilms were initially cultivated on artificial supports in a prototype rotating annular bioreactor (RAB) with Taylor-Couette type flow under constant operating conditions. Biofilms were collected after 1.6 and 4.4 weeks of culture providing biofilms with different maturation levels, and then exposed to nominal initial alachlor concentration of 10 μg L(-1) in either intact or recolonized biofilms for 15 days in microcosms (mean time-weighted average concentration - TWAC of 5.52 ± 0.74 μg L(-1)). At the end of the exposure period, alachlor effects were monitored by a combination of biomass descriptors (ash-free dry mass - AFDM, chlorophyll a), structural molecular fingerprinting (T-RFLP), carbon utilization spectra (Biolog) and diatom species composition. We found significant effects that in terms of AFDM, alachlor inhibited growth of the intact phototrophic biofilms. No effect of alachlor was observed on diatom composition or functional and structural properties of the bacterial community regardless of whether they were intact or recolonized. The intact three-dimensional structure of the biofilm did not appear to confer protection from the effects of alachlor. Bacterial community structure and biomass level of 4.4 weeks - intact phototrophic biofilms were significantly influenced by the biofilm maturation processes rather than alachlor exposure. The diatom communities which were largely composed of mobile and colonizer life-form populations were not affected by alachlor. This study showed that the effect of alachlor (at initial concentration of 10 μg L(-1) or mean TWAC of 5.52 ± 0.74 μg L(-1)) is mainly limited to

  12. The Influence of Maggot Excretions on PAO1 Biofilm Formation on Different Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; van Veen, Kiril E. B.; Bouwman, Lee H.; Bernards, Alexandra T.; Jukema, Gerrolt N.

    2008-01-01

    Biofilm formation in wounds and on biomaterials is increasingly recognized as a problem. It therefore is important to focus on new strategies for eradicating severe biofilm-associated infections. The beneficial effects of maggots (Lucilia sericata) in wounds have been known for centuries. We hypothesized sterile maggot excretions and secretions (ES) could prevent, inhibit, and break down biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) on different biomaterials. Therefore, we investigated biofilm fo...

  13. Impact of Irgarol 1051 on the larval development and metamorphosis of Balanus amphitirite Darwin, diatom, Amphora coffeaformis and natural biofilm

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.

    The effect of Irgarol 1051 on the biofilm-forming diatom, Amphora coffeaformis, and on natural biofilm was assessed. A reduction in the number of A. coffeaformis cells within a biofilm was observed after treatment with Irgarol 1051, confirming its...

  14. Permeabilizing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Burmølle, Mette;

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant to...... that biofilm bacteria in which QS is blocked either by mutation or by administration of QS inhibitory drugs are sensitive to treatment with tobramycin and H2O2, and are readily phagocytosed by PMNs, in contrast to bacteria with functional QS systems. In contrast to the wild-type, QS-deficient biofilms...

  16. CMEIAS bioimage informatics that define the landscape ecology of immature microbial biofilms developed on plant rhizoplane surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank B Dazzo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of the rhizoplane habitat is an important activity that enables certain microorganisms to promote plant growth. Here we describe various types of computer-assisted microscopy that reveal important ecological insights of early microbial colonization behavior within biofilms on plant root surfaces grown in soil. Examples of the primary data are obtained by analysis of processed images of rhizoplane biofilm landscapes analyzed at single-cell resolution using the emerging technology of CMEIAS bioimage informatics software. Included are various quantitative analyses of the in situ biofilm landscape ecology of microbes during their pioneer colonization of white clover roots, and of a rhizobial biofertilizer strain colonized on rice roots where it significantly enhances the productivity of this important crop plant. The results show that spatial patterns of immature biofilms developed on rhizoplanes that interface rhizosphere soil are highly structured (rather than distributed randomly when analyzed at the appropriate spatial scale, indicating that regionalized microbial cell-cell interactions and the local environment can significantly affect their cooperative and competitive colonization behaviors.

  17. Growing and analyzing biofilms in flow chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic......, and disassembly and cleaning of the system. In addition, embedding and fluorescent in situ hybridization of flow chamber-grown biofilms are addressed....

  18. Arsenate Retention by Epipsammic Biofilms Developed on Streambed Sediments: Influence of Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Prieto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural geological conditions together with the impact of human activities could produce environmental problems due to high As concentrations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of epipsammic biofilm-sediment systems onto As (V sorption and to evaluate the effect of the presence of equimolar P concentrations on As retention. A natural biofilm was grown on sediment samples in the laboratory, using river water as nutrient supplier. Sorption experiments with initial As concentrations 0, 5, 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500 μg L−1 were performed. The average percentage of As sorbed was 78.9±3.5 and 96.9±6.6% for the sediment and biofilm-sediment systems, respectively. Phosphate decreased by 25% the As sorption capactity in the sediment devoid of biofilm, whereas no significant effect was observed in the systems with biofilm. Freundlich, Sips, and Toth models were the best to describe experimental data. The maximum As sorption capacity of the sediment and biofilm-sediment systems was, respectively, 6.6 and 6.8 μg g−1 and 4.5 and 7.8 μg g−1 in the presence of P. In conclusion, epipsammic biofilms play an important role in the environmental quality of river systems, increasing As retention by the system, especially in environments where both As and P occur simultaneously.

  19. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    complicated organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition

  20. Improved computational model (AQUIFAS) for activated sludge, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, and moving-bed biofilm reactor systems, Part I: Semi-empirical model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Dipankar; Randall, Clifford W

    2008-05-01

    Research was undertaken to develop a model for activated sludge, integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS), and moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems. The model can operate with up to 12 cells (reactors) in series, with biofilm media incorporated to one or more cells, except the anaerobic cells. The process configuration can be any combination of anaerobic, anoxic, aerobic, post-anoxic with or without supplemental carbon, and reaeration; it can also include any combination of step feed and recycles, including recycles for mixed liquor, return activated sludge, nitrates, and membrane bioreactors. This paper presents the structure of the model. The model embeds a biofilm model into a multicell activated sludge model. The biofilm flux rates for organics, nutrients, and biomass can be computed by two methods--a semi-empirical model of the biofilm that is relatively simpler, or a diffusional model that is computationally intensive. The values of the kinetic parameters for the model were measured using pilot-scale activated sludge, IFAS, and MBBR systems. For the semiempirical version, a series of Monod equations were developed for chemical oxygen demand, ammonium-nitrogen, and oxidized-nitrogen fluxes to the biofilm. Within the equations, a second Monod expression is used to simulate the effect of changes in biofilm thickness and fraction nitrifiers in the biofilm. The biofilm flux model is then linked to the activated sludge model. The diffusional model and the verification of the models are presented in subsequent papers (Sen and Randall, 2008a, 2008b). The model can be used to quantify the amount of media and surface area required to achieve nitrification, identify the best locations for the media, and optimize the dissolved oxygen levels and nitrate recycle rates. Some of the advanced features include the ability to apply different media types and fill fractions in cells; quantify nitrification, denitrification, and biomass production in the biofilm and

  1. Overcoming barriers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections: Engineered nanoparticles for local delivery of a cationic antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Angelo, Ivana; Casciaro, Bruno; Miro, Agnese; Quaglia, Fabiana; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Ungaro, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are very promising in the treatment of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections experienced by cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Nevertheless, there is an urgent need of inhalable formulations able to deliver the intact CAMP in conductive airways and to shield its interactions with airway mucus/bacterial biofilm, thus enhancing CAMP/bacteria interactions. Along these lines, the aim of this work was the design and development of nano-embedded microparticles (NEM) for sustained delivery of CAMPs in the lung. To this purpose, nanoparticles (NPs) made of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) containing a model CAMP, colistin (Col), were produced by emulsion/solvent diffusion technique. Engineering NPs with chitosan (CS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) allowed to modulate surface properties and, in so doing, to improve NP transport through artificial CF mucus. In order to achieve a long-term stable dosage form useful for NP inhalation, NPs were spray-dried in different carriers (lactose or mannitol), thus producing NEM. The most promising NEM formulations were selected on the basis of bulk and flow properties, distribution of NPs in the carrier and aerosolization performance upon delivery through a breath-actuated dry powder inhaler. Of note, selected Col-loaded NEM were found to kill P. aeruginosa biofilm and to display a prolonged efficacy in biofilm eradication compared to the free Col. This effect was likely ascribable to the ability of NPs to penetrate into bacterial biofilm, as demonstrated by confocal analysis, and to sustain Col release inside it. Taken all together, our results indicate that adequate engineering of PLGA NPs represents an enticing technological approach to harness novel antimicrobials for P. aeruginosa lung infection, such as CAMPs, especially in CF. PMID:26340361

  2. Role of Tec1 in the Development, Architecture, and Integrity of Sexual Biofilms of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, Karla J.; Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Pujol, Claude; Park, Yang-Nim; Soll, David R.

    2015-01-01

    MTL-homozygous (a/a or α/α) white cells form a complex sexual biofilm that exhibits the same architecture as that of MTL-heterozygous (a/α) pathogenic biofilms. However, the former is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway, while the latter is regulated by the Ras1/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway. We previously demonstrated that in the formation of an MTL-homozygous, mature (48 h) sexual biofilm in RPMI 1640 medium, the MAP kinase pathway targets Tec1 rather than Cph1, the ...

  3. Synergistic Effect of 14-Alpha-Lipoyl Andrographolide and Various Antibiotics on the Formation of Biofilms and Production of Exopolysaccharide and Pyocyanin by Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Xiangping; Liu, Xiangyang; Bian, Jiang; Pei, Gang; Dai, Huanqin; Polyak, Steven W.; Song, Fuhang; Ma, Li; Wang, Yuqiang; Zhang, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a biofilm that provides the bacteria with an effective barrier against antibiotics. Here, we investigated the synergy of various antibiotics with 14-alpha-lipoyl andrographolide (AL-1), focusing upon synthesis of the biofilm. AL-1 also inhibited the production of the exopolysaccharide and pyocyanin components. We propose that AL-1 may potentially serve as a cotherapy to combat P. aeruginosa.

  4. Frequency of biofilm formation in toothbrushes and wash basin junks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulazeez A Abubakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilms are known to be resistant to several antibiotics once they are allowed to form on any surface. Aim: To investigate the biofilm forming ability of some bacterial isolates in toothbrushes and wash basin junks. Materials and Methods: A total of 606 students of Federal University of Technology, Yola were provided with new toothbrushes, which were collected after 1 month of usage and screened for biofilm formation. Another 620 swabs were collected from the wash basins of Federal Medical Centre, Specialist Hospital, Federal University of Technology, and students′ hostels in Yola and from some residence in Jimeta, Yola Metropolis; they were all screened for biofilm formation. Results: A total of 38.3% biofilm formation rate was recorded. Three types of bacterial isolates were identified in the biofilms of toothbrushes and wash basin junks, namely Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the prevalence rate of 48.0%, 29.1%, and 22.6%, respectively. Overall, 83.3% of the toothbrush biofilm were identified from female students, while 16.7% were from their male counterparts. Statistically, the frequency of biofilm formation showed a significant difference by gender (X 2 = 10.242, P 0.05. Conclusion: This study identified three microorganisms namely S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa that were involved in wash basin junk biofilm formation. The findings also showed that occurrence of biofilm in females′ toothbrushes were significantly higher than in males′ (X 2 = 10.242, P < 0.05.

  5. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B;

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant...... garlic-treated biofilm. Garlic extract was administered as treatment for a mouse pulmonary infection model. Mice were treated with garlic extract or placebo for 7 days, with the initial 2 days being prophylactic before P. aeruginosa was instilled in the left lung of the mice. Bacteriology, mortality......, histopathology and cytokine production were used as indicators. The garlic treatment initially provoked a higher degree of inflammation, and significantly improved clearing of the infecting bacteria. The results indicate that a QS-inhibitory extract of garlic renders P. aeruginosa sensitive to tobramycin...

  6. Beneficial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara R Robertson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface-adherent biofilm growth is a common trait of bacteria and other microorganisms in nature. Within biofilms, organisms are present in high density and are enmeshed in an organic matrix containing polysaccharides and other molecules. The close proximity of organisms within biofilms facilitates microbial interactions and signaling, including many metabolic processes in which consortia rather than individual organisms participate. Biofilm growth also enables microorganisms to withstand chemical and biological stresses. Here, we review some current literature and document representative beneficial aspects of biofilms using examples from wastewater treatment, microbial fuel cells, biological repair (biocementation of stonework, and biofilm protection against Candida albicans infections. Finally, we address a chemical ecology strategy whereby desired microbial succession and beneficial biofilm formation can be encouraged via manipulation of culture conditions and bacterial signaling.

  7. Extracellular DNA as matrix component in microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    to various persistent infections in humans and animals, and to a variety of complications in industry, where solid–water interfaces occur. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation is necessary for creating strategies to control biofilms. Recent studies have shown that......Bacteria in nature primarily live in surface-associated communities commonly known as biofilms. Because bacteria in biofilms, in many cases, display tolerance to host immune systems, antibiotics, and biocides, they are often difficult or impossible to eradicate. Biofilm formation, therefore, leads...... extracellular DNA is an important component of the extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms. The present chapter is focussed on extracellular DNA as matrix component in biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an example from the Gram-negative bacteria, and Streptococcus and Staphylococcus as examples...

  8. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  9. Characterization and Comparison of Biofilm Development by Pathogenic and Commensal Isolates of Histophilus somni▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sandal, Indra; Hong, Wenzhou; Swords, W. Edward; Inzana, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Histophilus somni (Haemophilus somnus) is an obligate inhabitant of the mucosal surfaces of bovines and sheep and an opportunistic pathogen responsible for respiratory disease, meningoencephalitis, myocarditis, arthritis, and other systemic infections. The identification of an exopolysaccharide produced by H. somni prompted us to evaluate whether the bacterium was capable of forming a biofilm. After growth in polyvinyl chloride wells a biofilm was formed by all strains examined, although most...

  10. A personal history of research on microbial biofilms and biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The observation of aggregated microorganisms surrounded by a self-produced matrix adhering to surfaces or located in tissues or secretions is as old as microbiology, with both Leeuwenhoek and Pasteur describing the phenomenon. In environmental and technical microbiology, biofilms were already shown...... aeruginosa cells in sputum and lung tissue from chronically infected cystic fibrosis patients. The term biofilm was introduced into medicine in 1985 by Costerton. In the following decades, it became obvious that biofilm infections are widespread in medicine, and their importance is now generally accepted....

  11. Development of Denitrifying and Nitrifying Bacteria and Their Co-occurrence in Newly Created Biofilms in Urban Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaessen, T. N.; Martí Roca, E.; Pinay, G.; Merbt, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Biofilms play a pivotal role on nutrient cycling in streams, which ultimately dictates the export of nutrients to downstream ecosystems. The extent to which biofilms influence the concentration of dissolved nutrients, oxygen and pH in the water column may be determined by the composition of the microbial assemblages and their activity. Evidence of biological interactions among bacteria and algae are well documented. However, the development, succession and co-occurence of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria remain poorly understood. These bacteria play a relevant role on the biogeochemical process associated to N cycling, and their relative abundance can dictate the fate of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in streams. In particular, previous studies indicated that nitrifiers are enhanced in streams receiving inputs from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents due to both increases in ammonium concentration and inputs of nitrifiers. However, less is known about the development of denitrifiers in receiving streams, although environmental conditions seem to favor it. We conducted an in situ colonization experiment in a stream receiving effluent from a WWTP to examine how this input influences the development and co-occurrence of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. We placed artificial substrata at different locations relative to the effluent and sampled them over time to characterize the developed biofilm in terms of bulk measurements (organic matter content and algae) as well as in terms of abundance of nitrifiers and denitrifiers (using qPCR). The results of this study contribute to a better understanding of the temporal dynamics of denitrifiers and nitrifiers in relation to the developed organic matter, dissolved oxygen and pH and the biomass accrual in stream biofilms under the influence of nutrients inputs from WWTP effluent. Ultimately, the results provide insights on the potential role of nitrifiers and denitrifiers on N cycling in WWTP effluent receiving

  12. Polymicrobial Biofilm Inhibition Effects of Acetate-Buffered Chitosan Sponge Delivery Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Jessica Amber; Beenken, Karen E; Parker, Ashley C; Smith, James Keaton; Courtney, Harry S; Smeltzer, Mark S; Haggard, Warren O

    2016-04-01

    Polymicrobial biofilm-associated implant infections present a challenging clinical problem. Through modifications of lyophilized chitosan sponges, degradable drug delivery devices for antibiotic solution have been fabricated for prevention and treatment of contaminated musculoskeletal wounds. Elution of amikacin, vancomycin, or a combination of both follows a burst release pattern with vancomycin released above minimum inhibitory concentration for Staphylococcus aureus for 72 h and amikacin released above inhibitory concentrations for Pseudomonas aeruginosa for 3 h. Delivery of a vancomycin, amikacin, or a combination of both reduces biofilm formation on polytetrafluoroethylene catheters in an in vivo model of contamination. Release of dual antibiotics from sponges is more effective at preventing biofilm formation than single-loaded chitosan sponges. Treatment of pre-formed biofilm with high-dose antibiotic release from chitosan sponges shows minimal reduction after 48 h. These results demonstrate infection-preventive efficacy for antibiotic-loaded sponges, as well as the need for modifications in the development of advanced materials to enhance treatment efficacy in removing established biofilm. PMID:26756211

  13. The ``Swiss cheese'' instability of bacterial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hongchul; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Bacteria often adhere to surfaces, where they develop polymer-encased communities (biofilms) that display dramatic resistance to antibiotic treatment. A better understanding of cell detachment from biofilms may lead to novel strategies for biofilm disruption. Here we describe a new detachment mode, whereby a biofilm develops a nearly regular array of ~50-100 μm holes. Using surface-treated microfluidic devices, we create biofilms of controlled shape and size. After the passage of an air plug, the break-up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a ``Swiss cheese'' pattern is left in the residual biofilm. Fluorescent staining of the polymeric matrix (EPS) reveals that resistance to cell dislodgement correlates with local biofilm age, early settlers having had more time to hunker down. Because few survivors suffice to regrow a biofilm, these results point at the importance of considering microscale heterogeneity in assessing the effectiveness of biofilm removal strategies.

  14. Sulfur as a Matrix for the Development of Microbial Biofilm Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, C.; Bell, E.; Johnson, J. E.; Ma, X.; Stamps, B. W.; Rideout, J.; Johnson, H. A.; Vuono, D.; Spear, J. R.; Hanselmann, K.

    2013-12-01

    The high temperature, low oxygen, and high sulfide concentration of many hot springs select for a low diversity of organisms. The stringent requirements for growth and survival limit the types of interactions, which allow the microbial sulfur metabolism to be examined in depth. We combined geochemical, microbial and molecular data to understand mat development in the warm, oxygen-poor sulfidic Stinking Spring, Utah, USA. The upper flow zone of this spring has a variety of observable microbial biofilm structures that are linked to the activities of both sulfide-oxidizing and oxygenic bacteria. The diverse architecture of the microbial assemblages consist of bulbous ridge structures on the bottom of the streambed, floating mats that cover a large portion of the water surface area, and two morphologically different streamers; green long filaments and white shorter filaments, which both contain large amounts of elemental sulfur. We performed structural analysis using phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy, and SEM coupled with EDS mapping. Amplicon sequenced 16S rRNA genes analyzed by QIIME and ARB indicated that the predominant organisms present were the cyanobacterial genus Leptolyngbya, and an ɛ-Proteobacteria closely related to the sulfur oxidizing genus Sulfurovum. Metagenomic analysis was conducted on six libraries from three locations using MG-RAST to analyze for genes associated with sulfur metabolism, specifically sulfur oxidation (sox) genes. The presence of sox genes and the microbial sulfur deposition strategy changes downstream as the sulfide concentration decreases. When sulfide is low, the streamers themselves become white and shorter with elemental sulfur deposited intracellularly, and diatoms seem to dominate over cyanobacteria, but do not form associations with the streamer structures. We propose that the microbial biofilms and green streamers present in the sulfide-rich section of the stream are formed in a multi-step process. Initial growth

  15. Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the

  16. Quorum-sensing regulation governs bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and host colonization in Pantoea stewartii subspecies stewartii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoudis, Maria D; Tsaltas, Dimitrios; Minogue, Timothy D; von Bodman, Susanne B

    2006-04-11

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii synthesizes stewartan exo/capsular polysaccharide (EPS) in a cell density-dependent manner governed by the EsaI/EsaR quorum-sensing (QS) system. This study analyzes biofilm development and host colonization of the WT and QS regulatory mutant strains of P. stewartii. First, we show that the cell density-dependent synthesis of stewartan EPS, governed by the EsaI/EsaR QS system, is required for proper bacterial adhesion and development of spatially defined, 3D biofilms. Second, a nonvirulent mutant lacking the esaI gene adheres strongly to surfaces and develops densely packed, less structurally defined biofilms in vitro. This strain appears to be arrested in a low cell density developmental mode. Exposure of this strain to exogenous N-acyl-homoserine lactone counteracts this adhesion phenotype. Third, QS mutants lacking the EsaR repressor attach poorly to surfaces and form amorphous biofilms heavily enmeshed in excess EPS. Fourth, the WT strain disseminates efficiently within the xylem, primarily in a basipetal direction. In contrast, the two QS mutant strains remain largely localized at the site of infection. Fifth, and most significantly, epifluorescence microscopic imaging of infected leaf tissue and excised xylem vessels reveals that the bacteria colonize the xylem with unexpected specificity, particularly toward the annular rings and spiral secondary wall thickenings of protoxylem, as opposed to indiscriminate growth to fill the xylem lumen. These observations are significant to bacterial plant pathogenesis in general and may reveal targets for disease control. PMID:16585516

  17. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized as...... being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections such as...... diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well as...

  18. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst; Høiby, Niels

    being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections such as......A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized as...... diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well as...

  19. Rapid depletion of dissolved oxygen in 96 well microtitre plate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm assays promotes biofilm development and is influenced by inoculum cell concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Cotter, John J.; O'Gara, James P.; CASEY, Eoin

    2009-01-01

    Biofilm-related research using 96-well microtiter plates involves static incubation of plates indiscriminate of environmental conditions, making oxygen availability an important variable which has not been considered to date. By directly measuring dissolved oxygen concentration over time we report here that dissolved oxygen is rapidly consumed in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm cultures grown in 96-well plates irrespective of the oxygen concentration in the gaseous environment in which the...

  20. A new rabbit model of implant-related biofilm infection: development and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cheng-Bing; Zeng, Hong; Shen, Ding-Xia; Wang, Hui; Wang, Ji-Fang; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2016-03-01

    This study is to establish a rabbit model for human prosthetic joint infection and biofilm formation. Thirty-two healthy adult rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and implanted with stainless steel screws and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) washers in the non-articular surface of the femoral lateral condyle of the right hind knees. The rabbit knee joints were inoculated with 1 mL saline containing 0, 102, 103, 104 CFU of Staphylococcus epidermidis ( S. epidermidis) isolated from the patient with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) infection, respectively. On the 14th postoperative day, the UHMWPE washers from the optimal 103 CFU group were further examined. The SEM examination showed a typical biofilm construction that circular S. epidermidis were embedded in a mucous-like matrix. In addition, the LCSM examination showed that the biofilm consisted of the polysaccharide stained bright green fluorescence and S. epidermidis radiating red fluorescence. Thus, we successfully create a rabbit model for prosthetic joint infection and biofilm formation, which should be valuable for biofilm studies.