WorldWideScience

Sample records for aerosol release detector

  1. Method for HEPA filter leak scanning with differentiating aerosol detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, B.J.; Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O. [NUCON International, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    While scanning HEPA filters for leaks with {open_quotes}Off the Shelf{close_quote} aerosol detection equipment, the operator`s scanning speed is limited by the time constant and threshold sensitivity of the detector. This is based on detection of the aerosol density, where the maximum signal is achieved when the scanning probe resides over the pinhole longer than several detector time-constants. Since the differential value of the changing signal can be determined by observing only the first small fraction of the rising signal, using a differentiating amplifier will speed up the locating process. The other advantage of differentiation is that slow signal drift or zero offset will not interfere with the process of locating the leak, since they are not detected. A scanning hand-probe attachable to any NUCON{reg_sign} Aerosol Detector displaying the combination of both aerosol density and differentiated signal was designed. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Method for HEPA filter leak scanning with differentiating aerosol detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While scanning HEPA filters for leaks with open-quotes Off the Shelf close-quote aerosol detection equipment, the operator's scanning speed is limited by the time constant and threshold sensitivity of the detector. This is based on detection of the aerosol density, where the maximum signal is achieved when the scanning probe resides over the pinhole longer than several detector time-constants. Since the differential value of the changing signal can be determined by observing only the first small fraction of the rising signal, using a differentiating amplifier will speed up the locating process. The other advantage of differentiation is that slow signal drift or zero offset will not interfere with the process of locating the leak, since they are not detected. A scanning hand-probe attachable to any NUCON reg-sign Aerosol Detector displaying the combination of both aerosol density and differentiated signal was designed. 3 refs., 1 fig

  3. Status of the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during light water reactor (LWR) accident sequences and released into containment is being studied. Recent activities in the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project include studies of (1) the thermal hydraulic conditions existing during Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) aerosol tests in steam-air environments, (2) the thermal output and aerosol mass generation rates for plasma torch aerosol generators, and (3) the influence of humidity on the shape of agglomerated aerosols of various materials. A new Aerosol-Moisture Interaction Test (AMIT) facility was prepared at the NSPP site to accommodate the aerosol shape studies; several tests with Fe2O3 aerosol have been conducted. In addition to the above activities a special study was conducted to determine the suitability of the technique of aerosol production by plasma torch under the operating conditions of future tests of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. 3 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Automated mobility-classified-aerosol detector

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Lynn M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Zhang, Shou-Hua

    2001-01-01

    An aerosol detection system for measuring particle number distribution with respect to particle dimension in an aerosol sample. The system includes an alternating dual-bag sampler, a radially classified differential mobility analyzer, and a condensation nucleus counter. Pressure variations in sampling are compensated by feedback control of volumetric flow rates using a plurality of flow control elements.

  5. Nanostructured Aerosol Particles: Fabrication, Pulmonary Drug Delivery, and Controlled Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmao Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary drug delivery is the preferred route of administration in the treatment of respiratory diseases and some nonrespiratory diseases. Recent research has focused on developing structurally stable high-dosage drug delivery systems without premature release. To maximize the deposition in the desired lung regions, several factors must be considered in the formulation. The special issue includes seven papers deal with aerosol-assisted fabrication of nanostructured particles, aerosol deposition, nanoparticles pulmonary exposure, and controlled release.

  6. Release of Free DNA by Membrane-Impaired Bacterial Aerosols Due to Aerosolization and Air Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen, Huajun; Han, Taewon; Fennell, Donna E.; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2013-01-01

    We report here that stress experienced by bacteria due to aerosolization and air sampling can result in severe membrane impairment, leading to the release of DNA as free molecules. Escherichia coli and Bacillus atrophaeus bacteria were aerosolized and then either collected directly into liquid or collected using other collection media and then transferred into liquid. The amount of DNA released was quantified as the cell membrane damage index (ID), i.e., the number of 16S rRNA gene copies in ...

  7. Radon and aerosol release from open-pit uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantity of 222Rn (hereafter called radon) released per unit of uranium produced from open pit mining has been determined. A secondary objective was to determine the nature and quantity of airborne particles resulting from mine operations. To accomplish these objectives, a comprehensive study of the release rates of radon and aerosol material to the atmosphere was made over a one-year period from April 1979 to May 1980 at the Morton Ranch Mine which was operated by United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) in partnership with Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The mine is now operated for TVA by Silver King Mines. Morton Ranch Mine was one of five open pit uranium mines studied in central Wyoming. Corroborative measurements were made of radon flux and 226Ra (hereafter called radium) concentrations of various surfaces at three of the other mines in October 1980 and again at these three mines plus a fourth in April of 1981. Three of these mines are located in the Powder River Basin, about 80 kilometers east by northeast of Casper. One is located in the Shirley Basin, about 60 km south of Casper, and the remaining one is located in the Gas Hills, approximately 100 km west of Casper. The one-year intensive study included simultaneous measurement of several parameters: continuous measurement of atmospheric radon concentration near the ground at three locations, monthly 24-hour radon flux measurements from various surfaces, radium analyses of soil samples collected under each of the flux monitoring devices, monthly integrations of aerosols on dichotomous aerosol samplers, analysis of aerosol samplers for total dust loading, aerosol elemental and radiochemical composition, aerosol elemental composition by particle size, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, barometric pressure, and rainfall

  8. The measurement of the radioactive aerosol diameter by position sensitive semiconductor detectors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the diameter of radioactive aerosol, in particular plutonium aerosol, is very important for the internal dose estimation. Determination of the diameter of radioactive aerosol is performed by using position sensitive semiconductor detector (PSD). The filter paper with the radioactive aerosols is contacted to the PSD which is connected to the data processor so that the diameter of the aerosol is calculated from the measured radioactivity. This investigation was performed in cooperation with Rikkyo University. (author)

  9. Rapid Detection and Identification of Biogenic Aerosol Releases and Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J.; Macher, J.; Ghosal, S.; Ahmed, K.; Hemati, K.; Wall, S.; Kumagai, K.

    2011-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols can be important contributors to aerosol chemistry, cloud droplet and ice nucleation, absorption and scattering of radiation, human health and comfort, and plant, animal, and microbial ecology. Many types of bioaerosols, e.g., fungal spores, are released into the atmosphere in response to specific climatological and meteorological conditions. The rapid identification of bioaerosol releases is thus important for better characterization of the above phenomena, as well as enabling public officials to respond quickly and appropriately to releases of infectious agents or biological toxins. One approach to rapid and accurate bioaerosol detection is to employ sequential, automated samples that can be fed directly into an image acquisition and data analysis device. Raman spectroscopy-based identification of bioaerosols, automated analysis of microscopy images, and automated detection of near-monodisperse peaks in aerosol size-distribution data were investigated as complementary approaches to traditional, manual methods for the identification and counting of fungal and actinomycete spores. Manual light microscopy is a widely used analytical technique that is compatible with a number of air sample formats and requires minimal sample preparation. However, a major drawback is its dependence on a human analyst's ability to distinguish particles and accurately count, size, and identify them. Therefore, automated methods, such as those evaluated in this study, have the potential to provide cost-effective and rapid alternatives if demonstrated to be accurate and reliable. An exploratory examination of individual spores for several macro- and microfungi (those with and without large fruiting bodies) by Raman microspectroscopy found unique spectral features that were used to identify fungi to the genus level. Automated analyses of digital spore images accurately recognized and counted single fungal spores and clusters. An automated procedure to discriminate near

  10. 10 CFR 32.26 - Gas and aerosol detectors containing byproduct material: Requirements for license to manufacture...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gas and aerosol detectors containing byproduct material... CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Exempt Concentrations and Items § 32.26 Gas and aerosol detectors containing... application for a specific license to manufacture, process, or produce gas and aerosol detectors...

  11. Aerosols released from solvent fire accidents in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic, aerosol characterizing and radiological data of solvent fires in reprocessing plants have been established in experiments. These are the main results: Depending on the ventilation in the containment, kerosene-TBP mixtures burn at a rate up to 120 kg/m2 h. The aqueous phase of inorganic-organic mixtures might be released during the fire. The gaseous reaction products contain unburnable acidic compounds. Solvents with TBP-nitrate complex shows higher (up to 25%) burning rates than pure solvents (kerosene-TBP). The nitrate complex decomposes violently at about 1300C with a release of acid and unburnable gases. Up to 20% of the burned kerosene-TBP solvents are released during the fire in the form of soot particles, phosphoric acid and TBP decomposition products. The particles have an aerodynamic mass median diameter of about 0.5 μm and up to 1.5% of the uranium fixed in the TBP-nitrate complex is released during solvent fires. (orig.)

  12. Experimental program in core melt aerosol release and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of the requirements for an experimental demonstration of core-melt aerosol release has indicated that the most practical technique is that referred to as skull melting by rf induction. The implied skull would be a preformed ZrO2 or ThO2 shell composed of presintered powdered oxide. The advantages of this method include freedom from foreign container materials, a cold wall environment that ensures furnace integrity, and an almost unrestricted use of steam or other atmosphere as the cover gas. The major emphases of the project will be first to investigate chemical states and adsorption processes for simulant fission products, particularly iodine and cesium, and second, to measure the coagglomeration and total attenuation rate of all vaporized species with the structural material aerosols. The initial part of the effort has been dedicated to the development of a demonstration scale (1.0-kg), water-cooled, skull container with segmented copper components. A second part of the effort has been concerned with the design of a full 10- to 20-kg scale furnace and the selection of a 250-kW-rf power unit to match the furnace

  13. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  14. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  15. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  16. Characteristics of the aerosols released to the environment after a severe PWR accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the event of a postulated severe accident on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) involving fuel degradation, gases and aerosols containing radioactive products could be released, with short, medium and long term consequences for the population and the environment. Under such accident conditions, the ESCADRE code system, developed at IPSN (Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection) can be used to calculate the properties of the substances released and, especially with the AEROSOLS/B2 code, the main characteristics of the aerosols (concentration, size distribution, composition). For conditions representative of severe PWR accidents, by varying different main parameters (structural material aerosols, steam condensation in the containment, etc...), indications are given on the range of characteristics of the aerosols (containing notably Cs, Te, Sr, Ru, etc...) released to the atmosphere. Information is also given on how more accurate data (especially on the chemical forms) will be obtainable in the framework of current or planned experimental programs (HEVA, PITEAS, PHEBUS PF, etc...)

  17. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission aerosol release and the transport program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the U.S.N.R.C. research program for providing experimentally verified, quantitative methods for estimating the release and transport of sodium and radionuclide aerosols following postulated accidents. The program is directed towards radiological consequence assessment, however a number of aerosol behavior mechanisms being studied are applicable to LMFBR operational considerations. Related theoretical and experimental work on aerosol formation, agglomeration, settling and plating is noted. (author)

  18. Comparing The Performance Of A New Electrical Aerosol Detector With Other Counters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardkapan, Siamak Rahimi; Afshari, Alireza; Bergsøe, Niels Christian

    2011-01-01

    aerosol detector was compared with two other particlemeasuring technologies, Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer spectrometer and Condensation Particle Counter. An electrical aerosol detector charges particles and later counts them according to their electrical movement. The particle counters were tested in...... a clean room with clean supply air. The results showed that the three counters follow a similar pattern at a low level of particle concentrations. An exponential relationship was found between the electrical aerosol detector and the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer spectrometer for high......Ultrafine particles are known to be harmful to the human respiratory system. Therefore, measuring their UFP concentration is essential in research areas related to human health. Different technologies exist for measuring the concentration and size of particles. In the present study, an electrical...

  19. Method of measuring aerosol particles using automated mobility-classified aerosol detector

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Lynn M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Zhang, Shou-Hua

    1999-01-01

    An aerosol detection system for measuring particle number distribution with respect to particle dimension in an aerosol sample. The system includes an alternating dual-bag sampler, a radially classified differential mobility analyzer, and a condensation nucleus counter. Pressure variations in sampling are compensated by feedback control of volumetric flow rates.

  20. Dual aerosol detector based on forward light scattering with a single laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in-place leak testing of HEPA filter banks using a single detector can lead to some error in the measurement due to the fluctuation of the aerosol concentration while the single detector is being switched from the upstream to downstream sampling. The time duration of the test also can cause unnecessarily high DOP loading of the HEPA filters and in some cases higher radiation exposure to the testing personnel. The new forward light scattering detector uses one 632.8 nm laser beam for aerosol detection in a dual chamber sampling and detecting aerosol concentration simultaneously both upstream and downstream. This manner of operation eliminates the errors caused by concentration variations between upstream and downstream sample points while the switching takes place. The new detector uses large area silicone photodiodes with a hole in the center, to permit uninterrupted passage of the laser beam through the downstream sample chamber. The nonlinearity due to the aerosol over population of the laser beam volume is calculated to be less than 1% using a Poisson distribution method to determine the average distance of the particles. A simple pneumatic system prevents mixing of the upstream and downstream samples even in wide pressure variations of the duct system

  1. LMFBR aerosol release and transport program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes progress for the Aerosol Release and Transport Program sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Division of Accident Evaluation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the period July-September 1981. Topics discussed include (1) preparations for under-sodium tests at the Fast Aerosol Simulant Test Facility, (2) progress in interpretation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory-Sandia Laboratory normalization test results, (3) U3O8 in steam (light-water reactor accident) aerosol experiments conducted in the Nuclear Safety Power Plant, (4) experiments on B2O3 and SiO2 aerosols at the Containment Research Installation-II Facility, (5) fuel-melting tests in small-scale experimental facilities for the core-melt aerosol program, (6) analytical comparison of simple adiabatic nonlinear and linear analytical models of bubble oscillation phenomena with experimental data

  2. Fission product partitioning in aerosol release from simulated spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lemma, F.G.; Colle, J.Y.; Rasmussen, G.; Konings, R J M

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols created by the vaporization of simulated spent nuclear fuel (simfuel) were produced by laser heating techniques and characterised by a wide range of post-analyses. In particular attention has been focused on determining the fission product behaviour in the aerosols, in order to improve the evaluation of the source term and consequently the risk associated with release from spent fuel sabotage or accidents. Different simulated spent fuels were tested with burn-up up to 8 at. %. The re...

  3. Online characterization of nano-aerosols released by commercial spray products using SMPS–ICPMS coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticle-containing sprays are a critical class of consumer products, since human exposure may occur by inhalation of nanoparticles (NP) in the generated aerosols. In this work, the suspension and the released aerosol of six different commercially available consumer spray products were analyzed. Next to a broad spectrum of analytical methods for the characterization of the suspension, a standardized setup for the analysis of aerosol has been used. In addition, a new online coupling technique (SMPS–ICPMS) for the simultaneous analysis of particle size and elemental composition of aerosol particles has been applied. Results obtained with this new method were confirmed by other well-established techniques. Comparison of particles in the original suspensions and in the generated aerosol showed that during spraying single particles of size less than 20 nm had been formed, even though in none of the suspensions particles of size less than 280 nm were present (Aerosol size range scanned: 7–300 nm). Both pump sprays and propellant gas sprays were analyzed and both released particles in the nm size range. Also, both water-based and organic solvent-based sprays released NP. However, a trend was observed that spraying an aqueous suspension contained in a pump spray dispenser after drying resulted in bigger agglomerates than spraying organic suspensions in propellant gas dispensers.

  4. Online characterization of nano-aerosols released by commercial spray products using SMPS–ICPMS coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losert, Sabrina; Hess, Adrian [Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry (Switzerland); Ilari, Gabriele [Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Electron Microscopy Center (Switzerland); Goetz, Natalie von, E-mail: natalie.von.goetz@chem.ethz.ch; Hungerbuehler, Konrad [ETH Zürich Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich, Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Nanoparticle-containing sprays are a critical class of consumer products, since human exposure may occur by inhalation of nanoparticles (NP) in the generated aerosols. In this work, the suspension and the released aerosol of six different commercially available consumer spray products were analyzed. Next to a broad spectrum of analytical methods for the characterization of the suspension, a standardized setup for the analysis of aerosol has been used. In addition, a new online coupling technique (SMPS–ICPMS) for the simultaneous analysis of particle size and elemental composition of aerosol particles has been applied. Results obtained with this new method were confirmed by other well-established techniques. Comparison of particles in the original suspensions and in the generated aerosol showed that during spraying single particles of size less than 20 nm had been formed, even though in none of the suspensions particles of size less than 280 nm were present (Aerosol size range scanned: 7–300 nm). Both pump sprays and propellant gas sprays were analyzed and both released particles in the nm size range. Also, both water-based and organic solvent-based sprays released NP. However, a trend was observed that spraying an aqueous suspension contained in a pump spray dispenser after drying resulted in bigger agglomerates than spraying organic suspensions in propellant gas dispensers.

  5. Adaptive assay of pulmonary radioactive aerosol with an external detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of the adaptive assay method was examined and then used to reduce the error caused by non-uniform spatial distribution. A computer program simulates adaptive assay of pulmonary aerosol within a standard man lungs, and compares its results with the results of static measurement. In the extreme hypothetical situation in which the aerosol is concentrated entirely in the left lung, and the static measurement is performed under the right arm, the errors obtained by calibration the static measurement on assumption of uniform spatial distribution, is as large as a factor 5 of the true value. In the same situation the adaptive assay result errs by less than 20%. In another situation, in which the aerosol is distributed in both lungs, and its concentration is higher in the pleura and near the back, the error obtained by calibrating the static measurement on the assumption of uniform spatial distribution, is as large as 30%, while the adaptive assay result errs by less than 2%. (author)

  6. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  7. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  8. Aerosol Release and Transport Program. Semiannual progress report, April-September 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes progress for the Aerosol Release and Transport Program sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Division of Accident Evaluation, for the period April 1985-September 1985. Topics discussed include (1) a steam-only test performed in the NSPP vessel; (2) development tests to study thermal input and generation efficiency; (3) Aerosol-Moisture Interaction Test (AMIT) preliminary and development tests to check various features of the AMIT facility; (4) data from the first two tests in the AMIT program; (5) an analysis of changes necessary in Andersen Mark-III impactor design for AMIT experiments; (6) the theory of capillary condensation on aerosols at nominally undersaturated humidity levels; (7) work in modifying data processing codes to accommodate data retrieval equipment changes; (8) correction of sample volume calculations for NSPP experiments on aerosols in steam-air environments; and (9) implementation and application of the CONTAIN code. 2 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Estimating trace gas and aerosol emissions over South America: Relationship between fire radiative energy released and aerosol optical depth observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gabriel; Freitas, Saulo R.; Moraes, Elisabete Caria; Ferreira, Nelson Jesus; Shimabukuro, Yosio Edemir; Rao, Vadlamudi Brahmananda; Longo, Karla M.

    2009-12-01

    Contemporary human activities such as tropical deforestation, land clearing for agriculture, pest control and grassland management lead to biomass burning, which in turn leads to land-cover changes. However, biomass burning emissions are not correctly measured and the methods to assess these emissions form a part of current research area. The traditional methods for estimating aerosols and trace gases released into the atmosphere generally use emission factors associated with fuel loading and moisture characteristics and other parameters that are hard to estimate in near real-time applications. In this paper, fire radiative power (FRP) products were extracted from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) fire products and new South America generic biomes FRE-based smoke aerosol emission coefficients were derived and applied in 2002 South America fire season. The inventory estimated by MODIS and GOES FRP measurements were included in Coupled Aerosol-Tracer Transport model coupled to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CATT-BRAMS) and evaluated with ground truth collected in Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, rainfall, and Climate (SMOCC) and Radiation, Cloud, and Climate Interactions (RaCCI). Although the linear regression showed that GOES FRP overestimates MODIS FRP observations, the use of a common external parameter such as MODIS aerosol optical depth product could minimize the difference between sensors. The relationship between the PM 2.5μm (Particulate Matter with diameter less than 2.5 μm) and CO (Carbon Monoxide) model shows a good agreement with SMOCC/RaCCI data in the general pattern of temporal evolution. The results showed high correlations, with values between 0.80 and 0.95 (significant at 0.5 level by student t test), for the CATT-BRAMS simulations with PM 2.5μm and CO.

  10. Sodium aerosol release rate and nonvolatile fission product retention factor during a sodium-concrete reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a series of tests conducted to study the mechanical release behavior of sodium aerosols containing nonvolatile fission products during a sodium-concrete reaction in which release behavior due to hydrodynamic breakup of the hydrogen bubble is predominant at the sodium pool surface. In the tests, nonradioactive materials, namely, strontium oxide, europium oxide, and ruthenium particles, whose sizes range from a few microns to several tens of microns, are used as nonvolatile fission product stimulants. The following results are obtained: The sodium aerosol release rate during the sodium-concrete reaction is larger than that of natural evaporation. The difference, however, becomes smaller with increasing sodium temperature: nearly ten times smaller at 400 degrees C and three times at 700 degrees C. The retention factors for the nonvolatile materials in the sodium pool increase to the range of 0.5 to 104 with an increase in the sodium temperature from 400 to 700 degrees C

  11. New data for aerosols generated by releases of pressurized powders and solutions in static air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop radioactive source-term estimation methods. Experiments measuring the mass airborne and particle size distribution of aerosols produced by pressurized releases were run. Carbon dioxide was used to pressurize uranine solutions to 50, 250, and 500 psig before release. The mass airborne from these experiments was higher than for comparable air-pressurized systems, but not as great as expected based on the amount of gas dissolved in the liquid and the volume of liquid ejected from the release equipment. Flashing sprays of uranine at 60, 125, and 240 psig produced a much larger source term than all other pressurized releases performed under this program. Low-pressure releases of depleted uranium dioxide at 9, 17.5, and 24.5 psig provided data in the energy region between 3-m spills and 50-psig pressurized releases

  12. Radiation-hygienic significance of gaseous aerosol releases from coal thermoelectric plants (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review data on the problem of radiation effect on the population of gaseous-aerosol releases from coal thermoelectric plants are presented. It is shown that effective dose equivalents to population due to 1 GW nominal thermoelectric plant releases much exceed radiation dose caused by releases of NPP of similar power. The mean individual dose equivalent to the lungs of population living near the rated power thermoelectric plant is about 0.42 mcZv. Polonium-210 is the most typical representative of natural radionuclides containing in releases. Carcinogenic effect of polonium on animals and man is considered. Significance of accounting synergism of radiation factor effects and main components of ash releases is stressed

  13. Aerosols generated by releases of pressurized powders and solutions in static air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases caused by accidents. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop the source terms for these releases. An upper boundary accidental release event would be a pressurized release of powder or liquid in static air. Experiments were run using various source sizes and pressures and measuring the mass airborne and the particle size distribution of aerosols produced by these pressurized releases. Two powder and two liquid sources were used: TiO2 and depleted uranium dioxide (DUO); and aqueous uranine (sodium fluorescein) and uranyl nitrate solutions. Results of the experiments showed that pressurization level and source size were significant variables for the airborne powder releases. For this experimental configuration, the liquid releases were a function of pressure, but volume did not appear to be a significant variable. During the experiments 100 g and 350 g of DUO (1 μm dia) and TiO2 (1.7 μm dia) powders and 100 cm3 and 350 cm3 of uranine and uranyl nitrate solutions were released at pressures ranging from 50 to 500 psig. The average of the largest fractions of powder airborne was about 24%. The maximum amount of liquid source airborne was significantly less, about 0.15%. The median aerodynamic equivalent diameters (AED) for collected airborne powders ranged from 5 to 19 μm; liquids ranged from 2 to 29 μm. All of the releases produced a significant fraction of respirable particles of 10 μm and less. 12 references, 10 figures, 23 tables

  14. Aerosol-halogen interaction: Change of physico-chemical properties of SOA by naturally released halogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, J.; Balzer, N.; Buxmann, J.; Grothe, H.; Krüger, H.; Platt, U.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species are released by various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol or salt pans and salt lakes. These heterogeneous release mechanisms have been overlooked so far, although their potential of interaction with organic aerosols like Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA), Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) or Atmospheric Humic LIke Substances (HULIS) is completely unknown. Such reactions can constitute sources of gaseous organo-halogen compounds or halogenated organic particles in the atmospheric boundary layer. To study the interaction of organic aerosols with reactive halogen species (RHS), SOA was produced from α-pinene, catechol and guaiacol using an aerosol smog-chamber. The model SOAs were characterized in detail using a variety of physico-chemical methods (Ofner et al., 2011). Those aerosols were exposed to molecular halogens in the presence of UV/VIS irradiation and to halogens, released from simulated natural halogen sources like salt pans, in order to study the complex aerosol-halogen interaction. The heterogeneous reaction of RHS with those model aerosols leads to different gaseous species like CO2, CO and small reactive/toxic molecules like phosgene (COCl2). Hydrogen containing groups on the aerosol particles are destroyed to form HCl or HBr, and a significant formation of C-Br bonds could be verified in the particle phase. Carbonyl containing functional groups of the aerosol are strongly affected by the halogenation process. While changes of functional groups and gaseous species were visible using FTIR spectroscopy, optical properties were studied using Diffuse Reflectance UV/VIS spectroscopy. Overall, the optical properties of the processed organic aerosols are significantly changed. While chlorine causes a "bleaching" of the aerosol particles, bromine shifts the maximum of UV/VIS absorption to the red end of the UV/VIS spectrum. Further physico-chemical changes were recognized according to the aerosol size-distributions or the

  15. Control of releases of radioactive aerosols from object ''Ukryttya'' in 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of control of radioactive particulate emission are presented from the object ''Ukryttya'' in 2014. The maximal rate of unorganized releases of beta-radiating products of Chernobyl accident was in winter period and reached 3.6 MBq/day. The concentration of long-lived beta-radiating aerosols released in atmosphere from system ''Bypass'' was within the range 0.3 - 5 Bq/m3 (maximal concentration was 14 Bq/m3). Them carriers were particles with active median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) 0.6 - 6 μm. Mean ratio of concentrations were: 137Cs/241Am = 97 i 241Am/154Eu = 6.2. The concentration of 212Pb - daughter products of thoron consisted as a rule 0.8 - 4 Bq/m3. Maximal concentration of 212Pb aerosols was 9 Bq/m3. The relation of concentrations of daughter products of radon and thoron and 212Pb were about 4. They have AMAD 0.06 - 0.3 μm. A volume activity and dispersity of radioactive aerosols in releases from object ''Ukryttya'' remain constant the last ten years

  16. AEROSOL DEPOSITION EFFICIENCIES AND UPSTREAM RELEASE POSITIONS FOR DIFFERENT INHALATION MODES IN AN UPPER BRONCHIAL AIRWAY MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerosol Deposition Efficiencies and Upstream Release Positions for Different Inhalation Modes in an Upper Bronchial Airway Model Zhe Zhang, Clement Kleinstreuer, and Chong S. KimCenter for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Ch...

  17. Results of aerosol code comparisons with releases from ACE MCCI tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of aerosol release calculations by six groups from six countries are compared with the releases from ACE MCCI Test L6. The codes used for these calculations included: SOLGASMIX-PV, SOLGASMIX Reactor 1986, CORCON.UW, VANESA 1.01, and CORCON mod2.04/VANESA 1.01. Calculations were performed with the standard VANESA 1.01 code and with modifications to the VANESA code such as the inclusion of various zirconium-silica chemical reactions. Comparisons of results from these calculations were made with Test L6 release fractions for U, Zr, Si, the fission-product elements Te, Ba, Sr, Ce, La, Mo, Ru and control materials Ag and In. Reasonable agreement was obtained between calculations and Test L6 results for the volatile elements Ag, In and Te. Calculated releases of the low volatility fission products ranged from within an order of magnitude to five orders of magnitude of Test L6 values. Releases were over and underestimated by calculations. Poorest agreements were obtained for Mo and Si. In summary: Results of this code comparison effort are useful in assessing progress on fission-product release calculations and in providing guidance with respect to databases and further model development. Conclusions and recommendations are given below. 1. Significant progress has been made by the development of various SOLGASMIX chemical equilibrium codes with extensive databases and the development of the CORCON.UW code which gives better agreement with Test L6 than the CORCON mod2.04/VANESA 1.01 codes. The SOLGASMIX calculations on Test L6 and other ACE MCCI tests have provided valuable contributions on the importance of various species in the melt chemistry and the effects of various test parameters on the release. 2. Although some possible causes for discrepancies between calculated and measured releases have been proposed in this paper, the combined efforts of specialists are needed to identify the causes of discrepancies between the calculated and measured releases for each

  18. Beta experiments on zirconium oxidation and aerosol release during melt-concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three experiments on melt-concrete interaction have been carried out in the BETA facility to investigate the zirconium oxidation processes during concrete attack and their influence on concrete erosion and aerosol release. The results clearly show the dominance of the condensed phase chemistry, that is the chemical reaction of Zr and SiO2 leading to the rapid oxidation of 80 kg of Zr and the formation of Si in the metallic melt within a few minutes only. The high chemical energy release from this reaction produces fast concrete erosion and a pronounced gas spike dominated by hydrogen release. After the completion of Zr oxidation the erosion is determined by the much lower internal decay heat level with moderate interaction processes. The temperature of the melt is measured to decrease very fast to the freezing temperature which can be explained by the very effective heat removal to the melting concrete. The overall downward erosion of 40 to 50 cm of the concrete crucible produces characteristic 2-dimensional cavity shapes. Aerosol release including simulated fission product behavior is reported with respect to aerosol rates, chemical composition, and characteristic particle size. In conclusion: The three tests investigated the interaction of predominantly metallic melts of high initial Zr concentration with siliceous concrete in a cylindrical crucible. They give clear and consistent data on Zr oxidation and related processes which may be summarized as follows: - Oxidation of 80 kg Zry-4 in 300 kg metallic melt dominates the interaction during the first 2 or 3 minutes. Material investigation shows the depletion of Zr within only 1 minute and a simultaneous increase of Si concentration in the metallic melt as described by the condensed phase chemical reaction Zr + SiO2 ZrO2 + Si. - In spite of the high energy deposition from Zr oxidation and from electric heating the temperature of the metal in all three BETA tests drops to its freezing temperature within some 150 s

  19. Results of aerosol code comparisons with releases from ACE MCCI tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of aerosol release calculations by six groups from six countries are compared with the releases from ACE MCCI Test L6. The codes used for these calculations included: SOLGASMIX-PV, SOLGASMIX Reactor 1986, CORCON.UW, VANESA 1.01, and CORCON mod2.04/VANESA 1.01. Calculations were performed with the standard VANESA 1.01 code and with modifications to the VANESA code such as the inclusion of various zirconium-silica chemical reactions. Comparisons of results from these calculations were made with Test L6 release fractions for U, Zr, Si, the fission-product elements Te, Ba, Sr, Ce, La, Mo and control materials Ag, In, and Ru. Reasonable agreement was obtained between calculations and Test L6 results for the volatile elements Ag, In and Te. Calculated releases of the low volatility fission products ranged from within an order of magnitude to five orders of magnitude of Test L6 values. Releases were over and underestimated by calculations. Poorest agreements were obtained for Mo and Si

  20. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The release of vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere as a result of clathrate destabilization is a potential mechanism for rapid amplification of global warming. Previous studies have calculated the enhanced warming based mainly on the radiative effect of the methane itself, with smaller contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4 levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is predicted to significantly decrease hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations, while moderately increasing ozone (O3. These changes lead to a 70 % increase in the atmospheric lifetime of methane, and an 18 % decrease in global mean cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC. The CDNC change causes a radiative forcing that is comparable in magnitude to the longwave radiative forcing ("enhanced greenhouse effect" of the added methane. Together, the indirect CH4-O3 and CH4-OH-aerosol forcings could more than double the warming effect of large methane increases. Our findings may help explain the anomalously large temperature changes associated with historic methane releases.

  1. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The release of vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere as a result of clathrate destabilization is a potential mechanism for rapid amplification of global warming. Previous studies have calculated the enhanced warming based mainly on the radiative effect of the methane itself, with smaller contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4 levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is predicted to significantly decrease hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations, while moderately increasing ozone (O3. These changes lead to a 70% increase in the atmospheric lifetime of methane, and an 18% decrease in global mean cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC. The CDNC change causes a radiative forcing that is comparable in magnitude to the longwave radiative forcing ("enhanced greenhouse effect" of the added methane. Together, the indirect CH4-O3 and CH4-OH-aerosol forcings could more than double the warming effect of large methane increases. Our findings may help explain the anomalously large temperature changes associated with historic methane releases.

  2. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurten, T.; Zhou, L.; Makkonen, R.;

    2011-01-01

    contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4) levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is......The release of vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere as a result of clathrate destabilization is a potential mechanism for rapid amplification of global warming. Previous studies have calculated the enhanced warming based mainly on the radiative effect of the methane itself, with smaller...... forcing that is comparable in magnitude to the long-wave radiative forcing ("enhanced greenhouse effect") of the added methane. Together, the indirect CH4-O-3 and CH4-OHaerosol forcings could more than double the warming effect of large methane increases. Our findings may help explain the anomalously...

  3. Sensitive and accurate dual wavelength UV-VIS polarization detector for optical remote sensing of tropospheric aerosols

    CERN Document Server

    David, G; Thomas, B; Rairoux, P

    2012-01-01

    An UV-VIS polarization Lidar has been designed and specified for aerosols monitoring in the troposphere, showing the ability to precisely address low particle depolarization ratios, in the range of a few percents. Non-spherical particle backscattering coefficients as low as 5 {\\times} 10-8 m-1.sr-1 have been measured and the particle depolarization ratio detection limit is 0.6 %. This achievement is based on a well-designed detector with laser-specified optical components (polarizers, dichroic beamsplitters) summarized in a synthetic detector transfer matrix. Hence, systematic biases are drastically minimized. The detector matrix being diagonal, robust polarization calibration has been achieved under real atmospheric conditions. This UV-VIS polarization detector measures particle depolarization ratios over two orders of magnitude, from 0.6 up to 40 %, which is new, especially in the UV where molecular scattering is strong. Hence, a calibrated UV polarization-resolved time-altitude map is proposed for urban an...

  4. Sensitivity of depositions to the size and hygroscopicity of Cs-bearing aerosols released from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajino, Mizuo; Adachi, Kouji; Sekiyama, Tsuyoshi; Zaizen, Yuji; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    We recently revealed that the microphysical properties of aerosols carrying the radioactive Cs released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) at an early stage (March 14-15, 2011) of the accident could be very different from what we assumed previously: super-micron and non-hygroscopic at the early stage, whereas sub-micron and hygroscopic afterwards (at least later than March 20-22). In the study, two sensitivity simulations with the two different aerosol microphysical properties were conducted using a regional scale meteorology- chemical transport model (NHM-Chem). The impact of the difference was quite significant. 17% (0.001%) of the radioactive Cs fell onto the ground by dry (wet) deposition processes, and the rest was deposited into the ocean or was transported out of the model domain, which is central and northern part of the main land of Japan, under the assumption that Cs-bearing aerosols are non-hygroscopic and super-micron. On the other hand, 5.7% (11.3%) fell onto the ground by dry (wet) deposition, for the cases under the assumption that the Cs-bearing aerosols are hygroscopic and sub-micron. For the accurate simulation of the deposition of radionuclides, knowledge of the aerosol microphysical properties is essential as well as the accuracy of the simulated wind fields and precipitation patterns.

  5. Fission product partitioning in aerosol release from simulated spent nuclear fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lemma, F.G.; Colle, J.Y.; Rasmussen, G.; Konings, R.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols created by the vaporization of simulated spent nuclear fuel (simfuel) were produced by laser heating techniques and characterised by a wide range of post-analyses. In particular attention has been focused on determining the fission product behaviour in the aerosols, in order to improve the

  6. EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute]/ANL investigations of MCCI [molten core-concrete interactions] phenomena and aerosol release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program of laboratory investigations has been undertaken at Argonne National Laboratory, under sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute, in which the interaction between molten core materials and concrete is studied, with particular emphasis on measurements of the magnitude and chemical species present in the aerosol releases. The experiment technique used in these investigations is direct electrical heating in which a high electric current is passed through the core debris to sustain the high-temperature melt condition for potentially long periods of time. In the scoping experiments completed to date, this technique has been successfully used for corium masses of 5 and 20 kg, generating an internal heating rate of 1 kw/kg and achieving melt temperatures of 2000C. Experiments have been performed both with a concrete base and also with a cooled base with the addition of H2/CO sparging gas to represent chemical processes in a stratified layer. An aerosol and gas sampling system is being used to collect aerosol samples. Test results are now becoming available including masses of aerosols, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscope analyses

  7. Comparison of FIPLOC-M with FIRAC computations on aerosol release in the event 'earthquake with subsequent solvent fine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The event 'earthquake with subsequent solvent fire' in the low level active waste management area of the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant has been modelled by two different computer codes FIPLOC-M (GRS) and FIRAC (Los Alamos). The results have been compared and are described. The fire itself with its gas and aerosol generation rates has been simulated by the FIRIN code which is integrated in FIRAC. The results were fed identically into FIPLOC and FIRAC. FIRAC underestimated the quantity of aerosols released to the environment by about 20%. The reasons for this result have been determined and analysed. Other differences between the results and models are described too. For the simulation of transportation pathways which comprise one or more larger volumes and which are therefore not typical for the application of FIRAC the FIPLOC code gives better results concerning aerosol transport and deposition effects. Also aerosol modelling is more precise in FIPLOC (MAEROS module) than in FIRAC. On the other hand ventilation components such as filters or blowers are simulated much better in the FIRAC code. (orig./HP)

  8. Containment behaviour in the event of core melt with gaseous and aerosol releases (CONGA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, E. E-mail: Eckart.friesen@off1.siemens.de; Meseth, J.; Guentay, S.; Suckow, D.; Lopez Jimenez, J.; Herranz, L.; Peyres, V.; De Santi, G.F.; Krasenbrink, A.; Valisi, M.; Mazzocchi, L

    2001-11-01

    The CONGA project concentrated on theoretical and experimental studies investigating the behaviour of advanced light water reactor containments containing passive containment heat removal systems and catalytic recombiners expected to be effectively operational during a hypothetical severe accident involving large quantities of aerosol particles and noncondensable gases. The central point of interest was the investigation of the effect of aerosol deposition on the condensation heat transfer of specially designed finned-type heat exchangers (HX) as well as the recombination efficiency of catalytic recombiners. A conceptual double-wall Italian PWR design and a SWR1000 design from Siemens were considered specifically as the reference Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) designs. An assessment of selected accident scenarios was performed in order to define the range of boundary conditions necessary to perform the experimental studies of the other work packages. Experimental investigations indicated that aerosol deposition accounted for up to 37% loss in the heat removal capacity of the two-tube-layer BWR HX units. However, no significant heat transfer degradation could be observed for the PWR HX units. These results can be attributed to the important differences in the designs and operating conditions of the two units. The tests to study the effect of hydrogen (simulated by helium) on the heat transfer rate for heat exchanger units designed for BWR and PWR applications indicated a degradation less than 30% under various conditions. This was found to be acceptable within the over capacity designed for the heat exchangers or containment characteristics. The tests performed to study the long-term aerosol behaviour in the pressure suppression chamber of the current operating BWRs indicated that the water pool scrubs the aerosol particles effectively and reduces the ultimate aerosol load expected on the off-gas system. The efficiency of the

  9. Containment behaviour in the event of core melt with gaseous and aerosol releases (CONGA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CONGA project concentrated on theoretical and experimental studies investigating the behaviour of advanced light water reactor containments containing passive containment heat removal systems and catalytic recombiners expected to be effectively operational during a hypothetical severe accident involving large quantities of aerosol particles and noncondensable gases. The central point of interest was the investigation of the effect of aerosol deposition on the condensation heat transfer of specially designed finned-type heat exchangers (HX) as well as the recombination efficiency of catalytic recombiners. A conceptual double-wall Italian PWR design and a SWR1000 design from Siemens were considered specifically as the reference Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) designs. An assessment of selected accident scenarios was performed in order to define the range of boundary conditions necessary to perform the experimental studies of the other work packages. Experimental investigations indicated that aerosol deposition accounted for up to 37% loss in the heat removal capacity of the two-tube-layer BWR HX units. However, no significant heat transfer degradation could be observed for the PWR HX units. These results can be attributed to the important differences in the designs and operating conditions of the two units. The tests to study the effect of hydrogen (simulated by helium) on the heat transfer rate for heat exchanger units designed for BWR and PWR applications indicated a degradation less than 30% under various conditions. This was found to be acceptable within the over capacity designed for the heat exchangers or containment characteristics. The tests performed to study the long-term aerosol behaviour in the pressure suppression chamber of the current operating BWRs indicated that the water pool scrubs the aerosol particles effectively and reduces the ultimate aerosol load expected on the off-gas system. The efficiency of the

  10. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurten, T.; Zhou, L.; Makkonen, R.;

    2011-01-01

    contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4) levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is...

  11. Final Report: Safety of Plasma Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-08-14

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m{sup 2} over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER.

  12. Aerosol material releases from a zircaloy-4 clad UO2 pellet at temperatures up to 2000 degrees Celsius in a flowing argon atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During some postulated loss of coolant and loss of emergency coolant injection accidents, vapours of fission products and structural (fuel and cladding) materials may be released into steam-hydrogen mixtures flowing in a CANDU fuel channel. These vapours will condense into aerosol particles in the cooler parts of the primary heat transport system. As part of an on-going program to study aerosol formation, transport, deposition and associated fission product retention in the PHTS, experiments were conducted to measure aerosol mass release rates from a Zircaloy-4 clad UO2 pellet inductively heated to temperatures up to 2000 degrees C, in a forced-flow argon environment. A description of these experiments and the obtained results, including fractional mass release rates of structural materials, are presented in this paper

  13. Possible way to prepare nanoparticles from aerosols released at plasma deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Mastný, L.; Moravec, Pavel; Ždímal, Vladimír

    Ostrava: Tanger, 2012, s. 87-92. ISBN 978-80-87294-32-1. [NANOCON 2012. International Conference /4./. Brno (CZ), 23.10.2012-25.10.2012] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : plasma spraying * aerosol technology * nanoparticles production * measurement of particle size distribution Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering (UCHP-M) http://www.nanocon.cz/files/proceedings/04/reports/780.pdf

  14. BETA experiments on aerosol release during melt-concrete interaction and filtering of the offgas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BETA facility is a test rig for core melt accident experiments. This rig is described. Up to now, 7 melt-concrete interaction experiments have been carried out. Results of sampling and analysis are given for the aerosol size distribution and the chemical components of the simulating fission products added in the offgas line. The size distribution ranges from 0.1 to 1 μm. High-volatile aerosols are found in the samplers. The erosion data in downward and radial directions are summed up. The initial melt used in the tests was produced by a thermite chemical reaction of 300 kg steel, 80 kg Zircaloy 4 and 50 kg oxides with Al2O3, SiO2 and CaO. The starting temperature is typically 2250 K. In induction heating the net power inputs may differ between 200 kW and 1000 kW. A metal fiber filter is installed in the offgas line as a protection against the environment. The data of the filter will be presented. The amount of collected aerosols is in the range of 1.5 to 3.7 kg/per experiment. A video clip will be presented showing the melt and the optically visible difference in the offgas withstand without filtering

  15. Aerosol-Assisted Fast Formulating Uniform Pharmaceutical Polymer Microparticles with Variable Properties toward pH-Sensitive Controlled Drug Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microencapsulation is highly attractive for oral drug delivery. Microparticles are a common form of drug carrier for this purpose. There is still a high demand on efficient methods to fabricate microparticles with uniform sizes and well-controlled particle properties. In this paper, uniform hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP-based pharmaceutical microparticles loaded with either hydrophobic or hydrophilic model drugs have been directly formulated by using a unique aerosol technique, i.e., the microfluidic spray drying technology. A series of microparticles of controllable particle sizes, shapes, and structures are fabricated by tuning the solvent composition and drying temperature. It is found that a more volatile solvent and a higher drying temperature can result in fast evaporation rates to form microparticles of larger lateral size, more irregular shape, and denser matrix. The nature of the model drugs also plays an important role in determining particle properties. The drug release behaviors of the pharmaceutical microparticles are dependent on their structural properties and the nature of a specific drug, as well as sensitive to the pH value of the release medium. Most importantly, drugs in the microparticles obtained by using a more volatile solvent or a higher drying temperature can be well protected from degradation in harsh simulated gastric fluids due to the dense structures of the microparticles, while they can be fast-released in simulated intestinal fluids through particle dissolution. These pharmaceutical microparticles are potentially useful for site-specific (enteric delivery of orally-administered drugs.

  16. Development and validation of a hydrophilic interaction chromatography method coupled with a charged aerosol detector for quantitative analysis of nonchromophoric α-hydroxyamines, organic impurities of metoprolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qun; Tan, Shane; Petrova, Katya

    2016-01-25

    The European Pharmacopeia (EP) metoprolol impurities M and N are polar, nonchromophoric α-hydroxyamines, which are poorly retained in a conventional reversed-phase chromatographic system and are invisible for UV detection. Impurities M and N are currently analyzed by TLC methods in the EP as specified impurities and in the United States Pharmacopeia-National Formulary (USP-NF) as unspecified impurities. In order to modernize the USP monographs of metoprolol drug substances and related drug products, a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) method coupled with a charged aerosol detector (CAD) was explored for the analysis of the two impurities. A comprehensive column screening that covers a variety of HILIC stationary phases (underivatized silica, amide, diol, amino, zwitterionic, polysuccinimide, cyclodextrin, and mixed-mode) and optimization of HPLC conditions led to the identification of a Halo Penta HILIC column (4.6 × 150 mm, 5 μm) and a mobile phase comprising 85% acetonitrile and 15% ammonium formate buffer (100 mM, pH 3.2). Efficient separations of metoprolol, succinic acid, and EP metoprolol impurities M and N were achieved within a short time frame (<8 min). The HILIC-CAD method was subsequently validated per USP validation guidelines with respect to specificity, robustness, linearity, accuracy, and precision, and could be incorporated into the current USP-NF monographs to replace the outdated TLC methods. Furthermore, the developed method was successfully applied to determine organic impurities in metoprolol drug substance (metoprolol succinate) and drug products (metoprolol tartrate injection and metoprolol succinate extended release tablets). PMID:26580821

  17. The Plinius/Colima CA-U3 test on fission-product aerosol release over a VVER-type corium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a hypothetical case of severe accident in a PWR type VVER-440, a complex corium pool could be formed and fission products could be released. In order to study aerosols release in terms of mechanisms, kinetics, nature or quantity, and to better precise the source term of VVER-440, a series of experiments have been performed in the Colima facility and the test Colima CA-U3 has been successfully performed thanks to technological modifications to melt a prototypical corium at 2760 C degrees. Specific instrumentation has allowed us to follow the evolution of the corium melt and the release, transport and deposition of the fission products. The main conclusions are: -) there is a large release of Cr, Te, Sr, Pr and Rh (>95%w), -) there is a significant release of Fe (50%w), -) there is a small release of Ba, Ce, La, Nb, Nd and Y (<90%w), -) there is a very small release of U in proportion (<5%w) but it is one of the major released species in mass, and -) there is no release of Zr. The Colima experimental results are consistent with previous experiments on irradiated fuels except for Ba, Fe and U releases. (A.C.)

  18. Quantification of pegylated phospholipids decorating polymeric microcapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide by reverse phase HPLC with a charged aerosol detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-López, R; Libong, D; Tsapis, N; Fattal, E; Chaminade, P

    2008-11-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains covalently linked to phospholipids are often used in the preparation of lipid or even polymer colloidal particles to avoid recognition and clearance by the reticuloendothelial system and to increase their plasmatic half-life. To the best of our knowledge, no direct method allows yet to quantify these pegylated phospholipids. The aim of this work was to develop a method for the quantification of a typical pegylated phospholipid, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000], DSPE-PEG2000, associated to polymeric microcapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB). Reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used, coupled with a corona charged aerosol detection (HPLC-CAD). Calibrations standards consisted of plain microcapsules and pegylated phospholipids (DSPE-PEG2000) in the concentration range of 2.23-21.36 microg/mL (0.22-2.14 microg injected). Calibration curve was evaluated with two different model, linear and power model. The power model describes experimental values better than the linear model, for pegylated phospholipids with the CAD detector. The correlation coefficient for the power model was 0.996, and limits of detection and quantification obtained were 33 and 100 ng, respectively. This method proved to be selective and sensitive; the accuracy of the method ranged from 90 to 115% and the relative standard deviation was

  19. Preliminary evaluation of radiological impact over the population due to radioactive gases and aerosol releases during normal exploitation of Juragua's Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we made an estimation of radiological influences of gases and aerosoles releases over the population during the normal exploitation of Juragua's Nuclear Power Station. We determined the behaviour of the dilution factor and other factors that causes ground contamination. Also, it was calculated the quantities of equivalent doses by different exposition ways and it was done an evaluation of the individual and collective radiological risk

  20. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, S. [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V. [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} ⋅ 5H{sub 2}O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  1. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO3)4 ⋅ 5H2O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories

  2. Optimization of detector size and scan rate for beta/gamma material release surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE facilities are required to offer for sale to the public items of salvageable value when they are no longer required by the facilities. These items have to be surveyed to ensure radioactive contamination levels do not exceed the values listed in DOE Order 5400.5. Most facilities use portable contamination monitoring.equipment with probe areas between 20 and 100 cm2 to check for fixed contamination. This procedure is very labor intensive and results in survey costs that often exceed the costs recovered from selling the items. A solution would be to use large area (> 100 cm2) detectors to find and quantify contamination. Large area scintillation detectors that can be used for beta and alpha detection simultaneously are becoming available commercially. Combining these with a rate meter that can differentiate between alpha and beta events can result in a survey that takes considerably less time to do and will save a proportional amount of money in doing so. The use and limitations of this combination of detectors and rate meters will be discussed

  3. Transfer of radionuclides in soil-plant systems following aerosol simulation of accidental release: design and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of 134Cs, 110mAg and 85Sr was studied in different soil-plant systems, using two types of Mediterranean soil with contrasting properties (sandy and sandy-loam soils). The plant species used was lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Contamination was induced at different stages of plant growth, using a synthetic aerosol which simulated a distant contamination source. Characterisation of aerosol and soils, interception factors in the various growth stages, foliar and root uptake, leaching from leaves by irrigation and distribution and migration of radionuclides of soils were studied, in an attempt to understand the key factors involving radionuclide soil-to-plant transferance. (author)

  4. Development of interpolation formulae for rapid evaluation of the Attenuation due to aerosol processes of radioactive release following hypothetical fast reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates via a parametric survey the essential factors determining the magnitude of the release mitigation to be obtained from aerosol deposition and thereby develops analytical and graphical representations which enable a rapid estimation of these attenuations over a range of source magnitudes, leak rates and containment geometries. The benefits obtained from aerosol deposition are conveniently exhibited by expressing airborne mass concentration and cumulative leaked mass in terms of non-dimensional attenuation factors which relate the quantities arising with deposition to those arising without deposition. Agglomeration is seen to play a crucial role in promoting deposition, and the reduction in release can amount to orders of magnitude on the time scale of a day for accidents involving high initial concentrations of airborne particulate. In the context of source magnitude variation for instantaneous releases the appearance of an envelope decay curve for the airborne mass concentration enables simple representations of airborne mass and leaked mass lo be developed. The leaked mass for constant fractional leak rate reaches an asymptotic limit at long times, a limit which varies only weakly with injected mass concentration. With regard to variation in containment size, the domination of deposition processes by gravitational settling results in attenuation factors for a given injected mass concentration (for containments of given height) being virtually independent of the area of walls (and roof). In addition, although the process coefficient for gravitational settling is inversely proportional to height, the net effect of a change in height on the attenuation factors for a given initial concentration is remarkably small where the attenuations are significantly different from unity on the time scale of a day. Thus, within the range of interest, attenuation factors for instantaneous releases are only a function of time and initial concentration to fair

  5. Development of analytical methods relating to aerosol and fission product release from hot and boiling sodium pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical methods are described for (a) sodium; (b) the following anions of sodium aerosols: OH-, CO2- and HCO3-; (c) fission products Cs and Sr. For sodium, the ion selective electrode was used. The anions were determined by a titration method using phenolphthalein and methyl orange as indicators. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used for Cs and Sr. (U.K.)

  6. Effect of aerosolization on subsequent bacterial survival.

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, M V; Marthi, B; Fieland, V P; Ganio, L M

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether aerosolization could impair bacterial survival, Pseudomonas syringae and Erwinia herbicola were aerosolized in a greenhouse, the aerosol was sampled at various distances from the site of release by using all-glass impingers, and bacterial survival was followed in the impingers for 6 h. Bacterial survival subsequent to aerosolization of P. syringae and E. herbicola was not impaired 1 m from the site of release. P. syringae aerosolized at 3 to 15 m from the site of release ...

  7. Measurement of an upper limit of fission energy release in HOLOG using a germanium gamma ray detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.F.

    1998-01-01

    An upper limit of less than 4 mg TNT equivalent fission energy release from the HOLOG experiment was determined using a germanium {gamma}-ray detector to measure the ratio of selected fission-product and plutonium {gamma} rays. Only three hours of {gamma}-ray data collected immediately after the zero-time were analyzed to calculate the above limit. We found no peaks corresponding to the {sup 97} Zr - {sup 97} Nb fission product pair at the gamma-ray energies of E{sub {gamma}} = 743 keV and E{sub {gamma}} = 658 keV, respectively. No information on the plutonium isotopic ratios is revealed because {gamma}-ray peaks in the energy region below 100 keV are not observed due to the high absorption in the containment barrier. The measurement is relatively easy to perform and is not subject to false-positive results because specific fission product and plutonium {gamma} ray energies need to be detected.

  8. Review of analytical techniques to determine the chemical forms of vapours and aerosols released from overheated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive review has been undertaken of appropriate analytical techniques to monitor and measure the chemical effects that occur in large-scale tests designed to study severe reactor accidents. Various methods have been developed to determine the chemical forms of the vapours, aerosols and deposits generated during and after such integral experiments. Other specific techniques have the long-term potential to provide some of the desired data in greater detail, although considerable efforts are still required to apply these techniques to the study of radioactive debris. Such in-situ and post-test methods of analysis have been also assessed in terms of their applicability to the analysis of samples from the Phebus-FP tests. The recommended in-situ methods of analysis are gamma-ray spectroscopy, potentiometry, mass spectrometry, and Raman/UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Vapour/aerosol and deposition samples should also be obtained at well-defined time intervals during each experiment for subsequent post-test analysis. No single technique can provide all the necessary chemical data from these samples, and the most appropriate method of analysis involves a complementary combination of autoradiography, AES, IR, MRS, SEMS/EDS, SIMS/LMIS, XPS and XRD

  9. Effect of an aerosol deposition pattern in the lung on the counting efficiency of a large area germanium detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Gary H; Hauck, Barry M

    2008-01-01

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory has extended the use of sliced lungs containing planar sources to simulate heterogeneous radionuclide deposition patterns. This work examined two deposition patterns and their effect on the counting efficiency of low-energy photons. The results have shown that heterogenous distributions can be difficult to detect in some cases and can still lead to large uncertainties (up to a factor of 2.5) in the activity estimate, especially at low photon energies. At higher energies ( approximately 60 keV), the effect of the heterogeneous distribution is greatly reduced and errors in the activity estimate reduced to approximately 25%. The presence of a heterogenous distribution can be detected by comparing the ratio of the individual detector counts with the expected values obtained from measuring multiple lungs sets that contained a homogeneous distribution. The distributions tested in this paper were detectable (at 2sigma) as heterogeneous by two of the four detectors in the counting array. PMID:18003713

  10. Research on aerosol formation, aerosol behaviour, aerosol filtration, aerosol measurement techniques and sodium fires at the Laboratory for Aerosol Physics and Filter Technology at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of aerosols in LMFBR plant systems is of great importance for a number of problems, both normal operational and accident kind. This paper covers the following: aerosol modelling for LMFBR containment systems; aerosol size spectrometry by laser light scattering; experimental facilities and experimental results concerned with aerosol release under accident conditions; filtration of sodium oxide aerosols by multilayer sand bed filters

  11. Preparation and characterisation of controlled release co-spray dried drug-polymer microparticles for inhalation 2: evaluation of in vitro release profiling methodologies for controlled release respiratory aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Rania O; Traini, Daniela; Chan, Hak-Kim; Young, Paul M

    2008-09-01

    Three in vitro methodologies were evaluated as models for the analysis of drug release from controlled release (CR) microparticulates for inhalation. USP Apparatus 2 (dissolution model), USP Apparatus 4 (flow through model) and a modified Franz cell (diffusion model), were investigated using identical sink volumes and temperatures (1000 ml and 37 degrees C). Microparticulates containing DSCG and different percentages of PVA (0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90%) were used as model CR formulations. Evaluation of the release profiles of DSCG from the modified PVA formulations, suggested that all data fitted a Weibull distribution model with R2 > or =0.942. Statistical analysis of the t(d) (time for 63.2% drug release) indicated that all methodologies could distinguish between microparticles that did or did not contain PVA (Students t-test, p or =0.862 for the diffusion methodology data set). Due to the relatively low water content in the respiratory tract and the lack of differentiation between formulations for USP Apparatus 2 and 4, it is concluded that the diffusion model is more applicable for the evaluation of CR inhalation medicines. PMID:18534832

  12. The Plinius/Colima CA-U3 test on fission-product aerosol release over a VVER-type corium pool; L'essai Plinius/Colima CA-U3 sur le relachement des aerosols de produits de fission au-dessus d'un bain de corium de type VVER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Journeau, Ch.; Piluso, P.; Correggio, P.; Godin-Jacqmin, L

    2007-07-01

    In a hypothetical case of severe accident in a PWR type VVER-440, a complex corium pool could be formed and fission products could be released. In order to study aerosols release in terms of mechanisms, kinetics, nature or quantity, and to better precise the source term of VVER-440, a series of experiments have been performed in the Colima facility and the test Colima CA-U3 has been successfully performed thanks to technological modifications to melt a prototypical corium at 2760 C degrees. Specific instrumentation has allowed us to follow the evolution of the corium melt and the release, transport and deposition of the fission products. The main conclusions are: -) there is a large release of Cr, Te, Sr, Pr and Rh (>95%w), -) there is a significant release of Fe (50%w), -) there is a small release of Ba, Ce, La, Nb, Nd and Y (<90%w), -) there is a very small release of U in proportion (<5%w) but it is one of the major released species in mass, and -) there is no release of Zr. The Colima experimental results are consistent with previous experiments on irradiated fuels except for Ba, Fe and U releases. (A.C.)

  13. Study on residual radioactivity measurement method for site release of nuclear facilities. In-situ radioactivity measurement test with the use of portable Ge semiconductor detector (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear facility sites after decommissioning are allowed to be released from nuclear safety regulations after confirming that sites have been decontaminated to acceptable levels. In-situ measurement with the use of a portable pure-germanium semiconductor detector (Ge detector) is a suitable technology for confirmatory survey. A method to conservatively evaluate residual radioactivity on the sites was proposed in this study. In the evaluation method concept, the radionuclide (Cs-137, etc.), which are in reality distributed across the area of interest, is assumed to be the single point source located at the furthest position on the ground surface of the area from the Ge detector. Based on this assumption, the detectable minimum time of the interest radionuclide was predicted by the calculation. If radiation from the point source is not detected for longer than the predicted detectable time, it can be proven that the radioactivity remaining in the interest area is lower than the radioactivity corresponding to the assumed point source. Results of the field test in JAEA site indicated that the proposed evaluation method was reasonable for the conservative evaluation of residual radioactivity. (author)

  14. Aerosol in the containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US program LACE (LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments), in which Italy participates together with several European countries, Canada and Japan, aims at evaluating by means of a large scale experimental activity at HEDL the retention in the pipings and primary container of the radioactive aerosol released following severe accidents in light water reactors. At the same time these experiences will make available data through which the codes used to analyse the behaviour of the aerosol in the containment and to verify whether by means of the codes of thermohydraulic computation it is possible to evaluate with sufficient accuracy variable influencing the aerosol behaviour, can be validated. This report shows and compares the results obtained by the participants in the LACE program with the aerosol containment codes NAVA 5 and CONTAIN for the pre-test computations of the test LA 1, in which an accident called containment by pass is simulated

  15. Development of real time detector for fluorescent particles applied to pollutant transfers characterization; Etude d`un dispositif de comptage en continu d`un aerosol fluorescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevost, C. [CEA Saclay, Departement de Prevention et d`Etude des Accidents, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-06-01

    The studies on aerosol transfer carried out in the field of staff protection and nuclear plants safety become more and more important. So techniques of pollutants simulation by specific tracers with the same aeraulic behaviour are an interesting tool in order to characterize their transfers. Resorting to aerosols tagged by a fluorescent dye allows to realize different studies in ventilation and filtration field. The feasibility of detection in real time for a particulate tracer is the main aim of this work. The need of such a technique is obvious because it can provide the specific aerosol behaviour. Furthermore, direct measurements in real time are required for model validation in calculation codes: they give the most realistic informations on interaction between contaminant and ventilation air flows. Up to now, the principle of fluorescent aerosol concentration measurement allows only an integral response in a delayed time, by means of sampling on filters and a fluorimetric analysis after a specific conditioning of these filters. In order to have the opportunity to detect in real time specific tracer, we have developed a new monitor able to count these particles on the following basis: fluorescent particles pass through a sampling nozzle up to a measurement chamber specially designed; sheath flow rate is defined to confine the test aerosol in the test aerosol in the sample flow rate at nozzle outlet; the interception of this stream by a highly focused laser beam allows aerosol detection and characterization particle by particle; the signature of a passing aerosol is the burst of photons that occurs when the fluoro-phore contained in the glycerol particle is excited by a light of adapted wavelength; these signals are transmitted to a photodetector by a patented optical arrangement. Then, an acquisition interfaced board connected to a computer, converts them into frequencies histograms. In the end, two kind of results could be provided simultaneously : the

  16. In Situ Aerosol Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is developing new platform systems that have the potential to benefit Earth science research activities, which include in situ instruments for atmospheric...

  17. Biological aerosol background characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  18. Organic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN

  19. Marine aerosols

    OpenAIRE

    Saltzman, Es

    2009-01-01

    The aerosol over the world oceans plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical characteristics of the Earth's atmosphere and its interactions with the climate system. The oceans contribute to the aerosols in the overlying atmosphere by the production and emission of aerosol particles and precursor gases. The marine aerosol, in turn, influences the biogeochemistry of the surface ocean through long distance transport and deposition of terrestrial and marine-derived nutrients...

  20. Review of models applicable to accident aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity

  1. Long-range micro-pulse aerosol lidar at 1.5 um with an up-conversion single-photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Haiyun; Shangguan, Mingjia; Xia, Xiuxiu; Jia, Xiaodong; Wang, Chong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Qiang; Dou, Xiankang; Pan, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    A micro-pulse lidar at eye-safe wavelength is constructed based on an up-conversion single-photon detector. The ultralow noise detector enables using integration technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the atmospheric backscattering even at daytime. With the pulse energy of 110uJ, the pulse repetition rate of 15 kHz, the optical antenna diameter of 100 mm and integration time of 5 minutes, a horizontal detection range of 7 km is realized. In the demonstration experiment, atmospheric visibility over 24 hours is monitored continuously, with results in accordance with the weather forecasts.

  2. Salt bridges overlapping the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist binding site reveal a coincidence detector for G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I; Conn, P Michael

    2011-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg(38)-Asp(98) and Glu(90)-Lys(121)) and two disulfide (Cys(14)-Cys(200) and Cys(114)-Cys(196)) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a "coincidence detector" that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu(90)-Lys(121), but not Arg(38)-Asp(98) ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr(284) and the hydrogen bonding of Ser(217) are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys(191) from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function. PMID:21527534

  3. Nuclear aerosol test facility studies using plasma torch aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the behavior of aerosols released into the reactor containment following accidents, an experimental simulation facility, called Nuclear Aerosol Test Facility (NATF) has recently been built and commissioned in BARC. It mainly consists of a Test vessel for simulating the containment, plasma torch aerosol generator (PTAG) system for generating metal-based aerosols and aerosol monitoring instrumentation. The main component of the PTAG is a 40 kW dc plasma torch, powered by a constant current power supply, operating in a non-transferred arc mode. Optimal operating conditions of PTAG have been established. Experiments consist of injecting the aerosols of a given material for about 20 minutes into the vessel, simultaneously monitoring the concentrations at various points in the vessel. The measurements of the size distribution and mass concentrations in the vessel are carried out at periodic intervals. Various combination of experiments with different metals such as zinc, tin and manganese, under varying turbulence conditions (with and without keeping the fan continuously on) have been performed. The aerosols were generally found to be fractal aggregates with low fractal dimension (∼1.6). The mass depletion data have been subjected to theoretical analysis and validation exercises with available aerosol behavior codes. The results are further discussed. (author)

  4. Influence of the aquatic environment on release behavior of fission products. Experimental study of aerosol emission during a PWR severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental study concerns the consequences on the environment of a PWR severe accident. A preliminary bibliographical survey has been undertaken in order to determine the elements to study, and the experimental protocols to use. 4 fission products (Cs, Sr, Ru, Ce) and 3 structure materials (Ag, Fe, In) have been chosen. Tests of cations (Cs+) retention by soils have been done. They showed up the great variability of the results according to experimental procedures (contact time, agitation, solid phase concentration...). The adoption of a standard procedure which would enable the different results comparison is suggested. Then, the dissolution of powders from the 7 elements has been studied in different solutions. Two different phenomena occurs for some elements. We observed a partial dissolution of Ag, In and Ce, according to solution compositions, but fine particles or colloid presence may contribute to the solution total activity. The Cs dissolution is more important but never complete, because of an amalgam formation during calcination with structure materials. Ru doesn't dissolve, and fine particles presence is the reason of solution activity. Soils retention is minimal for the elements that are neutral, like Ru, and maximal for cations, especially Cs+. High contents of organic matter and clay in soils enhance retention. Thanks to the new theoretical source term values, plurielementary aerosols fabrication has debuted. The installation we used (Inducing oven with an aerosol maturation enclosure) allows the obtention of temperatures as high as 2800 - 30000 C and the volatilization of 13 elements between the 16 presents. Suggestions are done that may increase the Ru, Ce and Zr emissions

  5. Aerosol studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the continuing studies of the effects of very severe reactor accidents, an effort was made to develop, test, and improve simple, effective, and inexpensive methods by which the average citizen, using only materials readily available, could protect his residence, himself, and his family from injury by toxic aerosols. The methods for protection against radioactive aerosols should be equally effective against a clandestine biological attack by terrorists. The results of the tests to date are limited to showing that spores of the harmless bacterium, bacillus globegii (BG), can be used as a simulant for the radioactive aerosols. An aerosol generator of Lauterbach type was developed which will produce an essentially monodisperse aerosol at the rate of 109 spores/min. Analytical techniques have been established which give reproducible results. Preliminary field tests have been conducted to check out the components of the system. Preliminary tests of protective devices, such as ordinary vacuum sweepers, have given protection factors of over 1000

  6. Stratospheric aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratospheric aerosol measurements can provide both spatial and temporal data of sufficient resolution to be of use in climate models. Relatively recent results from a wide range of instrument techniques for measuring stratospheric aerosol parameters are described. Such techniques include impactor sampling, lidar system sensing, filter sampling, photoelectric particle counting, satellite extinction-sensing using the sun as a source, and optical depth probing, at sites mainly removed from tropospheric aerosol sources. Some of these techniques have also had correlative and intercomparison studies. The main methods for determining the vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosols are outlined: lidar extinction measurements from satellites; impactor measurements from balloons and aircraft; and photoelectric particle counter measurements from balloons, aircraft, and rockets. The conversion of the lidar backscatter to stratospheric aerosol mass loading is referred to. Absolute measurements of total solar extinction from satellite orbits can be used to extract the aerosol extinction, and several examples of vertical profiles of extinction obtained with the SAGE satellite are given. Stratospheric mass loading can be inferred from extinction using approximate linear relationships but under restrictive conditions. Impactor sampling is essentially the only method in which the physical nature of the stratospheric aerosol is observed visually. Vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosol number concentration using impactor data are presented. Typical profiles using a dual-size-range photoelectric dustsonde particle counter are given for volcanically disturbed and inactive periods. Some measurements of the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols are also presented. Volatility measurements are described, indicating that stratospheric aerosols are composed primarily of about 75% sulfuric acid and 25% water

  7. Aerosol samplers innovation possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing demand for an early detection of increased levels of the artificial radionuclides in the atmosphere resulted in the design and fabrication of an aerosol sampler with automated spectrometric unit providing online gamma spectrometry above the aerosol filter. Study was performed with two types of high volume samplers- SENYA JL-900 SnowWhite (900 m3/h) a SENYA JL-150 Hunter (150 m3/h). This work gives results of the design optimization with respect to the detector type, geometry of measurement, remote control and spectrometric evaluation 222Rn and 220Rn concentration fluctuations in the outdoor air are discussed with regard to the detection limit so the radionuclides expected after the NPP accident. (authors)

  8. THE EFFECT OF AEROSOLIZATION ON SUBSEQUENT BACTERIAL SURVIVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine whether aerosolization could impair baterial survival, Pseudomonas syringae and Erwinia herbicola were aerosolized in a greenhouse, the aerosol was sampled at various distances from the site of release by using all-glass impingers, and bacterial survival was followed...

  9. MODIS 3 km aerosol product: algorithm and global perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Remer, L. A.; Mattoo, S; R. C. Levy; L. A. Munchak

    2013-01-01

    After more than a decade of producing a nominal 10 km aerosol product based on the dark target method, the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol team will be releasing a nominal 3 km product as part of their Collection 6 release. The new product differs from the original 10 km product only in the manner in which reflectance pixels are ingested, organized and selected by the aerosol algorithm. Overall, the 3 km product closely mirrors the 10 km product. H...

  10. Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  11. Transuranic-aerosol-measurement system for the workplace or stack monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compact transuranic-aerosol-measurement system, using alpha spectroscopy at vacuum, has a sensitivity of less than 0.5 MPC-h for 239Pu. In addition, a detector is mounted in the inlet pipe that responds immediately if there is a release of radioactivity; then, after an appropriate time, the filter is moved to the vacuum chamber for more sensitive off-line analysis. The system is very efficient for particles as large as 10 μ m in diameter. A microcomputer controls the filter transport, operates as a 256-channel pulse-height analyzer (PHA), performs calculations, checks calibration, and drives a matrix display and a central computer. This instrument, the Workplace Transuranic Aerosol Measurement System (WOTAMS), has been developed for use in facilities that process transuranics with the expectation it will further evolve into a commercial product to replace those less sensitive instruments now widely used. 10 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  12. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paytan, A.; Mackey, K.R.M.; Chen, Y.; Lima, I.D.; Doney, S.C.; Mahowald, N.; Labiosa, R.; Post, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus.We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere-ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia.

  13. HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY DETECTORS – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Ramni

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available HPLC is the most versatile and widely used elution chromatography. The technique is used to resolve and determine species in a variety of organic, inorganic, biological, ionic and polymeric materials. Detector is the heart of an instrument and efficiency of system is dependent upon detecting techniques. Many types of HPLC detectors exist, each of which has some valuable performance feature such as refractive index detector, ultraviolet detector, fluorescent detector, electrochemical detector, electric conductivity detector, liquid light scattering detector, evaporative light scattering detector. Due to strong requirement for improvements in sensitivity, selectivity and other performance characteristics of the detector recent developments in conventional techniques and some other new technologies have been adopted such as laser light scattering detector, charged aerosol detector, nano quantity aerosol detector, chiral detector and pulsed amperometric detector. These detectors provide accurate concentration analysis, excellent sensitivity, wide dynamic range, consistent response and broad applicability of the drug components. Working of these detectors involve different principles such as optical techniques, aerosol based techniques, refractive methods, light scattering principle, amperometric and fluorescence. The present review enlightens both conventional and advanced techniques and compares their capabilities of analyzing drug components and need for new techniques for better and wide range of applicability.

  14. Adsorption of radioactive ions on carnauba-wax aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method based on parallel aerosol size spectrometry and γ-spectrometry is introduced for the measurement of short-lived radioactive ions, fission products or super-heavy elements produced at accelerators. Furthermore a new aerosol generator is presented.The possibility of controlling and changing the aerosol size distribution in the helium aerosol jet produced by the aerosol generator allows the process of the adsorption and transport of radioactive ions on aerosols to be examined for the first time. This is due to the fact that the distribution is surveyed on-line using a negligible part of its total volume and parallel to the transporting flow. The radioactivity of the transported ions is measured by a germanium detector in offline position. In principle, both an on- or offline position with narrow multi-detector geometry (e.g. βγγ) is possible. (orig.)

  15. Indoor aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morawska, L.; Afshari, Alireza; N. Bae, G.;

    2013-01-01

    understanding of the risks posed by personal exposure to indoor aerosols. Limited studies assessing integrated daily residential exposure to just one particle size fraction, ultrafine particles, show that the contribution of indoor sources ranged from 19% to 76%. This indicates a strong dependence on resident...

  16. Salt Bridges Overlapping the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Agonist Binding Site Reveal a Coincidence Detector for G Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.; Conn, P. Michael

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small s...

  17. Alkali metal ionization detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  18. Aerosol filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the work on the development of fibre metallic prefilters to be placed upstream of HEPA filters for the exhaust gases of nuclear process plants. Investigations at ambient and high temperature were carried out. Measurements of the filtration performance of Bekipor porous webs and sintered mats were performed in the AFLT (aerosol filtration at low temperature) unit with a throughput of 15 m3/h. A parametric study on the influence of particle size, fibre diameter, number of layers and superficial velocity led to the optimum choice of the working parameters. Three selected filter types were then tested with polydisperse aerosols using a candle-type filter configuration or a flat-type filter configuration. The small-diameter candle type is not well suited for a spraying nozzles regeneration system so that only the flat-type filter was retained for high-temperature tests. A high-temperature test unit (AFHT) with a throughput of 8 to 10 m3/h at 4000C was used to test the three filter types with an aerosol generated by high-temperature calcination of a simulated nitric acid waste solution traced with 134Cs. The regeneration of the filter by spray washing and the effect of the regeneration on the filter performance was studied for the three filter types. The porous mats have a higher dust loading capacity than the sintered web which means that their regeneration frequency can be kept lower

  19. Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

    2003-01-28

    The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

  20. TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — TOMS_AI_G is an aerosol related dataset derived from the Total Ozone Monitoring Satellite (TOMS) Sensor. The TOMS aerosol index arises from absorbing aerosols such...

  1. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  2. The behaviour of sodium fire aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of the behaviour of aerosols released in nuclear accidents is of great importance for nuclear reactor safety and environmental protection. In sodium cooled fast breeder reactor accidents may occur by leaking pipes resulting in considerable spill of sodium. Major amounts of airborne sodium fire aerosols will be formed due to the evaporation and reaction of hot sodium with oxygen. For estimating the environmental impact of these aerosols it is necessary to know their chemical and physical behaviour in containments and in the free atmosphere

  3. Real-time measurement of sodium in single aerosol particles by flame emission: Laboratory characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, CD; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Covert, DS; Richter, RC; H. Maring; Hynes, AJ; Saltzman, ES

    2001-01-01

    A flame emission aerosol sodium detector (ASD) has been developed to study the distribution of seasalt in individual marine aerosol droplets. The instrument detects sodium via D-line emission in a fuel-rich, laminar, hydrogen/oxygen/nitrogen flame. Laboratory studies with synthetic monodisperse aerosols were carried out in order to characterize the sensitivity, precision, and linearity of the technique. Experiments were also carried out with aerosols generated from mixed salt solutions and se...

  4. Aerosol Observation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The aerosol observation system (AOS) is the primary Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) platform for in situ aerosol measurements at the surface. The principal...

  5. PIXE Analysis of Indoor Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher; Turley, Colin; Moore, Robert; Battaglia, Maria; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2011-10-01

    We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol samples collected in academic buildings at Union College to investigate the air quality in these buildings and the effectiveness of their air filtration systems. This is also the commissioning experiment for a new scattering chamber in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The aerosol samples were collected on Kapton foils using a nine-stage cascade impactor that separates particles according to their aerodynamic size. The foils were bombarded with beams of 2.2-MeV protons from the Union College 1.1-MV Pelletron Accelerator and the X-ray products were detected with an Amptek silicon drift detector. After subtracting the contribution from the Kapton foils, the X-ray energy spectra of the aerosol samples were analyzed using GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the samples. We will describe the collection of the aerosol samples, discuss the PIXE analysis, and present the results.

  6. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel ionization detector for use in X-ray tomography is described in detail. To achieve the ultimate resolution, the use of small detectors is necessary and, for ionization detectors, this implies using xenon gas at high pressure. Conventional small detectors can suffer from ''bowing'' but the present design overcomes their problems. (U.K.)

  7. A survey of aerosol research in European community programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the European Commission's (EC) 3rd Framework Programme (1990-1994) of community research and technological development, aerosol problems are of particular importance in the specific programmes Environment, Nuclear Fission Safety (with emphasis on Reactor Safety and on the Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations), Industrial and Materials Technologies, and Measurement and Testing. Under Environment, significant efforts are directed towards monitoring natural and anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere, understanding the role played by aerosols in ecosystem regulation, and the development of techniques to reduce aerosol emission from industrial plants. To ensure Nuclear Fission Safety, investigations are necessary to identify the mechanisms and determine the quantities of fission product aerosols released in the event of an accident and to develop measures for aerosol retention in such cases. The release of radioactive aerosols from nuclear installations in case of fire has been studied, and methods of aerosol abatement by acoustic techniques are under investigation. In decommissioning of nuclear installations the problem of aerosol formation and dispersion arises during dismantling operations. Industrial and Materials Technologies require information on aerosols ranging from welding fumes, asbestos fibres, lead compounds and quartz particles to aerosol/vapour mixtures of toxic products, aerosols from biotechnology industries and airborne micro-organisms. Finally, for Measurement and Testing, reference aerosols are needed for calibration purposes and to improve and harmonize particle counting characterisation. A brief summary of examples for each of the above activities, carried out in the form of EC cost shared actions or at the Commission's Joint Research Centre, will be given, together with a description of some aerosol problems still to be solved. (Author)

  8. Simultaneous aerosol measurements of unusual aerosol enhancement in troposphere over Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hara

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Unusual aerosol enhancement is often observed at Syowa Station, Antarctica during winter through spring. Simultaneous aerosol measurements near the surface and in the upper atmosphere were conducted twice using a ground-based optical particle counter, a balloon-borne optical particle counter, and micro-pulse LIDAR (MPL in August and September 2012. During 13–15 August, aerosol enhancement occurred immediately after a storm condition. A high backscatter ratio and aerosol concentrations were observed from the surface to ca. 2.5 km over Syowa Station. Clouds appeared occasionally at the top of aerosol-enhanced layer during the episode. Aerosol enhancement was terminated on 15 August by strong winds caused by a cyclone's approach. In the second case on 5–7 September, aerosol number concentrations in Dp > 0.3 μm near the surface reached > 104 L−1 at about 15:00 UT on 5 September in spite of calm wind conditions, whereas MPL measurement exhibited aerosols were enhanced at about 04:00 UT at 1000–1500 m above Syowa Station. The aerosol enhancement occurred near the surface–ca. 4 km. In both cases, air masses with high aerosol enhancement below 2.5–3 km were transported mostly from the boundary layer over the sea-ice area. In addition, air masses at 3–4 km in the second case came from the boundary layer over the open-sea area. This air mass history strongly suggests that dispersion of sea-salt particles from the sea-ice surface contributes considerably to the aerosol enhancement in the lower free troposphere (about 3 km and that the release of sea-salt particles from the ocean surface engenders high aerosol concentrations in the free troposphere (3–4 km.

  9. Containment aerosol behaviour simulation studies in the BARC nuclear aerosol test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Nuclear Aerosol Test Facility (NATF) has been built and commissioned at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre to carry out simulation studies on the behaviour of aerosols released into the reactor containment under accident conditions. This report also discusses some new experimental techniques for estimation of density of metallic aggregates. The experimental studies have shown that the dynamic densities of aerosol aggregates are far lower than their material densities as expected by the well-known fractal theory of aggregates. In the context of codes, this has significant bearing in providing a mechanistic basis for the input density parameter used in estimating the aerosol evolution characteristics. The data generated under the quiescent and turbulent conditions and the information on aggregate densities are now being subjected to the validation of the aerosol behaviour codes. (author)

  10. MORPHOLOGY OF BLACK CARBON AEROSOLS AND UBIQUITY OF 50-NANOMETER BLACK CARBON AEROSOLS IN THE ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengfu Fu; Liangjun Xu; Wei Ye; Yiquan Chen; Mingyu Jiang; Xueqin Xu

    2006-01-01

    Different-sized aerosols were collected by an Andersen air sampler to observe the detailed morphology of the black carbon (BC) aerosols which were separated chemically from the other accompanying aerosols, using a Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The results indicate that most BC aerosols are spherical particles of about 50 nm in diameter and with a homogeneous surface. Results also show that these particles aggregate with other aerosols or with themselves to form larger agglomerates in the micrometer range. The shape of these 50-nm BC spherical particles was found to be very similar to that of BC particles released from petroleum-powered vehicular internal combustion engines. These spherical BC particles were shown to be different from the previously reported fullerenes found using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).

  11. Aerosol Climate Time Series in ESA Aerosol_cci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Thomas; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Pinnock, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Aerosol_cci (2010 - 2017) conducts intensive work to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors. Meanwhile, full mission time series of 2 GCOS-required aerosol parameters are completely validated and released: Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from dual view ATSR-2 / AATSR radiometers (3 algorithms, 1995 - 2012), and stratospheric extinction profiles from star occultation GOMOS spectrometer (2002 - 2012). Additionally, a 35-year multi-sensor time series of the qualitative Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) together with sensitivity information and an AAI model simulator is available. Complementary aerosol properties requested by GCOS are in a "round robin" phase, where various algorithms are inter-compared: fine mode AOD, mineral dust AOD (from the thermal IASI spectrometer, but also from ATSR instruments and the POLDER sensor), absorption information and aerosol layer height. As a quasi-reference for validation in few selected regions with sparse ground-based observations the multi-pixel GRASP algorithm for the POLDER instrument is used. Validation of first dataset versions (vs. AERONET, MAN) and inter-comparison to other satellite datasets (MODIS, MISR, SeaWIFS) proved the high quality of the available datasets comparable to other satellite retrievals and revealed needs for algorithm improvement (for example for higher AOD values) which were taken into account for a reprocessing. The datasets contain pixel level uncertainty estimates which were also validated and improved in the reprocessing. For the three ATSR algorithms the use of an ensemble method was tested. The paper will summarize and discuss the status of dataset reprocessing and validation. The focus will be on the ATSR, GOMOS and IASI datasets. Pixel level uncertainties validation will be summarized and discussed including unknown components and their potential usefulness and limitations. Opportunities for time series extension

  12. Uncertainty quantification in aerosol dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of uncertainty in coagulation and depositions mechanisms, as well as in the initial conditions, on the solution of the aerosol dynamic equation have been assessed using polynomial chaos theory. In this way, large uncertainties can be incorporated into the equations and their propagation as a function of space and time studied. We base our calculations on the simplified point model dynamic equation which includes coagulation and deposition removal mechanisms. Results are given for the stochastic mean aerosol density as a function of time as well as its variance. The stochastic mean and deterministic mean are shown to differ and the associated uncertainty, in the form of a sensitivity coefficient, is obtained as a function of time. In addition, we obtain the probability density function of the aerosol density and show how this varies with time. In view of the generally uncertain nature of an accidental aerosol release in a nuclear reactor accident, the polynomial chaos method is a particularly useful technique as it allows one to deal with a very large spread of input data and examine the effect this has on the quantities of interest. Convergence matters are studied and numerical values given.

  13. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  14. The DRAGON aerosol research facility to study aerosol behaviour for reactor safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a severe accident in a nuclear power plant fission products are expected to be released in form of aerosol particles and droplets. To study the behaviour of safety relevant reactor components under aerosol loads and prototypical severe accident conditions the multi-purpose aerosol generation facility DRAGON is used since 1994 for several projects. DRAGON can generate aerosol particles by the evaporation-condensation technique using a plasma torch system, fluidized bed and atomization of particles suspended in a liquid. Soluble, hygroscopic aerosol (i.e. CsOH) and insoluble aerosol particles (i.e. SnO2, TiO2) or mixtures of them can be used. DRAGON uses state-of-the-art thermal-hydraulic, data acquisition and aerosol measurement techniques and is mainly composed of a mixing chamber, the plasma torch system, a steam generator, nitrogen gas and compressed air delivery systems, several aerosol delivery piping, gas heaters and several auxiliary systems to provide vacuum, coolant and off-gas treatment. The facility can be operated at system pressure of 5 bars, temperatures of 300 deg. C, flow rates of non-condensable gas of 900 kg/h and steam of 270 kg/h, respectively. A test section under investigation is attached to DRAGON. The paper summarizes and demonstrates with the help of two project examples the capabilities of DRAGON for reactor safety studies. (authors)

  15. MODIS 3 km aerosol product: algorithm and global perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Remer, L. A.; Mattoo, S; R. C. Levy; Munchak, L.

    2013-01-01

    After more than a decade of producing a nominal 10 km aerosol product based on the dark target method, the MODIS aerosol team will be releasing a nominal 3 km product as part of their Collection 6 release. The new product differs from the original 10 km product only in the manner in which reflectance pixels are ingested, organized and selected by the aerosol algorithm. Overall, the 3 km product closely mirrors the 10 km product. However, the finer resolution product is able to retrieve over o...

  16. Protection of air in premises and environment against beryllium aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitkolov, N.Z.; Vishnevsky, E.P.; Krupkin, A.V. [Research Inst. of Industrial and Marine Medicine, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    First and foremost, the danger of beryllium aerosols concerns a possibility of their inhalation. The situation is aggravated with high biological activity of the beryllium in a human lung. The small allowable beryllium aerosols` concentration in air poses a rather complex and expensive problem of the pollution prevention and clearing up of air. The delivery and transportation of beryllium aerosols from sites of their formation are defined by the circuit of ventilation, that forms aerodynamics of air flows in premises, and aerodynamic links between premises. The causes of aerosols release in air of premises from hoods, isolated and hermetically sealed vessels can be vibrations, as well as pulses of temperature and pressure. Furthermore, it is possible the redispersion of aerosols from dirty surfaces. The effective protection of air against beryllium aerosols at industrial plants is provided by a complex of hygienic measures: from individual means of breath protection up to collective means of the prevention of air pollution. (J.P.N.)

  17. Atmospheric aerosols at the Pierre Auger Observatory and environmental implications

    CERN Document Server

    Louedec, K

    2012-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory detects the highest energy cosmic rays. Calorimetric measurements of extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays are performed with a fluorescence detector. Thus, one of the main challenges is the atmospheric monitoring, especially for aerosols in suspension in the atmosphere. Several methods are described which have been developed to measure the aerosol optical depth profile and aerosol phase function, using lasers and other light sources as recorded by the fluorescence detector. The origin of atmospheric aerosols traveling through the Auger site is also presented, highlighting the effect of surrounding areas to atmospheric properties. In the aim to extend the Pierre Auger Observatory to an atmospheric research platform, a discussion about a collaborative project is presented.

  18. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  19. Facility of aerosol filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said invention relates to a facility of aerosol filtration, particularly of sodium aerosols. Said facility is of special interest for fast reactors where sodium fires involve the possibility of high concentrations of sodium aerosols which soon clog up conventional filters. The facility intended for continuous operation, includes at the pre-filtering stage, means for increasing the size of the aerosol particles and separating clustered particles (cyclone separator)

  20. Aerosol satellite remote sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veefkind, Joris Pepijn

    2001-01-01

    Aerosols are inportant for many processes in the atmosphere. Aerosols are a leading uncertainty in predicting global climate change, To a large extent this uncertainty is caused by a lack of knowledge on the occurrence and concentration of aerosols. On global scale, this information can only be o

  1. Investigation on aerosol transport in containment cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under severe accident conditions, the containment leak-tightness could be threatened by energetic phenomena that could yield a release to the environment of nuclear aerosols through penetrating concrete cracks. As few data are presently available to quantify this aerosol leakage, a specific action was launched in the framework of the Santar Project of the European 6th Framework Programme. In this context, both theoretical and experimental investigations have been managed to develop a model that can readily be applied within a code like Aster (Accident Source Term Evaluation Code). Particle diffusion, settling, turbulent deposition, diffusiophoresis and thermophoresis have been considered as deposition mechanisms inside the crack path. They have been encapsulated in numerical models set up to reproduce experiments with small tubes and capillaries and simulate the plug formation. Then, an original lagrangian approach has been used to evaluate the crack retention under typical PWR accident conditions, comparing its predictions with those given by the eulerian approach implemented in the ECART code. On the experimental side, the paper illustrates an aerosol production and measurement system developed to validate aerosol deposition models into cracks and the results that can be obtained: a series of tests were performed with monodispersed fluorescein aerosols injected into a cracked concrete sample. A key result that should be further explored refers to the high enhancement of aerosol retention that could be due to steam condensation. Recommendations concerning future experimentation are also given in the paper. (author)

  2. Ionization smoke detector with controlled sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionization smoke detector has been developed which has housing and sensing chambers together controlling the flow of detected smoke or aerosols containing particulate matter. This control of the air flow through the sensing chamber maintains the sensitivity to smoke even in the presence of winds or drafts. (DN)

  3. Aerosol behavior in a steam-air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during accident sequences and released into containment is being studied in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP). Observation on the behavior of U3O8 aerosol, Fe2O3 aerosol, concrete aerosol, and various mixtures of these aerosols in a dry air environment and in a steam-air environment within the NSPP vessel are reported. Under dry conditions, the aerosols are agglomerated in the form of branched chains; the aerodynamic mass median diameter (AMMD) of the U3O8, Fe2O3 and mixed U3O8-Fe2O3 aerosols ranged between 1.5 and 3μm while that of the concrete aerosol was about 1 μm. A steam-air environment, which would be present in LWR containment during and following an accident, causes the U3O8, the Fe2O3, and mixed U3O8-Fe2O3 aerosols to behave differently from that in a dry atmosphere; the primary effect is an enhanced rate of removal of the aerosol from the vessel atmosphere. Steam does not have a significant effect on the removal rate of a concrete aerosol. Electron microscopy showed the agglomerated U3O8, Fe2O3, and mixed U3O8-Fe2O3 aerosols to be in the form of spherical clumps of particles differing from the intermingled branched chains observed in the dry air tests; the AMMD was in the range of 1 to 2 μm. Steam had a lesser influence on the physical shape of the concrete aerosol with the shape being intermediate between branched chain and spherical clumps. 9 figures

  4. A transuranic-aerosol-measurement system for the workplace or stack monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compact transuranic-aerosol-measurement system, using alpha spectroscopy at vacuum, has a sensitivity of less than 0.5 MPC-hr for 239Pu. In addition, a detector is mounted in the inlet pipe that responds immediately if there is a release of radioactivity; then, after an appropriate time, the filter is moved to the vacuum chamber for more sensitive off-line analysis. The system is very efficient for particles as large as 10 μm in diameter. A micro-computer controls the filter transport, operates as a 256-channel PHA, performs calculations, checks calibration, and drives a matrix display and a central computer. This instrument, called WOTAMS, has been developed for use in facilities that process transuranics with the expectation it will further evolve into a commercial product to replace those less sensitive instruments now widely used

  5. Recent Improvements to CALIOP Level 3 Aerosol Profile Product for Global 3-D Aerosol Extinction Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, J. L.; Getzewich, B. J.; Winker, D. M.; Vaughan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    With nine years of retrievals, the CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product provides an unprecedented synopsis of aerosol extinction in three dimensions and the potential to quantify changes in aerosol distributions over time. The CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product, initially released as a beta product in 2011, reports monthly averages of quality-screened aerosol extinction profiles on a uniform latitude/longitude grid for different cloud-cover scenarios, called "sky conditions". This presentation demonstrates improvements to the second version of the product which will be released in September 2015. The largest improvements are the new sky condition definitions which parse the atmosphere into "cloud-free" views accessible to passive remote sensors, "all-sky" views accessible to active remote sensors and "cloudy-sky" views for opaque and transparent clouds which were previously inaccessible to passive remote sensors. Taken together, the new sky conditions comprehensively summarize CALIOP aerosol extinction profiles for a broad range of scientific queries. In addition to dust-only extinction profiles, the new version will include polluted-dust and smoke-only extinction averages. A new method is adopted for averaging dust-only extinction profiles to reduce high biases which exist in the beta version of the level 3 aerosol profile product. This presentation justifies the new averaging methodology and demonstrates vertical profiles of dust and smoke extinction over Africa during the biomass burning season. Another crucial advancement demonstrated in this presentation is a new approach for computing monthly mean aerosol optical depth which removes low biases reported in the beta version - a scenario unique to lidar datasets.

  6. Characterization of Sodium Spray Aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consequences of pool and spray fires require evaluation in the safety analysis of liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Sodium spray fires are characterized by high temperature and pressure, produced during the rapid combustion of sodium in air. Following the initial energy release, some fraction of the reaction products are available as aerosols which follow the normal laws of agglomeration, growth, settling, and plating. An experimental study is underway at Atomics International to study the characteristics of high concentration sprays of liquid sodium in reduced oxygen atmospheres and in air. The experiments are conducted in a 31.5 ft3 (2 ft diam. by 10 ft high) vessel, certified for a pressure of 100 lb/in2 (gauge). The spray injection apparatus consists of a heated sodium supply pot and a spray nozzle through which liquid sodium is driven by nitrogen pressure. Spray rate and droplet size can be varied by the injection velocity (nozzle size, nitrogen pressure, and sodium temperature). Aerosols produced in 0, 4, and 10 vol. % oxygen environments have been studied. The concentration and particle size distribution of the material remaining in the air after the spray injection and reaction period are measured. Fallout rates are found to be proportional to the concentration of aerosol which remains airborne following the spray period. (author)

  7. Development of a cavity enhanced aerosol albedometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a cavity enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS approach and an integrating sphere (IS for simultaneous in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients in the exact same sample volume. The cavity enhanced albedometer employed a blue light-emitting diode (LED based IBBCEAS approach for the measurement of wavelength-resolved aerosol optical extinction over the spectral range of 445–480 nm. An integrating sphere nephelometer coupled to the IBBCEAS setup was used for the measurement of aerosol scattering. The scattering signal was measured with a single channel photomultiplier tube (PMT, providing an integrated value over a narrow bandwidth (FWHM ~ 9 nm in the spectral region of 465–474 nm. A scattering coefficient at a wavelength of 470 nm was deduced as an averaged scattering value and used for data analysis and instrumental performance comparison. Performance evaluation of the albedometer was carried out using laboratory-generated particles and ambient aerosol. The scattering and extinction measurements of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL spheres generated in laboratory proved excellent correlation between two channels of the albedometer. The retrieved refractive index (RI from the measured scattering and extinction efficiencies agreed well with the values reported in previously published papers. Aerosol light scattering and extinction coefficients, single scattering albedo (SSA and NO2 concentrations in an ambient sample were directly and simultaneously measured using the developed albedometer. The developed instrument was validated via an intercomparison of the measured aerosol scattering coefficient and NO2 trace concentration against a TSI 3563 integrating nephelometer and a chemiluminescence detector, respectively.

  8. Transmutation detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Klupák, V.; Sus, F.; Kučera, Jan; Kůs, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 632, č. 1 (2011), s. 109-111. ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Transmutation detector * Activation method * Neutron detector * Neutron fluence Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  9. Gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Hans Gerhard

    1996-01-01

    Detector physics and operational aspects of gaseous detectors will be discussed. Topics such as ionization processes, gas amplification and its limitations, pulse formation and decoupling, related electronics constraints, operational stability and ageing phenomena will be touched with the aim at some quantitative understanding.

  10. Metal Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  11. International standard problem ISP37: VANAM M3 - A Multi compartment aerosol depletion test with hygroscopic aerosol material: comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results and assessment of the 'open' ISP37, which deals with the containment thermal-hydraulics and aerosol behavior during an unmitigated severe LWR accident with core melt-down and steam and aerosol release into the containment. Representatives of 22 organizations participated to the ISP37 using the codes CONTAIN, FIPLOC, MELCOR, RALOC, FUMO, MACRES, REMOVAL etc. The containment and aerosol behavior experiment VANAM M3 was selected as experimental comparison basis. The main phenomena investigated are the thermal behavior of a multi-compartment containment, e.g. pressure, temperature and the distribution and depletion of a soluble aerosol. The ISP37 has demonstrated that the codes used could calculate the thermal-hydraulic containment behavior in general with sufficient accuracy. But with respect to the needs of aerosol behavior analysis the accuracies, both analytical and experimental as well, for specific thermal-hydraulic variables should be improved. Although large progress has been made in the simulation of aerosol behavior in multi-compartment geometries the calculated local aerosol concentrations scatter widely. However, the aerosol source term to the environment is overestimated in general. The largest uncertainty concerning the aerosol results is caused by a limited number of thermal hydraulic variables like relative humidity, volume condensation rate and atmospheric flow rate. In some codes also a solubility model is missing

  12. Aerosol Chemistry Between Two Oceans: Auckland’s Urban Aerosol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coulson, G.; Olivares, G.; Salmond, J.; Talbot, Nicholas

    -: Italian Aerosol Society, 2015. ISBN N. [European Aerosol Conference EAC 2015. Milano (IT), 06.09.2015-11.09.2015] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : urban pollution * aerosol processing * New Zealand Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  13. Acute Exposure from RADON-222 and Aerosols in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, George Paul, IV

    Radon-222 in water is released when the water is aerated, such as during showering. As a result, a temporary burst of radon-222 can appear as a short term, or acute, exposure. This study looked at homes with radon-222 concentrations in water from 800 picocuries per liter (pCi/l) to 53,000 pCi/l to determine the buildup of radon gas in a bathroom during showering. Samples from the tap and drain, compared to determine the percentage of radon-222 released, showed that between 58% and 88% of radon-222 in the water was released. The resultant radon-222 increase in air, measured with a flow-through detector, ranged from 2 pCi/l to 114 pCi/l in bathrooms due to a 10 to 15 minute shower with water flow rates ranging from 3 l/min to 6 l/min. Significantly, these rates did not fall rapidly but stayed approximately the same for up to 15 minutes after the water flow ceased. In examining exposures, the true danger is in the radon-222 progeny rather than the radon itself. The progeny can be inhaled and deposited in the tracheobronchial passages in the lung. Filter samples of bathroom air measured in a portable alpha spectrometer showed an increase in radon-222 progeny, notably polonium-218 and -214, in the air after showering. These increases were gradual and were on the order of 0.5 pCi/l at the highest level. Tap samples measured in a portable liquid scintillator showed that the progeny are present in the water but are not in true secular equilibrium with the radon-222 in the water. Therefore, the radon-222 does not have to decay to produce progeny since the progeny are already present in the water. A two stage sampler was used to examine the percentage of radiation available in aerosols smaller than 7 microns. Repeated trials showed that up to 85% of the radiation available in the aerosols is contained in the smaller, more respirable particles.

  14. Sensitivity of aerosol direct radiative forcing to aerosol vertical profile

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Chul E.; Choi, Jung-Ok

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol vertical profile significantly affects the aerosol direct radiative forcing at the TOA level. The degree to which the aerosol profile impacts the aerosol forcing depends on many factors such as presence of cloud, surface albedo and aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA). Using a radiation model, we show that for absorbing aerosols (with an SSA of 0.7–0.8) whether aerosols are located above cloud or below induces at least one order of magnitude larger changes of the aerosol forcing tha...

  15. Monitoring biological aerosols using UV fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversole, Jay D.; Roselle, Dominick; Seaver, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus has been designed and constructed to continuously monitor the number density, size, and fluorescent emission of ambient aerosol particles. The application of fluorescence to biological particles suspended in the atmosphere requires laser excitation in the UV spectral region. In this study, a Nd:YAG laser is quadrupled to provide a 266 nm wavelength to excite emission from single micrometer-sized particles in air. Fluorescent emission is used to continuously identify aerosol particles of biological origin. For calibration, biological samples of Bacillus subtilis spores and vegetative cells, Esherichia coli, Bacillus thuringiensis and Erwinia herbicola vegetative cells were prepared as suspensions in water and nebulized to produce aerosols. Detection of single aerosol particles, provides elastic scattering response as well as fluorescent emission in two spectral bands simultaneously. Our efforts have focuses on empirical characterization of the emission and scattering characteristics of various bacterial samples to determine the feasibility of optical discrimination between different cell types. Preliminary spectroscopic evidence suggest that different samples can be distinguished as separate bio-aerosol groups. In addition to controlled sample results, we will also discuss the most recent result on the effectiveness of detection outdoor releases and variations in environmental backgrounds.

  16. Aerosols Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Agranovski, Igor

    2011-01-01

    This self-contained handbook and ready reference examines aerosol science and technology in depth, providing a detailed insight into this progressive field. As such, it covers fundamental concepts, experimental methods, and a wide variety of applications, ranging from aerosol filtration to biological aerosols, and from the synthesis of carbon nanotubes to aerosol reactors.Written by a host of internationally renowned experts in the field, this is an essential resource for chemists and engineers in the chemical and materials disciplines across multiple industries, as well as ideal supplementary

  17. Deposition and retention of radioactive aerosols on desert vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition velocities and retention times were obtained for submicron aerosols of 134Cs and 141Ce on a shrub species (Artemisia tridentata) and a grass (Elymus elimoides) in a natural desert environment. Submicron aerosols of these two nuclides were artificially generated and released over a sagebrush community in southeast Idaho during each of three seasons: spring, summer and winter, to determine the effects of weathering and plant development on aerosol deposition and retention. Information on friction velocities, roughness lengths, and particle size was also obtained

  18. MS Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  19. Evaluation of a radioactive aerosol surveillance system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scripsick, R.C.; Stafford, R.G.; Beckman, R.J.; Tillery, M.I.; Romero, P.O.

    1978-06-26

    Measurements of the dilution of air contaminants between worker breathing zone and area air samplers were made by releasing a test aerosol in a workroom equipped with an aerosol surveillance system. The data were used to evaluate performance, and suggest improvements in design of the workroom's alarming air monitor system. It was found that a breathing zone concentration of 960 times the maximum permissible concentration in air (MPC/sub a/) for a half-hour was required to trigger alarms of the existing monitoring system under some release conditions. Alternative air monitor placement, suggested from dilution measurements, would reduce this average triggering concentration to 354 MPC/sub a/. Deployment of additional air monitors could further reduce the average triggering concentration to 241 MPC/sub a/. The relation between number of monitors and triggering concentration was studied. No significant decrease in average triggering concentration was noted for arrays containing greater than five monitors.

  20. Evaluation of a radioactive aerosol surveillance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the dilution of air contaminants between worker breathing zone and area air samplers were made by releasing a test aerosol in a workroom equipped with an aerosol surveillance system. The data were used to evaluate performance, and suggest improvements in design of the workroom's alarming air monitor system. It was found that a breathing zone concentration of 960 times the maximum permissible concentration in air (MPC/sub a/) for a half-hour was required to trigger alarms of the existing monitoring system under some release conditions. Alternative air monitor placement, suggested from dilution measurements, would reduce this average triggering concentration to 354 MPC/sub a/. Deployment of additional air monitors could further reduce the average triggering concentration to 241 MPC/sub a/. The relation between number of monitors and triggering concentration was studied. No significant decrease in average triggering concentration was noted for arrays containing greater than five monitors

  1. Techniques for measuring atmospheric aerosols at the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Amann, J F; Archbold, G C; Belov, K; Belz, J W; Ben-Zvi, S Y; Bergman, D R; Boyer, J; Cannon, C T; Cao, Z; Connolly, B M; Fedorova, J; Finley, C B; Girard, J H V; Gray, R C; Hanlon, W P; Hoffman, C M; Holzscheiter, M H; Hughes, G A; Hüntemeyer, P; Jui, C C H; Kim, K; Kirn, M A; Knapp, B; Loh, E C; Manago, N; Mannel, E J; Martens, K; Matthews, J A J; Matthews, J N; Mumford, J R; O'Neill, A; Reil, K; Riehle, R; Roberts*, M D; Schnetzer, S R; Seman, M; Shen, P; Sinnis, G; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Song, C; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tupa, D; Westerhoff, S; Wiencke, L R; Zech, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe several techniques developed by the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment for measuring aerosol vertical optical depth, aerosol horizontal attenuation length, and aerosol phase function. The techniques are based on measurements of side-scattered light generated by a steerable ultraviolet laser and collected by an optical detector designed to measure fluorescence light from cosmic-ray air showers. We also present a technique to cross-check the aerosol optical depth measurement using air showers observed in stereo. These methods can be used by future air fluorescence experiments.

  2. Two-Column Aerosol Project: Aerosol Light Extinction Measurements Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, Manvendra [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aiken, Allison [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Andrew [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Gorkowski, Kyle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    We deployed Aerodyne Research Inc.’s first Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift extinction (CAPS PMex) monitor (built by Aerodyne) that measures light extinction by using a visible-light-emitting diode (LED) as a light source, a sample cell incorporating two high-reflectivity mirrors centered at the wavelength of the LED, and a vacuum photodiode detector in Cape Cod in 2012/13 for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). The efficacy of this instrument is based on the fact that aerosols are broadband scatterers and absorbers of light. The input LED is square-wave modulated and passed through the sample cell that distorts it due to exponential decay by aerosol light absorption and scattering; this is measured at the detector. The amount of phase shift of the light at the detector is used to determine the light extinction. This extinction measurement provides an absolute value, requiring no calibration. The goal was to compare the CAPS performance with direct measurements of absorption with ARM’s baseline photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and nephelometer instruments to evaluate its performance.

  3. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2010-04-09

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.

  4. A high-throughput hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with a charged aerosol detector method to assess trisulfides in IgG1 monoclonal antibodies using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine reaction products: Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine-oxide and tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine-sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Christopher; Karanjit, Amish; Chen, Yan; Jacobson, Fredric

    2016-07-29

    A robust, high-throughput method using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled with a charged aerosol detector (CAD) is reported as a novel approach for trisulfide quantitation in monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The products of mAb reduction using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) include a species (TCEP(S)) that is stoichiometrically produced from trisulfides. The TCEP reaction products are chromatographically separated, detected, and quantified by the HILICCAD method. The method was qualified to quantify trisulfides across a range of 1-40% (mol trisulfide/mol mAb). In all tested matrix components, assay linearity and intermediate precision were established with correlation coefficients (R(2))>0.99, and relative standard deviations (RSD)<10%. A method comparability study was performed using peptide mapping LC-MS as an orthogonal measurement. For the range of 1-40% trisulfides, the analysis demonstrates that, on average, HILICCAD reads between 0.95 and 1.10 times the value of LC-MS with 95% confidence. Applications of the HILICCAD method include trisulfide determination in purified mAbs to be used in the production of cysteine-linked antibody-drug conjugates, and in cell culture development studies to understand sources of, and strategies for control of, trisulfides. PMID:27345209

  5. The Effect of Water Injection on the Fission Product Aerosol Behavior in Fukushima Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important factor affects human health is fission product that is released from the plant. Fission products usually released with types of aerosol and vapor. The amount of released aerosols out of the plant is crucial, because it can be breathed by people. In this study, the best estimated scenario of Fukushima unit 1 accident was modeled with MELCOR. The amount of released fission product aerosols was estimated according to the amount of added water into reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The analysis of Fukushima unit 1 accident was conducted in view of fission product aerosol release using MELCOR. First of all, thermodynamic results of the plant were compared to the measured data, and then fission product aerosol (CsOH) behavior was calculated with changing the amount of water injection. Water injection affects the amount of aerosol which released into reactor building, because it decreases the temperature of deposition surface. In this study, only aerosol behavior was considered, further study will be conducted including hygroscopic model

  6. Photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF2 windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission

  7. Photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  8. Global combustion sources of organic aerosols: Model comparison with 84 AMS factor analysis data sets

    OpenAIRE

    Tsimpidi, A. P.; V. A. Karydis; Pandis, S. N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2016-01-01

    Emissions of organic compounds from biomass, biofuel and fossil fuel combustion strongly influence the global atmospheric aerosol load. Some of the organics are directly released as primary organic aerosol (POA). Most are emitted in the gas phase and undergo chemical transformations (i.e., oxidation by hydroxyl radical) and form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work we use the global chemistry climate model EMAC with a computation...

  9. UA1 central detector

    CERN Multimedia

    The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  10. Atmospheric fallout of sodium combustion aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five sodium combustion product release tests were conducted in the open atmosphere at INEL, Idaho. About 100 kg of sodium was burned in 5 min at 30 m elevation in two of the tests. Fallout distribution and combustion product species determinations were made. The principal fallout occurred near the release point and decreased exponentially as the plume moved downwind. The tests indicated that little fallout of combustion product aerosols occurred beyond a few hundred meters from the source under the given meteorological conditions. 2 refs

  11. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    Aerosols are important climactically. Their specific emissions are key to reducing the uncertainty in global climate models. Marine aerosols make up the largest source of primary aerosols to the Earth's atmosphere. Uncertainty in marine aerosol mass and number flux lies in separating primary...... emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use of a...... cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...

  12. Calorimeter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    de Barbaro, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Although the instantaneous and integrated luminosity in HL-LHC will be far higher than the LHC detectors were originally designed for, the Barrel calorimeters of the four experiments are expected to continue to perform well  throughout the Phase II program. The conditions for the End-Cap calorimeters are far more challenging and whilst some detectors will require relatively modest changes, others require far more substantial upgrades. We present the results of longevity and performance studies for the calorimeter systems of the four main LHC experiments and outline the upgrade options under consideration. We include a discussion of the R&D required to make the final technology choices for the upgraded detectors.

  13. Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  14. MAMA Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  15. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objects of the invention are, first, to provide an ionization detector having a three chamber structure characterised by a built-in feedback path that regeneratively stabilizes the operating point of the detector. Secondly, to provide a specially designed chamber construction including electrodes shaped so as to enhance the efficiency of the chamber and reduce ion recombination. The ionization chamber described has a chamber structure with a first closed chamber and a second chamber able to receive gases from outside. These two chambers have a common boundary including a common electrode. One electrode associated with the second chamber, and one within the first chamber, define a third chamber within the first chamber allowing an ionization path between. A radioactive source provides ionizing radiation for all three chambers and establishes an ionization current. There is a detector coupled to the common electrode for detecting changes in this current. (U.K.)

  16. Nanomaterial release characteristics in a single-walled carbon nanotube manufacturing workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used in various applications, exposure assessment also increases in importance with other various toxicity tests for CNTs. We conducted 24-h continuous nanoaerosol measurements to identify possible nanomaterial release in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing workplace. Four real-time aerosol instruments were used to determine the nanosized and microsized particle numbers, particle surface area, and carbonaceous species. Task-based exposure assessment was carried out for SWCNT synthesis using the arc plasma and thermal decomposition processes to remove amorphous carbon components as impurities. During the SWCNT synthesis, the black carbon (BC) concentration was 2–12 μg/m3. The maximum BC mass concentrations occurred when the synthesis chamber was opened for harvesting the SWCNTs. The number concentrations of particles with sizes 10–420 nm were 10,000–40,000 particles/cm3 during the tasks. The maximum number concentration existed when a vacuum pump was operated to remove exhaust air from the SWCNT synthesis chamber due to the penetration of highly concentrated oil mists through the window opened. We analyzed the particle mass size distribution and particle number size distribution for each peak episode. Using real-time aerosol detectors, we distinguished the SWCNT releases from background nanoaerosols such as oil mist and atmospheric photochemical smog particles. SWCNT aggregates with sizes of 1–10 μm were mainly released from the arc plasma synthesis. The harvesting process was the main release route of SWCNTs in the workplace

  17. Nanomaterial release characteristics in a single-walled carbon nanotube manufacturing workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Jun Ho [EcoPictures Co., Ltd (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Gwangjae; Bae, Gwi-Nam, E-mail: gnbae@kist.re.kr [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Center for Environment, Health and Welfare Research (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    As carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used in various applications, exposure assessment also increases in importance with other various toxicity tests for CNTs. We conducted 24-h continuous nanoaerosol measurements to identify possible nanomaterial release in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing workplace. Four real-time aerosol instruments were used to determine the nanosized and microsized particle numbers, particle surface area, and carbonaceous species. Task-based exposure assessment was carried out for SWCNT synthesis using the arc plasma and thermal decomposition processes to remove amorphous carbon components as impurities. During the SWCNT synthesis, the black carbon (BC) concentration was 2–12 μg/m{sup 3}. The maximum BC mass concentrations occurred when the synthesis chamber was opened for harvesting the SWCNTs. The number concentrations of particles with sizes 10–420 nm were 10,000–40,000 particles/cm{sup 3} during the tasks. The maximum number concentration existed when a vacuum pump was operated to remove exhaust air from the SWCNT synthesis chamber due to the penetration of highly concentrated oil mists through the window opened. We analyzed the particle mass size distribution and particle number size distribution for each peak episode. Using real-time aerosol detectors, we distinguished the SWCNT releases from background nanoaerosols such as oil mist and atmospheric photochemical smog particles. SWCNT aggregates with sizes of 1–10 μm were mainly released from the arc plasma synthesis. The harvesting process was the main release route of SWCNTs in the workplace.

  18. Interactions of fission product vapours with aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.G.; Newland, M.S. [AEA Technology, Winfrith (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    Reactions between structural and reactor materials aerosols and fission product vapours released during a severe accident in a light water reactor (LWR) will influence the magnitude of the radiological source term ultimately released to the environment. The interaction of cadmium aerosol with iodine vapour at different temperatures has been examined in a programme of experiments designed to characterise the kinetics of the system. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is a technique that is particularly amenable to the study of systems involving elemental iodine because of the high intensity of the fluorescence lines. Therefore this technique was used in the experiments to measure the decrease in the concentration of iodine vapour as the reaction with cadmium proceeded. Experiments were conducted over the range of temperatures (20-350{sup o}C), using calibrated iodine vapour and cadmium aerosol generators that gave well-quantified sources. The LIF results provided information on the kinetics of the process, whilst examination of filter samples gave data on the composition and morphology of the aerosol particles that were formed. The results showed that the reaction of cadmium with iodine was relatively fast, giving reaction half-lives of approximately 0.3 s. This suggests that the assumption used by primary circuit codes such as VICTORIA that reaction rates are mass-transfer limited, is justified for the cadmium-iodine reaction. The reaction was first order with respect to both cadmium and iodine, and was assigned as pseudo second order overall. However, there appeared to be a dependence of aerosol surface area on the overall rate constant, making the precise order of the reaction difficult to assign. The relatively high volatility of the cadmium iodide formed in the reaction played an important role in determining the composition of the particles. (author) 23 figs., 7 tabs., 22 refs.

  19. BES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e+e- annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  20. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  1. Submicron aerosols: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Submicron aerosols, ranging in particle diameter from 0.1 μm to 0.001 μm, and in number concentration from 10,000 to 100,000 per cm3, are more or less continuously suspended in the atmosphere we breathe. They usually require in situ measurement of concentration and size distribution with instruments such as diffusion batteries and condensation nucleus counters. Laboratory measurements require the development of submicron aerosol generators. The development of several of these devices and their use in the laboratory and field to measure radioactive as well as inactive aerosols is described

  2. Lessons learned from case studies of worker exposures to radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable efforts in the aerosol science and health protection communities are devoted to developing a defensible technical basis for measuring, modeling, and mitigating toxic aerosols. These efforts involve understanding aerosol source terms, projecting potential aerosol releases, describing their behavior in the workplace and environment, developing instruments and techniques to measure the aerosols, designing ways to contain or control the aerosols, modeling and measuring uptake by workers and other people, estimating health effects, and planning appropriate responses. To help in this effort, we have compiled a data base of case studies involving releases of aerosols and worker exposures in a wide range of industries. Sources of information have included personal communications, limited distribution reports, open literature publications, and reports of abnormal occurrences in U.S. Department of Energy facilities and among licensees of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The data base currently includes more than 100 cases. The case studies have been organized according to the radionuclides involved and the circumstances and consequences of the release. This information has been used to address a number of important questions, such as the adequacy of current aerosol sampling and monitoring procedures, areas needing improvement, and strategies for planning for or responding to accidents. One area of particular interest is related to strategies for prospective or retrospective characterization of aerosol source terms. In some cases, worker exposures have involved aerosols that are similar in particle size distribution, composition, and solubility to aerosols routinely produced in the normal process activities. In such cases, prospective characterization of aerosol source terms has provided relevant and useful information

  3. Improved global aerosol datasets for 2008 from Aerosol_cci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer-Popp, Thomas; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    . Users (MACC/ECMWF, AEROCOM) confirmed the relevance of this additional information and encouraged Aerosol_cci to release the current uncertainties. A thorough comparison was conducted for the three AATSR algorithms. Care was taken to compare equal data amounts by common point filtering. It was found that in some cases different filtering led to contradicting validation results. This is not yet completely understood and needs further analysis. Obviously one aspect is the anti-correlation between coverage and accuracy and thus the importance of the applied quality control methods (in particular to avoid cloud contamination). Also limitations of the available reference datasets over open ocean and in the Southern hemisphere became obvious. The validation showed that all three AATSR algorithms produce almost equal accuracy, but show differences in the resulting datasets (similar to those between MODIS and MISR). In conclusion the team recommends to use a combination of the three AATSR algorithms, since none of them can be identified which performs best under all conditions. The intensive validation provides a large wealth of information which needs to be fully exploited and can be used to determine future algorithm development priorities. The paper will summarize and discuss the validation results and conclude with an outline of future steps for validation and algorithm improvement.

  4. Preliminary results of the aerosol optical depth retrieval in Johor, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring of atmospheric aerosols over the urban area is important as tremendous amounts of pollutants are released by industrial activities and heavy traffic flow. Air quality monitoring by satellite observation provides better spatial coverage, however, detailed aerosol properties retrieval remains a challenge. This is due to the limitation of aerosol retrieval algorithm on high reflectance (bright surface) areas. The aim of this study is to retrieve aerosol optical depth over urban areas of Iskandar Malaysia; the main southern development zone in Johor state, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 500 m resolution data. One of the important steps is the aerosol optical depth retrieval is to characterise different types of aerosols in the study area. This information will be used to construct a Look Up Table containing the simulated aerosol reflectance and corresponding aerosol optical depth. Thus, in this study we have characterised different aerosol types in the study area using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data. These data were processed using cluster analysis and the preliminary results show that the area is consisting of coastal urban (65%), polluted urban (27.5%), dust particles (6%) and heavy pollution (1.5%) aerosols

  5. Field Studies of Broadband Aerosol Optical Extinction in the Ultraviolet Spectral Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. In the case of brown carbon, its wavelength-dependent absorption in the ultraviolet spectral region has been suggested as an important component of aerosol radiative forcing. We describe a new field instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We deployed this instrument during the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment during Fall 2012 to measure biomass burning aerosol, and again during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study in summer 2013 to measure organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. In both field experiments, we determined aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength and can interpret this together with size distribution and composition measurements to characterize the aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing.

  6. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  7. Sodium oxide aerosol filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the scope of the sodium aerosol trapping research effort by the CEA/DSN, the retention capacity and yield were measured for very high efficiency fiberglass filters and several types of prefilters (cyclone agglomerator, fabric prefilters, water scrubbers). (author)

  8. UA1 prototype detector

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Prototype of UA1 central detector inside a plexi tube. The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  9. Aerosol removal by emergency spray in PWR containment: synthesis of the TOSQAN aerosol tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the course of a severe accident in a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), containment reactor is pressurized by steam and hydrogen released from a primary circuit breach and distributed into the containment according to convective flows and steam wall condensation. In addition, core degradation leads to fission product release into the containment. Water spraying is used in the containment as mitigation means in order to reduce pressure, to remove fission products and to enhance the gas mixing in case of presence of hydrogen. This paper presents the synthesis of the results of the TOSQAN aerosol program undertaken by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN) devoted to study the aerosol removal by a spray, for typical accidental thermal hydraulic conditions in PWR containment. (author)

  10. Transfer of radioactive aerosol from unit shelter in boundary atmosphere layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of transfer of radioactive aerosol in boundary atmosphere layer in case of normal conditions of unit Shelter and in ceases of different emergency scenarios was performed. In cases of normal condition of unit Shelter the additional radioactive contamination of surface air in close ChNPP zone is the result of simultaneous activities of two sources: unorganized removal of radioactive aerosols from 'Shelter' gaps and release of aerosol particles through ventilating duct of power block 3 and 4. A software shell was created to implement computation mathematical models to evaluate transfer of radioactive aerosol from unit 'Shelter'

  11. Emergency protection from aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved

  12. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  13. MISR Aerosol Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    AeroCom is an open international initiative of scientists interested in the advancement of the understanding of global aerosol properties and aerosol impacts on climate. A central goal is to more strongly tie and constrain modeling efforts to observational data. A major element for exchanges between data and modeling groups are annual meetings. The meeting was held September 20 through October 2, 1014 and the organizers would like to post the presentations.

  14. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  15. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian

    1998-01-01

    The lecture series will present and overview of the basic techniques and underlying physical principles of particle detectors, applied to current and future high energy physics experiments. Illustrating examples, mainly from the field of collider experiments, will demonstrate the performance and limitations of the various techniques. After and introduction we shall concentrate on particle tracking. Wire chambers, drift chambers, micro gaseous tracking devices and solid state trackers will be discussed. It follows and overview of scintillators, photon detection, fiber tracking and nuclear emulsions. One lecture will deal with the various techniques of calorimetry. Finally we shall focus on methods developed for particle identification. These comprise specific energy loss, time of flight Cherenkov and transition radiation detectors.

  16. Aerosol mass spectrometry systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergenson, David P.; Gard, Eric E.

    2013-08-20

    A system according to one embodiment includes a particle accelerator that directs a succession of polydisperse aerosol particles along a predetermined particle path; multiple tracking lasers for generating beams of light across the particle path; an optical detector positioned adjacent the particle path for detecting impingement of the beams of light on individual particles; a desorption laser for generating a beam of desorbing light across the particle path about coaxial with a beam of light produced by one of the tracking lasers; and a controller, responsive to detection of a signal produced by the optical detector, that controls the desorption laser to generate the beam of desorbing light. Additional systems and methods are also disclosed.

  17. Experimental investigations on nuclear aerosols in a severe accident

    OpenAIRE

    DELGADO TARDÁGUILA, ROSARIO

    2016-01-01

    [EN] In case of a severe accident in a NPP fission products are released from the degraded fuel and may reach the environment if their confinement is lost and/or bypassed. Given the high radio-toxic nature of nuclear aerosols for environment and population, their unrestricted release should be absolutely avoided. One particular situation is the core meltdown sequence with steam generator tube rupture (SGTR). The containment bypass turns this sequence into an indispensable scenario to mode...

  18. Organic aerosols from biomass burning in Amazonian rain forest and their impact onto the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field campaign performed in Southern Brazilian Amazonia in 1993 has proved that this region is subjected to fallout of particulated exhausts released by fires of forestal biomass. In fact, organic content of aerosols collected at urban sites located on the border of pluvial forest, about 50 km from fires, was similar to that of biomass burning exhausts. Aerosol composition is indicative of dolous origin of fires. However, organic contents seems to be influenced by two additional sources, i. e. motor vehicle and high vegetation emission. Chemical pattern of organic aerosols released by biomass burning of forest seems to promote occurrence of photochemical smog episodes in that region

  19. Calculations of sodium aerosol concentrations at breeder reactor air intake ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology used and results obtained in efforts to estimate the sodium aerosol concentrations at air intake ports of a liquid-metal cooled, fast-breeder nuclear reactor. A range of wind speeds from 2 to 10 m/s is assumed, and an effort is made to include building wake effects which in many cases dominate the dispersal of aerosols near buildings. For relatively small release rates on the order of 1 to 10 kg/s, it is suggested that the plume rise will be small and that estimates of aerosol concentrations may be derived using the methodology of Wilson and Britter (1982), which describes releases from surface vents. For more acute releases with release rates on the order of 100 kg/s, much higher release velocities are expected, and plume rise must be considered. Both momentum-driven and density-driven plume rise are considered. An effective increase in release height is computed using the Split-H methodology with a parameterization suggested by Ramsdell (1983), and the release source strength was transformed to rooftop level. Evaluation of the acute release aerosol concentration was then based on the methodology for releases from a surface release of this transformed source strength

  20. Research on consequence analysis method for probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear fuel facilities (2). Basic experimental data aerosol release fraction and trial analysis in boiling event to radioactive solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special committee on 'Research on the analysis methods for accident consequence of nuclear fuel facilities (NFFs)' was organized by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan under the entrustment of Japan Atomic Energy Agency for research on the state-of-the-art consequence analysis method for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of NFFs, such as fuel reprocessing and fuel fabrication facilities. The objective of this research is to obtain the basic useful information related to the establishment of the quantitative performance requirement and to risk-informed regulation through qualifying issues needed to be resolved for applying PSA to NFFs. The research activities of the committee were mainly focused on accidents with more severe consequences than design basis, such as events of criticality, explosion, fire, and boiling of radioactive solution postulated in NFFs resulting in the release of radioactive materials into the environment. The research results are summarized in this technical report about basic experimental data related to key physical and chemical phenomena postulated in a boiling event of a radioactive solution storage tank caused by the loss of the cooling function. (author)

  1. Characterisation of Aerosols from Simulated Radiological Dispersion Events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lemma, F.G.

    2015-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aims at improving the evaluation of the radiaoctive aerosol release from different Radiological Dispersion Events (RDE's), such as accidents and sabotage involving radioactive and nuclear materials. These studies help in a better assessment of the source term as

  2. Sampling, characterization, and remote sensing of aerosols formed in the atmospheric hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is released into the atmosphere, it rapidly reacts with ambient moisture to form an aerosol of uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). As part of our Safety Analysis program, we have performed several experimental releases of HF6 in contained volumes in order to investigate techniques for sampling and characterizing the aerosol materials. The aggregate particle morphology and size distribution have been found to be dependent upon several conditions, including the temperature of the UF6 at the time of its release, the relative humidity of the air into which it is released, and the elapsed time after the release. Aerosol composition and settling rate have been investigated using stationary samplers for the separate collection of UO2F2 and HF and via laser spectroscopic remote sensing (Mie scatter and infrared spectroscopy). 25 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Broadband measurements of aerosol extinction in the ultraviolet spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Flores, J. M.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Rudich, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. We describe a new laboratory instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We determined aerosol extinction cross sections and directly observed Mie scattering resonances for aerosols that are purely scattering (polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate), slightly absorbing (Suwannee River fulvic acid), and strongly absorbing (nigrosin dye). We describe an approach for retrieving refractive indices as a function of wavelength from the measured extinction cross sections over the 360-420 nm wavelength region. The retrieved refractive indices for PSL and ammonium sulfate agree within uncertainty with the literature values for this spectral region. The refractive index determined for nigrosin is 1.78 (± 0.03) + 0.19 (± 0.08)i at 360 nm and 1.63 (± 0.03) + 0.21 (± 0.05)i at 420 nm. The refractive index determined for Suwannee River fulvic acid is 1.71 (± 0.02) + 0.07 (± 0.06)i at 360 nm and 1.66 (± 0.02) + 0.06 (± 0.04)i at 420 nm. These laboratory results support the potential for a field instrument capable of determining ambient aerosol optical extinction, average aerosol extinction cross section, and complex refractive index as a function of wavelength.

  4. Broadband measurements of aerosol extinction in the ultraviolet spectral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Washenfelder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross-sections and complex refractive indices. We describe a new laboratory instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360–390 and 385–420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD detector. We determined aerosol extinction cross-sections and directly observed Mie scattering resonances for aerosols that are purely scattering (polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate, slightly absorbing (Suwannee River fulvic acid, and strongly absorbing (nigrosin dye. We describe an approach for retrieving refractive indices as a function of wavelength from the measured extinction cross-sections over the 360–420 nm wavelength region. The retrieved refractive indices for PSL and ammonium sulfate agree within uncertainty with literature values for this spectral region. The refractive index determined for nigrosin is 1.78 (±0.03 + 0.19 (±0.08 i at 360 nm and 1.53 (±0.03 + 0.21 (±0.05 i at 420 nm. The refractive index determined for Suwannee River fulvic acid is 1.71 (±0.02 + 0.07 (±0.06 i at 360 nm and 1.66 (±0.02 + 0.06 (±0.04 i at 420 nm. These laboratory results support the potential for a field instrument capable of determining ambient aerosol optical extinction, average aerosol extinction cross-section, and complex refractive index as a function of wavelength.

  5. Broadband measurements of aerosol extinction in the ultraviolet spectral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Washenfelder

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. We describe a new laboratory instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360–390 and 385–420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD detector. We determined aerosol extinction cross sections and directly observed Mie scattering resonances for aerosols that are purely scattering (polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate, slightly absorbing (Suwannee River fulvic acid, and strongly absorbing (nigrosin dye. We describe an approach for retrieving refractive indices as a function of wavelength from the measured extinction cross sections over the 360–420 nm wavelength region. The retrieved refractive indices for PSL and ammonium sulfate agree within uncertainty with the literature values for this spectral region. The refractive index determined for nigrosin is 1.78 (± 0.03 + 0.19 (± 0.08i at 360 nm and 1.63 (± 0.03 + 0.21 (± 0.05i at 420 nm. The refractive index determined for Suwannee River fulvic acid is 1.71 (± 0.02 + 0.07 (± 0.06i at 360 nm and 1.66 (± 0.02 + 0.06 (± 0.04i at 420 nm. These laboratory results support the potential for a field instrument capable of determining ambient aerosol optical extinction, average aerosol extinction cross section, and complex refractive index as a function of wavelength.

  6. Physical metrology of aerosols; Metrologie physique des aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulaud, D.; Vendel, J. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1996-12-31

    The various detection and measuring methods for aerosols are presented, and their selection is related to aerosol characteristics (size range, concentration or mass range), thermo-hydraulic conditions (carrier fluid temperature, pressure and flow rate) and to the measuring system conditions (measuring frequency, data collection speed, cost...). Methods based on aerosol dynamic properties (inertial, diffusional and electrical methods) and aerosol optical properties (localized and integral methods) are described and their performances and applications are compared

  7. Combustion aerosols from potassium-containing fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balzer Nielsen, Lars

    1998-12-31

    The scope of the work presented in this thesis is the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the submicron range during combustion processes, in particular where biomass is used alone or co-fired with coal. An introduction to the formation processes of fly ash in general and submicron aerosol in particular during combustion is presented, along with some known problems related to combustion of biomass for power generation. The work falls in two parts. The first is the design of a laboratory setup for investigation of homogeneous nucleation and particle dynamics at high temperature. The central unit of the setup is a laminar flow aerosol condenser (LFAC), which essentially is a 173 cm long tubular furnace with an externally cooled wall. A mathematical model is presented which describes the formation and evolution of the aerosol in the LFAC, where the rate of formation of new nuclei is calculated using the so-called classical theory. The model includes mass and energy conservation equations and an expression for the description of particle growth by diffusion. The resulting set of nonlinear second-order partial differential equations are solved numerically using the method of orthogonal collocation. The model is implemented in the FORTRAN code MONAERO. The second part of this thesis describes a comprehensive investigation of submicron aerosol formation during co-firing of coal and straw carried out at a 380 MW{sub Th} pulverized coal unit at Studstrup Power Plant, Aarhus. Three types of coal are used, and total boiler load and straw input is varied systematically. Straw contains large amounts of potassium, which is released during combustion. Submicron aerosol is sampled between the two banks of the economizer at a flue gas temperature of 350 deg. C using a novel ejector probe. The aerosol is characterized using the SMPS system and a Berner-type low pressure impactor. The chemical composition of the particles collected in the impactor is determined using

  8. Combustion aerosols from potassium-containing fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of the work presented in this thesis is the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the submicron range during combustion processes, in particular where biomass is used alone or co-fired with coal. An introduction to the formation processes of fly ash in general and submicron aerosol in particular during combustion is presented, along with some known problems related to combustion of biomass for power generation. The work falls in two parts. The first is the design of a laboratory setup for investigation of homogeneous nucleation and particle dynamics at high temperature. The central unit of the setup is a laminar flow aerosol condenser (LFAC), which essentially is a 173 cm long tubular furnace with an externally cooled wall. A mathematical model is presented which describes the formation and evolution of the aerosol in the LFAC, where the rate of formation of new nuclei is calculated using the so-called classical theory. The model includes mass and energy conservation equations and an expression for the description of particle growth by diffusion. The resulting set of nonlinear second-order partial differential equations are solved numerically using the method of orthogonal collocation. The model is implemented in the FORTRAN code MONAERO. The second part of this thesis describes a comprehensive investigation of submicron aerosol formation during co-firing of coal and straw carried out at a 380 MWTh pulverized coal unit at Studstrup Power Plant, Aarhus. Three types of coal are used, and total boiler load and straw input is varied systematically. Straw contains large amounts of potassium, which is released during combustion. Submicron aerosol is sampled between the two banks of the economizer at a flue gas temperature of 350 deg. C using a novel ejector probe. The aerosol is characterized using the SMPS system and a Berner-type low pressure impactor. The chemical composition of the particles collected in the impactor is determined using chemical

  9. Aerosols behavior inside a PWR during an accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During very hypothetical accidents occurring in a pressurized water ractor, radioactive aerosols can be released, during core-melt, inside the reactor containment building. A good knowledge of their behavior in the humid containment atmosphere (mass concentration and size distribution) is essential in order to evaluate their harmfulness in case of environment contamination and to design possible filtration devices. Accordingly the Safety Analysis Department of the Atomic Energy Commission uses several computer models, describing the particle formation (BOIL/MARCH), then behavior in the primary circuits (TRAP-MELT), and in the reactor containment building (AEROSOLS-PARFDISEKO-III B). On the one hand, these models have been improved, in particular the one related to the aerosol formation (nature and mass of released particles) using recent experimental results. On the other hand, sensitivity analyses have been performed with the AEROSOLS code which emphasize the particle coagulation parameters: agglomerate shape factors and collision efficiency. Finally, the different computer models have been applied to the study of aerosol behavior during a 900 MWe PWR accident: loss-of-coolant-accident (small break with failure of all safety systems)

  10. Formation of halogen-induced secondary organic aerosol (XOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilli, Katharina; Ofner, Johannes; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Held, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    bromine with α-pinene. This work was funded by German Research Foundation (DFG) under grants HE 5214/5-1 and ZE792/5-2. References: Cai, X., and Griffin, R. J.: Secondary aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons by chlorine atoms, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D14206/14201-D14206/14214, 2006. Ofner, J. Balzer, N., Buxmann, J., Grothe, H., Schmitt-Kopplin, Ph., Platt, U., and Zetzsch, C., Halogenation processes of secondary organic aerosol and implications on halogen release mechanisms, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. 12, 2975-3017, 2012.

  11. Renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweda, Frank; Friis, Ulla; Wagner, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located...

  12. Aerosol studies with Listeria innocua and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guodong; Ma, Li; Oyarzabal, Omar A; Doyle, Michael P

    2007-08-01

    Aerosol studies of Listeria monocytogenes in food processing plants have been limited by lack of a suitable surrogate microorganism. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of using green fluorescent protein-labeled strains of Listeria innocua as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes for aerosol studies. These studies were conducted in a laboratory bioaerosol chamber and a pilot food-processing facility. Four strains of L. innocua and five strains of L. monocytogenes were used. In the laboratory chamber study, Listeria cells were released into the environment at two different cell numbers and under two airflow conditions. Trypticase soy agar (TSA) plates and oven-roasted breasts of chicken and turkey were placed in the chamber to monitor Listeria cell numbers deposited from aerosols. A similar experimental design was used in the pilot plant study; however, only L. innocua was used. Results showed that L. monocytogenes and L. innocua survived equally well on chicken and turkey breast meats and TSA plates. No-fan and continuous fan applications, which affected airflow, had no significant effect on settling rates of aerosolized L. monocytogenes and L. innocua in the bioaerosol chamber or L. innocua in the pilot plant study. Listeriae cell numbers in the air decreased rapidly during the first 1.5 h following release, with few to no listeriae detected in the air at 3 h. Aerosol particles with diameters of 1 and 2 microM correlated directly with the number of Listeria cells in the aerosol but not with particles that were 0.3, 0.5, and 5 microM in diameter. Results indicate that L. innocua can be used as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes in an aerosol study. PMID:17803142

  13. Aerosol sample inhomogeneity with debris from the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide aerosol sampling is a vital component in the detection of nuclear explosions, nuclear accidents, and other radiation releases. This was proven by the detection and tracking of emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi incident across the globe by IMS stations. Two separate aerosol samplers were operated in Richland, WA following the event and debris from the accident were measured at levels well above detection limits. While the atmospheric activity concentration of radionuclides generally compared well between the two stations, they did not agree within uncertainties. This paper includes a detailed study of the aerosol sample homogeneity of 134Cs and 137Cs, then relates it to the overall uncertainty of the original measurement. Our results show that sample inhomogeneity adds an additional 5−10% uncertainty to each aerosol measurement and that this uncertainty is in the same range as the discrepancies between the two aerosol sample measurements from Richland, WA. - Highlights: • Statistical discrepancies arise when comparing HVAS and RASA measurements. • Beta statistic was employed to quantize statistical discrepancies. • Aerosol sample inhomogeneity determined to be 5–10%. • Statistical discrepancies attributed to sample inhomogeneity

  14. Beta aerosols beacon, a truly portable continuous air monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Beta Aerosols Beacon (BAB) is a portable (57 lbs) continuous air monitor designed to detect airborne radiation. Utilizing solid state detectors has eliminated the use of lead shielding usually necessary for achieving accurate readings in high background areas, making the monitor lightweight as well as portable. The size of a small suitcase, it can be carried into confined work areas, eliminating the requirement for workers to wear respirators for many maintenance tasks. This paper describes the operation and applications of the BAB

  15. Experimental determination of attachment function of radon progeny on aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosol size information is very important for risk estimation of radon exposure. Size measurements of aerosol particles attaching radon progeny were made by using the Detati's ELPI (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor), and its attachment function was determined. The impactor, which covers a wide size range from 0.03 to 10 μm in diameter, gives number size distribution in real time by an electrical detection method. Prior to those size measurements, effects of impaction substrates on size classification were studied. Tested substrate materials were stainless steel plate and aluminum foil, and those surfaces were as follows: 1) untreated, 2) silicon grease coated, 3) silicon oil coated, 4) adhesive tape stuck. It was suggested that the use of grease- or oil-coated substrates did not interfere for the ELPI's electrical measurements but prevent particle rebound or redispersion. And it was confirmed that the coating gave no damage on alpha energy spectrum analysis by surface-barrier type solid state detector (SSD). Size distribution data on aerosol number and activity were independently taken for each impactor sample. In the size measurements on activity, the correction of sampling loss at the ELPI's charger unit was made. Comparing between number and activity size distributions, attachment function of radon progeny on aerosol surface was estimated. In the lower submicron range, the attachment strongly depend on the aerosol size. The larger the aerosol become, the less the attachment depend on the aerosol size. The attachment function of the submicron aerosols was in a transient region from surface-area proportion to diameter proportion, as shown in the previous studies. It means that the ELPI is useful for measurements on attachment function of radon progeny on aerosol particles. But the ELPI does not demand monodisperse aerosol as carrier aerosol, and the attachment function can be determined for any aerosols in a chamber or field experiment. (author)

  16. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  17. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  18. The Global Ozone and Aerosol Profiles and Aerosol Hygroscopic Effect and Absorption Optical Depth (GOA2HEAD) Network Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Frost, G. J.; McComiskey, A. C.; Murphy, D. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Inverse modeling using measurements of ozone (O3) and aerosol is a powerful tool for deriving pollutant emissions. Because they have relatively long lifetimes, O3 and aerosol are transported over large distances. Frequent and globally spaced vertical profiles rather than ground-based measurements alone are therefore highly desired. Three requirements necessary for a successful global monitoring program are: Low equipment cost, low operation cost, and reliable measurements of known uncertainty. Conventional profiling using aircraft provides excellent data, but is cost prohibitive on a large scale. Here we describe a new platform and instruments meeting all three global monitoring requirements. The platform consists of a small balloon and an auto-homing glider. The glider is released from the balloon at about 5 km altitude, returning the light instrument package to the launch location, and allowing for consistent recovery of the payload. Atmospheric profiling can be performed either during ascent or descent (or both) depending on measurement requirements. We will present the specifications for two instrument packages currently under development. The first measures O3, RH, p, T, dry aerosol particle number and size distribution, and aerosol optical depth. The second measures dry aerosol particle number and size distribution, and aerosol absorption coefficient. Other potential instrument packages and the desired spatial/temporal resolution for the GOA2HEAD monitoring initiative will also be discussed.

  19. Advancing Models and Evaluation of Cumulus, Climate and Aerosol Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gettelman, Andrew [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-27

    This project was successfully able to meet its’ goals, but faced some serious challenges due to personnel issues. Nonetheless, it was largely successful. The Project Objectives were as follows: 1. Develop a unified representation of stratifom and cumulus cloud microphysics for NCAR/DOE global community models. 2. Examine the effects of aerosols on clouds and their impact on precipitation in stratiform and cumulus clouds. We will also explore the effects of clouds and precipitation on aerosols. 3. Test these new formulations using advanced evaluation techniques and observations and release

  20. Sodium ionization detector and sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work conducted on a basic technology development effort with the Westinghouse Sodium Ionization Detector (SID) sensor is reported. Included are results obtained for three task areas: (1) On-line operational response testing - in-situ calibration techniques; (2) Performance-reliability characteristics of aged filaments; and (3) Evaluation of chemical interference effects. The results showed that a calibrator filament coated with a sodium compound, when activated, does supply the necessary sodium atoms to provide a valid operational in-situ test. The life time of new Cr203-protected SID sensor filaments can be extended by operating at a reduced temperature. However, there also is a reduction in the sensitivity. Non-sodium species, such as products from a smoldering fire and organic aerosols, produce an interference response from the sensor comparable to a typical sodium response

  1. Secondary Aerosol: Precursors and Formation Mechanisms. Technical Report on Grant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein-Lloyd, Judith B

    2009-05-04

    This project focused on studying trace gases that participate in chemical reactions that form atmospheric aerosols. Ammonium sulfate is a major constituent of these tiny particles, and one important pathway to sulfate formation is oxidation of dissolved sulfur dioxide by hydrogen peroxide in cloud, fog and rainwater. Sulfate aerosols influence the number and size of cloud droplets, and since these factors determine cloud radiative properties, sulfate aerosols also influence climate. Peroxide measurements, in conjunction with those of other gaseous species, can used to distinguish the contribution of in-cloud reaction to new sulfate aerosol formation from gas-phase nucleation reactions. This will lead to more reliable global climate models. We constructed and tested a new 4-channel fluorescence detector for airborne detection of peroxides. We integrated the instrument on the G-1 in January, 2006 and took a test flight in anticipation of the MAX-Mex field program, where we planned to fly under pressurized conditions for the first time. We participated in the 2006 Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) - Megacity Aerosol EXperiment Mexico City (MAX-Mex) field measurement campaign. Peroxide instrumentation was deployed on the DOE G-1 research aircraft based in Veracruz, and at the surface site at Tecamac University.

  2. Aerosol and melt chemistry in the ACE molten core-concrete interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results are discussed from the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) Program on the melt behavior and aerosols released during the interaction of molten reactor core material with concrete. A broad range of parameters were addressed in the experimental program: Seven large-scale tests were performed using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/sand, serpentine, and limestone) and a range of metal oxidations for both boiling water and pressurized waster reactor core debris. The release aerosols contained mainly constitutents of the concrete. In the tests with metal and limestone/sand siliceous concrete, silicon compounds comprised 50% or more of the aerosol mass. Releases of uranium and low-volatility fission-product elements were small in all tests. Releases of tellurium and neutron absorber materials (silver, indium, and boron from boron carbide) were high

  3. Sampling and characterization of aerosols formed in the atmospheric hydrolysis of UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When gaseous UF6 is released into the atmosphere, it rapidly reacts with ambient moisture to form an aerosol of uranyl fluoride and HF. As part of our Safety Analysis program, we have performed several experimental releases of UF6 (from natural uranium) in contained volumes in order to investigate techniques for sampling and characterizing the aerosol materials. The aggregrate particle morphology and size distribution have been found to be dependent upon several conditions, including the relative humidity at the time of the release and the elapse time after the release. Aerosol composition and settling rate have been investigated using isokinetic samplers for the separate collection of UO2F2 and HF, and via laser spectroscopic remote sensing (Mie scatter and infrared spectroscopy). 8 references

  4. Importance of core/concrete aerosol production and some containment heat sources to the source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of aerosols by core/concrete interaction in a large break PWR severe accident is discussed, and both vaporization and mechanical production processes are examined. In the case of the former, equilibrium chemical thermodynamic studies are used to decide which chemical species should be considered, recognizing the uncertainty in the likely configuration of the core/concrete melt. Lanthanide release is found to be particularly sensitive to this configuration. It is found that kinetic effects are not important in preventing the attainment of chemical equilibrium in the gas bubbling through the melt. At early times aerosol production by bubble bursting at the melt surface is found to be less important than that due to vaporization, except for those materials released in small quantities, e.g. Mo. The bubble bursting mechanism becomes relatively more important at later times. Calculations for a large modern PWR show that environmental release from the core/concrete aerosol is likely to be of comparable or greater importance (in terms of released decay heat) than that from the in-vessel core-melt aerosol for all but very early containment failure or failure to isolate, neglecting attenuation of the core/concrete aerosol during its flow from the cavity to the main containment volume. The importance of performing linked thermal-hydraulic and aerosol physics calculations is highlighted by the blowdown aerosol in a large break accident. Treatment of the decay heat arising from the aerosol material released to the containment is discussed. It is shown that it is very important to consider this heat source in containment pressure calculations, but it was not found to be important to treat its spatial dependence accurately in the large break accident considered here. Some scoping calculations for material resuspension on containment overpressure failure, due to a hydrogen burn, are presented

  5. Rhodium in-core detector sensitivity depletion, cycles 2-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity depletion of two rhodium (Rh) self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) has been measured since July 1976 at the Oconee 2 pressurized water reactor (PWR). The detectors were positioned inside the reactor core throughout the measurement period. Depletion has been determined as a function of electric charge released by each detector. The goal of the project is the empirical definition of the depletion characteristics over the operating life-time of the Rh detector. Results to date show that the sensitivity depletion rate of the Rh detector in the PWR is highly linear with charge released from the detector

  6. Deposition of CsI aerosol in horizontal straight pipe under inert and superheated steam environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a severe accident of an LWR, fission products (FPs) aerosol released from a reactor core region will be deposited on the inner surface of the reactor coolant piping. In such conditions, the piping might be subjected to a thermal load due to decay heat from the deposited FPs. It is very important to quantify the FP aerosol deposition on the piping surfaces. Therefore the FP aerosol behavior in piping is being investigated in the WIND (Wide Range Piping Integrity Demonstration) project at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The objectives of present study are to characterize the aerosol deposition on piping surfaces under various thermal-hydraulic conditions and to obtain insights for the validation of analytical models. A chemical analysis of the deposited aerosol showed that no evidence was found for the decomposition of CsI under inert and superheated steam environments. The major deposition mechanisms are identified to be the condensation of CsI vapor and the thermophoretic aerosol transportation from the carrier gas to the colder piping surfaces. Thermo-fluiddynamic analyses of the carrier gas with WINDFLOW code implied that a precise prediction is required for the evaluation of the amount and the spatial distribution of the aerosol deposition. Remarkable aerosol deposition onto the floor area and enlargement of the deposited aerosol were observed in the test with a superheated steam environment. An additional test will be shortly performed in order to reconfirm the findings obtained under a superheated steam environment. (J.P.N.)

  7. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Weilin [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The HERMES Collaboration at HERA constructed and installed a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the existed spectrometer. This detector is designed to measure recoil protons in hard exclusive processes which provide access to the orbital angular momentum of quarks. The Recoil Detector consists of a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fiber tracker and a photon detector. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnet which provides a 1 T longitudinal magnetic field. The Recoil Detector was installed in January 2006 and data taking lasted until the end of HERA operation in June 2007. Results on the detector performance will be presented here.

  8. Improved germanium well detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germanium well detectors with metal surface barrier contact are comparable for general use with conventional germanium coaxial detectors. They offer very high sensitivity, the highest presently available

  9. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  10. Detection of peroxyacetyl nitrate in air using chemiluminescence aerosol detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel; Bružeňák, L.; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 11 (2014), s. 1482-1490. ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : peroxyacetylnitrate * chemiluminescence * air Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2014

  11. Modification of combustion aerosols in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingartner, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-07-01

    Combustion aerosols particles are released on large scale into the atmosphere in the industrialized regions as well as in the tropics (by wood fires). The particles are subjected to various aging processes which depend on the size, morphology, and chemical composition of the particles. The interaction of combustion particles with sunlight and humidity as well as adsorption and desorption of volatile material to or from the particles considerably changes their physical and chemical properties and thus their residence time in the atmosphere. This is of importance because combustion particles are known to have a variety of health effects on people. Moreover, atmospheric aerosol particles have an influence on climate, directly through the reflection and absorption of solar radiation and indirectly through modifying the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. In a first step, a field experiment was carried out to study the sources and characteristics of combustion aerosols that are emitted from vehicles in a road tunnel. It was found that most of the fine particles were tail pipe emissions of diesel powered vehicles. The calculation shows that on an average these vehicles emit about 300 mg fine particulate matter per driven kilometer. This emission factor is at least 100 times higher than the mean emission factor estimated for gasoline powered vehicles. Furthermore, it is found that during their residence time in the tunnel, the particles undergo significant changes: The particles change towards a more compact structure. The conclusion is reached that this is mainly due to adsorption of volatile material from the gas phase to the particle surface. In the atmosphere, the life cycle as well as the radiative and chemical properties of an aerosol particle is strongly dependent on its response to humidity. Therefore the hygroscopic behavior of combustion particles emitted from single sources (i.e. from a gasoline and a diesel engine) were studied in laboratory experiments.

  12. Adsorption and revaporisation studies of thin iodine oxide and CsI aerosol deposits from containment surface materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    During a severe nuclear accident released fission and radiolysis products can react with each other to form new species which might contribute to the volatile source term. Iodine will be released from UO2 fuel mainly in form as CsI aerosol particles and elemental iodine. Elemental iodine can react in gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (IOx). Within the AIAS-2 (Adsorption of Iodine Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of IOx and CsI aerosols with common containment surface materials was investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled aerosols were produced from a KI solution and ozone with a new facility designed and built at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. CsI aerosols were produced from a CsI solution with the same facility. A monolayer of the aerosols was deposited on the surfaces. The deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the chemical form of the deposits on the surfaces to identify if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials had occured. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 with a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The decomposition effect of the radiolysis product carbon monoxide was tested on IOx aerosols deposited on a glass fibre filter. Iodine oxide particles were produced at 50 deg. C, 100 deg. C and 120 deg. C and deposited on filter samples in order to study the chemical

  13. Adsorption and revaporisation studies of thin iodine oxide and CsI aerosol deposits from containment surface materials in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a severe nuclear accident released fission and radiolysis products can react with each other to form new species which might contribute to the volatile source term. Iodine will be released from UO2 fuel mainly in form as CsI aerosol particles and elemental iodine. Elemental iodine can react in gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (IOx). Within the AIAS-2 (Adsorption of Iodine Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of IOx and CsI aerosols with common containment surface materials was investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS. Non-radioactive and 131I labelled aerosols were produced from a KI solution and ozone with a new facility designed and built at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. CsI aerosols were produced from a CsI solution with the same facility. A monolayer of the aerosols was deposited on the surfaces. The deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the chemical form of the deposits on the surfaces to identify if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials had occured. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 with a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The decomposition effect of the radiolysis product carbon monoxide was tested on IOx aerosols deposited on a glass fibre filter. Iodine oxide particles were produced at 50 deg. C, 100 deg. C and 120 deg. C and deposited on filter samples in order to study the chemical speciation of

  14. Aerosol behavior during SIC control rod failure in QUENCH-13 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear reactor severe accident, radioactive fission products as well as structural materials are released from the core by evaporation, and the released gases form particles by nucleation and condensation. In addition, aerosol particles may be generated by droplet formation and fragmentation of the core. In pressurized water reactors (PWR), a commonly used control rod material is silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) covered with stainless steel cladding. The control rod elements, Cd, In and Ag, have relatively low melting temperatures, and especially Cd has also a very low boiling point. Control rods are likely to fail early on in the accident due to melting of the stainless steel cladding which can be accelerated by eutectic interaction between stainless steel and the surrounding Zircaloy guide tube. The release of the control rod materials would follow the cladding failure thus affecting aerosol source term as well as fuel rod degradation. The QUENCH experimental program at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe investigates phenomena associated with reflood of a degrading core under postulated severe accident conditions. QUENCH-13 test was the first in this program to include a silver-indium-cadmium control rod of prototypic PWR design. To characterize the extent of aerosol release during the control rod failure, aerosol particle size distribution and concentration measurements in the off-gas pipe of the QUENCH facility were carried out. For the first time, it was possible to determine on-line the aerosol concentration and size distribution released from the core. These results are of prime importance for model development for the proper calculation of the source term resulting from control rod failure. The on-line measurement showed that the main aerosol release started at the bundle temperature maximum of T ∼ 1570 K at hottest bundle elevation. A very large burst of aerosols was detected 660 s later at the bundle temperature maximum of T ∼ 1650 K, followed by a

  15. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  16. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry. PMID:27125240

  17. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry.

  18. Near-highway aerosol and gas-phase measurements in a high-diesel environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, H. L.; Hellebust, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Polo, L.; Jacob, V.; Buisson, C.; Charron, A.; André, M.; Pasquier, A.; Besombes, J. L.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2015-04-01

    Diesel-powered passenger cars currently outnumber gasoline-powered cars in many countries, particularly in Europe. In France, diesel cars represented 61% of light duty vehicles in 2011 and this percentage is still increasing (French Environment and Energy Management Agency, ADEME). As part of the September 2011 joint PM-DRIVE (Particulate Matter - DiRect and Indirect on-road Vehicular Emissions) and MOCOPO (Measuring and mOdeling traffic COngestion and POllution) field campaign, the concentration and high-resolution chemical composition of aerosols and volatile organic carbon species were measured adjacent to a major urban highway south of Grenoble, France. Alongside these atmospheric measurements, detailed traffic data were collected from nearby traffic cameras and loop detectors, which allowed the vehicle type, traffic concentration, and traffic speed to be quantified. Six aerosol age and source profiles were resolved using the positive matrix factorization model on real-time high-resolution aerosol mass spectra. These six aerosol source/age categories included a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) commonly associated with primary vehicular emissions, a nitrogen-containing aerosol with a diurnal pattern similar to that of HOA, oxidized organic aerosol (OOA), and biomass burning aerosol. While quantitatively separating the influence of diesel from that of gasoline proved impossible, a low HOA : black carbon ratio, similar to that measured in other high-diesel environments, and high levels of NOx, also indicative of diesel emissions, were observed. Although the measurement site was located next to a large source of primary emissions, which are typically found to have low oxygen incorporation, OOA was found to comprise the majority of the measured organic aerosol, and isotopic analysis showed that the measured OOA contained mainly modern carbon, not fossil-derived carbon. Thus, even in this heavily vehicular-emission-impacted environment, photochemical processes

  19. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers

  20. Prediction of fission product and aerosol behaviour during a postulated severe accident in a LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lack of appropriate energy removal causes fuel elements in a reactor core to overheat and may eventually cause core to degrade. Fission products will be emitted from a degraded reactor core. Aerosols are generated when the vapours of various fuel and structural materials reach a cold environment and nucleate. In addition to the fission products release and aerosol generation taking place in the reactor vessel, some more fission products release and aerosol generation will occur when the molten core debris leaves the pressure vessel bottom head and comes in contact with the pedestal concrete floor. Fission products, if they are released to environment from the containment boundary, exert a great danger to public health. A source term is defined as the quantity, timing, and characteristics of the release of radionuclide material to the environment following a postulated severe accident. At PSI a considerable effort hase been spent in investigating and establishing a source term assessment methodology in order to predict the source term for a given Light Water Reactor (LWR) accident scenario. This report introduces the computer programs and the methods associated with the release of the fission products, generation of the aerosols and behaviour of the aerosols in LWR compartments used for a source term assessment analysis at PSI. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 28 refs

  1. Fission product vapour - aerosol interactions in the containment: simulant fuel studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been conducted in the Falcon facility to study the interaction of fission product vapours released from simulant fuel samples with control rod aerosols. The aerosols generated from both the control rod and fuel sample were chemically distinct and had different deposition characteristics. Extensive interaction was observed between the fission product vapours and the control rod aerosol. The two dominant mechanisms were condensation of the vapours onto the aerosol, and chemical reactions between the two components; sorption phenomena were believed to be only of secondary importance. The interaction of fission product vapours and reactor materials aerosols could have a major impact on the transport characteristics of the radioactive emission from a degrading core. (author)

  2. Graphical aerosol classification method using aerosol relative optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi-Xiang; Yuan, Yuan; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-06-01

    A simple graphical method is presented to classify aerosol types based on a combination of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and aerosol relative optical thickness (AROT). Six aerosol types, including maritime (MA), desert dust (DD), continental (CO), sub-continental (SC), urban industry (UI) and biomass burning (BB), are discriminated in a two dimensional space of AOT440 and AROT1020/440. Numerical calculations are performed using MIE theory based on a multi log-normal particle size distribution, and the AROT ranges for each aerosol type are determined. More than 5 years of daily observations from 8 representative aerosol sites are applied to the method to confirm spatial applicability. Finally, 3 individual cases are analyzed according to their specific aerosol status. The outcomes indicate that the new graphical method coordinates well with regional characteristics and is also able to distinguish aerosol variations in individual situations. This technique demonstrates a novel way to estimate different aerosol types and provide information on radiative forcing calculations and satellite data corrections.

  3. An aerosol sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    That device is characterized in that, within a closed casing provided with a sealable opening, it comprises a storage rack for a plurality of stacked saucers, a sheath having a transverse slot for extracting said saucers separately from, or re-introducing same into, their respective sockets, a transfer gripping-member with its control mechanism for taking saucers from their respective sockets through said slot and moving them transversally, a sealing-plate mounted below the casing-opening, said plate being associated with a pushing mechanism, and a laterally retractable cover controlled by a separate mechanism for unsealing said casing opening and collecting aerosols on a saucer. That device can be used for taking samples of sodium aerosols

  4. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  5. Aerosol characterization during project POLINAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, D.E.; Hopkins, A.R.; Paladino, J.D.; Whitefield, P.D. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Cloud and Aerosol Sciences Lab.; Lilenfeld, H.V. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-East, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of the aerosol/particulate characterization measurements of project POLINAT (POLlution from aircraft emissions In the North ATlantic flight corridor) are: to search for aerosol/particulate signatures of air traffic emissions in the region of the North Atlantic Flight Corridor; to search for the aerosol/particulate component of large scale enhancement (`corridor effects`) of air traffic related species in the North Atlantic region; to determine the effective emission indices for the aerosol/particulate component of engine exhaust in both the near and far field of aircraft exhaust plumes; to measure the dispersion and transformation of the aerosol/particulate component of aircraft emissions as a function of ambient condition; to characterize background levels of aerosol/particulate concentrations in the North Atlantic Region; and to determine effective emission indices for engine exhaust particulates for regimes beyond the jet phase of plume expansion. (author) 10 refs.

  6. Dust and atmospheric aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the types and characteristics of the various aerosol particles (by size effects, and origin) and goes on to discuss the composition of particulates and their variation in different places in Asia, and the origin of global particulate emissions from natural and anthropogenic sources. The effects of particulate matter on human health, visibility and climate are summarised. Techniques for control and abatement of particulate emissions are outlined. 10 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  7. Development of aerosol models for NPP applications (AMY). Aerosol model development for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMY-project concentrates on understanding and modelling on deposition-resuspension phenomena of aerosols in pipe flow. The aim is to develop a calculation model that could resolve the current deficiencies in the aerosol deposition modelling in turbulent flows, and to implement the models into the tools that are used for calculating the fission product behaviour and release in severe reactor accidents. These tools are APROS SA, which is used for simulating the severe accident phenomena and progression of the accident, and SaTu (support system for radiation experts), which is originally designed to estimate radiation levels and radioactive releases during the accident situation. In addition to the deposition-resuspension model, other important models are to be implemented in the tools mentioned above. Revaporisation of deposited fission products from primary circuit surfaces may increase the releases into the reactor containment and further into the environment, and thus the phenomenon should be taken into account. To the SaTu system, models for estimating the environmental consequences will be implemented, as well, and the system will be modified to be able to describe nuclear power plants other than the Loviisa plant. Another important feature for source term calculations in PSA level 2 analyses is implementation of the uncertainty calculation environment in SaTu. (orig.)

  8. Particle Identification in Cherenkov Detectors using Convolutional Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Theodore, Tomalty

    2016-01-01

    Cherenkov detectors are used for charged particle identification. When a charged particle moves through a medium faster than light can propagate in that medium, Cherenkov radiation is released in the shape of a cone in the direction of movement. The interior of the Cherenkov detector is instrumented with PMTs to detect this Cherenkov light. Particles, then, can be identified by the shapes of the images on the detector walls.

  9. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 μm were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO2 laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m2/g at 1087 cm-1. The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10-8 cm-1. The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations

  10. Trace elements in aerosols from background air pollution monitoring stations in the Amazon Basin using nuclear-related techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the natural release of aerosol particles by the Amazon Basin tropical rain forest, the composition and size distribution of biogenic aerosol particles were analyzed. The role of the atmospheric emissions from the Amazon Basin rain forest in the global atmosphere will be investigated. The atmosphere was studied in long-term sampling stations in three different locations. The elemental composition of aerosol particles released during biomass burning was also measured in several different ecosystems, from primary forest to Savannah. One of the main focuses was to identify and quantify important physical and chemical processes in the generation, transformation and deposition of aerosol particles. Also important was to obtain a better understanding of natural aerosol sources concerning identification, their characteristics and strength, to be able to understand the natural chemistry in the atmosphere on a global scale. 36 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  11. Aerosol influence on radiative cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Grassl, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol particles have a complex index of refraction and therefore contribute to atmospheric emission and radiative cooling rates. In this paper calculations of the longwave flux divergence within the atmosphere at different heights are presented including water vapour and aerosol particles as emitters and absorbers. The spectral region covered is 5 to 100 microns divided into 23 spectral intervals. The relevant properties of the aerosol particles, the single scattering albedo and the extinct...

  12. Development of a radon-aerosol system for testing radon and radon decay products measuring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposures to radon and its decay products may arise from NORM-related work activities. Employers are responsible for monitoring radon in their workplaces, and the methods and instruments used must be subjected to adequate quality assurance. A radon chamber is an important component of a quality assurance programme. In this study we developed a radon-aerosol chamber and used it to characterise the prototype version of a newly developed radon decay product measuring instrument. The system comprises a small radon chamber with dry radon source, aerosol chamber, monodisperse aerosol generator, and TSI aerodynamic particle sizer with its accessories. Radon-laden air mixed with aerosols is pumped from the radon-aerosol system through the radon decay product measuring instrument. The instrument's response is obtained continuously from alpha spectrometric analyses of the radon decay products, 218Po and 214Po, deposited on a membrane filter (0.8 - m pore sizes and 25 mm diameter) held close to a silicon surface barrier detector. A second couple of filter and detector is inserted downstream to check the efficiency and eventual leakage of the membrane filter. The results show that alpha activity on the filter nearer to the inlet was significantly higher than the activity on the second filter. There were also significant losses of aerosols to the inner wall of the instrument as air flows through. The implications of these observations on the response of the instrument are discussed. (author)

  13. An Emerging Global Aerosol Climatology from the MODIS Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Levy, Robert C.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Mattoo, Shana; Martins, J. Vandelei; Ichoku, Charles; Koren, Ilan; Hongbin, Yu; Holben, Brent N.

    2008-01-01

    The recently released Collection 5 MODIS aerosol products provide a consistent record of the Earth's aerosol system. Comparison with ground-based AERONET observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) we find that Collection 5 MODIS aerosol products estimate AOD to within expected accuracy more than 60% of the time over ocean and more than 72% of the time over land. This is similar to previous results for ocean, and better than the previous results for land. However, the new Collection introduces a 0.01 5 offset between the Terra and Aqua global mean AOD over ocean, where none existed previously. Aqua conforms to previous values and expectations while Terra is high. The cause of the offset is unknown, but changes to calibration are a possible explanation. We focus the climatological analysis on the better understood Aqua retrievals. We find that global mean AOD at 550 nm over oceans is 0.13 and over land 0.19. AOD in situations with 80% cloud fraction are twice the global mean values, although such situations occur only 2% of the time over ocean and less than 1% of the time over land. There is no drastic change in aerosol particle size associated with these very cloudy situations. Regionally, aerosol amounts vary from polluted areas such as East Asia and India, to the cleanest regions such as Australia and the northern continents. In almost all oceans fine mode aerosol dominates over dust, except in the tropical Atlantic downwind of the Sahara and in some months the Arabian Sea.

  14. Topics in current aerosol research

    CERN Document Server

    Hidy, G M

    1971-01-01

    Topics in Current Aerosol Research deals with the fundamental aspects of aerosol science, with emphasis on experiment and theory describing highly dispersed aerosols (HDAs) as well as the dynamics of charged suspensions. Topics covered range from the basic properties of HDAs to their formation and methods of generation; sources of electric charges; interactions between fluid and aerosol particles; and one-dimensional motion of charged cloud of particles. This volume is comprised of 13 chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic properties of HDAs, followed by a discussion on the form

  15. Source strength of fungal spore aerosolization from moldy building material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górny, Rafał L.; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Willeke, Klaus

    The release of Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium cladosporioides, and Penicillium melinii spores from agar and ceiling tile surfaces was tested under different controlled environmental conditions using a newly designed and constructed aerosolization chamber. This study revealed that all the investigated parameters, such as fungal species, air velocity above the surface, texture of the surface, and vibration of contaminated material, affected the fungal spore release. It was found that typical indoor air currents can release up to 200 spores cm -2 from surfaces with fungal spores during 30-min experiments. The release of fungal spores from smooth agar surfaces was found to be inadequate for accurately predicting the emission from rough ceiling tile surfaces because the air turbulence increases the spore release from a rough surface. A vibration at a frequency of 1 Hz at a power level of 14 W resulted in a significant increase in the spore release rate. The release appears to depend on the morphology of the fungal colonies grown on ceiling tile surfaces including the thickness of conidiophores, the length of spore chains, and the shape of spores. The spores were found to be released continuously during each 30-min experiment. However, the release rate was usually highest during the first few minutes of exposure to air currents and mechanical vibration. About 71-88% of the spores released during a 30-min interval became airborne during the first 10 min.

  16. Effects of aerosol particle size on dispersion and continuous air monitor response in a plutonium laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of continuous air monitors (CAMs) in protecting plutonium workers depends on the efficiency of aerosol transport from the release point to the CAM. The main processes for aerosol transport are diffusion, forced convection, and gravitational settling. The transport of particles relative to each of these processes depends on particle size. Studies have shown that activity median aerodynamic diameters for plutonium aerosols can range from less than 0.1 μm to greater than 10 μm. The purpose of this study was to characterize the influence of particle size on aerosol transport and CAM response in a plutonium laboratory. Polydisperse dioctyl sebacate oil aerosols were released from multiple locations within a plutonium laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. An array of Laser Particle counters (LPCs) positioned in the laboratory measured time resolved aerosol dispersion. Aerosol concentrations were binned into two size ranges: (1) 0.5 μm to 5.0 μm, and (2) those greater than 5.0 μm. Statistical comparisons were done and the results suggested that transport efficiency was greater for smaller particles than larger particles in this laboratory. This result suggested the importance of using particles of similar physical characteristics to those of the source when doing tests to decide optimal placement of CAMs

  17. CATHENA/PACE calculations of aerosol transport in a simulated primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe fuel damage in postulated loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) in CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactors may result in the release and transport of aerosol fission product materials from the fuel, through the primary circuit to containment and possibly into the atmosphere. In order to obtain a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying fission product release, transport and deposition resulting from fuel damage in such accidents, a series of COG funded (Candu Owners Group) severe fuel damage experiments have been planned in the Blowdown Test Facility (BTF) at AECL Research, Chalk River. One of the planned experiments, BTF-104, has been simulated with the thermalhydraulics/aerosol transport code CATHENA/PACE, as a pretest investigation of fission product transport behaviour. Results of a number of CATHENA/PACE pretest simulations of the BTF-104 experiment are reported in this paper. The CATHENA code, developed at Whiteshell Laboratories, has been used to model the thermalhydraulic phenomena in a section of primary circuit piping representing the BTF. The PACE code (a Program for Aerosol Code Evaluation), also developed at Whiteshell, is coupled to the thermahydraulic calculations of CATHENA to model the transport of the aerosol fission products generated from the fuel. The PACE code contains aerosol physics models from a number of aerosol codes (e.g., HAA4, REMOVAL, NAUA, AEROSIM, etc.) and can therefore emulate any one of these by user selection. A number of codes (including VICTORIA, AEROSIM, REMOVAL, AND HAARM) were emulated with CATHENA/PACE for aerosol transport in this circuit

  18. Solid state detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much has been charged particle detector radiation detector made by the industry, especially those engaged in the development of detection equipment and components. The development and further research will be made solid state detector with silicon material. To be able to detect charged particles (radiation), required the processing of silicon material into the detector material. The method used to make silicon detector material is a lithium evaporations. Having formed an intrinsic region contactor installation process, and with testing. (author)

  19. Determination of activity of the 222-Rn and 220-Rn in the air aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation filter method at aerosol sampling stations in Bratislava was used. For the measurement of the accumulated total activity of the daughter products of the nuclides (Rn-222, Rn-220 of the U-238 and Th-232) natural decay series on the filters a low level alpha-beta proportional detector was used

  20. Results and code predictions for ABCOVE [aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation] aerosol code validation with low concentration NaOH and NaI aerosol: CSTF test AB7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program for aerosol behavior validation and evaluation (ABCOVE) has been developed in accordance with the LMFBR Safety Program Plan. The ABCOVE program is a cooperative effort between the USDOE, the USNRC, and their contractor organizations currently involved in aerosol code development, testing or application. The third large-scale test in the ABCOVE program, AB7, was performed in the 850-m3 CSTF vessel with a two-species test aerosol. The test conditions involved the release of a simulated fission product aerosol, NaI, into the containment atmosphere after the end of a small sodium pool fire. Four organizations made pretest predictions of aerosol behavior using five computer codes. Two of the codes (QUICKM and CONTAIN) were discrete, multiple species codes, while three (HAA-3, HAA-4, and HAARM-3) were log-normal codes which assume uniform coagglomeration of different aerosol species. Detailed test results are presented and compared with the code predictions for eight key aerosol behavior parameters. 11 refs., 44 figs., 35 tabs

  1. Closing the Confidence Gap in Aerosol Contributions to Direct Radiative Forcing Using Space-based and Suborbital Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    As expected, the aerosol data products from the NASA Earth Observing System’s MISR and MODIS instruments provide significant advances in regional and global aerosol optical depth (AOD) mapping, aerosol type measurement, and source plume characterization from space. Although these products have been and are being used for many applications, ranging from regional air quality assessment, to aerosol air mass type evolution, to aerosol injection height and aerosol transport model validation, uncertainties still limit the quantitative constraints these satellite data place on global-scale direct aerosol radiative forcing. Some further refinement of the current aerosol products is possible, but a major advance in this area seems to require a different paradigm, involving the integration of satellite and suborbital data with models. This presentation will briefly summarize where we stand, and what incremental advances we can expect, with the current aerosol products, and will then elaborate on some initial steps aimed at the necessary integration. Many other AGU presentations, covering parts of the community’s emerging efforts in this direction, will be referenced, and key points from the recently released CCSP-SAP (US Climate Change Program - Synthesis and Assessment Product) 2.3 - Atmospheric aerosols: Properties and Climate Impacts, will be included in the discussion.

  2. Sulphur-rich volcanic eruptions and stratospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, M. R.; Self, S.

    1984-01-01

    Data from direct measurements of stratospheric optical depth, Greenland ice-core acidity, and volcanological studies are compared, and it is shown that relatively small but sulfur-rich volcanic eruptions can have atmospheric effects equal to or even greater than much larger sulfur-poor eruptions. These small eruptions are probably the most frequent cause of increased stratospheric aerosols. The possible sources of the excess sulfur released in these eruptions are discussed.

  3. E-7 analysis of aerosol behavior under secondary sodium leak accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of aerosol behavior inside and outside of the building under conditions of secondary sodium leak accident was performed by simulation The calculated results were compared to the sampled values. For the aerosol behavior analysis in the building, the aerosol generation rate was assumed to be 25 g/sec (conversion Na) and the chemical composition to be Na2O. The lumped-parameter code was used for simulation of aerosol diffusion in the building corresponding to air ventilating conditions. Based on the results of 3-dimension calculation for the roof space of the building, 20% of the aerosol released from the sodium leak cell to the outside was assumed to re-circulate to air supply system. Based on the result of comparison of density values between calculation and sampling, the simulation was almost successful, although density values in cells far from sodium leak cell were underestimated, and the values in cells near the leak were overestimated. For aerosol diffusion out of building and off-site, the 3-dimensional calculation was performed assuming that the aerosol exhaust rate was 25 g/sec (conversion Na), the chemical composition the Na2CO3, aerosol mass density 0.3 g/cm3, wind velocity 11 m/sec and wind direction north north west. The aerosol concentration at the site boundary was calculated at 0.03 mg/m3 (conversion Na) considering aerosol settling. This value is sufficiently smaller than aerosol concentration criterion 2 mg/m3 (NaOH). (author)

  4. Techniques for Measuring Aerosol Attenuation using the Central Laser Facility at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory in Malarg\\"ue, Argentina, is designed to study the properties of ultra-high energy cosmic rays with energies above 1018 eV. It is a hybrid facility that employs a Fluorescence Detector to perform nearly calorimetric measurements of Extensive Air Shower energies. To obtain reliable calorimetric information from the FD, the atmospheric conditions at the observatory need to be continuously monitored during data acquisition. In particular, light attenuation due to aerosols is an important atmospheric correction. The aerosol concentration is highly variable, so that the aerosol attenuation needs to be evaluated hourly. We use light from the Central Laser Facility, located near the center of the observatory site, having an optical signature comparable to that of the highest energy showers detected by the FD. This paper presents two procedures developed to retrieve the aerosol attenuation of fluorescence light from CLF laser shots. Cross checks between the two methods demonstrate that re...

  5. Size distributions of the ambient and radon daughter aerosols in southern England and implications for dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size distribution of ambient aerosols indoors and outside have been measured at several urban, suburban and rural locations in southern England, using an eleven stage, wire screen diffusion battery. At four indoor locations with relatively high radon daughter concentrations, the size distributions of the radon daughter aerosol were also measured, using the diffusion battery in conjunction with Cr-39 etched track detectors of alpha-activity. The transformation from size distribution of the ambient aerosol to the radon daughter activity-size distribution was examined, using various models of radon daughter attachment rates. The implications of the radon daughter aerosol size distributions estimated for the different indoor and outdoor locations are discussed in terms of variation in the conversion between exposure and effective dose equivalent

  6. Investigation of activity release during light water reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A test facility was developed for the determination of activity release and of aerosol characteristics under realistic light water reactor core melting conditions. It is composed of a high-frequency induction furnace, a ThO2 crucible system, and a collection apparatus consisting of membrane and particulate filters. Thirty-gram samples of a representative core material mixture (corium) were melted under air, argon, or steam at 0.8 to 2.2 bar. In air at 27000C, for example, the relative release was 0.4 to 0.7% for iron, chromium, and cobalt and 4 to 11% for tin, antimony, and manganese. Higher release values of 20 to 40% at lower temperatures (21500C, air) were found for selenium, cadmium, tellurium, and cesium. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was trimodal with maxima at diameters of 0.17, 0.30, and 0.73 μm. The result of a qualitative x-ray microanalysis was that the main elements of the melt were contained in each aerosol particle. Further investigations will include larger melt masses and the additional influence of concrete on the release and aerosol behavior

  7. Assessment of the basis for modeling releases from plutonium oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideally, a model of the release of plutonium aerosols from plutonium during oxidation or combustion should begin from a description of the plutonium material and its surroundings and proceed unequivocally to a situation-dependent estimate of the amount of oxide released and its size distribution. Such a model would need to provide a description of the heat- and mass-transfer processes involved and link them directly to the rate of aerosol production. The first step, the description of heat and mass transfer, is more easily achieved from current information than the second, the aerosol release. The sections of this report titled ''Physical Fundamentals'' and ''Available Theoretical Information'' describe the approach that would be required for theoretical modeling. The ''Experimental Results'' section describes the information on aerosol releases, size distributions, peak temperatures, oxidation rates, and experimental conditions that we have gleaned from the existing experimental literature. The data is summarized and the bibliography lists the relevant literature that has and has not been reviewed. 42 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Aerosol extinction in coastal zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piazzola, J.; Kaloshin, G.; Leeuw, G. de; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2004-01-01

    The performance of electro-optical systems can be substantially affected by aerosol particles that scatter and absorb electromagnetic radiation. A few years ago, an empirical model was developed describing the aerosol size distributions in the Mediterranean coastal atmosphere near Toulon (France). T

  9. Aerosol therapy in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. Janssens (Hettie)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractInhalation of aerosolized drugs has become an established means for treatment of pulmonary diseases in the last fifiy years. The majoriry of aerosol therapy in childhood concerns inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators in the management of asthma. Administration of drugs via the inha

  10. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  11. The MINOS Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Grashorn, A H E W

    2005-01-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment's primary goal is the precision measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the atmospheric neutrino sector. This long-baseline experiment uses Fermilab's NuMI beam, measured with a Near Detector at Fermilab, and again 735 km later using a Far Detector in the Soudan Mine Underground Lab in northern Minnesota. The detectors are magnetized iron/scintillator calorimeters. The Far Detector has been operational for cosmic ray and atmospheric neutrino data from July of 2003, the Near Detector from September 2004, and the NuMI beam started in early 2005. This poster presents details of the two detectors.

  12. Correlation for aerosol sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fission product source term from a postulated light water reactor (LWR) accident has several components. One of these components is the suspended aerosols present in the atmosphere during containment degradation and failure. Sedimentation, inertial impaction, and Stefan-Nusselt flows are the dominant natural removal mechanisms in the containment atmosphere for the majority of the postulated LWR severe accidents. The sedimentation correlation described was developed for conditions applicable to the primary coolant system and containment under severe accident conditions. The correlation exists as a result of a unique nondimensional mass concentration versus nondimensional particle volume

  13. Aerosols indirectly warm the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mauritsen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available On average, airborne aerosol particles cool the Earth's surface directly by absorbing and scattering sunlight and indirectly by influencing cloud reflectivity, life time, thickness or extent. Here we show that over the central Arctic Ocean, where there is frequently a lack of aerosol particles upon which clouds may form, a small increase in aerosol loading may enhance cloudiness thereby likely causing a climatologically significant warming at the ice-covered Arctic surface. Under these low concentration conditions cloud droplets grow to drizzle sizes and fall, even in the absence of collisions and coalescence, thereby diminishing cloud water. Evidence from a case study suggests that interactions between aerosol, clouds and precipitation could be responsible for attaining the observed low aerosol concentrations.

  14. An Indigenously Developed Insecticidal Aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Varma

    1969-10-01

    Full Text Available A total of 6 "Test" insecticidal aerosols (TA-I to VI indigenously produced were tested during the years 1966-67 as suitable replacements for imported aerosols.TA-I produced deep yellow staining and a yellowish spray mist. Its capacity was only 120 ml fluid. TA-III types II and III containing modified aerosol formulation with "Esso solvent 3245" and mineral turpentine oil (Burmah Shelland Freon 12 11 (all indigenouswere comparable to he "SRA" in insecticidial efficacy. The container was also manufactured in the country and it compared well with the "SRA" in construction, resistance against rough usage and mechanical function. They were both finally approved for introduction in the services as replacement for imported aerosols. TA-IV performed well in inscticidial assessment, but the aerosols formulation. TA-V and VI were similar to TA-III types II and III respectively.

  15. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  16. Speciation of Radiocesium and Radioiodine in Aerosols from Tsukuba after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Zhang, Luyuan; Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.;

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol samples were collected from Tsukuba, Japan, soon after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident and analyzed for speciation of radiocesium and radioiodine to explore their chemical behavior and isotopic ratios after the release. Most Cs-134 and Cs-137 were bound in organic matter (53-91%) and ......Aerosol samples were collected from Tsukuba, Japan, soon after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident and analyzed for speciation of radiocesium and radioiodine to explore their chemical behavior and isotopic ratios after the release. Most Cs-134 and Cs-137 were bound in organic matter (53...

  17. Lidar data assimilation for improved analyses of volcanic aerosol events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Anne Caroline; Elbern, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Observations of hazardous events with release of aerosols are hardly analyzable by today's data assimilation algorithms, without producing an attenuating bias. Skillful forecasts of unexpected aerosol events are essential for human health and to prevent an exposure of infirm persons and aircraft with possibly catastrophic outcome. Typical cases include mineral dust outbreaks, mostly from large desert regions, wild fires, and sea salt uplifts, while the focus aims for volcanic eruptions. In general, numerical chemistry and aerosol transport models cannot simulate such events without manual adjustments. The concept of data assimilation is able to correct the analysis, as long it is operationally implemented in the model system. Though, the tangent-linear approximation, which describes a substantial precondition for today's cutting edge data assimilation algorithms, is not valid during unexpected aerosol events. As part of the European COPERNICUS (earth observation) project MACC II and the national ESKP (Earth System Knowledge Platform) initiative, we developed a module that enables the assimilation of aerosol lidar observations, even during unforeseeable incidences of extreme emissions of particulate matter. Thereby, the influence of the background information has to be reduced adequately. Advanced lidar instruments comprise on the one hand the aspect of radiative transfer within the atmosphere and on the other hand they can deliver a detailed quantification of the detected aerosols. For the assimilation of maximal exploited lidar data, an appropriate lidar observation operator is constructed, compatible with the EURAD-IM (European Air Pollution and Dispersion - Inverse Model) system. The observation operator is able to map the modeled chemical and physical state on lidar attenuated backscatter, transmission, aerosol optical depth, as well as on the extinction and backscatter coefficients. Further, it has the ability to process the observed discrepancies with lidar

  18. Fission product release mechanisms and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is axiomatic that the severity of a nuclear reactor accident is determined by the extent of radioactivity escape which results. The main focus of site safety analyses is thus on fission product release and transport. Of all the processes involved, fission product escape from the fuel-cladding region into the primary coolant circuit is perhaps the most simple to describe; even so, it is an extremely complex function of the time/temperature history of the fuel-cladding system during an accident, since many mechanisms for release are involved. Depending upon the particular fission product species, these release mechanisms range from simple gaseous expansion processes at low temperatures to evaporation-condensation processes (aerosol formation) over molten fuel. Because of these complexities, it is convenient to subdivide the time/temperature sequence of an accident into more or less discrete phases over which specific release mechanisms dominate. Four such phases are the periods of (1) gap release, (2) meltdown release, (3) vaporization, and (4) oxidation release. This approach simplifies the problem considerably, although some loss of uniformity results. The methodology applies to BWR and PWR reactors with appropriate adaptations

  19. Dust layer profiling using an aerosol dropsonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Kaye, Paul Henry; Hirst, Edwin; Wieser, Andreas; Stanley, Warren

    2015-04-01

    Routine meteorological data is obtained in the atmosphere using disposable radiosondes, giving temperature, pressure, humidity and wind speed. Additional measurements are obtained from dropsondes, released from research aircraft. However, a crucial property not yet measured is the size and concentration of atmospheric particulates, including dust. Instead, indirect measurements are employed, relying on remote sensing, to meet the demands from areas such as climate research, air quality monitoring, civil emergencies etc. In addition, research aircraft can be used in situ, but airborne measurements are expensive, and aircraft use is restricted to near-horizontal profiling, which can be a limitation, as phenomena such as long-range transport depend on the vertical distribution of aerosol. The Centre for Atmospheric and Instrumentation Research at University of Hertfordshire develops light-scattering instruments for the characterization of aerosols and cloud particles. Recently a range of low-cost, miniature particle counters has been created, intended for use with systems such as disposable balloon-borne radiosondes, dropsondes, or in dense ground-based sensor networks. Versions for different particle size ranges exist. They have been used for vertical profiling of aerosols such as mineral dust or volcanic ash. A disadvantage of optical particle counters that sample through a narrow inlet is that they can become blocked, which can happen in cloud, for example. Hence, a different counter version has been developed, which can have open-path geometry, as the sensing zone is defined optically rather than being delimited by the flow system. This counter has been used for ground based air-quality monitoring around Heathrow airport. The counter has also been adapted for use with radiosondes or dropsondes. The dropsonde version has been successfully tested by launching it from research aircraft together with the so-called KITsonde, developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of

  20. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic Materials in the Atmosphere and Snow: Measurement and Characterization V. Faye McNeill, Neha Sareen, Allison N. Schwier Surface-Active Organics in Atmospheric Aerosols.

  1. TNT Equivalency of Unconfined Aerosols of Propylene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Apparao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The unconfined aerosols of propylene oxide (PO are formed by dispersing the fuel in air. These aerosols undergo detonation by suitable initiation and produce high impulse blast. Tri-nitro Toluene (TNT equivalence is an important parameter used to represent the power of explosive materials and compare their relative damage effects wrt TNT. The parameters commonly used for estimation of TNT equivalency are total energy of explosive source and properties of resulting blast wave, viz., blast peak overpressure and positive impulse. In the present study, the unconfined aerosols of 4.2 kg PO were formed by breaking open the cylindrical canister with the help of axially positioned central burster charge and then detonated using a secondary explosive charge after a preset time delay. The resulting blast profiles were recorded and the blast parameters were analysed. Being a non-ideal explosive source, the TNT equivalency depends on fraction of total energy utilised for blast formation, the rate of energy release, cloud dimensions, and concentration of fuel. Hence, various approaches based on energy release, experimental blast profiles, triangulated blast parameters, and ground reflected blast parameters were considered to determine the TNT equivalency of unconfined PO aerosols. It was observed that the TNT equivalency is not a single value but vary with distance. The paper provides various options for weapon designer to choose a suitable approach for considering TNT equivalency. The scaling laws established from the experimental data of unconfined aerosols of PO for blast peak over pressure and scaled impulse help in predicting the performance for different values of fuel weight and distance.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 64, No. 5, September 2014, pp.431-437, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.6851

  2. Preparatory studies for modelling steam condensation on soluble aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the fission products which would be released from the core of an LWR in the event of a severe accident, only the noble gases and possibly some of the iodine (depending on chemical form) are likely not to be in the form of aerosols when they reach the containment building atmosphere. Therefore in order to predict the extent of fission product retention on containment building internal structures, one needs to have a good understanding of aerosol deposition processes and of the factors which affect them. Following a severe accident in an LWR, a major component of the containment atmosphere will be steam. If the thermodynamic conditions allow condensation of this steam, this condensation is most likely to occur on the aerosol particles. A major component of the aerosol formed during the in-vessel release following a severe reactor accident will be fission product caesium. It is believed that much of this will enter the containment in the form of the hydroxide which has a great affinity for water, so particle growth due to steam condensation is likely to be a very important mechanism for retaining radioactive caesium within the containment builing. The author provides a systematic review of the basic chemical and physical issues which must be addressed if the phenomena are to be modelled accurately, and gives recommendations on how computer models of condensation onto soluble aerosols should be constructed. He proposes also to perform a systematic review of the existing literature and to perform small-scale thermodynamic experiments wherever important gaps in the data base are discovered

  3. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  4. Forward tracking detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Klaus Mönig

    2007-11-01

    Forward tracking is an essential part of a detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The requirements for forward tracking are explained and the proposed solutions in the detector concepts are shown.

  5. New apparatus of single particle trap system for aerosol visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Kitayama, Chiho; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    Control of transport and deposition of charged aerosol particles is important in various manufacturing processes. Aerosol visualization is an effective method to directly observe light scattering signal from laser-irradiated single aerosol particle trapped in a visualization cell. New single particle trap system triggered by light scattering pulse signal was developed in this study. The performance of the device was evaluated experimentally. Experimental setup consisted of an aerosol generator, a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), an optical particle counter (OPC) and the single particle trap system. Polystylene latex standard (PSL) particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μm) were generated and classified according to the charge by the DMA. Singly charged 0.5 and 1.0 μm particles and doubly charged 2.0 μm particles were used as test particles. The single particle trap system was composed of a light scattering signal detector and a visualization cell. When the particle passed through the detector, trigger signal with a given delay time sent to the solenoid valves upstream and downstream of the visualization cell for trapping the particle in the visualization cell. The motion of particle in the visualization cell was monitored by CCD camera and the gravitational settling velocity and the electrostatic migration velocity were measured from the video image. The aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was in good agreement with Stokes diameter calculated from the electrostatic migration velocity for individual particles. It was also found that the aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was a one-to-one function of the scattered light intensity of individual particles. The applicability of this system will be discussed.

  6. JADE muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-08-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.).

  7. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  8. The GRAPE aerosol retrieval algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol component of the Oxford-Rutherford Aerosol and Cloud (ORAC combined cloud and aerosol retrieval scheme is described and the theoretical performance of the algorithm is analysed. ORAC is an optimal estimation retrieval scheme for deriving cloud and aerosol properties from measurements made by imaging satellite radiometers and, when applied to cloud free radiances, provides estimates of aerosol optical depth at a wavelength of 550 nm, aerosol effective radius and surface reflectance at 550 nm. The aerosol retrieval component of ORAC has several incarnations – this paper addresses the version which operates in conjunction with the cloud retrieval component of ORAC (described by Watts et al., 1998, as applied in producing the Global Retrieval of ATSR Cloud Parameters and Evaluation (GRAPE data-set.

    The algorithm is described in detail and its performance examined. This includes a discussion of errors resulting from the formulation of the forward model, sensitivity of the retrieval to the measurements and a priori constraints, and errors resulting from assumptions made about the atmospheric/surface state.

  9. OMI/Aura Near UV Aerosol Optical Depth and Single Scattering Albedo 1-orbit L2 Swath 13x24 km V003 NRT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OMI/Aura level-2 near UV Aerosol data product 'OMAERUV', recently re-processed using an enhanced algorithm, is now released (April 2012) to the public. The data...

  10. The effects of mineral dust particles, aerosol regeneration and ice nucleation parameterizations on clouds and precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Teller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the effects of aerosol particles on the formation of convective clouds and precipitation in the Eastern Mediterranean sea with a special emphasis on the role of mineral dust particles in these processes. We used a new detailed numerical cloud microphysics scheme that has been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF model in order to study aerosol-cloud interaction in 3-D configuration based on realistic meteorological data. Using a number of case studies we tested the contribution of mineral dust particles and different ice nucleation parameterizations to precipitation development. In this study we also investigated the importance of recycled (regenerated aerosols that had been released to the atmosphere following the evaporation of cloud droplets.

    The results showed that increased aerosol concentration due to the presence of mineral dust enhanced the formation of ice crystals. The dynamic evolution of the cloud system sets the time periods and regions in which heavy or light precipitation occurred in the domain. The precipitation rate, the time and duration of precipitation were affected by the aerosol properties only at small area scales (with areas of about 20 km2. Changes of the ice nucleation scheme from ice supersaturation dependent parameterization to a recent approach of aerosol concentration and temperature dependent parameterization modified the ice crystals concentrations but did not affect the total precipitation in the domain. Aerosol regeneration modified the concentration of cloud droplets at cloud base by dynamic recirculation of the aerosols but also had only a minor effect on precipitation.

    The major conclusion from this study is that the effect of mineral dust particles on clouds and total precipitation is limited by the properties of the atmospheric dynamics and the only effect of aerosol on precipitation may come from significant increase in the concentration

  11. Radiation detector with a trapezoidal scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detector (CsI:Tl) is suited for application in the computerized X-ray tomography. It has a pair of collimator plates from W or Ta, alligned parallel to the direction of the incident radiation. Between the collimator plates there is the scintillator with a non-rectangular parallelepipedon shape and trapezoidal cross-section. The photons released by the scintillator are collected by a photosensor lying across the direction of radiation. By the shape of the scintillator the variation in detector response for radiation of different energies is reduced for a range of angles of incidence with respect to the vertical on the scintillator base. (DG)

  12. Shipborne aerosol IR decoy modulated by laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶晓英; 吴刚; 邓盼; 范宁

    2004-01-01

    Working principles, features, current situation and future development of the aerosol IR decoys are summarized in this paper, and a new type aerosol IR decoy aerosol IR decoy modulated by laser is emphasized. The simulation results show that compared with the traditional IR decoys, the late-model aerosol IR decoy effectively enhances the capability of protecting targets and countermining IR guidance weapons. It is a new direction of aerosol IR decoys.

  13. Gamma ray detector optimization for mobile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Energy Research and Development Administration supports a program enabling a rapid response to situations requiring a mobile, detection-at-a-distance capability for locating lost or stolen nuclear materials. For this application, man-portable, vehicular-borne, and airborne detection systems are used. For gamma ray detection, NaI detectors are usually used. Because weight is a serious constraint, many systems employ unshielded detectors. Results of optimization studies to determine a suitable thickness for 12.7 cm diameter NaI detectors that are commonly used in these applications are presented

  14. A fixed frequency aerosol albedometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jonathan E; Barta, Nick; Policarpio, Danielle; Duvall, Richard

    2008-02-01

    A new method for the measurement of aerosol single scatter albedo (omega) at 532 nm was developed. The method employs cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for measurement of aerosol extinction coefficient (b(ext)) and an integrating sphere nephelometer for determination of aerosol scattering coefficient (b(scat)). A unique feature of this method is that the extinction and scattering measurements are conducted simultaneously, on the exact same sample volume. Limits of detection (3s) for the extinction and scattering channel were 0.61 Mm(-1) and 2.7 Mm(-1) respectively. PMID:18542299

  15. Instrumentation for tropospheric aerosol characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Z.; Young, S.E.; Becker, C.H.; Coggiola, M.J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wollnik, H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A new instrument has been developed that determines the abundance, size distribution, and chemical composition of tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols with diameters down to 0.2 {mu}m. In addition to aerosol characterization, the instrument also monitors the chemical composition of the ambient gas. More than 25.000 aerosol particle mass spectra were recorded during the NASA-sponsored Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) field program using NASA`s DC-8 research aircraft. (author) 7 refs.

  16. eDPS Aerosol Collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venzie, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-13

    The eDPS Aerosol Collection project studies the fundamental physics of electrostatic aerosol collection for national security applications. The interpretation of aerosol data requires understanding and correcting for biases introduced from particle genesis through collection and analysis. The research and development undertaken in this project provides the basis for both the statistical correction of existing equipment and techniques; as well as, the development of new collectors and analytical techniques designed to minimize unwanted biases while improving the efficiency of locating and measuring individual particles of interest.

  17. Aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J; Snowden, Darci

    2013-02-19

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere. PMID:23382231

  18. Aerosol particle transport modeling for preclosure safety studies of nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important concern for preclosure safety analysis of a nuclear waste repository is the potential release to the environment of respirable aerosol particles. Such particles, less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter, may have significant adverse health effects if inhaled. To assess the potential health effects of these particles, it is not sufficient to determine the mass fraction of respirable aerosol. The chemical composition of the particles is also of importance since different radionuclides may pose vastly different health hazards. Thus, models are needed to determine under normal and accident conditions the particle size and the chemical composition distributions of aerosol particles as a function of time and of position in the repository. In this work a multicomponent sectional aerosol model is used to determine the aerosol particle size and composition distributions in the repository. A range of aerosol mass releases with varying mean particle sizes and chemical compositions is used to demonstrate the sensitivities and uncertainties of the model. Decontamination factors for some locations in the repository are presented. 8 refs., 1 tab

  19. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater (U.S. Department of Energy); Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S. (U.S. Department of Energy); Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Brochard, Didier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany)

    2004-05-01

    A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  20. Release of Streptomyces albus propagules from contaminated surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of Streptomyces albus propagules from contaminated agar an ceiling tile surfaces was studied under controlled environmental condition in a newly developed aerosolization chamber. The experiments revealed tha both spores and cell fragments can be simultaneously released from the colonized surface by relatively gentle air currents of 0.3 m s-1. A 100x increase of the air velocity can result in a 50-fold increase in the number of released propagules. The aerosolization rate depends strongly on the typ and roughness of the contaminated surface. Up to 90% of available actinomycete propagules can become airborne during the first 10 min of th release process. Application of vibration to the surface did not reveal an influence on the aerosolization process of S. albus propagules under th tested conditions. This study has shown that propagules in the fine particle size range can be released in large amounts from contaminated surfaces Measurement of the number of S. albus fragments in the vicinity of contaminated area, as an alternative to conventional air or surface sampling appears to be a promising approach for quantitative exposure assessment

  1. Compositional Analysis of Aerosols Using Calibration-Free Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudhib, Mohamed; Hermann, Jörg; Dutouquet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that the elemental composition of aerosols can be measured using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) without any preliminary calibration with standard samples. Therefore, a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam was focused into a flux of helium charged with alumina aerosols of a few micrometers diameter. The emission spectrum of the laser-generated breakdown plasma was recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector. The spectral features including emission from both the helium carrier gas and the Al2O3 aerosols were analyzed on the base of a partial local thermodynamic equilibrium. Thus, Boltzmann equilibrium distributions of population number densities were assumed for all plasma species except of helium atoms and ions. By analyzing spectra recorded for different delays between the laser pulse and the detector gate, it is shown that accurate composition measurements are only possible for delays ≤1 μs, when the electron density is large enough to ensure collisional equilibrium for the aerosol vapor species. The results are consistent with previous studies of calibration-free LIBS measurements of solid alumina and glass and promote compositional analysis of aerosols via laser-induced breakdown in helium. PMID:26974717

  2. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  3. Aerosol Transmission of Filoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhanu Mekibib

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses have become a worldwide public health concern because of their potential for introductions into non-endemic countries through international travel and the international transport of infected animals or animal products. Since it was first identified in 1976, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire and Sudan, the 2013–2015 western African Ebola virus disease (EVD outbreak is the largest, both by number of cases and geographical extension, and deadliest, recorded so far in medical history. The source of ebolaviruses for human index case(s in most outbreaks is presumptively associated with handling of bush meat or contact with fruit bats. Transmission among humans occurs easily when a person comes in contact with contaminated body fluids of patients, but our understanding of other transmission routes is still fragmentary. This review deals with the controversial issue of aerosol transmission of filoviruses.

  4. Aerosol Transmission of Filoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekibib, Berhanu; Ariën, Kevin K

    2016-01-01

    Filoviruses have become a worldwide public health concern because of their potential for introductions into non-endemic countries through international travel and the international transport of infected animals or animal products. Since it was first identified in 1976, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) and Sudan, the 2013-2015 western African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak is the largest, both by number of cases and geographical extension, and deadliest, recorded so far in medical history. The source of ebolaviruses for human index case(s) in most outbreaks is presumptively associated with handling of bush meat or contact with fruit bats. Transmission among humans occurs easily when a person comes in contact with contaminated body fluids of patients, but our understanding of other transmission routes is still fragmentary. This review deals with the controversial issue of aerosol transmission of filoviruses. PMID:27223296

  5. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5–10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming

  6. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  7. A-Train Aerosol Observations Preliminary Comparisons with AeroCom Models and Pathways to Observationally Based All-Sky Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Russell, P.; LeBlanc, S.; Vaughan, M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Rogers, R.; Burton, S.; Torres, O.; Remer, L.; Stier, P.; Schutgens, N.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a technique for combining CALIOP aerosol backscatter, MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), and OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) retrievals for the purpose of estimating full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately for calculating the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative forcing. We present results using one year of data collected in 2007 and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. Use of the recently released MODIS Collection 6 data for aerosol optical depths derived with the dark target and deep blue algorithms has extended the coverage of the multi-sensor estimates towards higher latitudes. We compare the spatio-temporal distribution of our multi-sensor aerosol retrievals and calculations of seasonal clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing based on the aerosol retrievals to values derived from four models that participated in the latest AeroCom model intercomparison initiative. We find significant inter-model differences, in particular for the aerosol single scattering albedo, which can be evaluated using the multi-sensor A-Train retrievals. We discuss the major challenges that exist in extending our clear-sky results to all-sky conditions. On the basis of comparisons to suborbital measurements, we present some of the limitations of the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals in the presence of adjacent or underlying clouds. Strategies for meeting these challenges are discussed.

  8. Aerosol and air pollution study by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal neutron activation analysis technique was used in air pollution and aerosol elemental content and size distribution investigations. Air pollution samples were collected on Whatman 41 paper filters which were activated along with known quantities of standards in a flux of approximately 1013 nxcm-2xs-1. The activity of the samples was measured with a 40 cm3 Ge(Li) detector and analyzed with the computer program JANE, which identified the isotopes and found their quantities by normalization with the standard measurement results. Correlation between the various elements, in particular those belonging to dust from the desert and those considered typical urban air pollution, is investigated. (author)

  9. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph B.

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  10. Identification of secondary organic aerosols based on aerosol mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is one of the major components of aerosols in the atmosphere and has not been well understood so far.Due to the complex chemical composition of organic aerosols,the identification of SOA has been a hotspot and difficult issue in the field of aerosol study.This study attempts to quantitatively identify SOA in winter of Shenzhen based on positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis.Major sources were resolved and SOA was identified subsequently according to the characteristic ion fragments measured by highly time-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer measurement.It showed that in the winter of Shenzhen the average SOA concentration was 9.41±6.33 g/m 3,accounting for 39.9±21.8% of the total organic mass.Compared with primary organic aerosol (POA),the SOA concentrations had no large variation,suggestive of characteristics of regional secondary pollutants.The ratio of SOA/BC had pronounced diurnal variation,similar to that of O x (O3+NO2),indicating SOA formation was significantly controlled by activity of photochemistry in the atmosphere.The most effective period for SOA formation was from 9 am~3 pm since the SOA/BC ratio increased by 122% during this period.This study provides a new technical method and a new idea for SOA investigation.

  11. Static and mobile networks design for atmospheric accidental releases monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global context of my PhD thesis work is the optimization of air pollution monitoring networks, but more specifically it concerns the monitoring of accidental releases of radionuclides in air. The optimization problem of air quality measuring networks has been addresses in the literature. However, it has not been addresses in the context of surveillance of accidental atmospheric releases. The first part of my thesis addresses the optimization of a permanent network of monitoring of radioactive aerosols in the air, covering France. The second part concerns the problem of targeting of observations in case of an accidental release of radionuclides from a nuclear plant. (author)

  12. The influence of nitrogen oxides on the activation of bromide and chloride in salt aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleicher, S.; Buxmann, J. C.; Sander, R.; Riedel, T. P.; Thornton, J. A.; Platt, U.; Zetzsch, C.

    2014-04-01

    Experiments on salt aerosol with different salt contents were performed in a Teflon chamber under tropospheric light conditions with various initial contents of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2). A strong activation of halogens was found at high NOx mixing ratios, even in samples with lower bromide contents such as road salts. The ozone depletion by reactive halogen species released from the aerosol, was found to be a function of the initial NOx mixing ratio. Besides bromine, large amounts of chlorine have been released in our smog chamber. Time profiles of the halogen species Cl2, Br2, ClNO2, BrNO2 and BrO, ClO, OClO and Cl atoms were simultaneously measured by various techniques (chemical ionization mass spectrometry, differential optical absorption spectrometry coupled with a multi-reflection cell and gas chromatography of hydrocarbon tracers for Cl and OH, employing cryogenic preconcentration and flame ionization detection). Measurements are compared to calculations by the CAABA/MECCA 0-D box model, which was adapted to the chamber conditions and took the aerosol liquid water content and composition into account. The model results agree reasonably with the observations and provide important information about the prerequisites for halogen release, such as the time profiles of the aerosol bromide and chloride contents as well as the aerosol pH.

  13. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  14. Dissecting Future Aerosol Emissions. Warming Tendencies and Mitigation Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streets, D.G. [Decision and Information Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Future global emissions of aerosols will play an important role in governing the nature and magnitude of future anthropogenic climate change. We present in this paper a number of future scenarios of emissions of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) by world region, which we combine with sulfate (SO4) assessed in terms of the emissions of its precursor, SO2. We find that aerosol emissions from the household and industrial sectors are likely to decline along almost all future pathways. Transportation emissions, however, are subject to complex interacting forces that can lead to either increases or decreases. Biomass burning declines in many scenarios, but the Amazon rainforests remain vulnerable if unsustainable economic growth persists. East Asia is the key region for primary aerosols, and trends in China will have a major bearing on the direction and magnitude of releases of BC (expected reductions in the range of 640-1290 Gg), OC (reductions of 520-1900 Gg), and SO2 (ranging from an increase of 21 Tg to a reduction of 30 Tg). Analysis of joint BC, OC, and SO2 emission changes identifies a number of key world regions and economic sectors that could be effectively targeted for aerosol reductions.

  15. Correlation of recent fission product release data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the calculation of source terms associated with severe accidents, it is necessary to model the release of fission products from fuel as it heats and melts. Perhaps the most definitive model for fission product release is that of the FASTGRASS computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. There is persuasive evidence that these processes, as well as additional chemical and gas phase mass transport processes, are important in the release of fission products from fuel. Nevertheless, it has been found convenient to have simplified fission product release correlations that may not be as definitive as models like FASTGRASS but which attempt in some simple way to capture the essence of the mechanisms. One of the most widely used such correlation is called CORSOR-M which is the present fission product/aerosol release model used in the NRC Source Term Code Package. CORSOR has been criticized as having too much uncertainty in the calculated releases and as not accurately reproducing some experimental data. It is currently believed that these discrepancies between CORSOR and the more recent data have resulted because of the better time resolution of the more recent data compared to the data base that went into the CORSOR correlation. This document discusses a simple correlational model for use in connection with NUREG risk uncertainty exercises. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Fluorescence from atmospheric aerosol detected by a lidar indicates biogenic particles in the lowermost stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Immler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available With a lidar system that was installed in Lindenberg/Germany, we observed in June 2003 an extended aerosol layer at 13km altitude in the lowermost stratosphere. This layer created an inelastic backscatter signal that we detected with a water vapour Raman channel, but that was not produced by Raman scattering. Also, we find evidence for inelastic scattering from a smoke plume from a forest fire that we observed in the troposphere. We interpret the unexpected properties of these aerosols as fluorescence induced by the laser beam at organic components of the aerosol particles. Fluorescence from ambient aerosol had not yet been considered detectable by lidar systems. However, organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sticking to the aerosol particles, or bioaerosol such as bacteria, spores or pollen fluoresce when excited with UV-radiation in a way that is detectable by our lidar system. Therefore, we conclude that fluorescence from organic material released by biomass burning creates, inelastic backscatter signals that we measured with our instrument and thus demonstrate a new and powerful way to characterize aerosols by a remote sensing technique. The stratospheric aerosol layer that we have observed in Lindenberg for three consecutive days is likely to be a remnant from Siberian forest fire plumes lifted across the tropopause and transported around the globe.

  17. The kinetics of aerosol particle formation and removal in NPP severe accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatevakhin, Mikhail A.; Arefiev, Valentin K.; Semashko, Sergey E.; Dolganov, Rostislav A.

    2016-06-01

    Severe Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accidents are accompanied by release of a massive amount of energy, radioactive products and hydrogen into the atmosphere of the NPP containment. A valid estimation of consequences of such accidents can only be carried out through the use of the integrated codes comprising a description of the basic processes which determine the consequences. A brief description of a coupled aerosol and thermal-hydraulic code to be used for the calculation of the aerosol kinetics within the NPP containment in case of a severe accident is given. The code comprises a KIN aerosol unit integrated into the KUPOL-M thermal-hydraulic code. Some features of aerosol behavior in severe NPP accidents are briefly described.

  18. RAFT - A computer model for formation and transport of fission product aerosols in LWR primary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer model RAFT (Reactor Aerosol Formation and Transport) has been developed to predict the size distribution and composition of the particles (aerosols) formed from condensation of the fission-product and control rod material vapors released in LWR accidents. The underlying theory of RAFT considers the processes of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, aerosol agglomeration, and aerosol and vapor deposition, in conjunction with the equilibrium chemistry of the Cs-I-Te-O-H-Ag-In-Cd-inert gas system. Calculations using RAFT show that under most accident conditions, the particle size spectrum is determined primarily by the competition between the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms rather than the agglomeration mechanism, and that direct vapor deposition on structural surfaces is an important mechanism for the scavenging of fission product vapours

  19. RAFT: a computer model for formation and transport of fission product aerosols in LWR primary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer model RAFT (Reactor Aerosol Formation and Transport) has been developed to predict the size distribution and composition of the particles (aerosols) formed from condensation of the fission-product and control rod material vapors released in LWR accidents. The underlying theory of RAFT considers the processes of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, aerosol agglomeration, and aerosol and vapor deposition, in conjunction with the equilibrium chemistry of the Cs-I-Te-O-H-Ag-In-Cd-inert gas system. Calculations using RAFT show that under most accident conditions, the particle size spectrum is determined primarily by the competition between the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms rather than the agglomeration mechanism, and that direct vapor deposition on structural surfaces is an important mechanism for the scavenging of fission product vapors

  20. Aerosol Size Distributions In Auckland.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coulson, G.; Olivares, G.; Talbot, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2016), s. 23-28. E-ISSN 1836-5876 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : aerosol size distribution * particle number concentration * roadside Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  1. Aerosols Produced by Cosmic Rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    our investigation at the smallest scales, namely the role of cosmic ray produced ions on atmospheric aerosol nucleation and growth processes. Aerosol theory suggests that this is one of the most promising areas to search for an effect. However, guided by the nature of our initial results, it will be...... mechanism linking cosmic rays to clouds and climate is currently speculative, there have been various suggestions of the role atmospheric ions may play; these involve any one of a number of processes from the nucleation of aerosols up to the collection processes of cloud droplets. We have chosen to start...... applied to control the number of ions present. This will enable experiments to be performed both with and without the presence of ions, thus providing information as to the potential role of ions in aerosol processes....

  2. Highly Resolved Paleoclimatic Aerosol Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Ernesto

    to paleotemperatures. Impurities in the matrix are comprised of particulate and soluble aerosols, each carrying information on its source’s activitiy and|or proximity. Opposed to gases and water isotopes, the seasonality of many aerosols is not smoothed out in the firn column so that large concentration gradients...... with frequently changing signs are preserved. Therefore, these aerosol records can be used for dating by annual layer counting. However, with increasing depth the annual layer thicknesses decreases due to pressure and ice flow and accurate dating is possible only as long as the rapid variations can be resolved...... experimentally. Over the last decades Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) has become a well-established technique for aerosol quantification. In CFA, a piece of core is melted continuously and the melt water is analysed for an array of chemical impurities. When designing a CFA system, a trilemma between high sample...

  3. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  4. Survival of bacteria during aerosolization.

    OpenAIRE

    Marthi, B; Fieland, V P; Walter, M.; Seidler, R J

    1990-01-01

    One form of commercial application of microorganisms, including genetically engineered microorganisms is as an aerosol. To study the effect of aerosol-induced stress on bacterial survival, nonrecombinant spontaneous antibiotic-resistant mutants of four organisms, Enterobacter cloacae, Erwinia herbicola, Klebsiella planticola, and Pseudomonas syringae, were sprayed in separate experiments in a greenhouse. Samples were collected over a distance of 15 m from the spray site for enumeration. Spore...

  5. The removal of sodium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is concentrated on the removal of sodium combustion aerosol. The experimental results are presented in it. Besides, the output of the aerosol, the igniting point and combustion rate of sodium are also obtained. An experimental device for removing of the aerosol consists of a blower, sodium combustion container, water-spraying column, water storage tank and nitrogen bottle. In order to compare the concentrations at the outlet of the column before and after the water-spraying, the concentration distribution was measured in the process of sodium burning. It was found that similar concentration could be obtained from sixth to eighth minute after ignition of sodium in the container. During the interval the water-spraying was performed, the measurement of the aerosol concentrations at different water-spray height was proceeded. The removing efficiency of the aerosol at different water-spraying heights is different. The efficiency at the height of 1220 mm is near to maximum. The results show that further increasing water-spray height could not greatly reduce the concentration of the aerosol at the outlet. (author)

  6. Comparison of sodium aerosol codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although hypothetical fast reactor accidents leading to severe core damage are very low probability events, their consequences are to be assessed. During such accidents, one can envisage the ejection of sodium, mixed with fuel and fission products, from the primary circuit into the secondary containment. Aerosols can be formed either by mechanical dispersion of the molten material or as a result of combustion of the sodium in the mixture. Therefore considerable effort has been devoted to study the different sodium aerosol phenomena. To ensure that the problems of describing the physical behaviour of sodium aerosols were adequately understood, a comparison of the codes being developed to describe their behaviour was undertaken. The comparison consists of two parts. The first is a comparative study of the computer codes used to predict aerosol behaviour during a hypothetical accident. It is a critical review of documentation available. The second part is an exercise in which code users have run their own codes with a pre-arranged input. For the critical comparative review of the computer models, documentation has been made available on the following codes: AEROSIM (UK), MAEROS (USA), HAARM-3 (USA), AEROSOLS/A2 (France), AEROSOLS/B1 (France), and PARDISEKO-IIIb (FRG)

  7. Aerosol deposition at high-temperature gradients in geometries relevant to a CANDU nuclear reactor primary cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During some postulated severe loss-of-coolant/loss-of-emergency coolant injection accidents, temperatures in a CANDU reactor fuel channel may rise high enough to cause release of vapours of core materials (UO2 fuel, Zircaloy-4 cladding and fission products such as Cs and I). The released vapour mass is expected to be carried by the coolant steam into the cooler parts of the primary cooling system in the form of aerosol particles. A fraction of the aerosol mass containing the fission products will be deposited in various component geometries, such as flow channels containing fuel rodbundles and pipes with changing cross-sectional area and bends. As part of an aerosol program, we have conducted experiments on aerosol transport in two geometries, focussing on thermophoresis and diffusion. The results obtained in these experiments and their analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  8. Aerosol generation and delivery in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that radioaerosol lung technique by inhalation is a very versatile technique in the evaluation of health effects and medical diagnostic applications, especially to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, their defence mechanism permeability and many others. Most important part of aerosol technology is to generate reproducibly stable diagnostic radioaerosols of known characteristics. Many compressed air atomisers are commercially available for generating aerosols but they have limited utility in aerosol inhalation, either because of large droplet size, low aerosol output or high airflow rates. There is clearly a need for a versatile and economical aerosol generation/inhalation system that can produce dry labelled aerosol particles with high deep lung delivery efficiency suitable for clinical studies. BARC (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre) has developed a dry aerosol generation/delivery system which operates on compressed air and generates dry polydisperse aerosols. This system is described along with an assessment of the aerosol characteristics and efficiency for diagnosis of various respiratory disorders

  9. Devices and methods for generating an aerosol

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-03-03

    Aerosol generators and methods of generating aerosols are provided. The aerosol can be generated at a stagnation interface between a hot, wet stream and a cold, dry stream. The aerosol has the benefit that the properties of the aerosol can be precisely controlled. The stagnation interface can be generated, for example, by the opposed flow of the hot stream and the cold stream. The aerosol generator and the aerosol generation methods are capable of producing aerosols with precise particle sizes and a narrow size distribution. The properties of the aerosol can be controlled by controlling one or more of the stream temperatures, the saturation level of the hot stream, and the flow times of the streams.

  10. How important is organic aerosol hygroscopicity to aerosol indirect forcing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organics are among the most abundant aerosol components in the atmosphere. However, there are still large uncertainties with emissions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (precursor gases of secondary organic aerosol, SOA), formation of SOA, and chemical and physical properties (e.g., hygroscopicity) of POA and SOA. All these may have significant impacts on aerosol direct and indirect forcing estimated from global models. In this study a modal aerosol module (MAM) in the NCAR community atmospheric model (CAM) is used to examine sensitivities of aerosol indirect forcing to hygroscopicity (represented by a single parameter 'κ' ) of POA and SOA. Our model simulation indicates that in the present-day (PD) condition changing the 'κ' value of POA from 0 to 0.1 increases the number concentration of cloud condensational nuclei (CCN) at supersaturation S = 0.1% by 40-80% over the POA source regions, while changing the 'κ' value of SOA by ± 50% (from 0.14 to 0.07 and 0.21) changes the CCN concentration within 40%. There are disproportionally larger changes in CCN concentration in the pre-industrial (PI) condition. Due to the stronger impact of organics hygroscopicity on CCN and cloud droplet number concentration at PI condition, global annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) between PD and PI conditions reduces with the increase of the hygroscopicity of organics. Global annual mean AIF varies by 0.4 W m-2 in the sensitivity runs with the control run of - 1.3 W m-2, highlighting the need for improved understanding of organics hygroscopicity and its representation in global models.

  11. Evaluation of the Particle Aerosolization from n-TiO2 Photocatalytic Nanocoatings under Abrasion

    OpenAIRE

    Neeraj Shandilya; Olivier Le Bihan; Christophe Bressot; Martin Morgeneyer

    2014-01-01

    A parametric study on the release of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles from two commercial photocatalytic nanocoatings is carried out. For this, abrasion tests are performed on them. The formed aerosols are characterized by their number concentration, particle size distribution, individual particle shape, size, and chemical composition. The two nanocoatings appear to exhibit contrastingly opposite behavior with respect to the number concentration of the released particles. Having irregula...

  12. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hulse, Charlotte, E-mail: charlotte@inwfsun1.UGent.b [Gent University Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2010-11-01

    In order to allow for the detection of low momentum particles, originating from the scattering of a 27.6 GeV lepton beam off a fixed gaseous target at the HERMES experiment at DESY in Hamburg (Germany), a dedicated recoil detector was installed. It consists of a silicon strip detector, located inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fiber tracker and a photon detector, around a 150 mm long target cell made out of a 75{mu}m thick aluminum tube. The full detector assembly is mounted inside a 1 T super-conducting solenoid and is able to detect protons and pions with momenta up to 1.40 GeV/c and photons in the region surrounding the target cell. The detector has been operational from February 2006 until June 2007. The commissioning and performance of the detector are presented in this paper.

  13. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R.

    2006-07-01

    The HERMES Collaboration is installing a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the spectrometer for measurements of hard exclusive electron/positron scattering reactions, in particular deeply virtual Compton scattering. These measurements will provide access to generalised parton distributions and hence to the localisation of quarks inside hadrons and to their orbital angular momentum. The HERMES Recoil Detector consists of three active components: a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fibre tracker and a photon detector consisting of three layers of tungsten/scintillator. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. The Recoil Detector was extensively tested with cosmic muons over the summer of 2005 and is being installed in the winter of 2005/6 for data taking until summer 2007.

  14. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HERMES Collaboration is installing a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the spectrometer for measurements of hard exclusive electron/positron scattering reactions, in particular deeply virtual Compton scattering. These measurements will provide access to generalised parton distributions and hence to the localisation of quarks inside hadrons and to their orbital angular momentum. The HERMES Recoil Detector consists of three active components: a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fibre tracker and a photon detector consisting of three layers of tungsten/scintillator. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. The Recoil Detector was extensively tested with cosmic muons over the summer of 2005 and is being installed in the winter of 2005/6 for data taking until summer 2007

  15. Intelligent detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the complexity and resolution of imaging detectors increases, the need for detailed simulation of the experimental setup also becomes more important. Designing the detectors requires efficient tools to simulate the detector response and reconstruct the events. We have developed efficient and flexible tools for detailed physics and detector response simulation as well as event reconstruction and analysis. The primary goal has been to develop a software toolkit and computing infrastructure to allow physicists from universities and labs to quickly and easily conduct physics analyses and contribute to detector research and development. The application harnesses the full power of the Geant4 toolkit without requiring the end user to have any experience with either Geant4 or C++, thereby allowing the user to concentrate on the physics of the detector system.

  16. Intelligent Detector Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the complexity and resolution of imaging detectors increases, the need for detailed simulation of the experimental setup also becomes more important. Designing the detectors requires efficient tools to simulate the detector response and reconstruct the events. We have developed efficient and flexible tools for detailed physics and detector response simulation as well as event reconstruction and analysis. The primary goal has been to develop a software toolkit and computing infrastructure to allow physicists from universities and labs to quickly and easily conduct physics analyses and contribute to detector research and development. The application harnesses the full power of the Geant4 toolkit without requiring the end user to have any experience with either Geant4 or C++, thereby allowing the user to concentrate on the physics of the detector system.

  17. Rotational raman lidar for aerosol scattering coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two channel lidar signals which are composed of the total rotational scattering and elastic signals provide good information for the aerosol scattering coefficients. We can calculate the aerosol backscattering coefficient and extinction coefficient directly without any assumption and calibration process. Generally, a high spectral resolution lidar is used for an aerosol monitoring. But we have designed a new normal spectral receiving lidar system which contains the scattering information simultaneously, and we have retrieved the aerosol scattering coefficient. The results show that there is no need to assume any relation between the aerosol backscattering and extinction and to consider any wavelength calibration process for the aerosol scattering coefficient

  18. Significant Atmospheric Aerosol Pollution Caused by World Food Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Miller, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter is a major concern for public health, causing cancer and cardiopulmonary mortality. Therefore, governments in most industrialized countries monitor and set limits for particulate matter. To assist policy makers, it is important to connect the chemical composition and severity of particulate pollution to its sources. Here we show how agricultural practices, livestock production, and the use of nitrogen fertilizers impact near-surface air quality. In many densely populated areas, aerosols formed from gases that are released by fertilizer application and animal husbandry dominate over the combined contributions from all other anthropogenic pollution. Here we test reduction scenarios of combustion-based and agricultural emissions that could lower air pollution. For a future scenario, we find opposite trends, decreasing nitrate aerosol formation near the surface while total tropospheric loads increase. This suggests that food production could be increased to match the growing global population without sacrificing air quality if combustion emission is decreased.

  19. Significant atmospheric aerosol pollution caused by world food cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Miller, Ron

    2016-05-01

    Particulate matter is a major concern for public health, causing cancer and cardiopulmonary mortality. Therefore, governments in most industrialized countries monitor and set limits for particulate matter. To assist policy makers, it is important to connect the chemical composition and severity of particulate pollution to its sources. Here we show how agricultural practices, livestock production, and the use of nitrogen fertilizers impact near-surface air quality. In many densely populated areas, aerosols formed from gases that are released by fertilizer application and animal husbandry dominate over the combined contributions from all other anthropogenic pollution. Here we test reduction scenarios of combustion-based and agricultural emissions that could lower air pollution. For a future scenario, we find opposite trends, decreasing nitrate aerosol formation near the surface while total tropospheric loads increase. This suggests that food production could be increased to match the growing global population without sacrificing air quality if combustion emission is decreased.

  20. Neutrino factory near detector

    OpenAIRE

    Bogomilov, M.; Y. Karadzhov; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Laing, A.; F.J.P. Soler

    2013-01-01

    The neutrino factory is a facility for future precision studies of neutrino oscillations. A so-called near detector is essential for reaching the required precision for a neutrino oscillation analysis. The main task of the near detector is to measure the flux of the neutrino beam. Such a high intensity neutrino source like a neutrino factory provides also the opportunity for precision studies of various neutrino interaction processes in the near detector. We discuss the design concepts of suc...

  1. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm2), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  2. The atlas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATLAS detector, one of the two multi-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, is currently being built in order to meet the first proton-proton collisions in time. A description of the detector components will be given, corresponding to the most up to date design and status of construction, completed with test beam results and performances of the first serial modules. (author)

  3. Impacts of elevated-aerosol-layer and aerosol type on the correlation of AOD and particulate matter with ground-based and satellite measurements in Nanjing, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; Wu, Yonghua; Wang, Tijian; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu; Zhao, Kun

    2015-11-01

    Assessment of the correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particulate matter (PM) is critical to satellite remote sensing of air quality, e.g. ground PM10 and ground PM2.5. This study evaluates the impacts of aloft-aerosol-plume and aerosol-type on the correlation of AOD-PM by using synergistic measurement of a polarization-sensitive Raman-Mie lidar, CIMEL sunphotometer (SP) and TEOM PM samplers, as well as the satellite MODIS and CALIPSO, during April to July 2011 in Nanjing city (32.05(○)N/118.77(○)E), southeast China. Aloft-aerosol-layer and aerosol types (e.g. dust and non-dust or urban aerosol) are identified with the range-resolved polarization lidar and SP measurements. The results indicate that the correlations for AOD-PM10 and AOD-PM2.5 can be much improved when screening out the aloft-aerosol-layer. The linear regression slopes show significant differences for the dust and non-dust dominant aerosols in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). In addition, we evaluate the recent released MODIS-AOD product (Collection 6) from the "dark-target" (DT) and "deep-blue" (DB) algorithms and their correlation with the PM in Nanjing urban area. The results verify that the MODIS-DT AODs show a good correlation (R = 0.89) with the SP-AOD but with a systematic overestimate. In contrast, the MODIS-DB AOD shows a moderate correlation (R = 0.66) with the SP-AOD but with a smaller regression intercept (0.07). Furthermore, the moderately high correlations between the MODIS-AOD and PM10 (PM2.5) are indicated, which suggests the feasibility of PM estimate using the MODIS-AOD in Nanjing city. PMID:26071961

  4. Aerosol behavior during sodium pool fires in a large vessel: CSTF tests AB1 and AB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two large-scale aerosol behavior tests, using sodium pool fires as the aerosol source, were performed in the Containment Systems Test Facility (CSTF). The tests were conducted to characterize the properties and behavior of sodium aerosol particles formed and aged in a large containment vessel. The 20-m high, 850-m3 CSTF containment building in regard to parameters that affect agglomeration and gravitational settling. In both tests, sodium burned for one hour in a 4.38-m2 pool, and the only difference between them was that steam was injected during the second test, simulating the release of water vapor from heated concrete

  5. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  6. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  7. Detector support head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The support head of detectors for densitometric measurements of the regional function of lungs using gamma radiation consists of a group of detectors placed in a common rack. The detectors are placed on holders with adjustable height which allow side movement. The holders are slidably connected to the converging quide rail on the frame via arms. Between the holders and the rack is fitted the drive mechanism consisting of a screw. The design allows the stable adjustment of detectors on the lung field during examination and thereby allows the comparison of results of measurements carried out at different times. (J.B.). 2 figs

  8. Superconducting quantum interference detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detector is made of a lead foil whose surface is finished with mineral acids. Coiling the foil wh+ch is inductively bonded to a resonance oscillating circuit forms a system of Josephson tunnel contacts. The detector signal was experimentally shown to be many times higher than signals from niobium detectors with point contacts. The detector described is suitable for measuring voltages in the order of 10-14 to 10-15 V, currents of the same order, magnetic fields, etc. (J.B.)

  9. Photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, A.; Lu, S. S.-M.; Moriarty, J. A.; Crouch, R. K.; Miller, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of room-temperature infrared detectors has been developed through use of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) or metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) slabs. The detectors, which have been fabricated from Si, Ge and GaAs, rely for operation on the electrical capacitance variations induced by modulated incident radiation. The peak detectivity for a 1000-A Si MISIM detector is comparable to that of a conventional Si detector functioning in the photovoltaic mode. Optimization of the photocapacitive-mode detection sensitivity is discussed.

  10. LHCb Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075808; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  11. Activity measurement of gamma-ray emitters in aerosol filters exposed in Lithuania, in March–April 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two aerosol sampling stations in Lithuania were simultaneously used for assessing consequences of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The maximum activity concentrations of 129mTe, 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs were 0.59±0.06, 3.5±0.3, 0.90±0.08, 0.90±0.07 mBq m−3 at station #1 in Vilnius, and 0.29±0.03, 1.0±0.1, 0.41±0.04, 0.41±0.04 mBq m−3 at station #2 in northeastern part of Lithuania, respectively. - Highlights: • Daily and weekly samples were analyzed by the gamma-ray spectrometry using different HPGe detectors and measuring geometries. • Corrections of 8–12% for the true coincidence-summing in 134Cs decay were applied. • The activity ratio 134Cs/137Cs was found to be in the range 0.99–1.09. • This result is consistent with published data on Fukushima radioactive release

  12. Rhodium in-core detector sensitivity depletion, cycles 2 to 4. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity depletion of two rhodium (Rh) self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) has been measured since July 1976 at the Oconee 2 pressurized water reactor (PWR). The detectors were positioned inside the reactor core throughout the measurement period. Depletion has been determined as a function of electric charge expended (released) by each detector. The goal of the project is the empirical definition of the depletion characteristics over the operating life-time of the Rh detector. Results to data show that the sensitivity depletion rate of the Rh detector in the PWR is highly linear with charge released from the detector. In contrast to preliminary observations reported earlier, there appears to be no effect on the depletion rate that is traceable to the beginning-of-cycle burnup of the fuel assembly in which the Rh detectors are located

  13. Behavior analysis of the aerosol using the radioactive nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural Radionuclides, 7Be (half-life 53.29 d) and 210Pb (half-life 22.3 y) in total deposition and aerosol samples were measured. These two radionuclides with their different sources are therefore useful to understand the mechanisms of aerosol behavior. All monthly depositions were collected in Kyushu University (Fukuoka City), University Forest (Sasaguri) and Mt. Sefuri by the tray. The aerosol in the atmosphere was collected by HV air sampler. The rain sample was divided one time of rain into arbitrary terms. All samples were measured with the gamma-ray spectrometry using Ge semiconductor detector. The seasonal change of 7Be and 210Pb depositions in all deposition samples was observed showing a spring peak in 7Be depositional pattern. On the other hand, the difference in seasonal change was seen. When the process of deposition was divided into Rainout, Washout and Dry deposition, the total deposition of 7Be became 71%, 24% and 5%, respectively. (author)

  14. Influence of aerosol concentration and multivariate processing on indication of radon progeny concentration in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indication of concentration of radon progeny gauge in air is sensitive to aerosol concentration. Minimum detectable concentration and accuracy of the measurement is determined by random errors of the gauge. Multivariate data processing can be used to decrease random errors. To investigate influence of aerosol concentration on indication of radon progeny concentration in air, measurements of mining radiometer, operating on the principle of alpha radiation detection from radon progeny deposited on air filter, were carried out in radon chamber. Aerosol concentration and radon concentration in radon chamber were controlled and measurements of radon progeny concentration was measured by radon progeny monitor. Additionally count rate from the monitor detector originating from alpha activity deposited on air filter was measured in 1 min. intervals that were later used for three interval, and Principal Component Regression (PCR) data processing. It was found that for aerosol concentration in air from 40 p/cm3 to approx. 9 000 p/cm3 indications of the radon progeny monitor depends considerably on aerosol concentration. Radon daughters concentration normalized to radon concentration against aerosol concentration varied from 0.3-0.9. In mines where the aerosol concentration generally is high, this phenomenon has a little effect on the indication of the radon progeny monitor, but is has to be taken into account where aerosol concentration is low. Comparison of random errors when measured signal of the monitor (count rate against time) was processed employing three interval method and PCR data processing shows that PCR ensures 2-3 times lower random error than three interval data processing. (author)

  15. Effect of aerosol sub-grid variability on aerosol optical depth and cloud condensation nuclei: Implications for global aerosol modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Weigum, N; Schutgens, N.; Stier, P.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental limitation of grid-based models is their inability to resolve variability on scales smaller than a grid box. Past research has shown that significant aerosol variability exists on scales smaller than these grid-boxes, which can lead to discrepancies in simulated aerosol climate effects between high and low resolution models. This study investigates the impact of neglecting sub-grid variability in present-day global microphysical aerosol models on aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ...

  16. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Buchard, V.; A. M. Silva; P. R. Colarco; Darmenov, A.; C. A. Randles; Govindaraju, R.; O. Torres; Campbell, J.; R. Spurr

    2015-01-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on...

  17. Mucoadhesive controlled release ciprofloxacin nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudumba, Sujata S.

    Controlled release of drugs to the lungs is an interesting and evolving field of research. The influence of physicochemical properties of nanoparticles on the controlled release of ciprofloxacin and in-vivo pharmacokinetics following pulmonary administration was evaluated. The physicochemical properties had an effect on encapsulation efficiency and surface charge, but no significant effect on particle size. The in-vitro release profiles of ciprofloxacin in phosphate buffered saline showed small differences over the range of physicochemical properties evaluated. The physicochemical properties of ciprofloxacin nanoparticles resulted in variable and unreliable nebulizer output using a vibrating mesh nebulizer whereas the impact on the aerosol properties of a jet nebulizer was negligible. Addition of mucoadhesive polymers in the nanoparticles had a three-fold increase in apparent half-life in rats by releasing ciprofloxacin over an extended release period on the surfaces of the lungs.

  18. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxu; Lin, Jintai; Ni, Ruijing

    2016-04-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant a large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RF of aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissions per unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size. South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions, its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency. The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is lowered by a small per capita GDP. Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The

  19. Chemical release module facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical release module provides the capability to conduct: (1) thermite based metal vapor releases; (2) pressurized gas releases; (3) dispersed liquid releases; (4) shaped charge releases from ejected submodules; and (5) diagnostic measurements with pi supplied instruments. It also provides a basic R-F and electrical system for: (1) receiving and executing commands; (2) telemetering housekeeping data; (3) tracking; (4) monitoring housekeeping and control units; and (5) ultrasafe disarming and control monitoring.

  20. GENIE Production Release 2.10.0

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, M.; Andreopoulos, C.; M. Athar; Bodek, A.; Christy, E.; Coopersmith, B.; S. Dennis; Dytman, S.; Gallagher, H.; Geary, N; Golan, T.; Hatcher, R.; Hoshina, K.; Liu, J; Mahn, K.

    2015-01-01

    GENIE is a neutrino Monte Carlo event generator that simulates the primary interaction of a neutrino with a nuclear target, along with the subsequent propagation of the reaction products through the nuclear medium. It additionally contains libraries for fully-featured detector geometries and for managing various types of neutrino flux. This note details recent updates to GENIE, in particular changes introduced into the newest production release, version 2.10.0.

  1. GENIE Production Release 2.10.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Physics; Andreopoulos, C. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL); Athar, M. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Physics; Bodek, A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Christy, E. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Coopersmith, B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Dennis, S. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept .of Physics; Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Gallagher, H. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Geary, N. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Golan, T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hatcher, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hoshina, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics. Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center; Liu, J. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Mahn, K. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Marshall, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Morrison, J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Nirkko, M. [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics. Lab. for High Energy Physics (LHEP); Nowak, J. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Perdue, G. N. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yarba, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-12-25

    GENIE is a neutrino Monte Carlo event generator that simulates the primary interaction of a neutrino with a nuclear target, along with the subsequent propagation of the reaction products through the nuclear medium. It additionally contains libraries for fully-featured detector geometries and for managing various types of neutrino flux. This note details recent updates to GENIE, in particular, changes introduced into the newest production release, version 2.10.0.

  2. Miniature Sensor for Aerosol Mass Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project seeks to develop a miniature sensor for mass measurement of size-classified aerosols. A cascade impactor will be used to classify aerosol sample...

  3. MISR Aerosol Climatology Product V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This product is 1)the microphysical and scattering characteristics of pure aerosol upon which routine retrievals are based;2)mixtures of pure aerosol to be compared...

  4. The ATLAS pixel detector

    OpenAIRE

    Cristinziani, M.

    2007-01-01

    After a ten years planning and construction phase, the ATLAS pixel detector is nearing its completion and is scheduled to be integrated into the ATLAS detector to take data with the first LHC collisions in 2007. An overview of the construction is presented with particular emphasis on some of the major and most recent problems encountered and solved.

  5. ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nayak, T

    2013-01-01

    Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) measures the multiplicity and spatial distribution of photons in the forward region of ALICE on a event-by-event basis. PMD is a pre-shower detector having fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 2.3 < η < 3.9.

  6. The TESLA Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Moenig, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    For the superconducting linear collider TESLA a multi purpose detector has been designed. This detector is optimised for the important physics processes expected at a next generation linear collider up to around 1 TeV and is designed for the specific environment of a superconducting collider.

  7. Alkali ionization detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  8. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  9. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  10. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  11. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  12. The LDC detector concept

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ties Behnke; LDC Concept Group

    2007-11-01

    In preparation of the experimental program at the international linear collider (ILC), the large detector concept (LDC) is being developed. The main points of the LDC are a large volume gaseous tracking system, combined with high precision vertex detector and an extremely granular calorimeter. The main design force behind the LDC is the particle flow concept.

  13. LHCb detector performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinol, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sanchez, A. Martin; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Moggi, N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazzquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are descri

  14. CMS Detector Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CMS Detector posters (produced in 2000): CMS installation CMS collaboration From the Big Bang to Stars LHC Magnetic Field Magnet System Trackering System Tracker Electronics Calorimetry Eletromagnetic Calorimeter Hadronic Calorimeter Muon System Muon Detectors Trigger and data aquisition (DAQ) ECAL posters (produced in 2010, FR & EN): CMS ECAL CMS ECAL-Supermodule cooling and mechatronics CMS ECAL-Supermodule assembly

  15. Aerosol MALDI mass spectrometry for bioaerosol analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kleefsman, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    In the thesis Aerosol MALDI mass spectrometry for bioaerosol analysis is described how the aerosol mass spectrometer of the TU Delft has been further developed for the on-line analysis of bioaerosols. Due to the implemented improvements mass spectra with high resolution and a high mass range can be obtained from single protein containing aerosol particles. Fluorescence is used to select the biological fraction of an aerosol: when a particle emits fluorescence when irradiated with UV-laser lig...

  16. Origins of atmospheric aerosols. Basic concepts on aerosol main physical properties; L`aerosol atmospherique: ses origines quelques notions sur les principales proprietes physiques des aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renoux, A. [Paris-12 Univ., 94 - Creteil (France). Laboratoire de Physique des aerosols et de transferts des contaminations

    1996-12-31

    Natural and anthropogenic sources of atmospheric aerosols are reviewed and indications of their concentrations and granulometry are given. Calculation of the lifetime of an atmospheric aerosol of a certain size is presented and the various modes of aerosol granulometry and their relations with photochemical and physico-chemical processes in the atmosphere are discussed. The main physical, electrical and optical properties of aerosols are also presented: diffusion coefficient, dynamic mobility and relaxation time, Stokes number, limit rate of fall, electrical mobility, optical diffraction

  17. Natural aerosol direct and indirect radiative effects

    OpenAIRE

    Rap, Alexandru; Scott, Catherine E.; Spracklen, Dominick V; Bellouin, Nicolas; Forster, Piers M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Schmidt, Anja; Mann, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Natural aerosol plays a significant role in the Earth's system due to its ability to alter the radiative balance of the Earth. Here we use a global aerosol microphysics model together with a radiative transfer model to estimate radiative effects for five natural aerosol sources in the present-day atmosphere: dimethyl sulfide (DMS), sea-salt, volcanoes, monoterpenes, and wildfires. We calculate large annual global mean aerosol direct and cloud albedo effects especially for DMS-derived sulfate ...

  18. Aerosol filtration with metallic fibrous filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The filtration efficiency of stainless steel fibrous filters (BEKIPOR porous mats and sintered webs) is determined using submicronic monodisperse polystyrene aerosols. Lasers spectrometers are used for the aerosol measurements. The parameters varied are the fiber diameter, the number of layers, the aerosol diameter and the superficial velocity. Two selected types of filters are tested with polydisperse methylene blue aerosols to determine the effect of bed loading on the filter performance and to test washing techniques for the regeneration of the filter

  19. Introduction to detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Walenta, Albert H

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for momentum measurements,particle identification and energy measurements (calorimeters) as well for imaging applications in medecine, biology and industry (non destructive testing) will be put into relation to the specific detection princip In particular the resolution for position, time, energy and intensity measurement and the efficiency will be discussed. Signal extraction,electronic signal processing and principles of information capture will close the logic circle to the input : the radiation properties.The lecture will provide some sources for data tables and small demonstration computer programs f The basic detector physics as interaction of radiation with matter, information transport via free charges,photons and phonons and the signal formation will be presented in some depth with emphasis on the influence on specific parameters for detector The lecture will cover the most popular detector principles, gas detectors (ion chambers,MPWC's and MSGC's), semiconductor detectors scintillators and ...

  20. Advanced far infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > λ > 50 μm are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide

  1. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon tracking systems will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. This report discusses its design and operation

  2. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Holzer-Popp

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI project Aerosol_cci (2010–2013, algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1 a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2 a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3 a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008 of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun

  3. Aerosols and fission product transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is presented of current knowledge of the possible role of aerosols in the consequences of in- and out-of-core LOCAs and of end fitting failures in CANDU reactors. An extensive literature search has been made of research on the behaviour of aerosols in possible accidents in water moderated and cooled reactors and the results of various studies compared. It is recommended that further work should be undertaken on the formation of aerosols during these possible accidents and to study their subsequent behaviour. It is also recommended that the fission products behaviour computer code FISSCON II should be re-examined to determine whether it reflects the advances incorporated in other codes developed for light water reactors which have been extensively compared. 47 refs

  4. Air ions and aerosol science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammet, Hannes

    1996-03-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4-1.8 nm.

  5. Air ions and aerosol science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammet, H. [Department of Environmental Physics, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia (Estonia) 2400

    1996-03-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4{endash}1.8 nm. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Atmospheric multiple scattering of fluorescence light from extensive air showers and effect of the aerosol size on the reconstruction of energy and depth of maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Louedec, K

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of the energy and the depth of maximum Xmax of an extensive air shower depends on the multiple scattering of fluorescence photons in the atmosphere. In this work, we explain how atmospheric aerosols, and especially their size, scatter the fluorescence photons during their propagation. Using a Monte Carlo simulation for the scattering of light, the dependence on the aerosol conditions of the multiple scattered light contribution to the recorded signal is fully parameterised. A clear dependence on the aerosol size is proposed for the first time. Finally, using this new parameterisation, the effect of atmospheric aerosols on the energy and on the Xmax reconstructions is presented for a typical extensive air shower observed by a ground-based detector: a systematic over-estimation of these two quantities is observed if aerosols of large size are neglected in the estimation of the multiple scattered fraction.

  7. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H.; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1 h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken ...

  8. The relationship between aerosol and cloud drop number concentrations in a global aerosol microphysics model

    OpenAIRE

    Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; D. V. Spracklen; Mann, G. M.; M. P. Chipperfield

    2009-01-01

    Empirical relationships that link cloud droplet number (CDN) to aerosol number or mass are commonly used to calculate global fields of CDN for climate forcing assessments. In this work we use a sectional global model of sulfate and sea-salt aerosol coupled to a mechanistic aerosol activation scheme to explore the limitations of this approach. We find that a given aerosol number concentration produces a wide range of CDN concentrations due to variations in the shape of the aerosol size distrib...

  9. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil based aerosol ''Smoke'' commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford

  10. Experimental determination of submicron aerosol dry deposition velocity onto rural canopies: influence of aerosol size, of micro meteorological parameters and of the substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of accidental or chronic pollutant releases on ecosystems, we must study the dry deposition of aerosols in rural areas. The lack of experimental data on the dry deposition velocity of particle sizes below 1 μm over rural environments leads to uncertainties regarding models and differences between them, which exceed one order of magnitude. The aim of this study is to develop a method, especially using an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (Outdoor ELPIDEKATI) to determine aerosol dry deposition velocities (Vd) over rural areas through experimental measurements. This method is based on eddy covariance flux calculation and spectral analysis correction. Dry deposition velocities were obtained for atmospheric aerosols sizing from 7 nm to 2 μm, in the South-West of France on a flat terrain under varied meteorological conditions and varied substrates (maize, grass and earth). Vd was analysed as a function of the particle diameters, and the impact of micro meteorological parameters was studied. (author)

  11. Aerosol Transport Over Equatorial Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S.; King, M.; Helas, G.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range and inter-hemispheric transport of atmospheric aerosols over equatorial Africa has received little attention so far. Most aerosol studies in the region have focussed on emissions from rain forest and savanna (both natural and biomass burning) and were carried out in the framework of programs such as DECAFE (Dynamique et Chimie Atmospherique en Foret Equatoriale) and FOS (Fires of Savanna). Considering the importance of this topic, aerosols samples were measured in different seasons at 4420 meters on Mt Kenya and on the equator. The study is based on continuous aerosol sampling on a two stage (fine and coarse) streaker sampler and elemental analysis by Particle Induced X-ray Emission. Continuous samples were collected for two seasons coinciding with late austral winter and early austral spring of 1997 and austral summer of 1998. Source area identification is by trajectory analysis and sources types by statistical techniques. Major meridional transports of material are observed with fine-fraction silicon (31 to 68 %) in aeolian dust and anthropogenic sulfur (9 to 18 %) being the major constituents of the total aerosol loading for the two seasons. Marine aerosol chlorine (4 to 6 %), potassium (3 to 5 %) and iron (1 to 2 %) make up the important components of the total material transport over Kenya. Minimum sulfur fluxes are associated with recirculation of sulfur-free air over equatorial Africa, while maximum sulfur concentrations are observed following passage over the industrial heartland of South Africa or transport over the Zambian/Congo Copperbelt. Chlorine is advected from the ocean and is accompanied by aeolian dust recirculating back to land from mid-oceanic regions. Biomass burning products are transported from the horn of Africa. Mineral dust from the Sahara is transported towards the Far East and then transported back within equatorial easterlies to Mt Kenya. This was observed during austral summer and coincided with the dying phase of 1997/98 El

  12. Adsorption and revaporisation studies on iodine oxide aerosols deposited on containment surface materials in LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a hypothetical severe nuclear accident, the radiation field will be very high in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a result gaseous radiolysis products will be formed. Elemental iodine can react in the gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (iodine oxide). Within the AIAS (Adsorption of Iodine oxide Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of iodine oxide (IOx) aerosols with common containment surface materials were investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS, as well as Pt and Pd surfaces from hydrogen recombiners. Non-radioactive and 131I labelled iodine oxide aerosols were produced with the EXSI CONT facility from elemental iodine and ozone at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The iodine oxide deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the kind of iodine oxide formed and if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials occurs. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited iodine oxide aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 having a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The revaporisated 131I species from the surfaces were chemically tested for elemental iodine formation. The parameter dominating the degradation of the produced iodine oxide aerosols was humidity. Cu and Zn surfaces were found to react with iodine from the iodine oxide aerosols to form iodides, while no metal iodides were detected for Al and SS samples. Most of the iodine oxide aerosols are assumed to be degraded

  13. Adsorption and revaporisation studies on iodine oxide aerosols deposited on containment surface materials in LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.R.StJ.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Lamminmaeki, S.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    During a hypothetical severe nuclear accident, the radiation field will be very high in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a result gaseous radiolysis products will be formed. Elemental iodine can react in the gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (iodine oxide). Within the AIAS (Adsorption of Iodine oxide Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of iodine oxide (IOx) aerosols with common containment surface materials were investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS, as well as Pt and Pd surfaces from hydrogen recombiners. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled iodine oxide aerosols were produced with the EXSI CONT facility from elemental iodine and ozone at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The iodine oxide deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the kind of iodine oxide formed and if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials occurs. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited iodine oxide aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 having a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The revaporisated {sup 131}I species from the surfaces were chemically tested for elemental iodine formation. The parameter dominating the degradation of the produced iodine oxide aerosols was humidity. Cu and Zn surfaces were found to react with iodine from the iodine oxide aerosols to form iodides, while no metal iodides were detected for Al and SS samples. Most of the iodine oxide aerosols are assumed to

  14. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Mo, Tin (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Billone, Michael C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Thompson, Nancy Slater (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Hibbs, Russell S. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL)

    2005-07-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of

  15. Aerosolization of a Human Norovirus Surrogate, Bacteriophage MS2, during Simulated Vomiting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Tung-Thompson

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses (NoV are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Epidemiological studies of outbreaks have suggested that vomiting facilitates transmission of human NoV, but there have been no laboratory-based studies characterizing the degree of NoV release during a vomiting event. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that virus aerosolization occurs in a simulated vomiting event, and to estimate the amount of virus that is released in those aerosols. A simulated vomiting device was constructed at one-quarter scale of the human body following similitude principles. Simulated vomitus matrices at low (6.24 mPa*s and high (177.5 mPa*s viscosities were inoculated with low (108 PFU/mL and high (1010 PFU/mL concentrations of bacteriophage MS2 and placed in the artificial "stomach" of the device, which was then subjected to scaled physiologically relevant pressures associated with vomiting. Bio aerosols were captured using an SKC Biosampler. In low viscosity artificial vomitus, there were notable differences between recovered aerosolized MS2 as a function of pressure (i.e., greater aerosolization with increased pressure, although this was not always statistically significant. This relationship disappeared when using high viscosity simulated vomitus. The amount of MS2 aerosolized as a percent of total virus "vomited" ranged from 7.2 x 10-5 to 2.67 x 10-2 (which corresponded to a range of 36 to 13,350 PFU total. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document and measure aerosolization of a NoV surrogate in a similitude-based physical model. This has implications for better understanding the transmission dynamics of human NoV and for risk modeling purposes, both of which can help in designing effective infection control measures.

  16. Odin-OSIRIS stratospheric aerosol data product and SAGE III intercomparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Bourassa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The scattered sunlight measurements made by the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS on the Odin spacecraft are used to retrieve vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction at 750 nm. The recently released OSIRIS Version 5 data product contains the first publicly released stratospheric aerosol extinction retrievals, and these are now available for the entire Odin mission, which extends from the present day back to launch in 2001. A proof-of-concept study for the retrieval of stratospheric aerosol extinction from limb scatter measurements was previously published and the Version 5 data product retrievals are based on this work, but incorporate several important improvements to the algorithm. One of the primary changes is the use of a new retrieval vector that greatly improves the sensitivity to aerosol scattering by incorporating a forward modeled calculation of the radiance from a Rayleigh atmosphere. Additional improvements include a coupled retrieval of the effective albedo, a new method for normalization of the retrieval vector to improve signal-to-noise, and the use of an initial guess that is representative of very low background aerosol loading conditions, which allows for maximal retrieval range. Furthermore, the Version 5 data set is compared to Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III 755 nm extinction profiles during the almost four years of mission overlap from 2002 to late 2005. The vertical structure in coincident profile measurements is well correlated and the statistics on a relatively large set of tight coincident measurements show agreement between the measurements from the two instruments to within approximately 10% throughout the 15 to 25 km altitude range, which covers the bulk of the stratospheric aerosol layer for the mid and high latitude cases studied here.

  17. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of

  18. Fluorescence from atmospheric aerosol detected by a lidar indicates biogenic particles in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Immler

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available With a lidar system that was installed in Lindenberg/Germany, we observed in June 2003, an extended aerosol layer at 13 km altitude in the lowermost stratosphere. This layer created an inelastic backscatter signal which we interpret as laser induced fluorescence from aerosol particles. Also, we find evidence for inelastic scattering in a smoke plume from a forest fire that we observed in the troposphere. Fluorescence from ambient aerosol had not yet been considered detectable by lidar. However, organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sticking to the aerosol particles, or bioaerosol such as bacteria, spores or pollen fluoresce when excited with UV-radiation in a way that is detectable by our lidar system. Therefore, we conclude that fluorescence from organic material released by biomass burning creates the inelastic backscatter signal that we measured with our instrument and thus demonstrate a new and powerful way to characterize aerosols by a remote sensing technique. The stratospheric aerosol layer that we have observed in Lindenberg for three consecutive days is likely to be a remnant from Siberian forest fire plumes lifted across the tropopause and transported around the globe.

  19. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol's thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ~27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3-5 W m(-2)) and a surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m(-2)). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments. PMID:24218569

  20. The coagulation of radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive aerosols can become charged by emitting charges during the decay process, and the resulting electrostatic forces will modify coagulation rates. For Brownian coagulation, calculations for nuclear containment aerosols show that rates averaged over charge distributions can be strongly reduced between particles of the same size, but that increases in average rates can occur for particles of different sizes. The increases arise from small, but significant, negative charging of non-radioactive and small-sized radioactive particles, and are sensitive to the asymmetry between the positive and negative ion mobilities. (Author)

  1. Influence of Humidity on the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasso, B. S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.; Jonsson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of attitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands or the EOS-AM ("Terra") detectors, MODIS and MISR. The UWPH measured (sigma(sub sp)) at 2 RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient (sigma(sub sp)) was obtained by interpolation of these 2 measurements. The data were stratified in terms of 3 types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., 2- or 1-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of (sigma(sub sp)) on RH, defined by (sigma(sub sp))(RH) = k. ((1 - RH/100)(exp -gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 + 0.06. Based on the measured (gamma)(s), the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each of those aerosol models at several ambient humidities. For the pre-launch estimated precision of the sensors and

  2. Radiation doses from contaminant aerosol deposition to the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly all assessments of radiation doses received following accidental airborne releases have focused on the contributions originating from the plume and from ground deposition. Very little thought has however been given to doses received from deposition directly onto humans. The results of recent experimental investigations of aerosol deposition to and clearance from human skin and clothing have been used to model the doses potentially received in an accident situation. It was found that both the skin dose from β-emitters and the whole body dose from γ-emitters may be significant compared with doses received through other pathways, such as external radiation from the environment. (au)

  3. Aerosols of Mongolian arid area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golobokova, L.; Marinayte, I.; Zhamsueva, G.

    2012-04-01

    Sampling was performed in July-August 2005-2010 at Station Sain Shand (44°54'N, 110°07'E) in the Gobi desert (1000 m a.s.l.), West Mongolia. Aerosol samples were collected with a high volume sampler PM 10 (Andersen Instruments Inc., USA) onto Whatman-41 filters. The substance was extracted from the filters by de-ionized water. The solution was screened through an acetate-cellulose filter with 0.2 micron pore size. Ions of ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium, as well as sulphate ions, nitrate ions, hydrocarbonate, chloride ions were determined in the filtrate by means of an atomic adsorption spectrometer Carl Zeiss Jena (Germany), a high performance liquid chromatographer «Milichrome A-02» (Russia), and an ionic chromatographer ICS-3000 (Dionex, USA). The PAH fraction was separated from aerosol samples using hexane extraction at room temperature under UV environment. The extract was concentrated to 0.1-0.2 ml and analysed by a mass-spectrometer "Agilent, GC 6890, MSD 5973 Network". Analysis of concentrations of aerosols components, their correlation ratios, and meteorological modeling show that the main factor affecting chemical composition of aerosols is a flow of contaminants transferred by air masses to the sampling area mainly from the south and south-east, as well as wind conditions of the area, dust storms in particular. Sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium are major ions in aerosol particles at Station Sain Shand. Dust-borne aerosol is known to be a sorbent for both mineral and organic admixtures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) being among superecotoxicants play an important role among resistant organic substances. PAH concentrations were determined in the samples collected in 2010. All aerosol samples contained dominant PAHs with 5-6 benzene rings ( (benze(k)fluoranthen, benze(b)flouranthen, benze(a)pyren, benze(?)pyren, perylene, benze(g,h,i)perylene, and indene(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene). Their total quantity varied between 42 and 90

  4. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    . Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300

  5. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  6. The HERMES recoil detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Belostotski, S.; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J.; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capitani, G. P.; Carassiti, V.; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Guler, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Hartig, M.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Jo, H. S.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Kisselev, A.; Krause, B.; Krauss, B.; Lagamba, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, S.; Lu, X.-G.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nowak, W.-D.; Naryshkin, Y.; Osborne, A.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrov, A.; Pickert, N.; Prahl, V.; Protopopescu, D.; Reinecke, M.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rubacek, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shearer, C.; Shutov, V.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vilardi, I.; Vikhrov, V.; Vogel, C.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.

    2013-05-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with a field strength of 1T. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  7. Advanced superconducting optical detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated advanced superconducting optical and infrared detectors for their integration with superconductive active circuits. The detectors are based on ultra-thin NbN striplines. NbN is the material of choice for single photon optical and infrared detectors, as already demonstrated in the literature. The detectors so far proposed are based on conceptually simple, although difficult to realize, sub-micrometric meander type structures. Most applications of such detectors require some treatment of the signal generated, either as pulse shaping or signal amplification, to fully exploit the detection capabilities, such as sub-ns response time and proportional response. We have developed a room temperature process that, while preserving reasonable superconducting properties of NbN, allows a simple integration of the detectors in Nb-based circuits. Moreover we have developed a passivation technique, by using a protective AlN layer on top of the NbN one. The developed technology allows complex detector configurations, such as integrated RSFQ circuits or SQUID readout, to be relatively easily realized. The response of our NbN strip to photon irradiation will be presented

  8. Profile detectors of GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design phase of GANIL, which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beam lines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The profile detectors are unavoidable tools in displaying the GANIL beams for adaptation and adjustment of the beam line optics. The installed detector assembly (about 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beams extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beams (VHIB), secondary ion beams emitted by LISE and SPEG spectrometers targets, different lines of SPIRAL project (HE, BE, ME): This detector assembly must meet the following standard requirements: flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; identical analog electronics for all the detectors with networking; unique visualization system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (the beam profile and ion packet length allow an in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability

  9. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  10. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Belostotski, S. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Insitute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Recoil Detector Group

    2013-02-15

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  11. The HERMES recoil detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  12. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : technical review and analysis supplement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2009-07-01

    This project seeks to provide vital data required to assess the consequences of a terrorist attack on a spent fuel transportation cask. One such attack scenario involves the use of conical shaped charges (CSC), which are capable of damaging a spent fuel transportation cask. In the event of such an attack, the amount of radioactivity that may be released as respirable aerosols is not known with great certainty. Research to date has focused on measuring the aerosol release from single short surrogate fuel rodlets subjected to attack by a small CSC device in various aerosol chamber designs. The last series of three experiments tested surrogate fuel rodlets made with depleted uranium oxide ceramic pellets in a specially designed double chamber aerosol containment apparatus. This robust testing apparatus was designed to prevent any radioactive release and allow high level radioactive waste disposal of the entire apparatus following testing of actual spent fuel rodlets as proposed. DOE and Sandia reviews of the project to date identified a number of issues. The purpose of this supplemental report is to address and document the DOE review comments and to resolve the issues identified in the Sandia technical review.

  13. Dissolution of LMFBR fuel-sodium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosols of either LMFBR fuel or PuO2 are essentially insoluble in water or biological fluids. If either of these aerosols is exposed to sodium metal vapor, the resulting aerosol is much more soluble in aqueous solutions. Preferential dissolution of uranium from mixed sodium-fuel aerosols makes the plutonium more readily soluble than for sodium-PuO2 aerosol. Ultrafiltration of the dissolution test solvent revealed the plutonium to be associated with particles between 2 nm and 10 nm in diameter, in both cases

  14. Contribution of methane to aerosol carbon mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, F.; Barmet, P.; Stirnweis, L.; El Haddad, I.; Platt, S. M.; Saurer, M.; Lötscher, C.; Siegwolf, R.; Bigi, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Slowik, J. G.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.

    2016-09-01

    Small volatile organic compounds (VOC) such as methane (CH4) have long been considered non-relevant to aerosol formation due to the high volatility of their oxidation products. However, even low aerosol yields from CH4, the most abundant VOC in the atmosphere, would contribute significantly to the total particulate carbon budget. In this study, organic aerosol (OA) mass yields from CH4 oxidation were evaluated at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) smog chamber in the presence of inorganic and organic seed aerosols. Using labeled 13C methane, we could detect its oxidation products in the aerosol phase, with yields up to 0.09

  15. Influence of the atmospheric aerosol and air pollution on solar albedo of the earth. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of increasing atmospheric aerosol and air pollutant concentration on the solar albedo and consequently upon the heat budget near the earth's surface is studied. The magnitude of aerosol absorption coefficient to back-scattering coefficient Bab/Bbs is calculated. This study will be used to estimate atmospheric stability categories and other meteorological parameters which are affected by thermal state radiation balance of the atmosphere as mixing and inversion height of Inshas nuclear reactor site. Consequently, concentration distribution of radioactive release from Inshas can be evaluated.. 4 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  17. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  18. Performance of GLD detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Yoshioka

    2007-12-01

    Most of the important physics processes to be studied in the international linear collider (ILC) experiment have multi-jets in the final state. In order to achieve better jet energy resolution, the so-called particle flow algorithm (PFA) will be employed and there is a general consensus that PFA derives overall ILC detector design. Four detector concepts for the ILC experiment have been proposed so far in the world; the GLD detector that has a large inner calorimeter radius, which is considered to have an advantage for a PFA, is one of them. In this paper, general scheme and performance of the GLD-PFA will be presented.

  19. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multicell X-ray or gamma detector is used in computer tomography. To achieve good spatial resolution, the electrode plates are narrowly spaced in each cell and are designed identical over the whole length of the detector group. The uniform spacing and precise check of the angles between the electrodes and accurate control of the dimensions of the whole detector structure are achieved by depositing, in the fabrication process, a viscous, resin type material (e.g., epoxy resin) or glue at selected points between the electrodes and insulators. (ORU)

  20. Lithium germanium detectors reactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A convenient method to regenerate the characteristics of damaged Ge(li) detectors, that has been applied in the authors' laboratory, is described. The procedure consists in warming-up the crystal in its cryostat to temperatures between 10 deg C and 30 deg C above room temperature, in order to clean its surface. Subsequent cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperature, followed by one or more clean-up drifting processes, are applied to the crystals. This paper summarizes the results obtained with several detectors; this method was applied successfully to 15 detectors more. (author)

  1. Nuclear radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a nuclear detector for neutrons and gamma rays. They are generally self quenching. They come back to initial state after the traversal of the particle which has triggered a detection. The detectors which deliver the higher charges are those which work in the regime of Geiger-Mueller. However, one does not know in the present state of the technique a gas detector which is sensitive to neutrons working in the Geiger-Mueller regime, self quenching and sensitive to neutrons and γ rays. The aim of the present invention is to overcome these difficulties

  2. The Silicon Cube detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental device, the Silicon Cube detector, consisting of six double-sided silicon strip detectors placed in a compact geometry was developed at CENBG. Having a very good angular coverage and high granularity, it allows simultaneous measurements of energy and angular distributions of charged particles emitted from unbound nuclear states. In addition, large-volume Germanium detectors can be placed close to the collection point of the radioactive species to be studied. The setup is ideally suited for isotope separation on-line (ISOL)-type experiments to study multi-particle emitters and was tested during an experiment at the low-energy beam line of SPIRAL at GANIL.

  3. Impacts of aerosol indirect effect on past and future changes in tropospheric composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Unger

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of effective emissions control policies that are beneficial to both climate and air quality requires a detailed understanding of all the feedbacks in the atmospheric composition and climate system. We perform sensitivity studies with a global atmospheric composition-climate model to assess the impact of aerosols on tropospheric chemistry through their modification on clouds, the aerosol indirect effect (AIE. The model includes coupling between both tropospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry and aerosols and liquid-phase clouds. We investigate past impacts from preindustrial (PI to present day (PD and future impacts from PD to 2050 (for the moderate IPCC A1B scenario that embrace a wide spectrum of precursor emission changes and consequential aerosol-cloud interactions. The AIE is estimated to be −2.0 W m−2 for PD–PI and −0.6 W m−2 for 2050–PD, at the high end of current estimates. Inclusion of aerosol-cloud interactions substantially impacts changes in global mean methane lifetime across both time periods, enhancing the past and future increases by 10% and 30%, respectively. In regions where pollution emissions increase, inclusion of aerosol-cloud effects leads to 20% enhancements in in-cloud sulfate production and ~10% enhancements in sulfate wet deposition that is displaced away from the immediate source regions. The enhanced in-cloud sulfate formation leads to larger increases in surface sulfate across polluted regions (~10–30%. Nitric acid wet deposition is dampened by 15–20% across the industrialized regions due to AIE allowing additional re-release of reactive nitrogen that contributes to 1–2 ppbv increases in surface ozone in outflow regions. Our model findings indicate that aerosol-cloud interactions must be considered in studies of methane trends and projections of future changes to particulate matter air quality.

  4. Light induced conversion of nitrogen dioxide into nitrous acid on submicron humic acid aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stemmler

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of aerosols consisting of humic acids with gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2 were investigated under different light conditions in aerosol flow tube experiments at ambient pressure and temperature. The results show that NO2 is converted on the humic acid aerosol into nitrous acid (HONO, which is released from the aerosol and can be detected in the gas phase at the reactor exit. The formation of HONO on the humic acid aerosol is strongly activated by light: In the dark, the HONO-formation was below the detection limit, but it was increasing with the intensity of the irradiation with visible light. Under simulated atmospheric conditions with respect to the actinic flux, relative humidity and NO2-concentration, reactive uptake coefficients γrxn for the NO2→HONO conversion on the aerosol between γrxn <10−7 (in the dark and γrxn = 6×10−6 were observed. The observed uptake coefficients decreased with increasing NO2-concentration in the range from 2.7 to 280 ppb and were dependent on the relative humidity (RH with slightly reduced values at low humidity (<20% RH and high humidity (>60% RH. The measured uptake coefficients for the NO2→HONO conversion are too low to explain the HONO-formation rates observed near the ground in rural and urban environments by the conversion of NO2→HONO on organic aerosol surfaces, even if one would assume that all aerosols consist of humic acid only. It is concluded that humic materials present on the Earth surface will have a much larger impact on the HONO-formation in the lowermost layer of the troposphere than humic materials potentially occurring in airborne particles.

  5. Elemental composition of aerosol particles from two atmospheric monitoring stations in the Amazon Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One key region for the study of processes that are changing the composition of the global atmosphere is the Amazon Basin tropical rain forest. The high rate of deforestation and biomass burning is emitting large amounts of gases and fine-mode aerosol particles to the global atmosphere. Two background monitoring stations are operating continuously measuring aerosol composition, at Cuiaba, and Serra do Navio. Fine- and coarse-mode aerosol particles are being collected using stacked filter units. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was used to measure concentrations of up to 21 elements: Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, and Pb. The elemental composition was measured at the new PIXE facility from the University of Sao Paulo, using a dedicated 5SDH tandem Pelletron nuclear accelerator. Absolute principal factor analysis (APFA) has derived absolute elemental source profiles. At the Serra do Navio sampling site a very clean background aerosol is being observed. Biogenic aerosol dominates the fine-mode mass concentration, with the presence of K, P, S, Cl, Zn, Br, and FPM. Three components dominate the aerosol composition: Soil dust particles, the natural biogenic release by the forest, and a marine aerosol component. At the Cuiaba site, during the dry season, a strong component of biomass burning is observed. An aerosol mass concentration up to 120 μg/m3 was measured. APFA showed three components: Soil dust (Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), biomass burning (soot, FPM, K, Cl) and natural biogenic particles (K, S, Ca, Mn, Zn). The fine-mode biogenic component of both sites shows remarkable similarities, although the two sampling sites are 3000 km apart. Several essential plant nutrients like P, K, S, Ca, Ni and others are transported in the atmosphere as a result of biomass burning processes. (orig.)

  6. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  7. Charge distributions and coagulation of radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-charging of radioactive aerosols will be reduced by background ions, such as those produced by radioactive gases. The sources of these background ions and their production rates are specified for a reactor containment atmosphere during a possible nuclear accident. Previous theory is extended to calculate the charging of a polydisperse radioactive aerosol. Gaussian approximations to charge distributions on an aerosol of a given size, and are shown to give a good representation of the exact numerical charge distributions of a Cs aerosol at normal temperatures, and also for highly radioactive aerosol containing 131I in a containment atmosphere. Extensive calculations are performed for charged-induced modifications to Brownian coagulation rates between steady-state size distribution of these radioactive aerosols, and also between small-sized radioactive aerosol and larger (non-radioactive) aerosol. The results show considerable enhancements of the coagulation rates between large and small-sized aerosol, but also a strong suppression of coagulation between large particles. Rate modifications calculated using the Gaussian approximations are generally close to the exact values. Time-dependent calculations for a monodisperse α-decaying aerosol reveal enhancements in coagulation rates even when the average charge on the aerosol is positive. Our results are relevant to behaviour in a dusty plasma. (author)

  8. The effects of aerosols on climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric aerosols (fine particles suspended in the atmosphere) can play two roles in the Earth’s radiation budget. In cloud-free air, aerosols scatter sunlight, some of which is reflected back to space (direct effect). Aerosols also determine the microphysical and optical properties of clouds (indirect effect). Whereas changes in natural aerosols are probably small during the last 100 years, there has been a large increase in the concentration of anthropogenic aerosols. The magnitude of their radiative effects is still very uncertain but seems to be sufficient to mask part of the global warming expected to stem from anthropogenic greenhouse gases. This paper presents the physical mechanisms of aerosol influence on climate. We then estimate the anthropogenic aerosol radiative effects and assess the climate response to these perturbations. (author)

  9. A statistical-numerical aerosol parameterization scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Chen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A new modal aerosol parameterization scheme, Statistical-Numerical Aerosol Parameterization (SNAP, was developed for studying aerosol processes and aerosol-cloud interactions in regional or global models. SNAP applies statistical fitting on numerical results to generate accurate parameterization formulas without sacrificing details of the growth kernel. Processes considered in SNAP include fundamental aerosol processes, as well as processes related to aerosol-cloud interactions. Comparison of SNAP with numerical solutions, analytical solutions, and binned aerosol model simulations showed that the new method performs well, with accuracy higher than that of the high-order numerical quadrature technique, at much less computation time. The SNAP scheme has been implemented in regional air quality models, producing results very close to those using binned-size schemes or numerical quadrature schemes.

  10. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trappe...

  11. Saving Joint with Aerosol physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Using electro spray method to analyze wear debris from artificial joints. Well known aerosol techniques have been applied to determine the size distribution and concentration of wear particles found in joint fluids. The organic fraction (cells and large molecules) are removed by digestion. Knowing these data the risk of clogging of blood vessels can be medicinally reduced. (author)

  12. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; Derousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-03-25

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried "nanomicroparticle" vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the former provides alignment of the principal nanodimension particle axes with the direction of airflow. Particles formed with this combination of nano- and micrometer-scale dimensions possess a greater ability to aerosolize than particles of standard spherical isotropic shape and of similar geometric diameter. Here, we demonstrate effective application of this biomaterial by using the live attenuated tuberculosis vaccine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Prepared as a spray-dried nanomicroparticle aerosol, BCG vaccine exhibited high-efficiency delivery and peripheral lung targeting capacity from a low-cost and technically simple delivery system. Aerosol delivery of the BCG nanomicroparticle to normal guinea pigs subsequently challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis significantly reduced bacterial burden and lung pathology both relative to untreated animals and to control animals immunized with the standard parenteral BCG. PMID:18344320

  13. Climatic impacts of anthropogenic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, T. [Oslo Univ. (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Anthropogenic production of aerosols is mainly connected with combustion of fossil fuel. Measured by particulate mass, the anthropogenic sulphate production is the dominating source of aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere. Particles emitted in mechanical processes, fly ash etc. are less important because of their shorter atmospheric residence time. Possible climatological effects of anthropogenic aerosols are usually classified in two groups: direct and indirect. Direct effects are alterations of the radiative heating budget due to the aerosol particles in clear air. Indirect effects involve the interaction between particles and cloud processes. A simplified one-layer radiation model gave cooling in the most polluted mid-latitude areas and heating due to soot absorption in the Arctic. This differential trend in heating rates may have significant effects on atmospheric meridional circulations, which is important for the atmosphere as a thermodynamic system. Recently the description of sulphur chemistry in the hemispheric scale dispersion model has been improved and will be used in a model for Mie scattering and absorption

  14. Modelling of the aerosol deposition in a hydrogen catalytic recombiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Studer, E.; Zavaleta, P. [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Prevention et d' Etudes des Accidents, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Hadida, Ph. [Quasar Informatique, Paris (France)

    1997-03-01

    Catalytic recombiners are used to remove the hydrogen released in case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, so as to reduce the risk of deflagration or detonation. H{sub 2}PAR experiments are carried out to precise the behaviour of recombiners in term of poisoning by aerosols. Firstly, some calculations have been done with the Trio-EF code to assess the structure of convection loops in the experimental tent. We note that when the recombiner is active, it may have a strong influence on the flow inside the tent and may even interact with an other heat source such as a furnace. In the second part, we study the deposition of aerosols on catalytic plates for a given recombiner, when it is active or passive. We list the different mechanisms and quantify them by introducing the deposition velocity. In fact, thermophoresis appears to be the main mechanism, compared to brownian diffusion or difrusiophoresis, which governs aerosols deposition. It favours deposition on <> plates and acts against it for <> plates. (author)

  15. Modelling of the aerosol deposition in a hydrogen catalytic recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic recombiners are used to remove the hydrogen released in case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, so as to reduce the risk of deflagration or detonation. H2PAR experiments are carried out to precise the behaviour of recombiners in term of poisoning by aerosols. Firstly, some calculations have been done with the Trio-EF code to assess the structure of convection loops in the experimental tent. We note that when the recombiner is active, it may have a strong influence on the flow inside the tent and may even interact with an other heat source such as a furnace. In the second part, we study the deposition of aerosols on catalytic plates for a given recombiner, when it is active or passive. We list the different mechanisms and quantify them by introducing the deposition velocity. In fact, thermophoresis appears to be the main mechanism, compared to brownian diffusion or difrusiophoresis, which governs aerosols deposition. It favours deposition on > plates and acts against it for > plates. (author)

  16. Change in the transport media of radionuclide in aerosol phase derived from the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Size segregated aerosols were collected at Tsukuba City, Japan, located 170 km south of the plant since 28 April, 2011, by use of a low-pressure cascade impactor. The radioactivity of 134Cs and 137Cs in aerosols were determined by γ-ray with a high sensitivity Germanic detector. After the γ-ray spectrometry analysis, the chemical species in the aerosols were analyzed. The activity size distributions of radiocesium measured from the first sample reside mostly in the accumulation mode size range and showed the double peak structure. These activity size distributions almost overlapped with the mass size distribution of non-sea-salt sulfate aerosol. From the results, we can regard that sulfate is the main transport medium of these radionuclides, and re-suspended soil particles that attached radionuclides were not the major airborne radioactive substances by the end of May, 2011 (Kaneyasu et al. ES and T, 2012). With the rough estimates of dry deposition velocities of radionuclides during the first large emission period, the changes in the activity size distributions and the mass size distribution of major aerosol components by the end of July, 2011, will be discussed in the presentation. (author)

  17. CFD simulation of aerosol deposition in an anatomically based human large-medium airway model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative data on aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract are useful for understanding the causes of certain lung diseases and for designing efficient drug delivery systems via inhalation. In this study, aerosol deposition in a 3D anatomically based human large-medium airway model was simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The model extended from mouth to generation 10 and included two-thirds of the airways obtained by multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging on normal healthy human subjects. Steady oral inhalation (15, 30, and 60 L/min) and aerosol (1-30 micrometer) deposition were computed by CFD using the realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. Based on the mean turbulence flow field, the computed extrathoracic deposition, ratio of left to right lung deposition, and deposition efficiency at each generation compared favorably with existing in vivo and in vitro experiments. The significant deposition in the large-medium airway model showed that the total tracheobronchial deposition is dominated by the large-medium airways for micrometer-sized aerosol particles. These quantitative data and the methods developed in this study provided valuable means toward subject-specific modeling of aerosol deposition in the human lung based on realistic lung geometry. PMID:19082892

  18. Aerosol behaviour modeling and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosol behavior within Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) containments is of critical importance since most of the radioactive species are expected to be associated with particulate forms and the mass of radiologically significant material leaked to the ambient atmosphere is directly related to the aerosol concentration airborne within the containment. Mathematical models describing the behavior of aerosols in closed environments, besides providing a direct means of assessing the importance of specific assumptions regarding accident sequences, will also serve as the basic tool with which to predict the consequences of various postulated accident situations. Consequently, considerable efforts have been recently directed toward the development of accurate and physically realistic theoretical aerosol behavior models. These models have accounted for various mechanisms affecting agglomeration rates of airborne particulate matter as well as particle removal rates from closed systems. In all cases, spatial variations within containments have been neglected and a well-mixed control volume has been assumed. Examples of existing computer codes formulated from the mathematical aerosol behavior models are the Brookhaven National Laboratory TRAP code, the PARDISEKO-II and PARDISEKO-III codes developed at Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, and the HAA-2, HAA-3, and HAA-3B codes developed by Atomics International. Because of their attractive short computation times, the HAA-3 and HAA-3B codes have been used extensively for safety analyses and are attractive candidates with which to demonstrate order of magnitude estimates of the effects of various physical assumptions. Therefore, the HAA-3B code was used as the nucleus upon which changes have been made to account for various physical mechanisms which are expected to be present in postulated accident situations and the latest of the resulting codes has been termed the HAARM-2 code. It is the primary purpose of the HAARM

  19. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  20. Effects of Microbial Aerosol in Poultry House on Meat Ducks' Immune Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guanliu; Wang, Yao; Wang, Shouguo; Duan, Changmin; Wei, Liangmeng; Gao, Jing; Chai, Tongjie; Cai, Yumei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of microbial aerosols on immune function of ducks and shed light on the establishment of microbial aerosol concentration standards for poultry. A total of 1800 1-d-old cherry valley ducks were randomly divided into five groups (A, B, C, D, and E) with 360 ducks in each. To obtain objective data, each group had three replications. Concentrations of airborne bacteria, fungi, endotoxin in different groups were created by controlling ventilation and bedding cleaning frequency. Group A was the control group and hygienic conditions deteriorated progressively from group B to E. A 6-stage Andersen impactor was used to detect the aerosol concentration of aerobes, gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and AGI-30 microbial air sampler detect the endotoxin, and Composite Gas Detector detect the noxious gas. In order to assess the immune function of meat ducks, immune indicators including H5 AIV antibody titer, IgG, IL-2, T-lymphocyte transformation rate, lysozyme and immune organ indexes were evaluated. Correlation coefficients were also calculated to evaluate the relationships among airborne bacteria, fungi, endotoxin, and immune indicators. The results showed that the concentration of airborne aerobe, gram-negative bacteria, fungi, endotoxin have a strong correlation to H5 AIV antibody titer, IgG, IL-2, T-lymphocyte transformation rate, lysozyme, and immune organ indexes, respectively. In addition, when the concentration of microbial aerosol reach the level of group D, serum IgG (6-8 weeks), lysozyme (4 week) were significantly higher than in group A (P aerosol adversely affected the immune level of meat ducks. The microbial aerosol values in group D provide a basis for recommending upper limit concentrations of microbial aerosols for healthy meat ducks. PMID:27582731

  1. Spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous aerosol aging in Central California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and adverse health effects. The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES was designed to study carbonaceous aerosols in the natural environment of Central Valley, California, and learn more about their atmospheric formation and aging. This paper presents results from spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous particles collected during CARES at the time of pollution accumulation event (27–29 June 2010, when in situ measurements indicated an increase in the organic carbon content of aerosols as the Sacramento urban plume aged. Computer controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (CCSEM/EDX and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS were used to probe the chemical composition and morphology of individual particles. It was found that the mass of organic carbon on individual particles increased through condensation of secondary organic aerosol. STXM/NEXAFS indicated that the number fraction of homogenous organic particles lacking inorganic inclusions (greater than ~50 nm diameter increased with plume age as did the organic mass per particle. Comparison of the CARES spectro-microscopic data set with a similar dataset obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign showed that individual particles in Mexico City contained twice as much carbon as those sampled during CARES. The number fraction of soot particles at the Mexico City urban site (30% was larger than at the CARES urban site (10% and the most aged samples from CARES contained less carbon-carbon double bonds. Differences between carbonaceous particles in Mexico City and California result from different sources, photochemical conditions, gas phase reactants, and secondary organic aerosol precursors. The detailed results provided by these spectro

  2. Microwave Radiation Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  3. Simplified phase detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    Tanlick sine-wave phase detector gives dc output voltage nearly proportional to phase difference between oscillator signal and reference signal. Device may be used for systems in which signal-to-noise ratio is high.

  4. Control rod position detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention can save blowers for compulsory cooling. That is, the control rod position detector comprises (1) a control rod driving shaft made of a ferromagnetic material moving in a pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor and (2) detector coils arranged to the outside of the pressure vessel each at an identical distance over the moving stroke of the driving shaft for detecting the position of the driving shaft by the change of inductance. In addition, heat insulation materials are disposed between the detector coils and the reactor pressure vessel. Then, heat from the reactor pressure vessel can be insulated. Accordingly, temperature of the detector coils can be reduced by natural cooling. As a result, since it is no more necessary to dispose compulsory cooling fans as required in a conventional case, the entire device can be constituted economically, and the reliability of the device is improved. (I.S.)

  5. Multiple detectors "Influence Method".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, I J; Mayer, R E

    2016-05-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015a). Its detailed mathematical description was recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015b) and its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016). With the objective of further reducing the measurement uncertainties, in this article we extend the method for the case of multiple detectors placed one behind the other. The new estimators for the number of particles and the detection efficiency are herein derived. PMID:26943904

  6. Infrared Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The end goal of this project is to develop proof-of-concept infrared detectors which can be integrated in future infrared instruments engaged in remote...

  7. Pendulum detector testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs

  8. Modular optical detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Brent A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2006-02-14

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  9. Hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid photon detectors detect light via vacuum photocathodes and accelerate the emitted photoelectrons by an electric field towards inversely polarized silicon anodes, where they are absorbed, thus producing electron-hole pairs. These, in turn, are collected and generate electronic signals on their ohmic contacts. This review first describes the characteristic properties of the main components of hybrid photon detectors: light entrance windows, photocathodes, and silicon anodes. Then, essential relations describing the trajectories of photoelectrons in electric and magnetic fields and their backscattering from the silicon anodes are derived. Depending on their anode configurations, three families of hybrid photon detectors are presented: hybrid photomultiplier tubes with single anodes for photon counting with high sensitivity and for gamma spectroscopy; multi-anode photon detector tubes with anodes subdivided into square or hexagonal pads for position-sensitive photon detection; imaging silicon pixel array t...

  10. The Advanced LIGO Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschel, Peter

    2016-03-01

    After decades of development, the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are now operating, and they completed their first observational run in early 2016. Advanced LIGO consists of two 4-km scale interferometric detectors located at separate sites in the US. The first year of detector commissioning that led to the first observation run produced instruments that have several times better sensitivity to gravitational-wave strain than previous instruments. At their final design sensitivity, the detectors will be another factor of 2-3x more sensitive than current performance. This talk will cover the design of Advanced LIGO, explain how the sensitivity improvements have been achieved, and lay out the path to reaching final design sensitivity.

  11. The pixelated detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Sutton, C

    1990-01-01

    "Collecting data as patterns of light or subatomic particles is vitally important in all the sciences. The new generation of solid-state detectors called pixel devices could transform experimental research at all levels" (4 pages).

  12. The LUX Prototype Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bedikian, S; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Bradley, A; Cahn, S; Carr, D; Chapman, J J; Clark, K; Classen, T; Curioni, A; Dahl, C E; Dazeley, S; deViveiros, L; Dragowsky, M; Druszkiewicz, E; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Hall, C; Faham, C; Holbrook, B; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Kwong, J; Lander, R; Leonard, D; Malling, D; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D; Mock, J; Morii, M; Nikkel, J; Phelps, P; Shutt, T; Skulski, W; Sorensen, P; Spaans, J; Steigler, T; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Thomson, J; Tripathi, M; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2012-01-01

    The LUX (Large Underground Xenon) detector is a two-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) designed to search for WIMP-nucleon dark matter interactions. As with all noble element detectors, continuous purification of the detector medium is essential to produce a large ($>$1ms) electron lifetime; this is necessary for efficient measurement of the electron signal which in turn is essential for achieving robust discrimination of signal from background events. In this paper we describe the development of a novel purification system deployed in a prototype detector. The results from the operation of this prototype indicated heat exchange with an efficiency above 94% up to a flow rate of 42 slpm, allowing for an electron drift length greater than 1 meter to be achieved in approximately two days and sustained for the duration of the testing period.

  13. ATLAS Inner Detector developments

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector consists of three layers of silicon pixels, four double layers of silicon microstrips and a Transition Radiation Tracker (straw tubes). The good performance of the track and vertex reconstruction algorithms is a direct consequence of the small radius (4.3, 10.1 and 13.2 cm), fine pitch ($50 \\times 300~\\mu$m) and low occupancy ($<3 \\times 10^{-4}$ at design luminosity) of the pixel detectors, and of the good tracking capabilities of the SCT and the TRT. The full detector simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the detector and of the reconstruction algorithms. Results are presented on track and vertex reconstruction efficiencies and resolutions, and on the separation between $b$-jets and jets produced by light quarks.

  14. Recent ATLAS Detector Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    de Nooij, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    During the recent LHC shutdown period, ATLAS performed vital maintenance and improvements on the various sub-detectors. For the calorimeters, repairs were carried out on front-end electronics and power supplies to recover detector coverage that had been lost since the last maintenance period. The ALFA luminosity detector was installed along the beam line and is currently being commissioned. Smaller scale repairs were needed on the Inner Detector. Maintenance on the muon system included repairs on the readout as well as updates and leak checks in the gas systems. Six TGC chambers were also replaced. This poster summarizes the repairs and their expected improvement for physics performance and reliability of ATLAS for the upcoming LHC run.

  15. ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Christensen, C

    2013-01-01

    The Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) extends the coverage for multiplicity of charge particles into the forward regions - giving ALICE the widest coverage of the 4 LHC experiments for these measurements.

  16. Improved CO [lidar detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, P.L.; Busch, G.E.; Thompson, D.C.; Remelius, D.K.; Wells, F.D.

    1999-07-18

    A high sensitivity, CO{sub 2} lidar detector, based on recent advances in ultra-low noise, readout integrated circuits (ROIC), is being developed. This detector will combine a high speed, low noise focal plane array (FPA) with a dispersive grating spectrometer. The spectrometer will filter the large background flux, thereby reducing the limiting background photon shot noise. In order to achieve the desired low noise levels, the HgCdTe FPA will be cooled to {approximately}50K. High speed, short pulse operation of the lidar system should enable the detector to operate with the order of a few noise electrons in the combined detector/ ROIC output. Current receiver design concepts will be presented, along with their expected noise performance.

  17. Novel Photo-Detectors and Photo-Detector Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Danilov, M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in photo-detectors and photo-detector systems are reviewed. The main emphasis is made on Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPM) - novel and very attractive photo-detectors. Their main features are described. Properties of detectors manufactured by different producers are compared. Different applications are discussed including calorimeters, muon detection, tracking, Cherenkov light detection, and time of flight measurements.

  18. Aerosol retention in the flooded steam generator bundle during SGTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → High retention of aerosol particles in a steam generator bundle flooded with water. → Increasing particle inertia, i.e., particle size and velocity, increases retention. → Much higher retention of aerosol particles in the steam generator bundle flooded with water than in a dry bundle. → Much higher retention of aerosol particles in the steam generator bundle than in a bare pool. → Bare pool models have to be adapted to be applicable for flooded bundles. - Abstract: A steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor may cause accidental release of radioactive particles into the environment. Its specific significance is in its potential to bypass the containment thereby providing a direct pathway of the radioactivity from the primary circuit to the environment. Under certain severe accident scenarios, the steam generator bundle may be flooded with water. In addition, some severe accident management procedures are designed to minimize the release of radioactivity into the environment by flooding the defective steam generator secondary side with water when the steam generator has dried out. To extend our understanding of the particle retention phenomena in the flooded steam generator bundle, tests were conducted in the ARTIST and ARTIST II programs to determine the effect of different parameters on particle retention. The effects of particle type (spherical or agglomerate), particle size, gas mass flow rate, and the break submergence on particle retention were investigated. Results can be summarized as follows: increasing particle inertia was found to increase retention in the flooded bundle. Particle shape, i.e., agglomerate or spherical structure, did not affect retention significantly. Even with a very low submergence, 0.3 m above the tube break, significant aerosol retention took place underlining the importance of the jet-bundle interactions close to the tube break. Droplets were entrained from the water surface with

  19. Impact of the modal aerosol scheme GLOMAP-mode on aerosol forcing in the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bellouin, N; Mann, G.W.; Woodhouse, M.T.; Johnson, C.; Carslaw, K. S.; Dalvi, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM) includes two aerosol schemes: the Coupled Large-scale Aerosol Simulator for Studies in Climate (CLASSIC), and the new Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP-mode). GLOMAP-mode is a modal aerosol microphysics scheme that simulates not only aerosol mass but also aerosol number, represents internally-mixed particles, and includes aerosol microphysical processes such as nucleation. In this study, both schemes provide hindcast simulations of...

  20. Composition and physical properties of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer and the North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, P.; Toon, OB; Neely, RR; Martinsson, BG; Brenninkmeijer, CAM

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies revealed layers of enhanced aerosol scattering in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Asia (Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)) and North America (North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer (NATAL)). We use a sectional aerosol model (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA)) coupled with the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) to explore the composition and optical properties of these aerosol layers. The observed aerosol extinctio...

  1. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E.C.; S. Belostotski(St. Petersburg, INP); Borissov, A; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J; Capitani, G.P.; V. Carassiti; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M; R.Leo

    2013-01-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct ...

  2. Silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main scope of this laboratory is to give the students an introduction of some special characteristics of silicon microstrip detectors. The students will perform some exercises using different instruments to appreciate the properties of these detectors, especially its great position resolution. An overview of different instruments such as an oscilloscope, wave function generator as others will be also given as important devices in any experimental laboratory

  3. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  4. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  5. Quantification of the release of inorganic elements from biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Flemming; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Korbee, Rob;

    2007-01-01

    The release of inorganic elements, mainly K, Na, Zn, Pb, S, and Cl, from a number of well-characterized biofuels (wood chips, bark, waste wood, and straw) was quantified as a function of temperature in a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor, and as a function of residence time in a lab-scale entrained flow...... reactor. The fuels were characterized by use of wet chemical analysis, and also by advanced techniques: chemical fractionation analysis (of the raw fuels) and simultaneous thermal analysis (of ash samples derived from the fuels at 550 degrees C). In parallel to the experimental release investigation and...... elements are thermodynamically stable as a function of temperature. This information is needed for the interpretation of the lab-scale release data. Thus, for the purpose of modeling ash or aerosol formation, fuel characterization methods should be combined with lab-scale release measurements. Pilot...

  6. Fission-product release from irradiated LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental investigation of fission product release from commercial LWR fuel under accident conditions is being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This work, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is an extension of earlier experiments up to 16000C and is designed to obtain the experimental data needed to reliably assess the consequences of accidents for fuel temperatures up to melting. The objectives of this program are (1) to determine fission product release rates from fully-irradiated commercial LWR fuel in high-temperature steam; (2) to collect and characterize the aerosol released; (3) to identify the chemical forms of the released material; (4) to correlate the results with related experimental data and develop a consistent source term model; and (5) to aid in the interpretation of tests using simulated LWR fuel

  7. Modelling semiconductor pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieson, K

    2001-01-01

    expected after 200 ps in most cases. The effect of reducing the charge carrier lifetime and examining the charge collection efficiency has been utilised to explore how these detectors would respond in a harsh radiation environment. It is predicted that over critical carrier lifetimes (10 ps to 0.1 ns) an improvement of 40 % over conventional detectors can be expected. This also has positive implications for fabricating detectors, in this geometry, from materials which might otherwise be considered substandard. An analysis of charge transport in CdZnTe pixel detectors has been performed. The analysis starts with simulation studies into the formation of contacts and their influence on the internal electric field of planar detectors. The models include a number of well known defect states and these are balanced to give an agreement with a typical experimental I-V curve. The charge transport study extends to the development of a method for studying the effect of charge sharing in highly pixellated detectors. The ...

  8. Detectors for CBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss some current approaches to a large solid angle detector. An alternative approach for utilizing the high rate of events at CBA is to design special purpose detectors for specific physics goals which can be pursued within a limited solid angle. In many cases this will be the only way to proceed, and then high luminosity has a different significance. The total rate in the restricted acceptance is less likely to be a problem, while the need for high luminosity to obtain sufficient data is obvious. Eight such experiments from studies carried out in the community are surveyed. Such experiments could be run on their own or in combination with others at the same intersection, or even with a large solid angle detector, if a window can be provided in the larger facility. The small solid angle detector would provide the trigger and special information, while the facility would provide back-up information on the rest of the event. We consider some possibilities of refurbishing existing detectors for use at CBA. This discussion is motivated by the fact that there is a growing number of powerful detectors at colliding beam machines around the world. Their builders have invested considerable amounts of time, money and ingenuity in them, and may wish to extend the useful lives of their creations, as new opportunities arise

  9. Protecting Detectors in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Mateusz Lechman, Mateusz; Chochula, Peter; Di Mauro, Antonio; Jirden, Lennart Stig; Schindler, Heinrich; Rosinsky, Peter; Moreno, Alberto; Kurepin, Alexander; Pinazza, Ombretta; De Cataldo, Giacinto

    2011-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the big LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments at CERN in Geneva. It is composed of many sophisticated and complex detectors mounted very compactly around the beam pipe. Each detector is a unique masterpiece of design, engineering and construction and any damage to it could stop the experiment for months or even for years. It is therefore essential that the detectors are protected from any danger and this is one very important role of the Detector Control System (DCS). One of the main dangers for the detectors is the particle beam itself. Since the detectors are designed to be extremely sensitive to particles they are also vulnerable to any excess of beam conditions provided by the LHC accelerator. The beam protection consists of a combination of hardware interlocks and control software and this paper will describe how this is implemented and handled in ALICE. Tools have also been developed to support operators and shift leaders in the decision making related...

  10. EMSP Final Report: Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaoli, D.W.

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electrically driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume. There was anecdotal evidence in the literature that acoustic agglomeration and electrical coalescence could be used together to change the size distribution of aerosol particles in such a way as to promote easier filtration and less frequent maintenance of filtration systems. As such, those electrically driven technologies could potentially be used as remote technologies for improved treatment; however, existing theoretical models are not suitable for prediction and design. To investigate the physics of such systems, and also to prototype a system for such processes, a collaborative project was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Texas at Austin (UT). ORNL was responsible for the larger-scale prototyping portion of the project, while UT was primarily responsible for the detailed physics in smaller scale unit reactors. It was found that both electrical coalescence and acoustic agglomeration do in fact increase the rate of aggregation of aerosols. Electrical coalescence requires significantly less input power than acoustic agglomeration, but it is much less effective in its ability to aggregate/coalesce aerosols. The larger-scale prototype showed qualitatively similar results as the unit reactor tests, but presented more difficulty in interpretation of the results because of the complex multi-physics coupling that necessarily occur in all larger

  11. Determination of 210Pb e 210Po in marine samples and aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the methodologies for 210Pb e 210Po analyses in marine samples, such as fish, seaweed, sediment, and aerosol samples are presented. The 210Pb levels in the samples were obtained by both210Bi and 210Po ingrowth. The 210Pb analysis via 210Bi presents the following steps: 210Pb leaching from samples with 8 M nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide; lead sulphate precipitation; conversion to carbonate; dissolution; lead sulphate precipitation; gravimetric analysis of lead; waiting of time to reach radioactive equilibrium and 210Bi beta counting by employing a Geiger-Mueller detector with a low background radiation. The 210Pb analysis via 210Po presents the following steps: 210Pb and 210Po leaching from samples with 8 M nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide; nitric acid elimination by heating and hydrochloric acid addition; spontaneous deposition onto silver disc and alpha counting of polonium in silicon surface-barrier detector. In order to determine 210Pb activity, the solution was percolated in the Dowex AG 1-X 8 anion exchange resin; preconditioned with 8 M nitric acid; the lead was eluted by 8 M hydrochloric acid; the solution was gently evaporated to dryness and diluted with 0.5 N hydrochloric acid. After 3-6 months a second 210Po spontaneous deposition onto silver disc was carried out. The methodology for 210Pb analysis via 210Bi showed lead recoveries from 63 to 100%. In the method via 210Po the polonium recoveries were varied from 39 to 63% under manual agitation, and from 60 to 100% under mechanical agitation. The radiochemical methods for 210Po and 210Pb analyses were applied in reference samples from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the results obtained showed the good precision and accuracy of the established methods. The analysis of marine sediment samples of Antarctica presented 210Pb and Po levels from 8 to 60 Bq.kg-1, and fish samples from Sao Paulo Coast presented 210Po levels from 0.5 to 5.3 Bq.kg-1. These results for fish are

  12. ATLAS Inner Detector (Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker)

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    To raise awareness of the basic functions of the Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker in the ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN. This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the detector, seeing critical pieces of the detector and hearing short explanations of how each works.

  13. Aerosol classification by airborne high spectral resolution lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Groß

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During four aircraft field experiments with the DLR research aircraft Falcon in 1998 (LACE, 2006 (SAMUM-1 and 2008 (SAMUM-2 and EUCAARI, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL and in situ measurements of aerosol microphysical and optical properties were performed. Altogether, the properties of six different aerosol types and aerosol mixtures – Saharan mineral dust, Saharan dust mixtures, Canadian biomass burning aerosol, African biomass burning aerosol, anthropogenic pollution aerosol, and marine aerosol have been studied. On the basis of this extensive HSRL data set, we present an aerosol classification scheme which is also capable to identify mixtures of different aerosol types. We calculated mixing lines that allowed us to determine the contributing aerosol types. The aerosol classification scheme was validated with in-situ measurements and backward trajectory analyses. Our results demonstrate that the developed aerosol mask is capable to identify complex stratifications with different aerosol types throughout the atmosphere.

  14. Dispersion of aerosol particles in the atmosphere: Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haszpra, Tímea; Lagzi, István; Tél, Tamás

    2013-04-01

    Investigation of dispersion and deposition of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is an essential issue, because they have an effect on the biosphere and atmosphere. Moreover, aerosol particles have different transport properties and chemical and physical transformations in the atmosphere compared to gas phase air pollutants. The motion of a particle is described by a set of ordinary differential equations. The large-scale dynamics in the horizontal direction can be described by the equations of passive scalar advection, but in the vertical direction a well-defined terminal velocity should be taken into account as a term added to the vertical wind component. In the planetary boundary layer turbulent diffusion has an important role in the particle dispersion, which is taken into account by adding stochastic terms to the deterministic equations above. Wet deposition is also an essential process in the lower levels of the atmosphere, however, its precise parameterization is a challenge. For the simulations the wind field and other necessary data were taken from the ECMWF ERA-Interim database. In the case of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (March-April 2011) radioactive aerosol particles were also released in the planetary boundary layer. Simulations (included the continuous and varying emission from the nuclear power plant) will be presented for the period of 14-23 March. Results show that wet deposition also has to be taken into consideration in the lower levels of the atmosphere. Furthermore, dynamical system characteristics are evaluated for the aerosol particle dynamics. The escape rate of particles was estimated both with and without turbulent diffusion, and in both cases when there was no wet deposition and also when wet deposition was taken into consideration.

  15. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the

  16. Aerosols in Santiago de Chile: A study using receptor modeling with X-ray fluorescence and single particle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Carlos M.; Artaxo, Paulo; Van Grieken, René

    Between 15 January and 26 February 1987, 51 fine and coarse mode aerosol samples were collected at the Universidad de Santiago de Chile Planetarium using a dichotomous sampler. The samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence for up to 17 elements (Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb). Aerosol particles were individually studied by Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA) and Laser Microprobe Mass Analysis (LAMMA). The data set consisting of aerosol elemental concentrations and meteorological variables was subjected to Principal Factor Analysis (PFA), allowing the identification of six fine mode particle source classes (soil, industrial, sulfate particles, traffic, residual oil, wood-burnings), and five coarse mode particle source classes (soil, industrial, traffic, residual oil, sulfate particles). Both PFA solutions explained about 81 and 90% of the total variance in the data set, respectively. The regression of elemental mass concentrations on the Absolute Principal Factor Scores allowed the estimation of the contribution of the different source classes to the Santiago aerosol. Within the fine fraction, secondary SO 42- particles were responsible for about 49% of the fine mode aerosol mass concentration, while 26, 13, 6.4 and 5.6% were attributed to wood-burning/car exhausts, residual oil combustion, soil dust/metallurgical, and soil dust/wood-burning releases, respectively. The coarse fraction source apportionment was mainly dominated by soil dust, accounting for 74% of the coarse mode aerosol mass concentration. A composite of soil dust and industrial release accounted for 13%; a composite of secondary sulfates contributed with 9%; a composite of soil dust and automotive emissions, and secondary sulfates were responsible for 4 and 0.03% of the coarse aerosol mass concentration, respectively. EPMA results are in satisfactory agreement with those from the bulk analysis and allowed the identification of eight particle types in both fine

  17. The ALICE forward multiplicity detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm Christensen, Christian; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan; Sogaard, Carsten;

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4......The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4...

  18. Seasonal and diurnal cycles of 0.25-2.5 μm aerosol fluxes over urban Stockholm, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, M.; Nilsson, E. D.; Ahlm, L.; Mártensson, E. M.; Johansson, C.

    2011-11-01

    Size resolved aerosol and gas fluxes were measured in Stockholm from 1 April 2008 to 15 April 2009 over both urban and green sectors. CO2 and H2O fluxes peaked in daytime for all seasons. CO2 concentrations peaked in winter. Due to vegetation influence the CO2 fluxes had different diurnal cycles and magnitude in the two sectors. In the urban sector, CO2 fluxes indicated a net source. The sector dominated by residential areas and green spaces had its highest aerosol fluxes in winter. In spring, super micrometer concentrations for both sectors were significantly higher, as were the urban sector rush hour fluxes. The submicrometer aerosol fluxes had a similar diurnal pattern with daytime maxima for all seasons. This suggests that only the super micrometer aerosol emissions are dependent on season. During spring there was a clear difference in super micrometer fluxes between wet and dry streets. Our direct flux measurements have improved the understanding of the processes behind these aerosol emissions. They support the hypothesis that the spring peak in aerosol emissions are due to road dust, produced during the winter, but not released in large quantities until the roads dry up during spring, and explain why Stockholm has problems meeting the EU directive for aerosol mass (PM10).

  19. Detectors on the drawing board

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Linear collider detector developers inside and outside CERN are tackling the next generation of detector technology. While their focus has centred on high-energy linear collider detectors, their innovative concepts and designs will be applicable to any future detector.   A simulated event display in one of the new generation detectors. “While the LHC experiments remain the pinnacle of detector technology, you may be surprised to realise that the design and expertise behind them is well over 10 years old,” says Lucie Linssen, CERN’s Linear Collider Detector (LCD) project manager whose group is pushing the envelope of detector design. “The next generation of detectors will have to surpass the achievements of the LHC experiments. It’s not an easy task but, by observing detectors currently in operation and exploiting a decade’s worth of technological advancements, we’ve made meaningful progress.” The LCD team is curr...

  20. Release and characteristics of fungal fragments in various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah-Attipoe, Jacob; Saari, Sampo; Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Pasanen, Pertti; Keskinen, Jorma; Leskinen, Jari T T; Reponen, Tiina

    2016-03-15

    Intact spores and submicrometer size fragments are released from moldy building materials during growth and sporulation. It is unclear whether all fragments originate from fungal growth or if small pieces of building materials are also aerosolized as a result of microbial decomposition. In addition, particles may be formed through nucleation from secondary metabolites of fungi, such as microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). In this study, we used the elemental composition of particles to characterize the origin of submicrometer fragments released from materials contaminated by fungi. Particles from three fungal species (Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium brevicompactum), grown on agar, wood and gypsum board were aerosolized using the Fungal Spore Source Strength Tester (FSSST) at three air velocities (5, 16 and 27m/s). Released spores (optical size, dp≥0.8μm) and fragments (dp≤0.8μm) were counted using direct-reading optical aerosol instruments. Particles were also collected on filters, and their morphology and elemental composition analyzed using scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) coupled with an Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Among the studied factors, air velocity resulted in the most consistent trends in the release of fungal particles. Total concentrations of both fragments and spores increased with an increase in air velocity for all species whereas fragment-spore (F/S) ratios decreased. EDX analysis showed common elements, such as C, O, Mg and Ca, for blank material samples and fungal growth. However, N and P were exclusive to the fungal growth, and therefore were used to differentiate biological fragments from non-biological ones. Our results indicated that majority of fragments contained N and P. Because we observed increased release of fragments with increased air velocities, nucleation of MVOCs was likely not a relevant process in the formation of fungal fragments. Based on elemental

  1. Onsite aerosol measurements for various engineered nanomaterials at industrial manufacturing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the health impact of and control over exposure to airborne engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) requires information, inter alia, the magnitude of environmental release during various industrial processes, as well as the size distribution and morphology of the airborne ENM particles. In this study, we performed onsite aerosol measurements for various ENMs at industrial manufacturing plants. The industrial processes investigated were the collection of SiC from synthesis reactors, synthesis and bagging of LiFePO4, and bagging of ZnO. Real-time aerosol monitoring using condensation particle counters, optical particle counters, and an electrical low-pressure impactor revealed frequent increases in the number concentrations of submicron- and micron-sized aerosol particles, but few increases in the number concentrations of nanoparticles. In the SEM observations, a large number of submicron- and micron-sized agglomerated ENM particles were observed.

  2. biogenic aerosol precursors: volatile amines from agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Uwe; Sintermann, Jörg; Spirig, Christoph; Ammann, Christof; Neftel, Albrecht

    2010-05-01

    Information on the occurrence of volatile biogenic amines in the atmosphere is marginal. This group of N-bearing organic compounds are assumed to be a small, though significant component of the atmospheric N-cycle, but are not accounted for in global assessments due to the scarceness of available data. There is increasing evidence for an important role of biogenic amines in the formation of new particulate matter, as well as for aerosol secondary growth. Volatile amines are ubiquitously formed by biodegradation of organic matter, and agriculture is assumed to dominantly contribute to their atmospheric burden. Here we show that the mixing ratios of volatile amines within livestock buildings scale about 2 orders of magnitude lower than NH3, confirming the few literature data available (e.g., Schade and Crutzen, J. Atm. Chem. 22, 319-346, 1995). Flux measurements after manure application in the field, mixing ratios in the headspace of manure storage pools, and concentrations in distilled manure all indicate major depletion of amines relative to NH3 during manure processing. We conclude that the agricultural source distribution of NH3 and amines is not similar. While for NH3 the spreading of manure in the field dominates agricultural emissions, the direct release from livestock buildings dominates the budget of volatile biogenic amines.

  3. Investigations of the MCP Detector of a Time-Of-Flight Detector for IMS at the FRS-ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry at the FRS-ESR facility at GSI can be used to perform high-precision mass measurements of exotic nuclei. The mass values are obtained from measuring the revolution time of the ions in the storage ring with a time-of-flight detector. The ions pass a thin carbon foil in the detector and release secondary electrons. These electrons are guided by electric and magnetic fields to two MCP detectors. Their number is amplified by micro channel plates and the resulting current is detected by an anode. In order to achieve an accurate time signal, the timing performance of the MCP detector is very important. The timing performance and the signal shape of the detector setup has been improved by including a new anode design. At the same time, the detector performance dependence on the magnetic field and the electron velocity inside of the MCP-detector was tested. The new detector design and the test results are presented.

  4. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannheim, D.

    2015-03-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration.

  5. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R and D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration

  6. Investigations of aerosol impacts on hurricanes: virtual seeding flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Carrió

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the feasibility of mitigating the intensity of hurricanes by enhancing the CCN concentrations in the outer rainband region. Increasing CCN concentrations would cause a reduced collision and coalescence, resulting in more supercooled liquid water to be transported aloft which then freezes and enhances convection via enhanced latent heat of freezing. The intensified convection would condense more water ultimately enhancing precipitation in the outer rainbands. Enhanced evaporative cooling from the increased precipitation in the outer rainbands would produce stronger and more widespread areal cold pools which block the flow of energy into the storm core, ultimately inhibiting the intensification of the tropical cyclone.

    We designed a series of multi-grid for which the time of the "virtual flights" as well as the aerosol release rates are varied. A code that simulates the flight of a plane is used to increase the CCN concentrations as an aircraft flies. Results show a significant sensitivity to both the seeding time and the aerosol release rates and support the aforementioned hypothesis.

  7. Investigations of aerosol impacts on hurricanes: virtual seeding flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Carrio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the feasibility of mitigating the intensity of hurricanes by enhancing the CCN concentrations in the outer rainband region. Increasing CCN concentrations would cause a reduced collision and coalescence, resulting in more supercooled liquid water to be transported aloft which then freezes and enhances convection via enhanced latent heat of freezing. The intensified convection would condense more water ultimately enhancing precipitation in the outer rainbands. Enhanced evaporative cooling from the increased precipitation in the outer rainbands would produce stronger and more widespread areal cold pools which block the flow of energy into the storm core, ultimately inhibiting the intensification of the tropical cyclone.

    We designed a series of multi-grid for which the time of the "virtual flights" as well as the aerosol release rates are varied. A code that simulates the flight of a plane is used to increase the CCN concentrations as an aircraft flies. Results show a significant sensitivity to both the seeding time and the aerosol release rates and support the aforementioned hypothesis.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of light scattering in the atmosphere and effect of atmospheric aerosols on the point spread function

    CERN Document Server

    Colombi, J

    2013-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation for the scattering of light in the case of an isotropic light source. The scattering phase functions are studied particularly in detail to understand how they can affect the multiple light scattering in the atmosphere. We show that although aerosols are usually in lower density than molecules in the atmosphere, they can have a non-negligible effect on the atmospheric point spread function. This effect is especially expected for ground-based detectors when large aerosols are present in the atmosphere.

  9. Evaluation of Observed and Modelled Aerosol Lifetimes Using Radioactive Tracers of Opportunity and an Ensemble of 19 Global Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivie, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Sovde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Shindell, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (Cs-137) and xenon-133 (Xe-133) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. Cs-137 size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation mode (AM) sulfate aerosols were the main carriers of cesium. Hence, Cs-137 can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulfate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas Xe-133 behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of Cs-137that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulfate, and Xe-133 emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulfate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled Cs-137and Xe-133 concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime e, calculated from station measurement data taken between 2 and 9 weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days (95

  10. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivié, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Søvde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bergman, T.; Evangeliou, N.; Wang, H.; Ma, P.-L.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P. J.; Liu, X.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; Zhao, S. Y.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Kokkola, H.; Martin, R. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Tost, H.; Zhang, H.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs) and xenon-133 (133Xe) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM) sulfate aerosols were the main carriers of cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulfate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulfate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulfate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 137Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between 2 and 9 weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days (95

  11. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Kristiansen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs and xenon-133 (133Xe were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM sulphate aerosols were the main carriers for the cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulphate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulphate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulphate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 37Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between two and nine weeks after the start of the

  12. Fission gas release (FGASRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During irradiation of water reactor fuel rods, gaseous fission products are produced in the fuel and are slowly released to various voipd volumes in the fuel rods. The released fission gases degrade the initial fill gas thermal conductivity and thus change the thermal response of the fuel rods. Moreover, fuel rod internal pressure is increased so that the cladding mechanical response is affected. The fission gas release subcode FGASRL is intended for use in analytical codes which predict water reactor fuel pin behavior. The development effort was directed primarily at improving code predictions of the gas release model used in FRAP-S3 which overpredicts release of fuels irradiated at relatively low operating temperatures and therefore small gas release fractions. The fission gas release subcode (FGASRL) presented in the report describes a two-step gas release process: (a) fission gas release from fuel grains to the grain boundaries, and (b) fission gas release from the grain boundaries to internal free volume of the fuel pin

  13. Optic detectors calibration for measuring ultra-high energy extensive air showers Cherenkov radiation by 532 nm laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knurenko, Stanislav; Petrov, Igor; Egorov, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    Calibration of a PMT matrix is crucial for the treatment of the data obtained with Cherenkov tracking detector. Furthermore, due to high variability of the aerosol abundance in the atmosphere depending on season, weather etc. A constant monitoring of the atmospheric transparency is required during the measurements. For this purpose, besides traditional methods, a station for laser atmospheric probing is used.

  14. Spectrometric characteristics of the γ emission of fission products: analysis of irradiated uranium with a 'germanium-lithium' detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the γ-ray spectra of atmospheric aerosol samples obtained with Ge-Li detectors, the spectrometric characteristics of fission product γ-ray emission had first to be specified by analyzing the evolution through time of the spectra of irradiated uranium. (authors)

  15. Optic detectors calibration for measuring ultra-high energy extensive air showers Cherenkov radiation by 532 nm laser

    CERN Document Server

    Knurenko, Stanislav; Petrov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Calibration of a PMT matrix is crucial for the treatment of the data obtained with Cherenkov tracking detector. Furthermore, due to high variability of the aerosol abundance in the atmosphere depending on season, weather etc. A constant monitoring of the atmospheric transparency is required during the measurements. For this purpose, besides traditional methods, a station for laser atmospheric probing is used.

  16. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  17. Assessment of fission product release from the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission product releases from the RCB associated with hypothetical core-melt accidents ABβ, S2CDβ and TLBβ in a PWR-900 MWe have been performed using French computer codes (in particular, the JERICHO Code for containment response analysis and AEROSOLS/B1 for aerosol behavior in the containment) related to thermalhydraulics and fission product behavior in the primary system and in the reactor containment building

  18. CCN activity of aliphatic amine secondary aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aliphatic amines can form secondary aerosol via oxidation with atmospheric radicals (e.g. hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical. The particle composition can contain both secondary organic aerosol (SOA and inorganic salts. The fraction of organic to inorganic materials in the particulate phase influences aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity. SOA formed from trimethylamine (TMA and butylamine (BA reactions with hydroxyl radical (OH is composed of organic material of low hygroscopicity (single hygroscopicity parameter, κ ≤ 0.25. Secondary aerosol formed from the tertiary aliphatic amine (TMA with N2O5 (source of nitrate radical, NO3, contains less volatile compounds than the primary aliphatic amine (BA aerosol. TMA + N2O5 form semi-volatile organics in low RH conditions that have κ ~ 0.20, indicative of slightly soluble organic material. As RH increases, several inorganic amine salts are formed as a result of acid-base reactions. The CCN activity of the humid TMA-N2O5 aerosol obeys Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson (ZSR ideal mixing rules. Higher CCN activity (κ > 0.3 was also observed for humid BA+N2O5 aerosols compared with dry aerosol (κ ~ 0.2, as a result of the formation of inorganic salts such as NH4NO3 and butylamine nitrate (C4H11N · HNO3. Compared with TMA, BA+N2O5 reactions produce more volatile aerosols. The BA+N2O5 aerosol products under humid experiments were found to be very sensitive to the temperature within the stream-wise continuous flow thermal gradient CCN counter. The CCN counter, when set above a 21 °C temperature difference, evaporates BA+N2O5 aerosol formed at RH ≥ 30%; κ ranges from 0.4 to 0.7 and is dependent on the instrument supersaturation (ss settings. The aerosol behaves non-ideally, hence simple ZSR rules cannot be applied to the CCN results from the primary aliphatic amine system. Overall, aliphatic amine aerosol systems κ ranges from 0.2 < κ < 0.7. This work indicates that

  19. How We Can Constrain Aerosol Type Globally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In addition to aerosol number concentration, aerosol size and composition are essential attributes needed to adequately represent aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) in models. As the nature of ACI varies enormously with environmental conditions, global-scale constraints on particle properties are indicated. And although advanced satellite remote-sensing instruments can provide categorical aerosol-type classification globally, detailed particle microphysical properties are unobtainable from space with currently available or planned technologies. For the foreseeable future, only in situ measurements can constrain particle properties at the level-of-detail required for ACI, as well as to reduce uncertainties in regional-to-global-scale direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). The limitation of in situ measurements for this application is sampling. However, there is a simplifying factor: for a given aerosol source, in a given season, particle microphysical properties tend to be repeatable, even if the amount varies from day-to-day and year-to-year, because the physical nature of the particles is determined primarily by the regional environment. So, if the PDFs of particle properties from major aerosol sources can be adequately characterized, they can be used to add the missing microphysical detail the better sampled satellite aerosol-type maps. This calls for Systematic Aircraft Measurements to Characterize Aerosol Air Masses (SAM-CAAM). We are defining a relatively modest and readily deployable, operational aircraft payload capable of measuring key aerosol absorption, scattering, and chemical properties in situ, and a program for characterizing statistically these properties for the major aerosol air mass types, at a level-of-detail unobtainable from space. It is aimed at: (1) enhancing satellite aerosol-type retrieval products with better aerosol climatology assumptions, and (2) improving the translation between satellite-retrieved aerosol optical properties and

  20. Detectors for proton counting. Si-APD and scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased intensity of synchrotron radiation requests users to prepare photon pulse detectors having higher counting rates. As detectors for photon counting, silicon-avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) and scintillation detectors were chosen for the fifth series of detectors. Principle of photon detection by pulse and need of amplification function of the detector were described. Structure and working principle, high counting rate measurement system, bunch of electrons vs. counting rate, application example of NMR time spectroscopy measurement and comments for users were described for the Si-APD detector. Structure of scintillator and photomultiplier tube, characteristics of scintillator and performance of detector were shown for the NaI detector. Future development of photon pulse detectors was discussed. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Beschrijving van een verdampings-condensatie aerosol generator voor de produktie van submicron aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijt; A.*; Meulen; A.van der

    1985-01-01

    Dit rapport is een handleiding voor een bedrijfszeker, routinematig gebruik van een zgn. Evaporation-Condensation aerosol Conditioner. Met deze aerosol generatie apparatuur kunnen op stabiele, reproduceerbare manier zeer hoge concentraties (tot 1 miljoen deeltjes per cc) monodispers submicron ae

  2. Odin-OSIRIS stratospheric aerosol data product and SAGE III intercomparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Bourassa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The scattered sunlight measurements made by the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS on the Odin spacecraft are used to retrieve vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction at 750 nm. The recently released OSIRIS Version 5 data product contains the first publicly released stratospheric aerosol extinction retrievals, and these are now available for the entire Odin mission, which extends from the present day back to launch in 2001. A proof-of-concept study for the retrieval of stratospheric aerosol extinction from limb scatter measurements was previously published and the Version 5 data product retrievals are based on this work, but incorporate several important improvements to the algorithm. One of the primary changes is the use of a new retrieval vector that greatly improves the sensitivity to aerosol scattering by incorporating a forward modeled calculation of the radiance from a Rayleigh atmosphere. Additional improvements include a coupled retrieval of the effective albedo, a new method for normalization of the measurement vector to improve signal-to-noise, and the use of an initial guess that is representative of very low background aerosol loading conditions, which allows for maximal retrieval range. Furthermore, the Version 5 data set is compared to SAGE III 755 nm extinction profiles during the almost four years of mission overlap from 2002 to late 2005. The vertical structure in coincident profile measurements is well correlated and the statistics on a relatively large set of tight coincident measurements show agreement between the measurements from the two instruments to within approximately 10 % throughout the 15 to 25 km altitude range, which covers the bulk of the stratospheric aerosol layer for the mid and high latitude cases studied here.

  3. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Belostotski, S; Borissov, A; Borisenko, A; Bowles, J; Brodski, I; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capitani, G P; Carassiti, V; Ciullo, G; Clarkson, A; Contalbrigo, M; De Leo, R; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Guler, H; Gregor, I M; Hartig, M; Hill, G; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Jo, H S; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kisselev, A; Krause, B; Krauss, B; Lagamba, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lu, S; Lu, X -G; Lumsden, S; Mahon, D; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nowak, W -D; Naryshkin, Y; Osborne, A; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrov, A; Pickert, N; Prahl, V; Protopopescu, D; Reinecke, M; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rubacek, L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Schnell, G; Seitz, B; Shearer, C; Shutov, V; Statera, M; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Varanda, M; Veretennikov, D; Vilardi, I; Vikhrov, V; Vogel, C; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yu, W; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B

    2013-01-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1 Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end...

  4. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy

  5. Detectors in Extreme Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaj, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carini, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carron, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Haller, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hart, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hasi, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Herrmann, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kenney, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Segal, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tomada, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-06

    Free Electron Lasers opened a new window on imaging the motion of atoms and molecules. At SLAC, FEL experiments are performed at LCLS using 120Hz pulses with 1012 - 1013 photons in 10 femtoseconds (billions of times brighter than the most powerful synchrotrons). This extreme detection environment raises unique challenges, from obvious to surprising. Radiation damage is a constant threat due to accidental exposure to insufficiently attenuated beam, focused beam and formation of ice crystals reflecting the beam onto the detector. Often high power optical lasers are also used (e.g., 25TW), increasing the risk of damage or impeding data acquisition through electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The sample can contaminate the detector surface or even produce shrapnel damage. Some experiments require ultra high vacuum (UHV) with strict design, surface contamination and cooling requirements - also for detectors. The setup is often changed between or during experiments with short turnaround times, risking mechanical and ESD damage, requiring work planning, training of operators and sometimes continuous participation of the LCLS Detector Group in the experiments. The detectors used most often at LCLS are CSPAD cameras for hard x-rays and pnCCDs for soft x-rays.

  6. Formation and characterization of fission-product aerosols under postulated HTGR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the formation mechanism and physical characterization of simulated nuclear aerosols that could likely be released during an HTGR core heat-up accident. Experiments were carried out in a high-temperature flow system consisting essentially of an inductively heated release source, a vapor deposition tube, and a filter assembly for collecting particulate matter. Simulated fission products Sr and Ba as oxides are separately impregnated in H451 graphite wafers and released at elevated temperatures into a dry helium flow. In the presence of graphite, the oxides are quantitatively reduced to metals, which subsequently vaporize at temperatures much lower than required for the oxides alone to vaporize in the absence of graphite. A substantial fraction of the released material is associated with particulate matter, which is collected on filters located downstream at ambient temperature. The release and transport of simulated fission product Ag as metal are also investigated

  7. Periodicities in Aerosol Optical Depths

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, S; Verma, Amit; Panigrahi, Prasanta K

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the temporal and spatial variability in aerosol optical depth (AOD) over different geographic locations in India due to their important role in the earth-atmosphere radiation budget. The use of continuous wavelet transform pinpoints the spatio-temporal non-stationarity of the periodic variations in the AOD depending on local factors. The optimal time-frequency localization ability of Morlet wavelet accurately isolates the periodic features in the different frequency domains, to study the variations in the dominant periods due to local effects. The origin of the effects on the periodic modulations is then related to physical phenomena of regional nature, which throws considerable light on the observed variations in aerosol optical depths. We also find the phase relationship between different locations and to identify the possible correlations between different geographic locations and related environmental variations.

  8. Photostimulated Aggregation of Metal Aerosols

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    The effect of optical radiation on the rate of aggregation of nanoscopic particles is studied in metal aerosols. It has been shown that under light exposure, polydisperse metal aerosols can aggregate up to two orders faster due to the size dependent photoelectron effect from nanoparticles. Different size nanoparticles undergo mutual heteropolar charging when exchanging photoelectrons through the interparticle medium to result in an increased rate of aggregation. It is shown that long-range electrostatic attractive forces drive the particles into closer distances where the short-range Van-der-Waals forces become dominating. Attention is drawn to the fact that this effect may occur in various types of dispersed systems as well as in natural heteroaerosols.

  9. Secondary organic aerosol formation from the gas phase reaction of hydroxyl radicals with m-, o- and p-cresol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Françoise; Coeur-Tourneur, Cecile; Ledoux, Frédéric; Tomas, Alexandre; Menu, Dominique

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation during the atmospheric oxidation of cresols was investigated using a large smog chamber (8000 L), at atmospheric pressure, 294±2 K and low relative humidity (6-10%). Cresol oxidation was initiated by irradiation of cresol/CH 3ONO/NO/air mixtures. The cresol loss was measured by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and the temporal evolution of the aerosol was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The overall organic aerosol yield ( Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses ( Mo) to the total reacted cresol concentrations assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm -3. Analysis of the data clearly show that Y is a strong function of Mo and that SOA formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial cresol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields from 9% to 42%. These results are in good agreement with a recent study performed on SOA formation from the photo-oxidation of o-cresol in a smog chamber. To our knowledge, the present work represents the first investigation of SOA formation from OH reaction with m- and p-cresol.

  10. Atmospheric PM and volatile organic compounds released from Mediterranean shrubland wildfires

    OpenAIRE

    García Hurtado, Elisa; Pey, Jorge; Borrás, Esther; Sánchez, Pilar; Vera, Teresa; Carratalá, Adoración; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier; Vallejo, V. Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires produce a significant release of gases and particles affecting climate and air quality. In the Mediterranean region, shrublands significantly contribute to burned areas and may show specific emission profiles. Our objective was to depict and quantify the primary-derived aerosols and precursors of secondary particulate species released during shrubland experimental fires, in which fire-line intensity values were equivalent to those of moderate shrubland wildfires, by using a number o...

  11. Overview of experimental programs on core melt progression and fission product release behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of experimental programs that have been conducted to better understand core melt progression phenomena and fission product behaviour during severe reactor accidents in water reactors is presented. This discussion principally focuses on the melting and liquefaction of core materials at different temperatures, materials oxidation and relocation, hydrogen generation behaviour, and the release and transport of fission products and aerosols. A comparison of fission product release results from annealing and in-reactor experiments is also presented. (author)

  12. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E;

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model of aerosol delivery from holding chambers (spacers) was developed incorporating tidal volume (VT), chamber volume (Vch), apparatus dead space (VD), effect of valve insufficiency and other leaks, loss of aerosol by immediate impact on the chamber wall, and fallout of aerosol...... in the chamber with time. Four different spacers were connected via filters to a mechanical lung model, and aerosol delivery during "breathing" was determined from drug recovery from the filters. The formula correctly predicted the delivery of budesonide aerosol from the AeroChamber (Trudell Medical, London......-mentioned factors, initial loss of aerosol by impact on the chamber wall is most important for the efficiency of a spacer. With a VT of 195 mL, the AeroChamber and Babyhaler were emptied in two breaths, the NebuChamber in four breaths, and the Nebuhaler in six breaths. Insufficiencies of the expiratory valves were...

  13. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; DeRousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R.; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P. Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-01-01

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried “nanomicroparticle” vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the form...

  14. Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global aerosol models

    OpenAIRE

    G. Myhre; F. Stordal; M. Johnsrud; Y. J. Kaufman; D. Rosenfeld; Storelvmo, T.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Berntsen, T. K.; Myhre, A.; I. S. A. Isaksen

    2007-01-01

    We have used the MODIS satellite data and two global aerosol models to investigate the relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud parameters that may be affected by the aerosol concentration. The relationships that are studied are mainly between AOD, on the one hand, and cloud cover, cloud liquid water path, and water vapour, on the other. Additionally, cloud droplet effective radius, cloud optical depth, cloud top pressure and aerosol Ångström exponent, have been a...

  15. High resolution aerosol optical thickness retrieval over the Pearl River Delta region with improved aerosol modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG ManSing; NICHOL Janet; LEE Kwon Ho; LI ZhanQing

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have been developed to estimate aerosol and microphysical properties of the atmosphere, which help to address aerosol climatic issues at global scale. However, higher spatial resolution aerosol products for urban areas have not been well researched mainly due to the difficulty of differentiating aerosols from bright surfaces in urban areas. Here, a new aerosol retrieval algorithm using the MODIS 500 m resolu-tion images is described, to retrieve aerosol properties over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta re-gion. The rationale of our technique is to first estimate the aerosol reflectance by decomposing the top-of-atmosphere reflectance from surface reflectance and Rayleigh path reflectance. For the deter-mination of surface reflectance, a modified Minimum Reflectance Technique (MRT) is used, and MRT images are computed for different seasons. A strong correlation is shown between the surface reflec-tance of MRT images and MODIS land surface reflectance products (MOD09), with a value of 0.9. For conversion of aerosol reflectance to Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), comprehensive Look Up Tables (LUT) are constructed, in which aerosol properties and sun-viewing geometry in the radiative transfer calculations are taken into account. Four aerosol types, namely mixed urban, polluted urban, dust, and heavy pollution, were derived using cluster analysis on three years of AERONET measurements in Hong Kong. Their aerosol properties were input for LUT calculation. The resulting 500 m AOT images are highly correlated (r=0.89) with AERONET sunphotometer observations in Hong Kong. This study demonstrates the applicability of aerosol retrieval at fine resolution scale in urban areas, which can assist the study of aerosol loading distribution and the impact of localized and transient pollution on urban air quality. In addition, the MODIS 500 m AOT images can be used to study cross

  16. High resolution aerosol optical thickness retrieval over the Pearl River Delta region with improved aerosol modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG; ManSing; NICHOL; Janet; LEE; Kwon; Ho

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have been developed to estimate aerosol and microphysical properties of the atmosphere, which help to address aerosol climatic issues at global scale. However, higher spatial resolution aerosol products for urban areas have not been well researched mainly due to the difficulty of differentiating aerosols from bright surfaces in urban areas. Here, a new aerosol retrieval algorithm using the MODIS 500 m resolution images is described, to retrieve aerosol properties over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta region. The rationale of our technique is to first estimate the aerosol reflectance by decomposing the top-of-atmosphere reflectance from surface reflectance and Rayleigh path reflectance. For the determination of surface reflectance, a modified Minimum Reflectance Technique (MRT) is used, and MRT images are computed for different seasons. A strong correlation is shown between the surface reflectance of MRT images and MODIS land surface reflectance products (MOD09), with a value of 0.9. For conversion of aerosol reflectance to Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), comprehensive Look Up Tables (LUT) are constructed, in which aerosol properties and sun-viewing geometry in the radiative transfer calculations are taken into account. Four aerosol types, namely mixed urban, polluted urban, dust, and heavy pollution, were derived using cluster analysis on three years of AERONET measurements in Hong Kong. Their aerosol properties were input for LUT calculation. The resulting 500 m AOT images are highly correlated (r = 0.89) with AERONET sunphotometer observations in Hong Kong. This study demonstrates the applicability of aerosol retrieval at fine resolution scale in urban areas, which can assist the study of aerosol loading distribution and the impact of localized and transient pollution on urban air quality. In addition, the MODIS 500 m AOT images can be used to study cross

  17. Beschrijving van een verdampings-condensatie aerosol generator voor de produktie van submicron aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Feijt; Meulen, van der, A.; De, A.

    1985-01-01

    Dit rapport is een handleiding voor een bedrijfszeker, routinematig gebruik van een zgn. Evaporation-Condensation aerosol Conditioner. Met deze aerosol generatie apparatuur kunnen op stabiele, reproduceerbare manier zeer hoge concentraties (tot 1 miljoen deeltjes per cc) monodispers submicron aerosol geproduceerd worden. De aerosol afmetingen kunnen gevarieerd worden tussen 0.3 en 1.2 mu-m in diameter de geometrische standaardafwijking bedraagt circa 1.25-1.4.

  18. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between ∼0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m3/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m3/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs

  19. Characterization of Aerosols Containing Microcystin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine C. Backer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Toxic blooms of cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in both freshwater and brackishwater sources throughout the world. One class of cyanobacterial toxins, calledmicrocystins, is cyclic peptides. In addition to ingestion and dermal, inhalation is a likelyroute of human exposure. A significant increase in reporting of minor symptoms,particularly respiratory symptoms was associated with exposure to higher levels ofcyanobacteria during recreational activities. Algae cells, bacteria, and waterborne toxinscan be aerosolized by a bubble-bursting process with a wind-driven white-capped wavemechanism. The purposes of this study were to: evaluate sampling and analysis techniquesfor microcystin aerosol, produce aerosol droplets containing microcystin in the laboratory,and deploy the sampling instruments in field studies. A high-volume impactor and an IOMfilter sampler were tried first in the laboratory to collect droplets containing microcystins.Samples were extracted and analyzed for microcystin using an ELISA method. Thelaboratory study showed that cyanotoxins in water could be transferred to air via a bubble-bursting process. The droplets containing microcystins showed a bimodal size distributionwith the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD of 1.4 and 27.8 μm. The samplingand analysis methods were successfully used in a pilot field study to measure microcystinaerosol in situ.

  20. Chromism of Model Organic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Angela; Guzman, Marcelo; Hoffmann, Michael; Colussi, Agustin

    2008-03-01

    The optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol play a fundamental role in the Earth's radiative balance. Since more than half of the aerosol mass consists of complex organic matter that absorbs in the ultraviolet and visible regions of the spectrum, it is important to establish the identity of the organic chromophores. Here we report studies on the chromism vs. chemical composition of photolyzed (lambda longer than 305 nm) solutions of pyruvic acid, a widespread aerosol component, under a variety of experimental conditions that include substrate concentration, temperature and the presence of relevant spectator solutes, such ammonium sulfate. We use high resolution mass- and 13C NMR-spectrometries to track chemical speciation in photolyzed solutions as they undergo thermochromic and photobleaching cycles. Since the chemical identity of the components of these mixtures does not change in these cycles, in which photobleached solutions gradually recover their yellow color in the dark with non-conventional kinetics typical of aggregation processes, we infer that visible absorptions likely involve the intermolecular coupling of carbonyl chromophores in supramolecular assemblies made possible by the polyfunctional nature of the products of pyruvic acid photolysis.