WorldWideScience

Sample records for aerosol generator model

  1. Development of a portable sodium fluorescence aerosol generator model

    CERN Document Server

    LiuQun; Gao Xiao Mei; Jia Ming; Guo Chuang Cheng; Wu Tao; Liu Zhao Feng; Qiu Dan Gui

    2002-01-01

    A portable sodium fluorescence aerosol generator has been developed. It is a key equipment for in-situ testing of HEPA filters using sodium fluorescence method. The structure and technical specifications of the model generator are presented, along with its performance testing methods. The performance comparison result of the model with two French-made generators is also presented. The self-made generator has performances as follows: the average mass generating rate is 32.9 mg/h, mass median diameter of the particles 0.22 mu m and geometric standard deviation 1.58. The filtration efficiency up to 99.99% can be achieved flow-rate of ventilation system is less than 150000 m sup 3 /h. The portable model weight 25 kg, which is convenient for in situ testing

  2. Validation of an hourly resolved global aerosol model in answer to solar electricity generation information needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schroedter-Homscheidt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy applications need global aerosol optical depth (AOD information to derive historic surface solar irradiance databases from geostationary meteorological satellites reaching back to the 1980's. This paper validates the MATCH/DLR model originating in the climate community against AERONET ground measurements. Hourly or daily mean AOD model output is evaluated individually for all stations in Europe, Africa and the Middle East – an area highly interesting for solar energy applications being partly dominated by high aerosol loads. Overall, a bias of 0.02 and a root mean square error of 0.23 are found for daily mean AOD values, while the RMSE increases to 0.28 for hourly mean AOD values. Large differences between various regions and stations are found providing a feedback loop for the aerosol modelling community. The difference in using daily means versus hourly resolved modelling with respect to hourly resolved observations is evaluated. Nowadays state of the art in solar resource assessment relies on monthly turbidity or AOD climatologies while at least hourly resolved irradiance time series are needed by the solar sector. Therefore, the contribution of higher temporally modelled AOD is evaluated.

  3. Devices and methods for generating an aerosol

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-03-03

    Aerosol generators and methods of generating aerosols are provided. The aerosol can be generated at a stagnation interface between a hot, wet stream and a cold, dry stream. The aerosol has the benefit that the properties of the aerosol can be precisely controlled. The stagnation interface can be generated, for example, by the opposed flow of the hot stream and the cold stream. The aerosol generator and the aerosol generation methods are capable of producing aerosols with precise particle sizes and a narrow size distribution. The properties of the aerosol can be controlled by controlling one or more of the stream temperatures, the saturation level of the hot stream, and the flow times of the streams.

  4. Review of models applicable to accident aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity

  5. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, D.A.

    1998-07-27

    Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

  6. Applications of aerosol model in the reactor containment

    OpenAIRE

    Mossad Slama; Mohammad Omar Shaker; Ragaa Aly; Magdy Sirwah

    2014-01-01

    The study simulates of aerosol dynamics including coagulation, deposition and source reinforcement. Typical applications are for nuclear reactor aerosols, aerosol reaction chambers and the production of purified materials. The model determines the aerosol number and volume distributions for an arbitrary number of particle-size classes, called sections. The user specifies the initial aerosol size distribution and the source generation rate of each component in each section. For spatially ho...

  7. Study of radioactive aerosols emissions and establishment of a model in a nuclear medicine environment during the use of a technetium generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the control of radioactive aerosols emissions inside the nuclear medicine facilities. These emissions occur during pulmonary scintigraphy examinations using aerosols marked with 99mTc. Using a test chamber, we have developed a method permitting to quantify these emissions around the aerosol generator. A method dedicated to emissions measurement coming from the patient during the pulmonary ventilation is also described. The results obtained on one patient are exposed in this thesis. We characterized and modelled the ventilation of a complete nuclear medicine department with a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software. This permitted us to study the dissemination of the radioactive aerosol and to compare it with measures of ambient air activity. The numerical model of this department was then employed to test containment solutions and to help defining the best location for air contaminations sensors. An original method combining staff position information and the simulation of the dissemination for the aerosol released has been used to confirm the exposure levels for several professional groups and enhance the workplace studies. (author)

  8. Generating monodisperse pharmacological aerosols using the spinning-top aerosol generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddiscombe, Martyn F; Barnes, Peter J; Usmani, Omar S

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological aerosols of precisely controlled particle size and narrow dispersity can be generated using the spinning-top aerosol generator (STAG). The ability of the STAG to generate monodisperse aerosols from solutions of raw drug compounds makes it a valuable research instrument. In this paper, the versatility of this instrument has been further demonstrated by aerosolizing a range of commercially available nebulized pulmonary therapy preparations. Nebules of Flixotide (fluticasone propionate), Pulmicort (budesonide), Combivent (salbutamol sulphate and ipratropium bromide), Bricanyl (terbutaline sulphate), Atrovent(ipratropium bromide), and Salamol (salbutamol sulphate) were each mixed with ethanol and delivered to the STAG. Monodisperse drug aerosol distributions were generated with MMADs of 0.95-6.7 microm. To achieve larger particle sizes from the nebulizer drug suspensions, the STAG formed compound particle agglomerates derived from the smaller insoluble drug particles. These compound agglomerates behaved aerodynamically as a single particle, and this was verified using an aerodynamic particle sizer and an Andersen Cascade Impactor. Scanning electron microscope images demonstrated their physical structure. On the other hand using the nebulizer drug solutions, spherical particles proportional to the original droplet diameter were generated. The aerosols generated by the STAG can allow investigators to study the scientific principles of inhaled drug deposition and lung physiology for a range of therapeutic agents. PMID:17034300

  9. Simulating secondary organic aerosol in a regional air quality model using the statistical oxidation model – Part 1: Assessing the influence of constrained multi-generational ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Jathar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-generational oxidation of volatile organic compound (VOC oxidation products can significantly alter the mass, chemical composition and properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA compared to calculations that consider only the first few generations of oxidation reactions. However, the most commonly used state-of-the-science schemes in 3-D regional or global models that account for multi-generational oxidation (1 consider only functionalization reactions but do not consider fragmentation reactions, (2 have not been constrained to experimental data; and (3 are added on top of existing parameterizations. The incomplete description of multi-generational oxidation in these models has the potential to bias source apportionment and control calculations for SOA. In this work, we used the Statistical Oxidation Model (SOM of Cappa and Wilson (2012, constrained by experimental laboratory chamber data, to evaluate the regional implications of multi-generational oxidation considering both functionalization and fragmentation reactions. SOM was implemented into the regional UCD/CIT air quality model and applied to air quality episodes in California and the eastern US. The mass, composition and properties of SOA predicted using SOM are compared to SOA predictions generated by a traditional "two-product" model to fully investigate the impact of explicit and self-consistent accounting of multi-generational oxidation. Results show that SOA mass concentrations predicted by the UCD/CIT-SOM model are very similar to those predicted by a two-product model when both models use parameters that are derived from the same chamber data. Since the two-product model does not explicitly resolve multi-generational oxidation reactions, this finding suggests that the chamber data used to parameterize the models captures the majority of the SOA mass formation from multi-generational oxidation under the conditions tested. Consequently, the use of low and high NOx yields

  10. Assessment of the Aerosol Generation and Toxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. O'Shaughnessy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Current interest in the pulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has resulted in a need for an aerosol generation system that is capable of consistently producing a CNT aerosol at a desired concentration level. This two-part study was designed to: (1 assess the properties of a commercially-available aerosol generator when producing an aerosol from a purchased powder supply of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs; and (2 assess the pulmonary sub-acute toxicity of DWCNTs in a murine model during a 5-day (4 h/day whole-body exposure. The aerosol generator, consisting of a novel dustfeed mechanism and venturi ejector was determined to be capable of producing a DWCNT consistently over a 4 h exposure period at an average level of 10.8 mg/m3. The count median diameter was 121 nm with a geometric standard deviation of 2.04. The estimated deposited dose was 32 µg/mouse. The total number of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was significantly (p < 0.01 increased in exposed mice compared to controls. Similarly, macrophages in BAL fluid were significantly elevated in exposed mice, but not neutrophils. All animals exposed to CNT and euthanized immediately after exposure had changes in the lung tissues showing acute inflammation and injury; however these pathological changes resolved two weeks after the exposure.

  11. Generation of aerosols: BARC nebulizer and others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concern with atmospheric pollution in recent times has focused attention on aerosols, their distribution pattern after inhalation and the kinetics of their deposition and exclusion from bronchial passages. The technique of radioaerosols for lung imaging is of recent origin. The procedure was proposed as a means of estimating regional ventilation and localizing areas of airway narrowing. The technique is an alternative in the face of non-availability of radioactive gases, especially in developing countries where the cost is the major factor due to economic reasons. Now, it is beyond doubt that radioaerosol lung studies are a potentially valuable tool in the evaluation of respiratory function in health and disease, especially to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Also, the administration of a drug by aerosol inhalation provides a convenient method for the treatment of conditions affecting the respiratory system. This write-up will brief us about radioaerosol, its generation and characterisation

  12. An aerosol generator for the resuspension of cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyel, D A; Ellakkani, M; Alarie, Y; Karol, M

    1984-12-01

    An aerosol generator, the Pitt 3 model, was designed, fabricated, and characterized for the resuspension of inhalable particles from bulk cotton dust. The generator was constructed around a loudspeaker whose energy is transferred into an air column through latex rubber dams. This action tumbles the bulk dust, and small particles are loosened which can then be carried out of the column with the air passing through it. Thirty to forty grams of bulk cotton dust produced a stable aerosol concentration for at least 90 min. The maximum output of about 100 mg/m3 can be reduced to lower concentrations by adding dilution air. In one application, the generator produced a stable aerosol cloud in the range of 2 to 30 mg/m3 with a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of about 3 microns and a geometric standard deviation (sigma g) of about 1.5. In another application the concentration in an animal exposure chamber was kept at 20.8 mg/m3 with an MMAD = 2.5 microns and a sigma g = 1.8 for over 6 months. The Pitt 3 generator proved to be trouble-free and produced large amounts of inhalable particles from bulk cotton dust. The generator was also used to generate dust clouds from silica powder, fly ash, and cellulose dust. The only requirement for successful resuspension of any dust with this generator is the presence of small particles in the bulk feed dust. PMID:6506079

  13. Characterization of aerosols containing Legionella generated upon nebulization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Séverine; Leclerc, Lara; Massard, Pierre André; Girardot, Françoise; Riffard, Serge; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2016-09-01

    Legionella pneumophila is, by far, the species most frequently associated with Legionnaires’ disease (LD). Human infection occurs almost exclusively by aerosol inhalation which places the bacteria in juxtaposition with alveolar macrophages. LD risk management is based on controlling water quality by applying standardized procedures. However, to gain a better understanding of the real risk of exposure, there is a need (i) to investigate under which conditions Legionella may be aerosolized and (ii) to quantify bacterial deposition into the respiratory tract upon nebulization. In this study, we used an original experimental set-up that enables the generation of aerosol particles containing L. pneumophila under various conditions. Using flow cytometry in combination with qPCR and culture, we determined (i) the size of the aerosols and (ii) the concentration of viable Legionella forms that may reach the thoracic region. We determined that the 0.26–2.5 μm aerosol size range represents 7% of initial bacterial suspension. Among the viable forms, 0.7% of initial viable bacterial suspension may reach the pulmonary alveoli. In conclusion, these deposition profiles can be used to standardize the size of inoculum injected in any type of respiratory tract model to obtain new insights into the dose response for LD.

  14. Generation and characterization of biological aerosols for laser measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Concerns for proliferation of biological weapons including bacteria, fungi, and viruses have prompted research and development on methods for the rapid detection of biological aerosols in the field. Real-time instruments that can distinguish biological aerosols from background dust would be especially useful. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a laser-based, real-time instrument for rapid detection of biological aerosols, and ITRI is working with SNL scientists and engineers to evaluate this technology for a wide range of biological aerosols. This paper describes methods being used to generate the characterize the biological aerosols for these tests. In summary, a biosafe system has been developed for generating and characterizing biological aerosols and using those aerosols to test the SNL laser-based real-time instrument. Such tests are essential in studying methods for rapid detection of airborne biological materials.

  15. The effect of the number of condensed phases modeled on aerosol behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VICTORIA is a mechanistic computer code designed to analyze fission product behavior within a nuclear reactor coolant system (RCS) during a severe accident. It provides detailed predictions of the release of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from the reactor core and transport and deposition of these materials within the RCS. A recently completed independent peer review of VICTORIA, while confirming the overall adequacy of the code, recommended a number of modeling improvements. One of these recommendations, to model three rather than a single condensed phase, is the focus of the work reported here. The recommendation has been implemented as an option so that either a single or three condensed phases can be treated. Both options have been employed in the study of fission product behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence. Differences in deposition patterns and mechanisms predicted using these two options are discussed

  16. The effect of the number of condensed phases modeled on aerosol behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bixler, N.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schaperow, J.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-06-01

    VICTORIA is a mechanistic computer code designed to analyze fission product behavior within a nuclear reactor coolant system (RCS) during a severe accident. It provides detailed predictions of the release of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from the reactor core and transport and deposition of these materials within the RCS. A recently completed independent peer review of VICTORIA, while confirming the overall adequacy of the code, recommended a number of modeling improvements. One of these recommendations, to model three rather than a single condensed phase, is the focus of the work reported here. The recommendation has been implemented as an option so that either a single or three condensed phases can be treated. Both options have been employed in the study of fission product behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence. Differences in deposition patterns and mechanisms predicted using these two options are discussed.

  17. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  18. Simplified aerosol modeling for variational data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chevallier

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a simplified aerosol model together with its tangent linear and adjoint versions for variational assimilation of aerosol optical depth with the aim to optimize aerosol emissions over the globe. The model was derived from the general circulation model LMDz; it groups together the 24 aerosol species simulated in LMDz into 4 species, namely gaseous precursors, fine mode aerosols, coarse mode desert dust and coarse mode sea salt. The emissions have been kept as in the original model. Modifications, however, were introduced in the computation of aerosol optical depth and in the processes of sedimentation, dry and wet deposition and sulfur chemistry to ensure consistency with the new set of species and their composition.

    The simplified model successfully manages to reproduce the main features of the aerosol distribution in LMDz. Differences between the original and simplified models are mainly associated to the new deposition and sedimentation velocities consistent with the definition of species in the simplified model and the simplification of the sulfur chemistry. Furthermore, simulated aerosol optical depth remains within the variability of AERONET observations for all aerosol types and all sites throughout most of the year.

    Sensitivity analyses with the tangent linear version show that the simplified sulfur chemistry is the dominant process responsible for the strong non-linearity of the model.

  19. A New Electrospray Aerosol Generator with High Particle Transmission Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huijing; Patel, Anand C; Holtzman, Michael J; Chen, Da-Ren

    2011-01-01

    A new single-capillary electrospray (ES) aerosol generator has been developed for monodisperse particle production with maximal transmission efficiency. The new generator consists of both a spray chamber in a point-to-orifice-plate configuration and a charge reduction chamber that can hold up to 4 Nuclespot ionizers (Model P-2042, NRD Inc.). The 2 chambers are partitioned by an orifice plate. To optimize the particle transmission efficiency of the prototype, a systematic study was performed on the generator by varying the system setup and operation. Two key dimensions of the generator setup, the orifice diameter and the distance from the capillary tip to the orifice plate, were varied. Fluorescence analysis was applied to characterize the loss of ES-generated particles at different locations of the prototype. It was found that particle loss in the generator could be reduced by either increasing the orifice diameter or decreasing the distance between the capillary tip and the orifice plate. Increasing either the total radioactivity of the ionizers or the flowrate of the particle carrier gas also further decreased the particle loss in the system. The maximum particle transmission efficiency of 88.0% was obtained with the spray chamber fully opened to the charge reduction chamber, the capillary tip at the same level as the orifice plate, and 4 bipolar ionizers installed. PMID:22829715

  20. Multicomponent aerosol dynamics model UHMA: model development and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.

    2004-01-01

    A size-segregated aerosol dynamics model UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model) was developed for studies of multicomponent tropospheric aerosol particles. The model includes major aerosol microphysical processes in the atmosphere with a focus on new particle formation and growth; thus it incorporates particle coagulation and multicomponent condensation, applying a revised treatment of condensation flux onto free molecular regime particles and the activation of nanosi...

  1. Enhanced Deep Blue Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm: The Second Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, N. C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A. M.; Hansell, R.; Seftor, C. S.; Huang, J.; Tsay, S.-C.

    2013-01-01

    The aerosol products retrieved using the MODIS collection 5.1 Deep Blue algorithm have provided useful information about aerosol properties over bright-reflecting land surfaces, such as desert, semi-arid, and urban regions. However, many components of the C5.1 retrieval algorithm needed to be improved; for example, the use of a static surface database to estimate surface reflectances. This is particularly important over regions of mixed vegetated and non- vegetated surfaces, which may undergo strong seasonal changes in land cover. In order to address this issue, we develop a hybrid approach, which takes advantage of the combination of pre-calculated surface reflectance database and normalized difference vegetation index in determining the surface reflectance for aerosol retrievals. As a result, the spatial coverage of aerosol data generated by the enhanced Deep Blue algorithm has been extended from the arid and semi-arid regions to the entire land areas.

  2. Aerosol Generation by Modern Flush Toilets

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, David; Lynch, Robert; Marshall, Charles; Mead, Kenneth; Hirst, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    A microbe-contaminated toilet will produce bioaerosols when flushed. We assessed toilet plume aerosol from high efficiency (HET), pressure-assisted high efficiency (PAT), and flushometer (FOM) toilets with similar bowl water and flush volumes. Total and droplet nuclei “bioaerosols” were assessed. Monodisperse 0.25–1.9-μm fluorescent microspheres served as microbe surrogates in separate trials in a mockup 5 m3 water closet (WC). Bowl water seeding was approximately 1012 particles/mL. Droplet n...

  3. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E;

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model of aerosol delivery from holding chambers (spacers) was developed incorporating tidal volume (VT), chamber volume (Vch), apparatus dead space (VD), effect of valve insufficiency and other leaks, loss of aerosol by immediate impact on the chamber wall, and fallout of aerosol...... in the chamber with time. Four different spacers were connected via filters to a mechanical lung model, and aerosol delivery during "breathing" was determined from drug recovery from the filters. The formula correctly predicted the delivery of budesonide aerosol from the AeroChamber (Trudell Medical, London......, Ontario, Canada), NebuChamber (Astra, Södirtälje, Sweden) and Nebuhaler (Astra) adapted for babies. The dose of fluticasone proportionate delivered by the Babyhaler (Glaxco Wellcome, Oxbridge, Middlesex, UK) was 80% of that predicted, probably because of incomplete priming of this spacer. Of the above...

  4. Effect of aerosol sub-grid variability on aerosol optical depth and cloud condensation nuclei: Implications for global aerosol modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Weigum, N; Schutgens, N.; Stier, P.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental limitation of grid-based models is their inability to resolve variability on scales smaller than a grid box. Past research has shown that significant aerosol variability exists on scales smaller than these grid-boxes, which can lead to discrepancies in simulated aerosol climate effects between high and low resolution models. This study investigates the impact of neglecting sub-grid variability in present-day global microphysical aerosol models on aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ...

  5. Aerosol data assimilation using data from Himawari-8, a next-generation geostationary meteorological satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumimoto, K.; Nagao, T. M.; Kikuchi, M.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Murakami, H.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Ogi, A.; Irie, H.; Khatri, P.; Okumura, H.; Arai, K.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Maki, T.

    2016-06-01

    Himawari-8, a next-generation geostationary meteorological satellite, was launched on 7 October 2014 and became operational on 7 July 2015. The advanced imager on board Himawari-8 is equipped with 16 observational bands (including three visible and three near-infrared bands) that enable retrieval of full-disk aerosol optical properties at 10 min intervals from geostationary (GEO) orbit. Here we show the first application of aerosol optical properties (AOPs) derived from Himawari-8 data to aerosol data assimilation. Validation of the assimilation experiment by comparison with independent observations demonstrated successful modeling of continental pollution that was not predicted by simulation without assimilation and reduced overestimates of dust front concentrations. These promising results suggest that AOPs derived from Himawari-8/9 and other planned GEO satellites will considerably improve forecasts of air quality, inverse modeling of emissions, and aerosol reanalysis through assimilation techniques.

  6. Condensing Organic Aerosols in a Microphysical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  7. Modelling Aerosol Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, B. K.; Jones, D. P.; Gallagher, M. W.; McFiggans, G. B.; Watkins, A. P.

    2009-04-01

    Flow patterns within an urban street canyon are influenced by various micrometeorological factors. It also represents an environment where pollutants such as aerosols accumulate to high levels due to high volumes of traffic. As adverse health effects are being attributed to exposure to aerosols, an investigation of the dispersion of aerosols within such environments is of growing importance. In particular, one is concerned with the vertical structure of the aerosol concentration, the ventilation characteristics of the street canyon and the influence of aerosol microphysical processes. Due to the inherent heterogeneity of the aerosol concentrations within the street canyon and the lack of spatial resolution of measurement campaigns, these issues are an on-going debate. Therefore, a modelling tool is required to represent aerosol dispersion patterns to provide insights to results of past measurement campaigns. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models are able to predict detailed airflow patterns within urban geometries. This capability may be further extended to include aerosol dispersion, by an Euler-Euler multiphase approach. To facilitate the investigation, a two-dimensional, multiphase CFD tool coupled with the k-epsilon turbulence model and with the capability of modelling mixed convection flow regimes arising from both wind driven flows and buoyancy effects from heated walls was developed. Assuming wind blowing perpendicularly to the canyon axis and treating aerosols as a passive scalar, an attempt will be made to assess the sensitivities of aerosol vertical structure and ventilation characteristics to the various flow conditions. Numerical studies were performed using an idealized 10m by 10m canyon to represent a regular canyon and 10m by 5m to represent a deep one. An aerosol emission source was assigned on the centerline of the canyon to represent exhaust emissions. The vertical structure of the aerosols would inform future directives regarding the

  8. Sea-spray aerosol particles generated in the surf zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Kusmierczyk‐Michulec, J.T.; Francius, M.J.; Tedeschi, G.; Piazzola,J.; Merritt, D.L.; Fontana, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the properties of aerosol particles generated over the surf zone, two experiments were held at the pier of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), La Jolla CA, and at the pier of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF) in Duck NC. On both sites concentrations of s

  9. The relationship between aerosol and cloud drop number concentrations in a global aerosol microphysics model

    OpenAIRE

    Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; D. V. Spracklen; Mann, G. M.; M. P. Chipperfield

    2009-01-01

    Empirical relationships that link cloud droplet number (CDN) to aerosol number or mass are commonly used to calculate global fields of CDN for climate forcing assessments. In this work we use a sectional global model of sulfate and sea-salt aerosol coupled to a mechanistic aerosol activation scheme to explore the limitations of this approach. We find that a given aerosol number concentration produces a wide range of CDN concentrations due to variations in the shape of the aerosol size distrib...

  10. Aerosol generation by blower motors as a bias in assessing aerosol penetration into cabin filtration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitbrink, William A; Collingwood, Scott

    2005-01-01

    In cabin filtration systems, blower motors pressurize a vehicle cabin with clean filtered air and recirculate air through an air-conditioning evaporator coil and a heater core. The exposure reduction offered by these cabins is evaluated by optical particle counters that measure size-dependent aerosol concentration inside and outside the cabin. The ratio of the inside-to-outside concentration is termed penetration. Blower motors use stationary carbon brushes to transmit an electrical current through a rotating armature that abrades the carbon brushes. This creates airborne dust that may affect experimental evaluations of aerosol penetration. To evaluate the magnitude of these dust emissions, blower motors were placed in a test chamber and operated at 12 and 13.5 volts DC. A vacuum cleaner drew 76 m3/hour (45 cfm) of air through HEPA filters, the test chamber, and through a 5 cm diameter pipe. An optical particle counter drew air through an isokinetic sampling probe and measured the size-dependent particle concentrations from 0.3 to 15 microm. The concentration of blower motor aerosol was between 2 x 10(5) and 1.8 x 10(6) particles/m3. Aerosol penetration into three stationary vehicles, two pesticide application vehicles and one tractor were measured at two conditions: low concentration (outside in the winter) and high concentration (inside repair shops and burning incense sticks used as a supplemental aerosol source). For particles smaller than 1 microm, the in-cabin concentrations can be explained by the blower motor emissions. For particles larger than 1 microm, other aerosol sources, such as resuspended dirt, are present. Aerosol generated by the operation of the blower motor and by other sources can bias the exposure reduction measured by optical particle counters. PMID:15764523

  11. Aerosol Data Assimilation with the Next Generation Meteorological Satellite (Himawari-8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumimoto, K.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Murakami, H.; Kikuchi, M.; Nagao, T. M.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Ogi, A.; Maki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) launched a new generation geostationary meteorological satellite, Himawari-8, on 7 October 2014. The Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) aboard Himawari-8 is a 16 channel multispectral imager including three observational bands (i.e. RGB) in visible lights with 1km horizontal and 10-minite temporal resolutions covering the East Asia and Western Pacific regions. The visible imaging sensor allows us to obtain aerosol optical observations with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions and horizontal coverage. Meteorological Research Institute (MRI)/JMA have been developing an aerosol data assimilation system with a global aerosol transport model (MASINGAR mk-2) and the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) for the operational aerosol (Asian dust) forecasting system (Yumimoto et al., under review). In this study, we have the first attempt to assimilate aerosol retrievals derived from the next generation meteorological satellite in the assimilation system. Our preliminary experiment results show that assimilation of full disk aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from Himawari-8 successfully reduces overestimates of anthropogenic pollution outflow from the Asian Continent, and compensates underestimates of dust outflow from the Australian continent.

  12. Gas/Aerosol partitioning: a simplified method for global modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metzger, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is the development of a simplified method to routinely calculate gas/aerosol partitioning of multicomponent aerosols and aerosol associated water within global atmospheric chemistry and climate models. Atmospheric aerosols are usually multicomponent mixtures, partl

  13. Assimilation of Aerosols from Biomass Burning by the Radiative Transfer Model Brasil-Sr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, R. S.; Gonçalves, A. R.; Souza, J. G.; Martins, F. R.; Pereira, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative transfer model BRASIL-SR is the main tool used by the Earth System Science Centre from the National Institute for Space Research (CCST / INPE) for solar energy resource assessment. Due to large and frequent events of burning biomass in Brazil there is a need to improve the aerosol representation in this model, mainly during the dry season (September - November) in Northern and Central Brazil. The standard aerosol representation in this model is inadequate to capture these events. It is based on the mean monthly climatological horizontal visibility with latitudinal values based on coarse global observation data. To improve the aerosol representation, climatological data of daily horizontal visibility from National Institute of Meteorology (INMET) was used to generate monthly averages from 1999 to 2012. To do a better representation of aerosols from burning biomass events, from megacities aerosol generation, and from transport processes, horizontal visibility estimates performed using aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm data from MACC Project Reanalysis model were used to adjust the aerosol representation in regions were the simple horizontal visibility fails. A methodology to generate these new visibility data from the Reanalysis was made and the resulting data was compared with the average horizontal visibility to implement a new corrected database. The solar irradiation simulated by the model using this new aerosol representation proved to be better than the previous version of the model in all regions with high aerosol loading.

  14. Impact of the modal aerosol scheme GLOMAP-mode on aerosol forcing in the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bellouin, N; Mann, G.W.; Woodhouse, M.T.; Johnson, C.; Carslaw, K. S.; Dalvi, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM) includes two aerosol schemes: the Coupled Large-scale Aerosol Simulator for Studies in Climate (CLASSIC), and the new Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP-mode). GLOMAP-mode is a modal aerosol microphysics scheme that simulates not only aerosol mass but also aerosol number, represents internally-mixed particles, and includes aerosol microphysical processes such as nucleation. In this study, both schemes provide hindcast simulations of...

  15. New trajectory driven aerosol and chemical process model: chemical and aerosol Lagrangian model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) have been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61°51' N, 24°17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements thro...

  16. Modeling the Explicit Chemistry of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madronich, Sasha [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-09

    The atmospheric burden of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) remains one of the most important yet uncertain aspects of the radiative forcing of climate. This grant focused on improving our quantitative understanding of SOA formation and evolution, by developing, applying, and improving a highly detailed model of atmospheric organic chemistry, the Generation of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) model. Eleven (11) publications have resulted from this grant.

  17. Modeling heterogeneous chemical processes on aerosol surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junjun Deng; Tijian Wang; Li Liu; Fei Jiang

    2010-01-01

    To explore the possible impact of heterogeneous chemical processes on atmospheric trace components,a coupled box model including gas-phase chemical processes,aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium processes,and heterogeneous chemical processes on the surface of dust,black carbon(BC)and sea salt is set up to simulate the effects of heterogeneous chemistry on the aerosol surface,and analyze the primary factors affecting the heterogeneous processes.Results indicate that heterogeneous chemical processes on the aerosol surface in the atmosphere will affect the concentrations of trace gases such as H2O2,HO2,O3,NO2,NO3,HNO3 and SO2,and aerosols such as SO42-,NO3-and NH4+.Sensitivity tests suggest that the magnitude of the impact of heterogeneous processes strongly depends on aerosol concentration and the surface uptake coefficients used in the box model.However,the impact of temperature on heterogeneous chemical processes is considerably less.The"renoxification"of HNO3 will affect the components of the troposphere such as nitrogen oxide and ozone.

  18. Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global aerosol models

    OpenAIRE

    G. Myhre; F. Stordal; M. Johnsrud; Y. J. Kaufman; D. Rosenfeld; Storelvmo, T.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Berntsen, T. K.; Myhre, A.; I. S. A. Isaksen

    2007-01-01

    We have used the MODIS satellite data and two global aerosol models to investigate the relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud parameters that may be affected by the aerosol concentration. The relationships that are studied are mainly between AOD, on the one hand, and cloud cover, cloud liquid water path, and water vapour, on the other. Additionally, cloud droplet effective radius, cloud optical depth, cloud top pressure and aerosol Ångström exponent, have been a...

  19. Visualization of aerosol particles generated by near infrared nano- and femtosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expansion of aerosols generated by near infrared (NIR) nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) laser ablation (LA) of metals at atmospheric pressures was explored by laser-induced scattering. In order to achieve adequate temporal and spatial resolution a pulsed laser source was utilized for illuminating a 0.5 mm-wide cross section of the expanding aerosol. It could, for instance, be shown that NIR-ns-LA under quiescent argon atmosphere provokes the formation of a dense aerosol confined within a radially propagating vortex ring. The expansion dynamics achieved under these conditions were found to be fairly slow whereas the degree of aerosol dispersion for NIR-ns-LA using helium drastically increased due to its lower viscosity. As a consequence, the maximum diameter of expansion differed by a factor of approximately four. The trajectories of aerosol particles generated by NIR-ns-LA using argon could, furthermore, be simulated on the basis of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). For this purpose, a model inspired by the thermal character of NIR-ns-LA taking into account a sudden temperature build-up of 10,000 K at the position of the laser focus was implemented. In contrast, NIR-fs-LA generally resulted in extremely dynamic expansion patterns. Initial aerosol velocities derived from corresponding expansion plots varied from 10 m/s up to 30 m/s for fs-LA using argon and helium, respectively. Our results, moreover, indicate that fs-LA carried out under helium atmosphere favours a chaotic aerosol expansion. Analytical implications concerning, e.g. dispersion phenomena or the choice of the LA protocol and physical dimensions of future ablation cell designs are discussed

  20. Global Aerosol Optical Models and Lookup Tables for the New MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Loraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Since 2000, MODIS has been deriving aerosol properties over land from MODIS observed spectral reflectance, by matching the observed reflectance with that simulated for selected aerosol optical models, aerosol loadings, wavelengths and geometrical conditions (that are contained in a lookup table or 'LUT'). Validation exercises have showed that MODIS tends to under-predict aerosol optical depth (tau) in cases of large tau (tau greater than 1.0), signaling errors in the assumed aerosol optical properties. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from the hundreds of global AERONET sunphotometer sites, we found that three spherical-derived models (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol), and one spheroid-derived model (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally described the range of observed global aerosol properties. The fine dominated models were separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (omega(sub 0)), ranging from non-absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to neutrally absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We determined the dominant model type in each region and season, to create a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid of assumed aerosol type. We used vector radiative transfer code to create a new LUT, simulating the four aerosol models, in four MODIS channels. Independent AERONET observations of spectral tau agree with the new models, indicating that the new models are suitable for use by the MODIS aerosol retrieval.

  1. Retrieving global aerosol sources from satellites using inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Dubovik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding aerosol effects on global climate requires knowing the global distribution of tropospheric aerosols. By accounting for aerosol sources, transports, and removal processes, chemical transport models simulate the global aerosol distribution using archived meteorological fields. We develop an algorithm for retrieving global aerosol sources from satellite observations of aerosol distribution by inverting the GOCART aerosol transport model.

    The inversion is based on a generalized, multi-term least-squares-type fitting, allowing flexible selection and refinement of a priori algorithm constraints. For example, limitations can be placed on retrieved quantity partial derivatives, to constrain global aerosol emission space and time variability in the results. Similarities and differences between commonly used inverse modeling and remote sensing techniques are analyzed. To retain the high space and time resolution of long-period, global observational records, the algorithm is expressed using adjoint operators.

    Successful global aerosol emission retrievals at 2°×2.5 resolution were obtained by inverting GOCART aerosol transport model output, assuming constant emissions over the diurnal cycle, and neglecting aerosol compositional differences. In addition, fine and coarse mode aerosol emission sources were inverted separately from MODIS fine and coarse mode aerosol optical thickness data, respectively. These assumptions are justified, based on observational coverage and accuracy limitations, producing valuable aerosol source locations and emission strengths. From two weeks of daily MODIS observations during August 2000, the global placement of fine mode aerosol sources agreed with available independent knowledge, even though the inverse method did not use any a priori information about aerosol sources, and was initialized with a "zero aerosol emission" assumption. Retrieving coarse mode aerosol emissions was less successful

  2. Importance of global aerosol modeling including secondary organic aerosol formed from monoterpene

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Daisuke; Takemura, Toshihiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2008-01-01

    A global three-dimensional aerosol transport-radiation model, coupled to an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), has been extended to improve the model process for organic aerosols, particularly secondary organic aerosols (SOA), and to estimate SOA contributions to direct and indirect radiative effects. Because the SOA formation process is complicated and unknown, the results in different model simulations include large differences. In this work, we simulate SOA production assuming v...

  3. Model-Measurement Integration for Global Aerosols: Old and New Challenges (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying aerosol-climate interactions hinges on making progress on old and new challenges. An old challenge is to monitor the global burden and distribution of short-lived atmospheric particles. Even for “simple” aerosol components (e.g. sulfate), where the chemistry is understood and the emissions are reasonably quantified, aerosol models differ substantially in their predicted global burdens. This points to the need for more complete global aerosol monitoring on a routine basis. Satellite remote sensing of aerosol optical depth is probably the closest to achieving such an ideal, and the recent generation of satellite instruments has led to important advances. Remaining challenges in remote sensing include gaps in coverage, sampling biases, and a limited set of aerosol properties that can be retrieved reliably from optical measurements. In situ measurements from field campaigns provide complementary data and have scored successes in advancing our understanding of aerosol processes, but their limited spatial and temporal coverage make them weak constraints on global aerosol burdens and distributions predicted by models. The last 5-10 years have seen significant work by many research groups to develop global models of aerosol microphysics. These explicitly predict aerosol number size distributions and CCN spectra by simulating nucleation, condensation, and coagulation processes, making them process-based simulations of the aerosol indirect effect. The newly emerging challenge is to find suitable observations to evaluate these new aerosol modeling capabilities. Aerosol optical depth and aerosol index retrieved by satellites have been used as proxies for CCN, and there is empirical evidence to support that these are correlated, but detailed measurements of aerosol size and composition are only available from sparse in situ observations. Moreover, aerosol microphysical models indicate that growth of ultrafine particles is a major source of CCN on the global

  4. Simulation of climate response to aerosol direct and indirect effects with aerosol transport‐radiation model

    OpenAIRE

    Takemura, Toshihiko; Nozawa, Toru; Emori, Seita; Nakajima, Takashi-Y.; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2005-01-01

    With a global aerosol transport‐radiation model coupled to a general circulation model, changes in the meteorological parameters of clouds, precipitation, and temperature caused by the direct and indirect effects of aerosols are simulated, and its radiative forcing are calculated. A microphysical parameterization diagnosing the cloud droplet number concentration based on the Köhler theory is introduced into the model, which depends not only on the aerosol particle number concentration but als...

  5. A New Method to Generate Micron-Sized AerosolS With Narrow Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gañón-Calvo, Alfonso; Barrero, Antonio

    1996-11-01

    Aerosols in the micron-size range with a remarkable monodisperse size distribution can be generated from the breaking up process of a capillary microjet. The size of the main droplets and satellites depend on the jet diameter, d_j, as well as the flow rate, Q, and liquid properties which eventually determine the jet`s breaking up. Therefore, the generation and control of capillary microjets is essential to produce sprays of small droplets with narrow size histograms. Electrosprays has been up to now one of the most successful techniques to produce monodisperse micron-size aerosols. As an alternative, we report here a new method, aerospray, to generate capillary micro jets which can compete against the electrospray for the production of aerosols of small droplets with very narrow size distribution. The method is outlined in the following. Liquid coming out from the exit of a capillary needle is sucked by means of a high speed gas stream (usually air) which flows throughout a hole separating two chambers at different pressures. Under certain parametric conditions of liquid properties, liquid and air flow rates, and geometric characteristics (needle and hole diameters, distance from the needle to the hole, etc), the liquid forms a steady capillary microjet of very small diameter which is speeded up an stabilized by the action of the viscous stresses at the gas liquid interface. The jet passes through the hole and goes out the outside chamber where eventually breaks up into microdroplets by varicose instabilities. Measurements from Laser-Doppler PDA Analizer of these aerosprays show that both the droplet size and its standard deviation are comparable to those obtained by electrospray techniques. On the other hand, using the aerospray, the standard deviation of the resulting droplet size distribution is of the order of those that can be obtained by ultrasonic atomization but the mean diameters can be more than one order of magnitude smaller.

  6. Improvements in the Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Merritt, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) is widely used as an engineering tool to provide a quick estimate of the aerosol extinction in the marine environment. Since its introduction, several shortcomings of NAM have been identified that are being addressed by the development of the Advanced Navy Aerosol Model

  7. Radiative Effects of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Sundar A.; Vulcan, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic, are important to the earth's radiative balance. They scatter the incoming solar radiation and modify the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by acting as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). Although it has been recognized that aerosols exert a net cooling influence on climate (Twomey et al. 1984), this effect has received much less attention than the radiative forcings due to clouds and greenhouse gases. The radiative forcing due to aerosols is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign (Houghton et al. 1990). Atmospheric aerosol particles generated from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are important regional climatic variables. A recent study by Penner et al. (1992) proposed that smoke particles from biomass burning may have a significant impact on the global radiation balance. They estimate that about 114 Tg of smoke is produced per year in the tropics through biomass burning. The direct and indirect effects of smoke aerosol due to biomass burning could add up globally to a cooling effect as large as 2 W/sq m. Ackerman and Chung (1992) used model calculations and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data to show that in comparison to clear days, the heavy dust loading over the Saudi Arabian peninsula can change the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) clear sky shortwave and longwave radiant exitance by 40-90 W/sq m and 5-20 W/sq m, respectively. Large particle concentrations produced from these types of events often are found with optical thicknesses greater than one. These aerosol particles are transported across considerable distances from the source (Fraser et al. 1984). and they could perturb the radiative balance significantly. In this study, the regional radiative effects of aerosols produced from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are examined using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Local Area

  8. The relationship between aerosol and cloud drop number concentrations in a global aerosol microphysics model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Pringle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Empirical relationships that link cloud droplet number (CDN to aerosol number or mass are commonly used to calculate global fields of CDN for climate forcing assessments. In this work we use a sectional global model of sulfate and sea-salt aerosol coupled to a mechanistic aerosol activation scheme to explore the limitations of this approach. We find that a given aerosol number concentration produces a wide range of CDN concentrations due to variations in the shape of the aerosol size distribution. On a global scale, the dependence of CDN on the size distribution results in regional biases in predicted CDN (for a given aerosol number. Empirical relationships between aerosol number and CDN are often derived from regional data but applied to the entire globe. In an analogous process, we derive regional "correlation-relations" between aerosol number and CDN and apply these regional relations to calculations of CDN on the global scale. The global mean percentage error in CDN caused by using regionally derived CDN-aerosol relations is 20 to 26%, which is about half the global mean percentage change in CDN caused by doubling the updraft velocity. However, the error is as much as 25–75% in the Southern Ocean, the Arctic and regions of persistent stratocumulus when an aerosol-CDN correlation relation from the North Atlantic is used. These regions produce much higher CDN concentrations (for a given aerosol number than predicted by the globally uniform empirical relations. CDN-aerosol number relations from different regions also show very different sensitivity to changing aerosol. The magnitude of the rate of change of CDN with particle number, a measure of the aerosol efficacy, varies by a factor 4. CDN in cloud processed regions of persistent stratocumulus is particularly sensitive to changing aerosol number. It is therefore likely that the indirect effect will be underestimated in these important regions.

  9. The relationship between aerosol and cloud drop number concentrations in a global aerosol microphysics model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Pringle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical relationships that link cloud droplet number (CDN to aerosol number or mass are commonly used to calculate global fields of CDN for climate forcing assessments. In this work we use a sectional global model of sulfate and sea-salt aerosol coupled to a mechanistic aerosol activation scheme to explore the limitations of this approach. We find that a given aerosol number concentration produces a wide range of CDN concentrations due to variations in the shape of the aerosol size distribution. On a global scale, the dependence of CDN on the size distribution results in regional biases in predicted CDN (for a given aerosol number. Empirical relationships between aerosol number and CDN are often derived from regional data but applied to the entire globe. In an analogous process, we derive regional "correlation-relations" between aerosol number and CDN and apply these regional relations to calculations of CDN on the global scale. The global mean percentage error in CDN caused by using regionally derived CDN-aerosol relations is 20 to 26%, which is about half the global mean percentage change in CDN caused by doubling the updraft velocity. However, the error is as much as 25–75% in the Southern Ocean, the Arctic and regions of persistent stratocumulus when an aerosol-CDN correlation relation from the North Atlantic is used. These regions produce much higher CDN concentrations (for a given aerosol number than predicted by the globally uniform empirical relations. CDN-aerosol number relations from different regions also show very different sensitivity to changing aerosol. The magnitude of the rate of change of CDN with particle number, a measure of the aerosol efficacy, varies by a factor 4. CDN in cloud processed regions of persistent stratocumulus is particularly sensitive to changing aerosol number. It is therefore likely that the indirect effect will be underestimated in these important regions.

  10. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout mos...

  11. Global modeling of organic aerosol: the importance of reactive nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    H. O. T. Pye; A. W. H. Chan; Barkley, M. P.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen compounds, specifically NOx and NO3, likely influence global organic aerosol levels. To assess these interactions, GEOS-Chem, a chemical transport model, is updated to include improved biogenic emissions (following MEGAN v2.1/2.04), a new organic aerosol tracer lumping scheme, aerosol from nitrate radical (NO3) oxidation of isoprene, and NOx-dependent terpene aerosol yields. As a resu...

  12. Beschrijving van een verdampings-condensatie aerosol generator voor de produktie van submicron aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijt; A.*; Meulen; A.van der

    1985-01-01

    Dit rapport is een handleiding voor een bedrijfszeker, routinematig gebruik van een zgn. Evaporation-Condensation aerosol Conditioner. Met deze aerosol generatie apparatuur kunnen op stabiele, reproduceerbare manier zeer hoge concentraties (tot 1 miljoen deeltjes per cc) monodispers submicron ae

  13. Beschrijving van een verdampings-condensatie aerosol generator voor de produktie van submicron aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Feijt; Meulen, van der, A.; De, A.

    1985-01-01

    Dit rapport is een handleiding voor een bedrijfszeker, routinematig gebruik van een zgn. Evaporation-Condensation aerosol Conditioner. Met deze aerosol generatie apparatuur kunnen op stabiele, reproduceerbare manier zeer hoge concentraties (tot 1 miljoen deeltjes per cc) monodispers submicron aerosol geproduceerd worden. De aerosol afmetingen kunnen gevarieerd worden tussen 0.3 en 1.2 mu-m in diameter de geometrische standaardafwijking bedraagt circa 1.25-1.4.

  14. The contribution of aerosol hygroscopic growth to the modeled aerosol radiative effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkola, Harri; Kühn, Thomas; Kirkevåg, Alf; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Arola, Antti

    2016-04-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant effect on the direct radiative effect of atmospheric aerosol. However, there are significant uncertainties concerning how much of the radiative forcing is due to different chemical compounds, especially water. For example, modeled optical depth of water in global aerosol-climate models varies by more than a factor of two. These differences can be attributed to differences in modeled 1) hygroscopicity, 2) ambient relative humidity, and/or 3) aerosol size distribution. In this study, we investigate which of these above-mentioned factors cause the largest variability in the modeled optical depth of water. In order to do this, we have developed a tool that calculates aerosol extinction using interchangeable global 3D data of aerosol composition, relative humidity, and aerosol size distribution fields. This data is obtained from models that have taken part in the open international initiative AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models). In addition, we use global 3D data for relative humidity from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) flying on board NASA's Aqua satellite and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data. These observations are used to evaluate the modeled relative humidity fields. In the first stage of the study, we made a detailed investigation using the aerosol-chemistry-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ in which most of the aerosol optical depth is caused by water. Our results show that the model significantly overestimates the relative humidity over the oceans while over land, the overestimation is lower or it is underestimated. Since this overestimation occurs over the oceans, the water optical depth is amplified as the hygroscopic growth is very sensitive to changes in high relative humidities. Over land, error in modeled relative humidity is unlikely to cause significant errors in water optical depth as relative humidities are generally

  15. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  16. Characterization of heparin aerosols generated in jet and ultrasonic nebulizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendstrup, K.E.; Newhouse, M.T.; Pedersen, Ole Finn;

    1999-01-01

    Inhaled heparin has been used for asthma treatment, but results have been inconsistent, probably due to highly varying lung doses. We determined the output per unit time and the particle size distributions of sodium heparin, calcium heparin, and low molecular weight (LMW) heparin formulations...... depended upon the viscosity and temperature of the solution. MMD was independent of formulation, temperature, or concentration and ranged from 5.61 to 7.03 /urn. Sodium heparin/calcium heparin in a concentration of 20,000 IU/mL in the jet nebulizer driven at 10 L/min produced the highest dose of heparin...... capable of reaching the lower respiratory tract. Mass balance was determined for these combinations with the jet nebulizer run until visible aerosol generation ceased. Of a loading dose of 80,000 IU of heparin, 45,000 IU remained in the dead space of the nebulizer, 20,000 IU was deposited...

  17. Global modeling of organic aerosol: the importance of reactive nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, H. O. T.; Chan, A. W. H.; Barkley, M. P.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-09-01

    Reactive nitrogen compounds, specifically NOx and NO3, likely influence global organic aerosol levels. To assess these interactions, GEOS-Chem, a chemical transport model, is updated to include improved biogenic emissions (following MEGAN v2.1/2.04), a new organic aerosol tracer lumping scheme, aerosol from nitrate radical (NO3) oxidation of isoprene, and NOx-dependent terpene aerosol yields. As a result of significant nighttime terpene emissions, fast reaction of monoterpenes with the nitrate radical, and relatively high aerosol yields from NO3 oxidation, biogenic hydrocarbon-NO3 reactions are expected to be a major contributor to surface level aerosol concentrations in anthropogenically influenced areas such as the United States. By including aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation in GEOS-Chem, terpene aerosol approximately doubles and isoprene aerosol is enhanced by 30 to 40% in the Southeast United States. In terms of the global budget of organic aerosol, however, aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation is somewhat minor (slightly more than 3 Tg/yr) due to the relatively high volatility of organic-NO3 oxidation products. Globally, 69 to 88 Tg/yr of organic aerosol is predicted to be produced annually, of which 14-15 Tg/yr is from oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and 8-9 Tg/yr from isoprene.

  18. Global modeling of organic aerosol: the importance of reactive nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. O. T. Pye

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive nitrogen compounds, specifically NOx and NO3, likely influence global organic aerosol levels. To assess these interactions, GEOS-Chem, a chemical transport model, is updated to include improved biogenic emissions (following MEGAN v2.1/2.04, a new organic aerosol tracer lumping scheme, aerosol from nitrate radical (NO3 oxidation of isoprene, and NOx-dependent terpene aerosol yields. As a result of significant nighttime terpene emissions, fast reaction of monoterpenes with the nitrate radical, and relatively high aerosol yields from NO3 oxidation, biogenic hydrocarbon-NO3 reactions are expected to be a major contributor to surface level aerosol concentrations in anthropogenically influenced areas such as the United States. By including aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation in GEOS-Chem, terpene aerosol approximately doubles and isoprene aerosol is enhanced by 30 to 40% in the Southeast United States. In terms of the global budget of organic aerosol, however, aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation is somewhat minor (slightly more than 3 Tg/yr due to the relatively high volatility of organic-NO3 oxidation products. Globally, 69 to 88 Tg/yr of organic aerosol is predicted to be produced annually, of which 14–15 Tg/yr is from oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and 8–9 Tg/yr from isoprene.

  19. Beschrijving van een spinning top generator voor de produktie van hypermicron aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkus; R.*; Meulen; A.van der

    1986-01-01

    Dit rapport beschrijft pogingen tot het verbeteren van de May spinning top aerosol generator. Met deze generator is het theoretisch mogelijk monodispers aerosol met afmetingen tussen 1 en 10 um te produceren met grote concentraties (ongeveer 500 deeltjes per cc). Diverse factoren die de werking

  20. How robust are models of precipitation response to aerosols?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carslaw, Ken; Johnson, Jill; Cui, Zhiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Models of cloud-aerosol interaction and effects on precipitation are complex and therefore slow to run, so our understanding mostly relies on case studies and a very limited exploration of model uncertainties. Here we address the concept of cloud model robustness. A robust model is one that is reliable under different conditions in spite of uncertainties in the underlying processes. To assess model robustness, we quantify how the accumulated precipitation from a mixed-phase convective cloud responds to changes in aerosol accounting for the combined uncertainties in ten microphysical processes. Sampling across the full uncertainty space is achieved using statistical emulators, which essentially enable tens of thousands of cloud-resolving model simulations to be performed. Overall, precipitation increases with aerosol when aerosol concentrations are low and decreases when aerosol concentrations are high. However, when we account for uncertainties across the ten-dimensional parameter space of microphysical processes, the direction of response can no longer be defined with confidence except under some rather narrow aerosol conditions. To assess robustness of the modelled precipitation response to aerosols, we select a set of model "variants" that display a particular response in one aerosol environment and use this subset of models to predict precipitation response in other aerosol environments. Despite essentially tight model tuning, the model has very little reliability in predicting precipitation responses in different aerosol environments. Based on these results, we argue that the neglect of model uncertainty and a narrow case-study approach using highly complex cloud models may lead to false confidence in our understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions.

  1. ModelE2-TOMAS development and evaluation using aerosol optical depths, mass and number concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional microphysics model (TOMAS has been integrated into the state-of-the-art general circulation model, GISS ModelE2. TOMAS has the flexibility to select a size resolution as well as the lower size cutoff. A computationally efficient version of TOMAS is used here, which has 15 size bins covering 3 nm to 10 μm aerosol dry diameter. For each bin, it simulates the total aerosol number concentration and mass concentrations of sulphate, pure elementary carbon (hydrophobic, mixed elemental carbon (hydrophilic, hydrophobic organic matter, hydrophilic organic matter, sea salt, mineral dust, ammonium, and aerosol-associated water. This paper provides a detailed description of the ModelE2-TOMAS model and evaluates the model against various observations including aerosol precursor gas concentrations, aerosol mass and number concentrations, and aerosol optical depths. Additionally, global budgets in ModelE2-TOMAS are compared with those of other global aerosol models, and the TOMAS model is compared to the default aerosol model in ModelE2, which is a bulk aerosol model. Overall, the ModelE2-TOMAS predictions are within the range of other global aerosol model predictions, and the model has a reasonable agreement with observations of sulphur species and other aerosol components as well as aerosol optical depth. However, ModelE2-TOMAS (as well as the bulk aerosol model cannot capture the observed vertical distribution of sulphur dioxide over the Pacific Ocean possibly due to overly strong convective transport. The TOMAS model successfully captures observed aerosol number concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Anthropogenic aerosol burdens in the bulk aerosol model running in the same host model as TOMAS (ModelE2 differ by a few percent to a factor of 2 regionally, mainly due to differences in aerosol processes including deposition, cloud processing, and emission parameterizations. Larger differences are found

  2. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  3. Modeling the Relationships Between Aerosol Properties and the Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols on Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols may affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing visible and infrared energy, They may also affect climate indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes, and by altering abundances of radiatively important gases through heterogeneous chemistry. Researchers understand which aerosol properties control the direct effect of aerosols on the radiation budget. Unfortunately, despite an abundance of data on certain types of aerosols, much work remains to be done to determine the values of these properties. For instance we have little idea about the global distribution, seasonal variation, or interannual variability of the aerosol optical depth. Also we do not know the visible light absorption properties of tropical aerosols which may contain much debris from slash and burn agriculture. A positive correlation between aerosol concentrations and albedos of marine stratus clouds is observed, and the causative microphysics is understood. However, models suggest that it is difficult to produce new particles in the marine boundary layer. Some modelers have suggested that the particles in the marine boundary layer may originate in the free troposphere and be transported into the boundary layer. Others argue that the aerosols are created in the marine boundary layer. There are no data linking aerosol concentration and cirrus cloud albedo, and models suggest cirrus properties may not be very sensitive to aerosol abundance. There is clear evidence of a radiatively significant change in the global lower stratospheric ozone abundance during the past few decades. These changes are caused by heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of particles. The rates of these reactions depend upon the chemical composition of the particles. Although rapid advances in understanding heterogeneous chemistry have been made, much remains to be done.

  4. Development of an in vitro cytotoxicity model for aerosol exposure using 3D reconstructed human airway tissue; application for assessment of e-cigarette aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Louise; Mankus, Courtney; Thorne, David; Jackson, George; DeBay, Jason; Meredith, Clive

    2015-10-01

    Development of physiologically relevant test methods to analyse potential irritant effects to the respiratory tract caused by e-cigarette aerosols is required. This paper reports the method development and optimisation of an acute in vitro MTT cytotoxicity assay using human 3D reconstructed airway tissues and an aerosol exposure system. The EpiAirway™ tissue is a highly differentiated in vitro human airway culture derived from primary human tracheal/bronchial epithelial cells grown at the air-liquid interface, which can be exposed to aerosols generated by the VITROCELL® smoking robot. Method development was supported by understanding the compatibility of these tissues within the VITROCELL® system, in terms of airflow (L/min), vacuum rate (mL/min) and exposure time. Dosimetry tools (QCM) were used to measure deposited mass, to confirm the provision of e-cigarette aerosol to the tissues. EpiAirway™ tissues were exposed to cigarette smoke and aerosol generated from two commercial e-cigarettes for up to 6 h. Cigarette smoke reduced cell viability in a time dependent manner to 12% at 6 h. E-cigarette aerosol showed no such decrease in cell viability and displayed similar results to that of the untreated air controls. Applicability of the EpiAirway™ model and exposure system was demonstrated, showing little cytotoxicity from e-cigarette aerosol and different aerosol formulations when compared directly with reference cigarette smoke, over the same exposure time. PMID:26176715

  5. Emissions and Characteristics of Ice Nucleating Particles Associated with Laboratory Generated Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, C. S.; Hill, T. C. J.; Beall, C.; Sultana, C. M.; Moore, K.; Cornwell, G.; Lee, C.; Al-Mashat, H.; Laskina, O.; Trueblood, J.; Grassian, V. H.; Prather, K. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate emission rates and activity spectra of atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs) are required for proper representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in atmospheric modeling studies. However, few investigations have quantified or characterized oceanic INP emissions. In conjunction with the Center for Aerosol Impacts on the Climate and the Environment, we have directly measured changes in INP emissions and properties of INPs from nascent sea spray aerosol (SSA) through the evolution of phytoplankton blooms. Multiple offline and online instruments were used to monitor aerosol chemistry and size, and bulk water characteristics during two phytoplankton bloom experiments. Two methods were utilized to monitor the number concentrations of INPs from 0 to -34 °C: The online CSU continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) and collections processed offline using the CSU ice spectrometer. Single particle analyses were performed on ice crystal residuals downstream of the CFDC, presumed to be INPs, via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and Raman microspectroscopy. Preliminary results indicate that laboratory-generated nascent SSA corresponds to number concentrations of INPs that are generally consistent with open ocean regions, based on current knowledge. STEM analyses revealed that the sizes of ice crystal residuals that were associated with nascent SSA ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 μm. Raman microspectroscopy analysis of 1 μm sized residuals found a variety of INP identities, including long chain organics, diatom fragments and polysaccharides. Our data suggest that biological processes play a significant role in ocean INP emissions by generating the species and compounds that were identified during these studies.

  6. Aerosol generation and charging phenomena in plasma- enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Bruce Riley

    This thesis is concerned with advancing the theoretical study of the origin and acquisition of particle charge from aerosol generation. A newly designed integral mobility charge analyzer was constructed and calibrated to measure the electrical charge distribution on aerosol particles between 10 nanometer (nm) and 10 micrometer ( m m). The charge analyzer can be used in a wide variety of laboratory and industrial applications due to its broad operating range. Initially, the analyzer performance was tested by generating a variety of aerosol particles with and without neutralization by two different radioactive sources. As a result, experimental charge distributions can be compared with analytical and numerical models of spray and contact electrification related to the interface's double layer. The liquid surface can be simply modeled as a flat plate electrical capacitor with a stored dipole charge layer near the interface. Experimental research will investigate the charge state of a surface double layer using the interaction of dissolved particles. Ion interactions with a particle- liquid interface in the electrical double layer can be analyzed by measuring the aerosol charge distribution from different concentrations of salts, colloids and organic solutions. However, the main thesis research goal is to monitor charged contaminants in process exhaust using the developed integral mobility charge analyzer. Experimental measurements can then be correlated with the dynamic behavior of different nucleated species in the reactor. Hypothetically, particles formed in the plasma volume will have a different charge and size distribution than exhaust line particles originating from unreacted gas species in the pump line. A thorough understanding of the charge level of particles within the plasma volume is necessary to understand the charging, trapping and behavior of contaminant species in the CVD film processes. Charge neutralization by free ion attachment in the exhaust lines

  7. Particle generation methods applied in large-scale experiments on aerosol behaviour and source term studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In aerosol research aerosols of known size, shape, and density are highly desirable because most aerosols properties depend strongly on particle size. However, such constant and reproducible generation of those aerosol particles whose size and concentration can be easily controlled, can be achieved only in laboratory-scale tests. In large scale experiments, different generation methods for various elements and compounds have been applied. This work presents, in a brief from, a review of applications of these methods used in large scale experiments on aerosol behaviour and source term. Description of generation method and generated aerosol transport conditions is followed by properties of obtained aerosol, aerosol instrumentation used, and the scheme of aerosol generation system-wherever it was available. An information concerning aerosol generation particular purposes and reference number(s) is given at the end of a particular case. These methods reviewed are: evaporation-condensation, using a furnace heating and using a plasma torch; atomization of liquid, using compressed air nebulizers, ultrasonic nebulizers and atomization of liquid suspension; and dispersion of powders. Among the projects included in this worked are: ACE, LACE, GE Experiments, EPRI Experiments, LACE-Spain. UKAEA Experiments, BNWL Experiments, ORNL Experiments, MARVIKEN, SPARTA and DEMONA. The aim chemical compounds studied are: Ba, Cs, CsOH, CsI, Ni, Cr, NaI, TeO2, UO2Al2O3, Al2SiO5, B2O3, Cd, CdO, Fe2O3, MnO, SiO2, AgO, SnO2, Te, U3O8, BaO, CsCl, CsNO3, Urania, RuO2, TiO2, Al(OH)3, BaSO4, Eu2O3 and Sn. (Author)

  8. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhola, T.; Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric models often represent the aerosol particle size distribution with a modal approach, in which particles are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. This approach reallocates particles numerically from one mode to another for example during particle growth, potentially leading to artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how the modal reallocation affects climate-relevant variables: cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), aerosol-cloud interaction parameter (ACI) and light extinction coefficient (qext). The ACI parameter gives the response of CDNC to a change in total aerosol number concentration. We compared these variables between a modal model (with and without reallocation routines) and a high resolution sectional model, which was considered a reference model. We analysed the relative differences in the chosen variables in four experiments designed to assess the influence of atmospheric aerosol processes. We find that limiting the allowed size ranges of the modes, and subsequent remapping of the distribution, leads almost always to an underestimation of cloud droplet number concentrations (by up to 100%) and an overestimation of light extinction (by up to 20%). On the other hand, the aerosol-cloud interaction parameter can be either over- or underestimated by the reallocating model, depending on the conditions. For example, in the case of atmospheric new particle formation events followed by rapid particle growth, the reallocation can cause on average a 10% overestimation of the ACI parameter. Thus it is shown that the reallocation affects the ability of a model to estimate aerosol climate effects accurately, and this should be taken into account when using and developing aerosol models.

  9. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gyawali

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the first laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet (UV wavelength (i.e. 355 nm and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory-generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Exact T-matrix method calculations were used to model the absorption and scattering characteristics of fractal-like agglomerates of different compactness and varying number of monomers. With these calculations, we attempted to estimate the number of monomers and fractal dimension of laboratory generated kerosene soot. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009, and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols and relatively clean (aged aerosols conditions. Particulate matter (PM concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm and 10 μm, respectively and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO, nitric oxide (NO, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2. The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from

  10. Distributed generation systems model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklund, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    A slide presentation is given on a distributed generation systems model developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and its application to a situation within the Idaho Power Company`s service territory. The objectives of the work were to develop a screening model for distributed generation alternatives, to develop a better understanding of distributed generation as a utility resource, and to further INEL`s understanding of utility concerns in implementing technological change.

  11. A general circulation model (GCM) parameterization of Pinatubo aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacis, A.A.; Carlson, B.E.; Mishchenko, M.I. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The June 1991 volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo is the largest and best documented global climate forcing experiment in recorded history. The time development and geographical dispersion of the aerosol has been closely monitored and sampled. Based on preliminary estimates of the Pinatubo aerosol loading, general circulation model predictions of the impact on global climate have been made.

  12. Aerosol Optical Depth over Europe : Satellite Retrieval and Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robles Gonzalez, C.; Leeuw, G. de; Veefkind, J.P.; Builtjes, P.J.H.; Loon, M. van; Schaap, M.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom coefficients over Europe retrieved from satellite data for August 1997 provide information on the spatial variations of these aerosol properties. The AOD results are compared with initial results from model calculations, showing the relative influences of sul

  13. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    OpenAIRE

    Korhola, T.; H. Kokkola; Korhonen, H.; A.-I. Partanen; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; S. Romakkaniemi

    2013-01-01

    In atmospheric modelling applications the aerosol particle size distribution is commonly represented by modal approach, in which particles in different size ranges are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. Such method includes numerical reallocation of particles from a mode to another for example during particle growth, leading to potentially artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how this reallocation affects climatologicall...

  14. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    OpenAIRE

    Korhola, T.; H. Kokkola; Korhonen, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; S. Romakkaniemi

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric models often represent the aerosol particle size distribution with a modal approach, in which particles are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. This approach reallocates particles numerically from one mode to another for example during particle growth, potentially leading to artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how the modal reallocation affects climate-relevant variables: cloud droplet numbe...

  15. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  16. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Cirrus Clouds in Global Aerosol-Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Zhou, C.; Penner, J.; Barahona, D.; Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei that promote ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning activities have substantially perturbed and enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Global aerosol-climate models (GCMs) have now been used to quantify the radiative forcing and effects of aerosols on cirrus clouds (IPCC AR5). However, the estimate uncertainty is very large due to the different representation of ice cloud formation and evolution processes in GCMs. In addition, large discrepancies have been found between model simulations in terms of the spatial distribution of ice-nucleating aerosols, relative humidity, and temperature fluctuations, which contribute to different estimates of the aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds. In this presentation, four GCMs with the start-of-the art representations of cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions are used to estimate the aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds and to identify the causes of the discrepancies. The estimated global and annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds ranges from 0.1 W m-2 to 0.3 W m-2 in terms of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation flux, and 0.5-0.6 W m-2 for the TOA longwave flux. Despite the good agreement on global mean, large discrepancies are found at the regional scale. The physics behind the aerosol indirect effect is dramatically different. Our analysis suggests that burden of ice-nucleating aerosols in the upper troposphere, ice nucleation frequency, and relative role of ice formation processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation) play key roles in determining the characteristics of the simulated aerosol indirect effects. In addition to the indirect effect estimate, we also use field campaign

  17. Bedding disposal cabinet for containment of aerosols generated by animal cage cleaning procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, C L; Sabel, F L; Henke, C B

    1976-02-01

    Laboratory tests with aerosolized spores and animal room tests with uranine dye indicate the effectiveness of a prototype bedding disposal cabinet in reducing airborne contamination generated by cage cleaning procedures. PMID:826219

  18. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Korhola

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In atmospheric modelling applications the aerosol particle size distribution is commonly represented by modal approach, in which particles in different size ranges are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. Such method includes numerical reallocation of particles from a mode to another for example during particle growth, leading to potentially artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how this reallocation affects climatologically relevant parameters: cloud droplet number concentration, aerosol-cloud interaction coefficient and light extinction coefficient. We compared these parameters between a modal model with and without reallocation routines, and a high resolution sectional model that was considered as a reference model. We analysed the relative differences of the parameters in different experiments that were designed to cover a wide range of dynamic aerosol processes occurring in the atmosphere. According to our results, limiting the allowed size ranges of the modes and the following numerical remapping of the distribution by reallocation, leads on average to underestimation of cloud droplet number concentration (up to 100% and overestimation of light extinction (up to 20%. The analysis of aerosol first indirect effect is more complicated as the ACI parameter can be either over- or underestimated by the reallocating model, depending on the conditions. However, for example in the case of atmospheric new particle formation events followed by rapid particle growth, the reallocation can cause around average 10% overestimation of the ACI parameter. Thus it is shown that the reallocation affects the ability of a model to estimate aerosol climate effects accurately, and this should be taken into account when using and developing aerosol models.

  19. Stratospheric aerosol forcing for climate modeling: 1850-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfeuille, Florian; Luo, Beiping; Thomason, Larry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present here a stratospheric aerosol dataset produced using the available aerosol optical depth observations from the pre-satellite period. The scarce atmospheric observations are supplemented by additional information from an aerosol microphysical model, initialized by ice-core derived sulfur emissions. The model is used to derive extinctions at all altitudes, latitudes and times when sulfur injections are known for specific volcanic eruptions. The simulated extinction coefficients are then scaled to match the observed optical depths. In order to produce the complete optical properties at all wavelengths (and the aerosol surface area and volume densities) needed by climate models, we assume a lognormal size distribution of the aerosols. Correlations between the extinctions in the visible and the effective radius and distribution width parameters are taken from the better constrained SAGE II period. The aerosol number densities are then fitted to match the derived extinctions in the 1850-1978 period. From these aerosol size distributions, we then calculate extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors at all wavelengths using the Mie theory. The aerosol surface area densities and volume densities are also provided.

  20. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tunved

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout most of the year, but fails in reproducing the aerosol properties during the winter season, resulting in poor agreement between model and measurements especially during December–January. Nevertheless, through the rest of the year both trends and magnitude of modal concentrations show good agreement with observation, as do the monthly average size distribution properties. The model is also shown to capture individual nucleation events to a certain degree. This indicates that nucleation largely is controlled by the availability of nucleating material (as prescribed by the [H2SO4], availability of condensing material (in this model 15% of primary reactions of monoterpenes (MT are assumed to produce low volatile species and the properties of the size distribution (more specifically, the condensation sink. This is further demonstrated by the fact that the model captures the annual trend in nuclei mode concentration. The model is also used, alongside sensitivity tests, to examine which processes dominate the aerosol size distribution physical properties. It is shown, in agreement with previous studies, that nucleation governs the number concentration during transport from clean areas. It is also shown that primary number emissions almost exclusively govern the CN concentration when air from Central Europe is advected north over Scandinavia. We also show that biogenic emissions have a large influence on the amount of potential CCN observed

  1. New trajectory driven aerosol and chemical process model: chemical and aerosol Lagrangian model (CALM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tunved

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM have been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61°51' N, 24°17' E over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout most of the year, but fails in reproducing the aerosol properties during the winter season, resulting in poor agreement between model and measurements especially during December–January. Nevertheless, through the rest of the year both trends and magnitude of modal concentrations show good agreement with observation, as do the monthly average size distribution properties. The model is also shown to capture individual nucleation events to a certain degree. This indicates that nucleation largely is controlled by the availability of nucleating material (as prescribed by the [H2SO4], availability of condensing material (in this model 15% of primary reactions of monoterpenes (MT are assumed to produce low volatile species and the properties of the size distribution (more specifically, the condensation sink. This is further demonstrated by the fact that the model captures the annual trend in nuclei mode concentration. The model is also used, alongside sensitivity tests, to examine which processes dominate the aerosol size distribution physical properties. It is shown, in agreement with previous studies, that nucleation governs the number concentration while transport from clean areas takes place. It is also shown that primary number emissions almost exclusively govern the CN concentration when air from Central Europe is advected north over Scandinavia. We also show that biogenic emissions have a large influence on the amount of potential CCN observed

  2. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2010-04-09

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.

  3. Auxiliary Deep Generative Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaløe, Lars; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Sønderby, Søren Kaae;

    2016-01-01

    Deep generative models parameterized by neural networks have recently achieved state-of-the-art performance in unsupervised and semi-supervised learning. We extend deep generative models with auxiliary variables which improves the variational approximation. The auxiliary variables leave...... the generative model unchanged but make the variational distribution more expressive. Inspired by the structure of the auxiliary variable we also propose a model with two stochastic layers and skip connections. Our findings suggest that more expressive and properly specified deep generative models converge...... faster with better results. We show state-of-the-art performance within semi-supervised learning on MNIST (0.96%), SVHN (16.61%) and NORB (9.40%) datasets....

  4. Role of clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interaction in 20th century simulations with GISS ModelE2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, L.; Rind, D. H.; Bauer, S.; Del Genio, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Simulations of aerosols, clouds and their interaction contribute to the major source of uncertainty in predicting the changing Earth's energy and in estimating future climate. Anthropogenic contribution of aerosols affects the properties of clouds through aerosol indirect effects. Three different versions of NASA GISS global climate model are presented for simulation of the twentieth century climate change. All versions have fully interactive tracers of aerosols and chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. All chemical species are simulated prognostically consistent with atmospheric physics in the model and the emissions of short-lived precursors [Shindell et al., 2006]. One version does not include the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. The other two versions include a parameterization of the interactive first indirect aerosol effect on clouds following Menon et al. [2010]. One of these two models has the Multiconfiguration Aerosol Tracker of Mixing state (MATRIX) that permits detailed treatment of aerosol mixing state, size, and aerosol-cloud activation. The main purpose of this study is evaluation of aerosol-clouds interactions and feedbacks, as well as cloud and aerosol radiative forcings, for the twentieth century climate under different assumptions and parameterizations for aerosol, clouds and their interactions in the climate models. The change of global surface air temperature based on linear trend ranges from +0.8°C to +1.2°C between 1850 and 2012. Water cloud optical thickness increases with increasing temperature in all versions with the largest increase in models with interactive indirect effect of aerosols on clouds, which leads to the total (shortwave and longwave) cloud radiative cooling trend at the top of the atmosphere. Menon, S., D. Koch, G. Beig, S. Sahu, J. Fasullo, and D. Orlikowski (2010), Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10,4559-4571, doi:10.5194/acp-10-4559-2010. Shindell, D., G. Faluvegi

  5. Multicomponent aerosol dynamics model UHMA: model development and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korhonen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A size-segregated aerosol dynamics model UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model was developed for studies of multicomponent tropospheric aerosol particles. The model includes major aerosol microphysical processes in the atmosphere with a focus on new particle formation and growth; thus it incorporates particle coagulation and multicomponent condensation, applying a revised treatment of condensation flux onto free molecular regime particles and the activation of nanosized clusters by organic vapours (Nano-Köhler theory, as well as recent parameterizations for binary H2SO4–H2O and ternary H2SO4–NH3-H2O homogeneous nucleation and dry deposition. The representation of particle size distribution can be chosen from three sectional methods: the hybrid method, the moving center method, and the retracking method in which moving sections are retracked to a fixed grid after a certain time interval. All these methods can treat particle emissions and transport consistently, and are therefore suitable for use in large scale atmospheric models. In a test simulation against an accurate high resolution solution, all the methods showed reasonable treatment of new particle formation with 20 size sections although the hybrid and the retracking methods suffered from artificial widening of the distribution. The moving center approach, on the other hand, showed extra dents in the particle size distribution and failed to predict the onset of detectable particle formation. In a separate test simulation of an observed nucleation event, the model captured the key qualitative behaviour of the system well. Furthermore, its prediction of the organic volume fraction in newly formed particles, suggesting values as high as 0.5 for 3–4 nm particles and approximately 0.8 for 10 nm particles, agrees with recent indirect composition measurements.

  6. Multicomponent aerosol dynamics model UHMA: model development and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korhonen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A size-segregated aerosol dynamics model UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model was developed for studies of multicomponent tropospheric aerosol particles. The model includes major aerosol microphysical processes in the atmosphere with a focus on new particle formation and growth; thus it incorporates particle coagulation and multicomponent condensation, applying a revised treatment of condensation flux onto free molecular regime particles and the activation of nanosized clusters by organic vapours (Nano-Köhler theory, as well as recent parameterizations for binary H2SO4-H2O and ternary H2SO4-NH3-H2O homogeneous nucleation and dry deposition. The representation of particle size distribution can be chosen from three sectional methods: the hybrid method, the moving center method, and the retracking method in which moving sections are retracked to a fixed grid after a certain time interval. All these methods can treat particle emissions and atmospheric transport consistently, and are therefore suitable for use in large scale atmospheric models. In a test simulation against an accurate high resolution solution, all the methods showed reasonable treatment of new particle formation with 20 size sections although the hybrid and the retracking methods suffered from artificial widening of the distribution. The moving center approach, on the other hand, showed extra dents in the particle size distribution and failed to predict the onset of detectable particle formation. In a separate test simulation of an observed nucleation event, the model captured the key qualitative behaviour of the system well. Furthermore, its prediction of the organic volume fraction in newly formed particles, suggesting values as high as 0.5 for 3–4 nm particles and approximately 0.8 for 10 nm particles, agrees with recent indirect composition measurements.

  7. Development towards a global operational aerosol consensus: basic climatological characteristics of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, W. R.; Reid, J. S.; Benedetti, A.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Lu, S.; Sekiyama, T.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Brooks, M. E.; Eck, T. F.; Iredell, M.; Hansen, J. A.; Jorba, O. C.; Juang, H.-M. H.; Lynch, P.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Moorthi, S.; Mulcahy, J.; Pradhan, Y.; Razinger, M.; Sampson, C. B.; Wang, J.; Westphal, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the first steps in developing a global multi-model aerosol forecasting ensemble intended for eventual operational and basic research use. Drawing from members of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction (ICAP) latest generation of quasi-operational aerosol models, 5-day aerosol optical thickness (AOT) forecasts are analyzed for December 2011 through November 2012 from four institutions: European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and Naval Research Lab/Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (NRL/FNMOC). For dust, we also include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NOAA NGAC) product in our analysis. The Barcelona Supercomputing Centre and UK Met Office dust products have also recently become members of ICAP, but have insufficient data to be included in this analysis period. A simple consensus ensemble of member and mean AOT fields for modal species (e.g., fine and coarse mode, and a separate dust ensemble) is used to create the ICAP Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME). The ICAP-MME is run daily at 00:00 UTC for 6-hourly forecasts out to 120 h. Basing metrics on comparisons to 21 regionally representative Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites, all models generally captured the basic aerosol features of the globe. However, there is an overall AOT low bias among models, particularly for high AOT events. Biomass burning regions have the most diversity in seasonal average AOT. The Southern Ocean, though low in AOT, nevertheless also has high diversity. With regard to root mean square error (RMSE), as expected the ICAP-MME placed first over all models worldwide, and was typically first or second in ranking against all models at individual sites. These results are encouraging; furthermore, as more global operational aerosol models come online, we expect their inclusion in a robust

  8. Bio aerosol Generation at wastewater treatment plants: Identification of main bio aerosols sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical operations taking place at wastewater treatment plants, especially those involving aeration and mechanical agitation of raw wastewater, represent one of the main sources of bio aerosols that, if inhaled, could pose a biologic hazard to site workers and local residents. Six different wastewater treatment plants from southeast Spain were monitories in order to identify the main bio aerosol sources and to evaluate the airborne microorganisms levels to which workers may be exposed to. Air samples were taken from selected locations by using a single stage impactor. (Author)

  9. CFD simulation of aerosol deposition in an anatomically based human large-medium airway model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative data on aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract are useful for understanding the causes of certain lung diseases and for designing efficient drug delivery systems via inhalation. In this study, aerosol deposition in a 3D anatomically based human large-medium airway model was simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The model extended from mouth to generation 10 and included two-thirds of the airways obtained by multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging on normal healthy human subjects. Steady oral inhalation (15, 30, and 60 L/min) and aerosol (1-30 micrometer) deposition were computed by CFD using the realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. Based on the mean turbulence flow field, the computed extrathoracic deposition, ratio of left to right lung deposition, and deposition efficiency at each generation compared favorably with existing in vivo and in vitro experiments. The significant deposition in the large-medium airway model showed that the total tracheobronchial deposition is dominated by the large-medium airways for micrometer-sized aerosol particles. These quantitative data and the methods developed in this study provided valuable means toward subject-specific modeling of aerosol deposition in the human lung based on realistic lung geometry. PMID:19082892

  10. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  11. Modelling and numerical simulation of the General Dynamic Equation of aerosols; Modelisation et simulation des aerosols atmospheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debry, E.

    2005-01-15

    Chemical-transport models are now able to describe in a realistic way gaseous pollutants behavior in the atmosphere. Nevertheless atmospheric pollution also exists as fine suspended particles, called aerosols, which interact with gaseous phase, solar radiation, and have their own dynamic behavior. The goal of this thesis is the modelling and numerical simulation of the General Dynamic Equation of aerosols (GDE). Part I deals with some theoretical aspects of aerosol modelling. Part II is dedicated to the building of one size resolved aerosol model (SIREAM). In part III we perform the reduction of this model in order to use it in dispersion models as POLAIR3D. Several modelling issues are still opened: organic aerosol matter, externally mixed aerosols, coupling with turbulent mixing, and nano-particles. (author)

  12. Model Assessment of the Ability of MODIS to Measure Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Forcing from Smoke Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Levin, Zev; Ghan, Steven J.

    2002-02-01

    The new generation of satellite sensors such as the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) will be able to detect and characterize global aerosols with an unprecedented accuracy. The question remains whether this accuracy will be sufficient to narrow the uncertainties in our estimates of aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere. We narrow the discussion to cloud free direct forcing. Satellite remote sensing detects aerosol optical thickness with the least amount of relative error when aerosol loading is high. Satellites are less effective when aerosol loading is low. We use the monthly mean results of two global aerosol transport models to simulate the spatial distribution of smoke aerosol in the Southern Hemisphere during the tropical biomass burning season. This spatial distribution allows us to determine that 87-94% of the smoke aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere occurs in grid squares with sufficient signal to noise ratio to be detectable from space. The uncertainty of quantifying the smoke aerosol forcing in the Southern Hemisphere depends on the uncertainty introduced by errors in estimating the background aerosol, errors resulting from uncertainties in surface properties and errors resulting from uncertainties in assumptions of aerosol properties. These three errors combine to give overall uncertainties of 1.2 to 2.2 Wm-2 (16-60%) in determining the Southern Hemisphere smoke aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere. The range of values depend on which estimate of MODIS retrieval uncertainty is used, either the theoretical calculation (upper bound) or the empirical estimate (lower bound). Strategies that use the satellite data to derive flux directly or use the data in conjunction with ground-based remote sensing and aerosol transport models can reduce these uncertainties.

  13. Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Myhre

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We have used the MODIS satellite data and two global aerosol models to investigate the relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD and cloud parameters that may be affected by the aerosol concentration. The relationships that are studied are mainly between AOD, on the one hand, and cloud cover, cloud liquid water path, and water vapour, on the other. Additionally, cloud droplet effective radius, cloud optical depth, cloud top pressure and aerosol Ångström exponent, have been analysed in a few cases. In the MODIS data we found, as in earlier studies, an enhancement in the cloud cover with increasing AOD. We find it likely that most of the strong increase in cloud cover with AOD, at least for AOD<0.2, is a result of aerosol-cloud interactions and a prolonged cloud lifetime. Large and mesoscale weather systems seem not to be a cause for the increase in cloud cover with AOD in this range. Sensitivity simulations show that when water uptake of the aerosols is not taken into account in the models the modelled cloud cover mostly decreases with AOD. Part of the relationship found in the MODIS data for AOD>0.2 can be explained by larger water uptake close to the clouds since relative humidity is higher in regions with higher cloud cover. The efficiency of the hygroscopic growth depends on aerosol type, the hygroscopic nature of the aerosol, the relative humidity, and to some extent the cloud screening. By analysing the Ångström exponent we find that the hygroscopic growth of the aerosol is not likely to be a main contributor to the cloud cover increase with AOD. Since the largest increase in cloud cover with AOD is for low AOD (~0.2 and thus also for low cloud cover, we argue that cloud contamination is not likely to play a large role. However, interpretation of the complex relationships between AOD and cloud parameters should be made with great care and further work is clearly needed.

  14. Size distribution of chromate paint aerosol generated in a bench-scale spray booth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabty-Daily, Rania A; Hinds, William C; Froines, John R

    2005-01-01

    Spray painters are potentially exposed to aerosols containing hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] via inhalation of chromate-based paint sprays. Evaluating the particle size distribution of a paint spray aerosol, and the variables that may affect this distribution, is necessary to determine the site and degree of respiratory deposition and the damage that may result from inhaled Cr(VI)-containing paint particles. This study examined the effect of spray gun atomization pressure, aerosol generation source and aerosol aging on the size distribution of chromate-based paint overspray aerosols generated in a bench-scale paint spray booth. The study also determined the effect of particle bounce inside a Marple personal cascade impactor on measured size distributions of paint spray aerosols. Marple personal cascade impactors with a modified inlet were used for sample collection. The data indicated that paint particle bounce did not occur inside the cascade impactors sufficiently to affect size distribution when using uncoated stainless steel or PVC substrate sampling media. A decrease in paint aerosol mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) from 8.2 to 7.0 mum was observed as gun atomization pressure increased from 6 to 10 psi. Overspray aerosols were sampled at two locations in the spray booth. A downstream sampling position simulated the exposure of a worker standing between the painted surface and exhaust, a situation encountered in booths with multiple workers. The measured mean MMAD was 7.2 mum. The distance between the painted surface and sampler was varied to sample oversprays of varying ages between 2.8 and 7.7 s. Age was not a significant factor for determining MMAD. Overspray was sampled at a 90 degrees position to simulate a worker standing in front of the surface being painted with air flowing to the worker's side, a common situation in field applications. The resulting overspray MMAD averaged 5.9 mum. Direct-spray aerosols were sampled at ages from 5.3 to 11.7 s

  15. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    OpenAIRE

    S. E. Bauer; Wright, D. L.; D. Koch; Lewis, E. R.; McGraw, R; Chang, L.-S.; S. E. Schwartz; R. Ruedy

    2008-01-01

    A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mod...

  16. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state: an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS climate model (ModelE are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM, represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations.

    A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment

  17. An image-based automatic mesh generation and numerical simulation for a population-based analysis of aerosol delivery in the human lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-11-01

    The authors propose a method to automatically generate three-dimensional subject-specific airway geometries and meshes for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of aerosol delivery in the human lungs. The proposed method automatically expands computed tomography (CT)-based airway skeleton to generate the centerline (CL)-based model, and then fits it to the CT-segmented geometry to generate the hybrid CL-CT-based model. To produce a turbulent laryngeal jet known to affect aerosol transport, we developed a physiologically-consistent laryngeal model that can be attached to the trachea of the above models. We used Gmsh to automatically generate the mesh for the above models. To assess the quality of the models, we compared the regional aerosol distributions in a human lung predicted by the hybrid model and the manually generated CT-based model. The aerosol distribution predicted by the hybrid model was consistent with the prediction by the CT-based model. We applied the hybrid model to 8 healthy and 16 severe asthmatic subjects, and average geometric error was 3.8% of the branch radius. The proposed method can be potentially applied to the branch-by-branch analyses of a large population of healthy and diseased lungs. NIH Grants R01-HL-094315 and S10-RR-022421, CT data provided by SARP, and computer time provided by XSEDE.

  18. An Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model for the Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    This report is the final report for the Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1000. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are: (1) Development of an aerosol chemistry model; (2) Utilization of satellite measurements of trace gases along with analysis of temperatures and dynamic conditions to understand ice cloud formation, dehydration and sedimentation in the winter polar regions; (3) Comparison of the HALOE and SAGE II time dependencies of the Pinatubo aerosol decay. The publications are attached.

  19. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state: an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguation Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS climate model (ModelE is described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM, represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol mode, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble modes. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various mode configurations are presented. The number concentration of aerosol particles activated to cloud drops depends on the mode configuration. Simulations on the global scale with the GISS climate model are evaluated against aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment.

  20. Satellite Characterization of Fire Emissions of Aerosols and Gases Relevant to Air-Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Ellison, L.; Yue, Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Because of the transient and widespread nature of wildfires and other types of open biomass burning, satellite remote sensing has become an indispensable technique for characterizing their smoke emissions for modeling applications, especially at regional to global scales. Fire radiative energy (FRE), whose instantaneous rate of release or fire radiative power (FRP) is measurable from space, has been found to be proportional to both the biomass consumption and emission of aerosol particulate matter. We have leveraged this relationship to generate a global, gridded smoke-aerosol emission coefficients (Ce) dataset based on FRP and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements from the MODIS sensors aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. Ce is a simple coefficient to convert FRE to smoke aerosol emissions, in the same manner as traditional emission factors are used to convert burned biomass to emissions. The first version of this Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER.v1) global gridded Ce product at 1°x1° resolution is available at http://feer.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Based on published emission ratios, the FEER.v1 Ce product for total smoke aerosol has also been used to generate similar products for specific fire-emitted aerosols and gases, including those that are regulated as 'criteria pollutants' under the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), such as particulate matter (PM) and carbon monoxide (CO). These gridded Ce products were used in conjunction with satellite measurements of FRP to derive emissions of several smoke constituents, which were applied to WRF-Chem fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model simulations, with promising results. In this presentation, we analyze WRF-Chem simulations of surface-level concentrations of various pollutants based on FEER.v1 emission products to illustrate their value for air-quality modeling, particularly in parts of Africa and southeast Asia where ground-based air

  1. MODELS-3 COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODEL AEROSOL COMPONENT 1: MODEL DESCRIPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aerosol component of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is designed to be an efficient and economical depiction of aerosol dynamics in the atmosphere. The approach taken represents the particle size distribution as the superposition of three lognormal subdis...

  2. Receptor models for source apportionment of remote aerosols in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission), and PESA (proton elastic scattering analysis) method were used in conjunction with receptor models for source apportionment of remote aerosols in Brazil. The PIXE used in the determination of concentration for elements with Z >- 11, has a detection limit of about 1 ng/m3. The concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen in the fine fraction of Amazon Basin aerosols was measured by PESA. We sampled in Jureia (SP), Fernando de Noronha, Arembepe (BA), Firminopolis (GO), Itaberai (GO) and Amazon Basin. For collecting the airbone particles we used cascade impactors, stacked filter units, and streaker samplers. Three receptor models were used: chemical mass balance, stepwise multiple regression analysis and principal factor analysis. The elemental and gravimetric concentrations were explained by the models within the experimental errors. Three sources of aerosol were quantitatively distinguished: marine aerosol, soil dust and aerosols related to forests. The emission of aerosols by vegetation is very clear for all the sampling sites. In Amazon Basin and Jureia it is the major source, responsible for 60 to 80% of airborne concentrations. (Author)

  3. Model analysis of aerosol optical depth distributions over East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on simulated major aerosol concentrations (e.g., sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon, black carbon, and sea salt) over East Asia during the year 2005 by using the Multi-scale Air Quality modeling system (RAMS-CMAQ), the aerosol optical depth (AOD) was calculated by the reconstruction mass-extinction method and then analyzed to explore its characteristics in temporal-spatial distributions. For evaluating the model performances, simulated AOD values were compared against observations at stations of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET). The comparison shows that the model can well reproduce observed temporal and spatial features of AOD, especially in natural en- vironment. However, the simulated AOD values are underestimated over urban and suburban regions with dense human activities. Analysis of simulation results indicates that AOD varies significantly in time and space, and generally, AOD values are lower in summer and higher in winter. Excluding the contribution from soil dust aerosols, high AOD values (over 0.8) are found over the Sichuan Basin, South China, and Central China in several months, while low values (less than 0.2) are over northern and western areas of East Asia and southern sea regions. Analysis also shows that aerosols such as sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium are main contributors to AOD in East Asia, and their contributions are over 80% in most high AOD areas, while black carbon aerosols play an important role in northern China where dense human activities exist, especially in the winter time.

  4. Experimental study on capturing and encapsulating radioactive aerosol generated in plasma cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive aerosol and loose contamination generated in disassembling the contaminated equipment by plasma cutting was harmful to the operator's health. The method of atomizing capture liquid was used to capture and encapsulate the radioactive aerosol. The result of the engineering test indicated that reducing the capture liquid's surface tension can decrease the atomized droplet's particle diameter. That benefits the aerosol particle capturing. The higher viscosity contributes to encapsulate the loose contamination. On the decommissioning site, the selected capturing liquid in engineering test was effective in capturing the high concentration α radioactive aerosol and encapsulating the loose contamination. The encapsulating effort could prevent the loose contamination from resuspension for several days. (authors)

  5. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Ho Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Remote Sensing (RS by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future.

  6. Modeling Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over the Northern Hemisphere using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Wong, D.; Hogrefe, C.; Xing, J.; Wei, C.; Gan, M.

    2013-12-01

    population trends, economic conditions, and technology changes in motor vehicles and electric power generation. Analysis of measurements of aerosol composition, radiation, and associated variables, over the past two decades will be presented which indicate significant reductions in the tropospheric aerosol burden as well as an increase in down-welling shortwave radiation at numerous sites across the U.S. Initial applications of the coupled WRF-CMAQ model for time-periods pre and post the implementation of CAA Title IV will be discussed and comparisons with measurements to assess the model's ability to capture trends in aerosol burden, composition, and direct aerosol effects on surface shortwave radiation will be presented.

  7. Assessment of aerosol models to AOD retrieval from HJ1 Satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese environmental satellites HJ1 A and B can play a significant role in the aerosol retrieval due to their high spatial and temporal resolution. The current Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieval methods from HJ1-CCD are almost based on the LUT (Look-Up Table), by selecting the best fitting result to determine the AOD. However, aerosol model selection has an important impact on the retrieval results when creating the lookup table; inappropriate choice of aerosol model will significantly affect the accuracy and applicability of the method. This paper determined the local aerosol physical properties (such as complex refractive index, and size distribution) based on the observational data, thus we defined the aerosol type and retrieved the AOD of the local aerosol. Furthermore we compared the results retrieved from the measurement aerosol model with those retrieved from the inherent aerosol model in the radiative transfer model and then evaluate its effect on the aerosol type

  8. Model of optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bondo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the effect of galactic cosmic rays on cloud formation, we investigate the optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases – abrupt decreases in galactic cosmic rays – by means of modeling. We vary the nucleation rate of new aerosols, in a sectional coagulation and condensation model, according to changes in ionization by the Forbush decrease. From the resulting size distribution we then calculate the aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent, for the wavelength pairs 350, 450 nm and 550, 900 nm. In the cases where the output parameters from the model seem to compare best with atmospheric observations we observe, for the shorter wavelength pair, a change in Angstrom exponent, following the Forbush Decrease, of −6 to +3%. In some cases we also observe a delay in the change of Angstrom exponent, compared to the maximum of the Forbush decrease, which is caused by different sensitivities of the probing wavelengths to changes in aerosol number concentration and size. For the long wavelengths these changes are generally smaller. The types and magnitude of change is investigated for a suite of nucleation rates, condensable gas production rates, and aerosol loss rates. Furthermore we compare the model output with observations of 5 of the largest Forbush decreases after year 2000. For the 350, 450 nm pair we use AERONET data and find a comparable change in signal while the Angstrom Exponent is lower in the model than in the data, due to AERONET being mainly sampled over land. For 550, 900 nm we compare with both AERONET and MODIS and find little to no response in both model and observations. In summary our study shows that the optical properties of aerosols show a distinct response to Forbush Decreases, assuming that the nucleation of fresh aerosols is driven by ions. Shorter wavelengths seem more favorable for observing these effects and great care should be taken when analyzing observations, in order to avoid

  9. Modeling of pollution aerosols in Ile-de-France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modeling of aerosols is a major stake in the understanding of the emission processes and evolution of particulates in the atmosphere. However, the parameterizations used in today's aerosol models still comprise many uncertainties. This work has been motivated by the need of better identifying the weaknesses of aerosols modeling tools and by the necessity of having new validation methods for a 3D evaluation of models. The studies have been carried out using the CHIMERE chemistry-transport model, which allows to simulate the concentrations and physico-chemical characteristics of pollution aerosols at the European scale and in Ile-de-France region. The validation approach used is based on the complementarity of the measurements performed on the ground by monitoring networks with those acquired during the ESQUIF campaign (study and simulation of air quality in Ile-de-France), with lidar and photometric measurements and with satellite observations. The comparison between the observations and the simulations has permitted to identify and reduce the modeling errors, and to characterize the aerosol properties in the vicinity of an urban area. (J.S.)

  10. The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-10-03

    The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

  11. Model of optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bondo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the effect of galactic cosmic rays on cloud formation, we investigate the optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases – abrupt decreases in galactic cosmic rays – by means of modeling. We vary the nucleation rate of new aerosols, in a sectional coagulation and condensation model, according to changes in ionization by the Forbush decrease. From the resulting size distribution we then calculate the aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent, for the wavelength pairs 350, 450 nm and 550, 900 nm. For the shorter wavelength pair we observe a change in Angstrom exponent, following the Forbush Decrease, of −6 to +3% in the cases with atmospherically realistic output parameters. For some parameters we also observe a delay in the change of Angstrom exponent, compared to the maximum of the Forbush decrease, which is caused by different sensitivities of the probing wavelengths to changes in aerosol number concentration and size. For the long wavelengths these changes are generally smaller. The types and magnitude of change is investigated for a suite of nucleation rates, condensable gas production rates, and aerosol loss rates. Furthermore we compare the model output with observations of 5 of the largest Forbush decreases after year 2000. For the 350, 450 nm pair we use AERONET data and find a comparable change in signal while the Angstrom Exponent is lower in the model than in the data, due to AERONET being mainly sampled over land. For 550, 900 nm we compare with both AERONET and MODIS and find little to no response in both model and observations. In summary our study shows that the optical properties of aerosols show a distinct response to Forbush Decreases, assuming that the nucleation of fresh aerosols is driven by ions. Shorter wavelengths seem more favorable for observing these effects and great care should be taken when analyzing observations, in order to avoid the signal being drowned out by noise.

  12. Generation of Mie size microdroplet aerosols with applications in laser-driven fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a tunable source of Mie scale microdroplet aerosols that can be used for the generation of energetic ions. To demonstrate this potential, a terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser focused to 2x1019 W/cm2 was used to irradiate heavy water (D2O) aerosols composed of micron-scale droplets. Energetic deuterium ions, which were generated in the laser-droplet interaction, produced deuterium-deuterium fusion with approximately 2x103 fusion neutrons measured per joule of incident laser energy.

  13. Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation (CAR ensemble modeling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-Z. Liang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation (CAR ensemble modeling system has been developed to incorporate the largest choices of alternative parameterizations for cloud properties (cover, water, radius, optics, geometry, aerosol properties (type, profile, optics, radiation transfers (solar, infrared, and their interactions. These schemes form the most comprehensive collection currently available in the literature, including those used by the world leading general circulation models (GCMs. The CAR provides a unique framework to determine (via intercomparison across all schemes, reduce (via optimized ensemble simulations, and attribute specific key factors for (via physical process sensitivity analyses the model discrepancies and uncertainties in representing greenhouse gas, aerosol and cloud radiative forcing effects. This study presents a general description of the CAR system and illustrates its capabilities for climate modeling applications, especially in the context of estimating climate sensitivity and uncertainty range caused by cloud-aerosol-radiation interactions. For demonstration purpose, the evaluation is based on several CAR standalone and coupled climate model experiments, each comparing a limited subset of the full system ensemble with up to 896 members. It is shown that the quantification of radiative forcings and climate impacts strongly depends on the choices of the cloud, aerosol and radiation schemes. The prevailing schemes used in current GCMs are likely insufficient in variety and physically biased in a significant way. There exists large room for improvement by optimally combining radiation transfer with cloud property schemes.

  14. Aerosol activation and cloud processing in the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Roelofs

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A parameterization for cloud processing is presented that calculates activation of aerosol particles to cloud drops, cloud drop size, and pH-dependent aqueous phase sulfur chemistry. The parameterization is implemented in the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The cloud processing parameterization uses updraft speed, temperature, and aerosol size and chemical parameters simulated by ECHAM5-HAM to estimate the maximum supersaturation at the cloud base, and subsequently the cloud drop number concentration (CDNC due to activation. In-cloud sulfate production occurs through oxidation of dissolved SO2 by ozone and hydrogen peroxide. The model simulates realistic distributions for annually averaged CDNC although it is underestimated especially in remote marine regions. On average, CDNC is dominated by particles from the accumulation mode, with smaller contributions from the Aitken and coarse modes. The simulations indicate that in-cloud sulfate production is a potentially important source of accumulation mode sized cloud condensation nuclei, due to chemical growth of activated Aitken particles and to enhanced coalescence of processed particles. The strength of this source depends on the distribution of produced sulfate over the activated modes. This distribution is affected by uncertainties in many parameters that play a direct role in particle activation, such as the updraft velocity, the aerosol chemical composition and the organic solubility, and the simulated CDNC is found to be relatively sensitive to these uncertainties.

  15. Aerosol activation and cloud processing in the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Roelofs

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A parameterization for cloud processing is presented that calculates activation of aerosol particles to cloud drops, cloud drop size, and pH-dependent aqueous phase sulfur chemistry. The parameterization is implemented in the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The cloud processing parameterization uses updraft speed, temperature, and aerosol size and chemical parameters simulated by ECHAM5-HAM to estimate the maximum supersaturation at the cloud base, and subsequently the cloud drop number concentration (CDNC due to activation. In-cloud sulfate production occurs through oxidation of dissolved SO2 by ozone and hydrogen peroxide. The model simulates realistic distributions for annually averaged CDNC although it is underestimated especially in remote marine regions. On average, CDNC is dominated by cloud droplets growing on particles from the accumulation mode, with smaller contributions from the Aitken and coarse modes. The simulations indicate that in-cloud sulfate production is a potentially important source of accumulation mode sized cloud condensation nuclei, due to chemical growth of activated Aitken particles and to enhanced coalescence of processed particles. The strength of this source depends on the distribution of produced sulfate over the activated modes. This distribution is affected by uncertainties in many parameters that play a direct role in particle activation, such as the updraft velocity, the aerosol chemical composition and the organic solubility, and the simulated CDNC is found to be relatively sensitive to these uncertainties.

  16. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  17. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of aerosol in a U-shaped steam generator tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Pamela

    To quantify primary side aerosol retention, an Eulerian/Lagrangian approach was used to investigate aerosol transport in a compressible, turbulent, adiabatic, internal, wall-bounded flow. The ARTIST experimental project (Phase I) served as the physical model replicated for numerical simulation. Realizable k-epsilon and standard k-o turbulence models were selected from the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, FLUENT, to provide the Eulerian description of the gaseous phase. Flow field simulation results exhibited: (a) onset of weak secondary flow accelerated at bend entrance towards the inner wall; (b) flow separation zone development on the convex wall that persisted from the point of onset; (c) centrifugal force concentrated high velocity flow in the direction of the concave wall; (d) formation of vortices throughout the flow domain resulted from rotational (Dean-type) flow; (e) weakened secondary flow assisted the formation of twin vortices in the outflow cross section; and (f) perturbations induced by the bend influenced flow recovery several pipe diameters upstream of the bend. These observations were consistent with those of previous investigators. The Lagrangian discrete random walk model, with and without turbulent dispersion, simulated the dispersed phase behavior, incorrectly. Accurate deposition predictions in wall-bounded flow require modification of the Eddy Impaction Model (EIM). Thus, to circumvent shortcomings of the EIM, the Lagrangian time scale was changed to a wall function and the root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuating velocities were modified to account for the strong anisotropic nature of flow in the immediate vicinity of the wall (boundary layer). Subsequent computed trajectories suggest a precision that ranges from 0.1% to 0.7%, statistical sampling error. The aerodynamic mass median diameter (AMMD) at the inlet (5.5 mum) was consistent with the ARTIST experimental findings. The geometric standard deviation (GSD) varied depending on the

  18. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties Among Aerocom Models of a Range of Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, K.; Ghan, S. J.; Easter, R. C.; Liu, X.; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S. E.; Tsigaridis, K.; van Noije, T. P. C.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by 12 global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the multimodel- mean data set simulates the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree of skill, suggesting

  19. Global modelling of secondary organic aerosol in the troposphere: a sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tsigaridis

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A global 3-dimensional chemistry/transport model able to describe O3, NOx, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC, sulphur and NH3 chemistry has been extended to simulate the temporal and spatial distribution of primary and secondary carbonaceous aerosols in the troposphere focusing on Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA formation. A number of global simulations have been performed to determine a possible range of annual global SOA production and investigate uncertainties associated with the model results. The studied uncertainties in the SOA budget have been evaluated to be in decreasing importance: the potentially irreversible sticking of the semi-volatile compounds on aerosols, the enthalpy of vaporization of these compounds, the partitioning of SOA on non-carbonaceous aerosols, the conversion of aerosols from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, the emissions of primary carbonaceous aerosols, the chemical fate of the first generation products and finally the activity coefficient of the condensable species. The large uncertainties associated with the emissions of VOC and the adopted simplification of chemistry have not been investigated in this study. Although not all sources of uncertainties have been investigated, according to our calculations, the above factors within the experimental range of variations could result to an overall uncertainty of about a factor of 20 in the global SOA budget. The global annual SOA production from biogenic VOC might range from 2.5 to 44.5 Tg of organic matter per year, whereas that from anthropogenic VOC ranges from 0.05 to 2.62 Tg of organic matter per year. These estimates can be considered as a lower limit, since partitioning on coarse particles like nitrate, dust or sea-salt, together with the partitioning and the dissociation of the semi-volatile products in aerosol water has been neglected. Comparison of model results to observations, where available, shows a better agreement for the upper budget estimates than for the

  20. Time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: Measuring gaseous iodine species after selective uptake in lab-generated aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundel, Michael; Ries, Marco; Schott, Mathias; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2010-05-01

    Reactive iodine species play an important role in the marine atmospheric chemistry. Recent studies show that iodine containing compounds (e.g. I2 and ICl) are involved in the tropospheric ozone depletion, the enrichment of iodine in marine aerosols and the formation of new particles in the marine boundary layer (MBL). Various laboratory and field measurements report that molecular iodine (I2) and organoiodine compounds (e.g. CH3I, CH2I2) are the most important precursors for reactive iodine in the MBL[1],[2]. However, the identification and quantification of reactive iodine containing compounds are still analytical challenges. Here, we present a new application of the time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) for the quantification of gaseous I2 and ICl in real-time. Time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry enables the real-time analysis of the particle size, the particle mass and the chemical composition of non-refractory aerosols[3]. The aerosol enters the ToF-AMS through a critical orifice of 100 μm inner diameter. An aerodynamic lens system focuses the particles in a size range of 50-600 nm as a narrow beam into the vacuum system. While most of the air is removed by a skimmer, the particle beam is transmitted into the particle-sizing chamber. After passing the particle-sizing chamber, the non-refractory particles are flash-vaporized on a heated tungsten surface (500-600 °C) and then ionized by electron impact. The generated ions are extracted by an orthogonal extractor into the time-of-flight mass spectrometer, where the time resolved particle mass detection is performed. Since gaseous compounds are removed inside the ToF-AMS, a direct measurement of gaseous iodine species is not possible. Therefore gaseous iodine species have to be transferred from the gas phase to the particle phase before entering the ToF-AMS. For this purpose α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) particles were used as selective sampling probes for I2 and 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB

  1. Modelling of formation and distribution of secondary aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani-Aksoyoglu, S.; Keller, J.; Baertsch-Ritter, N.; Prevot, A.S.H.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.

    2003-03-01

    The performance of aerosol modules of the 3-dimensional CAMx model was evaluated for the first time in a domain covering the Po Basin in northern Italy. The preliminary results for particulate species (especially those containing nitrate) smaller than 2.5 {mu}m were comparable to the values measured both in urban and rural stations. In most of the model domain, particulate NO{sub 3}{sup -} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentrations decreased with reduced NO{sub x} emissions. On the other hand, the levels of secondary organic carbon aerosols decreased with reduced VOC emissions, but increased with reduced NO{sub x} emissions similarly to ozone. Including aerosol chemistry in the model also affected the indicator values which are used for the ozone production sensitivities. (author)

  2. Fukushima radionuclides in Vilnius/Lithuania aerosols: Modelling of aerosol transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of activity concentrations of 131I; 129mTe, 132Te, 134Cs and; 136Cs, 137Cs in aerosol were carried out in daily samples after the Fukushima accident during the period of March–April, 2011 in Vilnius. The maximum activity concentrations of 131I and 137Cs were found to be 3700 μBq m−3 and 1040 μBq m−3, respectively. Variations in activity ratios of 132Te/129mTe and 137Cs/136Cs observed after the accident were explained by the decay of the short-lived isotopes, while those in 134Cs/137Cs by the dilution effect of the Chernobyl-derived 137Cs. It was found that different behaviours of highly volatile 131I and 137Cs resulted in enrichment of ground level aerosol particles by 131I with respect to 137Cs. Simulated activity concentrations of 137Cs attached to aerosol particles for the Vilnius site reasonably agreed with measured activities in aerosol samples during the Fukushima accident. - Highlights: • Variations in the 134Cs/137Cs ratios were due to effect of the Chernobyl-derived 137Cs. • 131I/137Cs ratios indicated different behaviour of volatile 131I in the atmosphere. • Modelling data satisfactorily agreed with measured activities of particulate 137Cs

  3. Evaluation of black carbon estimations in global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhao

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate black carbon (BC model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD retrievals from AERONET and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.7 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 8 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC ratio is 0.4 and models underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model

  4. Spatial distributions and seasonal cycles of aerosols in India and China seen in global climate-aerosol model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Henriksson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A climate-aerosol model is employed to study spatial and temporal variability of aerosol properties over India and China for recent (year 2006 and future conditions (year 2020 under different emission pathways. We present results for aerosol mass concentration in different size classes and optical properties for the five different aerosol species treated by the model. Aerosol mass concentration and optical depth have significant contributions from both anthropogenic and natural aerosols. Different species have maxima in different regions, with the highest anthropogenic aerosol concentrations found in Kolkata and elsewhere in the Ganges basin in India and on the northern part of the east coast and in the Sichuan basin in China. In India natural aerosols have a maximum in the summer due to higher wind speeds and anthropogenic aerosols have a maximum in the winter due to less efficient wet removal. Surface concentrations are also higher in winter due to the additional reason of lower average boundary layer height. In China seasonal cycles are weaker with natural aerosols having a maximum in the spring and sulfate contribution to the aerosol optical depth (AOD being higher in the latter half of the year. MODIS AOD spatial distributions are reproduced well by the model, except for the Ganges valley with high absorption and for the Thar desert with high dust concentrations. Seasonal cycles compare well qualitatively with MODIS results. The larger AOD in China during the latter half of the year in the year 2006 simulation as compared to the MODIS data can be traced back to sulfate contribution with some contribution also from natural aerosols.

  5. Evaluation of aerosol properties simulated by the high resolution global coupled chemistry-aerosol-microphysics model C-IFS-GLOMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Flemming, Johannes; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Engelen, Richard; Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Benduhn, Francois; Hewson, Will; Woodhouse, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The EU Framework Programme GEMS and MACC consortium projects co-ordinated by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have developed an operational global forecasting and reanalysis system (Composition-IFS) for atmospheric composition including greenhouse gases, reactive gases and aerosol. The current operational C-IFS system uses a mass-based aerosol model coupled to data assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth measured by satellite (MODIS) to predict global aerosol properties. During MACC, the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics scheme was added to the system, providing information on aerosol size and number for improved representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting also for simulated global variations in size distribution and internally-mixed particle composition. The IFS-GLOMAP system has recently been upgraded to couple with the sulphur cycle simulated in the online TM5 tropospheric chemistry module for global reactive gases. This C-IFS-GLOMAP system is also being upgraded to use a new "nitrate-extended" version of GLOMAP which realistically treats the size-resolved gas-particle partitioning of semi volatile gases ammonia and nitric acid. In this poster we described C-IFS-GLOMAP and present an evaluation of the global sulphate aerosol distribution simulated in this coupled aerosol-chemistry C-IFS-GLOMAP, comparing to surface observations in Europe, North America and the North Atlantic and contrasting to the fixed timescale sulphate production scheme developed in GEMS. We show that the coupling to the TM5 sulphur chemistry improves the seasonal cycle of sulphate aerosol, for example addressing a persistent wintertime sulphate high bias in northern Europe. The improved skill in simulated sulphate aerosol seasonal cycle is a pre-requisite to realistically characterise nitrate aerosol since biases in sulphate affect the amount of free ammonia available to form ammonium nitrate.

  6. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : model and implementation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-10-01

    In this report a model for simulating aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls is presented. The model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular (DEM) package within the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Modeling the interactions of small particles is relevant to a number of applications (e.g., soils, powders, colloidal suspensions, etc.). Modeling the behavior of aerosol particles during agglomeration and cluster dynamics upon impact with a wall is of particular interest. In this report we describe preliminary efforts to develop and implement physical models for aerosol particle interactions. Future work will consist of deploying these models to simulate aerosol cluster behavior upon impact with a rigid wall for the purpose of developing relationships for impact speed and probability of stick/bounce/break-up as well as to assess the distribution of cluster sizes if break-up occurs. These relationships will be developed consistent with the need for inputs into system-level codes. Section 2 gives background and details on the physical model as well as implementations issues. Section 3 presents some preliminary results which lead to discussion in Section 4 of future plans.

  7. Evaluation of black carbon estimations in global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koch

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate black carbon (BC model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD from AERONET and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50 N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimates the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a

  8. Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

    2009-11-27

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the

  9. NEW VERSATILE AEROSOL GENERATION SYSTEM DEVELOPED FOR USE IN A LARGE WIND TUNNEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new aerosol generation system was developed to accommodate a variety of research activities performed within a large wind tunnel. Because many of the velocity measurements are taken in the wind tunnel with a laser Doppler anemometer (LDA), it is necessary to maintain an aero...

  10. Incorporation of advanced aerosol activation treatments into CESM/CAM5: model evaluation and impacts on aerosol indirect effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, B.; He, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.

    2014-07-01

    One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in the science of anthropogenic climate change is from aerosol-cloud interactions. The activation of aerosols into cloud droplets is a direct microphysical linkage between aerosols and clouds; parameterizations of this process link aerosol with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the resulting indirect effects. Small differences between parameterizations can have a large impact on the spatiotemporal distributions of activated aerosols and the resulting cloud properties. In this work, we incorporate a series of aerosol activation schemes into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1 within the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM/CAM5) which include factors such as insoluble aerosol adsorption and giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation kinetics to understand their individual impacts on global-scale cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Compared to the existing activation scheme in CESM/CAM5, this series of activation schemes increase the computation time by ~10% but leads to predicted CDNC in better agreement with satellite-derived/in situ values in many regions with high CDNC but in worse agreement for some regions with low CDNC. Large percentage changes in predicted CDNC occur over desert and oceanic regions, owing to the enhanced activation of dust from insoluble aerosol adsorption and reduced activation of sea spray aerosol after accounting for giant CCN activation kinetics. Comparison of CESM/CAM5 predictions against satellite-derived cloud optical thickness and liquid water path shows that the updated activation schemes generally improve the low biases. Globally, the incorporation of all updated schemes leads to an average increase in column CDNC of 150% and an increase (more negative) in shortwave cloud forcing of 12%. With the improvement of model-predicted CDNCs and better agreement with most satellite-derived cloud properties in many regions, the inclusion of these aerosol activation

  11. Physicochemical Characterization of Lake Spray Aerosol Generated from Great Lakes Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, A. P.; Axson, J. L.; May, N.; Pratt, K.

    2014-12-01

    Wave breaking across bodies of water releases particles into the air which can impact climate and human health. Similar to sea spray aerosols formed through marine wave breaking, freshwater lakes generate lake spray aerosol (LSA). LSA can impact climate directly through scattering/absorption and indirectly through cloud nucleation. In addition, these LSA are suggested to impact human health through inhalation of these particles during algal bloom periods characterized by toxic cyanobacteria. Few studies have been conducted to assess the physical and chemical properties of freshwater LSA. Herein, we discuss constructing a LSA generation system and preliminary physical and chemical characterization of aerosol generated from water samples collected at various sites across Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, and Lake Michigan. Information on aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and chemical composition will be discussed as a function of lake water blue-green algae concentration, dissolved organic carbon concentration, temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen concentration. These studies represent a first step towards evaluating the potential for LSA to impact climate and health in the Great Lakes region.

  12. Advancing Models and Evaluation of Cumulus, Climate and Aerosol Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gettelman, Andrew [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-27

    This project was successfully able to meet its’ goals, but faced some serious challenges due to personnel issues. Nonetheless, it was largely successful. The Project Objectives were as follows: 1. Develop a unified representation of stratifom and cumulus cloud microphysics for NCAR/DOE global community models. 2. Examine the effects of aerosols on clouds and their impact on precipitation in stratiform and cumulus clouds. We will also explore the effects of clouds and precipitation on aerosols. 3. Test these new formulations using advanced evaluation techniques and observations and release

  13. Comparison of five bacteriophages as models for viral aerosol studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Martel, Bruno; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2014-07-01

    Bacteriophages are perceived to be good models for the study of airborne viruses because they are safe to use, some of them display structural features similar to those of human and animal viruses, and they are relatively easy to produce in large quantities. Yet, only a few studies have investigated them as models. It has previously been demonstrated that aerosolization, environmental conditions, and sampling conditions affect viral infectivity, but viral infectivity is virus dependent. Thus, several virus models are likely needed to study their general behavior in aerosols. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of aerosolization and sampling on the infectivity of five tail-less bacteriophages and two pathogenic viruses: MS2 (a single-stranded RNA [ssRNA] phage of the Leviviridae family), Φ6 (a segmented double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] phage of the Cystoviridae family), ΦX174 (a single-stranded DNA [ssDNA] phage of the Microviridae family), PM2 (a double-stranded DNA [dsDNA] phage of the Corticoviridae family), PR772 (a dsDNA phage of the Tectiviridae family), human influenza A virus H1N1 (an ssRNA virus of the Orthomyxoviridae family), and the poultry virus Newcastle disease virus (NDV; an ssRNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family). Three nebulizers and two nebulization salt buffers (with or without organic fluid) were tested, as were two aerosol sampling devices, a liquid cyclone (SKC BioSampler) and a dry cyclone (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health two-stage cyclone bioaerosol sampler). The presence of viruses in collected air samples was detected by culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Our results showed that these selected five phages behave differently when aerosolized and sampled. RNA phage MS2 and ssDNA phage ΦX174 were the most resistant to aerosolization and sampling. The presence of organic fluid in the nebulization buffer protected phages PR772 and Φ6 throughout the aerosolization and sampling with dry cyclones. In this

  14. An Aerosolized Brucella spp. Challenge Model for Laboratory Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    To characterize the optimal aerosol dosage of Brucella abortus strain 2308 (S2308) and B. melitensis (S16M) in a laboratory animal model of brucellosis, dosages of 10**3 to 10**10 CFU were nebulized to mice. Although tissue weights were minimally influenced, total colony-forming units (CFU) per tis...

  15. A Review on the Study of the Generation of (Nanoparticles Aerosols during the Mechanical Solicitation of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Shandilya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on presenting the forefront of the interdisciplinary studies conceived towards the generation of the wear particles aerosol when materials are subjected to mechanical stresses. Various wear mechanisms and instrumentation involved during stress application and aerosolization of wear particles, as well as particles characterization, measurement, and modeling techniques are presented through the investigation of a series of contextual works which are emphasized on the identification of these aspects. The review is motivated from the fact that understanding mechanisms involved in wear-induced particle generation, both at nano- and at microscale, is important for many applications that involve surfaces sliding over each other due to various potential health aspects. An attempt has been made to explain how the information based on this broad spectrum of subjects discovered in this contribution can be used and improved in order to produce a more resilient, rational, and versatile knowledge base which has been found lacking in the present literature during its survey. The area of study is highly multidisciplinary since it involves aerosol, particle, and material sciences.

  16. The aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stier

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol-climate modelling system ECHAM5-HAM is introduced. It is based on a flexible microphysical approach and, as the number of externally imposed parameters is minimised, allows the application in a wide range of climate regimes. ECHAM5-HAM predicts the evolution of an ensemble of microphysically interacting internally- and externally-mixed aerosol populations as well as their size-distribution and composition. The size-distribution is represented by a superposition of log-normal modes. In the current setup, the major global aerosol compounds sulfate (SU, black carbon (BC, particulate organic matter (POM, sea salt (SS, and mineral dust (DU are included. The simulated global annual mean aerosol burdens (lifetimes for the year 2000 are for SU: 0.80 Tg(S (3.9 days, for BC: 0.11 Tg (5.4 days, for POM: 0.99 Tg (5.4 days, for SS: 10.5 Tg (0.8 days, and for DU: 8.28 Tg (4.6 days. An extensive evaluation with in-situ and remote sensing measurements underscores that the model results are generally in good agreement with observations of the global aerosol system. The simulated global annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD is with 0.14 in excellent agreement with an estimate derived from AERONET measurements (0.14 and a composite derived from MODIS-MISR satellite retrievals (0.16. Regionally, the deviations are not negligible. However, the main patterns of AOD attributable to anthropogenic activity are reproduced.

  17. Evaluation of the sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA implementation in ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bergman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the implementation and evaluation of a sectional aerosol microphysics model SALSA within the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. This aerosol microphysics module has been designed to be flexible and computationally efficient so that it can be implemented in regional or global scale models. The computational efficiency has been achieved by keeping the number of variables needed to describe the size and composition distribution to the minimum. The aerosol size distribution is described using 20 size sections with 10 size sections in size space which cover diameters ranging from 3 nm to 10 μm divided to three subranges each having distinct optimised process and compound selection.

    The ability of the module to describe the global aerosol properties was evaluated by comparison against (1 measured continental and marine size distributions, (2 observed variability of continental modal number concentrations, (3 measured sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon and sea salt mass concentrations, (4 observations of AOD and other aerosol optical properties from satellites and AERONET network, (5 global aerosol budgets and concentrations from previous model studies, and (6 model results using M7 which is the default aerosol microphysics module in ECHAM5-HAM.

    The evaluation shows that the global aerosol properties can be reproduced reasonably well using the coarse resolution of 10 size sections in size space. The simulated global aerosol budgets are within the range of previous studies. Surface concentrations of sea salt, sulphate and carbonaceous species have an annual mean within a factor of five of the observations, while the simulated sea salt concentrations reproduce the observations less accurately and show high variability. Regionally, AOD is in relatively good agreement with the observations (within a factor of two. At mid-latitudes the observed AOD is captured well, while at high-latitudes as well as in some polluted and

  18. Spatial distributions and seasonal cycles of aerosol climate effects in India seen in global climate-aerosol model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Henriksson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate-aerosol interactions in India are studied by employing the global climate-aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM and the GAINS inventory for anthropogenic aerosol emissions. Seasonal cycles and spatial distributions of radiative forcing and the temperature and rainfall responses are presented for different model setups. While total aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in the summer, anthropogenic forcing is considerably stronger in winter than in summer. Local seasonal temperature anomalies caused by aerosols are mostly negative with some exceptions, e.g. Northern India in March–May and the eastern Himalayas in September–November. Rainfall increases due to the elevated heat pump (EHP mechanism and decreases due to solar dimming effects are studied. Aerosol light absorption does increase rainfall significantly in Northern India, but effects due to solar dimming and circulation work to cancel the increase. The total aerosol effect on rainfall is negative when considering all effects if assuming that aerosols have cooled the Northern Indian Ocean by 0.5 °K compared to the equator.

  19. Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2014-06-17

    The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

  20. Design, demonstration and performance of a versatile electrospray aerosol generator for nanomaterial research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes are difficult to aerosolize in a controlled manner. We present a method for generating aerosols not only of carbon nanotubes, but also of many reference and proprietary materials including quantum dots, diesel particulate matter, urban dust, and their mixtures, using electrospraying. This method can be used as a teaching tool, or as the starting point for advanced research, or to deliver nanomaterials in animal exposure studies. This electrospray system generates 180 μg of nanotubes per m3 of carrier gas, and thus aerosolizes an occupationally relevant mass concentration of nanotubes. The efficiency achievable for single-walled carbon nanotubes is 9.4%. This system is simple and quick to construct using ordinary lab techniques and affordable materials. Since it is easy to replace soiled parts with clean ones, experiments on different types of nanomaterial can be performed back to back without contamination from previous experiments. In this paper, the design, fabrication, operation and characterization of our versatile electrospray method are presented. Also, the morphological changes that carbon nanotubes undergo as they make the transition from dry powders to aerosol particles are presented.

  1. Design, demonstration and performance of a versatile electrospray aerosol generator for nanomaterial research and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennerjohn, Nancy; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Prikhodko, Sergey; Fung, David C.; Hirakawa, Karen S.; Zavala-Mendez, Jose D.; Hinds, William; Kennedy, Nola J.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are difficult to aerosolize in a controlled manner. We present a method for generating aerosols not only of carbon nanotubes, but also of many reference and proprietary materials including quantum dots, diesel particulate matter, urban dust, and their mixtures, using electrospraying. This method can be used as a teaching tool, or as the starting point for advanced research, or to deliver nanomaterials in animal exposure studies. This electrospray system generates 180 µg of nanotubes per m3 of carrier gas, and thus aerosolizes an occupationally relevant mass concentration of nanotubes. The efficiency achievable for single-walled carbon nanotubes is 9.4%. This system is simple and quick to construct using ordinary lab techniques and affordable materials. Since it is easy to replace soiled parts with clean ones, experiments on different types of nanomaterial can be performed back to back without contamination from previous experiments. In this paper, the design, fabrication, operation and characterization of our versatile electrospray method are presented. Also, the morphological changes that carbon nanotubes undergo as they make the transition from dry powders to aerosol particles are presented.

  2. Mitigating secondary aerosol generation potentials from biofuel use in the energy sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Abhishek; Colls, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    This paper demonstrates secondary aerosol generation potential of biofuel use in the energy sector from the photochemical interactions of precursor gases on a life cycle basis. The paper is divided into two parts-first, employing life cycle analysis (LCA) to evaluate the extent of the problem for a typical biofuel based electricity production system using five baseline scenarios; second, proposing adequate mitigation options to minimise the secondary aerosol generation potential on a life cycle basis. The baseline scenarios cover representative technologies for 2010 utilising energy crop (miscanthus), short rotation coppiced chips and residual/waste wood in different proportions. The proposed mitigation options include three approaches-biomass gasification prior to combustion, delaying the harvest of biomass, and increasing the geographical distance between the biomass plant and the harvest site (by importing the biofuels). Preliminary results indicate that the baseline scenarios (assuming all the biomass is sourced locally) bear significant secondary aerosol formation potential on a life cycle basis from photochemical neutralisation of acidic emissions (hydrogen chloride and sulphur dioxide) with ammonia. Our results suggest that gasification of miscanthus biomass would provide the best option by minimising the acidic emissions from the combustion plant whereas the other two options of delaying the harvest or importing biofuels from elsewhere would only lead to marginal reduction in the life cycle aerosol loadings of the systems. PMID:19878969

  3. The occupational exposure limit for fluid aerosol generated in metalworking operations: limitations and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donguk

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this review was to assess current knowledge related to the occupational exposure limit (OEL) for fluid aerosols including either mineral or chemical oil that are generated in metalworking operations, and to discuss whether their OEL can be appropriately used to prevent several health risks that may vary among metalworking fluid (MWF) types. The OEL (time-weighted average; 5 mg/m(3), short-term exposure limit ; 15 mg/m(3)) has been applied to MWF aerosols without consideration of different fluid aerosol-size fractions. The OEL, is also based on the assumption that there are no significant differences in risk among fluid types, which may be contentious. Particularly, the health risks from exposure to water-soluble fluids may not have been sufficiently considered. Although adoption of The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's recommended exposure limit for MWF aerosol (0.5 mg/m(3)) would be an effective step towards minimizing and evaluating the upper respiratory irritation that may be caused by neat or diluted MWF, this would fail to address the hazards (e.g., asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) caused by microbial contaminants generated only by the use of water-soluble fluids. The absence of an OEL for the water-soluble fluids used in approximately 80-90 % of all applicants may result in limitations of the protection from health risks caused by exposure to those fluids. PMID:22953224

  4. Aerosol predictions and their links to weather forecasts through online interactive atmospheric modeling and data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saide Peralta, Pablo Enrique

    Atmospheric particles represent a component of air pollution that has been identified as a major contributor to adverse health effects and mortality. Aerosols also interact with solar radiation and clouds perturbing the atmosphere and generating responses in a wide range of scales, such as changes to severe weather and climate. Thus, being able to accurately predict aerosols and its effects on atmospheric properties is of upmost importance. This thesis presents a collection of studies with the global objective to advance in science and operations the use of WRF-Chem, a regional model able to provide weather and atmospheric chemistry predictions and simultaneously representing aerosol effects on climate. Different strategies are used to obtain accurate predictions, including finding an adequate model configuration for each application (e.g., grid resolution, parameterizations choices, processes modeled), using accurate forcing elements (e.g., weather and chemical boundary conditions, emissions), and developing and applying data assimilation techniques for different observational sources. Several environments and scales are simulated, including complex terrain at a city scale, meso-scale over the southeast US for severe weather applications, and regional simulations over the three subtropical persistent stratocumulus decks (off shore California and southeast Pacific and Atlantic) and over North America. Model performance is evaluated against a large spectrum of observations, including field experiments and ground based and satellite measurements. Overall, very positive results were obtained with the WRF-Chem system once it had been configured properly and the inputs chosen. Also, data assimilation of aerosol and cloud satellite observations contributed to improve model performance even further. The model is proven to be an excellent tool for forecasting applications, both for local and long range transported pollution. Also, advances are made to better understand

  5. Sensitivity of remote aerosol distributions to representation of cloud-aerosol interactions in a global climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5, have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold increase in the winter (summer months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold

  6. Evaluation of the sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA implementation in ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bergman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the implementation and evaluation of a sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA within the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. This aerosol microphysics module has been designed to be flexible and computationally efficient so that it can be implemented in regional or global scale models. The computational efficiency has been achieved by minimising the number of variables needed to describe the size and composition distribution. The aerosol size distribution is described using 10 size classes with parallel sections which can have different chemical compositions. Thus in total, the module tracks 20 size sections which cover diameters ranging from 3 nm to 10 μm and are divided into three subranges, each with an optimised selection of processes and compounds.

    The implementation of SALSA into ECHAM5-HAM includes the main aerosol processes in the atmosphere: emissions, removal, radiative effects, liquid and gas phase sulphate chemistry, and the aerosol microphysics. The aerosol compounds treated in the module are sulphate, organic carbon, sea salt, black carbon, and mineral dust. In its default configuration, ECHAM5-HAM treats aerosol size distribution using the modal method. In this implementation, the aerosol processes were converted to be used in a sectional model framework.

    The ability of the module to describe the global aerosol properties was evaluated by comparing against (1 measured continental and marine size distributions, (2 observed variability of continental number concentrations, (3 measured sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon and sea-salt mass concentrations, (4 observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD and other aerosol optical properties from satellites and AERONET network, (5 global aerosol budgets and concentrations from previous model studies, and (6 model results using M7, which is the default aerosol microphysics module in ECHAM5-HAM.

    The evaluation shows that the global aerosol

  7. A global off-line model of size-resolved aerosol microphysics: I. Model development and prediction of aerosol properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A GLObal Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP has been developed as an extension to the TOMCAT 3-D Eulerian off-line chemical transport model. GLOMAP simulates the evolution of the global aerosol size distribution using a sectional two-moment scheme and includes the processes of aerosol nucleation, condensation, growth, coagulation, wet and dry deposition and cloud processing. We describe the results of a global simulation of sulfuric acid and sea spray aerosol. The model captures features of the aerosol size distribution that are well established from observations in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere. Modelled condensation nuclei (CN>3nm vary between about 250–500 cm-3 in remote marine boundary layer regions and are generally in good agreement with observations. Modelled continental CN concentrations are lower than observed, which may be due to lack of some primary aerosol sources or the neglect of nucleation mechanisms other than binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid-water particles. Remote marine CN concentrations increase to around 2000–10 000 cm (at standard temperature and pressure in the upper troposphere, which agrees with typical observed vertical profiles. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN at 0.2% supersaturation vary between about 1000 cm-3 in polluted regions and between 10 and 500 cm-3 in the remote marine boundary layer. New particle formation through sulfuric acid-water binary nucleation occurs predominantly in the upper troposphere, but the model results show that these particles contribute greatly to aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer. For this sulfur-sea salt system it is estimated that sea spray emissions account for only ~10% of CCN in the tropical marine boundary layer, but between 20 and 75% in the mid-latitude Southern Ocean. In a run with only natural sulfate and sea salt emissions the global mean surface CN concentration is more than 60% of that from a run with 1985 anthropogenic

  8. Quantification of Optical and Physical Properties of Combustion-Generated Carbonaceous Aerosols (Analytical and Microscopic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Inoka Eranda; Litton, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to quantify and characterize the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated aerosols during both flaming and smoldering combustion of three materials common to underground mines—Pittsburgh Seam coal, Styrene Butadiene Rubber (a common mine conveyor belt material), and Douglas-fir wood—using a combination of analytical and gravimetric measurements. Laser photometers were utilized in the experiments for continuous measurement of aerosol mass concentrations and for comparison to measurements made using gravimetric filter samples. The aerosols of interest lie in the size range of tens to a few hundred nanometers, out of range of the standard photometer calibration. To correct for these uncertainties, the photometer mass concentrations were compared to gravimetric samples to determine if consistent correlations existed. The response of a calibrated and modified combination ionization/photoelectric smoke detector was also used. In addition, the responses of this sensor and a similar, prototype ionization/photoelectric sensor, along with discrete angular scattering, total scattering, and total extinction measurements, were used to define in real time the size, morphology, and radiative transfer properties of these differing aerosols that are generally in the form of fractal aggregates. SEM/TEM images were also obtained in order to compare qualitatively the real-time, continuous experimental measurements with the visual microscopic measurements. These data clearly show that significant differences exist between aerosols from flaming and from smoldering combustion and that these differences produce very different scattering and absorption signatures. The data also indicate that ionization/photoelectric sensors can be utilized to measure continuously and in real time aerosol properties over a broad spectrum of applications related to adverse environmental and health effects.

  9. Lessons Learned About Organic Aerosol Formation in the Southeast U.S. Using Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work, modeling of isoprene SOA via heterogeneous uptake is explored and compared to observations from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS).

  10. Secondary organic aerosol 2. Thermodynamic model for gas/particle partitioning of molecular constituents

    OpenAIRE

    Pun, Betty K.; Griffin, Robert J.; Seigneur, Christian; Seinfeld, John H.

    2002-01-01

    A model that predicts secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation based on the thermodynamic equilibrium partitioning of secondary organic oxidation products has been developed for implementation into atmospheric models. Hydrophobic secondary products are assumed to partition to an absorbing organic aerosol consisting of primary organic aerosol (POA) and other secondary hydrophobic organics according to an equilibrium partitioning coefficient calculated iteratively for each secondary compound p...

  11. Low-cost screening for microbial contaminants in aerosols generated in a dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubar, J Sean; Pelon, William

    2005-01-01

    It has been reported that aerosols and droplets generated by high-speed dental drills and cavitrons are contaminated with blood and bacteria and represent a potential route for transmitting disease. Bacterial cells possess a negative electrical charge, while the cathode ray tubes (CRT) that are used in computer monitors generate positively charged static electric fields. Consequently, bacteria dispersed within these aerosols could be attracted to the screens on CRT monitors. In this study, pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus were found on CRT screens in different locations within the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry facility. The results suggest that surveying CRT screens is a simple method for evaluating the airborne microbial contaminants present within a dental office.

  12. Monthly Averages of Aerosol Properties: A Global Comparison Among Models, Satellite Data, and AERONET Ground Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinne, S.; Lohmann, U; Feichter, J; Schulz, M.; Timmreck, C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Chin, M; Ginoux, P.; Takemura, T.; Tegen, I.; Koch, D; Herzog, M.; Penner, J.; Pitari, G.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T.; Smirnov, A.; Dubovik, O.; Slutsker, I.; Tanre, D.; Torres, O.; Mishchenko, M.; Geogdzhayev, I.; Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2003-10-21

    Aerosol introduces the largest uncertainties in model-based estimates of anthropogenic sources on the Earth's climate. A better representation of aerosol in climate models can be expected from an individual processing of aerosol type and new aerosol modules have been developed, that distinguish among at least five aerosol types: sulfate, organic carbon, black carbon, sea-salt and dust. In this study intermediate results of aerosol mass and aerosol optical depth of new aerosol modules from seven global models are evaluated. Among models, differences in predicted mass-fields are expected with differences to initialization and processing. Nonetheless, unusual discrepancies in source strength and in removal rates for particular aerosol types were identified. With simultaneous data for mass and optical depth, type conversion factors were compared. Differences among the tested models cover a factor of 2 for each, even hydrophobic, aerosol type. This is alarming and suggests that efforts of good mass-simulations could be wasted or that conversions are misused to cover for poor mass-simulations. An individual assessment, however, is difficult, as only part of the conversion determining factors (size assumption, permitted humidification and prescribed ambient relative humidity) were revealed. These differences need to be understood and minimized, if conclusions on aerosol processing in models can be drawn from comparisons to aerosol optical depth measurements.

  13. ModelE2-TOMAS development and evaluation using aerosol optical depths, mass and number concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Y. H.; P. J. Adams; D. T. Shindell

    2014-01-01

    The TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional microphysics model (TOMAS) has been integrated into the state-of-the-art general circulation model, GISS ModelE2. TOMAS has the flexibility to select a size resolution as well as the lower size cutoff. A computationally efficient version of TOMAS is used here, which has 15 size bins covering 3 nm to 10 μm aerosol dry diameter. For each bin, it simulates the total aerosol number concentration and mass concentrations of sulp...

  14. Effective Henry's Law constant measurements for glyoxal in model aerosols containing sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, C.; Waxman, E.; Slowik, J.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Noziere, B.; Hoffmann, T.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-04-01

    Traditional models represent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation based on the gas-phase oxidation of a limited set of precursor molecules. However, these models tend to under-estimate the amounts and degree of oxygenation of actual SOA, indicating missing processes. One such source that has become increasingly important in recent years is glyoxal (CHOCHO, the smallest alpha-dicarbonyl). Unlike traditional SOA precursors, glyoxal forms SOA by partitioning to the aqueous phase according to Henry's Law. This work presents an analysis of Henry's Law constants for glyoxal uptake to laboratory-generated aerosols in a dynamically coupled gas-aerosol system. We combine CU LED-CE-DOAS measurements of gas-phase glyoxal with online HR-Tof-AMS and time-resolved HPLC ESI MS/MS particle-phase measurements to characterize the time resolved evolution of glyoxal partitioning, and relate molecular-specific measurements to AMS mass spectra. The experiments were performed in the simulation chamber facility at PSI, Switzerland, and investigate ammonium sulfate (AS), and mixed AS / fulvic acid seed aerosols under relative humidity conditions ranging from 50 to 85% RH. The Henry's Law and effective Henry's Law constants are compared with other values reported in the literature.

  15. Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

    2007-09-19

    This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

  16. Study of particle size distribution and formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols generated in high-energy neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, S; Iida, T; Furuichi, S; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y

    2003-01-01

    The size distributions of sup 3 sup 8 Cl, sup 3 sup 9 Cl, sup 8 sup 2 Br and sup 8 sup 4 Br aerosols generated by irradiations of argon and krypton gases containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols with 45 MeV and 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured in order to study the formation mechanism of radioactive particles in high energy radiation fields. The effects of the size distribution of the radioactive aerosols on the size of the added DOP aerosols, the energy of the neutrons and the kinds of nuclides were studied. The observed size distributions of the radioactive particles were explained by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reactions to the DOP aerosols. (author)

  17. High resolution aerosol optical thickness retrieval over the Pearl River Delta region with improved aerosol modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG; ManSing; NICHOL; Janet; LEE; Kwon; Ho

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have been developed to estimate aerosol and microphysical properties of the atmosphere, which help to address aerosol climatic issues at global scale. However, higher spatial resolution aerosol products for urban areas have not been well researched mainly due to the difficulty of differentiating aerosols from bright surfaces in urban areas. Here, a new aerosol retrieval algorithm using the MODIS 500 m resolution images is described, to retrieve aerosol properties over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta region. The rationale of our technique is to first estimate the aerosol reflectance by decomposing the top-of-atmosphere reflectance from surface reflectance and Rayleigh path reflectance. For the determination of surface reflectance, a modified Minimum Reflectance Technique (MRT) is used, and MRT images are computed for different seasons. A strong correlation is shown between the surface reflectance of MRT images and MODIS land surface reflectance products (MOD09), with a value of 0.9. For conversion of aerosol reflectance to Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), comprehensive Look Up Tables (LUT) are constructed, in which aerosol properties and sun-viewing geometry in the radiative transfer calculations are taken into account. Four aerosol types, namely mixed urban, polluted urban, dust, and heavy pollution, were derived using cluster analysis on three years of AERONET measurements in Hong Kong. Their aerosol properties were input for LUT calculation. The resulting 500 m AOT images are highly correlated (r = 0.89) with AERONET sunphotometer observations in Hong Kong. This study demonstrates the applicability of aerosol retrieval at fine resolution scale in urban areas, which can assist the study of aerosol loading distribution and the impact of localized and transient pollution on urban air quality. In addition, the MODIS 500 m AOT images can be used to study cross

  18. High resolution aerosol optical thickness retrieval over the Pearl River Delta region with improved aerosol modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG ManSing; NICHOL Janet; LEE Kwon Ho; LI ZhanQing

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have been developed to estimate aerosol and microphysical properties of the atmosphere, which help to address aerosol climatic issues at global scale. However, higher spatial resolution aerosol products for urban areas have not been well researched mainly due to the difficulty of differentiating aerosols from bright surfaces in urban areas. Here, a new aerosol retrieval algorithm using the MODIS 500 m resolu-tion images is described, to retrieve aerosol properties over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta re-gion. The rationale of our technique is to first estimate the aerosol reflectance by decomposing the top-of-atmosphere reflectance from surface reflectance and Rayleigh path reflectance. For the deter-mination of surface reflectance, a modified Minimum Reflectance Technique (MRT) is used, and MRT images are computed for different seasons. A strong correlation is shown between the surface reflec-tance of MRT images and MODIS land surface reflectance products (MOD09), with a value of 0.9. For conversion of aerosol reflectance to Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), comprehensive Look Up Tables (LUT) are constructed, in which aerosol properties and sun-viewing geometry in the radiative transfer calculations are taken into account. Four aerosol types, namely mixed urban, polluted urban, dust, and heavy pollution, were derived using cluster analysis on three years of AERONET measurements in Hong Kong. Their aerosol properties were input for LUT calculation. The resulting 500 m AOT images are highly correlated (r=0.89) with AERONET sunphotometer observations in Hong Kong. This study demonstrates the applicability of aerosol retrieval at fine resolution scale in urban areas, which can assist the study of aerosol loading distribution and the impact of localized and transient pollution on urban air quality. In addition, the MODIS 500 m AOT images can be used to study cross

  19. Strong sensitivity of aerosol concentrations to convective wet scavenging parameterizations in a global model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Croft

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the influences of assumptions in convective wet scavenging parameterizations on global climate model simulations of aerosol concentrations and wet deposition. To facilitate this study, an explicit representation of the uptake of aerosol mass and number into convective cloud droplets and ice crystals by the processes of activation, collisions, freezing and evaporation is introduced into the ECHAM5-HAM model. This development replaces the prescribed aerosol cloud-droplet-borne/ice-crystal-borne fractions of the standard model. Relative to the standard model, the more consistent treatment between convective aerosol-cloud microphysical processes yields a reduction of aerosol wet removal in mixed liquid and ice phase convective clouds by at least a factor of two, and the global, annual mean aerosol burdens are increased by at least 20%. Two limiting cases regarding the wet scavenging of entrained aerosols are considered. In the first case, aerosols entering convective clouds at their bases are the only aerosols that are scavenged into cloud droplets, and are susceptible to removal by convective precipitation formation. In the second case, aerosols that are entrained into the cloud above the cloud base layer can activate, can collide with existing cloud droplets and ice crystals, and can subsequently be removed by precipitation formation. The limiting case that allows aerosols entrained above cloud base to become cloud-droplet-borne and ice-crystal-borne reduces the annual and global mean aerosol burdens by 30% relative to the other limiting case, and yields the closest agreement with global aerosol optical depth retrievals, and black carbon vertical profiles from aircraft campaigns (changes of about one order of magntiude in the upper troposphere. Predicted convective cloud droplet number concentrations are doubled in the tropical middle troposphere when aerosols entrained above cloud base are allowed to activate. These results

  20. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas–liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D3,2) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D3,2), within a span of 0.07–0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined. - Graphical abstract: Further characterization of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator for sample introduction in atomic spectrometry. - Highlights: • Significantly improved ICP-MS sensitivity using the DOD vs. EnyaMist. • Comparable detection limits but slightly worse short-term precision. • Superior flexibility compared with conventional/miniaturized pneumatic nebulizers. • Electrical operation conditions of the DOD influence aerosol characteristics. • The

  1. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandini von Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H., E-mail: bings@uni-mainz.de

    2014-02-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas–liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D{sub 3,2}) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D{sub 3,2}), within a span of 0.07–0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined. - Graphical abstract: Further characterization of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator for sample introduction in atomic spectrometry. - Highlights: • Significantly improved ICP-MS sensitivity using the DOD vs. EnyaMist. • Comparable detection limits but slightly worse short-term precision. • Superior flexibility compared with conventional/miniaturized pneumatic nebulizers. • Electrical operation conditions of the DOD influence aerosol

  2. Aerosol kinetic code "AERFORM": Model, validation and simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainullin, K. G.; Golubev, A. I.; Petrov, A. M.; Piskunov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol kinetic code "AERFORM" is modified to simulate droplet and ice particle formation in mixed clouds. The splitting method is used to calculate condensation and coagulation simultaneously. The method is calibrated with analytic solutions of kinetic equations. Condensation kinetic model is based on cloud particle growth equation, mass and heat balance equations. The coagulation kinetic model includes Brownian, turbulent and precipitation effects. The real values are used for condensation and coagulation growth of water droplets and ice particles. The model and the simulation results for two full-scale cloud experiments are presented. The simulation model and code may be used autonomously or as an element of another code.

  3. Comparing Organic Aerosol Composition from Marine Biogenic Sources to Seawater and to Physical Sea Spray Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L. M.; Frossard, A. A.; Sanchez, K.; Massoli, P.; Elliott, S.; Burrows, S. M.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P.

    2015-12-01

    In much of the marine atmosphere, organic components in aerosol particles have many sources other than sea spray that contribute organic constituents. For this reason, physical sea spray models provide an important technique for studying the organic composition of particles from marine biogenic sources. The organic composition of particles produced by two different physical sea spray models were measured in three open ocean seawater types: (i) Coastal California in the northeastern Pacific, which is influenced by wind-driven, large-scale upwelling leading to productive or eutrophic (nutrient-rich) seawater and high chl-a concentrations, (ii) George's Bank in the northwestern Atlantic, which is also influenced by nutrient upwelling and eutrophic seawater with phytoplankton productivity and high chl-a concentrations, and (iii) the Sargasso Sea in the subtropical western Atlantic, which is oligotrophic and nutrient-limited, reflected in low phytoplankton productivity and low chl-a concentrations. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides information about the functional group composition that represents the marine organic fraction more completely than is possible with techniques that measure non-refractory mass (vaporizable at 650°C). After separating biogenic marine particles from those from other sources, the measured compositions of atmospheric marine aerosol particles from three ocean regions is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. The organic composition of atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol particles is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles from bubbled seawater. Variability in productive and non-productive seawater may be caused by the presence of surfactants that can stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components without substantial changes in overall group composition

  4. Model representations of aerosol layers transported from North America over the Atlantic Ocean during the Two-Column Aerosol Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.; Zhang, Kai; Easter, Richard C.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Liu, Ying; Ortega, Ivan; Sedlacek, Arthur; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, Manish; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-08-01

    The ability of the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) version 3.7 and the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.3 (CAM5) in simulating profiles of aerosol properties is quantified using extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements from the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) conducted during July of 2012. TCAP was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and was designed to obtain observations within two atmospheric columns; one fixed over Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and the other several hundred kilometers over the ocean. The performance is quantified using most of the available aircraft and surface measurements during July, and 2 days are examined in more detail to identify the processes responsible for the observed aerosol layers. The higher-resolution WRF-Chem model produced more aerosol mass in the free troposphere than the coarser-resolution CAM5 model so that the fraction of aerosol optical thickness above the residual layer from WRF-Chem was more consistent with lidar measurements. We found that the free troposphere layers are likely due to mean vertical motions associated with synoptic-scale convergence that lifts aerosols from the boundary layer. The vertical displacement and the time period associated with upward transport in the troposphere depend on the strength of the synoptic system and whether relatively high boundary layer aerosol concentrations are present where convergence occurs. While a parameterization of subgrid scale convective clouds applied in WRF-Chem modulated the concentrations of aerosols aloft, it did not significantly change the overall altitude and depth of the layers.

  5. Evaluation of a size-resolved aerosol model based on satellite and ground observations and its implication on aerosol forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Yu, Fangqun

    2016-04-01

    The latest AeroCom phase II experiments have showed a large diversity in the simulations of aerosol concentrations, size distribution, vertical profile, and optical properties among 16 detailed global aerosol microphysics models, which contribute to the large uncertainty in the predicted aerosol radiative forcing and possibly induce the distinct climate change in the future. In the last few years, we have developed and improved a global size-resolved aerosol model (Yu and Luo, 2009; Ma et al., 2012; Yu et al., 2012), GEOS-Chem-APM, which is a prognostic multi-type, multi-component, size-resolved aerosol microphysics model, including state-of-the-art nucleation schemes and condensation of low volatile secondary organic compounds from successive oxidation aging. The model is one of 16 global models for AeroCom phase II and participated in a couple of model inter-comparison experiments. In this study, we employed multi-year aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from 2004 to 2012 taken from ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite retrievals to evaluate the performance of the GEOS-Chem-APM in predicting aerosol optical depth, including spatial distribution, reginal variation and seasonal variabilities. Compared to the observations, the modelled AOD is overall good over land, but quite low over ocean possibly due to low sea salt emission in the model and/or higher AOD in satellite retrievals, specifically MODIS and MISR. We chose 72 AERONET sites having at least 36 months data available and representative of high spatial domain to compare with the model and satellite data. Comparisons in various representative regions show that the model overall agrees well in the major anthropogenic emission regions, such as Europe, East Asia and North America. Relative to the observations, the modelled AOD is

  6. Assimilation of POLDER aerosol optical thickness into the LMDz-INCA model: Implications for the Arctic aerosol burden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol load makes it a challenge to quantify aerosol effect on climate. This study is one of the first attempts to apply data assimilation for the analysis of global aerosol distribution. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observed from the Polarization and Directionality of the Earth Reflectances (POLDER) space-borne instrument are assimilated into a three-dimensional chemistry model. POLDER capabilities to distinguish between fine and coarse AOT are used to constrain them separately in the model. Observation and model errors are a key component of such a system and are carefully estimated on a regional basis using some of the high-quality surface observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Other AERONET data provide an independent evaluation of the a posteriori fields. Results for the fine mode show improvements, in terms of reduction of root-mean-square errors, in most regions with the largest improvements found in the Mediterranean Sea and Eurasia. We emphasize the results for the Arctic, where there is growing evidence of a strong aerosol impact on climate, but a lack of regional and continuous aerosol monitoring. The a posteriori fields noticeably well reproduce the winter-spring 'Arctic Haze' peak measured in Longyearbyen (15 degrees E, 78 degrees N) and typical seasonal variations in the Arctic region, where AOT increase by up to a factor of three between a posteriori and a priori. Enhanced AOT are found over a longer period in spring 2003 than in 1997, suggesting that the large Russian fires in 2003 have influenced the Arctic aerosol load. (authors)

  7. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides data on aerosol concentrations in tank head spaces, total mass of aerosols in the tank head space and mass of aerosols sent to the exhauster during Rotary Mode Core Sampling from November 1994 through April 1999

  8. Simulation of atmospheric aerosols in East Asia using modeling system RAMS-CMAQ: Model evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is applied in this paper to East Asia to simulate the temporo-spatial concentration distributions of atmospheric aerosols. For evaluating its performances, modeled concentrations of aerosols such as sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon and organic carbon were compared with observations obtained in East Asia on board of two aircrafts in the springtime of 2001. The comparison showed generally good agreement, and, in particular, that the modeling system captured most of the important observed features, including vertical gradients of the aerosols of the Asian outflow over the western Pacific. The evaluation results provide us with much confidence for further use of the modeling system to investigate the transport and transformation processes of atmospheric aerosols over East Asia and to assess their impacts on the Earth's radiation budget.

  9. A simplified model of aerosol removal by containment sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Burson, S.B. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution)

    1993-06-01

    Spray systems in nuclear reactor containments are described. The scrubbing of aerosols from containment atmospheres by spray droplets is discussed. Uncertainties are identified in the prediction of spray performance when the sprays are used as a means for decontaminating containment atmospheres. A mechanistic model based on current knowledge of the physical phenomena involved in spray performance is developed. With this model, a quantitative uncertainty analysis of spray performance is conducted using a Monte Carlo method to sample 20 uncertain quantities related to phenomena of spray droplet behavior as well as the initial and boundary conditions expected to be associated with severe reactor accidents. Results of the uncertainty analysis are used to construct simplified expressions for spray decontamination coefficients. Two variables that affect aerosol capture by water droplets are not treated as uncertain; they are (1) [open quote]Q[close quote], spray water flux into the containment, and (2) [open quote]H[close quote], the total fall distance of spray droplets. The choice of values of these variables is left to the user since they are plant and accident specific. Also, they can usually be ascertained with some degree of certainty. The spray decontamination coefficients are found to be sufficiently dependent on the extent of decontamination that the fraction of the initial aerosol remaining in the atmosphere, m[sub f], is explicitly treated in the simplified expressions. The simplified expressions for the spray decontamination coefficient are given. Parametric values for these expressions are found for median, 10 percentile, and 90 percentile values in the uncertainty distribution for the spray decontamination coefficient. Examples are given to illustrate the utility of the simplified expressions to predict spray decontamination of an aerosol-laden atmosphere.

  10. Applications of aerosol model in the reactor containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mossad Slama

    2014-10-01

    For spatially homogeneous aerosol of uniform chemical composition, the aerosol dynamic equation is solved in closed volume to simulate the radionuclide particle transport in the containment. The effects of initial conditions on the aerosol distribution, boundary layer thickness and the aerosol behaviour under source reinforcement (external source are considered.

  11. Study on Aerosol Model and Sources at Zhoushan, China Using Sun-sky Photometer Observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosol models are widely used in satellite remote sensing to derived aerosol mode from aerosol optical and microphysical properties. One year of ground-based aerosol remote sensing observations were carried out using sun-sky radiometer measurements in Zhoushan (122.1897E, 29.9944N), Zhejiang Province, Eastern China. At the same time column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (AE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA), asymmetry factor (g), complex refractive index and column aerosol volume spectral distribution were retrieved by mature code as well as some procedures, such as radiometer calibration, cloud screening and data selection strategies. Aerosol size parameters were separated as fine effective radius (rvf) and coarse effective radius (rvc) due to the column aerosol size distribution is generally bimodal lognormal distribution. The relationship between these parameters and effective radius was shown and analyzed. It is shown that aerosol in Zhoushan is urban-industrial type dominate, mixed with marine aerosol and mineral dust aerosol. As a result, this study showed a part of aerosol comes from mainland industrial areas by using the backward trajectory model

  12. Aerosol effects over China investigated with a high resolution convection permitting weather model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Mahura, Alexander; Yang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    We investigate aerosol effects in the operational high resolution (2.5 km) convection permitting non-hydrostatical weather model HARMONIE (HIRLAM-ALADIN Regional Mesoscale Operational NWP in Euromed). Aerosol input from the global C-IFS model is downscaled and used. The impact of using realistic aerosols on both the direct and the indirect aerosol effects is studied and compared with default simulations that include only the direct aerosol effect of climatological aerosols. The study is performed as a part of the MarcoPolo FP7 project for a selected region of China during the months January and July 2010, where in particular January 2010 saw several cases of high anthropogenic aerosol loads. We also investigate the impact of accounting for realistic aerosol single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors in the simulations of the direct aerosol forcing. In many studies only variations in the aerosol optical depth are accounted for. We show this to be inadequate, when the assumed aerosol types have different optical properties than the actual aerosols.

  13. Modelling of primary aerosols in the chemical transport model MOCAGE: development and evaluation of aerosol physical parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sič, B.; El Amraoui, L.; Marécal, V.; Josse, B.; Arteta, J.; Guth, J.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P. D.

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with recent improvements to the global chemical transport model of Météo-France MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle) that consists of updates to different aerosol parameterizations. MOCAGE only contains primary aerosol species: desert dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and also volcanic ash in the case of large volcanic eruptions. We introduced important changes to the aerosol parameterization concerning emissions, wet deposition and sedimentation. For the emissions, size distribution and wind calculations are modified for desert dust aerosols, and a surface sea temperature dependant source function is introduced for sea salt aerosols. Wet deposition is modified toward a more physically realistic representation by introducing re-evaporation of falling rain and snowfall scavenging and by changing the in-cloud scavenging scheme along with calculations of precipitation cloud cover and rain properties. The sedimentation scheme update includes changes regarding the stability and viscosity calculations. Independent data from satellites (MODIS, SEVIRI), the ground (AERONET, EMEP), and a model inter-comparison project (AeroCom) are compared with MOCAGE simulations and show that the introduced changes brought a significant improvement on aerosol representation, properties and global distribution. Emitted quantities of desert dust and sea salt, as well their lifetimes, moved closer towards values of AeroCom estimates and the multi-model average. When comparing the model simulations with MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) observations over the oceans, the updated model configuration shows a decrease in the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB; from 0.42 to 0.10) and a better correlation (from 0.06 to 0.32) in terms of the geographical distribution and the temporal variability. The updates corrected a strong positive MNMB in the sea salt representation at high latitudes (from 0.65 to 0.16), and a negative MNMB in the desert

  14. Modelling of primary aerosols in the chemical transport model MOCAGE: development and evaluation of aerosol physical parameterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sič

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with recent improvements to the global chemical transport model of Météo-France MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle that consists of updates to different aerosol parameterizations. MOCAGE only contains primary aerosol species: desert dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and also volcanic ash in the case of large volcanic eruptions. We introduced important changes to the aerosol parameterization concerning emissions, wet deposition and sedimentation. For the emissions, size distribution and wind calculations are modified for desert dust aerosols, and a surface sea temperature dependant source function is introduced for sea salt aerosols. Wet deposition is modified toward a more physically realistic representation by introducing re-evaporation of falling rain and snowfall scavenging and by changing the in-cloud scavenging scheme along with calculations of precipitation cloud cover and rain properties. The sedimentation scheme update includes changes regarding the stability and viscosity calculations. Independent data from satellites (MODIS, SEVIRI, the ground (AERONET, EMEP, and a model inter-comparison project (AeroCom are compared with MOCAGE simulations and show that the introduced changes brought a significant improvement on aerosol representation, properties and global distribution. Emitted quantities of desert dust and sea salt, as well their lifetimes, moved closer towards values of AeroCom estimates and the multi-model average. When comparing the model simulations with MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD observations over the oceans, the updated model configuration shows a decrease in the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB; from 0.42 to 0.10 and a better correlation (from 0.06 to 0.32 in terms of the geographical distribution and the temporal variability. The updates corrected a strong positive MNMB in the sea salt representation at high latitudes (from 0.65 to 0.16, and a negative MNMB in

  15. Modeling of pollution aerosols in Ile-de-France; Modelisation des aerosols de pollution en Ile-de-France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodzic, A

    2005-10-15

    The modeling of aerosols is a major stake in the understanding of the emission processes and evolution of particulates in the atmosphere. However, the parameterizations used in today's aerosol models still comprise many uncertainties. This work has been motivated by the need of better identifying the weaknesses of aerosols modeling tools and by the necessity of having new validation methods for a 3D evaluation of models. The studies have been carried out using the CHIMERE chemistry-transport model, which allows to simulate the concentrations and physico-chemical characteristics of pollution aerosols at the European scale and in Ile-de-France region. The validation approach used is based on the complementarity of the measurements performed on the ground by monitoring networks with those acquired during the ESQUIF campaign (study and simulation of air quality in Ile-de-France), with lidar and photometric measurements and with satellite observations. The comparison between the observations and the simulations has permitted to identify and reduce the modeling errors, and to characterize the aerosol properties in the vicinity of an urban area. (J.S.)

  16. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gyawali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory-generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols and relatively clean (aged aerosols conditions. Particulate matter (PM concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm and 10 μm, respectively and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO, nitric oxide (NO, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2. The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA, Ångström exponent of absorption (AEA, and Ångström exponent of scattering (AES for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy

  17. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-08

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In

  18. Modelling the optical properties of aerosols in a chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    According to the IPCC fifth assessment report (2013), clouds and aerosols still contribute to the largest uncertainty when estimating and interpreting changes to the Earth's energy budget. Therefore, understanding the interaction between radiation and aerosols is both crucial for remote sensing observations and modelling the climate forcing arising from aerosols. Carbon particles are the largest contributor to the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, thereby enhancing the warming of the planet. Modelling the radiative properties of carbon particles is a hard task and involves many uncertainties arising from the difficulties of accounting for the morphologies and heterogeneous chemical composition of the particles. This study aims to compare two ways of modelling the optical properties of aerosols simulated by a chemical transport model. The first method models particle optical properties as homogeneous spheres and are externally mixed. This is a simple model that is particularly easy to use in data assimilation methods, since the optics model is linear. The second method involves a core-shell internal mixture of soot, where sulphate, nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, sea salt, and water are contained in the shell. However, by contrast to previously used core-shell models, only part of the carbon is concentrated in the core, while the remaining part is homogeneously mixed with the shell. The chemical transport model (CTM) simulations are done regionally over Europe with the Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry (MATCH) model, developed by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). The MATCH model was run with both an aerosol dynamics module, called SALSA, and with a regular "bulk" approach, i.e., a mass transport model without aerosol dynamics. Two events from 2007 are used in the analysis, one with high (22/12-2007) and one with low (22/6-2007) levels of elemental carbon (EC) over Europe. The results of the study help to assess the

  19. Multi-sensor cloud and aerosol retrieval simulator and remote sensing from model parameters - Part 2: Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Galina; da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.

    2016-07-01

    The Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator (MCRS) produces a "simulated radiance" product from any high-resolution general circulation model with interactive aerosol as if a specific sensor such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were viewing a combination of the atmospheric column and land-ocean surface at a specific location. Previously the MCRS code only included contributions from atmosphere and clouds in its radiance calculations and did not incorporate properties of aerosols. In this paper we added a new aerosol properties module to the MCRS code that allows users to insert a mixture of up to 15 different aerosol species in any of 36 vertical layers.This new MCRS code is now known as MCARS (Multi-sensor Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval Simulator). Inclusion of an aerosol module into MCARS not only allows for extensive, tightly controlled testing of various aspects of satellite operational cloud and aerosol properties retrieval algorithms, but also provides a platform for comparing cloud and aerosol models against satellite measurements. This kind of two-way platform can improve the efficacy of model parameterizations of measured satellite radiances, allowing the assessment of model skill consistently with the retrieval algorithm. The MCARS code provides dynamic controls for appearance of cloud and aerosol layers. Thereby detailed quantitative studies of the impacts of various atmospheric components can be controlled.In this paper we illustrate the operation of MCARS by deriving simulated radiances from various data field output by the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model. The model aerosol fields are prepared for translation to simulated radiance using the same model subgrid variability parameterizations as are used for cloud and atmospheric properties profiles, namely the ICA technique. After MCARS computes modeled sensor radiances equivalent to their observed counterparts, these radiances are presented as input to

  20. Electro-optical propagation just above wave tops as predicted by ANAM, the Advanced Navy Aerosol Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathman, S.G.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    1998-01-01

    An extension of the Nary aerosol model (NAM), intended to describe aerosol size distributions from l0 meters down to the wave tops is being developed. The preliminary version of the empirical Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM) is based on a series of meteorological and aerosol measurements taken dur

  1. Multi-generation gas-phase oxidation, equilibrium partitioning, and the formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Cappa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A new model of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation is developed that explicitly takes into account multi-generational oxidation as well as fragmentation of gas-phase compounds, and assumes equilibrium gas-particle partitioning. The model framework requires specification of a limited number of tunable parameters to describe the kinetic evolution of SOA mass, the average oxygen-to-carbon atomic ratio and the mean particle volatility as oxidation proceeds. These parameters describe (1 the relationship between oxygen content and volatility, (2 the probability of fragmentation and (3 the amount of oxygen added per reaction. The time-evolution and absolute value of the simulated SOA mass depends sensitively on all tunable parameters. Of the tunable parameters, the mean O : C is most sensitive to the oxygen/volatility relationship, exhibiting only a weak dependence on the other relationships. The model mean particle O : C produced from a given compound is primarily controlled by the number of carbon atoms comprising the SOA precursor, with some sensitivity to the specified oxygen/volatility relationship. The model is tested against laboratory measurements of time-dependent SOA formation from the photooxidation of α-pinene and n-pentadecane and performs well (after tuning. The model can also accurately simulate the carbon-number dependence of aerosol yields previously observed for oxidation of straight-chain alkanes. This model may provide a generalized framework for the interpretation of laboratory SOA formation experiments in which explicit consideration of multiple-generations of products is required, which is true for all photo-oxidation experiments.

  2. Advanced nebulizer designs employing vibrating mesh/aperture plate technologies for aerosol generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrep, J C; Dhand, R

    2008-04-01

    Recent technological advances and improved nebulizer designs have overcome many limitations of jet nebulizers. Newer devices employ a vibrating mesh or aperture plate (VM/AP) for the generation of therapeutic aerosols with consistent, increased efficiency, predominant aerosol fine particle fractions, low residuals, and the ability to nebulize even microliter volumes. These enhancements are achieved through several different design features and include improvements that promote patient compliance, such as compact design, portability, shorter treatment durations, and quiet operation. Current VM/AP devices in clinical use are the Omron MicroAir, the Nektar Aeroneb, and the Pari eFlow. However, some devices are only approved for use with specific medications. Development of "smart nebulizers" such as the Respironics I-neb couple VM technologies with coordinated delivery and optimized inhalation patterns to enhance inhaled drug delivery of specialized, expensive formulations. Ongoing development of advanced aerosol technologies should improve clinical outcomes and continue to expand therapeutic options as newer inhaled drugs become available. PMID:18393813

  3. Global modeling of organic aerosol: the importance of reactive nitrogen (NOx and NO3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, H. O. T.; Chan, A. W. H.; Barkley, M. P.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    Reactive nitrogen compounds, specifically NOx and NO3, likely influence global organic aerosol levels. To assess these interactions, GEOS-Chem, a chemical transport model, is updated to include improved biogenic emissions (following MEGAN v2.1/2.04), a new organic aerosol tracer lumping scheme, aerosol from nitrate radical (NO3) oxidation of isoprene, and NOx-dependent monoterpene and sesquiterpene aerosol yields. As a result of significant nighttime terpene emissions, fast reaction of monoterpenes with the nitrate radical, and relatively high aerosol yields from NO3 oxidation, biogenic hydrocarbon-NO3 reactions are expected to be a major contributor to surface level aerosol concentrations in anthropogenically influenced areas such as the United States. By including aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation in GEOS-Chem, terpene (monoterpene + sesquiterpene) aerosol approximately doubles and isoprene aerosol is enhanced by 30 to 40% in the Southeast United States. In terms of the global budget of organic aerosol, however, aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation is somewhat minor (slightly more than 3 Tg/yr) due to the relatively high volatility of organic-NO3 oxidation products in the yield parameterization. Globally, 69 to 88 Tg/yr of organic aerosol is predicted to be produced annually, of which 14-15 Tg/yr is from oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and 8-9 Tg/yr from isoprene.

  4. A numerical model of aerosol scavenging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a three-dimensional numerical cloud/smoke-plume model, we have simulated the burning of a large, mid-latitude city following a nuclear exchange. The model includes 18 dynamic and microphysical equations that predict the fire-driven airflow, cloud processes, and smoke-cloud interactions. In the simulation, the intense heating from the burning city produces a firestorm with updraft velocities exceeding 60 m/s. Within 15 minutes of ignition, the smoke plume penetrates the tropopause. The updraft triggers a cumulonimbus cloud that produces significant quantities of ice, snow, and hail. These solid hydrometeors, as well as cloud droplets and rain, interact with the smoke particles from the fire. At the end of the one-hour simulation, over 20% of the smoke is in slowly falling snowflakes. If the snow reaches the ground before the flakes completely sublimate (or melt and then evaporate), then only approximately 50% of the smoke will survive the scavenging processes and remain in the atmosphere to affect the global climate

  5. Vertical profiles of aerosol radiative forcing - a comparison of AEROCOM phase 2 model submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosols in the earth's atmosphere affect the radiation balance of the planet. The radiative forcing (RF) induced by a given aerosol burden is however sensitive to its vertical density profile, in addition to aerosol optical properties, cloud distributions and surface albedo. Differences in vertical profiles are thought to be among the causes for the large intermodel differences in RF of the aerosol direct effect. As part of the AEROCOM phase 2 direct radiative forcing experiment, this study compares 3D concentration fields of black carbon from fossil fuel burning (BC) and sulphate (SO4) from a set of major global climate models. The participating models were run using a prescribed set of emissions of aerosol and aerosol precursors and the same meteorological year. We assume that model differences due to the aerosol vertical profile can be factored out from other differences such as aerosol physics, radiative transfer or ground albedo. We consequently analyse model RF variability using profiles of normalized RF (radiative forcing per unit mass, NDRF) calculated from a single model. This tool allows us to quantify the fraction of the intermodel variability due to differences in aerosol vertical profiles. We show that there are still significant differences between both modelled vertical density profiles, treatment of aerosol physics and other factors influencing the RF profiles.

  6. Atmospheric Modelling of Aerosols Long-Range Transport over the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapipith, V.; Adhikary, B.; Bhave, P.; Panday, A. K.; Mukherji, A.

    2014-12-01

    modelling tool is also being set up with an aim to capture aerosol interactions during fog formation, and to generate forecast during a field campaign of the increasing persistent winter fog that ICIMOD plans to coordinate across the Indo-Gangetic Plains during winters 2014-15 and 2015-16.

  7. MALTE – Model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere

    OpenAIRE

    M. Boy; Hellmuth, O.; Korhonen, H.; Nilsson, E.D.; Revelle, D.; A. Turnipseed; Arnold, F.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-01-01

    The manuscript presents a detailed description of the meteorological and chemical code of Malte – a model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere. The aerosol dynamics are achieved by the new developed UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol Model) code with kinetic limited nucleation as responsible mechanism to form new clusters. First results indicate that the model is able to predict the on- and offset of new particle formation as well as the total aeros...

  8. MALTE – model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere

    OpenAIRE

    M. Boy; Hellmuth, O.; Korhonen, H.; Nilsson, E.D.; Revelle, D.; A. Turnipseed; Arnold, F.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-01-01

    The manuscript presents a detailed description of the meteorological and chemical code of Malte – a model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere. The aerosol dynamics are achieved by the new developed UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol Model) code with kinetic limited nucleation as responsible mechanism to form new clusters. First results indicate that the model is able to predict the on- and offset of new particle formation as well as the total aeros...

  9. MALTE ? model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere

    OpenAIRE

    M. Boy; Hellmuth, O.; Korhonen, H.; Nilsson, E.D.; Revelle, D.; A. Turnipseed; Arnold, F.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-01-01

    International audience The manuscript presents a detailed description of the meteorological and chemical code of Malte ? a model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere. The aerosol dynamics are achieved by the new developed UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol Model) code with kinetic limited nucleation as responsible mechanism to form new clusters. First results indicate that the model is able to predict the on- and offset of new particle formation as wel...

  10. Near-Range Receiver Unit of Next Generation PollyXT Used with Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar in Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stachlewska Iwona S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Near-range Aerosol Raman lidar (NARLa receiver unit, that was designed to enhance the detection range of the NeXT generation PollyXT Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman (ADR lidar of the University of Warsaw, was employed next the Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL at the AWI-IPEV German-French station in Arctic during Spring 2015. Here we introduce shortly design of both lidars, the scheme of their installation next to each other, and preliminary results of observations aiming at arctic haze investigation by the lidars and the iCAP a set of particle counter and aethalometer installed under a tethered balloon.

  11. Near-Range Receiver Unit of Next Generation PollyXT Used with Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar in Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Ritter, Christoph; Neuber, Roland; Heese, Birgit; Engelmann, Ronny; Linne, Holger

    2016-06-01

    The Near-range Aerosol Raman lidar (NARLa) receiver unit, that was designed to enhance the detection range of the NeXT generation PollyXT Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman (ADR) lidar of the University of Warsaw, was employed next the Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL) at the AWI-IPEV German-French station in Arctic during Spring 2015. Here we introduce shortly design of both lidars, the scheme of their installation next to each other, and preliminary results of observations aiming at arctic haze investigation by the lidars and the iCAP a set of particle counter and aethalometer installed under a tethered balloon.

  12. Development of the aerosol generation system for simulating the dry deposition behavior of radioaerosol emitted by the accident of FDNPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A large amount of radioactivity was discharged by the accident of FDNPP. The long half-life radionuclide, 137Cs was transported through the atmosphere mainly as the aerosol form and deposited to the forests in Fukushima prefecture. After the dry deposition of the 137Cs, the foliar uptake process would occur. To evaluate environmental transfer of radionuclides, the dry deposition and following foliar uptake is very important. There are some pioneering studies for radionuclide foliar uptake with attaching the solution containing stable target element on the leaf, however, cesium oxide aerosols were used for these deposition study [1]. In the FDNPP case, 137Cs was transported in sulfate aerosol form [2], so the oxide aerosol behaviors could not represent the actual deposition behavior in this accident. For evaluation of whole behavior of 137Cs in vegetation system, fundamental data for deposition and uptake process of sulfate aerosol was desired. In this study, we developed aerosol generation system for simulating the dry deposition and the foliar uptake behaviors of aerosol in the different chemical constitutions. In this system, the method of aerosol generation based on the spray drying. Solution contained 137Cs was send to a nozzle by a syringe pump and spraying with a high speed air flow. The sprayed mist was generated in a chamber in the relatively high temperature. The solution in the mist was dried quickly, and micro size solid aerosols consisting 137Cs were generated. The aerosols were suctioned by an ejector and transported inside a tube by the dry air flow, then were directly blown onto the leaves. The experimental condition, such as the size of chamber, chamber temperature, solution flow rate, air flow rate and so on, were optimized. In the deposition experiment, the aerosols on leaves were observed by a SEM/EDX system and the deposition amount was evaluated by measuring the stable Cs remaining on leaf. In the presentation, we will discuss the detail

  13. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, William C. [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia

    2013-05-20

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry's MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences

  14. Modeling organic aerosols during MILAGRO: importance of biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The meso-scale chemistry-transport model CHIMERE is used to assess our understanding of major sources and formation processes leading to a fairly large amount of organic aerosols – OA, including primary OA (POA and secondary OA (SOA – observed in Mexico City during the MILAGRO field project (March 2006. Chemical analyses of submicron aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS indicate that organic particles found in the Mexico City basin contain a large fraction of oxygenated organic species (OOA which have strong correspondence with SOA, and that their production actively continues downwind of the city. The SOA formation is modeled here by the one-step oxidation of anthropogenic (i.e. aromatics, alkanes, biogenic (i.e. monoterpenes and isoprene, and biomass-burning SOA precursors and their partitioning into both organic and aqueous phases. Conservative assumptions are made for uncertain parameters to maximize the amount of SOA produced by the model. The near-surface model evaluation shows that predicted OA correlates reasonably well with measurements during the campaign, however it remains a factor of 2 lower than the measured total OA. Fairly good agreement is found between predicted and observed POA within the city suggesting that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are reasonably captured. Consistent with previous studies in Mexico City, large discrepancies are encountered for SOA, with a factor of 2–10 model underestimate. When only anthropogenic SOA precursors were considered, the model was able to reproduce within a factor of two the sharp increase in OOA concentrations during the late morning at both urban and near-urban locations but the discrepancy increases rapidly later in the day, consistent with previous results, and is especially obvious when the column-integrated SOA mass is considered instead of the surface concentration. The increase in the missing SOA mass in the afternoon coincides with the sharp drop in POA

  15. The impact of recirculation, ventilation and filters on secondary organic aerosols generated by indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadeyi, M.O.; Weschler, Charles J.; Tham, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of recirculation rates (7 and 14 h(-1)), ventilation rates (1 and 2 h(-1)), and filtration on secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated by ozone of outdoor origin reacting with limonene of indoor origin. Experiments were conducted within a recirculating air handling......, but this was more than offset by the increased dilution of SOA derived from ozone-initiated chemistry. The presence of a particle filter (new or used) strikingly lowered SOA number and mass concentrations compared with conditions when no filter was present. Even though the particle filter in this study had only 35...

  16. Ambient and indoor particulate aerosols generated by dairies in the southern High Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, C W; Clark, R N; Straus, D C

    2009-12-01

    The objectives were to quantify and size ambient aerosolized dust in and around the facilities of 4 southern High Plains dairies of New Mexico and to determine where health of workers might be vulnerable to particulate aerosols, based on aerosol concentrations that exceed national air quality standards. Ambient dust air samples were collected upwind (background) and downwind of 3 dairy location sites (loafing pen boundary, commodity, and compost field). The indoor milking parlor, a fourth site, was monitored immediately upwind and downwind. Aerosolized particulate samples were collected using high-volume sequential reference air samplers, laser aerosol monitors, and cyclone air samplers. The overall (main effects and estimable interactions) statistical general linear model statement for particulate matter (PM(10); particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of up to 10 microm) and PM(2.5) resulted in a greater mean concentration of dust in the winter (PM(10) = 97.4 +/- 4.4 microg/m(3); PM(2.5) = 32.6 +/- 2.6 microg/m(3)) compared with the summer (PM(10) = 71.9 +/- 5.0 microg/m(3); PM(2.5) = 18.1 +/- 1.2 microg/m(3)). The upwind and downwind boundary PM(10) concentrations were significantly higher in the winter (upwind = 64.3 +/- 9.5 microg/m(3); downwind = 119.8 +/- 13.0 microg/m(3)) compared with the summer (upwind = 35.2 +/- 7.5 microg/m(3); downwind = 66.8 +/- 11.8 microg/m(3)). The milking parlor PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentration data were significantly higher in the winter (PM(10) = 119.5 +/- 5.8 microg/m(3); PM(2.5) = 55.3 +/- 5.8microg/m(3)) compared with the summer (PM(10) = 88.6.0 +/- 5.8 microg/m(3); PM(2.5) = 21.0 +/- 2.1 microg/m(3)). Personnel should be protected from high aerosol concentrations found at the commodity barn, compost field, and milking parlor during the winter. PMID:19923606

  17. A perspective on SOA generated in aerosol water from glyoxal and methylglyoxal and its impacts on climate-relevant aerosol properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, glyoxal and methylglyoxal have emerged to be potentially important SOA precursors with significant implications for climate-related aerosol properties. Here we will discuss how the chemistry of these and similar organic compounds in aerosol water can affect the aerosol optical and cloud formation properties. Aqueous-phase SOA production from glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a potential source of strongly light-absorbing organics, or "brown carbon". We characterized the kinetics of brown carbon formation from these precursors in mixtures of ammonium sulfate and water using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. This mechanism has been incorporated into a photochemical box model with coupled gas phase-aqueous aerosol chemistry. Methylglyoxal and related compounds also may impact an aerosol's ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus. We recently showed via pendant drop tensiometry and aerosol chamber studies that uptake of methylglyoxal from the gas phase driven by aqueous-phase oligomerization chemistry is a potentially significant, previously unidentified source of surface-active organic material in aerosols. Results from pendant drop tensiometry showed significantly depressed surface tension in methylglyoxal-ammonium sulfate solutions. We further found that ammonium sulfate particles exposed to gas-phase methylglyoxal in a 3.5 m3 aerosol reaction chamber activate into cloud droplets at sizes up to 15% lower at a given supersaturation than do pure ammonium sulfate particles. The observed enhancement exceeds that predicted based on Henry's Law and our measurements of surface tension depression in bulk solutions, suggesting that surface adsorption of methylglyoxal plays a role in determining CCN activity. Methylglyoxal and similar gas-phase surfactants may be an important and overlooked source of enhanced CCN activity in the atmosphere. To characterize the SOA products formed in these solutions, an Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) was used

  18. Regional modeling of carbonaceous aerosols over Europe-focus on secondary organic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, an improved and complete secondary organic aerosols (SOA) chemistry scheme was implemented in the CHIMERE model. The implementation of isoprene chemistry for SOA significantly improves agreement between long series of simulated and observed particulate matter concentrations. While simulated organic carbon concentrations are clearly improved at elevated sites by adding the SOA scheme, time correlation are impaired at low level sites in Portugal, Italy and Slovakia. At several sites a clear underestimation by the CHIMERE model is noticed in wintertime possibly due to missing wood burning emissions as shown in previous modeling studies. In Europe, the CHIMERE model gives yearly average SOA concentrations ranging from 0.5 μg m-3 in the Northern Europe to 4 μg m-3 over forested regions in Spain, France, Germany and Italy. In addition, our work suggests that during the highest fire emission periods, fires can be the dominant source of primary organic carbon over the Mediterranean Basin, but the SOA contribution from fire emissions is low. Isoprene chemistry has a strong impact on SOA formation when using current available kinetic schemes. (authors)

  19. Sensitivity analysis of a global aerosol model to understand how parametric uncertainties affect model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. A.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pringle, K. J.

    2012-04-01

    Global aerosol contributions to radiative forcing (and hence climate change) are persistently subject to large uncertainty in successive Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports (Schimel et al., 1996; Penner et al., 2001; Forster et al., 2007). As such more complex global aerosol models are being developed to simulate aerosol microphysics in the atmosphere. The uncertainty in global aerosol model estimates is currently estimated by measuring the diversity amongst different models (Textor et al., 2006, 2007; Meehl et al., 2007). The uncertainty at the process level due to the need to parameterise in such models is not yet understood and it is difficult to know whether the added model complexity comes at a cost of high model uncertainty. In this work the model uncertainty and its sources due to the uncertain parameters is quantified using variance-based sensitivity analysis. Due to the complexity of a global aerosol model we use Gaussian process emulation with a sufficient experimental design to make such as a sensitivity analysis possible. The global aerosol model used here is GLOMAP (Mann et al., 2010) and we quantify the sensitivity of numerous model outputs to 27 expertly elicited uncertain model parameters describing emissions and processes such as growth and removal of aerosol. Using the R package DiceKriging (Roustant et al., 2010) along with the package sensitivity (Pujol, 2008) it has been possible to produce monthly global maps of model sensitivity to the uncertain parameters over the year 2008. Global model outputs estimated by the emulator are shown to be consistent with previously published estimates (Spracklen et al. 2010, Mann et al. 2010) but now we have an associated measure of parameter uncertainty and its sources. It can be seen that globally some parameters have no effect on the model predictions and any further effort in their development may be unnecessary, although a structural error in the model might also be identified. The

  20. Intercomparison and evaluation of global aerosol microphysical properties among AeroCom models of a range of complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Mann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by 12 global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the multi-model-mean data set simulates the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree

  1. Evaluation of aerosol distributions in the GISS-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model with remote sensing observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD and Angstrom Coefficient (AC predictions in the GISS-TOMAS model of global aerosol microphysics are evaluated against remote sensing data from MODIS, MISR, and AERONET. The model AOD agrees well (within a factor of two over polluted continental (or high sulfate, dusty, and moderate sea-salt regions but less well over the equatorial, high sea-salt, and biomass burning regions. Underprediction of sea-salt in the equatorial region is likely due to GCM meteorology (low wind speeds and high precipitation. For the Southern Ocean, overprediction of AOD is very likely due to high sea-salt emissions and perhaps aerosol water uptake in the model. However, uncertainties in cloud screening in high latitude make it difficult to evaluate the model AOD at high latitudes with the satellite-based AOD. AOD in biomass burning regions is underpredicted, a problem also seen in other global aerosol models but more severely in this work. Using measurements from the LBA-SMOCC 2002 campaign, the surface-level OC and EC concentrations in the model are found to be underpredicted severely during the dry season, suggesting the low AOD in the model is due to underpredictions in OM and EC mass. These, in turn, result from unrealistically short wet deposition lifetimes during the dry season in the GCM.

  2. Establishment of an aerosol-based Marek's disease virus infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Careem, Mohamed Faizal; Javaheri-Vayeghan, Abbas; Shanmuganathan, Sangitha; Haghighi, Hamid Reza; Read, Leah R; Haq, Kamran; Hunter, D Bruce; Schat, Karel A; Heidari, Mohammad; Sharif, Shayan

    2009-09-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV), which is the causative agent of Marek's disease (MD), is shed by infected chickens and transmitted to other chickens through the respiratory route. Experimental reproduction of MD has been commonly done either by intra-abdominal inoculation of cell-associated MDV or by exposure to MDV-infected 'seeder' chickens. The former method does not mimic the natural route of MDV infection, whereas the latter method suffers from lack of uniformity in the timing and amount of virus transmission from seeder chickens to susceptible birds. The aim of the present study was to establish an infection model of MDV that mimics the natural route of infection. Here we report that when chickens were exposed for 20 min to aerosols (particle size 1.91 microm) of cell-free MDV suspensions containing 1280 plaque-forming units/ml, which were generated using a nebulizer, pathological and clinical signs of MD were observed in 95%-100% of the aerosol-exposed chickens by 21 days post-infection (dpi). Chickens that were exposed to aerosols and sampled at 1, 2, 3, 10, and 21 dpi showed MDV replication as early as 1 dpi in lungs as well as in other tissues such as spleen and bursa of Fabricius. This infection model will facilitate the studies directed to elucidate MDV-host interaction at the site of virus entry. PMID:19848077

  3. An aerosol dynamics model for simulating particle formation and growth in a mixed flow chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Vesterinen, M.; Korhonen, H.; Joutsensaari, J.; P. Yli-Pirilä; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we model the aerosol size distribution dynamics in a mixed flow chamber in which new particles are formed via nucleation and subsequent condensation of oxidation products of VOCs emitted from Norway spruce seedlings. The microphysical processes included in the model are nucleation, condensation, deposition and coagulation. The aerosol dynamics in the chamber is a competition between aerosol growth and scavenging/deposition whi...

  4. The MESSy aerosol submodel MADE3 (v2.0b: description and a box model test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Kaiser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation; version: MADE3v2.0b, an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System. MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse mode particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl / chloride (Cl partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealised marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HCl / Cl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, the aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse mode particles. MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes ≲ 2 μm that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distributions (sizes ≳ 2 μm, and also in terms of aerosol composition. Considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition

  5. Aerosol Infection Model of Tuberculosis in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheshagiri Gaonkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored suitability of a rat tuberculosis aerosol infection model for investigating the pharmacodynamics of new antimycobacterial agents. Infection of rats via the aerosol route led to a reproducible course of M. tuberculosis infection in the lungs. The pulmonary bacterial load increased logarithmically during the first six weeks, thereafter, the infection stabilized for the next 12 weeks. We observed macroscopically visible granulomas in the lungs with demonstrable acid-fast bacilli and associated histopathology. Rifampicin (RIF at a dose range of 30 to 270 mg/kg exhibited a sharp dose response while isoniazid (INH at a dose range of 10 to 90 mg/kg and ethambutol (EMB at 100 to 1000 mg/kg showed shallow dose responses. Pyrazinamide (PZA had no dose response between 300 and 1000 mg/kg dose range. In a separate time kill study at fixed drug doses (RIF 90 mg/kg, INH 30 mg/kg, EMB 300 mg/kg, and PZA 300 mg/kg the bactericidal effect of all the four drugs increased with longer duration of treatment from two weeks to four weeks. The observed infection profile and therapeutic outcomes in this rat model suggest that it can be used as an additional, pharmacologically relevant efficacy model to develop novel antitubercular compounds at the interface of discovery and development.

  6. Wave Generation in Physical Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    The present book describes the most important aspects of wave generation techniques in physical models. Moreover, the book serves as technical documentation for the wave generation software AwaSys 6, cf. Aalborg University (2012). In addition to the two main authors also Tue Hald and Michael...

  7. A detailed aerosol mixing state model for investigating interactions between mixing state, semivolatile partitioning, and coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for describing externally mixed particles, the Detailed Aerosol Mixing State (DAMS representation, is presented in this study. This novel method classifies aerosols by both composition and size, using a user-specified mixing criterion to define boundaries between compositional populations. Interactions between aerosol mixing state, semivolatile partitioning, and coagulation are investigated with a Lagrangian box model that incorporates the DAMS approach. Model results predict that mixing state affects the amount and types of semivolatile organics that partition to available aerosol phases, causing external mixtures to produce a more size-varying composition than internal mixtures. Both coagulation and condensation contribute to the mixing of emitted particles, producing a collection of multiple compositionally distinct aerosol populations that exists somewhere between the extremes of a strictly external or internal mixture. The selection of mixing criteria has a significant impact on the size and type of individual populations that compose the modeled aerosol mixture.

  8. The role of aerosols in cloud drop parameterizations and its applications in global climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The characteristics of the cloud drop size distribution near cloud base are initially determined by aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei and the updraft velocity. We have developed parameterizations relating cloud drop number concentration to aerosol number and sulfate mass concentrations and used them in a coupled global aerosol/general circulation model (GCM) to estimate the indirect aerosol forcing. The global aerosol model made use of our detailed emissions inventories for the amount of particulate matter from biomass burning sources and from fossil fuel sources as well as emissions inventories of the gas-phase anthropogenic SO{sub 2}. This work is aimed at validating the coupled model with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program measurements and assessing the possible magnitude of the aerosol-induced cloud effects on climate.

  9. An AeroCom Initial Assessment - Optical Properties in Aerosol Component Modules of Global Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.; Textor, C.; Guibert, S.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Berglen, T.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, H.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Grini, A.; Hendricks, J.; Herzog, M.; Horrowitz, L.; Isaksen, I.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Kloster, S.; Koch, D.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Krol, M.; Lauer, A.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lesins, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, U.; Montanaro, V.; Myhre, G.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tie, X.

    2006-05-29

    The AeroCom exercise diagnoses multi-component aerosol modules in global modeling. In an initial assessment global fields for mass and for mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (aot) were compared among aerosol component modules of 21 different global models. There is general agreement among models for the annual global mean of component combined aot. At 0.12 to 0.14, simulated aot values are at the lower end of global averages suggested by remote sensing from ground (AERONET ca 0.14) and space (MODIS-MISR composite ca 0.16). More detailed comparisons, however, reveal that larger differences in regional distribution and significant differences in compositional mixture have remained. Of particular concern is the large model diversity for contributions by dust and carbon, because it leads to significant uncertainty in aerosol absorption (aab). Since not only aot but also aab influence the aerosol impact on the radiative energy-balance, aerosol (direct) forcing uncertainty in modeling is larger than differences in aot might suggest. New diagnostic approaches are proposed to trace model differences in terms of aerosol processing and transport: These include the prescription of common input (e.g. amount, size and injection of aerosol component emissions) and the use of observational capabilities from ground (e.g. measurements networks) and space (e.g. correlations between retrieved aerosol and cloud properties).

  10. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O' Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

    2014-05-13

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution

  11. New Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Structure from Space using the NASA Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): Applications for Aerosol Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, E. J.; Spinhime, J.; Palm, S.; Hlavka, D.; Hart, W.; Ginoux, P.; Chin, M.; Colarco, P.

    2004-01-01

    In the past, satellite measurements of aerosols have only been possible using passive sensors. Analysis of passive satellite data has lead to an improved understanding of aerosol properties, spatial distribution, and their effect on the earth,s climate. However, direct measurement of aerosol vertical distribution has not been possible using only the passive data. Knowledge of aerosol vertical distribution is important to correctly assess the impact of aerosol absorption, for certain atmospheric correction procedures, and to help constrain height profiles in aerosol transport models. On January 12,2003 NASA launched the first satellite-based lidar, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), onboard the ICESat spacecraft. GLAS is both an altimeter and an atmospheric lidar, and obtains direct measurements of aerosol and cloud heights. Here we show an overview of GLAS, provide an update of its current status, and discuss how GLAS data will be useful for modeling efforts. In particular, a strategy of using GLAS to characterize the height profile of dust plumes over source regions will be presented, along with initial results. Such information can be used to validate and improve output from aerosol transport models. Aerosol height profile comparisons between GLAS and transport models will be shown for regions downwind of aerosol sources. We will also discuss the feasibility of assimilating GLAS profiles into the models in order to improve their output.

  12. Modelled and observed changes in aerosols and surface solar radiation over Europe between 1960 and 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Turnock

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantial changes in anthropogenic aerosols and precursor gas emissions have occurred over recent decades due to the implementation of air pollution control legislation and economic growth. The response of atmospheric aerosols to these changes and the impact on climate are poorly constrained, particularly in studies using detailed aerosol chemistry climate models. Here we compare the HadGEM3-UKCA coupled chemistry-climate model for the period 1960 to 2009 against extensive ground based observations of sulfate aerosol mass (1978–2009, total suspended particle matter (SPM, 1978–1998, PM10 (1997–2009, aerosol optical depth (AOD, 2000–2009 and surface solar radiation (SSR, 1960–2009 over Europe. The model underestimates observed sulfate aerosol mass (normalised mean bias factor (NMBF = −0.4, SPM (NMBF = −0.9, PM10 (NMBF = −0.2 and aerosol optical depth (AOD, NMBF = −0.01 but slightly overpredicts SSR (NMBF = 0.02. Trends in aerosol over the observational period are well simulated by the model, with observed (simulated changes in sulfate of −68% (−78%, SPM of −42% (−20%, PM10 of −9% (−8% and AOD of −11% (−14%. Discrepancies in the magnitude of simulated aerosol mass do not affect the ability of the model to reproduce the observed SSR trends. The positive change in observed European SSR (5% during 1990–2009 ("brightening" is better reproduced by the model when aerosol radiative effects (ARE are included (3%, compared to simulations where ARE are excluded (0.2%. The simulated top-of-the-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing over Europe under all-sky conditions increased by 3 W m−2 during the period 1970–2009 in response to changes in anthropogenic emissions and aerosol concentrations.

  13. Distributions and climate effects of atmospheric aerosols from the preindustrial era to 2100 along Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs simulated using the global aerosol model SPRINTARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Takemura

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Global distributions and associated climate effects of atmospheric aerosols were simulated using a global aerosol climate model, SPRINTARS, from 1850 to the present day and projected forward to 2100. Aerosol emission inventories used by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5 were applied to this study. Scenarios based on the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs were used for the future projection. Aerosol loading in the atmosphere has already peaked and is now reducing in Europe and North America. However, in Asia where rapid economic growth is ongoing, aerosol loading is estimated to reach a maximum in the first half of this century. Atmospheric aerosols originating from the burning of biomass have maintained high loadings throughout the 21st century in Africa, according to the RCPs. Evolution of the adjusted forcing by direct and indirect aerosol effects over time generally correspond to the aerosol loading. The probable future pathways of global mean forcing differ based on the aerosol direct effect for different RCPs. Because aerosol forcing will be close to the preindustrial level by the end of the 21st century for all RCPs despite the continuous increases in greenhouse gases, global warming will be accelerated with reduced aerosol negative forcing.

  14. Distributions and climate effects of atmospheric aerosols from the preindustrial era to 2100 along Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs simulated using a global aerosol model SPRINTARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Takemura

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Global distributions and associated climate effects of atmospheric aerosols were simulated using a global aerosol climate model, SPRINTARS, from 1850 to the present day and projected forward to 2100. Aerosol emission inventories used by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5 were applied to this study. Scenarios based on the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs were used for the future projection. Aerosol loading in the atmosphere has already peaked and is now reducing in Europe and North America. However, in Asia where rapid economic growth is ongoing, aerosol loading is estimated to reach a maximum in the first half of this century. Atmospheric aerosols originating from the burning of biomass have maintained high loadings throughout the 21st century in Africa, according to the RCPs. Evolution of the adjusted forcing by direct and indirect aerosol effects over time generally correspond to the aerosol loading. The probable future pathways of global mean forcing differ based on the aerosol direct effect for different RCPs. Because aerosol forcing will be close to the preindustrial level by the end of the 21st century for all RCPs despite the continuous increases in greenhouse gases, global warming will be accelerated with reduced aerosol negative forcing.

  15. Uncertainty associated with convective wet removal of entrained aerosols in a global climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Croft

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainties associated with the wet removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases are investigated in a global aerosol-climate model (ECHAM5-HAM under a set of limiting assumptions for the wet removal of the entrained aerosols. The limiting assumptions for the wet removal of entrained aerosols are negligible scavenging and vigorous scavenging (either through activation, with size-dependent impaction scavenging, or with the prescribed fractions of the standard model. To facilitate this process-based study, an explicit representation of cloud-droplet-borne and ice-crystal-borne aerosol mass and number, for the purpose of wet removal, is introduced into the ECHAM5-HAM model. This replaces and is compared with the prescribed cloud-droplet-borne and ice-crystal-borne aerosol fraction scavenging scheme of the standard model.

    A 20% to 35% uncertainty in simulated global, annual mean aerosol mass burdens and optical depth (AOD is attributed to different assumptions for the wet removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases. Assumptions about the removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases control modeled upper tropospheric aerosol concentrations by as much as one order of magnitude.

    Simulated aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases contribute 20% to 50% of modeled global, annual mean aerosol mass convective wet deposition (about 5% to 10% of the total dry and wet deposition, depending on the aerosol species, when including wet scavenging of those entrained aerosols (either by activation, size-dependent impaction, or with the prescribed fraction scheme. Among the simulations, the prescribed fraction and size-dependent impaction schemes yield the largest global, annual mean aerosol mass convective wet deposition (by about two-fold. However, the prescribed fraction scheme has more vigorous convective mixed-phase wet removal (by two to five-fold relative to the size-dependent impaction

  16. Modeling study on the transport of summer dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau (TP is located at the juncture of several important natural and anthropogenic aerosol sources. Satellites have observed substantial dust and anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere during summer over the TP. These aerosols have distinct effects on the earth's energy balance, microphysical cloud properties, and precipitation rates. To investigate the transport of summer dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the TP, we combined the Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS with a non-hydrostatic regional model (NHM. The model simulation shows heavily loaded dust aerosols over the northern slope and anthropogenic aerosols over the southern slope and to the east of the TP. The dust aerosols are primarily mobilized around the Taklimakan Desert, where a portion of the aerosols are transported eastward due to the northwesterly current; simultaneously, a portion of the particles are transported northward when a second northwesterly current becomes northeasterly because of the topographic blocking of the northern slope of the TP. Because of the strong upward current, dust plumes can extend upward to approximately 7–8 km a.s.l. over the northern slope of the TP. When a dust event occurs, anthropogenic aerosols that entrain into the southwesterly current via the Indian summer monsoon are transported from India to the southern slope of the TP. Simultaneously, a large amount of anthropogenic aerosols is also transported from eastern China to east of the TP by easterly winds. An investigation on the transport of dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the plateau may provide the basis for determining aerosol impacts on summer monsoons and climate systems.

  17. Modeling study on the transport of summer dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Sato, Y.; Jia, R.; Xie, Y.; Huang, J.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-11-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is located at the juncture of several important natural and anthropogenic aerosol sources. Satellites have observed substantial dust and anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere during summer over the TP. These aerosols have distinct effects on the earth's energy balance, microphysical cloud properties, and precipitation rates. To investigate the transport of summer dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the TP, we combined the Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS) with a non-hydrostatic regional model (NHM). The model simulation shows heavily loaded dust aerosols over the northern slope and anthropogenic aerosols over the southern slope and the east of the TP. The dust aerosols are primarily mobilized around the Taklimakan Desert, where a portion of the aerosols are transported eastward due to the northwesterly current; simultaneously, a portion of the particles are transported southward when a second northwesterly current becomes northeasterly because of the topographic blocking of the northern slope of the TP. Because of the strong upward current, dust plumes can extend upward to approximately 7-8 km a.s.l. over the northern slope of the TP. When a dust event occurs, anthropogenic aerosols that entrained into the southwesterly current via the Indian summer monsoon are transported from India to the southern slope of the TP. Simultaneously, a large amount of anthropogenic aerosol is also transported from eastern China to the east of the TP by easterly winds. An investigation on the transport of dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the plateau may provide the basis for determining aerosol impacts on summer monsoons and climate systems.

  18. Future Aerosol Emissions: A Multi-Model Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Steven J.; Rao, Shilpa; Riahi, Keywan; van Vuuren, Detlef; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2016-08-22

    This paper compares projections over the 21st century of SO2, BC, and OC emissions from three technologically detailed, long-term integrated assessment models. The character of the projections and the response of emissions due to a comprehensive climate policy are discussed. In a continuation of historical experience, aerosol and precursor emissions are increasingly decoupled from carbon dioxide emissions over the 21st century. Implementation of a comprehensive climate policy further reduces emissions, although there is significant variation in this response by sector and by model. Differences in model responses can be traced to specific characteristics of reference case end-use and supply-side technology deployment and emissions control assumptions, which are detailed by sector.

  19. Use of the CALIOP vertical feature mask for evaluating global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Nowottnick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Global aerosol distributions provided by the NASA Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications aerosol reanalysis (MERRAero are evaluated using the aerosol types identified by the CALIOP vertical feature mask (VFM algorithm, focusing especially on Saharan dust distributions during July 2009. MERRAero is comprised of an aerosol simulation produced in the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5 Earth system model and incorporates assimilation of MODIS-derived aerosol optical thickness to constrain column aerosol loadings. For comparison to the CALIOP VFM we construct two synthetic VFMs using the MERRAero aerosol distributions: a Level 2 VFM in which simulated MERRAero total attenuated backscatter and estimated particulate depolarization ratios are input directly to the CALIOP VFM typing algorithm, and a Level 3 VFM in which we map the aerosol species in MERRAero to the CALIOP VFM types. By comparing the simulated MERRAero-Level 2 VFM to CALIOP VFM we can diagnose the aerosol transport and speciation in MERRAero. By comparing the MERRAero-Level 2 and MERRAero-Level 3 simulated VFMs we perform a simple Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE, which is useful for identifying shortcomings in the CALIOP VFM algorithm itself. We find that despite having our column AOT constrained by MODIS, comparison to the CALIOP VFM reveals a greater occurrence of dusty aerosol layers in our MERRAero-Level 2 VFM, due to errors in MERRAero aerosol speciation. Additionally, we find that the CALIOP VFM algorithm classification for desert dust and polluted dust should be reconsidered for aerosol features that contain dust mixtures in low aerosol loadings, as our application of the CALIOP VFM to MERRAero distributions flagged a greater presence of dusty vs. marine aerosols when our two MERRAero VFMs were compared.

  20. Evolution of ozone, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg A.; Peckham, Steven E.

    2006-11-01

    A new fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban- to regional-scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a 5 day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still underestimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  1. Maritime Aerosol Network as a Component of AERONET - First Results and Comparison with Global Aerosol Models and Satellite Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Giles, D. M.; Slutsker, I.; O'Neill, N. T.; Eck, T. F.; Macke, A.; Croot, P.; Courcoux, Y.; Sakerin, S. M.; Smyth, T. J.; Zielinski, T.; Zibordi, G.; Goes, J. I.; Harvey, M. J.; Quinn, P. K.; Nelson, N. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Duarte, C. M.; Remer, L. A.; Kahn, R. A.; Kleidman, R. G.; Gaitley, B. J.; Tan, Q.; Diehl, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) has been collecting data over the oceans since November 2006. Over 80 cruises were completed through early 2010 with deployments continuing. Measurement areas included various parts of the Atlantic Ocean, the Northern and Southern Pacific Ocean, the South Indian Ocean, the Southern Ocean, the Arctic Ocean and inland seas. MAN deploys Microtops handheld sunphotometers and utilizes a calibration procedure and data processing traceable to AERONET. Data collection included areas that previously had no aerosol optical depth (AOD) coverage at all, particularly vast areas of the Southern Ocean. The MAN data archive provides a valuable resource for aerosol studies in maritime environments. In the current paper we present results of AOD measurements over the oceans, and make a comparison with satellite AOD retrievals and model simulations.

  2. Global aerosol modeling with the online NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model: sensitivity to fire injection height prescription and secondary organic aerosol schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Michele; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Soares, Joana; Obiso, Vincenzo; Janjic, Zavisa; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    We develop and evaluate a fully online-coupled model simulating the life-cycle of the most relevant global aerosols (i.e. mineral dust, sea-salt, black carbon, primary and secondary organic aerosols, and sulfate) and their feedbacks upon atmospheric chemistry and radiative balance. Following the capabilities of its meteorological core, the model has been designed to simulate both global and regional scales with unvaried parameterizations: this allows detailed investigation on the aerosol processes bridging the gap between global and regional models. Since the strong uncertainties affecting aerosol models are often unresponsive to model complexity, we choose to introduce complexity only when it clearly improves results and leads to a better understanding of the simulated aerosol processes. We test two important sources of uncertainty - the fires injection height and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production - by comparing a baseline simulation with experiments using more advanced approaches. First, injection heights prescribed by Dentener et al. (2006, ACP) are compared with climatological injection heights derived from satellite measurements and produced through the Integrated Monitoring and Modeling System For Wildland Fires (IS4FIRES). Also global patterns of SOA produced by the yield conversion of terpenes as prescribed by Dentener et al. (2006, ACP) are compared with those simulated by the two-product approach of Tsigaridis et al. (2003, ACP). We evaluate our simulations using a variety of observations and measurement techniques. Additionally, we discuss our results in comparison to other global models within AEROCOM and ACCMIP.

  3. Complex Coupling of Air Quality and Climate-Relevant Aerosols in a Chemistry-Aerosol Microphysics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C.; Mann, G.

    2013-12-01

    Controlling emissions of aerosols and their precursors to improve air quality will impact the climate through direct and indirect radiative forcing. We have investigated the impacts of changes in a range of aerosol and gas-phase emission fluxes and changes in temperature on air quality and climate change metrics using a global aerosol microphysics and chemistry model, GLOMAP. We investigate how the responses of PM2.5 and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are coupled, and how attempts to improve air quality could have inadvertent effects on CCN, clouds and climate. The parameter perturbations considered are a 5°C increase in global temperature, increased or decreased precursor emissions of anthropogenic SO2, NH3, and NOx, and biogenic monoterpenes, and increased or decreased primary emissions of organic and black carbon aerosols from wildfire, fossil fuel, and biofuel. To quantify the interactions, we define a new sensitivity metric in terms of the response of CCN divided by the response of PM in different regions. .Our results show that the coupled chemistry and aerosol processes cause complex responses that will make any co-benefit policy decision problematic. In particular, we show that reducing SO2 emissions effectively reduces surface-level PM2.5 over continental regions in summer when background PM2.5 is high, with a relatively small reduction in marine CCN (and hence indirect radiative cooling over ocean), which is beneficial for near-term climate. Reducing NOx emissions does not improve summertime air quality very effectively but leads to a relatively high reduction of marine CCN. Reducing NH3 emissions has moderate effects on both PM2.5 and CCN. These three species are strongly coupled chemically and microphysically and the effects of changing emissions of one species on mass and size distributions of aerosols are very complex and spatially and temporally variable. For example, reducing SO2 emissions leads to reductions in sulphate and ammonium mass

  4. Quantification of model uncertainty in aerosol optical thickness retrieval from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Määttä

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We study uncertainty quantification in remote sensing of aerosols in the atmosphere with top of the atmosphere reflectance measurements from the nadir-viewing Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. Focus is on the uncertainty in aerosol model selection of pre-calculated aerosol models and on the statistical modelling of the model inadequacies. The aim is to apply statistical methodologies that improve the uncertainty estimates of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT retrieval by propagating model selection and model error related uncertainties more realistically. We utilise Bayesian model selection and model averaging methods for the model selection problem and use Gaussian processes to model the smooth systematic discrepancies from the modelled to observed reflectance. The systematic model error is learned from an ensemble of operational retrievals. The operational OMI multi-wavelength aerosol retrieval algorithm OMAERO is used for cloud free, over land pixels of the OMI instrument with the additional Bayesian model selection and model discrepancy techniques. The method is demonstrated with four examples with different aerosol properties: weakly absorbing aerosols, forest fires over Greece and Russia, and Sahara dessert dust. The presented statistical methodology is general; it is not restricted to this particular satellite retrieval application.

  5. A Pure Marine Aerosol Model, for Use in Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related parameters from satellite measurements typically involve prescribed models of aerosol size and composition, and are therefore dependent on how well these models are able to represent the radiative behaviour of real aerosols, This study uses aerosol volume size distributions retrieved from Sun-photometer measurements at 11 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) island sites, spread throughout the world's oceans, as a basis to define such a model for unpolluted maritime aerosols. Size distributions are observed to be bimodal and approximately lognormal, although the coarse mode is skewed with a long tail on the low-radius end, The relationship of AOD and size distribution parameters to meteorological conditions is also examined, As wind speed increases, so do coarse-mode volume and radius, The AOD and Angstrom exponent (alpha) show linear relationships with wind speed, although there is considerable scatter in all these relationships, limiting their predictive power. Links between aerosol properties and near-surface relative humidity, columnar water vapor, and sea surface temperature are also explored. A recommended bimodal maritime model, which is able to reconstruct the AERONET AOD with accuracy of order 0.01-0.02, is presented for use in aerosol remote sensing applications. This accuracy holds at most sites and for wavelengths between 340 nm and 1020 nm. Calculated lidar ratios are also provided, and differ significantly from those currently used in Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) processing.

  6. Modeling the Fate of Expiratory Aerosols and the Associated Infection Risk in an Aircraft Cabin Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, M.P.; To, G.N.S.; Chao, C.Y.H.;

    2009-01-01

    The transport and deposition of polydispersed expiratory aerosols in an aircraft cabin were simulated using a Lagrangian-based model validated by experiments conducted in an aircraft cabin mockup. Infection risk by inhalation was estimated using the aerosol dispersion data and a model was developed...

  7. Neural network radiative transfer solvers for the generation of high resolution solar irradiance spectra parameterized by cloud and aerosol parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Kazadzis, S.; Keramitsoglou, I.; Kiranoudis, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a neural network (NN) model for instantaneous and accurate estimation of solar radiation spectra and budgets geared toward satellite cloud data using a ≈2.4 M record, high-spectral resolution look up table (LUT) generated with the radiative transfer model libRadtran. Two NN solvers, one for clear sky conditions dominated by aerosol and one for cloudy skies, were trained on a normally-distributed and multiparametric subset of the LUT that spans a very broad class of atmospheric and meteorological conditions as inputs with corresponding high resolution solar irradiance target spectra as outputs. The NN solvers were tested by feeding them with a large (10 K record) "off-grid" random subset of the LUT spanning the training data space, and then comparing simulated outputs with target values provided by the LUT. The NN solvers demonstrated a capability to interpolate accurately over the entire multiparametric space. Once trained, the NN solvers allow for high-speed estimation of solar radiation spectra with high spectral resolution (1 nm) and for a quantification of the effect of aerosol and cloud optical parameters on the solar radiation budget without the need for a massive database. The cloudy sky NN solver was applied to high spatial resolution (54 K pixel) cloud data extracted from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation 3 (MSG3) satellite and demonstrated that coherent maps of spectrally-integrated global horizontal irradiance at this resolution can be produced on the order of 1 min.

  8. Prediction of air leakage and aerosol transport through concrete cracks with a fractal based crack morphology model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishnoi, L.R., E-mail: lrbishnoi@aerb.gov.in [Siting and Structural Engineering Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Vedula, R.P., E-mail: rpv@iitb.ac.in [Mechanical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A fractal based numerical concrete crack morphology model is presented. • Computational studies conducted for airflow and aerosol transport through cracks. • Results are compared with experimental data and other empirical relations. • Comparative studies demonstrate model effectiveness and versatility of application. - Abstract: Cracks may appear in pressurized concrete containment of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident and provide leak paths for release of radioactive aerosols dispersed in the contained air. In this paper, a fractal based crack morphology model is presented for prediction of air leakage and aerosol transport through cracks in concrete. Airflow field generated in air leakage studies is used for aerosol transport studies with the Lagrangian discrete phase model using CFD code FLUENT. Computational studies conducted with the fractal based model are compared with the experimental data as well as the predictions from empirical relations available in open literature. The comparative studies demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed fractal based model and its versatility for practical applications.

  9. Model analysis of influences of aerosol mixing state upon its optical properties in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Xu, Liren

    2013-07-01

    The air quality model system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality) coupled with an aerosol optical/radiative module was applied to investigate the impact of different aerosol mixing states (i.e., externally mixed, half externally and half internally mixed, and internally mixed) on radiative forcing in East Asia. The simulation results show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) generally increased when the aerosol mixing state changed from externally mixed to internally mixed, while the single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased. Therefore, the scattering and absorption properties of aerosols can be significantly affected by the change of aerosol mixing states. Comparison of simulated and observed SSAs at five AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites suggests that SSA could be better estimated by considering aerosol particles to be internally mixed. Model analysis indicates that the impact of aerosol mixing state upon aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is complex. Generally, the cooling effect of aerosols over East Asia are enhanced in the northern part of East Asia (Northern China, Korean peninsula, and the surrounding area of Japan) and are reduced in the southern part of East Asia (Sichuan Basin and Southeast China) by internal mixing process, and the variation range can reach ±5 W m-2. The analysis shows that the internal mixing between inorganic salt and dust is likely the main reason that the cooling effect strengthens. Conversely, the internal mixture of anthropogenic aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon, could obviously weaken the cooling effect.

  10. Model Analysis of Influences of Aerosol Mixing State upon Its Optical Properties in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xiao; ZHANG Meigen; ZHU Lingyun; XU Liren

    2013-01-01

    The air quality model system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality) coupled with an aerosol optical/radiative module was applied to investigate the impact of different aerosol mixing states (i.e.,externally mixed,half externally and half internally mixed,and internally mixed) on radiative forcing in East Asia.The simulation results show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) generally increased when the aerosol mixing state changed from externally mixed to internally mixed,while the single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased.Therefore,the scattering and absorption properties of aerosols can be significantly affected by the change of aerosol mixing states.Comparison of simulated and observed SSAs at five AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites suggests that SSA could be better estimated by considering aerosol particles to be internally mixed.Model analysis indicates that the impact of aerosol mixing state upon aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is complex.Generally,the cooling effect of aerosols over East Asia are enhanced in the northern part of East Asia (Northern China,Korean peninsula,and the surrounding area of Japan) and are reduced in the southern part of East Asia (Sichuan Basin and Southeast China) by internal mixing process,and the variation range can reach ±5 W m-2.The analysis shows that the internal mixing between inorganic salt and dust is likely the main reason that the cooling effect strengthens.Conversely,the internal mixture of anthropogenic aerosols,including sulfate,nitrate,ammonium,black carbon,and organic carbon,could obviously weaken the cooling effect.

  11. Evaluating Direct Radiative Effects of Absorbing Aerosols on Atmospheric Dynamics with Aquaplanet and Regional Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Ö.; Tegen, I.; Quaas, J.

    2015-12-01

    Effects of absorbing aerosol on atmospheric dynamics are usually investigated with help of general circulation models or also regional models that represent the atmospheric system as realistic as possible. Reducing the complexity of models used to study the effects of absorbing aerosol on atmospheric dynamics helps to understand underlying mechanisms. In this study, by using ECHAM6 General Circulation Model (GCM) in an Aquaplanet setting and using simplified aerosol climatology, an initial idealization step has been taken. The analysis only considers direct radiative effects, furthering the reduction of complex model results. The simulations include cases including aerosol radiative forcing, no aerosol forcing, coarse mode aerosol forcing only (as approximation for mineral dust forcing) and forcing with increased aerosol absorption. The results showed that increased absorption affects cloud cover mainly in subtropics. Hadley circulation is found to be weakened in the increased absorption case. To compare the results of the idealized model with a more realistic model setting, the results of the regional model COSMO-MUSCAT that includes interactive mineral dust aerosol and considers the effects of dust radiative forcing are also analyzed. The regional model computes the atmospheric circulation for the year 2007 twice, including the feedback of dust and excluding the dust aerosol forcing. It is investigated to which extent the atmospheric response to the dust forcing agrees with the simplified Aquaplanet results. As expected, in the regional model mineral dust causes an increase in the temperature right above the dust layer while reducing the temperature close to the surface. In both models the presence of aerosol forcing leads to increased specific humidity, close to ITCZ. Notwithstanding the difference magnitudes, comparisons of the global aquaplanet and the regional model showed similar patterns. Further detailed comparisons will be presented.

  12. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 5.0.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The uploaded data consists of the BRACE Na aerosol observations paired with CMAQ model output, the updated model's parameterization of sea salt aerosol emission...

  13. Impacts of increasing the aerosol complexity in the Met Office global NWP model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Jane; Walters, David; Bellouin, Nicolas; Milton, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Inclusion of the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosols in high resolution global numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is being increasingly recognised as important for the improved accuracy of short-range weather forecasts. In this study the impacts of increasing the aerosol complexity in the global NWP configuration of the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) are investigated. A hierarchy of aerosol representations are evaluated including three dimensional monthly mean speciated aerosol climatologies, fully prognostic aerosols modelled using the CLASSIC aerosol scheme and finally, initialised aerosols using assimilated aerosol fields from the GEMS project. The prognostic aerosol schemes are better able to predict the temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric aerosol optical depth, which is particularly important in cases of large sporadic aerosol events such as large dust storms or forest fires. Including the direct effect of aerosols improves model biases in outgoing longwave radiation over West Africa due to a better representation of dust. Inclusion of the indirect aerosol effects has significant impacts on the SW radiation particularly at high latitudes due to lower cloud amounts in high latitude clean air regions. This leads to improved surface radiation biases at the North Slope of Alaska ARM site. Verification of temperature and height forecasts is also improved in this region. Impacts on the global mean model precipitation and large-scale circulation fields were found to be generally small in the short range forecasts. However, the indirect aerosol effect leads to a strengthening of the low level monsoon flow over the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal and an increase in precipitation over Southeast Asia. This study highlights the importance of including a more realistic treatment of aerosol-cloud interactions in global NWP models and the potential for improved global environmental prediction systems through the incorporation of more complex

  14. Aerosol and nucleation research in support of NASA cloud physics experiments in space. [ice nuclei generator for the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory on Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, G.; Rogers, D.; Gordon, G.; Saunders, C. P. R.; Reischel, M.; Black, R.

    1978-01-01

    Tasks performed in the development of an ice nucleus generator which, within the facility concept of the ACPL, would provide a test aerosol suitable for a large number and variety of potential experiments are described. The impact of Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory scientific functional requirements on ice nuclei generation and characterization subsystems was established. Potential aerosol generating systems were evaluated with special emphasis on reliability, repeatability and general suitability for application in Spacelab. Possible contamination problems associated with aerosol generation techniques were examined. The ice nucleating abilities of candidate test aerosols were examined and the possible impact of impurities on the nucleating abilities of those aerosols were assessed as well as the relative merits of various methods of aerosol size and number density measurements.

  15. Evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols at elevated relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jacqueline; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semisolid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on α-pinene SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30-70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 h, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses; with aging at elevated RH leading to a more significant effect. In all cases, the observed SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent.

  16. Evaporation Kinetics of Laboratory Generated Secondary Organic Aerosols at Elevated Relative Humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-06

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semi-solid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at 0%, 50% and 90% RH. We find that in all cases evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30% to 70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 hours, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at 0% and 50% RH are nearly the same, while at 90% RH a slightly larger fraction evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses, with aging at elevated RH leading to more significant effect. In all cases, SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent, providing direct evidence that oligomers play a crucial role in determining the evaporation kinetics.

  17. Models for the optical simulations of fractal aggregated soot particles thinly coated with non-absorbing aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Light absorption enhancement of aged soot aerosols is highly sensitive to the morphologies and mixing states of soot aggregates and their non-absorbing coatings, such as organic materials. The quantification of these effects on the optical properties of thinly coated soot aerosols is simulated using an effective model with fixed volume fractions. Fractal aggregated soot was simulated using the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) algorithm and discretized into soot dipoles. The dipoles of non-absorbing aerosols, whose number was fixed by the volume fraction, were further generated from the neighboring random edge dipoles. Their optical properties were calculated using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method and were compared with other commonly used models. The optical properties of thinly coated soot calculated using the fixed volume fraction model are close to (less than ~10% difference) the results of the fixed coating thickness model, except their asymmetry parameters (up to ~25% difference). In the optical simulations of thinly coated soot aerosols, this relative difference of asymmetry parameters and phase functions between these realistic models may be notable. The realizations of the fixed volume fraction model may introduce smaller variation of optical results than those of the fixed coating thickness model. Moreover, the core-shell monomers model and homogeneous aggregated spheres model with the Maxwell-Garnett (MG) theory may underestimate (up to ~20%) the cross sections of thinly coated soot aggregates. The single core-shell sphere model may largely overestimate (up to ~150%) the cross sections and single scattering albedo of thinly coated soot aggregates, and it underestimated (up to ~60%) their asymmetry parameters. It is suggested that the widely used single core-shell sphere approximation may not be suitable for the single scattering calculations of thinly coated soot aerosols.

  18. Development of a global model of mineral dust aerosol microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A mineral dust module is developed and implemented into the global aerosol microphysics model, GISS-TOMAS. The model is evaluated against long-term measurements of dust surface mass concentrations and deposition fluxes. Predicted mass concentrations and deposition fluxes are in error on average by a factor of 3 and 5, respectively. The comparison shows that the model performs better near the dust source regions but underestimates surface concentrations and deposition fluxes in more remote regions. For example, including only sites with measured dust concentrations of at least 0.5 μg m−3, the model prediction agrees with observations to within a factor of 2. It was hypothesized that the lifetime of dust, 2.6 days in our base case, is too short and causes the underestimation in remote areas. However, a sensitivity simulation with smaller dust particles and increased lifetime, 3.7 days, does not significantly improve the comparison. We conclude that the underestimation of mineral dust in remote areas results from local factors and sources not well described by the dust source function and/or the GCM meteorology. The effect of dust aerosols on CCN(0.2% concentrations is negligible in most regions of the globe; however, CCN(0.2% concentrations decrease by 10–20% in dusty regions as a result of coagulational scavenging of CCN particles by dust and a decrease in H2SO4 condensation to CCN particles due to the additional surface area of dust.

  19. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides data on aerosol concentrations in tank head spaces, total mass of aerosols in the tank head space and mass of aerosols sent to the exhauster during Rotary Mode Core Sampling from November 1994 through June 1999. A decontamination factor for the RMCS exhauster filter housing is calculated based on operation data

  20. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  1. Community Radiative Transfer Model for Aerosol Radiance Assimilation in Global and Regional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; van Delst, P. F.; Groff, D.; Collard, A.; Boukabara, S. A.; Weng, F.; Derber, J.

    2013-12-01

    Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM), developed at the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, has being operationally supporting satellite radiance assimilation for weather forecasting in NOAA and NASA. The CRTM is also supporting the MODIS, GOES-R and JPSS/NPP missions for instrument calibration, validation, monitoring long-term trending, and satellite products using a retrieval approach. The CRTM development is contributed to by multiple U.S. government agencies, universities as well as private companies. This paper will present the latest CRTM version 2.1, which is applicable for passive microwave, infrared and visible sensors. It supports all NOAA satellite instruments, NASA MODIS, and many foreign meteorological satellites. In this study, we will describe the CRTM functionalities and capabilities in the new release of version 2.1. The following are the highlights of the CRTM version: 1. Dual Transmittance models, ODAS and ODPS, 2. Sensor Specific Transmittance models: Fast Transmittance Model for Stratospheric Sounding Unit to take account for CO2 cell pressure variation, Fast Transmittance Model for SSMIS Upper Atmospheric Sounding (UAS) Channels including Zeeman-splitting. 3. Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) Radiative Transfer 4. Surface Emissivity/Reflectivity Models 5. Aerosol, Cloud, and Molecular Scattering Models Pre-computed look-up tables for extinction, scattering coefficients and phase functions 6. Dual Radiative Transfer Solver, Adding Double-Adding method [1][2], Adding Matrix Operator method, and SOI method. The CRTM is flexible for users' applications, for example one can simulate aircraft measurements, turn scattering off for fast calculations, use an aerosol optical depth (AOD) module for aerosol optical depth calculation, use an emissivity interface to input your own emissivity data base, and use a channel selection function for specified channel radiance calculations. In this presentation, we focus on aerosol product

  2. BVOC-aerosol-climate interactions in the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5.5-HAM2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Makkonen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The biosphere emits volatile organic compounds (BVOCs which, after oxidation in the atmosphere, can partition on the existing aerosol population or even form new particles. The large quantities emitted provide means for a large potential impact on both aerosol direct and indirect effects. Biogenic responses to atmospheric temperature change can establish feedbacks even in rather short timescales. However, due to the complexity of organic aerosol partitioning, even the sign of these feedbacks is of large uncertainty. We use the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5.5-HAM2 to explore the effect of BVOC emissions on new particle formation, clouds and climate. Two BVOC emission models, MEGAN2 and LPJ-GUESS, are used. MEGAN2 shows a 25% increase while LPJ-GUESS shows a slight decrease in global BVOC emission between years 2000 and 2100. The change of shortwave cloud forcing from year 1750 to 2000 ranges from −1.4 to −1.8 W m−2 with 5 different nucleation mechanisms. We show that the change in shortwave cloud forcing from the year 2000 to 2100 ranges from 1.0 to 1.5 W m−2. Although increasing future BVOC emissions provide 3–5% additional CCN, the effect on the cloud albedo change is modest. Due to simulated decreases in future cloud cover, the increased CCN concentrations from BVOCs can not provide significant additional cooling in the future.

  3. Phenomenological Model of Vortex Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Westergaard, C.

    1995-01-01

    For some time attempts have been made to improve the power curve of stall regulated wind turbines by using devices like vortex generators VG and Gurney flaps. The vortex produces an additional mixing of the boundary layer and the free stream and thereby increasing the momentum close to the wall......, which again delays separation in adverse pressure gradient regions. A model is needed to include the effect of vortex generators in numerical computations of the viscous flow past rotors. In this paper a simple model is proposed....

  4. Aerosols in large-scale atmospheric models: Future directions and needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerminen, V.M.; Korhonen, H. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    Large-scale atmospheric models range from regional air quality models to global chemical transport and/or climate models. The treatment of aerosol particles in such models was very crude in the past, as most models included only the sulfate aerosol or some other major aerosol type such as sea-salt or dust. The only predicted aerosol parameter in these models was the total mass concentration of each aerosol type. More recent models have aimed to predict the mass size distribution of relevant chemical components in the particulate phase. The application of large-scale atmospheric models has shifted gradually from acid deposition and visibility studies toward investigating the climate change and various health effects caused by air pollution. As a result, new requirements for these models and their structures have appeared. In the following we will discuss briefly what this means in terms of treating aerosols in large-scale atmospheric models, and what implications this further has on doing aerosol measurements.

  5. Evaluating model parameterizations of submicron aerosol scattering and absorption with in situ data from ARCTAS 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Matthew J.; Lonsdale, Chantelle R.; Macintyre, Helen L.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Ridley, David A.; Heald, Colette L.; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Cubison, Michael J.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kondo, Yutaka; Sahu, Lokesh K.; Dibb, Jack E.; Wang, Chien

    2016-07-01

    Accurate modeling of the scattering and absorption of ultraviolet and visible radiation by aerosols is essential for accurate simulations of atmospheric chemistry and climate. Closure studies using in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption can be used to evaluate and improve models of aerosol optical properties without interference from model errors in aerosol emissions, transport, chemistry, or deposition rates. Here we evaluate the ability of four externally mixed, fixed size distribution parameterizations used in global models to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption at three wavelengths using in situ data gathered during the 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign. The four models are the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) Combo model, GEOS-Chem v9-02, the baseline configuration of a version of GEOS-Chem with online radiative transfer calculations (called GC-RT), and the Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds (OPAC v3.1) package. We also use the ARCTAS data to perform the first evaluation of the ability of the Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP v2.1) to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption when in situ data on the aerosol size distribution are used, and examine the impact of different mixing rules for black carbon (BC) on the results. We find that the GMI model tends to overestimate submicron scattering and absorption at shorter wavelengths by 10-23 %, and that GMI has smaller absolute mean biases for submicron absorption than OPAC v3.1, GEOS-Chem v9-02, or GC-RT. However, the changes to the density and refractive index of BC in GC-RT improve the simulation of submicron aerosol absorption at all wavelengths relative to GEOS-Chem v9-02. Adding a variable size distribution, as in ASP v2.1, improves model performance for scattering but not for absorption, likely due to the assumption in ASP v2.1 that BC is present at a constant mass fraction

  6. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  7. Characteristics of Anthropogenic Sulfate and Carbonaceous Aerosols over East Asia: Regional Modeling and Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan HUANG; William L. CHAMEIDES; Qian TAN; Robert E. DICKINSON

    2008-01-01

    The authors present spatial and temporal characteristics of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols over East Asia using a 3-D coupled regional climate-chemistry-aerosol model, and compare the simulation with the limited aerosol observations over the region. The aerosol module consists of SO2, SO42-, hydrophobic and hydrophilic black carbon (BC) and organic carbon compounds (OC), including emission, advections, dry and wet deposition, and chemical production and conversion. The simulated patterns of SO2 are closely tied to its emission rate, with sharp gradients between the highly polluted regions and more rural areas. Chemical conversion (especially in the aqueous phase) and dry deposition remove 60% and 30% of the total SO2 emission, respectively. The SO42- shows less horizontal gradient and seasonality than SO2, with wet deposition (60%) and export (27%) being two major sinks. Carbonaceous aerosols are spatially smoother than sulfur species. The aging process transforms more than 80% of hydrophobic BC and OC to hydrophilic components, which are removed by wet deposition (60%) and export (30%). The simulated spatial and seasonal SO42-, BC and OC aerosol concentrations and total aerosol optical depth are generally consistent with the observations in rural areas over East Asia, with lower bias in simulated OC aerosols, likely due to the underestimation of anthropogenic OC emissions and missing treatment of secondary organic carbon. The results suggest that our model is a useful tool for characterizing the anthropogenic aerosol cycle and for assessing its potential climatic and environmental effects in future studies.

  8. Evaluation of aerosol distributions in the GISS-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model with remote sensing observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD and Angstrom Coefficient (AC predictions in the GISS-TOMAS model of global aerosol microphysics are evaluated against remote sensing data from MODIS, MISR, and AERONET. The model AOD agrees well (within a factor of two over polluted continental (or high sulfate, dusty, and moderate sea-salt regions but less well over the equatorial, high sea-salt, and biomass burning regions. Underprediction of sea-salt in the equatorial region is likely due to GCM meteorology (low wind speeds and high precipitation. For the Southern Ocean, overprediction of AOD is very likely due to high sea-salt emissions and perhaps aerosol water uptake in the model. However, uncertainties in cloud screening at high latitudes make it difficult to evaluate the model AOD there with the satellite-based AOD. AOD in biomass burning regions is underpredicted, a tendency found in other global models but more severely here. Using measurements from the LBA-SMOCC 2002 campaign, the surface-level OC concentration in the model are found to be underpredicted severely during the dry season while much less severely for EC concentration, suggesting the low AOD in the model is due to underpredictions in OM mass. The potential for errors in emissions and wet deposition to contribute to this bias is discussed.

  9. Effect of some natural processes on the generation and characteristics of aerosols over radioactive polluted areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of radioactive aerosols over contaminated areas results from some natural and technogenic factors. Results of several years investigations of physicochemical properties of secondary aerosols, such as volume activity, radionuclide composition, dispersity, are presented taking Chernobyl accident as an example. The results of monitoring of the aerosol from traffic, dust storms and forest fires are presented. Data of aerosol monitoring in the 30 km controlled area near Chernobyl power plant and controlled areas in other regions (Belarus, Lithuania) are compared. Some methodical aspects of the sampling and analyses of aerosols are considered. The recommendations for choice of the personal respirators are given

  10. Program Models A Laser Beam Focused In An Aerosol Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Monte Carlo analysis performed on packets of light. Program for Analysis of Laser Beam Focused Within Aerosol Spray (FLSPRY) developed for theoretical analysis of propagation of laser pulse optically focused within aerosol spray. Applied for example, to analyze laser ignition arrangement in which focused laser pulse used to ignite liquid aerosol fuel spray. Scattering and absorption of laser light by individual aerosol droplets evaluated by use of electromagnetic Lorenz-Mie theory. Written in FORTRAN 77 for both UNIX-based computers and DEC VAX-series computers. VAX version of program (LEW-16051). UNIX version (LEW-16065).

  11. Explicit simulation of aerosol physics in a cloud-resolving model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. L. Ekman

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of convection in introducing aerosols and promoting the formation of new particles to the upper troposphere has been examined using a cloud-resolving model coupled with an interactive explicit aerosol module. A baseline simulation suggests good agreement in the upper troposphere between modeled and observed results including concentrations of aerosols in different size ranges, mole fractions of key chemical species, and concentrations of ice particles. In addition, a set of 34 sensitivity simulations has been carried out to investigate the sensitivity of modeled results to the treatment of various aerosol physical and chemical processes in the model. The size distribution of aerosols is proved to be an important factor in determining the aerosols' fate within the convective cloud. Nucleation mode aerosols (0<−d<−5.84 nm are quickly transferred to the larger modes as they grow through coagulation and condensation of H2SO4. Accumulation mode aerosols (d>−31.0 nm are almost completely removed by nucleation (activation of cloud droplets and impact scavenging. However, a substantial part (up to 10% of the boundary layer concentration of the Aitken mode aerosol population (5.84 nm<−d<−31.0 nm reaches the top of the cloud and the free troposphere. These particles may continually survive in the upper troposphere, or over time form ice crystals, both that could impact the atmospheric radiative budget. The sensitivity simulations performed indicate that critical processes in the model causing a substantial change in the upper tropospheric Aitken mode number concentration are coagulation, condensation, nucleation scavenging, nucleation of aerosols and the transfer of aerosol mass and number between different aerosol bins. In particular, for aerosols in the Aitken mode to grow to CCN size, coagulation appears to be more important than condensation. Less important processes are dry deposition, impact scavenging

  12. The effect of harmonized emissions on aerosol properties in global models - an AeroCom experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Textor, C.; Schulz, M.; Krol, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of unified aerosol sources on global aerosol fields simulated by different models are examined in this paper. We compare results from two AeroCom experiments, one with different (ExpA) and one with unified emissions, injection heights, and particle sizes at the source (ExpB). Surprisingl

  13. A model study of the size and composition distribution of aerosols in an aircraft exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, A.A. [SRC `ECOLEN`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A two-dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model which includes water and sulphate aerosol formation represented by moments of the size and composition distribution function is used to calculate the effect of radial turbulent jet mixing on the aerosol size distribution and mean modal composition. (author) 6 refs.

  14. In vitro surfactant and perfluorocarbon aerosol deposition in a neonatal physical model of the upper conducting airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estibalitz Goikoetxea

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aerosol delivery holds potential to release surfactant or perfluorocarbon (PFC to the lungs of neonates with respiratory distress syndrome with minimal airway manipulation. Nevertheless, lung deposition in neonates tends to be very low due to extremely low lung volumes, narrow airways and high respiratory rates. In the present study, the feasibility of enhancing lung deposition by intracorporeal delivery of aerosols was investigated using a physical model of neonatal conducting airways. METHODS: The main characteristics of the surfactant and PFC aerosols produced by a nebulization system, including the distal air pressure and air flow rate, liquid flow rate and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD, were measured at different driving pressures (4-7 bar. Then, a three-dimensional model of the upper conducting airways of a neonate was manufactured by rapid prototyping and a deposition study was conducted. RESULTS: The nebulization system produced relatively large amounts of aerosol ranging between 0.3±0.0 ml/min for surfactant at a driving pressure of 4 bar, and 2.0±0.1 ml/min for distilled water (H2Od at 6 bar, with MMADs between 2.61±0.1 µm for PFD at 7 bar and 10.18±0.4 µm for FC-75 at 6 bar. The deposition study showed that for surfactant and H2Od aerosols, the highest percentage of the aerosolized mass (∼65% was collected beyond the third generation of branching in the airway model. The use of this delivery system in combination with continuous positive airway pressure set at 5 cmH2O only increased total airway pressure by 1.59 cmH2O at the highest driving pressure (7 bar. CONCLUSION: This aerosol generating system has the potential to deliver relatively large amounts of surfactant and PFC beyond the third generation of branching in a neonatal airway model with minimal alteration of pre-set respiratory support.

  15. Characterization of Particle Size Distributions of Powdery Building Material Aerosol Generated by Fluidization and Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Prasauskas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify particle size distributions (PSD of aerosol of powdery building materials commonly used in construction work (cement, chalk, clay, wood sawdust, wood grinding dust, gypsum, hydrated lime, masonry grout, quartz sand, sand and structural lime by two aerosolization methods: fluidization and gravitation. Fluidization and gravitation methods represent industrial activities such as pneumotransportation and unloading. Both particle resuspension mechanisms have been modelled in laboratory conditions. The particle size distributions of resuspended particulate matter from powdery building materials were rather similar identified by both fluidization and gravitation methods, with an exception of wood sawdust and sand. The PM10 fraction ranged between 30% and 87%, PM2.5 from 7% to 28% and PM1.0 from 3% to 7% of the total mass of particulate matter. The highest PM10/PMtotal ratio was calculated for masonry grout - 0.87, and the lowest ratio for quartz sand - 0.30. The highest ratio of PM2.5/PMtotal was calculated for sand - 0.23, the lowest for quartz sand - 0.07. Substantial quantities of PM2.5 were found to be emitted implying a potential threat to human health.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.61.3.1519

  16. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are.

    The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation.

    The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas. Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance

  17. Investigations of Global Chemistry-Climate Interactions and Organic Aerosol Using Atmospheric Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Havala Olson Taylor

    Aerosol, or particulate matter (PM), is an important component of the atmosphere responsible for negative health impacts, environmental degradation, reductions in visibility, and climate change. In this work, the global chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem, is used as a tool to examine chemistry-climate interactions and organic aerosols. GEOS-Chem is used to simulate present-day (year 2000) and future (year 2050) sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium aerosols and investigate the potential effects of changes in climate and emissions on global budgets and U.S. air quality. Changes in a number of meteorological parameters, such as temperature and precipitation, are potentially important for aerosols and could lead to increases or decreases in PM concentrations. Although projected changes in sulfate and nitrate precursor emissions favor lower PM concentrations over the U.S., projected increases in ammonia emissions could result in higher nitrate concentrations. The organic aerosol simulation in GEOS-Chem is updated to include aerosol from primary semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCS), intermediate volatility compounds (IVOCs), NOx dependent terpene aerosol, and aerosol from isoprene + NO3 reaction. SVOCs are identified as the largest global source of organic aerosol even though their atmospheric transformation is highly uncertain and emissions are probably underestimated. As a result of significant nighttime terpene emissions, fast reaction of monoterpenes with the nitrate radical, and high aerosol yields from NO3 oxidation, biogenic hydrocarbons reacting with the nitrate radical are expected to be a major contributor to surface level aerosol concentrations in anthropogenically influenced areas such as the United States. Globally, 69 to 88 Tg/yr of aerosol is predicted to be produced annually, approximately 22 to 24 Tg/yr of which is from biogenic hydrocarbons.

  18. Climate response due to carbonaceous aerosols and aerosol-induced SST effects in NCAR community atmospheric model CAM3.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-C. Hsieh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study used the Community Atmospheric Model 3.5 (CAM3.5 to investigate the effects of carbonaceous aerosols on climate. The simulations include control runs with 3 times the mass of carbonaceous aerosols as compared to the model's default carbonaceous aerosol mass, as well as no-carbon runs in which carbonaceous aerosols were removed. The slab ocean model (SOM and the fixed sea surface temperature (SST were used to examine effects of ocean boundary conditions. Throughout this study, climate response induced by aerosol forcing was mainly analyzed in the following three terms: (1 aerosol radiative effects under fixed SST, (2 effects of aerosol-induced SST feedbacks, and (3 total effects including effects of aerosol forcing and SST feedbacks. The change of SST induced by aerosols has large impacts on distribution of climate response; the magnitudes in response patterns such as temperature, precipitation, zonal winds, mean meridional circulation, radiative fluxes, and cloud coverage are different between the SOM and fixed SST runs. Moreover, different spatial responses between the SOM and fixed SST runs can also be seen in some local areas. This implies the importance of SST feedbacks on simulated climate response. The aerosol dimming effects cause a cooling predicted at low layers near the surface in most carbonaceous aerosol source regions. The temperature response shows a warming (cooling predicted in the north (south high latitudes, suggesting that aerosol forcing can cause climate change in regions far away from its origins. Our simulation results show that direct and semidirect radiative forcing due to carbonaceous aerosols decreases rainfall in the tropics. This implies that carbonaceous aerosols have possibly strong influence on weakening of the tropical circulation. Most changes in precipitation are negatively correlated with changes of radiative fluxes at the top of model. The changes in radiative fluxes at top of model are physically

  19. Studying electromagnetic interference spectrum in antenna under aircraft radome using models with artificial charged aerosol clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temnikov, A. G.; Gilyazov, M. Z.; Matveev, D. A.; Voronkova, A. Yu.; Chernenskii, L. L.; Orlov, A. V.

    2011-09-01

    The spectrum of electromagnetic interference that is induced by discharges in an antenna arranged under an aircraft radome in an artificial charged aqueous aerosol cloud has been experimentally studied. It is established that, among different possible variants of lightning-arrest radomes, the minimum level of the spectral density of interference signals in the antenna is provided by vertical stripe electrodes on the radome surface. The maximum characteristic frequencies of signals in a model spherical antenna are several times lower than those in model lightning diverters, while the flat model antennas of disk or rectangular shapes exhibit the opposite trend. It has been suggested that a significant role in determining the characteristics of the electromagnetic interference spectrum in weather radar antennas is played by currents of discharges generated by charges accumulated on the dielectric radome surface.

  20. CCN activation and cloud processing in sectional aerosol models with low size resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, H.; V.-M. Kerminen; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.

    2005-01-01

    International audience We investigate the influence of low size resolution, typical to sectional aerosol models in large scale applications, on cloud droplet activation and cloud processing of aerosol particles. A simplified cloud model with five approaches to determine the fraction of activated particles is compared with a detailed reference model under different atmospheric conditions. In general, activation approaches which assume a distribution profile within the critical model size se...

  1. Lidar signal simulation for the evaluation of aerosols in chemistry transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stromatas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an adaptable tool, the OPTSIM (OPTical properties SIMulation software, for the simulation of optical properties and lidar attenuated backscattered profiles (β' from aerosol concentrations calculated by chemistry transport models (CTM. It was developed to model both Level 1 observations and Level 2 aerosol lidar retrievals in order to compare model results to measurements: the level 2 enables to estimate the main properties of aerosols plume structures, but may be limited due to specific assumptions. The level 1, originally developed for this tool, gives access to more information about aerosols properties (β' requiring, at the same time, less hypothesis on aerosols types. In addition to an evaluation of the aerosol loading and optical properties, active remote sensing allows the analysis of aerosols' vertical structures. An academic case study for two different species (black carbon and dust is presented and shows the consistency of the simulator. Illustrations are then given through the analysis of dust events in the Mediterranean region during the summer 2007. These are based on simulations by the CHIMERE regional CTM and observations from the CALIOP space-based lidar, and highlight the potential of this approach to evaluate the concentration, size and vertical structure of the aerosol plumes.

  2. Model of optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondo, Torsten; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Svensmark, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    by different sensitivities of the probing wavelengths to changes in aerosol number concentration and size. For the long wavelengths these changes are generally smaller. The types and magnitude of change is investigated for a suite of nucleation rates, condensable gas production rates, and aerosol loss rates...

  3. Experimental investigations on carbonation of sodium aerosol generated from sodium fire in the context of fast reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Investigated carbonation of aerosol released from sodium fire. • Investigated influence of % RH and CO2 content in air on carbonation process. • Deployed a novel technique for assay of different specimens in Na-aerosol. • This work can be used to predict chemical assay of aerosols in large sodium fire. - Abstract: Carbonation of sodium aerosols is the most important aspects to be considered for the evaluation of chemical hazards as a part of fast reactor safety studies. The sodium oxide, immediately formed as the combustion product due to sodium fire, undergoes chemical changes to NaOH, Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 upon reactions with moisture and CO2 prevailed in the atmosphere. Of which, hydroxide aerosols are highly corrosive and harmful, and it has stringent concentration limit for human exposure. Hence, in order to assess the condition for human intervention in the event of sodium fire, chemical composition of aerosols resulting from controlled sodium fires in a closed Aerosol Test Facility was investigated. The real time chemical species of aerosols generated from sodium fire and the effect of relative humidity (RH) and carbon dioxide concentration in air on carbonation have been studied. The experiments were carried out with the initial mass concentration of ∼4 g m−3, RH between 20% and 90% and the CO2 concentration in surrounding environment at 390 and 280 ppm. It is observed from the experimental study that aerosols are enriched with NaOH (0.8 mol fraction) in the beginning stage (samples collected during first few minutes after sodium fire) when surrounding atmosphere contains any of the following compositions – (i) ∼90% RH and 390 ppm CO2, (ii) ∼90% RH and 280 ppm CO2 or (iii) 50% RH and 280 ppm CO2 whereas they are almost equally distributed between NaOH and Na2CO3 in the beginning stage when the atmosphere has any of the compositions (i) 50% RH, 390 ppm CO2, (ii) 20% RH, 390 ppm CO2 or (iii) 20% RH, 280 ppm CO2. Carbonation of

  4. Cosmic rays, aerosol formation and cloud-condensation nuclei: sensitivities to model uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Snow-Kropla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The flux of cosmic rays to the atmosphere has been observed to correlate with cloud and aerosol properties. One proposed mechanism for these correlations is the "ion-aerosol clear-air" mechanism where the cosmic rays modulate atmospheric ion concentrations, ion-induced nucleation of aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations. We use a global chemical transport model with online aerosol microphysics to explore the dependence of CCN concentrations on the cosmic-ray flux. Expanding upon previous work, we test the sensitivity of the cosmic-ray/CCN connection to several uncertain parameters in the model including primary emissions, Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA condensation and charge-enhanced condensational growth. The sensitivity of CCN to cosmic rays increases when simulations are run with decreased primary emissions, but show location-dependent behavior from increased amounts of secondary organic aerosol and charge-enhanced growth. For all test cases, the change in the concentration of particles larger than 80 nm between solar minimum (high cosmic ray flux and solar maximum (low cosmic ray flux simulations is less than 0.2%. The change in the total number of particles larger than 10 nm was larger, but always less than 1%. The simulated change in the column-integrated Ångström exponent was negligible for all test cases. Additionally, we test the predicted aerosol sensitivity to week-long Forbush decreases of cosmic rays and find that the maximum change in aerosol properties for these cases is similar to steady-state aerosol differences between the solar maximum and solar minimum. These results provide evidence that the effect of cosmic rays on CCN and clouds through the ion-aerosol clear-sky mechanism is limited by dampening from aerosol processes.

  5. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean – potential impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Astitha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates, natural (desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, indicating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols shows that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud, and by entrainment. The sodium (sea salt related aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  6. Aerosols generated by releases of pressurized powders and solutions in static air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases caused by accidents. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop the source terms for these releases. An upper boundary accidental release event would be a pressurized release of powder or liquid in static air. Experiments were run using various source sizes and pressures and measuring the mass airborne and the particle size distribution of aerosols produced by these pressurized releases. Two powder and two liquid sources were used: TiO2 and depleted uranium dioxide (DUO); and aqueous uranine (sodium fluorescein) and uranyl nitrate solutions. Results of the experiments showed that pressurization level and source size were significant variables for the airborne powder releases. For this experimental configuration, the liquid releases were a function of pressure, but volume did not appear to be a significant variable. During the experiments 100 g and 350 g of DUO (1 μm dia) and TiO2 (1.7 μm dia) powders and 100 cm3 and 350 cm3 of uranine and uranyl nitrate solutions were released at pressures ranging from 50 to 500 psig. The average of the largest fractions of powder airborne was about 24%. The maximum amount of liquid source airborne was significantly less, about 0.15%. The median aerodynamic equivalent diameters (AED) for collected airborne powders ranged from 5 to 19 μm; liquids ranged from 2 to 29 μm. All of the releases produced a significant fraction of respirable particles of 10 μm and less. 12 references, 10 figures, 23 tables

  7. Development of a global model of mineral dust aerosol microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A mineral dust module is developed and implemented into the global aerosol microphysics model, GISS-TOMAS. The model is evaluated against long-term measurements of dust surface mass concentrations and deposition fluxes. Predicted mass concentrations and deposition fluxes are in error on average by a factor of 3 and 5, respectively. The comparison shows that the model performs better near the dust source regions but underestimates surface concentrations and deposition fluxes in more remote regions. Including only sites with measured dust concentrations of at least 0.5 μg m−3, the model prediction agrees with observations to within a factor of 2. It was hypothesized that the lifetime of dust, 2.6 days in our base case, is too short and causes the underestimation in remote areas. However, a sensitivity simulation with smaller dust particles and increased lifetime, 3.7 days, does not significantly improve the comparison. These results suggest that the underestimation of mineral dust in remote areas may result from local factors/sources not well described by the global dust source function used here or the GCM meteorology. The effect of dust aerosols on CCN(0.2% concentrations is negligible in most regions of the globe; however, CCN(0.2% concentrations change decrease by 10–20% in dusty regions the impact of dust on CCN(0.2% concentrations in dusty regions is very sensitive to the assumed size distribution of emissions. If emissions are predominantly in the coarse mode, CCN(0.2% decreases in dusty regions up to 10–20% because dust competes for condensable H2SO4, reducing the condensational growth of ultrafine mode particles to CCN sizes. With significant fine mode emissions, however, CCN(0.2% doubles in Saharan source regions because the direct emission of dust particles outweighs any microphysical feedbacks. The impact of dust on CCN concentrations active at various water supersaturations is also investigated

  8. A simplified model of aerosol removal by natural processes in reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simplified formulae are developed for estimating the aerosol decontamination that can be achieved by natural processes in the containments of pressurized water reactors and in the drywells of boiling water reactors under severe accident conditions. These simplified formulae were derived by correlation of results of Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of detailed models of aerosol behavior under accident conditions. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of decontamination by natural aerosol processes are reported for 1,000, 2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 MW(th) pressurized water reactors and for 1,500, 2,500, and 3,500 MW(th) boiling water reactors. Uncertainty distributions for the decontamination factors and decontamination coefficients as functions of time were developed in the Monte Carlo analyses by considering uncertainties in aerosol processes, material properties, reactor geometry and severe accident progression. Phenomenological uncertainties examined in this work included uncertainties in aerosol coagulation by gravitational collision, Brownian diffusion, turbulent diffusion and turbulent inertia. Uncertainties in aerosol deposition by gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and turbulent diffusion were examined. Electrostatic charging of aerosol particles in severe accidents is discussed. Such charging could affect both the coagulation and deposition of aerosol particles. Electrostatic effects are not considered in most available models of aerosol behavior during severe accidents and cause uncertainties in predicted natural decontamination processes that could not be taken in to account in this work. Median (50%), 90 and 10% values of the uncertainty distributions for effective decontamination coefficients were correlated with time and reactor thermal power. These correlations constitute a simplified model that can be used to estimate the decontamination by natural aerosol processes at 3 levels of conservatism. Applications of the model are described

  9. A simplified model of aerosol removal by natural processes in reactor containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A.; Washington, K.E.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burson, S.B. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Simplified formulae are developed for estimating the aerosol decontamination that can be achieved by natural processes in the containments of pressurized water reactors and in the drywells of boiling water reactors under severe accident conditions. These simplified formulae were derived by correlation of results of Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of detailed models of aerosol behavior under accident conditions. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of decontamination by natural aerosol processes are reported for 1,000, 2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 MW(th) pressurized water reactors and for 1,500, 2,500, and 3,500 MW(th) boiling water reactors. Uncertainty distributions for the decontamination factors and decontamination coefficients as functions of time were developed in the Monte Carlo analyses by considering uncertainties in aerosol processes, material properties, reactor geometry and severe accident progression. Phenomenological uncertainties examined in this work included uncertainties in aerosol coagulation by gravitational collision, Brownian diffusion, turbulent diffusion and turbulent inertia. Uncertainties in aerosol deposition by gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and turbulent diffusion were examined. Electrostatic charging of aerosol particles in severe accidents is discussed. Such charging could affect both the coagulation and deposition of aerosol particles. Electrostatic effects are not considered in most available models of aerosol behavior during severe accidents and cause uncertainties in predicted natural decontamination processes that could not be taken in to account in this work. Median (50%), 90 and 10% values of the uncertainty distributions for effective decontamination coefficients were correlated with time and reactor thermal power. These correlations constitute a simplified model that can be used to estimate the decontamination by natural aerosol processes at 3 levels of conservatism. Applications of the model are described.

  10. Generation of a CALIPSO climatology of near-surface boundary layer aerosols for solar energy applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mancera Guevara, Diana R.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols are highly variable in time and space. Along with water vapour they are the biggest contributors to extinction of radiation at Earth´s surface. As a consequence they affect the energy yield in CSP (Concentrated Solar Power) plants. This study aims to describe the presence of aerosols in the lowest portion of the Planet Boundary Layer in order to provide a starting point to characterize aerosol vertical profiles. This information might provide additional information useful for the ear...

  11. Reproducing the optical properties of fine desert dust aerosols using ensembles of simple model particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single scattering optical properties are calculated for a proxy of fine dust aerosols at a wavelength of 0.55 μm. Spherical and spheroidal model particles are employed to fit the aerosol optical properties and to retrieve information about the physical parameters characterising the aerosols. It is found that spherical particles are capable of reproducing the scalar optical properties and the forward peak of the phase function of the dust aerosols. The effective size parameter of the aerosol ensemble is retrieved with high accuracy by using spherical model particles. Significant improvements are achieved by using spheroidal model particles. The aerosol phase function and the other diagonal elements of the Stokes scattering matrix can be fitted with high accuracy, whereas the off-diagonal elements are poorly reproduced. More elongated prolate and more flattened oblate spheroids contribute disproportionately strongly to the optimised shape distribution of the model particles and appear to be particularly useful for achieving a good fit of the scattering matrix. However, the clear discrepancies between the shape distribution of the aerosols and the shape distribution of the spheroidal model particles suggest that the possibilities of extracting shape information from optical observations are rather limited

  12. Organic aerosols associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by water-soluble PM2.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vishal; Fang, Ting; Xu, Lu; Peltier, Richard E; Russell, Armistead G; Ng, Nga Lee; Weber, Rodney J

    2015-04-01

    We compare the relative toxicity of various organic aerosol (OA) components identified by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) based on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ambient fine aerosols were collected from urban (three in Atlanta, GA and one in Birmingham, AL) and rural (Yorkville, GA and Centerville, AL) sites in the Southeastern United States. The ROS generating capability of the water-soluble fraction of the particles was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Water-soluble PM extracts were further separated into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions using a C-18 column, and both fractions were analyzed for DTT activity and water-soluble metals. Organic aerosol composition was measured at selected sites using a high-resolution time-of-flight AMS. Positive matrix factorization of the AMS spectra resolved the organic aerosol into isoprene-derived OA (Isop_OA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), less-oxidized oxygenated OA, (LO-OOA), more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), cooking OA (COA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA). The association of the DTT activity of water-soluble PM2.5 (WS_DTT) with these factors was investigated by linear regression techniques. BBOA and MO-OOA were most consistently linked with WS_DTT, with intrinsic water-soluble activities of 151 ± 20 and 36 ± 22 pmol/min/μg, respectively. Although less toxic, MO-OOA was most widespread, contributing to WS_DTT activity at all sites and during all seasons. WS_DTT activity was least associated with biogenic secondary organic aerosol. The OA components contributing to WS_DTT were humic-like substances (HULIS), which are abundantly emitted in biomass burning (BBOA) and include highly oxidized OA from multiple sources (MO-OOA). Overall, OA contributed approximately 60% to the WS_DTT activity, with the remaining probably from water-soluble metals, which were mostly associated with the hydrophilic WS_DTT fraction. PMID:25748105

  13. Characterization of secondary organic aerosol generated from ozonolysis of α-pinene mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hardik S.; Hatfield, Meagan L.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

    2013-03-01

    In the atmosphere, multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) co-exist, and they can be oxidized concurrently and generate secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work, SOA is formed by the oxidation (in presence of excess ozone) of mixtures containing α-pinene and other VOCs. The VOC mixtures were made so their composition approached a commercially-available α-pinene-based essential oil, Siberian fir needle oil. The SOA products were sampled using filters, solvent extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with trimethylsilyl derivatization. The individual product yields for SOA generated from α-pinene changed upon the addition of other VOCs. An increase in concentration of non-reactive VOCs (bornyl acetate, camphene, and borneol) lead to a decrease in individual product yields of characteristic α-pinene SOA products. Although these experiments were carried out under higher VOC and ozone concentrations in comparison to the atmosphere, this work suggests that the role of non-reactive VOCs should be explored in SOA products formation.

  14. Aerosol-cloud interactions in the NASA GMI: model development and indirect forcing assessments

    OpenAIRE

    N. Meskhidze; R. E. P. Sotiropoulou; Nenes, A.; J. Kouatchou; Das, B.; Rodriguez, J. M

    2007-01-01

    This study uses the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) for assessments of indirect forcing and its sensitivity to the treatment of aerosol, aerosol-cloud interactions and meteorological fields. Three different meteorological datasets from NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO), NASA finite volume GCM (FVGCM) and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies version II' (GISS II') GCM were used. GMI is ideal for this study as different model components (s...

  15. CCN activation and cloud processing in simplified sectional aerosol models with low size resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, H.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.

    2005-01-01

    International audience We investigate the influence of low size resolution, typical to sectional aerosol models in large scale applications, on cloud droplet activation and cloud processing of aerosol particles. A simplified cloud scheme with five approaches to determine the fraction of activated particles is compared with a detailed reference model under different atmospheric conditions. In general, activation approaches which assume a distribution profile within the critical model size s...

  16. Investigation of Multi-decadal Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over North America using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Wong, D.; Wei, C.; Xing, J.; Gan, M.; Yu, S.; Binkowski, F.

    2012-12-01

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, there has been little effort devoted to verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing. A comprehensive investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects and verification of their simulated effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in order to build confidence in the estimates of the projected impacts arising from changes in both anthropogenic forcing and climate change. This study aims at addressing this issue through a systematic investigation of changes in anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx over the past two decades in the United States, their impacts on anthropogenic aerosol loading in the North American troposphere, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. A newly developed 2-way coupled meteorology and air pollution model composed of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is being run for 20 years (1990 - 2010) on a 12 km resolution grid that covers most of North America including the entire conterminous US. During this period US emissions of SO2 and NOx have been reduced by about 66% and 50%, respectively, mainly due to Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA) that aimed to reduce emissions that contribute to acid deposition. A methodology is developed to consistently estimate emission inventories for the 20-year period accounting for air quality regulations as well as population trends, economic conditions, and technology changes in motor vehicles and electric power generation. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model includes detailed treatment of direct effects of aerosols on photolysis rates as well as on shortwave radiation and the direct effects of tropospheric ozone on the long

  17. Coupling aerosol optics to the MATCH (v5.5.0) chemical transport model and the SALSA (v1) aerosol microphysics module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Emma; Kahnert, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A new aerosol-optics model is implemented in which realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon particles. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey-shell" model. Simulated results of aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical depth, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent, as well as radiative fluxes are computed with the new optics model and compared with results from an older optics-model version that treats all particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing state impacts the aerosol optical properties to a degree of the same order of magnitude as the effects of aerosol-microphysical processes. For instance, the aerosol optical depth computed for two cases in 2007 shows a relative difference between the two optics models that varies over the European region between -28 and 18 %, while the differences caused by the inclusion or omission of the aerosol-microphysical processes range from -50 to 37 %. This is an important finding, suggesting that a simple optics model coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors affecting radiative fluxes in chemistry-climate models, compromising comparisons of model results with remote sensing observations of aerosols, and impeding the assimilation of satellite products for aerosols into chemical-transport models.

  18. Evaluation of VIIRS AOD over North China Plain: biases from aerosol models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Xia, X.; Wang, J.; Chen, H.; Zhang, J.; Oo, M. M.; Holz, R.

    2014-12-01

    With the launch of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suit (VIIRS) instrument onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership(S-NPP) in late 2011, the aerosol products of VIIRS are receiving much attention.To date, mostevaluations of VIIRS aerosol productswere carried out about aerosol optical depth (AOD). To further assess the VIIRS AOD in China which is a heavy polluted region in the world,we made a comparison between VIIRS AOD and CE-318 radiometerobservation at the following three sites overNorth China Plain (NCP): metropolis-Beijing (AERONET), suburbs-XiangHe (AERONET) and regional background site- Xinglong (CARSNET).The results showed the VIIRS AOD at 550 nm has a positive mean bias error (MBE) of 0.14-0.15 and root mean square error (RMBE) 0.20. Among three sites, Beijing is mainly a source of bias with MBE 0.17-0.18 and RMBE 0.23-0.24, and this bias is larger than some recent global statics recently published in the literature. Further analysis shows that this large bias in VIIRS AOD overNCP may be partly caused by the aerosol model selection in VIIRS aerosol inversion. According to the retrieval of sky radiance from CE-318 at three sites, aerosols in NCP have high mean real part of refractive indices (1.52-1.53), large volume mean radius (0.17-0.18) and low concentration (0.04-0.09) of fine aerosol, and small mean radius (2.86-2.92) and high concentration (0.06-0.16) of coarse mode aerosol. These observation-based aerosol single scattering properties and size of fine and coarse aerosols differ fromthe aerosol properties used in VIIRSoperational algorithm.The dominant aerosol models used in VIIRS algorithm for these three sites are less polluted urban aerosol in Beijing and low-absorption smoke in other two sites, all of which don't agree with the high imaginary part of refractive indices from CE-318 retrieval. Therefore, the aerosol models in VIIRS algorithm are likely to be refined in NCP region.

  19. Aerosol nucleation and its role for clouds and Earth's radiative forcing in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kazil

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nucleation from the gas phase is an important source of aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, contributing to the number of cloud condensation nuclei, which form cloud droplets. We have implemented in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM a new scheme for neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water based on laboratory data, and nucleation of an organic compound and sulfuric acid using a parametrization of cluster activation based on field measurements. We give details of the implementation, compare results with observations, and investigate the role of the individual aerosol nucleation mechanisms for clouds and the Earth's radiative budget. The results of our simulations are most consistent with observations when neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid proceed throughout the troposphere and nucleation due to cluster activation is limited to the forested boundary layer. The globally averaged annual mean contributions of the individual nucleation processes to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation via the direct, semi-direct, indirect cloud-albedo and cloud-lifetime effects in our simulations are −1.15 W/m2 for charged H2SO4/H2O nucleation, −0.235 W/m2 for cluster activation, and −0.05 W/m2 for neutral H2SO4/H2O nucleation. The overall effect of nucleation is −2.55 W/m2, which exceeds the sum of the individual terms due to feedbacks and interactions in the model. Aerosol nucleation contributes over the oceans with −2.18 W/m2 to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation, compared to −0.37 W/m2 over land. We explain the higher effect of aerosol nucleation on Earth's radiative budget over the oceans with the larger area covered by ocean clouds, due to the larger contrast in albedo between clouds and the ocean surface compared to continents, and the larger susceptibility of

  20. Case study of modeled aerosol optical properties during the SAFARI 2000 campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Box, Michael A; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B; Redemann, Jens

    2007-08-01

    We present modeled aerosol optical properties (single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and lidar ratio) in two layers with different aerosol loadings and particle sizes, observed during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2,000 (SAFARI 2,000) campaign. The optical properties were calculated from aerosol size distributions retrieved from aerosol layer optical thickness spectra, measured using the NASA Ames airborne tracking 14-channel sunphotometer (AATS-14) and the refractive index based on the available information on aerosol chemical composition. The study focuses on sensitivity of modeled optical properties in the 0.3-1.5 microm wavelength range to assumptions regarding the mixing scenario. We considered two models for the mixture of absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol components commonly used to model optical properties of biomass burning aerosol: a layered sphere with absorbing core and nonabsorbing shell and the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium model. In addition, comparisons of modeled optical properties with the measurements are discussed. We also estimated the radiative effect of the difference in aerosol absorption implied by the large difference between the single scattering albedo values (approximately 0.1 at midvisible wavelengths) obtained from different measurement methods for the case with a high amount of biomass burning particles. For that purpose, the volume fraction of black carbon was varied to obtain a range of single scattering albedo values (0.81-0.91 at lambda=0.50 microm). The difference in absorption resulted in a significant difference in the instantaneous radiative forcing at the surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and can result in a change of the sign of the aerosol forcing at TOA from negative to positive.

  1. Response of different regional online coupled models to aerosol-radiation interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, Renate; Balzarini, Alessandra; Brunner, Dominik; Baró, Rocio; Curci, Gabriele; Hirtl, Marcus; Honzak, Luka; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San José, Roberto; Schröder, Wolfram; Tuccella, Paolo; Werhahn, Johannes; Wolke, Ralf; Žabkar, Rahela

    2016-04-01

    The importance of aerosol-meteorology interactions and their representation in online coupled regional atmospheric chemistry-meteorology models was investigated in COST Action ES1004 (EuMetChem, http://eumetchem.info/). Case study results from different models (COSMO-Muscat, COSMO-ART, and different configurations of WRF-Chem), which were applied for Europe as a coordinated exercise for the year 2010, are analyzed with respect to inter-model variability and the response of the different models to direct and indirect aerosol-radiation interactions. The main focus was on two episodes - the Russian heat wave and wildfires episode in July/August 2010 and a period in October 2010 with enhanced cloud cover and rain and including an of Saharan dust transport to Europe. Looking at physical plausibility the decrease in downward solar radiation and daytime temperature due to the direct aerosol effect is robust for all model configurations. The same holds for the pronounced decrease in cloud water content and increase in solar radiation for cloudy conditions and very low aerosol concentrations that was found for WRF-Chem when aerosol cloud interactions were considered. However, when the differences were tested for statistical significance no significant differences in mean solar radiation and mean temperature between the baseline case and the simulations including the direct and indirect effect from simulated aerosol concentrations were found over Europe for the October episode. Also for the fire episode differences between mean temperature and radiation from the simulations with and without the direct aerosol effect were not significant for the major part of the modelling domain. Only for the region with high fire emissions in Russia, the differences in mean solar radiation and temperature due to the direct effect were found to be significant during the second half of the fire episode - however only for a significance level of 0.1. The few observational data indicate that

  2. Relationship between aerosol characteristics and altitude based on multi-measurements and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Makiko; Ohshima, Tsubasa; Fujito, Toshiyuki; Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo

    2010-10-01

    The suspending particulate matter (PM2.5) is a typical indicator of small particles in the atmosphere. Accordingly in order to monitor the air quality, sampling of PM2.5 has been widely undertaken over the world, especially in the urban cities. On the other hand, it is known that the sun photometry provides us with the aerosol information, e.g. aerosol optical thickness (AOT), aerosol size information and so on. Simultaneous measurements of PM2.5 and the AOT have been performed at a NASA/AERONET (Aerosol Robotics Network) site in urban city of Higashi-Osaka in Japan since March 2004, and successfully provided a linear correlation between PM2.5 and AOT in separately considering with several cases, e.g. usual, anthropogenic aerosols, dust aerosols and so on. This fact suggests that the vertical distribution also should be taken into account separately for each aerosol type. In this work, vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosols are considered based on combination use of photometric data with AERONET, LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measurements and model simulations.

  3. Multi-generation gas-phase oxidation, equilibrium partitioning, and the formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Cappa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new statistical model of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation is developed that explicitly takes into account multi-generational oxidation as well as fragmentation of gas-phase compounds. The model framework requires three tunable parameters to describe the kinetic evolution of SOA mass, the average oxygen-to-carbon atomic ratio and the mean particle volatility as oxidation proceeds. These parameters describe (1 the relationship between oxygen content and volatility, (2 the probability of fragmentation and (3 the amount of oxygen added per reaction. The time-evolution and absolute value of the SOA mass depends sensitively on all three tunable parameters. Of the tunable parameters, the mean O:C is most sensitive to the oxygen/volatility relationship, exhibiting only a weak dependence on the other two. The mean particle O:C produced from a given compound is primarily controlled by the number of carbon atoms comprising the SOA precursor. It is found that gas-phase compounds with larger than 11 carbon atoms are unlikely to form SOA with O:C values >0.4, which suggests that so-called "intermediate-volatility" organic compounds (IVOCs and "semi-volatile" organic compounds (SVOCs are not major contributors to the ambient SOA burden when high O:C ratios are observed, especially at short atmospheric times. The model is tested against laboratory measurements of SOA formation from the photooxidation of α-pinene and n-pentadecane and performs well (after tuning. This model may provide a generalized framework for the interpretation of laboratory SOA formation experiments in which explicit consideration of multiple-generations of products is required, which is true for all photo-oxidation experiments.

  4. Simulation test of aerosol generation from vessels in the pre-treatment system of fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujine, Sachio; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kihara, Takehiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Aerosol concentration and droplet size are measured in off-gas of vessel under various conditions by changing off-gas flow rate, stirring air flow rate, salts concentration and temperature of nitrate solution. Aerosols are also measured under evaporation and air-lift operation. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Glyoxal processing by aerosol multiphase chemistry: towards a kinetic modeling framework of secondary organic aerosol formation in aqueous particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ervens

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a modeling framework based on laboratory data to describe the kinetics of glyoxal reactions that form secondary organic aerosol (SOA in aqueous aerosol particles. Recent laboratory results on glyoxal reactions are reviewed and a consistent set of empirical reaction rate constants is derived that captures the kinetics of glyoxal hydration and subsequent reversible and irreversible reactions in aqueous inorganic and water-soluble organic aerosol seeds. Products of these processes include (a oligomers, (b nitrogen-containing products, (c photochemical oxidation products with high molecular weight. These additional aqueous phase processes enhance the SOA formation rate in particles and yield two to three orders of magnitude more SOA than predicted based on reaction schemes for dilute aqueous phase (cloud chemistry for the same conditions (liquid water content, particle size.

    The application of the new module including detailed chemical processes in a box model demonstrates that both the time scale to reach aqueous phase equilibria and the choice of rate constants of irreversible reactions have a pronounced effect on the predicted atmospheric relevance of SOA formation from glyoxal. During day time, a photochemical (most likely radical-initiated process is the major SOA formation pathway forming ∼5 μg m−3 SOA over 12 h (assuming a constant glyoxal mixing ratio of 300 ppt. During night time, reactions of nitrogen-containing compounds (ammonium, amines, amino acids contribute most to the predicted SOA mass; however, the absolute predicted SOA masses are reduced by an order of magnitude as compared to day time production. The contribution of the ammonium reaction significantly increases in moderately acidic or neutral particles (5 < pH < 7.

    Glyoxal uptake into ammonium sulfate seed under dark conditions can be represented with a single reaction parameter keffupt that does not depend

  6. Glyoxal processing by aerosol multiphase chemistry: towards a kinetic modeling framework of secondary organic aerosol formation in aqueous particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervens, B.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-09-01

    This study presents a modeling framework based on laboratory data to describe the kinetics of glyoxal reactions that form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in aqueous aerosol particles. Recent laboratory results on glyoxal reactions are reviewed and a consistent set of empirical reaction rate constants is derived that captures the kinetics of glyoxal hydration and subsequent reversible and irreversible reactions in aqueous inorganic and water-soluble organic aerosol seeds. Products of these processes include (a) oligomers, (b) nitrogen-containing products, (c) photochemical oxidation products with high molecular weight. These additional aqueous phase processes enhance the SOA formation rate in particles and yield two to three orders of magnitude more SOA than predicted based on reaction schemes for dilute aqueous phase (cloud) chemistry for the same conditions (liquid water content, particle size). The application of the new module including detailed chemical processes in a box model demonstrates that both the time scale to reach aqueous phase equilibria and the choice of rate constants of irreversible reactions have a pronounced effect on the predicted atmospheric relevance of SOA formation from glyoxal. During day time, a photochemical (most likely radical-initiated) process is the major SOA formation pathway forming ∼5 μg m-3 SOA over 12 h (assuming a constant glyoxal mixing ratio of 300 ppt). During night time, reactions of nitrogen-containing compounds (ammonium, amines, amino acids) contribute most to the predicted SOA mass; however, the absolute predicted SOA masses are reduced by an order of magnitude as compared to day time production. The contribution of the ammonium reaction significantly increases in moderately acidic or neutral particles (5 < pH < 7). Glyoxal uptake into ammonium sulfate seed under dark conditions can be represented with a single reaction parameter keffupt that does not depend on aerosol loading or water content, which indicates a

  7. A Simple Model for the Cloud Adjacency Effect and the Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Wen, Guoyong; Coakley, James A., Jr.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Loeb,Norman G.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    In determining aerosol-cloud interactions, the properties of aerosols must be characterized in the vicinity of clouds. Numerous studies based on satellite observations have reported that aerosol optical depths increase with increasing cloud cover. Part of the increase comes from the humidification and consequent growth of aerosol particles in the moist cloud environment, but part comes from 3D cloud-radiative transfer effects on the retrieved aerosol properties. Often, discerning whether the observed increases in aerosol optical depths are artifacts or real proves difficult. The paper provides a simple model that quantifies the enhanced illumination of cloud-free columns in the vicinity of clouds that are used in the aerosol retrievals. This model is based on the assumption that the enhancement in the cloud-free column radiance comes from enhanced Rayleigh scattering that results from the presence of the nearby clouds. The enhancement in Rayleigh scattering is estimated using a stochastic cloud model to obtain the radiative flux reflected by broken clouds and comparing this flux with that obtained with the molecules in the atmosphere causing extinction, but no scattering.

  8. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Ding, A.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Takeamura, Toshihiko; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Shindell, D. T.; Partridge, Daniel; Stier, P.; Kipling, Z.; Fu, Congbin

    2016-03-04

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascend (ω500 < -25 hPa/d) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is as large as that in stratocumulus regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascend are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. 42" It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm/d) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64% to nearly 100%). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes than that globally, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.

  9. ISA-MIP: A co-ordinated intercomparison of Interactive Stratospheric Aerosol models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmreck, Claudia; Mann, Graham; Aquila, Valentina; Bruehl, Christoph; Chin, Mian; Dohmse, Sandip; English, Jason; Lee, Lindsay; Mills, Michael; Hommel, Rene; Neely, Ryan; Schmidt, Anja; Sheng, Jianxiong; Toohey, Matthew; Weisenstein, Debra

    2016-04-01

    The SPARC activity, "Stratospheric Sulfur and its Role in Climate" (SSiRC) was initiated to coordinate international research activities on modelling and observation of stratospheric sulphate aerosols (and precursor gases) in order to assess its climate forcing and feedback. With several international activities to extend and improve observational stratospheric aerosol capabilities and data sets, and a growing number of global models treating stratospheric aerosol interactively, a new model intercomparison activity "ISA-MIP" has been established in the frame of SSIRC. ISA-MIP will compare interactive stratospheric aerosol (ISA) models using a range of observations to constrain and improve the models and to provide a sound scientific basis for future work. Four ISA-MIP experiments have been designed to assess different periods of the obervational stratospheric aerosol record, and to explore key processes which influence the formation and temporal development of stratospheric aerosol. The "Background" experiment will focus on the role of microphysical and transport processes under volcanically quiescent conditions, where the stratospheric aerosol size distribution is only modulated by seasonal circulations. The "Model intercomparison of Transient Aerosol Record" (MiTAR) experiment will focus on addressing the role of small- to moderate-magnitude volcanic eruptions and transport processes in the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS) aerosols loading over the period 1998-2011. Background and MiTAR simulations will be compared to recent in-situ and satellite observations to evaluate the performances of the model and understand their strengths and weaknesses. Two further experiments investigate the radiative forcing from historical major eruptions. The Historical Eruptions SO2 Emission Assessment (HErSEA) will involve models carrying out mini-ensembles of the stratospheric aerosol perturbations from each of the 1963 Agung, 1982 El Chichon and 1991 Pinatubo

  10. Global modelling of direct and indirect effects of sea spray aerosol using a source function encapsulating wave state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Partanen, A.I.; Dunne, E.M.; Bergman, T.; Laakso, A.; Kokkola, H.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Sogacheva, L.; Baisnée, D.; Sciare, J.; Manders, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Leeuw, G. de; Korhonen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Recently developed parameterizations for the sea spray aerosol source flux, encapsulating wave state, and its organic fraction were incorporated into the aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to investigate the direct and indirect radiative effects of sea spray aerosol particles. Our simulated global s

  11. Assimilation of Polder aerosol optical thickness into LMD2-Inca model in order to study aerosol-climate interactions; Etude des interactions entre aerosols et climat: assimilation des observations spatiales de Polder dans LMDz-Inca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, S.

    2004-12-15

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget both through their direct (scattering and absorption of solar radiation) and indirect (impacts on cloud microphysics) effects. The anthropogenic perturbation due to aerosol emissions is of the same order of magnitude than the one due to greenhouse gases, but less well known. To improve our knowledge, we need to better know aerosol spatial and temporal distributions. Indeed, aerosol modeling still suffers from large uncertainties in sources and transport, while satellite observations are incomplete (no detection in the presence of clouds, no information on the vertical distribution or on the chemical nature). Moreover, field campaigns are localized in space and time. This study aims to reduce uncertainties in aerosol distributions, developing assimilation of satellite data into a chemical transport model. The basic idea is to combine information obtained from spatial observation (optical thickness) and modeling studies (aerosol types, vertical distribution). In this study, we assimilate data from the POLDER space-borne instrument into the LMDz-INCA model. The results show the advantage of merging information from different sources. In many regions, the method reduces uncertainties on aerosol distribution (reduction of RMS error). An application of the method to the study of aerosol impact on cloud microphysics is shown. (author)

  12. Why Is Improvement of Earth System Models So Elusive? Challenges and Strategies From Dust Aerosol Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. L.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Ginoux, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Past decades have seen an accelerating increase in computing efficiency,while climate models are representing a rapidly widening set ofphysical processes. Yet simulations of some fundamental aspects ofclimate like precipitation or aerosol forcing remain highly uncertainand resistent to progress. Dust aerosol modeling of soil particleslofted by wind erosion has seen a similar conflict between increasingmodel sophistication and remaining uncertainty. Dust aerosols perturbthe energy and water cycles by scattering radiation and acting as icenuclei, while mediating atmospheric chemistry and marinephotosynthesis (and thus the carbon cycle). These effects take placeacross scales from the dimensions of an ice crystal to theplanetary-scale circulation that disperses dust far downwind of itsparent soil. Representing this range leads to several modelingchallenges. Should we limit complexity in our model, which consumescomputer resources and inhibits interpretation? How do we decide if aprocess involving dust is worthy of inclusion within our model? Canwe identify a minimal representation of a complex process that isefficient yet retains the physics relevant to climate? Answeringthese questions about the appropriate degree of representation isguided by model evaluation, which presents several more challenges.How do we proceed if the available observations do not directlyconstrain our process of interest? (This could result from competingprocesses that influence the observed variable and obscure thesignature of our process of interest.) Examples will be presentedfrom dust modeling, with lessons that might be more broadlyapplicable. The end result will either be clinical depression or thereassuring promise of continued gainful employment as the communityconfronts these challenges.

  13. MATCH-SALSA – Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model – Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; H. Kokkola

    2015-01-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA (Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications) in the European-scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower c...

  14. Aerosol Simulation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during MCMA2003 using CMAQ/Models3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, N.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; de Foy, B.; Molina, L.

    2007-12-01

    CMAQ/Models3 has been employed to simulate the aerosol distribution and variation during the period from 13 to 16 April 2003 over the Mexico City Metropolitan Area as part of MCMA-2003 campaign. The meteorological fields are simulated using MM5, with three one-way nested grids with horizontal resolutions of 36, 12 and 3 km and 23 sigma levels in the vertical. MM5 3DVAR system has also been incorporated into the meteorological simulations. Chemical initial and boundary conditions are interpolated from the MOZART output. The SAPRC emission inventory is developed based on the official emission inventory for MCMA in 2004. The simulated mass concentrations of different aerosol compositions, such as elemental carbon (EC), primary organic aerosol (POA), secondary organic aerosol (SOA), nitrate, ammonium, and sulfate have been compared to the measurements taken at the National Center for Environmental Research and Training (Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental, CENICA) super-site. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) are used as observations of POA and SOA, respectively in this study. The preliminary model results show that the temporal evolutions of EC and POA are reasonable compared with measurements. The peak time of EC and POA are basically reproduced, thus validating the emission inventory and its processing through CMAQ/Models3. But the magnitude of EC and POA are underestimated over the entire episode. The modeled nitrate and ammonium concentrations are overestimated on most of the days. There is 1-2 hour difference between the simulated peak time of nitrate and ammonium aerosols compared to observations at CENICA. The simulated mass concentrations of SOA and sulfate are significantly underestimated. The reasons of the discrepancy between simulations and measurements are due to the uncertainties existing in the emission inventory, meteorological fields, and as well as aerosol formation mechanism in the case

  15. Effects of stratospheric aerosol surface processes on the LLNL two-dimensional zonally averaged model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the effects of incorporating representations of heterogeneous chemical processes associated with stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosol into the LLNL two-dimensional, zonally averaged, model of the troposphere and stratosphere. Using distributions of aerosol surface area and volume density derived from SAGE 11 satellite observations, we were primarily interested in changes in partitioning within the Cl- and N- families in the lower stratosphere, compared to a model including only gas phase photochemical reactions

  16. FlexibleSUSY -- A spectrum generator generator for supersymmetric models

    CERN Document Server

    Athron, Peter; Stöckinger, Dominik; Voigt, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We introduce FlexibleSUSY, a Mathematica and C++ package, which generates a fast, precise C++ spectrum generator for any SUSY model specified by the user. The generated code is designed with both speed and modularity in mind, making it easy to adapt and extend with new features. The model is specified by supplying the superpotential, gauge structure and particle content in a SARAH model file; specific boundary conditions e.g. at the GUT, weak or intermediate scales are defined in a separate FlexibleSUSY model file. From these model files, FlexibleSUSY generates C++ code for self-energies, tadpole corrections, renormalization group equations (RGEs) and electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) conditions and combines them with numerical routines for solving the RGEs and EWSB conditions simultaneously. The resulting spectrum generator is then able to solve for the spectrum of the model, including loop-corrected pole masses, consistent with user specified boundary conditions. The modular structure of the generated co...

  17. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  18. Microphysical Modeling and POAM III Observations of Aerosol Extinction in the 1998-2003 Antarctic Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, C. M.; Drdla, K.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Shettle, E. P.; Alfred, J.; Hoppel, K. W.

    2005-12-01

    The Integrated Microphysics and Chemistry on Trajectories (IMPACT) model is used to study Polar stratospheric cloud formation and evolution in the Southern Polar vortex during the 1998-2003 winters. The model is applied to individual air parcels which are advected through the vortex on UKMO wind and temperature fields. The parcel temperature and pressure histories are used by IMPACT to calculate the formation and sedimentation of ice, NAT, SAT, and STS aerosols. Model results are validated by the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III solar occultation instrument. Comparisons of POAM data to the model results help to constrain the microphysical parameters influencing aerosol formation and growth. Measurements of the water vapor mixing ratio are of limited use in clarifying the model microphysics; however, POAM measurements of aerosol extinction prove to be valuable in differentiating model runs. Specifically, the relationship of aerosol extinction to temperature arises from the different temperatures at which the various particle types form and grow. Comparisons of IMPACT calculations of this relationship to POAM measurements constrain the initial fraction of nuclei available for heterogeneous NAT freezing to 0.02% of all aerosols. Constraints are also placed on the ice accommodation coefficient and the NAT-ice lattice compatibility factor. However, these two parameters have similar effects on the extinction-temperature relationship, and thus a range of values are permissible for each.

  19. A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical characteristics and radiative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects.

    Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is −0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between −0.32 to −0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  20. Comparison of virulence of different Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes and biotypes using an aerosol infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Mariann Juul; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Nielsen, Ragnhild

    1996-01-01

    An aerosol infection model for inoculation of pigs with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is described, With this model the virulence of three A. pleuropneumoniae biotype 1 strains representing serotypes 2, 5b and 6, and one Danish biotype 2 were compared using 13-week-old pigs for inoculation....... The pigs were sacrificed 24 h after aerosol exposure and lung lesions were evaluated. In pigs exposed to aerosols of suspensions containing 10(4) CFU/ml of serotypes 2, 5b and 6, a number of 5-10 lesions of haemorrhagic necrotizing pneumonia were induced, For the biotype 2 strain the dose creating similar...... lesions was 10(9) CFU/ml. Repeated experiments confirmed these results showing similar virulence of serotypes 2, 5b and 6 whereas the biotype 2 strain proved less virulent, The aerosol infection model allowed a comparison of the number of A. pleuropneumoniae CFU/liter air which were necessary to induce...

  1. The global middle-atmosphere aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2: comparison with satellite and in-situ observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hommel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate results from a three-dimensional middle-atmosphere aerosol-climate model which has been developed to study the evolution of stratospheric aerosols. Here we focus on the stratospheric background period and evaluate several key quantities of the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols and their precursors with observations and other model studies. It is shown that the model fairly well reproduces in situ observations of the aerosol size and number concentrations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Compared to measurements from the limb-sounding SAGE II satellite instrument, modelled integrated aerosol quantities are more biased the lower the moment of the aerosol population is. Both findings are consistent with earlier work analysing the quality of SAGE II retrieved e.g. aerosol surface area densities in the volcanically unperturbed stratosphere (SPARC/ASAP, 2006; Thomason et al., 2008; Wurl et al., 2010.

    The model suggests that new particles are formed over large areas of the LS, albeit nucleation rates in the upper troposphere are at least one order of magnitude larger than those in the stratosphere. Hence, we suggest that both, tropospheric sulphate aerosols and particles formed in situ in the LS are maintaining the stability of the stratospheric aerosol layer in the absence of direct stratospheric emissions from volcanoes. Particle size distributions are clearly bimodal, except in the upper branches of the stratospheric aerosol layer where aerosols evaporate. Modelled concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN are smaller than measured in regions of the aerosol layer where aerosol mixing ratios are largest. This points to an overestimated particle growth by coagulation.

    Transport regimes of tropical stratospheric aerosol have been identified from modelled aerosol mixing ratios and correspond to those deduced from satellite extinction measurements. We found that convective

  2. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd

  3. High resolution simulations of aerosol microphysics in a global and regionally nested chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.; Marks, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aerosol indirect effect is the largest source of forcing uncertainty in current climate models. This effect arises from the influence of aerosols on the reflective properties and lifetimes of clouds, and its magnitude depends on how many particles can serve as cloud droplet formation sites. Assessing levels of this subset of particles (cloud condensation nuclei, or CCN) requires knowledge of aerosol levels and their global distribution, size distributions, and composition. A key tool necessary to advance our understanding of CCN is the use of global aerosol microphysical models, which simulate the processes that control aerosol size distributions: nucleation, condensation/evaporation, and coagulation. Previous studies have found important differences in CO (Chen, D. et al., 2009) and ozone (Jang, J., 1995) modeled at different spatial resolutions, and it is reasonable to believe that short-lived, spatially-variable aerosol species will be similarly - or more - susceptible to model resolution effects. The goal of this study is to determine how CCN levels and spatial distributions change as simulations are run at higher spatial resolution - specifically, to evaluate how sensitive the model is to grid size, and how this affects comparisons against observations. Higher resolution simulations are necessary supports for model/measurement synergy. Simulations were performed using the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem (v9-02). The years 2008 and 2009 were simulated at 4ox5o and 2ox2.5o globally and at 0.5ox0.667o over Europe and North America. Results were evaluated against surface-based particle size distribution measurements from the European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research project. The fine-resolution model simulates more spatial and temporal variability in ultrafine levels, and better resolves topography. Results suggest that the coarse model predicts systematically lower ultrafine levels than does the fine-resolution model. Significant

  4. Aerosol Generating Procedures and Risk of Transmission of Acute Respiratory Infections to Healthcare Workers: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Khai Tran; Karen Cimon; Melissa Severn; Pessoa-Silva, Carmem L.; John Conly

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol generating procedures (AGPs) may expose health care workers (HCWs) to pathogens causing acute respiratory infections (ARIs), but the risk of transmission of ARIs from AGPs is not fully known. We sought to determine the clinical evidence for the risk of transmission of ARIs to HCWs caring for patients undergoing AGPs compared with the risk of transmission to HCWs caring for patients not undergoing AGPs. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, University of Yo...

  5. Marine Aerosol Precursor Emissions for Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltrud, Mathew Einar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is generated by marine ecosystems and plays a major role in cloud formation over the ocean. Currently, Earth System Models use imposed flux of DMS from the ocean to the atmosphere that is independent of the climate state. We have added DMS as a prognostic variable to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that depends on the distribution of phytoplankton species, and thus changes with climate.

  6. Climate response due to carbonaceous aerosols and aerosol-induced SST effects in NCAR community atmospheric model CAM3.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-C. Hsieh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study used Community Atmospheric Model 3.5 (CAM3.5 to investigate the effects of carbonaceous aerosols on climate. The simulations include control runs with carbonaceous aerosols and no carbon runs in which carbonaceous aerosols were removed. The Slab Ocean Model (SOM and the fixed Sea Surface Temperature (SST were used to examine effects of ocean boundary conditions. Throughout this study, climate response induced by aerosol forcing was mainly analyzed in the following three terms: (1 aerosol radiative effects under fixed SST, (2 effects of aerosol-induced SST feedbacks , and (3 total effects including effects of aerosol forcing and SST feedbacks. The change of SST induced by aerosols has large impacts on distribution of climate response, the magnitudes in response patterns such as temperature, precipitation, zonal winds, mean meridional circulation, radiative fluxes and cloud coverage are different between the SOM and fixed SST runs. Moreover, different spatial responses between the SOM and fixed SST runs can also be seen in some local areas. This implies the importance of SST feedbacks on simulated climate response. The aerosol dimming effects cause a cooling predicted at low layers near the surface in most of carbonaceous aerosol source regions. The temperature response shows a warming (cooling predicted in the north (south high latitudes, suggesting that aerosol forcing can cause climate change in regions far away from its origins. Our simulation results show that warming of the troposphere due to black carbon decreases rainfall in the tropics. This implies that black carbon has possibly strong influence on weakening of the tropical circulation. Most of these changes in precipitation are negatively correlated with changes of radiative fluxes at the top of model. The changes in radiative fluxes at top of model are physically consistent with the response patterns in cloud fields. On global average, low-level cloud coverage increases, mid

  7. Evaluation of Observed and Modelled Aerosol Lifetimes Using Radioactive Tracers of Opportunity and an Ensemble of 19 Global Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivie, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Sovde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Shindell, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (Cs-137) and xenon-133 (Xe-133) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. Cs-137 size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation mode (AM) sulfate aerosols were the main carriers of cesium. Hence, Cs-137 can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulfate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas Xe-133 behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of Cs-137that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulfate, and Xe-133 emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulfate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled Cs-137and Xe-133 concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime e, calculated from station measurement data taken between 2 and 9 weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days (95

  8. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Kristiansen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs and xenon-133 (133Xe were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM sulphate aerosols were the main carriers for the cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulphate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulphate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulphate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 37Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between two and nine weeks after the start of the

  9. A Model for the Transport of Sea-Spray Aerosols in the Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzola, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Demoisson, A.

    2015-05-01

    We study the dynamics of sea-spray particles in the coastal region of La Reunion Island on the basis of numerical simulations using the transport aerosol model MACMod (Marine Aerosol Concentration Model) and a survey of the aerosol size distributions measured at four locations at two different heights in the north-west part of the island. This allows evaluation of the performance of our model in case of pure marine air masses with implementation of accurate boundary conditions. First of all, an estimate of the aerosol concentration at 10-m height at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain is obtained using a revisited version of the MEDEX (Mediterranean Extinction) model. Estimates of the vertical profile of aerosol concentrations are then provided using aerosol data obtained at two different heights at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain. A parametrization of the vertical profiles of aerosol concentrations for maritime environment is proposed. The results are then compared to the vertical profiles of 0.532 m aerosol particle extinction coefficient obtained from lidar data provided by the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and also to the data provided by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). This allows validation of the complete vertical profiles in the mixed layer and shows the validity of satellite data for determination of the vertical profiles. Two kinds of simulation were made: one without a particle advection flux at the upwind boundary of the numerical domain, whereas the second simulation was made with a particle advection flux. In the first case, the influence of the distance to the shoreline on the local sea-spray dynamics is investigated. In the second set of simulation, the particles issued from the local production in the surf zone near the shoreline are mixed with aerosols advected from the remote ocean. A good agreement between the model calculations using our boundary conditions and the data was found. The

  10. INVESTIGATIONS OF MAIN FACTORS AFFECTING TROPOSPHERIC NITRATE AEROSOL USING A COUPLING MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tijian Wang; Shu Li; Fei Jiang; Lijie Gao

    2006-01-01

    Factors affecting tropospheric nitrate aerosol formation were investigated through a number of sensitivity studies using the thermodynamic equilibrium model ISORROPIA and the condensed gas-phase chemistry model. Resuits indicate that the equilibrium concentration of nitrate aerosol varies with solar zenith angle, air temperature, relative humidity, initial SO2 concentration, initial NO2 concentration and initial NH3 concentration. NH3 concentration and solar zenith angle play the most important roles, followed by relative humidity and NO2 concentration. It seems that the relations between nitrate aerosol and these four factors, as well as air temperature, are strong and highly nonlinear due to the coupling effect. The influence of SO2 concentration on nitrate aerosol is near-linear and weak.

  11. Ion-UHMA: a model for simulating the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppae, J.; Kerminen, V.-M. (Finnish Meteorological Institute, Climate Change Research, Helsinki (Finland)); Gagne, S.; Manninen, H. E.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Laakso, L. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, North-West Univ. Potchefstroom (South Africa)); Korhonen, H. (Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Physics (Finland)); Lehtinen, K. E. J. (Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Physics (Finland); Finnish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio Unit (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    A new aerosol dynamical box model, Ion-UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model for neutral and charged particles), is introduced in this paper. The model includes basic dynamical processes (condensation, coagulation and deposition) as well as ion-aerosol attachment and ion-ion recombination. The formation of particles is treated as model input or, alternatively, the model can be coupled with an existing nucleation model. Ion-UHMA was found to be able to reproduce qualitatively the measured time evolution of the particle number size distribution, when the particle formation and growth rates as well as concentrations of particles > 20 nm in diameter were taken from measurements. The simulated charging state of freshly formed particles during a new particle formation event evolved towards charge equilibrium in line with previously-derived analytical formulae. We provided a few illustrative examples to demonstrate possible applications, to which the Ion-UHMA model could be used in the near future. (orig.)

  12. Estimation of Biomass Burning Influence on Air Pollution around Beijing from an Aerosol Retrieval Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sonoyo Mukai; Masayoshi Yasumoto; Makiko Nakata

    2014-01-01

    We investigate heavy haze episodes (with dense concentrations of atmospheric aerosols) occurring around Beijing in June, when serious air pollution was detected by both satellite and ground measurements. Aerosol retrieval is achieved by radiative transfer simulation in an Earth atmosphere model. We solve the radiative transfer problem in the case of haze episodes by successive order of scattering. We conclude that air pollution around Beijing in June is mainly due to increased emissions of an...

  13. Application of computer-aided multi-scale modelling framework - Aerosol case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitzig, Martina; Gregson, Christopher; Sin, Gürkan;

    2011-01-01

    A computer-aided modelling tool for efficient multi-scale modelling has been developed and is applied to solve a multi-scale modelling problem related to design and evaluation of fragrance aerosol products. The developed modelling scenario spans three length scales and describes how droplets...

  14. From nanoclusters to climate forcers. Global modeling of aerosol climate effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkonen, R.

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles influence everyday life through their adverse health effects. Aerosols also affect the Earth's climate, directly by scattering and absorbing radiation and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and modifying cloud properties. The net effect of aerosols on climate is cooling. Although only a small fraction of atmospheric aerosol mass is of direct human origin, the anthropogenic aerosol climate forcing can be of same magnitude, but opposite in sign, as the anthropogenic forcing via CO{sub 2}. As aerosols are short-lived and respond rapidly to changes in emissions, they are an important factor in determining the future climate change. Aerosols are either emitted as primary particles or they are formed from gas-phase precursors. Atmospheric new particle formation is observed around the world. In this thesis, new particle formation is studied with a global aerosol-climate model. Several thermodynamic and semi- empirical parameterizations of nucleation are investigated. It is shown that in addition to the thermodynamic models, semi-empirical parameterizations are needed to explain the observed aerosol number concentrations. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can contribute to particle number, particle growth, and total aerosol mass. It was shown that biogenic VOCs have an important role in growing the freshly-nucleated particles to sizes capable of acting as CCN. It was also shown that the current atmospheric concentrations of nitric acid can greatly affect cloud droplet activation and increase the number of cloud droplets, making a large contribution to the indirect aerosols effect. With current scenarios for anthropogenic SO{sub 2} emissions, the formation of new particles will diminish significantly by the year 2100. Together with the predicted reductions in primary particles, the future cloud droplet number concentrations were shown to decrease close to pre-industrial levels. As a result, the anthropogenic aerosol

  15. Combined observational and modeling efforts of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions over Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Adrian; Tsay, Si-Chee; Nguyen, Xuan Anh

    2016-04-01

    Low-level stratocumulus (Sc) clouds cover more of the Earth's surface than any other cloud type rendering them critical for Earth's energy balance, primarily via reflection of solar radiation, as well as their role in the global hydrological cycle. Stratocumuli are particularly sensitive to changes in aerosol loading on both microphysical and macrophysical scales, yet the complex feedbacks involved in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions remain poorly understood. Moreover, research on these clouds has largely been confined to marine environments, with far fewer studies over land where major sources of anthropogenic aerosols exist. The aerosol burden over Southeast Asia (SEA) in boreal spring, attributed to biomass burning (BB), exhibits highly consistent spatiotemporal distribution patterns, with major variability due to changes in aerosol loading mediated by processes ranging from large-scale climate factors to diurnal meteorological events. Downwind from source regions, the transported BB aerosols often overlap with low-level Sc cloud decks associated with the development of the region's pre-monsoon system, providing a unique, natural laboratory for further exploring their complex micro- and macro-scale relationships. Compared to other locations worldwide, studies of springtime biomass-burning aerosols and the predominately Sc cloud systems over SEA and their ensuing interactions are underrepresented in scientific literature. Measurements of aerosol and cloud properties, whether ground-based or from satellites, generally lack information on microphysical processes; thus cloud-resolving models are often employed to simulate the underlying physical processes in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud model has recently been enhanced with a triple-moment (3M) bulk microphysics scheme as well as the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) version 6 aerosol module. Because the aerosol burden not only affects cloud

  16. Aerosol particle transport modeling for preclosure safety studies of nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important concern for preclosure safety analysis of a nuclear waste repository is the potential release to the environment of respirable aerosol particles. Such particles, less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter, may have significant adverse health effects if inhaled. To assess the potential health effects of these particles, it is not sufficient to determine the mass fraction of respirable aerosol. The chemical composition of the particles is also of importance since different radionuclides may pose vastly different health hazards. Thus, models are needed to determine under normal and accident conditions the particle size and the chemical composition distributions of aerosol particles as a function of time and of position in the repository. In this work a multicomponent sectional aerosol model is used to determine the aerosol particle size and composition distributions in the repository. A range of aerosol mass releases with varying mean particle sizes and chemical compositions is used to demonstrate the sensitivities and uncertainties of the model. Decontamination factors for some locations in the repository are presented. 8 refs., 1 tab

  17. A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical characteristics and radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing.

    Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing between 1750 and 2000 is −0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing can vary between −0.32 to −0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particle, changes the overall net aerosol radiative forcing from negative to positive. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Black carbon absorption is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings, but even more strongly by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative forcing when sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to climate benefits.

  18. Direct Climatic Effect of Aerosols and Interdecadal Variations over East Asia Investigated by a Regional Coupled Climate-Chemistry/Aerosol Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Zhi-Wei; XIONG Zhe; LI Jia-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The direct climatic effect of aerosols for the 1980-2000 period over East Asia was numerically investigated by a regional scale coupled climate-chemistry/ aerosol model, which includes major anthropogenic aerosols (sulfate, black carbon, and organic carbon) and natural aerosols (soil dust and sea salt). Anthropogenic emissions used in model simulation are from a global emission inventory prepared for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5), whereas natural aerosols are calculated online in the model. The simulated 20-year average direct solar radiative effect due to aerosols at the surface was estimated to be in a range of-9- -33 W m-2 over most areas of China, with maxima over the Gobi desert of West China, and-12 W m-2 to -24 W m-2 over the Sichuan Basin, the middle and lower reaches of the Yellow River and the Yangtze River. Aerosols caused surface cooling in most areas of East Asia, with maxima of-0.8℃ to -1.6℃ over the deserts of West China, the Sichuan Basin, portions of central China, and the middle reaches of the Yangtze River. Aerosols induced a precipitation decrease over almost the entire East China, with maxima of-90 mm/year to -150 mm/year over the Sichuan Basin, the middle reaches of the Yangtze River and the lower reaches of the Yellow River. Interdecadal variation of the climate response to the aerosol direct radiative effect is evident, indicating larger decrease in surface air temperature and stronger per- turbation to precipitation in the 1990s than that in the 1980s, which could be due to the interdecadal variation of anthropogenic emissions.

  19. Aerosol impact on seasonal prediction using FIM-Chem-iHYCOM coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    sun, shan; Grell, Georg; Bleck, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    A coupled model consisting of the weather model FIM and the ocean model iHYCOM, both operating on an icosahedral horizontal grid, is being developed for subseasonal to seasonal prediction. Initial results indicate that the model skill is comparable to that of the operational model CFSv2 used by NCEP. In addition, an online atmospheric chemistry module is coupled to FIM. The purpose of onging experiments with the FIM-Chem-iHYCOM combination is to investigate the aerosol impact on the atmospheric and oceanic circulation at the seasonal scale. We compare the model sensitivity with various chemistry emissions, including aerosols, fire and anthropogenic emissions. Additional emphasis of this work is on the effect of aerosols on cloudiness and precipitation, either directly or indirectly through changes in SST. To isolate the latter effect, we conduct parallel experiments with observed SST.

  20. MODELING OF ORGANIC CARBON AEROSOL DISTRIBUTIONS OVER EAST ASIA IN THE SPRINGTIME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meigen Zhang

    2004-01-01

    The Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system coupled with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) is applied to East Asia to investigate the transport and evolution processes of organic carbon (OC) aerosols in the springtime of 2001. The simulated OC mixing ratios are compared with ground level observations at three remote sites in Japan during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment - Asia (ACE-Asia) field campaign. It is found that the modeled OC concentrations are generally in good agreement with the observed ones, and the model reproduces the time variations in OC mixing ratios reasonably well. Model results show that high levels (larger than 16 mg.m-2) of column burden of OC aerosols concentrated in the middle reaches of Yangtse River and southern isopleth of 4 mg.m-2 extended to the inner area of northwestern Pacific Ocean.

  1. Characterizing aerosol transport into the Canadian High Arctic using aerosol mass spectrometry and Lagrangian modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the analysis of measurements made using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Aerodyne Research Inc. that was installed in the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL in summer 2006. PEARL is located in the Canadian high Arctic at 610 m above sea level on Ellesmere Island (80° N 86° W. PEARL is unique for its remote location in the Arctic and because most of the time it is situated within the free troposphere. It is therefore well suited as a receptor site to study the long range tropospheric transport of pollutants into the Arctic. Some information about the successful year-round operation of an AMS at a high Arctic site such as PEARL will be reported here, together with design considerations for reliable sampling under harsh low-temperature conditions. Computational fluid dynamics calculations were made to ensure that sample integrity was maintained while sampling air at temperatures that average −40 °C in the winter and can be as low as −55 °C. Selected AMS measurements of aerosol mass concentration, size, and chemical composition recorded during the months of August, September and October 2006 will be reported. During this period, sulfate was at most times the predominant aerosol component with on average 0.115 μg m−3 (detection limit 0.003 μg m−3. The second most abundant component was undifferentiated organic aerosol, with on average 0.11 μg m−3 detection limit (0.04 μg m−3. The nitrate component, which averaged 0.007 μg m−3, was above its detection limit (0.002 μg m−3, whereas the ammonium ion had an apparent average concentration of 0.02 μg m−3, which was approximately equal to its detection limit. A few episodes having increased mass concentrations and lasting from several hours to several days are apparent in the data. These were investigated further using a statistical analysis to determine their common

  2. Characterising aerosol transport into the Canadian High Arctic using aerosol mass spectrometry and Lagrangian modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the analysis of measurements made using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Aerodyne Research Inc. that was installed in the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL in summer 2006. PEARL is located in the Canadian high Arctic at 610 m above sea level on Ellesmere Island (80° N 86° W. PEARL is unique for its remote location in the Arctic and because most of the time it is situated within the free troposphere. It is, therefore, well suited as a receptor site to study the long-range tropospheric transport of pollutants into the Arctic. Some information about the successful year-round operation of an AMS at a high Arctic site such as PEARL will be reported here, together with design considerations for reliable sampling under harsh low-temperature conditions. Computational fluid dynamics calculations were made to ensure that sample integrity was maintained while sampling air at temperatures that average −40 °C in the winter and can be as low as −55 °C. Selected AMS measurements of aerosol mass concentration, size and chemical composition recorded during the months of August, September and October 2006 will be reported. The air temperature was raised to about 20 °C during sampling, but the short residence time in the inlet system (~25 s ensured that less than 10% of semivolatiles such as ammonium nitrate were lost. During this period, sulfate was, at most times, the predominant aerosol component with on average 0.115 μg m−3 (detection limit 0.003 μg m−3. The second most abundant component was undifferentiated organic aerosol, with on average 0.11 μg m−3 (detection limit 0.04 μg m−3. The nitrate component, which averaged 0.007 μg m−3, was above its detection limit (0.002 μg m−3, whereas the ammonium ion had an apparent average concentration of 0.02 μg m−3, which was approximately equal to its detection limit. A few

  3. Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-29

    A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

  4. Aerosol effects on ozone concentrations in Beijing: A model sensitivity study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Xu; Yuanhang Zhang; Shaoqing Zheng; Youjiang He

    2012-01-01

    Most previous O3 simulations were based only on gaseous phase photochemistry.However,some aerosol-related processes,namely,heterogeneous reactions occurring on the aerosol surface and photolysis rate alternated by aerosol radiative influence,may affect O3 photochemistry under high aerosol loads.A three-dimensional air quality model,Models-3/Community Multi-scale Air Quality-Model of Aerosol Dynamics,Reaction,Ionization,and Dissolution,was employed to simulate the effects of the above-mentioned processes on O3 formation under typical high O3 episodes in Beijing during summer.Five heterogeneous reactions,i.e.,NO2,NO3,N2O5,HO2,and O3,were individually investigated to elucidate their effects on O3 formation.The results showed that the heterogeneous reactions significantly affected O3 formation in the urban plume.NO2 heterogeneous reaction increased O3 to 90 ppb,while HO2 heterogeneous reaction decreased O3 to 33 ppb.In addition,O3 heterogeneous loss decreased O3 to 31 ppb.The effects of NO2,NO3,and N2O5 heterogeneous reactions showed opposite O3 concentration changes between the urban and extra-urban areas because of the response of the reactions to the two types of O3 formation regimes.When the aerosol radiative influence was included,the photolysis rate decreased and O3 decreased significantly to 73 ppb O3.The two aerosol-related processes should be considered in the study of O3 formation because high aerosol concentration is a ubiquitous phenomenon that affects the urban- and regional air quality in China.

  5. Evaluation of aerosol simulation in a global model using multiple-platform observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.

    2015-12-01

    Large diversity in the magnitude of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and their spatial distributions is one of key factors contributing to the large uncertainty of the model predicted aerosol radiative forcing (global mean ranging from -0.02 to -0.58W m-2) and its climatic effect. Therefore, evaluation of model performances with respect to AOD is a critical step to improve the model simulations and, thus, reduce the diversities. In this study, multi-year AOD data (2004-2012) from ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite retrievals are used to evaluate the performance of a global model, GEOS-Chem-APM, one of global models involved in AeroCom phase II aerosol module inter-comparison project. Comparisons of the modeled AOD with satellite data on spatial distribution, seasonal and inter-annual variations are quantitatively analyzed. In addition, several regions representative of various aerosol dominant species are chose for the detailed evaluations of AOD between the simulation and AERONET observations. The capability and weakness of the model to capture seasonal variation and chemical species is also discussed for further improvement in the future.

  6. Why Is Improvement of Earth System Models so Elusive? Challenges and Strategies from Dust Aerosol Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ronald L.; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Perlwitz, Jan; Ginoux, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Past decades have seen an accelerating increase in computing efficiency, while climate models are representing a rapidly widening set of physical processes. Yet simulations of some fundamental aspects of climate like precipitation or aerosol forcing remain highly uncertain and resistant to progress. Dust aerosol modeling of soil particles lofted by wind erosion has seen a similar conflict between increasing model sophistication and remaining uncertainty. Dust aerosols perturb the energy and water cycles by scattering radiation and acting as ice nuclei, while mediating atmospheric chemistry and marine photosynthesis (and thus the carbon cycle). These effects take place across scales from the dimensions of an ice crystal to the planetary-scale circulation that disperses dust far downwind of its parent soil. Representing this range leads to several modeling challenges. Should we limit complexity in our model, which consumes computer resources and inhibits interpretation? How do we decide if a process involving dust is worthy of inclusion within our model? Can we identify a minimal representation of a complex process that is efficient yet retains the physics relevant to climate? Answering these questions about the appropriate degree of representation is guided by model evaluation, which presents several more challenges. How do we proceed if the available observations do not directly constrain our process of interest? (This could result from competing processes that influence the observed variable and obscure the signature of our process of interest.) Examples will be presented from dust modeling, with lessons that might be more broadly applicable. The end result will either be clinical depression or there assuring promise of continued gainful employment as the community confronts these challenges.

  7. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivie, D. J.; Croft, B.; Sovde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, Kai; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bergman, T.; Evangeliou, N.; Wang, Hailong; Ma, Po-Lun; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Liu, X.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, Glauco; Zhao, S. Y.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Faluvegi, G.; Kokkola, H.; Martin, R. V.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Tost, H.; Zhang, H.

    2016-03-17

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs) and xenon-133 (133Xe) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM) sulphate aerosols were the main carriers for the cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulphate aerosol’s fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model’s default properties of AM sulphate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulphate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 37Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between two and nine weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14

  8. Model Study on the Transport and Mixing of Dust Aerosols and Pollutants during an Asian Dust Storm in March 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport and mixing of dust aerosols and pollutants in East Asia during March 18 to 22, 2002 was studied using the nested air quality prediction model system (NAQPMS. Dust was primarily generated in the Gobi desert on 19 March and then swept across several areas of East Asia. The model results were verified with observations of surface weather, TSP/PM10, SO2 and lidar data. The model simulated the right timing and strength of dust events, capturing most of the variation features in dust and SO2. Numerical results showed that the dust aerosols were mainly transported in two layers and mixed with pollutants in different ways. Some of the dust kicked up in the source region was uplifted to a higher layer (200 - 2000 m layer and transported downwind faster than dust of the lower level. This lower-level dust was of greater concentration. The dust arriving at the upper layer began to drop and mixed well with pollutants in the atmosphere during _ first _ During _ second _ pollutants were diluted by the dust air mass that was transported along the lower layer. The remaining pollutants mixed well with dust aerosols during this period. The mixed air mass of the higher layer (1500 m eventually reached the Northwestern Pacific. A large amount of clouds in the upper layers potentially led to an increase in sulfate mass on the surface of dust particles.

  9. AMARSI: Aerosol modeling and retrieval from multi-spectral imagers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Curier, R.L.; Staroverova, A.; Kokhanovsky, A.; Hoyningen-Huene, W. van; Rozanov, V.V.; Burrows, J.P.; Hesselmans, G.; Gale, L.; Bouvet, M.

    2008-01-01

    The AMARSI project aims at the development and validation of aerosol retrieval algorithms over ocean. One algorithm will be developed for application with data from the Multi Spectral Imager (MSI) on EarthCARE. A second algorithm will be developed using the combined information from AATSR and MERIS,

  10. RAFT - A computer model for formation and transport of fission product aerosols in LWR primary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer model RAFT (Reactor Aerosol Formation and Transport) has been developed to predict the size distribution and composition of the particles (aerosols) formed from condensation of the fission-product and control rod material vapors released in LWR accidents. The underlying theory of RAFT considers the processes of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, aerosol agglomeration, and aerosol and vapor deposition, in conjunction with the equilibrium chemistry of the Cs-I-Te-O-H-Ag-In-Cd-inert gas system. Calculations using RAFT show that under most accident conditions, the particle size spectrum is determined primarily by the competition between the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms rather than the agglomeration mechanism, and that direct vapor deposition on structural surfaces is an important mechanism for the scavenging of fission product vapours

  11. RAFT: a computer model for formation and transport of fission product aerosols in LWR primary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer model RAFT (Reactor Aerosol Formation and Transport) has been developed to predict the size distribution and composition of the particles (aerosols) formed from condensation of the fission-product and control rod material vapors released in LWR accidents. The underlying theory of RAFT considers the processes of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, aerosol agglomeration, and aerosol and vapor deposition, in conjunction with the equilibrium chemistry of the Cs-I-Te-O-H-Ag-In-Cd-inert gas system. Calculations using RAFT show that under most accident conditions, the particle size spectrum is determined primarily by the competition between the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms rather than the agglomeration mechanism, and that direct vapor deposition on structural surfaces is an important mechanism for the scavenging of fission product vapors

  12. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol – Part 1: Model improvements and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Meskhidze

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7. Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA, phytoplankton-produced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA and methane sulfonate (MS are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr−1, for the Gantt et al. (2011 and Vignati et al. (2010 emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr−1, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ng m−3, with values up to 400 ng m−3 over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that both Gantt et al. (2011 and Vignati et al. (2010 formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011 parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The largest increases (up to 20 % in CCN (at a supersaturation (S of 0.2 % number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides

  13. Urban surface models for better aerosol retrieval with MODIS and Landsat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Eduardo H.

    Aerosols are notoriously hard to measure on a global scale since they do not have unique spectral signatures like trace green house gases. Accurate global characterization of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is essential because aerosols are the most uncertain mechanism in climate forecast models, and have known impact on human health. In particular, fine mode particulates (PM2.5) can penetrate deep into the lung tissue contributing to lung damage and cardiac distress. Because of these effects on human health, the Environmental Protection Agency has strict monitoring standards for PM2.5. Aerosols measurements over urban areas are critical because extended urban centers can have significant aerosol loadings with air quality levels that are above EPA standards. For global studies, satellite measurements are the only realistic approach. Making this monitoring possible from space is the observation that column AOD is quite remarkably related to PM2.5. Dark vegetative surfaces make such correlations strongest and more accurate aerosols retrieval. However, over urban scenes, it is particularly complicated due to the confusion between the ground signal and the aerosol signal. The satellite sensors cannot distinguish if the incoming photons come from the surface or from atmosphere scattering. For global retrieval of aerosols, the MODIS sensor is perhaps the most suited for global observations, because it can cover almost the entire planet in less than 2 days. The general approach is to use the Long Wave Channel (2130nm) as a good estimate of the surface albedo, since the aerosols contribution in this channel is almost always negligible (especially urban aerosols). Then, the surface albedos in the visible channels, where aerosols are important, can be inferred from empirical relations. However, it has become more apparent that the relations used by MODIS algorithms are not optimized for urban areas and tend to overestimate the AOD. This thesis provides a more extensive study of

  14. Indian monsoon and the elevated-heat-pump mechanism in a coupled aerosol-climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Miriam; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Lau, William K. M.; Hardenberg, Jost; Fierli, Federico; Cherchi, Annalisa

    2015-09-01

    A coupled aerosol-atmosphere-ocean-sea ice climate model is used to explore the interaction between aerosols and the Indian summer monsoon precipitation on seasonal-to-interannual time scales. Results show that when increased aerosol loading is found on the Himalayas slopes in the premonsoon period (April-May), intensification of early monsoon rainfall over India and increased low-level westerly flow follow, in agreement with the elevated-heat-pump mechanism. The increase in rainfall during the early monsoon season has a cooling effect on the land surface. In the same period, enhanced surface cooling may also be amplified through solar dimming by more cloudiness and aerosol loading, via increased dust transported by low-level westerly flow. The surface cooling causes subsequent reduction in monsoon rainfall in July-August over India. The time-lagged nature of the reasonably realistic response of the model to aerosol forcing suggests that absorbing aerosols, besides their potential key roles in impacting monsoon water cycle and climate, may influence the seasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon.

  15. Lidar signal simulation for the evaluation of aerosols in chemistry-transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stromatas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an adaptable tool, the OPTSIM (OPTical properties SIMulation software, for the simulation of optical properties and lidar attenuated backscattered profiles (β' from aerosol concentrations calculated by chemistry-transport models (CTM. It was developed to support model evaluation using an original approach based on the lidar Level 1 observations (β', avoiding the use of Level 2 aerosol retrievals which include specific assumptions on aerosol types that may not be in agreement with the CTM. In addition to an evaluation of the aerosol loading and optical properties, active remote sensing allows the analysis of aerosols' vertical structures. An academic case study for two different species (black carbon and dust is presented and shows the consistency of the simulator. Illustrations are then given through the analysis of dust events in the Mediterranean region during the summer 2007. These are based on simulations by the CHIMERE regional CTM and observations from the CALIOP space-based lidar, and highlight the potential of this approach to evaluate the concentration, size and vertical structure of the aerosol plumes.

  16. An indoor air aerosol model for outdoor contaminant transmission into occupied rooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hui; ZHAO Shen; CAO Guo-qing

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a simple model for outdoor air contaminant transmission into occupied rooms. In the model, several factors such as filtration, ventilation, deposition, re-emission, outdoor concentration and indoor sources are included. The model results show that the air exchange rate plays an important role in the transmission of outdoor contaminants into the indoor environment. The model shows that increasing the value of the filtration efficiency decreases the mass concentration of indoor particles. In addition, if outdoor aerosol particles have a periodic behaviour, indoor aerosol particles also behave periodically but smoother. Indoor sources are found to be able to increase indoor concentrations greatly and continuously.

  17. A Modeling Study of Seasonal Variation of Atmospheric Aerosols over East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiawei; HAN Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    In this study,a regional air quality model system (RAQMS) was applied to investigate the spatial distributions and seasonal variations of atmospheric aerosols in 2006 over East Asia.Model validations demonstrated that RAQMS was able to reproduce the evolution processes of aerosol components reasonably well.Ground-level PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm) concentrations were highest in spring and lowest in summer and were characterized by three maximum centers:the Taklimakan Desert (~ 1000μg m-3),the Gobi Desert (~ 400 μg m-3),and the Huabei Plain (~ 300 μg m-3) of China.Vertically,high PM10 concentrations ranging from 100 μg m-3 to 250μg m-3 occurred from the surface to an altitude of 6000 m at 30°-45°N in spring.In winter,the vertical gradient was so large that most aerosols were restricted in the boundary layer.Both sulfate and ammonium reached their highest concentrations in autumn,while nitrate reached its maximum level in winter.Black carbon and organic carbon aerosol concentrations reached maximums in winter.Soil dust were strongest in spring,whereas sea salt exerted the strongest influence on the coastal regions of eastern China in summer.The estimated burden of anthropogenic aerosols was largest in winter (1621 Gg) and smallest in summer (1040 Gg).The sulfate burden accounted for ~42% of the total anthropogenic aerosol burden.The dust burden was about twice the anthropogenic aerosol burden,implying the potentially important impacts of the natural aerosols on air quality and climate over East Asia.

  18. SILAM and MACC reanalysis aerosol data used for simulating the aerosol direct radiative effect with the NWP model HARMONIE for summer 2010 wildfire case in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, V.; Reis, K.; Ots, R.; Kaasik, M.; Männik, A.; Prank, M.; Sofiev, M.

    2015-11-01

    Persistent high pressure conditions over the European part of Russia during summer 2010 were responsible for an extended period of hot and dry weather, creating favourable conditions for severe wildfires. The chemical transport model SILAM is used to simulate the dispersion of smoke aerosol for this case. Aerosol fields from SILAM are compared to the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis. Moreover, the model output is compared to in situ and remote sensing measurements, paying particular attention to the most intense fire period of August 7 to 9, when the plume reached the Baltic countries and Finland. The maximum observed aerosol optical depth was more than 4 at 550 nm during this time. The aerosol distributions from the SILAM run and the MACC reanalysis are subsequently used in meteorological simulations using the Hirlam Aladin Research for Mesoscale Operational Numerical Weather Prediction in Euromed (HARMONIE) model. The modelling results show a significant reduction of the daily average shortwave radiation fluxes at the surface (up to 125 W/m2) and daily average near-surface temperature (up to 4 °C) through the aerosol direct radiative effect. The simulated near-surface temperature and vertical temperature profile agree better with the observations, when the aerosol direct radiative effect is considered in the meteorological simulation. The boundary layer is more stably stratified, creating poorer dispersion conditions for the smoke.

  19. The Role of Cloud Contamination, Aerosol Layer Height and Aerosol Model in the Assessment of the OMI Near-UV Retrievals Over the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasso, Santiago; Torres, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 388 nm over the ocean from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) two-channel near-UV algorithm (OMAERUV) have been compared with independent AOD measurements. The analysis was carried out over the open ocean (OMI and MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) AOD comparisons) and over coastal and island sites (OMI and AERONET, the AErosol RObotic NETwork). Additionally, a research version of the retrieval algorithm (using MODIS and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) information as constraints) was utilized to evaluate the sensitivity of the retrieval to different assumed aerosol properties. Overall, the comparison resulted in differences (OMI minus independent measurements) within the expected levels of uncertainty for the OMI AOD retrievals (0.1 for AOD less than 0.3, 30% for AOD greater than 0.3). Using examples from case studies with outliers, the reasons that led to the observed differences were examined with specific purpose to determine whether they are related to instrument limitations (i.e., pixel size, calibration) or algorithm assumptions (such as aerosol shape, aerosol height). The analysis confirms that OMAERUV does an adequate job at rejecting cloudy scenes within the instrument's capabilities. There is a residual cloud contamination in OMI pixels with quality flag 0 (the best conditions for aerosol retrieval according to the algorithm), resulting in a bias towards high AODs in OMAERUV. This bias is more pronounced at low concentrations of absorbing aerosols (AOD 388 nm approximately less than 0.5). For higher aerosol loadings, the bias remains within OMI's AOD uncertainties. In pixels where OMAERUV assigned a dust aerosol model, a fraction of them (less than 20 %) had retrieved AODs significantly lower than AERONET and MODIS AODs. In a case study, a detailed examination of the aerosol height from CALIOP and the AODs from MODIS, along with sensitivity tests, was carried out by

  20. The role of cloud contamination, aerosol layer height and aerosol model in the assessment of the OMI near-UV retrievals over the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassó, Santiago; Torres, Omar

    2016-07-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 388 nm over the ocean from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) two-channel near-UV algorithm (OMAERUV) have been compared with independent AOD measurements. The analysis was carried out over the open ocean (OMI and MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) AOD comparisons) and over coastal and island sites (OMI and AERONET, the AErosol RObotic NETwork). Additionally, a research version of the retrieval algorithm (using MODIS and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) information as constraints) was utilized to evaluate the sensitivity of the retrieval to different assumed aerosol properties. Overall, the comparison resulted in differences (OMI minus independent measurements) within the expected levels of uncertainty for the OMI AOD retrievals (0.1 for AOD 0.3). Using examples from case studies with outliers, the reasons that led to the observed differences were examined with specific purpose to determine whether they are related to instrument limitations (i.e., pixel size, calibration) or algorithm assumptions (such as aerosol shape, aerosol height). The analysis confirms that OMAERUV does an adequate job at rejecting cloudy scenes within the instrument's capabilities. There is a residual cloud contamination in OMI pixels with quality flag 0 (the best conditions for aerosol retrieval according to the algorithm), resulting in a bias towards high AODs in OMAERUV. This bias is more pronounced at low concentrations of absorbing aerosols (AOD 388 nm ˜ < 0.5). For higher aerosol loadings, the bias remains within OMI's AOD uncertainties. In pixels where OMAERUV assigned a dust aerosol model, a fraction of them (< 20 %) had retrieved AODs significantly lower than AERONET and MODIS AODs. In a case study, a detailed examination of the aerosol height from CALIOP and the AODs from MODIS, along with sensitivity tests, was carried out by varying the different assumed parameters in the retrieval (imaginary

  1. Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2010-03-12

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterises aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (N{sub d}) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between {tau}{sub a} and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. This suggests that the implementation of the second aerosol indirect effect mainly in terms of an autoconversion parameterisation has to be revisited in the GCMs. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (f{sub cld}) and {tau}{sub a} as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong f{sub cld} - {tau}{sub a} relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as a unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between {tau}{sub a} and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - {tau}{sub a} relationship show a strong positive correlation between {tau}{sub a} and f{sub cld} The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is

  2. Modelling iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol: Contributions of inorganic and organic iodine chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pechtl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of iodine in atmospheric aerosol is currently poorly understood. Models predict negligible iodide concentrations but accumulation of iodate in aerosol, both of which is not confirmed by recent measurements. We present an updated aqueous phase iodine chemistry scheme for use in atmospheric chemistry models and discuss sensitivity studies with the marine boundary layer model MISTRA. These studies show that iodate can be reduced in acidic aerosol by inorganic reactions, i.e., iodate does not necessarily accumulate in particles. Furthermore, the transformation of particulate iodide to volatile iodine species likely has been overestimated in previous model studies due to negligence of collision-induced upper limits for the reaction rates. However, inorganic reaction cycles still do not seem to be sufficient to reproduce the observed range of iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol. Therefore, we also investigate the effects of the recently suggested reaction of HOI with dissolved organic matter to produce iodide. If this reaction is fast enough to compete with the inorganic mechanism, it would not only directly lead to enhanced iodide concentrations but, indirectly via speed-up of the inorganic iodate reduction cycles, also to a decrease in iodate concentrations. Hence, according to our model studies, organic iodine chemistry, combined with inorganic reaction cycles, is able to reproduce observations. The presented chemistry cycles are highly dependent on pH and thus offer an explanation for the large observed variability of the iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol.

  3. Boundary layer aerosol characteristics at Mahabubnagar during CAIPEEX-IGOC: Modeling the optical and radiative properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Integrated Ground Observational Campaign (IGOC) was conducted at Mahabubnagar — a tropical rural station in the southern peninsular India, under the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) program during the period from July to November 2011. Measured chemical composition and carbonaceous aerosols from PM2.5 samples were used in an aerosol optical model to deduce crucial aerosol optical properties, which were then used in a radiative transfer model for radiative forcing estimations. The model derived aerosol optical depth (AOD at 500 nm), varied from 0.13 to 0.76 (mean of 0.40 ± 0.18) whereas Ångström exponent (AE) between 0.10 and 0.65 (mean of 0.33 ± 0.17) suggests relative dominance of coarse particles over the station. On the other hand, single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm) was found to vary from 0.78 to 0.92 (mean of 0.87 ± 0.04) during the measurement period. The magnitude of absorption Ångström exponent (AAE), varied from 0.83 to 1.33 (mean of 1.10 ± 0.15), suggests mixed type aerosols over the station. Aerosol direct radiative forcing was estimated and found to vary from − 8.9 to − 49.3 W m−2 (mean of − 27.4 ± 11.8 W m−2) at the surface and + 9.7 to + 44.5 W m−2 (mean of + 21.3 ± 9.4 W m−2) in the atmosphere during the course of measurements. The atmospheric forcing was observed to be ∼ 30% higher during October (+ 29 ± 9 W m−2) as compared to August (+ 21 ± 7 W m−2) when the station is mostly influenced by continental polluted aerosols. The result suggests an additional atmospheric heating rate of 0.24 K day−1 during October, which may be crucial for various boundary layer processes in favorable atmospheric conditions. - Highlights: • Modeling the optical and radiative properties of aerosols using measured chemical composition. • Based on optical properties, mixed type aerosols were observed over the station. • Atmospheric forcing was ∼ 30% higher during October as

  4. Cytotoxic Evaluation of e-Liquid Aerosol using Different Lung-Derived Cell Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Scheffler

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro toxicological evaluation of e-liquid aerosol is an important aspect of consumer protection, but the cell model is of great significance. Due to its water solubility, e-liquid aerosol is deposited in the conducting zone of the respiratory tract. Therefore, primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells are more suitable for e-liquid aerosol testing than the widely used alveolar cell line A549. Due to their prolonged lifespan, immortalized cell lines derived from primary NHBE cells, exhibiting a comparable in vitro differentiation, might be an alternative for acute toxicity testing. In our study, A549 cells freshly isolated NHBE cells and the immortalized cell line CL-1548 were exposed at the air-liquid interface to e-liquid aerosol and cigarette mainstream smoke in a CULTEX® RFS compact module. The cell viability was analyzed 24 h post-exposure. In comparison with primary NHBE cells, the CL-1548 cell line showed lower sensitivity to e-liquid aerosol but significantly higher sensitivity compared to A549 cells. Therefore, the immortalized cell line CL-1548 is recommended as a tool for the routine testing of e-liquid aerosol and is preferable to A549 cells.

  5. AERONET-based models of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2014-10-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol system. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of aerosol microphysical/optical parameters at 10 sites reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke observed at coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at the near-source sites. Differences between sites tend to be larger than variability at an individual site, although optical properties for some sites in different regions can be quite similar. Across the sites, typical midvisible SSA ranges from ~ 0.95-0.97 (sites dominated by boreal forest or peat burning, typically with larger fine-mode particle radius and spread) to ~ 0.88-0.9 (sites most influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning, typically smaller fine-mode particle radius and spread). The tropical forest site Alta Floresta (Brazil) is closer to this second category, although with intermediate SSA ~ 0.92. The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average midvisible SSA ~ 0.85. Sites with stronger absorption also tend to have stronger spectral gradients in SSA, becoming more absorbing at longer wavelengths. Microphysical/optical models are presented in detail so as to facilitate their use in radiative transfer calculations, including extension to UV (ultraviolet) wavelengths, and lidar ratios. One intended application is to serve as candidate optical models for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean often have insufficient absorption (i.e. too high SSA) to represent these biomass burning aerosols. The underestimates in satellite-retrieved AOD in smoke outflow regions, which have important consequences for applications of these satellite data sets, are consistent with

  6. Novel method of generation of Ca(HCO32 and CaCO3 aerosols and first determination of hygroscopic and cloud condensation nuclei activation properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Trimborn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mineral aerosols contain CaCO3 as a reactive component. A novel method to produce CaCO3 aerosol was developed by spraying Ca(HCO32 solutions, which were generated from CaCO3 suspensions and CO2. By aerosol mass spectrometry the freshly sprayed aerosol was characterized to be Ca(HCO32 which under annealing in a tube furnace transformed into CaCO3. Transmission Electron Microscopy demonstrated that the particles produced were spherical. The method is easy to operate and was able to generate aerosol of sufficient concentration and proper size for the study of physiochemical properties as was demonstrated for hygroscopicity and CCN activity measurements, and investigations of heterogeneous reactions of mineral aerosol. Fresh Ca(HCO32 particles are somewhat more hygroscopic than CaCO3 particles although both have small growth factors of 1.03 and 1.01, respectively, at 95% relative humidity. The CCN activity of Ca(HCO32 aerosol is remarkably higher than that of CaCO3 aerosol and only slightly less than that of Ca(NO32. Experiments in the Large Jülich Aerosol Chamber showed that Ca(HCO32 can exist for several hours under dry atmospheric conditions which is in contrast to the current believe that Ca(HCO32 is unstable in the atmosphere. We conclude that Ca(HCO32 maybe be formed in the atmosphere in cloud droplets of activated mineral dust by reaction of CaCO3 with CO2 and H2O. The presence of Ca(HCO32 and as a consequence an enhanced CCN activity may alter the influence of mineral aerosol on global climate.

  7. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: Part 1 – Inorganic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamic modelling framework to predict the equilibrium behaviour of mixed inorganic salt aerosols is developed, and then coupled with a technique for finding a solution to the Kohler equation in order to create a diameter dependent hygroscopic aerosol model (Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model – ADDEM. The model described here provides a robust and accurate inorganic basis using a mole fraction based activity coefficient model and adjusted energies of formation for treating solid precipitation. The model framework can accommodate organic components, though this added complexity is considered in a companion paper, this paper describes the development of the modelling architecture to be used and predictions of an inorganic model alone. The modelling framework has been developed to flexibly use a combination of mixing rules and other potentially more accurate techniques where available to calculate the water content. Comparisons with other state-of-the-art general equilibrium models and experimental data are presented and show excellent agreement. The Kelvin effect can be considered in this scheme using a variety of surface tension models. Comparison of predicted diameter dependent phenomena, such as the increased relative humidity for onset of deliquescence with decreasing diameter, with another diameter dependent model is very good despite the different approach used. The model is subject to various sensitivities. For the inorganic systems studied here, the model is sensitive to choice of surface tension scheme used, which decreases for larger aerosol. Large sensitivities are found for the value of dry density used. It is thus likely that the history of the aerosol studied in a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA, specifically the nature of the drying process that will influence the final crystalline form, will create systematic uncertainties upon comparisons with theoretical predictions. However, the

  8. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: 1 – Inorganics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Coe

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamic modelling framework to predict the equilibrium behaviour of mixed inorganic salt aerosols is developed, and then coupled with a technique for finding a solution to the Köhler equation in order to create a diameter dependent hygroscopic aerosol model (Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model – ADDEM. The model described here provides a robust and accurate inorganic basis using a mole fraction based activity coefficient model and adjusted energies of formation for treating solid precipitation. The model framework can accommodate organic components, though this added complexity is considered in a companion paper, whereas this paper describes the development of the modelling architecture to be used and predictions of an inorganic model alone. The modelling framework has been developed to flexibly use a combination of mixing rules and other potentially more accurate techniques where available to calculate the water content. Comparisons with other state-of-the-art general equilibrium models and experimental data are presented and show excellent agreement. The Kelvin effect can be considered in this scheme using a variety of surface tension models. Comparison of predicted diameter dependent phenomena, such as the increased relative humidity for onset of deliquescence with decreasing diameter, with another diameter dependent model is very good despite the different approach used. The model is subject to various sensitivities. For the inorganic systems studied here, the model is sensitive to choice of surface tension scheme used, which decreases for larger aerosol. Large sensitivities are found for the value of dry density used. It is thus likely that the history of the aerosol studied in a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA, specifically the nature of the drying process that will influence the final crystalline form, will create systematic uncertainties upon comparisons with theoretical predictions. However

  9. Modelling of the aerosol deposition in a hydrogen catalytic recombiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Studer, E.; Zavaleta, P. [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Prevention et d' Etudes des Accidents, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Hadida, Ph. [Quasar Informatique, Paris (France)

    1997-03-01

    Catalytic recombiners are used to remove the hydrogen released in case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, so as to reduce the risk of deflagration or detonation. H{sub 2}PAR experiments are carried out to precise the behaviour of recombiners in term of poisoning by aerosols. Firstly, some calculations have been done with the Trio-EF code to assess the structure of convection loops in the experimental tent. We note that when the recombiner is active, it may have a strong influence on the flow inside the tent and may even interact with an other heat source such as a furnace. In the second part, we study the deposition of aerosols on catalytic plates for a given recombiner, when it is active or passive. We list the different mechanisms and quantify them by introducing the deposition velocity. In fact, thermophoresis appears to be the main mechanism, compared to brownian diffusion or difrusiophoresis, which governs aerosols deposition. It favours deposition on <> plates and acts against it for <> plates. (author)

  10. Modeling Aerosol Effects on Clouds and Precipitation: Insights from CalWater 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, L. R.; Lim, K. S. S.; Fan, J.; Prather, K. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field campaign took place in northern California from mid January through early March of 2015. The field campaign, including collaborations between CalWater 2 and ACAPEX, aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with atmospheric rivers (ARs) and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. An observational strategy was employed using land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. During the field campaign, an AR developed in the Northeast Pacific Ocean in early February and made landfall in northern California. In-situ aerosol and cloud measurements from the G-1 aircraft; remote sensing data of clouds and aerosols; and meteorological measurements from aircraft, ship, and ground-based instruments collected from February 5 - 8, 2015 are analyzed to characterize the large-scale environment and cloud and precipitation forming processes. Modeling experiments are designed using a regional model for simulations with a cloud resolving limited area domain and quasi-global coarser resolution domain to evaluate the impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation, and to explore the relative contributions of long-range transported and regional aerosols that interacted with the clouds before, during, and after AR landfall. Preliminary results will be discussed in the context of the field data as well as a multi-year simulation of the climatological contributions of long-range transported dust during AR landfall in California.

  11. Simulation of Cloud-aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP Attenuated Backscatter Profiles Using the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To permit the calculation of the radiative effects of atmospheric aerosols, we have linked our aerosol-chemical transport model (CTMGLOMAP to a new radiation module (UKCARADAER. In order to help assess and improve the accuracy of the radiation code, in particular the height dependence of the predicted scattering, we have developed a module that simulates attenuated backscatter (ABS profiles that would be measured by the satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP if it were to sample an atmosphere with the same aerosol loading as predicted by the CTM. Initial results of our comparisons of the predicted ABS profiles with actual CALIOP data are encouraging but some differences are noted, particularly in marine boundary layers where the scattering is currently under-predicted and in dust layers where it is often over-predicted. The sources of these differences are being investigated.

  12. Model study on the dependence of primary marine aerosol emission on the sea surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barthel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary marine aerosol composed of sea salt and organic material is an important contributor to the global aerosol load. By comparing measurements from two EMEP (co-operative programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmissions of air-pollutants in Europe intensive campaigns in June 2006 and January 2007 with results from an atmospheric transport model this work shows that accounting for the influence of the sea surface temperature on the emission of primary marine aerosol improves the model results towards the measurements in both months. Different sea surface temperature dependencies were evaluated. Using correction functions based on Sofiev et al. (2011 and Jaeglé et al. (2011 improves the model results for coarse mode particles. In contrast, for the fine mode aerosols no best correction function could be found. The model captures the low sodium concentrations at the marine station Virolahti II (Finland, which is influenced by air masses from the low salinity Baltic Sea, as well as the higher concentrations at Cabauw (Netherlands and Auchencorth Moss (Scotland. These results indicate a shift towards smaller sizes with lower salinity for the emission of dry sea salt aerosols. Organic material was simulated as part of primary marine aerosol assuming an internal mixture with sea salt. A comparison of the model results for primary organic carbon with measurements by a Berner-impactor at Sao Vincente (Cape Verde indicated that the model underpredicted the observed organic carbon concentration. This leads to the conclusion that the formation of secondary organic material needs to be included in the model to improve the agreement with the measurements.

  13. Different Manhattan project: automatic statistical model generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Chee Keng; Biermann, Henning; Hertzmann, Aaron; Li, Chen; Meyer, Jon; Pao, Hsing-Kuo; Paxia, Salvatore

    2002-03-01

    We address the automatic generation of large geometric models. This is important in visualization for several reasons. First, many applications need access to large but interesting data models. Second, we often need such data sets with particular characteristics (e.g., urban models, park and recreation landscape). Thus we need the ability to generate models with different parameters. We propose a new approach for generating such models. It is based on a top-down propagation of statistical parameters. We illustrate the method in the generation of a statistical model of Manhattan. But the method is generally applicable in the generation of models of large geographical regions. Our work is related to the literature on generating complex natural scenes (smoke, forests, etc) based on procedural descriptions. The difference in our approach stems from three characteristics: modeling with statistical parameters, integration of ground truth (actual map data), and a library-based approach for texture mapping.

  14. The impact of building recirculation rates on secondary organic aerosols generated by indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuraimi, M.S.; Weschler, Charles J.; Tham, K.W.;

    2007-01-01

    Numerous investigators have documented increases in the concentrations of airborne particles as a consequence of ozone/terpene reactions in indoor environments. This study examines the effect of building recirculation rates on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) resulting from r...

  15. Improved discriminative training for generative model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ya-hui; GUO Jun; LIU Gang

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a model combination method to enhance the discriminability of the generative model. Generative and discriminative models have different optimization objectives and have their own advantages and drawbacks. The method proposed in this article intends to strike a balance between the two models mentioned above. It extracts the discriminative parameter from the generative model and generates a new model based on a multi-model combination. The weight for combining is determined by the ratio of the inter-variance to the intra-variance of the classes. The higher the ratio is, the greater the weight is, and the more discriminative the model will be. Experiments on speech recognition demonstrate that the performance of the new model outperforms the model trained with the traditional generative method.

  16. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  17. Modeling the effects of aerosols to increase rainfall in regions with shortage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, J. B.; Sundar, Shyam; Misra, A. K.; Naresh, Ram

    2013-05-01

    It is well known that the emissions of hot gases from various power stations and other industrial sources in the regional atmosphere cause decrease in rainfall around these complexes. To overcome this shortage, one method is to introduce artificially conducive aerosol particles in the atmosphere using aeroplane to increase rainfall. To prove the feasibility of this idea, in this paper, a nonlinear mathematical model is proposed involving five dependent variables, namely, the volume density of water vapour, number densities of cloud droplets and raindrops, and the concentrations of small and large size conducive aerosol particles. It is assumed that two types of aerosol particles are introduced in the regional atmosphere, one of them is of small size CCN type which is conducive to increase cloud droplets from vapour phase, while the other is of large size and is conducive to transform the cloud droplets to raindrops. The model is analyzed using stability theory of differential equations and computer simulation. The model analysis shows that due to the introduction of conducive aerosol particles in the regional atmosphere, the rainfall increases as compared to the case when no aerosols are introduced in the atmosphere of the region under consideration. The computer simulation confirms the analytical results.

  18. Heavy-Metal Aerosol Transport in a Lead-Bismuth-Cooled Fast Reactor with In-Vessel Direct-Contact Steam Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of lead or lead alloys (Pb-Bi) as the coolant of a fast reactor offers the potential for enhanced safety and reliability due to their benign physical and chemical characteristics. In an effort to assess this class of coolants in advanced nuclear systems of the next generation, an innovative fast reactor concept that eliminates the need for steam generators and main coolant pumps and thus offers capital and operating cost reduction was explored. The working steam is generated by direct-contact vaporization of water by liquid metal in the chimney above the core and is then sent directly to the turbine. The presence of a lighter fluid in the chimney substantially enhances the natural circulation of the Pb-Bi within the reactor pool. A key technical issue of this reactor concept is the consequences of Pb-Bi aerosol generation within the vessel, its transport within the power cycle components and impact on the design and operation of the turbine.Generation, transport, and deposition of Pb-Bi aerosols were modeled. It was found that the utilization of a suitable chevron steam separator design reduces the heavy-liquid metal transported to the steam lines by about three orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, the residual Pb-Bi (∼0.003 kg/s) is predicted to be sufficient to cause embrittlement of the turbine blades if conventional materials are used and the plant is to operate for 40 yr. Four solutions to this problem were assessed and found potentially viable from a technical standpoint: blade coating, employment of alternative materials, electrostatic precipitation, and oxidation of the Pb-Bi droplets

  19. The Role of Atmospheric Aerosol Concentration on Deep Convective Precipitation: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds NRC [2001]." The aerosol effect on Clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect, is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. In this paper, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with detailed spectral-bin microphysics was used to examine the effect of aerosols on three different deep convective cloud systems that developed in different geographic locations: South Florida, Oklahoma and the Central Pacific, In all three cases, rain reaches the ground earlier for the low CCN (clean) case. Rain suppression is also evident in all three cases with high CCN (dirty) case. However, this suppression only occurs during the first hour of the simulations. During the mature stages of the simulations, the effects of increasing aerosol concentration range from rain suppression in the Oklahoma case, to almost no effect in the Florida case, to rain enhancement in the Pacific case. These results show the complexity of aerosol interactions with convection. The model results suggest that evaporative cooling is a key process in determining whether high CCN reduces or enhances precipitation. Stronger evaporative cooling can produce a stronger cold pool and thus stronger low-level convergence through interactions

  20. Aerosol cloud interactions in southeast Pacific stratocumulus: satellite observations, in situ data and regional modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Rhea

    The influence of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud radiative properties in the persistent southeast Pacific stratocumulus deck is investigated using MODIS satellite observations, in situ data from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), and WRF-Chem, a regional model with interactive chemistry and aerosols. An albedo proxy is derived based on the fractional coverage of low cloud (a macrophysical field) and the cloud albedo, with the latter broken down into contributions from microphysics (cloud droplet concentration, Nd and macrophysics (liquid water path). Albedo variability is dominated by low cloud fraction variability, except within 10-15° of the South American coast, where cloud albedo variability contributes significantly. Covariance between cloud fraction and cloud albedo also contributes significantly to the variance in albedo, which highlights how complex and inseparable the factors controlling albedo are. N d variability contributes only weakly, which emphasizes that attributing albedo variability to the indirect effects of aerosols against the backdrop of natural meteorological variability is extremely challenging. Specific cases of aerosol changes can have strong impacts on albedo. We identify a pathway for periodic anthropogenic aerosol transport to the unpolluted marine stratocumulus >1000 km offshore, which strongly enhances Nd and albedo in zonally-elongated 'hook'-shaped arc. Hook development occurs with Nd increasing to polluted levels over the remote ocean primarily due to entrainment of a large number of small aerosols from the free troposphere that contribute a relatively small amount of aerosol mass to the marine boundary layer. Strong, deep offshore flow needed to transport continental aerosols to the remote ocean is favored by a trough approaching the South American coast and a southeastward shift of the climatological subtropical high pressure system. DMS significantly influences the aerosol number and

  1. Impacts of 20th century aerosol emissions on the South Asian monsoon in the CMIP5 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of single-forcing varieties of 20th century historical experiments in a subset of models from the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5 reveals that South Asian summer monsoon rainfall increases towards the present day in Greenhouse Gas (GHG-only experiments with respect to pre-industrial levels, while it decreases in anthropogenic aerosol-only experiments. Comparison of these single-forcing experiments with the all-forcings historical experiment suggests aerosol emissions have dominated South Asian monsoon rainfall trends in recent decades, especially during the 1950s to 1970s. The variations in South Asian monsoon rainfall in these experiments follows approximately the time-evolution of inter-hemispheric temperature gradient over the same period, suggesting a contribution from the large-scale background state relating to the asymmetric distribution of aerosol emissions about the equator. By examining the twenty-five available all-forcings historical experiments, we show that models including aerosol indirect effects dominate the negative rainfall trend. Indeed, models including only the direct radiative effect of aerosol show an increase in monsoon rainfall, consistent with the dominance of increasing greenhouse gas emissions and planetary warming on monsoon rainfall in those models. For South Asia, reduced rainfall in the models with indirect effects is related to decreased evaporation at the land surface rather than from anomalies in horizontal moisture flux, suggesting the impact of indirect effects on local aerosol emissions. This is confirmed by examination of aerosol loading and cloud droplet number trends over the South Asia region. Thus while remote aerosols and their asymmetric distribution about the equator play a role in setting the inter-hemispheric temperature distribution on which the South Asian monsoon, as one of the global monsoons, operates, the addition of indirect aerosol effects acting on very local

  2. Impact of aerosols on tropical cyclones: An investigation using convection-permitting model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Anupam; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Taraphdar, S.; Chen, J.-P.; Cotton, William R.

    2013-07-01

    role of aerosols' effect on two tropical cyclones over the Bay of Bengal is investigated using a convection-permitting model with a two-moment mixed-phase bulk cloud microphysics scheme. The simulation results show the role of aerosol on the microphysical and dynamical properties of the cloud and bring out the change in efficiency of the clouds in producing precipitation. The tracks of the tropical cyclones (TCs) are hardly affected by the changing aerosol concentrations, but the intensity exhibits significant sensitivity due to the change in aerosol concentration. It is also clearly seen from the analyses that higher heating in the middle troposphere within the cyclone center is in response to latent heat release as a consequence of greater graupel formation. Greater heating in the middle level is particularly noticeable for the clean aerosol regime which causes enhanced divergence in the upper level, which, in turn, forces lower level convergence. As a result, the cleaner aerosol perturbation is more unstable within the cyclone core and produces a more intense cyclone as compared to the other two aerosol perturbations. This study, along with previous simulations, shows the robustness of the concept of TC weakening by storm ingestion of high concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The consistency of these model results gives us confidence in stating that there is a high probability that ingestion of high CCN concentrations in a TC will lead to weakening of the storm but has little impact on storm direction. Moreover, as pollution is increasing over the Indian subcontinent, this study suggests that pollution may be weakening TCs over the Bay of Bengal.

  3. Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones: An Investigation Using Convection-permitting Model Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazra, Anupam; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Taraphdar, Sourav; Chen, J. P.; Cotton, William R.

    2013-07-16

    The role of aerosols effect on two tropical cyclones over Bay of Bengal are investigated using a convection permitting model with two-moment mixed-phase bulk cloud microphysics scheme. The simulation results show the role of aerosol on the microphysical and dynamical properties of cloud and bring out the change in efficiency of the clouds in producing precipitation. The tracks of the TCs are hardly affected by the changing aerosol types, but the intensity exhibits significant sensitivity due to the change in aerosol contribution. It is also clearly seen from the analyses that higher heating in the middle troposphere within the cyclone center is in response to latent heat release as a consequence of greater graupel formation. Greater heating in the middle level is particularly noticeable for the clean aerosol regime which causes enhanced divergence in the upper level which, in turn, forces the lower level convergence. As a result, the cleaner aerosol perturbation is more unstable within the cyclone core and produces a more intense cyclone as compared to other two perturbations of aerosol. All these studies show the robustness of the concept of TC weakening by storm ingestion of high concentrations of CCN. The consistency of these model results gives us confidence in stating there is a high probability that ingestion of high CCN concentrations in a TC will lead to weakening of the storm but has little impact on storm direction. Moreover, as pollution is increasing over the Indian sub-continent, this study suggests pollution may be weakening TCs over the Bay of Bengal.

  4. Modeling nitrate aerosol distributions and its direct radiative forcing in East Asia with RAMS-CMAQ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Han; Meigen Zhang; Baorong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The geographical and seasonal characteristics in nitrate aerosol and its direct radiative forcing over East Asia are analyzed by using the air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ coupled with an aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module.For evaluating the model performance,nitrate ion concentration in precipitation,and mixing ratios of PM1o,and some gas precursors of aerosol during the whole year of 2007 are compared against surface observations at 17 stations located in Japan,Korea,and China,and the satellite retrieved NO2 columns.The comparison shows that the simulated values are generally in good agreement with the observed ones.Simulated monthly averaged values are mostly within a factor of 2 of the measurements at the observation stations.The distribution patterns of NO2 from simulation and satellite measurement are also similar with each other.Analysis of the distribution features of monthly and yearly averaged mass concentration and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of nitrate indicates that the nitrate aerosol could reach about 25-30% of the total aerosol mass concentration and DRF in Sichuan Basin,Southeast China,and East China where the high mass burden of all major aerosols concentrated.The high-est mass concentration and strongest DRF of nitrate could exceed 40 μg/m3 and-5 W/m2,respectively.It also indicates that other aerosol species,such as carbonaceous and mineral particles,could obviously influence the nitrate DRF for they are often internally mixed with each other.

  5. Sensitivity of modelled sulfate aerosol and its radiative effect on climate to ocean DMS concentration and air-sea flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesdal, Jan-Erik; Christian, James R.; Monahan, Adam H.; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-09-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is a well-known marine trace gas that is emitted from the ocean and subsequently oxidizes to sulfate in the atmosphere. Sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere have direct and indirect effects on the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Thus, as a potential source of sulfate, ocean efflux of DMS needs to be accounted for in climate studies. Seawater concentration of DMS is highly variable in space and time, which in turn leads to high spatial and temporal variability in ocean DMS emissions. Because of sparse sampling (in both space and time), large uncertainties remain regarding ocean DMS concentration. In this study, we use an atmospheric general circulation model with explicit aerosol chemistry (CanAM4.1) and several climatologies of surface ocean DMS concentration to assess uncertainties about the climate impact of ocean DMS efflux. Despite substantial variation in the spatial pattern and seasonal evolution of simulated DMS fluxes, the global-mean radiative effect of sulfate is approximately linearly proportional to the global-mean surface flux of DMS; the spatial and temporal distribution of ocean DMS efflux has only a minor effect on the global radiation budget. The effect of the spatial structure, however, generates statistically significant changes in the global-mean concentrations of some aerosol species. The effect of seasonality on the net radiative effect is larger than that of spatial distribution and is significant at global scale.

  6. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)'s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9° by 2.5° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate

  7. Comparing regional modeling (CHIMERE) and satellite observations of aerosols (PARASOL): Methodology and case study over Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromatas, Stavros

    2010-05-01

    S. Stromatas (1), S. Turquety (1), H. Chepfer (1), L. Menut (1), B. Bessagnet (2), JC Pere (2), D. Tanré (3) . (1) Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, CNRS/IPSL, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France, (2) INERIS, Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Parc technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte, FRANCE, (3) Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique/CNRS Univ. des Sciences et Tech. de Lille, 59650 - Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. Atmospheric suspended particles (aerosols) have significant radiative and environmental impacts, affecting human health, visibility and climate. Therefore, they are regulated by air quality standards worldwide, and monitored by regional observation networks. Satellite observations vastly improve the horizontal and temporal coverage, providing daily distributions. Aerosols are currently estimated using aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals, a quantitative measure of the extinction of solar radiation by aerosol scattering and absorption between the point of observation and the top of the atmosphere. Even though remarkable progresses in aerosol modeling by chemistry-transport models (CTM) and measurement experiments have been made in recent years, there is still a significant divergence between the modeled and observed results. However, AOD retrievals from satellites remains a highly challenging task mostly because it depends on a variety of different parameters such as cloud contamination, surface reflectance contributions and a priori assumptions on aerosol types, each one of them incorporating its own difficulties. Therefore, comparisons between CTM and observations are often difficult to interpret. In this presentation, we will discuss comparisons between regional modeling (CHIMERE CTM) over Mexico and satellite observations obtained by the POLDER instrument embarked on PARASOL micro-satellite. After a comparison of the model AOD with the retrieved L2 AOD, we will present an alternative

  8. Modeling and measurements of urban aerosol processes on the neighborhood scale in Rotterdam, Oslo and Helsinki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Keuken, Menno P.; Lützenkirchen, Susanne; Pirjola, Liisa; Hussein, Tareq

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the influence of aerosol processes on the particle number (PN) concentrations in three major European cities on the temporal scale of 1 h, i.e., on the neighborhood and city scales. We have used selected measured data of particle size distributions from previous campaigns in the cities of Helsinki, Oslo and Rotterdam. The aerosol transformation processes were evaluated using the aerosol dynamics model MAFOR, combined with a simplified treatment of roadside and urban atmospheric dispersion. We have compared the model predictions of particle number size distributions with the measured data, and conducted sensitivity analyses regarding the influence of various model input variables. We also present a simplified parameterization for aerosol processes, which is based on the more complex aerosol process computations; this simple model can easily be implemented to both Gaussian and Eulerian urban dispersion models. Aerosol processes considered in this study were (i) the coagulation of particles, (ii) the condensation and evaporation of two organic vapors, and (iii) dry deposition. The chemical transformation of gas-phase compounds was not taken into account. By choosing concentrations and particle size distributions at roadside as starting point of the computations, nucleation of gas-phase vapors from the exhaust has been regarded as post tail-pipe emission, avoiding the need to include nucleation in the process analysis. Dry deposition and coagulation of particles were identified to be the most important aerosol dynamic processes that control the evolution and removal of particles. The error of the contribution from dry deposition to PN losses due to the uncertainty of measured deposition velocities ranges from -76 to +64 %. The removal of nanoparticles by coagulation enhanced considerably when considering the fractal nature of soot aggregates and the combined effect of van der Waals and viscous interactions. The effect of condensation and

  9. Oxidation of a model alkane aerosol by OH radical: the emergent nature of reactive uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, F A; Hinsberg, W D; Wilson, K R

    2015-02-14

    An accurate description of the evolution of organic aerosol in the Earth's atmosphere is essential for climate models. However, the complexity of multiphase chemical and physical transformations has been challenging to describe at the level required to predict aerosol lifetimes and changes in chemical composition. In this work a model is presented that reproduces experimental data for the early stages of oxidative aging of squalane aerosol by hydroxyl radical (OH), a process governed by reactive uptake of gas phase species onto the particle surface. Simulations coupling free radical reactions and Fickian diffusion are used to elucidate how the measured uptake coefficient reflects the elementary steps of sticking of OH to the aerosol as a result of a gas-surface collision, followed by very rapid abstraction of hydrogen and subsequent free radical reactions. It is found that the uptake coefficient is not equivalent to a sticking coefficient or an accommodation coefficient: it is an intrinsically emergent process that depends upon particle size, viscosity, and OH concentration. An expression is derived to examine how these factors control reactive uptake over a broad range of atmospheric and laboratory conditions, and is shown to be consistent with simulation results. Well-mixed, liquid behavior is found to depend on the reaction conditions in addition to the nature of the organic species in the aerosol particle.

  10. Organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol yield from NO3 oxidation of β-pinene evaluated using a gas-phase kinetics/aerosol partitioning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-P. Dorn

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The yields of organic nitrates and of secondary organic aerosol (SOA particle formation were measured for the reaction NO3+β-pinene under dry and humid conditions in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Research Center Jülich. These experiments were conducted at low concentrations of NO3 (NO3+N2O5β-pinene (peak~15 ppb, with no seed aerosol. SOA formation was observed to be prompt and substantial (~50% mass yield under both dry conditions and at 60% RH, and highly correlated with organic nitrate formation. The observed gas/aerosol partitioning of organic nitrates can be simulated using an absorptive partitioning model to derive an estimated vapor pressure of the condensing nitrate species of pvap~5×10−6 Torr (6.67×10−4 Pa, which constrains speculation about the oxidation mechanism and chemical identity of the organic nitrate. Once formed the SOA in this system continues to evolve, resulting in measurable aerosol volume decrease with time. The observations of high aerosol yield from NOx-dependent oxidation of monoterpenes provide an example of a significant anthropogenic source of SOA from biogenic hydrocarbon precursors. Estimates of the NO3+β-pinene SOA source strength for California and the globe indicate that NO3 reactions with monoterpenes are likely an important source (0.5–8% of the global total of organic aerosol on regional and global scales.

  11. MATCH–SALSA – Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model – Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; H. Kokkola

    2014-01-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA in the European scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH–SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The model PNC size ...

  12. Evaluation of Regional Climatic Model Simulated Aerosol Optical Properties over South Africa Using Ground-Based and Satellite Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfaye, M.; Botai, J.; Sivakumar, V.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluates the aerosol optical property computing performance of the Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) which is interactively coupled with anthropogenic-desert dust schemes, in South Africa. The validation was carried out by comparing RegCM4 estimated: aerosol extinction coefficient profile, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), and Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) with AERONET, LIDAR, and MISR observations. The results showed that the magnitudes of simulated AOD at the Skukuza station (2...

  13. Evaluation of biomass burning aerosols in the HadGEM3 climate model with observations from the SAMBBA field campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, B. T.; Haywood, J. M.; Langridge, J. M.; E. Darbyshire; Morgan, W. T.; Szpek, K.; Brooke, J.(University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom); Marenco, F.; Coe, H.; Artaxo, P; K. M. Longo; Mulcahy, J; Mann, G.; Dalvi, M; Bellouin, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of biomass burning aerosol from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) and other measurement campaigns, and use these to evaluate the representation of biomass burning aerosol properties and processes in a state-of-the-art climate model. The evaluation includes detailed comparisons with aircraft and ground data, along with remote sensing observations from MODIS and AERONET. We demonstrate several improvements to aerosol properties following the implementa...

  14. Advances In Global Aerosol Modeling Applications Through Assimilation of Satellite-Based Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James; Hyer, Edward; Zhang, Jianglong; Reid, Jeffrey; Westphal, Douglas; Xian, Peng; Vaughan, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Modeling the instantaneous three-dimensional aerosol field and its downwind transport represents an endeavor with many practical benefits foreseeable to air quality, aviation, military and science agencies. The recent proliferation of multi-spectral active and passive satellite-based instruments measuring aerosol physical properties has served as an opportunity to develop and refine the techniques necessary to make such numerical modeling applications possible. Spurred by high-resolution global mapping of aerosol source regions, and combined with novel multivariate data assimilation techniques designed to consider these new data streams, operational forecasts of visibility and aerosol optical depths are now available in near real-time1. Active satellite-based aerosol profiling, accomplished using lidar instruments, represents a critical element for accurate analysis and transport modeling. Aerosol source functions, alone, can be limited in representing the macrophysical structure of injection scenarios within a model. Two-dimensional variational (2D-VAR; x, y) assimilation of aerosol optical depth from passive satellite observations significantly improves the analysis of the initial state. However, this procedure can not fully compensate for any potential vertical redistribution of mass required at the innovation step. The expense of an inaccurate vertical analysis of aerosol structure is corresponding errors downwind, since trajectory paths within successive forecast runs will likely diverge with height. In this paper, the application of a newly-designed system for 3D-VAR (x,y,z) assimilation of vertical aerosol extinction profiles derived from elastic-scattering lidar measurements is described [Campbell et al., 2009]. Performance is evaluated for use with the U. S. Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) by assimilating NASA/CNES satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 0.532 μm measurements [Winker et al., 2009

  15. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, P.M.

    1992-12-31

    A research program on the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions is proposed. The experiments involve measuring changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol. Aerosols with differing surface properties will be generated by changing the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. Kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modelling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol will be measured, both before and after reaction, using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Information about the detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during the course of the reaction. Studies will focus on the condensation and oxidation of sulfur species (sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide) on water aerosols.

  16. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A research program on the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions is proposed. The experiments involve measuring changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol. Aerosols with differing surface properties will be generated by changing the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. Kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modelling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol will be measured, both before and after reaction, using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Information about the detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during the course of the reaction. Studies will focus on the condensation and oxidation of sulfur species (sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide) on water aerosols.

  17. Evaluation of regional air quality models in the presence of moderate to strong aerosol events

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, N. T.; Thulasiraman, S.; Pancrati, O.; Aube, M.; Lupu, A.; Neary, L.; Strawbridge, K.; Freemantle, J.; Kaminski, J.; McConnell, J.

    2006-12-01

    During the 2004 to 2006 period a program of synchronized sunphotometry and lidar backscatter measurements were carried out at Egbert, Ontario (70 km north of Toronto). A variety of events, ranging from moderate to strong pollution events, long and short distance smoke transport, long distance dust transport and the presence of thin homogeneous clouds were registered and optically analyzed. These data were employed to help evaluate the performance of the Canadian GEM-AQ air quality model as well an aerosol optical assimilation model (NOMAD). The evaluations were based on optical indicators of integrated aerosol content (aerosol optical depth), particle size indicators such as Angstrom exponent, and vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter ratio. Some preliminary analyses will be presented; the focus will be on the problems associated with emissions modelling, the influence of cloud screening algorithms in the data and in the model, the robustness of particle size information in the passive optical data and the ability of the models to capture subtle variations, and the vertical performance of the models relative to the lidar backscatter data.

  18. Global combustion sources of organic aerosols: model comparison with 84 AMS factor-analysis data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimpidi, Alexandra P.; Karydis, Vlassis A.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-07-01

    Emissions of organic compounds from biomass, biofuel, and fossil fuel combustion strongly influence the global atmospheric aerosol load. Some of the organics are directly released as primary organic aerosol (POA). Most are emitted in the gas phase and undergo chemical transformations (i.e., oxidation by hydroxyl radical) and form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work we use the global chemistry climate model ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) with a computationally efficient module for the description of organic aerosol (OA) composition and evolution in the atmosphere (ORACLE). The tropospheric burden of open biomass and anthropogenic (fossil and biofuel) combustion particles is estimated to be 0.59 and 0.63 Tg, respectively, accounting for about 30 and 32 % of the total tropospheric OA load. About 30 % of the open biomass burning and 10 % of the anthropogenic combustion aerosols originate from direct particle emissions, whereas the rest is formed in the atmosphere. A comprehensive data set of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements along with factor-analysis results from 84 field campaigns across the Northern Hemisphere are used to evaluate the model results. Both the AMS observations and the model results suggest that over urban areas both POA (25-40 %) and SOA (60-75 %) contribute substantially to the overall OA mass, whereas further downwind and in rural areas the POA concentrations decrease substantially and SOA dominates (80-85 %). EMAC does a reasonable job in reproducing POA and SOA levels during most of the year. However, it tends to underpredict POA and SOA concentrations during winter indicating that the model misses wintertime sources of OA (e.g., residential biofuel use) and SOA formation pathways (e.g., multiphase oxidation).

  19. Modeling secondary organic aerosol in an urban area: application to Paris, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Couvidat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A secondary organic aerosol (SOA model, H2O (Hydrophilic/Hydrophobic Organic, is evaluated over the Paris area. This model treats the formation of SOA with two kinds of surrogate species: hydrophilic species (which condense preferentially on an aqueous phase and hydrophobic species (which condense only on an organic phase. These surrogates species are formed from the oxidation in the atmosphere of volatile organic compounds (VOC by radicals (HO and NO3 and ozone. These VOC are either biogenic (isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes or anthropogenic (mainly aromatic compounds. This model includes the formation of aerosols from different precursors (biogenic precursors, aromatics, and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC from traffic. The H2O aerosol model was incorporated into the Polyphemus air quality modeling platform and applied to the Paris area and evaluated by comparison to measurements performed during the Megapoli campaign in July 2009.

    The comparison to measurements in the suburbs and in the city center of Paris shows that the model gives satisfactory results for both elemental carbon (EC and organic carbon (OC. However, the model gives a peak of OC concentrations in the morning due to high emissions from traffic, which does not appear in measurements. Uncertainties in the modeled temperature, which can affect the gas-particle partitioning, in the partitioning of primary SVOC or underestimation of primary organic aerosol (POA evaporation by the model could explain the differences between model and measurements. Moreover, using a theoretical mechanism for the oxidation of primary SVOC and intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOC, POA concentrations were found to be likely overestimated by models due to the use of simple partitioning constants (which do not take into account the affinity of a compound with the liquid aerosol solution or due to the assumption that the organic aerosol

  20. Modeling secondary organic aerosol in an urban area: application to Paris, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Couvidat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A secondary organic aerosol (SOA model, H2O (Hydrophilic/Hydrophobic Organic, is evaluated over the Paris area. This model treats the formation of SOA with two kinds of surrogate species: hydrophilic species (which condense preferentially on an aqueous phase and hydrophobic species (which condense only on an organic phase. These surrogates species are formed from the oxidation in the atmosphere of volatile organic compounds (VOC by radicals (HO and NO3 and ozone. These VOC are either biogenic (isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes or anthropogenic (mainly aromatic compounds. This model includes the formation of aerosols from different precursors (biogenic precursors, aromatics, and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC from traffic. The H2O aerosol model was incorporated into the Polyphemus air quality modeling platform and applied to the Paris area and evaluated by comparison to measurements performed during the Megapoli campaign in July 2009.

    The comparison to measurements in the suburbs and in the city center of Paris shows that the model gives satisfactory results for both elemental carbon (EC and organic carbon (OC. However, the model gives a peak of OC concentrations in the morning due to high emissions from traffic, which does not appear in measurements. Uncertainties in the modeled temperature, which can affect the gas-particle partitioning, in the partitioning of primary SVOC or underestimation of primary organic aerosol (POA evaporation by the model could explain the differences between model and measurements. Moreover, using a theoretical mechanism for the oxidation of primary SVOC and intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOC, POA concentrations were found to be likely overestimated by models due to the use of simple partitioning constants (which do not take into account the affinity of a compound with the liquid aerosol solution or due to the assumption that the organic aerosol

  1. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  2. Micro-physics of aircraft-generated aerosols and their potential impact on heterogeneous plume chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Luo, B.P. [Muenchen Univ., Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung

    1997-12-31

    Answers are attempted to give to open questions concerning physico-chemical processes in near-field aircraft plumes, with emphasis on their potential impact on subsequent heterogeneous chemistry. Research issues concerning the nucleation of aerosols and their interactions among themselves and with exhaust gases are summarized. Microphysical properties of contrail ice particles, formation of liquid ternary mixtures, and nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in contrails are examined and possible implications for heterogeneous plume chemistry are discussed. (author) 19 refs.

  3. Aerosol optical depth assimilation for a size-resolved sectional model: impacts of observationally constrained, multi-wavelength and fine mode retrievals on regional scale analyses and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saide, P. E.; Carmichael, G. R.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H. C.; da Silva, A. M.; Hyer, E.

    2013-10-01

    An aerosol optical depth (AOD) three-dimensional variational data assimilation technique is developed for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for which WRF-Chem forecasts are performed with a detailed sectional model, the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC). Within GSI, forward AOD and adjoint sensitivities are performed using Mie computations from the WRF-Chem optical properties module, providing consistency with the forecast. GSI tools such as recursive filters and weak constraints are used to provide correlation within aerosol size bins and upper and lower bounds for the optimization. The system is used to perform assimilation experiments with fine vertical structure and no data thinning or re-gridding on a 12 km horizontal grid over the region of California, USA, where improvements on analyses and forecasts is demonstrated. A first set of simulations was performed, comparing the assimilation impacts of using the operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) dark target retrievals to those using observationally constrained ones, i.e., calibrated with AERONET (Aerosol RObotic NETwork) data. It was found that using the observationally constrained retrievals produced the best results when evaluated against ground based monitors, with the error in PM2.5 predictions reduced at over 90% of the stations and AOD errors reduced at 100% of the monitors, along with larger overall error reductions when grouping all sites. A second set of experiments reveals that the use of fine mode fraction AOD and ocean multi-wavelength retrievals can improve the representation of the aerosol size distribution, while assimilating only 550 nm AOD retrievals produces no or at times degraded impact. While assimilation of multi-wavelength AOD shows positive impacts on all analyses performed, future work is needed to generate observationally constrained multi-wavelength retrievals, which when assimilated will generate size

  4. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Taufiq; Moosmüller, H.; Chung, Chul E.

    2015-10-01

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  5. Tropospheric aerosol microphysics simulation with assimilated meteorology: model description and intermodel comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Trivitayanurak

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We implement the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS microphysics module into GEOS-CHEM, a CTM driven by assimilated meteorology. TOMAS has 30 size sections covering 0.01–10 μm diameter with conservation equations for both aerosol mass and number. The implementation enables GEOS-CHEM to simulate aerosol microphysics, size distributions, mass and number concentrations. The model system is developed for sulfate and sea-salt aerosols, a year-long simulation has been performed, and results are compared to observations. Additionally model intercomparison was carried out involving global models with sectional microphysics: GISS GCM-II' and GLOMAP. Comparison with marine boundary layer observations of CN and CCN(0.2% shows that all models perform well with average errors of 30–50%. However, all models underpredict CN by up to 42% between 15° S and 45° S while overpredicting CN up to 52% between 45° N and 60° N, which could be due to the sea-salt emission parameterization and the assumed size distribution of primary sulfate emission, in each case respectively. Model intercomparison at the surface shows that GISS GCM-II' and GLOMAP, each compared against GEOS-CHEM, both predict 40% higher CN and predict 20% and 30% higher CCN(0.2% on average, respectively. Major discrepancies are due to different emission inventories and transport. Budget comparison shows GEOS-CHEM predicts the lowest global CCN(0.2% due to microphysical growth being a factor of 2 lower than other models because of lower SO2 availability. These findings stress the need for accurate meteorological inputs and updated emission inventories when evaluating global aerosol microphysics models.

  6. New developments in the representation of Saharan dust sources in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM6-HAM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina; Schepanski, Kerstin; Banks, Jamie R.

    2016-02-01

    In the aerosol-climate model ECHAM6-HAM2, dust source activation (DSA) observations from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite are proposed to replace the original source area parameterization over the Sahara Desert. The new setup is tested in nudged simulations for the period 2007 to 2008. The evaluation is based on comparisons to dust emission events inferred from MSG dust index imagery, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer observations, and satellite retrievals of aerosol optical thickness (AOT).The model results agree well with AERONET measurements especially in terms of seasonal variability, and a good spatial correlation was found between model results and MSG-SEVIRI (Spinning-Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) dust AOT as well as Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) AOT. ECHAM6-HAM2 computes a more realistic geographical distribution and up to 20 % higher annual Saharan dust emissions, using the MSG-based source map. The representation of dust AOT is partly improved in the southern Sahara and Sahel. In addition, the spatial variability is increased towards a better agreement with observations depending on the season. Thus, using the MSG DSA map can help to circumvent the issue of uncertain soil input parameters.An important issue remains the need to improve the model representation of moist convection and stable nighttime conditions. Compared to sub-daily DSA information from MSG-SEVIRI and results from a regional model, ECHAM6-HAM2 notably underestimates the important fraction of morning dust events by the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet, while a major contribution is from afternoon-to-evening emissions.

  7. Modelling the background aerosol climatologies (1989-2010) for the Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Guerrero, Pedro; Jerez, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    Aerosol levels and composition are influenced by multiple atmospheric physico-chemical processes that can affect them from its release point (as primary aerosol), or via gas-to-particle conversion processes that give rise to secondary aerosols. The contribution of the various aerosol sources, the role of long-range transport and the contribution of primary and secondary particulate matter to the ambient aerosol concentrations over Europe are not well known (Kulmala et al., 2009). Focusing on the Mediterranean, Querol et al. (2009) point out that there is a lack of studies on the variability of particulate matter (PM) along the Mediterranean basin, necessary for understanding the special features that differentiate aerosol processes between the western, eastern and central Mediterranean basins. In this perspective, modelling systems based on state-of-science chemistry transport models (CTMs) are fundamental elements to investigate the transport and chemistry of pollutants behaviour at different scales and to assess the impact of emissions in aerosol levels and composition. Therefore, this study aims to summarise the results on the levels and chemical composition of aerosols along the Mediterranean basin, highlighting the marked gradient between the western-central-eastern coasts. Special attention is paid to the analysis of the seasonality of PM composition and levels. For this purpose, the regional modelling system WRF-CHIMERE-EMEP has been implemented for conducting a full transient simulation for the ERA-Interim period (1989-2010) using year-to-year changing EMEP emissions. The domain of study covers Europe with a horizontal resolution of 25 km and a vertical resolution of 23 layers in the troposphere; however the analysis focuses on the Mediterranean area. The PM levels and composition are compared to the measured values reported by the EMEP network, showing a good agreement with observations for both western and eastern Mediterranean. The modelling results for

  8. Incorporating an advanced aerosol activation parameterization into WRF-CAM5: Model evaluation and parameterization intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kai; He, Jian; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Fan, Jiwen; Nenes, Athanasios

    2015-07-22

    Aerosol activation into cloud droplets is an important process that governs aerosol indirect effects. The advanced treatment of aerosol activation by Fountoukis and Nenes (2005) and its recent updates, collectively called the FN series, have been incorporated into a newly developed regional coupled climate-air quality model based on the Weather Research and Forecasting model with the physics package of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (WRF-CAM5) to simulate aerosol-cloud interactions in both resolved and convective clouds. The model is applied to East Asia for two full years of 2005 and 2010. A comprehensive model evaluation is performed for model predictions of meteorological, radiative, and cloud variables, chemical concentrations, and column mass abundances against satellite data and surface observations from air quality monitoring sites across East Asia. The model performs overall well for major meteorological variables including near-surface temperature, specific humidity, wind speed, precipitation, cloud fraction, precipitable water, downward shortwave and longwave radiation, and column mass abundances of CO, SO2, NO2, HCHO, and O3 in terms of both magnitudes and spatial distributions. Larger biases exist in the predictions of surface concentrations of CO and NOx at all sites and SO2, O3, PM2.5, and PM10 concentrations at some sites, aerosol optical depth, cloud condensation nuclei over ocean, cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), cloud liquid and ice water path, and cloud optical thickness. Compared with the default Abdul-Razzack Ghan (2000) parameterization, simulations with the FN series produce ~107–113% higher CDNC, with half of the difference attributable to the higher aerosol activation fraction by the FN series and the remaining half due to feedbacks in subsequent cloud microphysical processes. With the higher CDNC, the FN series are more skillful in simulating cloud water path, cloud optical thickness, downward shortwave radiation

  9. Regional scale effects of the aerosol cloud interaction simulated with an online coupled comprehensive chemistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bangert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have extended the coupled mesoscale atmosphere and chemistry model COSMO-ART to account for the transformation of aerosol particles into cloud condensation nuclei and to quantify their interaction with warm cloud microphysics on the regional scale. The new model system aims to fill the gap between cloud resolving models and global scale models. It represents the very complex microscale aerosol and cloud physics as detailed as possible, whereas the continental domain size and efficient codes will allow for both studying weather and regional climate. The model system is applied in a first extended case study for Europe for a cloudy five day period in August 2005.

    The model results show that the mean cloud droplet number concentration of clouds is correlated with the structure of the terrain, and we present a terrain slope parameter TS to classify this dependency. We propose to use this relationship to parameterise the PDF of subgrid-scale cloud updraft velocity in the activation parameterisations of climate models.

    The simulations show that the presence of CCN and clouds are closely related spatially. We find high aerosol and CCN number concentrations in the vicinity of clouds at high altitudes. The nucleation of secondary particles is enhanced above the clouds. This is caused by an efficient formation of gaseous aerosol precursors above the cloud due to more available radiation, transport of gases in clean air above the cloud, and humid conditions. Therefore the treatment of complex photochemistry is crucial in atmospheric models to simulate the distribution of CCN.

    The mean cloud droplet number concentration and droplet diameter showed a close link to the change in the aerosol. To quantify the net impact of an aerosol change on the precipitation we calculated the precipitation susceptibility β for the whole model domain over a period of two days with an hourly resolution. The distribution function of

  10. The Reactive-Diffusive Length of OH and Ozone in Model Organic Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lance; Wilson, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    A key step in the heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric aerosols is the reaction of ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) at the gas-particle interface. The formation of reaction products and free radical intermediates and their spatial distribution inside the particle is a sensitive function of the length over which these oxidants diffuse prior to reaction. The reactive-diffusive length of OH and ozone at organic aerosol interfaces is determined by observing the change in the effective uptake coefficient for size-selected model aerosols comprising a reactive core and a thin nanometer-sized (0-12 nm) organic shell. The core and shell materials are selected so that they are immiscible and adopt an assumed core-shell configuration. The results indicate a reactive-diffusive length of 1.4 nm for hydroxyl (OH) radicals in squalane and 1.0 nm for ozone in squalene. Measurements for a purely diffusive system allow for an estimate for diffusion constant (1.6 × 10(-6) cm(2)/s) of ozone in squalane to be determined. The reactive-diffusive length offers a simple first order estimate of how shielding of aerosols by immiscible layers can alter estimates of oxidative lifetimes of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  11. Next generation neural mass models

    OpenAIRE

    Coombes, Stephen; Byrne, Áine

    2016-01-01

    Neural mass models have been actively used since the 1970s to model the coarse grained activity of large populations of neurons and synapses. They have proven especially useful in understanding brain rhythms. However, although motivated by neurobiological considerations they are phenomenological in nature, and cannot hope to recreate some of the rich repertoire of responses seen in real neuronal tissue. In this chapter we consider the $\\theta$-neuron model that has recently been shown to admi...

  12. Recent updates in the aerosol model of C-IFS and their impact on skill scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Hauglustaine, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The Composition-Integrated Forecast System (C-IFS) is a global atmospheric composition forecasting tool, run by ECMWF within the framework of the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Services (CAMS). The aerosol model of C-IFS is a simple bulk scheme that forecasts 5 species: dust, sea-salt, black carbon, organic matter and sulfates. Three bins represent the dust and sea-salt, for the super-coarse, coarse and fine mode of these species (Morcrette et al., 2009). This talk will present recent updates of the aerosol model, and also introduce coming upgrades. It will also present evaluations of these scores against AERONET observations. Next cycle of the C-IFS will include a mass fixer, because the semi-Lagrangian advection scheme used in C-IFS is not mass-conservative. This modification has a negligible impact for most species except for black carbon and organic matter; it allows to close the budgets between sources and sinks in the diagnostics. Dust emissions have been tuned to favor the emissions of large particles, which were under-represented. This brought an overall decrease of the burden of dust aerosol and improved scores especially close to source regions. The biomass-burning aerosol emissions are now emitted at an injection height that is provided by a new version of the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS). This brought a small increase in biomass burning aerosols, and a better representation of some large fire events. Lastly, SO2 emissions are now provided by the MACCity dataset instead of and older version of the EDGAR dataset. The seasonal and yearly variability of SO2 emissions are better captured by the MACCity dataset; the use of which brought significant improvements of the forecasts against observations. Upcoming upgrades of the aerosol model of C-IFS consist mainly in the overhaul of the representation of secondary aerosols. Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production will be dynamically estimated by scaling them on CO fluxes. This approach has been

  13. Improving the representation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, A.; Barsanti, K.

    2013-07-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) module in the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4) was updated by replacing existing two-product (2p) parameters with those obtained from two-product volatility basis set (2p-VBS) fits (MZ4-C1), and by treating SOA formation from the following additional volatile organic compounds (VOCs): isoprene, propene and lumped alkenes (MZ4-C2). Strong seasonal and spatial variations in global SOA distributions were demonstrated, with significant differences in the predicted concentrations between the base case and updated model simulations. Updates to the model resulted in significant increases in annual average SOA mass concentrations, particularly for the MZ4-C2 simulation in which the additional SOA precursor VOCs were treated. Annual average SOA concentrations predicted by the MZ4-C2 simulation were 1.00 ± 1.04 μg m-3 in South America, 1.57 ± 1.88 μg m-3 in Indonesia, 0.37 ± 0.27 μg m-3 in the USA, and 0.47 ± 0.29 μg m-3 in Europe with corresponding increases of 178, 406, 311 and 292% over the base-case simulation, respectively, primarily due to inclusion of isoprene. The increases in predicted SOA mass concentrations resulted in corresponding increases in SOA contributions to annual average total aerosol optical depth (AOD) by ~ 1-6%. Estimated global SOA production was 5.8, 6.6 and 19.1 Tg yr-1 with corresponding burdens of 0.22, 0.24 and 0.59 Tg for the base-case, MZ4-C1 and MZ4-C2 simulations, respectively. The predicted SOA budgets fell well within reported ranges for comparable modeling studies, 6.7 to 96 Tg yr-1, but were lower than recently reported observationally constrained values, 50 to 380 Tg yr-1. For MZ4-C2, simulated SOA concentrations at the surface also were in reasonable agreement with comparable modeling studies and observations. Total organic aerosol (OA) mass concentrations at the surface, however, were slightly over-predicted in Europe, Amazonian regions and Malaysian Borneo

  14. Improving the representation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mahmud

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The secondary organic aerosol (SOA module in the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4 was updated by replacing existing two-product (2p parameters with those obtained from two-product volatility basis set (2p-VBS fits (MZ4-C1, and by treating SOA formation from the following additional volatile organic compounds (VOCs: isoprene, propene and lumped alkenes (MZ4-C2. Strong seasonal and spatial variations in global SOA distributions were demonstrated, with significant differences in the predicted concentrations between the base case and updated model simulations. Updates to the model resulted in significant increases in annual average SOA mass concentrations, particularly for the MZ4-C2 simulation in which the additional SOA precursor VOCs were treated. Annual average SOA concentrations predicted by the MZ4-C2 simulation were 1.00 ± 1.04 μg m−3 in South America, 1.57 ± 1.88 μg m−3 in Indonesia, 0.37 ± 0.27 μg m−3 in the USA, and 0.47 ± 0.29 μg m−3 in Europe with corresponding increases of 178, 406, 311 and 292% over the base-case simulation, respectively, primarily due to inclusion of isoprene. The increases in predicted SOA mass concentrations resulted in corresponding increases in SOA contributions to annual average total aerosol optical depth (AOD by ~ 1–6%. Estimated global SOA production was 5.8, 6.6 and 19.1 Tg yr−1 with corresponding burdens of 0.22, 0.24 and 0.59 Tg for the base-case, MZ4-C1 and MZ4-C2 simulations, respectively. The predicted SOA budgets fell well within reported ranges for comparable modeling studies, 6.7 to 96 Tg yr−1, but were lower than recently reported observationally constrained values, 50 to 380 Tg yr−1. For MZ4-C2, simulated SOA concentrations at the surface also were in reasonable agreement with comparable modeling studies and observations. Total organic aerosol (OA mass concentrations at the surface, however, were slightly over-predicted in Europe, Amazonian

  15. Aerosol indirect effects – general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, T.; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, A.; Lohmann, U.; Bellouin, N.; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, A.; Feingold, G.; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Y.; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, P.; Stier, P.; Grandey, B.; Feichter, J.; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, D.; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, A.; Iversen, T.; Seland, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Lamarque, J. F.; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.

    2009-11-16

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated in the present study using three satellite datasets. The satellite datasets are taken as reference bearing in mind that cloud and aerosol retrievals include uncertainties. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (τa) and various cloud and radiation quantities consistently in models and satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over oceans. The relationship between τa and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to rep¬resentation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive re¬lationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and τa as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly in most of them. In a discussion of the hypo¬theses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld – τa relation¬ship, we find that none is unequivocally confirmed by our results. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between τa and cloud top tem¬perature and outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - τa relationship show a strong positive cor¬relation between τa and cloud fraction. The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of τa, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the short

  16. A two-dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Jones, C. F.; Park, J.

    1976-01-01

    Observational data of the pre- and post-volcanic aerosols from the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego in Guatemala (15 deg N) in October 1974 were used in conjunction with predictions of a 2-D circulation model to gain better understanding of the transport, chemical and sedimentation processes which determine the stratospheric aeosol layer.

  17. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sea spray aerosols (SSA) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is updated to enhance fine mode SSA emissions,...

  18. An aerosol dynamics model for simulating particle formation and growth in a mixed flow chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vesterinen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work we model the aerosol size distribution dynamics in a mixed flow chamber in which new particles are formed via nucleation and subsequent condensation of oxidation products of VOCs emitted from Norway spruce seedlings. The microphysical processes included in the model are nucleation, condensation, deposition and coagulation. The aerosol dynamics in the chamber is a competition between aerosol growth and scavenging/deposition which results in a cyclic particle formation process. With a simple 1-product model, in which the formed gas is able to both condense to the particles and nucleate, we are able to catch both the oscillatory features of the particle formation process and the evolution of the number concentration in a reasonable way. The gas-phase chemistry was adjusted using pre-estimated reaction rate constant in the simulations and the particle deposition rate as a function of size was determined experimentally. Despite this, some of the essential features of the physical properties of the aerosol population could still be captured and investigated without the detailed knowledge of the physical processes underlying the problem by using the constructed model. The size dependency of the wall loss coefficient was investigated using a slightly modified measurement set-up.

  19. Inverse modeling of cloud-aerosol interactions -- Part 1: Detailed response surface analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.G. Partridge; J.A. Vrugt; P. Tunved; A.M.L. Ekman; D. Gorea; A. Sooroshian

    2011-01-01

    New methodologies are required to probe the sensitivity of parameters describing cloud droplet activation. This paper presents an inverse modeling-based method for exploring cloud-aerosol interactions via response surfaces. The objective function, containing the difference between the measured and m

  20. The effect of harmonized emissions on aerosol properties in global models – an AeroCom experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Textor

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of unified aerosol sources on global aerosol fields simulated by different models are examined in this paper. We compare results from two AeroCom experiments, one with different (ExpA and one with unified emissions, injection heights, and particle sizes at the source (ExpB. Surprisingly, harmonization of aerosol sources has only a small impact on the simulated inter-model diversity of the global aerosol burden, and consequently global optical properties, as the results are largely controlled by model-specific transport, removal, chemistry (leading to the formation of secondary aerosols and parameterizations of aerosol microphysics (e.g., the split between deposition pathways and to a lesser extent by the spatial and temporal distributions of the (precursor emissions.

    The burdens of black carbon and especially sea salt become more coherent in ExpB only, because the large ExpA diversities for these two species were caused by a few outliers. The experiment also showed that despite prescribing emission fluxes and size distributions, ambiguities in the implementation in individual models can lead to substantial differences.

    These results indicate the need for a better understanding of aerosol life cycles at process level (including spatial dispersal and interaction with meteorological parameters in order to obtain more reliable results from global aerosol simulations. This is particularly important as such model results are used to assess the consequences of specific air pollution abatement strategies.

  1. Type-segregated aerosol effects on regional monsoon activity: A study using ground-based experiments and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Sonbawne, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Classification of observed aerosols into key types [e.g., clean-maritime (CM), desert-dust (DD), urban-industrial/biomass-burning (UI/BB), black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) and mixed-type aerosols (MA)] would facilitate to infer aerosol sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms, not only to improve the accuracy of satellite retrievals but also to quantify the assessment of aerosol radiative impacts on climate. In this paper, we report the results of a study conducted in this direction, employing a Cimel Sun-sky radiometer at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India during 2008 and 2009, which represent two successive contrasting monsoon years. The study provided an observational evidence to show that the local sources are subject to heavy loading of absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon), with strong seasonality closely linked to the monsoon annual rainfall cycle over Pune, a tropical urban station in India. The results revealed the absence of CM aerosols in the pre-monsoon as well as in the monsoon seasons of 2009 as opposed to 2008. Higher loading of dust aerosols is observed in the pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons of 2009; majority may be coated with fine BC aerosols from local emissions, leading to reduction in regional rainfall. Further, significant decrease in coarse-mode AOD and presence of carbonaceous aerosols, affecting the aerosol-cloud interaction and monsoon-rain processes via microphysics and dynamics, is considered responsible for the reduction in rainfall during 2009. Additionally, we discuss how optical depth, contributed by different types of aerosols, influences the distribution of monsoon rainfall over an urban region using the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) aerosol reanalysis. Furthermore, predictions of the Dust REgional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) simulations combined with HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) cluster model are also discussed in support of the

  2. More Realistic Face Model Surface Improves Relevance of Pediatric In-Vitro Aerosol Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirav, Israel; Halamish, Asaf; Gorenberg, Miguel; Omar, Hamza; Newhouse, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Various hard face models are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of aerosol face masks. Softer more realistic “face” surface materials, like skin, deform upon mask application and should provide more relevant in-vitro tests. Studies that simultaneously take into consideration many of the factors characteristic of the in vivo face are lacking. These include airways, various application forces, comparison of various devices, comparison with a hard-surface model and use of a more representative model face based on large numbers of actual faces. Aim To compare mask to “face” seal and aerosol delivery of two pediatric masks using a soft vs. a hard, appropriately representative, pediatric face model under various applied forces. Methods Two identical face models and upper airways replicas were constructed, the only difference being the suppleness and compressibility of the surface layer of the “face.” Integrity of the seal and aerosol delivery of two different masks [AeroChamber (AC) and SootherMask (SM)] were compared using a breath simulator, filter collection and realistic applied forces. Results The soft “face” significantly increased the delivery efficiency and the sealing characteristics of both masks. Aerosol delivery with the soft “face” was significantly greater for the SM compared to the AC (p< 0.01). No statistically significant difference between the two masks was observed with the hard “face.” Conclusions The material and pliability of the model “face” surface has a significant influence on both the seal and delivery efficiency of face masks. This finding should be taken into account during in-vitro aerosol studies. PMID:26090661

  3. More Realistic Face Model Surface Improves Relevance of Pediatric In-Vitro Aerosol Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Amirav

    Full Text Available Various hard face models are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of aerosol face masks. Softer more realistic "face" surface materials, like skin, deform upon mask application and should provide more relevant in-vitro tests. Studies that simultaneously take into consideration many of the factors characteristic of the in vivo face are lacking. These include airways, various application forces, comparison of various devices, comparison with a hard-surface model and use of a more representative model face based on large numbers of actual faces.To compare mask to "face" seal and aerosol delivery of two pediatric masks using a soft vs. a hard, appropriately representative, pediatric face model under various applied forces.Two identical face models and upper airways replicas were constructed, the only difference being the suppleness and compressibility of the surface layer of the "face." Integrity of the seal and aerosol delivery of two different masks [AeroChamber (AC and SootherMask (SM] were compared using a breath simulator, filter collection and realistic applied forces.The soft "face" significantly increased the delivery efficiency and the sealing characteristics of both masks. Aerosol delivery with the soft "face" was significantly greater for the SM compared to the AC (p< 0.01. No statistically significant difference between the two masks was observed with the hard "face."The material and pliability of the model "face" surface has a significant influence on both the seal and delivery efficiency of face masks. This finding should be taken into account during in-vitro aerosol studies.

  4. Evolutionary Industrial Physical Model Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Alberto; Alberdi, Amaia

    Both complexity and lack of knowledge associated to physical processes makes physical models design an arduous task. Frequently, the only available information about the physical processes are the heuristic data obtained from experiments or at best a rough idea on what are the physical principles and laws that underlie considered physical processes. Then the problem is converted to find a mathematical expression which fits data. There exist traditional approaches to tackle the inductive model search process from data, such as regression, interpolation, finite element method, etc. Nevertheless, these methods either are only able to solve a reduced number of simple model typologies, or the given black-box solution does not contribute to clarify the analyzed physical process. In this paper a hybrid evolutionary approach to search complex physical models is proposed. Tests carried out on a real-world industrial physical process (abrasive water jet machining) demonstrate the validity of this approach.

  5. Ensemble-Based Assimilation of Aerosol Observations in GEOS-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchard, V.; Da Silva, A.

    2016-01-01

    MERRA-2 is the latest Aerosol Reanalysis produced at NASA's Global Modeling Assimilation Office (GMAO) from 1979 to present. This reanalysis is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model radiatively coupled to GOCART aerosols and includes assimilation of bias corrected Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from AVHRR over ocean, MODIS sensors on both Terra and Aqua satellites, MISR over bright surfaces and AERONET data. In order to assimilate lidar profiles of aerosols, we are updating the aerosol component of our assimilation system to an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) type of scheme using ensembles generated routinely by the meteorological assimilation. Following the work performed with the first NASA's aerosol reanalysis (MERRAero), we first validate the vertical structure of MERRA-2 aerosol assimilated fields using CALIOP data over regions of particular interest during 2008.

  6. Improving the representation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mahmud

    2012-12-01

    reasonable agreement with comparable modeling studies and observations. Concentrations of estimated organic aerosol (OA at the surface, however, showed under-prediction in Europe and over-prediction in the Amazonian regions and Malaysian Borneo during certain months of the year. Overall, the updated version of MOZART-4, MZ4-v2, showed consistently better skill in predicting SOA and OA levels and spatial distributions as compared with unmodified MOZART-4. The MZ4-v2 updates may be particularly important when MOZART-4 output is used to generate boundary conditions for regional air quality simulations that require more accurate representation of SOA concentrations and distributions.

  7. Generation of Java code from Alvis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyasik, Piotr; Szpyrka, Marcin; Wypych, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Alvis is a formal language that combines graphical modelling of interconnections between system entities (called agents) and a high level programming language to describe behaviour of any individual agent. An Alvis model can be verified formally with model checking techniques applied to the model LTS graph that represents the model state space. This paper presents transformation of an Alvis model into executable Java code. Thus, the approach provides a method of automatic generation of a Java application from formally verified Alvis model.

  8. Modeling South America regional smoke plume: aerosol optical depth variability and shortwave surface forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, N. E.; Longo, K. M.; Freitas, S. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Fonseca, R. M.

    2012-07-01

    Intra-seasonal variability of smoke aerosol optical depth (AOD) and downwelling solar irradiance at the surface during the 2002 biomass burning season in South America was modeled using the Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT-BRAMS). Measurements of AOD from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and solar irradiance at the surface from the Solar Radiation Network (SolRad-NET) were used to evaluate model results. In general, the major features associated with AOD evolution over the southern part of the Amazon Basin and cerrado ecosystem are captured by the model. The main discrepancies were found for high aerosol loading events. In the northeastern portion of the Amazon Basin the model systematically underestimated AOD. This is likely due to the cloudy nature of the region, preventing accurate detection of the fire spots used in the emission model. Moreover, measured AOD were very often close to background conditions and emissions other than smoke were not considered in the simulation. Therefore, under the background scenario, one would expect the model to underestimate AOD. The issue of high aerosol loading events in the southern part of the Amazon and cerrado is also discussed in the context of emission shortcomings. The Cuiabá cerrado site was the only one where the highest quality AERONET data were unavailable. Thus, lower quality data were used. Root-mean-square-error (RMSE) between the model and observations decreased from 0.48 to 0.17 when extreme AOD events (AOD550 nm ≥ 1.0) and Cuiabá were excluded from analysis. Downward surface solar irradiance comparisons also followed similar trends when extremes AOD were excluded. This highlights the need to improve the modelling of the regional smoke plume in order to enhance the accuracy of the radiative energy budget. Aerosol optical model based on the mean intensive properties of smoke from the southern part of the

  9. Coupling aerosol-cloud-radiative processes in the WRF-Chem model: investigating the radiative impact of elevated point sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Chapman

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The local and regional influence of elevated point sources on summertime aerosol forcing and cloud-aerosol interactions in northeastern North America was investigated using the WRF-Chem community model. The direct effects of aerosols on incoming solar radiation were simulated using existing modules to relate aerosol sizes and chemical composition to aerosol optical properties. Indirect effects were simulated by adding a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, simulate aqueous-phase chemistry, and tie a two-moment treatment of cloud water (cloud water mass and cloud droplet number to an existing radiation scheme. Fully interactive feedbacks thus were created within the modified model, with aerosols affecting cloud droplet number and cloud radiative properties, and clouds altering aerosol size and composition via aqueous processes, wet scavenging, and gas-phase-related photolytic processes. Comparisons of a baseline simulation with observations show that the model captured the general temporal cycle of aerosol optical depths (AODs and produced clouds of comparable thickness to observations at approximately the proper times and places. The model overpredicted SO2 mixing ratios and PM2.5 mass, but reproduced the range of observed SO2 to sulfate aerosol ratios, suggesting that atmospheric oxidation processes leading to aerosol sulfate formation are captured in the model. The baseline simulation was compared to a sensitivity simulation in which all emissions at model levels above the surface layer were set to zero, thus removing stack emissions. Instantaneous, site-specific differences for aerosol and cloud related properties between the two simulations could be quite large, as removing above-surface emission sources influenced when and where clouds formed within the modeling domain. When summed spatially over the finest resolution model

  10. Development of an aerosol chemical transport model RAQM2 and predictions of Northeast Asian aerosol mass, size, chemistry, and mixing type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kajino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new aerosol chemical transport model, Regional Air Quality Model 2 (RAQM2, was developed to simulate Asian air quality. We implemented a simple version of a modal-moment aerosol dynamics model (MADMS and achieved a completely dynamic (non-equilibrium solution of a gas-to-particle mass transfer over a wide range of aerosol diameters from 1 nm to super μm. To consider a variety of atmospheric aerosol properties, a category approach was utilized, in which the aerosols were distributed into 4 categories: Aitken mode (ATK, soot-free accumulation mode (ACM, soot aggregates (AGR, and coarse mode (COR. Condensation, evaporation, and Brownian coagulations for each category were solved dynamically. A regional-scale simulation (Δ x = 60 km was performed for the entire year of 2006 covering the Northeast Asian region. Statistical analyses showed that the model reproduced the regional-scale transport and transformation of the major inorganic anthropogenic and natural air constituents within factors of 2 to 5. The modeled PM1/bulk ratios of the chemical components were consistent with the observations, indicating that the simulations of aerosol mixing types were successful. Non-sea salt SO42- mixed with ATK + ACM was the largest at Hedo in summer, whereas it mixed with AGR was substantial in cold seasons. Ninety-eight percent of the modeled NO3- was mixed with sea salt at Hedo, whereas 53.7% of the NO3- was mixed with sea salt at Gosan, located upwind toward the Asian continent. The condensation of HNO3 onto sea salt particles during transport over the ocean makes the difference in the NO3- mixing type at the two sites. Because the aerosol mixing type alters optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity, its accurate prediction and evaluation are indispensable for aerosol-cloud-radiation interaction studies.

  11. MALTE – Model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The manuscript presents a detailed description of the meteorological and chemical code of Malte – a model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere. The aerosol dynamics are achieved by the new developed UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol Model code with kinetic limited nucleation as responsible mechanism to form new clusters. First results indicate that the model is able to predict the on- and offset of new particle formation as well as the total aerosol number concentrations that were in good agreement with the observations. Further, comparison of predicted and measured H2SO4 concentrations showed a satisfactory agreement. The simulation results indicated that at a certain transitional particle diameter (2–9 nm, organic molecules can begin to contribute significantly to the growth rate compared to sulphuric acid. At even larger particle sizes, organic molecules can dominate the growth rate on days with significant monoterpene concentrations. The intraday vertical evolution of newly formed clusters and particles in two different size ranges resulted in two maxima at the ground and the top of the mixed layer with higher concentrations for the detectable particles above 3 nm below in contrast to the predicted cluster concentrations.

  12. MALTE – model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The manuscript presents a detailed description of the meteorological and chemical code of Malte – a model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere. The aerosol dynamics are achieved by the new developed UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol Model code with kinetic limited nucleation as responsible mechanism to form new clusters. First results indicate that the model is able to predict the on- and offset of new particle formation as well as the total aerosol number concentrations that were in good agreement with the observations. Further, comparison of predicted and measured H2SO4 concentrations showed a satisfactory agreement. The simulation results indicated that at a certain transitional particle diameter (2–7 nm, organic molecules can begin to contribute significantly to the growth rate compared to sulphuric acid. At even larger particle sizes, organic molecules can dominate the growth rate on days with significant monoterpene concentrations. The intraday vertical evolution of newly formed clusters and particles in two different size ranges resulted in two maxima at the ground. These particles grow around noon to the detectable size range and agree well with measured vertical profiles.

  13. Use of the Aerosol Rabbitpox Virus Model for Evaluation of Anti-Poxvirus Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Voss

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox is an acute disease caused by infection with variola virus that has had historic effects on the human population due to its virulence and infectivity. Because variola remains a threat to humans, the discovery and development of novel pox therapeutics and vaccines has been an area of intense focus. As variola is a uniquely human virus lacking a robust animal model, the development of rational therapeutic or vaccine approaches for variola requires the use of model systems that reflect the clinical aspects of human infection. Many laboratory animal models of poxviral disease have been developed over the years to study host response and to evaluate new therapeutics and vaccines for the treatment or prevention of human smallpox. Rabbitpox (rabbitpox virus infection in rabbits is a severe and often lethal infection that has been identified as an ideal disease model for the study of poxviruses in a non-rodent species. The aerosol infection model (aerosolized rabbitpox infection embodies many of the desired aspects of the disease syndrome that involves the respiratory system and thus may serve as an appropriate model for evaluation of antivirals under development for the therapeutic treatment of human smallpox. In this review we summarize the aerosol model of rabbitpox, discuss the development efforts that have thus far used this model for antiviral testing, and comment on the prospects for its use in future evaluations requiring a poxviral model with a focus on respiratory infection.

  14. The importance of temporal collocation for the evaluation of aerosol models with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutgens, N. A. J.; Partridge, D. G.; Stier, P.

    2016-01-01

    It is often implicitly assumed that over suitably long periods the mean of observations and models should be comparable, even if they have different temporal sampling. We assess the errors incurred due to ignoring temporal sampling and show that they are of similar magnitude as (but smaller than) actual model errors (20-60 %).Using temporal sampling from remote-sensing data sets, the satellite imager MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and the ground-based sun photometer network AERONET (AErosol Robotic NETwork), and three different global aerosol models, we compare annual and monthly averages of full model data to sampled model data. Our results show that sampling errors as large as 100 % in AOT (aerosol optical thickness), 0.4 in AE (Ångström Exponent) and 0.05 in SSA (single scattering albedo) are possible. Even in daily averages, sampling errors can be significant. Moreover these sampling errors are often correlated over long distances giving rise to artificial contrasts between pristine and polluted events and regions. Additionally, we provide evidence that suggests that models will underestimate these errors. To prevent sampling errors, model data should be temporally collocated to the observations before any analysis is made.We also discuss how this work has consequences for in situ measurements (e.g. aircraft campaigns or surface measurements) in model evaluation.Although this study is framed in the context of model evaluation, it has a clear and direct relevance to climatologies derived from observational data sets.

  15. A balanced team generating model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Water, Tara; van de Water, Henny; Bukman, Cock

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a general team balancing model. It first summarizes existing balancing methods. It is shown that for these methods it is difficult to meet all the conditions posed by Belbin on balanced teams. This mainly is caused by the complexity of the balancing problem. A mathematical mode

  16. Trip Generation Model Based on Destination Attractiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Liya; GUAN Hongzhi; YAN Hai

    2008-01-01

    Traditional trip generation forecasting methods use unified average trip generation rates to determine trip generation volumes in various traffic zones without considering the individual characteristics of each traffic zone.Therefore,the results can have significant errors.To reduce the forecasting error produced by uniform trip generation rates for different traffic zones,the behavior of each traveler was studied instead of the characteristics of the traffic zone.This paper gives a method for calculating the trip efficiency and the effect of traffic zones combined with a destination selection model based on disaggregate theory for trip generation.Beijing data is used with the trip generation method to predict trip volumes.The results show that the disaggregate model in this paper is more accurate than the traditional method.An analysis of the factors influencing traveler behavior and destination selection shows that the attractiveness of the traffic zone strongly affects the trip generation volume.

  17. Influence of Heterogeneous OH Oxidation on the Evaporation Behavior and Composition of a Model Organic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesar, K. R.; Cappa, C. D.; Wilson, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneously oxidized squalane particles are used here as a model system to investigate the interplay between chemical composition and particle volatility. Reaction of squalane particles by OH radicals leads to the production of oxygenated products. Here we use the vacuum ultra-violet Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (VUV-AMS) at beamline 9.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source to monitor the evolution of specific oxidation products that result from increasing OH exposures, and how the composition changes as the oxidized particles evaporate. The soft ionization in the VUV-AMS allows us to uniquely track the parent squalane molecule and the various oxidation products over multiple generations of oxidation. Compositional changes of the oxidized particles resulting from evaporation have been measured in three sets of laboratory experiments. In the first set, a thermodenuder at varying temperatures was used to induce evaporation of particles at a fixed OH exposure. Second, the OH exposure was varied along with temperature to create a cross-sectional observation of particle composition at 50% mass fraction remaining for ten different oxidation levels. The combination of these two experiments provides information as to the compositional changes that occur during evaporation due to heating. In the third set of experiments, VUV-AMS spectra of oxidized squalane particles following dilution-induced evaporation were measured for comparison with the thermodenuder experiments. These experiments provide insights into the relationships between particle oxidation, composition and evaporation kinetics.

  18. Modeling sea-salt aerosol in a coupled climate and sectional microphysical model: mass, optical depth and number concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Sea-salt aerosol mass, optical depth, and number concentration over the global oceans have significant implications for aerosol direct and indirect climate effects. We modeled sea-salt aerosol in a coupled climate and sectional microphysical model, CAM/CARMA, with aerosol dynamics including sea salt emission, gravitational sedimentation, dry deposition, wet scavenging, and particle swelling. We aimed at finding an integrated sea salt source function parameterization in the global climate model to simultaneously represent mass, optical depth, and number concentration. Each of these quantities is sensitive to a different part of the aerosol size distribution, which requires a size resolved microphysical model to treat properly. The CMS source function introduced in the research, based upon several earlier source functions, reproduced measurements of mass, optical depth and number concentration as well as the size distribution better than other source function choices we tried. However, as we note, it is also important to properly set the removal rate of the particles. The source function and removal rate are coupled in producing observed abundances. We find that sea-salt mass and optical depth peak in the winter, when winds are highest. However, surprisingly, particle numbers and CCN concentrations peak in summer when rainfall is lowest. The quadratic dependence of sea salt optical depth on wind speed, observed by some, is well represented in the model. We also found good agreement with the wind speed dependency of the number concentration at the measurement location and the regional scale. The work is the basis for further investigation of the effects of sea-salt aerosol on climate and atmospheric chemistry.

  19. Climate impact of biofuels in shipping: global model studies of the aerosol indirect effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Mattia; Klinger, Carolin; Eyring, Veronika; Hendricks, Johannes; Lauer, Axel; Petzold, Andreas

    2011-04-15

    Aerosol emissions from international shipping are recognized to have a large impact on the Earth's radiation budget, directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and indirectly by altering cloud properties. New regulations have recently been approved by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) aiming at progressive reductions of the maximum sulfur content allowed in marine fuels from current 4.5% by mass down to 0.5% in 2020, with more restrictive limits already applied in some coastal regions. In this context, we use a global bottom-up algorithm to calculate geographically resolved emission inventories of gaseous (NO(x), CO, SO(2)) and aerosol (black carbon, organic matter, sulfate) species for different kinds of low-sulfur fuels in shipping. We apply these inventories to study the resulting changes in radiative forcing, attributed to particles from shipping, with the global aerosol-climate model EMAC-MADE. The emission factors for the different fuels are based on measurements at a test bed of a large diesel engine. We consider both fossil fuel (marine gas oil) and biofuels (palm and soy bean oil) as a substitute for heavy fuel oil in the current (2006) fleet and compare their climate impact to that resulting from heavy fuel oil use. Our simulations suggest that ship-induced surface level concentrations of sulfate aerosol are strongly reduced, up to about 40-60% in the high-traffic regions. This clearly has positive consequences for pollution reduction in the vicinity of major harbors. Additionally, such reductions in the aerosol loading lead to a decrease of a factor of 3-4 in the indirect global aerosol effect induced by emissions from international shipping.

  20. Modeling Study of the Global Distribution of Radiative Forcing by Dust Aerosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; MA Jinghui; ZHENG Youfei

    2010-01-01

    To quantitatively understand the dust aerosol effects on climate change, we calculated the global dis-tribution of direct radiative forcing due to dust aerosol under clear and cloudy skies in both winter and summer, by using an improved radiative transfer model and the global distribution of dust mass concentra-tion given by GADS (Global Aerosol Data Set). The results show that the global means of the solar forcing due to dust aerosol at the tropopause for winter and summer are -0.48 and -0.50 W m-2, respectively; the corresponding values for the longwave forcing due to dust are 0.11 and 0.09 W m-2, respectively. At the surface, the global means of the solar forcing clue to dust are -1.36 W m-2 for winter and -1.56 W m-2 for summer, whereas the corresponding values for the longwave forcing are 0.27 and 0.23 W m-2, respectively. This work points out that the absolute values of the solar forcing due to dust aerosol at both the tropopause and surface increase linearly with the cosine of solar zenith angle and surface albedo. The solar zenith angle influences both the strength and distribution of the solar forcing greatly. Clouds exert great effects on the direct radiative forcing of dust, depending on many factors including cloud cover, cloud height, cloud water path, surface albedo, solar zenith angle, etc. The effects of low clouds and middle clouds are larger than those of high clouds. The existence of clouds reduces the longwave radiative forcing at the tropopause, where the influences of low clouds are the most obvious. Therefore, the impacts of clouds should not be ignored when estimating the direct radiative forcing due to dust aerosol.

  1. Digital relief generation from 3D models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meili; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Hongming; Qian, Kun; Chang, Jian; He, Dongjian

    2016-09-01

    It is difficult to extend image-based relief generation to high-relief generation, as the images contain insufficient height information. To generate reliefs from three-dimensional (3D) models, it is necessary to extract the height fields from the model, but this can only generate bas-reliefs. To overcome this problem, an efficient method is proposed to generate bas-reliefs and high-reliefs directly from 3D meshes. To produce relief features that are visually appropriate, the 3D meshes are first scaled. 3D unsharp masking is used to enhance the visual features in the 3D mesh, and average smoothing and Laplacian smoothing are implemented to achieve better smoothing results. A nonlinear variable scaling scheme is then employed to generate the final bas-reliefs and high-reliefs. Using the proposed method, relief models can be generated from arbitrary viewing positions with different gestures and combinations of multiple 3D models. The generated relief models can be printed by 3D printers. The proposed method provides a means of generating both high-reliefs and bas-reliefs in an efficient and effective way under the appropriate scaling factors.

  2. CCN activation and cloud processing in sectional aerosol models with low size resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korhonen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of low size resolution, typical to sectional aerosol models in large scale applications, on cloud droplet activation and cloud processing of aerosol particles. A simplified cloud model with five approaches to determine the fraction of activated particles is compared with a detailed reference model under different atmospheric conditions. In general, activation approaches which assume a distribution profile within the critical model size sections predict the cloud droplet concentration most accurately under clean and moderately polluted conditions. In such cases, the deviation from the reference simulations is below 15% except for very low updraft velocities. In highly polluted cases, the concentration of cloud droplets is significantly overestimated due to the inability of the simplified model to account for the kinetic limitations of the droplet growth. Of the profiles examined, taking into account the local shape of the particle size distribution is the most accurate although in most cases the shape of the profile has little relevance. While the low resolution cloud model cannot reproduce the details of the out-of-the-cloud aerosol size distribution, it captures well the amount of sulphate produced in aqueous-phase reactions as well as the distribution of the sulphate between the cloud droplets. Overall, the simplified cloud model with low size resolution performs well for clean and moderately polluted regions that cover most of the Earth's surface and is therefore suitable for large scale models. It can, however, show uncertainties in areas with strong pollution from anthropogenic sources.

  3. The impact of natural aerosols on Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoj, V.; Wang, H.; Yoon, J.; Rasch, P.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols emitted from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources impact the earth's radiation and water budget. Most of the studies in the recent past have been focusing on anthropogenic aerosols and their impact. However, natural aerosols like sea-salt and dust form the bulk of the aerosol mass loading in the atmosphere. For example, oceans cover about 70% of the earth's surface area and are a major source of sea-salt aerosols in the atmosphere. Sea-salt emission is the single largest contributor to natural aerosols and accounts for nearly half of the global aerosol optical depth. Dust emission, the counterpart over land, also contributes substantially to natural atmospheric aerosols. In addition to their direct effect on solar radiation, these aerosols also actively participate in cloud formation by acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei and have indirect effects on clouds. Both sea-salt and dust particles are primarily formed by the action of winds that largely determine seasonal/annual variations in their source strength and atmospheric loading. Over the Indian Ocean region, especially the Arabian Sea is characterized by high winds during the monsoon that generate a large amount of sea-salt aerosols. Also these high winds mobilize large amount of dust aerosols in the northern Arabian Sea depending on wind direction. These natural aerosols together with anthropogenic emissions impact Indian monsoon precipitation. We use satellite observation of precipitation and column aerosol loading along with a global climate model (Community Atmosphere Model version 5, CAM5) to show that the variability of natural aerosols (i.e., sea-salt and dust) play an important role in modulating the Indian monsoon precipitation and the response of the monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosols. The effect of dust and sea-salt on precipitation is found to be opposite to each other. Our study suggests that the observed spatial and temporal trends in precipitation

  4. Exploiting the weekly cycle as observed over Europe to analyse aerosol indirect effects in two climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Quaas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A weekly cycle in aerosol pollution and meteorological quantities is observed over Europe. In the present study we exploit this effect to analyse aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions. A weekly cycle is imposed on anthropogenic emissions in two general circulation models that include parameterizations of aerosol cycles and cloud microphysics. It is found that the simulated weekly cycles in sulfur dioxide, sulfate, and aerosol optical depth in both models agree reasonably well with the observed ones indicating model skill in simulating the aerosol cycle. A distinct weekly cycle in cloud droplet number concentration is demonstrated in both observations and models. For other variables, such as cloud liquid water path, cloud cover, top-of-the-atmosphere radiation fluxes, precipitation, and surface temperature, large variability and contradictory results between observations, model simulations, and model control simulations without a weekly cycle in emissions prevent us from reaching any firm conclusions about the potential aerosol impact on meteorology or the realism of the modeled second aerosol indirect effects.

  5. Exploiting the weekly cycle as observed over Europe to analyse aerosol indirect effects in two climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Joos

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A weekly cycle in aerosol pollution and some meteorological quantities is observed over Europe. In the present study we exploit this effect to analyse aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions. A weekly cycle is imposed on anthropogenic emissions in two general circulation models that include parameterizations of aerosol processes and cloud microphysics. It is found that the simulated weekly cycles in sulfur dioxide, sulfate, and aerosol optical depth in both models agree reasonably well with those observed indicating model skill in simulating the aerosol cycle. A distinct weekly cycle in cloud droplet number concentration is demonstrated in both observations and models. For other variables, such as cloud liquid water path, cloud cover, top-of-the-atmosphere radiation fluxes, precipitation, and surface temperature, large variability and contradictory results between observations, model simulations, and model control simulations without a weekly cycle in emissions prevent us from reaching any firm conclusions about the potential aerosol impact on meteorology or the realism of the modelled second aerosol indirect effects.

  6. Cloud Processing of Gases and Aerosols in Air Quality Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiming Zhang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The representations of cloud processing of gases and aerosols in some of the current state-of-the-art regional air quality models in North America and Europe are reviewed. Key processes reviewed include aerosol activation (or nucleation scavenging of aerosols, aqueous-phase chemistry, and wet deposition/removal of atmospheric tracers. It was found that models vary considerably in the parameterizations or algorithms used in representing these processes. As an emerging area of research, the current understanding of the uptake of water soluble organics by cloud droplets and the potential aqueous-phase reaction pathways leading to the atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation is also reviewed. Sensitivity tests using the AURAMS model have been conducted in order to assess the impact on modeled regional particulate matter (PM from: (1 the different aerosol activation schemes, (2 the different below-cloud particle scavenging algorithms, and (3 the inclusion of cloud processing of water soluble organics as a potential pathway for the formation of atmospheric SOA. It was found that the modeled droplet number concentrations and ambient PM size distributions were strongly affected by the use of different aerosol activation schemes. The impact on the modeled average ambient PM mass concentration was found to be limited in terms of averaged PM2.5 concentration (~a few percents but more significant in terms of PM1.0 (up to 10 percents. The modeled ambient PM was found to be moderately sensitive to the below-cloud particle scavenging algorithms, with relative differences up to 10% and 20% in terms of PM2.5 and PM10, respectively, when using the two different algorithms for the scavenging coefficient (Λ corresponding to the lower and upper bounds in the parameterization for Λ. The model simulation with the additional cloud uptake and processing of water-soluble organic gases was shown to improve the evaluation statistics for modeled PM2.5 OA

  7. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Meskhidze

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7. Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA, phytoplankton-produced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA and methane sulfonate (MS are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr−1, for the Gantt et al. (2011 and Vignati et al. (2010 emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr−1, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ng m−3, with values up to 400 ng m−3 over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2, both Gantt et al. (2011 and Vignati et al. (2010 formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011 parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The largest increases (up to 20% in CCN (at a supersaturation (S of 0.2% number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming

  8. Direct radiative effect modeled for regional aerosols in central Europe including the effect of relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorga, G.; Hitzenberger, R.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Puxbaum, Hans

    2007-01-01

    In view of both the climatic relevance of aerosols and the fact that aerosol burdens in central Europe are heavily impacted by anthropogenic sources, this study is focused on estimating the regional-scale direct radiative effect of aerosols in Austria. The aerosol data (over 80 samples in total) were collected during measurement campaigns at five sampling sites: the urban areas of Vienna, Linz, and Graz and on Mt. Rax (1644 m, regional background aerosol) and Mt. Sonnblick (3106 m, background aerosol). Aerosol mass size distributions were obtained with eight-stage (size range: 0.06-16 μm diameter) and six-stage (size range 0.1-10 μm) low-pressure cascade impactors. The size-segregated samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC), black carbon (BC), and inorganic ions. The aerosol at these five locations is compared in terms of size distributions, optical properties, and direct forcing. Mie calculations are performed for the dry aerosol at 60 wavelengths in the range 0.3-40 μm. Using mass growth factors determined earlier, the optical properties are also estimated for higher relative humidities (60%, 70%, 80%, and 90%). A box model was used to estimate direct radiative forcing (DRF). The presence of absorbing species (BC) was found to reduce the cooling effect of the aerosols. The water-soluble substances dominate radiative forcing at the urban sites, while on Rax and Sonnblick BC plays the most important role. This result can be explained by the effect of the surface albedo, which is much lower in the urban regions (0.16) than at the ice and snow-covered mountain sites. Shortwave (below 4 μm) and longwave surface albedo values for ice were 0.35 and 0.5, while for snow surface albedo, values of 0.8 (shortwave) and 0.5 (longwave) were used. In the case of dry aerosol, especially for urban sites, the unidentified material may contribute a large part to the forcing. Depending on the sampling site the estimated forcing gets more negative with increasing humidity

  9. Modeling aerosol impacts on atmospheric visibility in Beijing with RAMS-CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Tao, Jinhua; Wang, Lili; Gao, Jian; Wang, Shulan; Chai, Fahe

    2013-06-01

    A typical heavy air pollution episode occurred over the North China Plain (NCP) in December 2010. The air quality in Beijing and its surrounding regions worsened during the period December 17 to 22, and local visibility became significantly affected by the high pollution levels. The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ coupled with an aerosol optical property scheme was applied to simulate the trace gases and major aerosol components in the NCP to obtain an in-depth understanding of the relationship between regional low visibility and aerosol particles. The model performance was evaluated using various observation data, such as meteorological factors (temperature, relative humidity, and wind field), gaseous pollutants (SO2, NO2, and O3), PM2.5, PM10, and visibility at several measurement stations. The modeled meteorological field and visibility were in good agreement with observations from December 2010. The modeled mass concentrations of gaseous pollutants and aerosol particles also suitably captured the magnitude and variation features of the observation data, especially during the air pollution episode. The simulated results showed that during this pollution episode, low visibility (lower than 10 km) occurred mainly in Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, and Shandong. The analysis and sensitivity test indicated that the aerosol particles larger than PM2.5 and the water uptake effect of aerosol optical properties could not significantly influence visibility. Thus, the low visibility was primarily caused by the high mass burden of PM2.5as a result of the local pollutant accumulation and long-range transport. Statistics showed that the visibility variation was closely inversely related to the variation in PM2.5 in most regions in the NCP. Visibility decreased lower than 10 km when the mass concentration of PM2.5 exceeded 75 μg m-3 to 85 μg m-3 in the NCP. Sulfate and nitrate were the two major inorganic aerosol components of PM2.5 that evidently decreased visibility by

  10. Molecular characterization of brown carbon (BrC) chromophores in secondary organic aerosol generated from photo-oxidation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E; Kathmann, Shawn M; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365 nm = 0.78 m(2) g(-1)) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene NOx. The integrated absorbance of these fifteen chromophores accounts for 40-60% of the total light absorbance by Tol-SOA at wavelengths between 300 nm and 500 nm. The combination of tandem LC-UV/Vis-ESI/HRMS measurements provides an analytical platform for predictive understanding of light absorption properties by BrC and their relationship to the structure of individual chromophores. General trends in the UV/Vis absorption by plausible isomers of the BrC chromophores were evaluated using theoretical chemistry calculations. The molecular-level understanding of BrC chemistry is helpful for better understanding the evolution and behavior of light absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere. PMID:26173064

  11. Organic aerosol concentration and composition over Europe: insights from comparison of regional model predictions with aerosol mass spectrometer factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fountoukis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A detailed three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (PMCAMx was applied over Europe focusing on the formation and chemical transformation of organic matter. Three periods representative of different seasons were simulated, corresponding to intensive field campaigns. An extensive set of AMS measurements was used to evaluate the model and, using factor analysis results, gain more insight into the sources and transformations of organic aerosol (OA. Overall, the agreement between predictions and measurements for OA concentration is encouraging with the model reproducing two thirds of the data (daily average mass concentrations within a factor of two. Oxygenated OA (OOA is predicted to contribute 93% to total OA during May, 87% during winter and 96% during autumn with the rest consisting of fresh primary OA (POA. Predicted OOA concentrations compare well with the observed OOA values for all periods with an average fractional error of 0.53 and a bias equal to −0.07 (mean error = 0.9 μg m−3, mean bias = −0.2 μg m−3. The model systematically underpredicts fresh POA in most sites during late spring and autumn (mean bias up to −0.8 μg m−3. Based on results from a source apportionment algorithm running in parallel with PMCAMx, most of the POA originates from biomass burning (fires and residential wood combustion and therefore biomass burning OA is most likely underestimated in the emission inventory. The model performs well at all sites when the PMF-estimated low volatility OOA is compared against the OA with C* ≤ 0.1 μg m−3 and semivolatile OOA against the OA with C* > 0.1 μg m−3 respectively.

  12. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Analysis of postulated energetic reactions and resultant aerosol generation in Hanford Site Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews work done to estimate the possible consequences of postulated energetic reactions in ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The issue of explosive reactions was raised in the 1987 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), where a detonation-like explosion was postulated for the purpose of defining an upper bound on dose consequences for various disposal options. A review of the explosion scenario by the General Accounting Office (GAO) indicated that the aerosol generation and consequent radioactive doses projected for the explosion postulated in the EIS were understated by one to two orders of magnitude. The US DOE has sponsored an extensive study of the hazard posed by uncontrolled exothermic reactions in ferrocyanide waste, and results obtained during the past three years have allowed this hazard to be more realistically assessed. The objective of this report is to summarize the improved knowledge base that now indicates that explosive or vigorous chemical reactions are not credible in the ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks. This improved understanding supports the decision not to proceed with further analyses or predictions of the consequences of such an event or with aerosol tests in support of such predictions. 53 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Contribution of First- versus Second-Generation Products to Secondary Organic Aerosols Formed in the Oxidation of Biogenic Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Nga L.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Keywood, Melita D.; Bahreini, Roya; Varutbangkul, Varuntida; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Lee, Anita; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic hydrocarbons emitted by vegetation are important contributors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the aerosol formation mechanisms are incompletely understood. In this study, the formation of aerosols and gas-phase products from the ozonolysis and photooxidation of a series of biogenic hydrocarbons (isoprene, 8 monoterpenes, 4 sesquiterpenes, and 3 oxygenated terpenes) are examined. By comparing aerosol growth (measured by Differential Mobility Analyzers, DMAs) and gas-phase conc...

  14. Anthropogenic contribution to cloud condensation nuclei and the first aerosol indirect climate effect modelled by GEOS-Chem/APM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F.

    2013-05-01

    Atmospheric particles influence climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud properties (albedo, lifetime, etc.) and precipitation. The first aerosol indirect radiative forcing (FAIRF) (i.e., cloud albedo effect) constitutes the largest uncertainty among the various radiative forcings quantified by the latest IPCC assessment report (IPCC2007). In order to confidently interpret climate change over the past century and project future change, it is essential to reduce the FAIRF uncertainty. One of the large sources of the uncertainty is the poor knowledge of the number concentrations and spatial distributions of pre-industrial and present-day aerosols. All previous and recent FAIRF studies are based on global models with simplified chemistry and aerosol microphysics, which may lead to large uncertainties in predicted aerosol properties and FAIRF values. Here, we investigate the anthropogenic contribution to CCN and associated FAIRF using a state-of-the-art global chemical transport and aerosol model (GEOS-Chem/APM) that contains a number of advanced features (including size-resolved sectional particle microphysics, online comprehensive SOx-NOx-Ox-VOCs chemistry, consideration of nitrate and secondary organic aerosols, online aerosol-cloud-radiation calculation, usage of more accurate assimilated meteorology, etc.). As far as we know, this is the first time that a global model with full chemistry and size-resolved (sectional) particle microphysics is employed to study FAIRF. Key aerosol properties predicted by GEOS-Chem/APM for the present-day case have been evaluated against a large set of land-, ship-, aircraft-, and satellite- based aerosol measurements including total particle number concentrations, CCN concentrations, AODs, and vertical profiles of extinction coefficients. The GEOS-Chem/APM model, with its advanced features and ability to reproduce observed aerosol properties (including CCN) around the globe, is expected to

  15. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2015-02-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA (Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications) in the European-scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The modeled PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at four measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at northern and central European sites and accumulation-mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. The low nucleation rate coefficient used in this study is an important reason for the underestimation. On the other hand, the model performs well for particle mass (including secondary inorganic aerosol components), while elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation. Updating the biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation.

  16. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shipeng; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Takeamura, Toshihiko; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Lee, Yunha; Shindell, Drew T.; Partridge, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol–cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (...

  17. More Realistic Face Model Surface Improves Relevance of Pediatric In-Vitro Aerosol Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Israel Amirav; Asaf Halamish; Miguel Gorenberg; Hamza Omar; Michael T Newhouse

    2015-01-01

    Background Various hard face models are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of aerosol face masks. Softer more realistic “face” surface materials, like skin, deform upon mask application and should provide more relevant in-vitro tests. Studies that simultaneously take into consideration many of the factors characteristic of the in vivo face are lacking. These incl