WorldWideScience

Sample records for aeronomy

  1. The Long, Bumpy Road to a Mars Aeronomy Mission (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Bougher, S. W.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    With the advent of the space age, early focus was put into characterizing the Earth's upper atmosphere with aeronomy missions. These missions were designed to study the upper atmosphere region of a planet where the ionosphere is produced with particular attention given to the composition, properties and motion of atmosphere constituents. In particular a very successful US series of Atmosphere Explorer aeronomy spacecraft (1963-1977) was implemented. This upper atmosphere region is the envelope that all energy from the sun must penetrate and is recognized as an inseparable part of a planet's entire atmosphere. Venus was the next planet to have its upper atmosphere/ionosphere deeply probed via the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (1978-1986) that carried a complement of instruments similar to some flown on the Atmosphere Explorers. The planet which humans have long set their imagination on, Mars, has yet to be subjected to the same detailed upper atmosphere perusal until now, with MAVEN. Not that attempts have been wanting. More than 30 spacecraft launches to Mars were attempted, but half were not successful and those that attained orbit came far short of attaining the same level of knowledge of the Martian upper atmosphere. Other countries had planned Mars aeronomy missions that didn't bear fruit - e.g. Mars-96 and Nozomi and the US did studies for two missions, Mars Aeronomy Orbiter and MUADEE, that never were implemented. This is about to change. NASA's Scout Program singled out two aeronomy missions in its final competition and the selected mission, MAVEN, will fly with the needed sophistication of instruments to finally probe and understand the top of Mars' atmosphere. Was this late selection of a NASA aeronomy mission to Mars a philosophy change in US priorities or was it an accident of planning and budget constraints? Was it driven by the developing knowledge that Mars really had an early atmosphere environment conducive to life and that an aeronomy mission is indeed

  2. Mars Aeronomy Observer: Report of the Science Working Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunten, Donald M.; Slavin, James A.; Brace, Lawrence H.; Deming, Drake; Frank, Louis A.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Haberle, Robert M.; Hanson, William B.; Intriligator, Devrie S.; Killeen, Timothy L.; hide

    1986-01-01

    The Mars Aeronomy Observer (MAO) is a candidate follow-on mission to Mars Observer (MO) in the Planetary Observer Program. The four Mariner and two Viking spacecraft sent to Mars between 1965 and 1976 have provided a wealth of information concerning Martian planetology. The Mars Observer, to be launched in 1990, will build on their results by further examining the elemental and mineralogical composition of the surface, the strength and multipolar composition of the planetary magnetic field, the gravitational field and topography, and the circulation of the lower atmosphere. The Mars Aeronomy Observer is intended to address the last major aspects of Martian environment which have yet to be investigated: the upper atmosphere, the ionsphere, and the solar wind interaction region.

  3. The Spark of Disruptive Innovation for Space Physics and Aeronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, E.

    2017-12-01

    What is disruptive innovation and why does it matter for Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA)? This presentation will define disruptive innovation and present several examples relevant to SPA. These examples range from Cubesats to Citizen Science. Disruptive innovation requires not just an idea but also execution. Why do we need disruptive innovation? Simply put, we need to break out of our comfortable rut to solve bigger problems and evolve as a field for the future. These opportunities are exciting and they are difficult. SPA is well-suited to these types of interdisciplinary applications, due to its dual fundamental and applied nature that dovetails with many other fields. Challenges are that we do not incentivize disruptive innovation, we do not recognize it, and we typically do not fund it. As a result we are risk averse and we suffer from the "Matthew effect" of accumulated advantage. We do not allow ourselves to learn from new and uncomfortable angles and recognize the innovation that comes from there. The strength of having a more diverse and inclusive field is that a range of more diverse ideas and perspectives will be promoted. The next big innovations for SPA may come from the outside, and the best way to capture such ideas may be to promote diversity and inclusion at all levels.

  4. Spread F – an old equatorial aeronomy problem finally resolved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Woodman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the oldest scientific topics in Equatorial Aeronomy is related to Spread-F. It includes all our efforts to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the existence of ionospheric F-region irregularities, the spread of the traces in a night-time equatorial ionogram – hence its name – and all other manifestations of the same. It was observed for the first time as an abnormal ionogram in Huancayo, about 70 years ago. But only recently are we coming to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for its occurrence and its capricious day to day variability. Several additional techniques have been used to reveal the spatial and temporal characteristics of the F-region irregularities responsible for the phenomenon. Among them we have, in chronological order, radio star scintillations, trans-equatorial radio propagation, satellite scintillations, radar backscatter, satellite and rocket in situ measurements, airglow, total electron content techniques using the propagation of satellite radio signals and, recently, radar imaging techniques. Theoretical efforts are as old as the observations. Nevertheless, 32 years after their discovery, Jicamarca radar observations showed that none of the theories that had been put forward could explain them completely. The observations showed that irregularities were detected at altitudes that were stable according to the mechanisms proposed. A breakthrough came a few years later, again from Jicamarca, by showing that some of the "stable" regions had become unstable by the non-linear propagation of the irregularities from the unstable to the stable region of the ionosphere in the form of bubbles of low density plasma. A problem remained, however; the primary instability mechanism proposed, an extended (generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability, was too slow to explain the rapid development seen by the observations. Gravity waves in the neutral background have been proposed as a seeding mechanism to

  5. Geomagnetism and Aeronomy activities in Italy during IGY, 1957/58

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilla Alfonsi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2007 several events were organized to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the International Geophysical Year
    (IGY, 1957-1958. The celebrations will last until 2009 and are taking place within different contexts: the International
    Polar Year (IPY, the International Heliophysical Year (IHY, the electronic Geophysical Year (eGY
    and the International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE.
    IGY offered a very appropriate and timely occasion to undertake a series of coordinated observations of various
    geophysical phenomena all over the globe. Italy took part in the broad international effort stimulated by IGY. In
    fact, Italy participated in observations and studies in many of the proposed scientific areas, in particular Geomagnetism
    and Aeronomy. The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (ING started the installation of observatories,
    and updated and ensured continuous recording of geophysical observations. Geomagnetism, ionospheric
    physics, seismology, and other geophysical disciplines, were advanced. Although much of the work was undertaken
    in Italy, some attention was also devoted to other areas of the world, in particular Antarctica, where Italy
    participated in seismological observations. This paper gives a summary of the Geomagnetism and Ionospheric
    Physics activities within IGY. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of this historical event and its outcomes
    for the improvement of geophysical observations and the post-IGY growth of scientific investigations in Italy.

  6. Recommendation for a set of solar EUV lines to be monitored for aeronomy applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lilensten

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In two recent studies, Dudok de Wit et al. (2005 and Kretzschmar et al. (2006 have shown that the solar Ultra-Violet spectrum between 25 and 195 nm can be reconstructed from the observation of a set of 6 to 10 carefully chosen spectral lines. The best set of lines, however, is application dependent. In this study, we demonstrate that a good candidate for aeronomy applications consists of the following 6 lines: H I at 102.572 nm, C III at 97.702 nm, O V at 62.973 nm, He I at 58.433 nm, Fe XV at 28.415 nm and He II at 30.378 nm. The TRANSCAR model is used to quantify the impact of each individual line on the density, temperature and velocity profiles. Using a multidimensional scaling technique, we show how to select from this the best set of lines. Although this selection is motivated by the specification of the ionosphere, our set of lines is also found to be appropriate for reconstructing the variability of the solar spectrum between 25 and 195 nm.

  7. The Efforts of the American Geophysical Union Space Physics and Aeronomy Section Education and Public Outreach Committee to Use NASA Research in Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Dusenbery, P.; Gross, N. A.; Johnson, R.; Lopez, R. E.; Lysak, R. L.; Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; Nichols-Yehling, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Reiff, P. H.; Scherrer, D. K.; Thieman, J.; Wawro, M.; Wood, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union Space Physics and Aeronomy Section Education and Public Outreach Committee (AGU SPA-EPO Committee) was established in 1990 to foster the growth of a culture of outreach and community engagement within the SPA Section of the AGU. The SPA was the first AGU Section to establish an EPO Committee. The Committee has initiated several key Section EPO programs that have grown to become Union programs. NASA sponsored research is central to the mission of the SPE-EPO. Programs highlighting NASA research include the Student Paper Competition, Exploration Station, a precursor to the GIFT workshops, the Student mixer, and more. The Committee played a key role in coordinating the AGU's outreach activities relating to the International Heliophysical Year in 2007-2008. This paper will review the triumphs, the failures, and the lessons learned about recruiting colleagues to join with us from the last quarter century of effort.

  8. Low Latitude Aeronomy Study in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    was acquired and an aluminum base plate was attached to the optical dome for mounting on the top of the house for the instrument. The dome was...Preparation in Ivory Coast NCAR also worked closely with our Ivory Coast colleagues to make the necessary preparation for the site. An optical dome ...constructed a new hut to house the FPI with their funding (Figure 2). Figure 2. The hut (under construction earlier in 2015) in Korhogo Ivory

  9. IASB-BIRA contribution to VESPA for planetary aeronomy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompet, L.; Vandaele, A. C.; Geunes, Y.; Mahieux, A.; Wilquet, V.; Chamberlain, S.; Robert, S.; Thomas, I.; Erard, S.; Cecconi, B.; Le Sidaner, P.

    2017-09-01

    IASB-BIRA is contributing to VESPA activities by developing all necessary facilities to make accessible through the VESPA infrastructure: a) SOIR profiles of the atmosphere of Venus and b) the radiative transfer code ASIMUT for simulation or retrievals of spectra.

  10. Meeting report: Comparative aeronomy in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Bunce, Emma

    2003-04-01

    The coupled upper atmospheres, ionospheres and magnetospheres of the planets were the subject of a joint RAS-G/MIST discussion meeting hosted by the RAS on 10 January 2003, organized by Ingo Mueller-Wodarg and Emma Bunce. The scientific programme consisted of 10 presentations by speakers from the UK, France, USA and Australia.

  11. The 2010 Polar Aeronomy and Radio Science (PARS) Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    Ionospheric Plasma ........................................................................26 3.7. Measurements of HF Wave-Induced Micropulsations Using GMOS ...facility‟s most distant diagnostic pad. This instrument, called the Geomagnetic Observatory System ( GMOS ) is capable of measuring very small...angles 3.7. Measurements of HF Wave-Induced Micropulsations Using GMOS 3.7.1. Investigators J. Gancarz, R. Pradipta, and Min-Chang Lee (Mentor

  12. Aeronomy report no. 73: analysis of sounding rocket data from Punta Chilca, Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillinger, R.W. Jr; Mechtly, E.A.; Walton, E.K.

    1976-01-01

    A technique is described for measuring electron concentrations in the lower portion of the ionosphere above Punta Chilca. A radio-propagation experiment for measuring Faraday rotation is combined with a dc/Langmuir probe experiment for measuring electron current. The results obtained from the analysis of radio and probe data from Nike Apache 14.532, which was launched at 20:26 UT on May 28, 1975, at a solar zenith angle of 60 deg are presented. A comparison of the profiles of electron concentration indicates that the value of the maximum ionization in the D region under quiet conditions is proportional to the square of the cosine of the solar zenith angle

  13. Morrow, Reiff, Receive 2013 Space Physics and Aeronomy Richard Carrington Awards: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Patricia H.

    2014-08-01

    It is a special privilege to receive this award honoring Richard Carrington's discovery of what we now call space weather. It is particularly appropriate that this award also recognizes Cherilynn Morrow, who 20 years ago made a presentation to the Space Science Advisory Committee on Jeff Rosendhal's idea of mission-based E/PO. We worked together, bringing that idea to the successful, but threatened, network it is today. For me, learning and teaching go hand in hand—as we publish our findings for our peers, we should also repay the public investment in our research with accurate, understandable results. My interest in space science was sparked by a father-daughter course in astronomy sponsored by the Brownies at the Oklahoma City Planetarium and kindled by the Bell Labs production The Strange Case of the Cosmic Rays directed by Frank Capra. Knowing that planetarium shows and educational movies can change lives, I have devoted a large portion of my last 25 years to creating software, shows, and portable planetariums to inspire and engage youth. This has not been a one-person effort, of course. My work Cherilynn Ann Morrow would have been impossible without the collaboration of Carolyn Sumners, vice president of the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Our museum kiosk and planetarium control software would not have happened without the skill and perseverance of my chief programmer, Colin Law. Jim Burch has been first a mentor and then a colleague on both the research and outreach sides of my career. I share this honor with a long line of highly talented students and postdocs who have contributed science content and outreach efforts. Most importantly, without the support of my husband, Tom Hill, I would not have had the time and freedom to build an educational network while continuing research and raising a family. I thank AGU for bestowing this honor.

  14. Advancements in Chinese Geomagnetism and Aeronomy during the Last Thirty Years,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-09

    movements of charged particles in geomagnetic fields and neutral line magnetic fields and they vigorously initiated simulated tests. References (120-121... telluric prospecting and related probems; (6) Magnetic prospecting and interpretation of data; (7) Some research on geomagnetic instruments; (8

  15. SWUIS-A: A Versatile, Low-Cost UV/VIS/IR Imaging System for Airborne Astronomy and Aeronomy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Stern, S. Alan; Tomlinson, William; Slater, David C.; Vilas, Faith

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and successfully flight-tested on 14 different airborne missions the hardware and techniques for routinely conducting valuable astronomical and aeronomical observations from high-performance, two-seater military-type aircraft. The SWUIS-A (Southwest Universal Imaging System - Airborne) system consists of an image-intensified CCD camera with broad band response from the near-UV to the near IR, high-quality foreoptics, a miniaturized video recorder, an aircraft-to-camera power and telemetry interface with associated camera controls, and associated cables, filters, and other minor equipment. SWUIS-A's suite of high-quality foreoptics gives it selectable, variable focal length/variable field-of-view capabilities. The SWUIS-A camera frames at 60 Hz video rates, which is a key requirement for both jitter compensation and high time resolution (useful for occultation, lightning, and auroral studies). Broadband SWUIS-A image coadds can exceed a limiting magnitude of V = 10.5 in <1 sec with dark sky conditions. A valuable attribute of SWUIS-A airborne observations is the fact that the astronomer flies with the instrument, thereby providing Space Shuttle-like "payload specialist" capability to "close-the-loop" in real-time on the research done on each research mission. Key advantages of the small, high-performance aircraft on which we can fly SWUIS-A include significant cost savings over larger, more conventional airborne platforms, worldwide basing obviating the need for expensive, campaign-style movement of specialized large aircraft and their logistics support teams, and ultimately faster reaction times to transient events. Compared to ground-based instruments, airborne research platforms offer superior atmospheric transmission, the mobility to reach remote and often-times otherwise unreachable locations over the Earth, and virtually-guaranteed good weather for observing the sky. Compared to space-based instruments, airborne platforms typically offer substantial cost advantages and the freedom to fly along nearly any groundtrack route for transient event tracking such as occultations and eclipses.

  16. The International Symposium on Equatorial Aeronomy (10th) Held in Antalya, Turkey on May 17-23, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-23

    P. ST.- MAURICE 2. 8:55-9:10 East-West Asymmetry in Type I Electrojet Conveners: S. Fukao and C. Haldoupis Echoes at Jicamarca, J. L. CHAU, D. T...Kudeki, S. Franke, J. Urbina, M. Larsen, D. mamoto, and S. Fukao. Hysell, J. Clemmons , G. Earle, R. Heelis, R. 6. 15:10-15:25 Large scale E-region...GPS/DMSP Ionization Gauges, J. H. CLEMMONS , R. F. Observations, and the Equatorial Region, J. Aarons, Pfaff, and M. F. Larsen. M. MENDILLO, and P

  17. Swarm accelerometer data processing from raw accelerations to thermospheric neutral densities 2. Aeronomy Swarm Science Results after two years in Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, C.; de Teixeira da Encarnacao, J.; Doornbos, E.N.; van den IJssel, J.A.A.; Kraus, Jiří; Pereštý, Radek; Grunwaldt, Ludwig; Apelbaum, Guy; Flury, Jakob; Holmdahl Olsen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    The Swarm satellites were launched on November 22, 2013, and carry accelerometers and GPS receivers as part of their scientific payload. The GPS receivers do not only provide the position and time for the magnetic field measurements, but are also used for determining non-gravitational forces like

  18. Geomagnetic Storm Sudden Commencements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Storm Sudden Commencements (ssc) 1868 to present: STORM1 and STORM2 Lists: (Some text here is taken from the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy...

  19. Krishnamoorthy, Dr Krishnaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Microphysics, Regional Radiative Forcing, Equatorial Aeronomy, Atmospheric Aerosols, Radiation Budget & Climate Science and Climatology Address: Distinguished Visiting Scientist, CAOS, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2293 2505/208. Residence: 94960 ...

  20. Topical Meeting on Laser and Optical Remote Sensing: Instrumentation and Techniques Technical Digest Held in North Falmoth, Massachusetts on September 28-October 1, 1987. Volume 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    5 National d’Astronomie et de Geophysique , France; Gerard Megie, CNRS Service d’Aeronomie, France. The LASE 11 8:30 AM-10:.1 AM (laser atmospheric...Institut National d’Astronomie et de Geophysique , 77, avenue Denfert-Rochereau, 75014, Paris, France d Centre National de al Recherche Scientifique

  1. Swarm Products and Space Weather Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolle, Claudia; Olsen, Nils; Martini, Daniel

    The Swarm satellite constellation mission provides high precision magnetic field data and models and other observations that enable us to explore near Earth space for example in terms of in situ electron density and electric fields. On board GPS observables can be used for sounding ionospheric...... in aeronomy and space weather. We will emphasize results from the Swarm mission....

  2. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Chris; Beggan, Ciarán D.

    2015-01-01

    The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch ...

  3. Italian research on Antarctic atmosphere: 1st workshop. Ricerche italiane sull'atmosfera antartica: 1o workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colacino, M. (ed.); Giovannelli, G. (ed.); Stefanutti, L. (ed.)

    1989-01-01

    The papers and reports, presented at this 1st workshop on 'Italian research on antarctic atmosphere', deal with several main topics: meteorology and climatology, aerosol and tropospheric clouds, planetary boundary layer, chemical-physic stratospheric property, aeronomy. They define the stage of development of Italian research in this area after 3 years of activity in Antarctica.

  4. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    The summaries in this document describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1984-1985. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas.

  5. Electron-beam-welded segmental heat pipes of AlMgSi 1 for the thermal model of the satellite Aeros-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoell, H.; Lasar, H.

    1974-07-01

    For the purposes of tests with the thermal model of the German aeronomy satellite Aeros-A, a heat pipe system of optimized weight was developed in order to transport thermal energy from the solar cells of the cylindrical satellite to the conical bottom. Because of stringent requirements on the fabrication process, electron beam welding is used for bonding. The welding process is described and preliminary test results are given. (LEW)

  6. Ground Testing and Flight Demonstration of Charge Management of Insulated Test Masses Using UV LED Electron Photoemission

    OpenAIRE

    Saraf, Shailendhar; Buchman, Sasha; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Lui, Chin Yang; Soulage, Michael; Faied, Dohy; Hanson, John; Ling, Kuok; Jaroux, Belgacem; AlRashed, Abdullah; Nassban, Badr Al; Suwaidan, Badr Al; Harbi, Mohammed Al; Salamah, Badr Bin; Othman, Mohammed Bin

    2016-01-01

    The UV LED mission demonstrates the precise control of the potential of electrically isolated test masses that is essential for the operation of space accelerometers and drag free sensors. Accelerometers and drag free sensors were and remain at the core of geodesy, aeronomy, and precision navigation missions as well as gravitational science experiments and gravitational wave observatories. Charge management using photoelectrons generated by the 254 nm UV line of Hg was first demonstrated on G...

  7. Study of Large-Scale Wave Structure and Development of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles Using the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    scientific journals. The papers are listed below in chronological order. Kelley, M.C., F.S. Rodrigues, J.J. Makela, R. Tsunoda, P.A. Roddy, D.E. Hunton...source region be located on the dip equator. To illustrate, Figure 6 presents a sequence of satellite OLR maps, which were taken over Peru on 19-20...to large-scale wave structure and equatorial spread F, presented at the International Symposium for Equatorial Aeronomy, Paracas, Peru , March 2012

  8. A new imaging riometer based on Mills Cross technique

    OpenAIRE

    Grill, M.; Honary, F.; Nielsen, E.; Hagfors, T.; Dekoulis, G.; Chapman, P.; Yamagishi, H.

    2003-01-01

    A new type of imaging riometer system based on a Mills Cross antenna array is currently under construction by the Ionosphere and Radio Propagation Group, Department of Communication Systems, Lancaster in collaboration with the Max-Planck-Institut für Aeronomie, Germany. The system will have an unprecedented spatial resolution in a viewing area of 300x300km. It is located at Ramfjordmoen, near Tromsø, Norway. The riometer (relative ionospheric opacity meter) determines the radio-wave absorptio...

  9. Studies on a double-interferometer and mesospheric temperature measurements with a sodium-LIDAR-instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serwazi, M.

    1989-07-01

    The first part of this report describes the integration and alignment of a second Fabry-Perot-Interferometer into the optical bench of the sodium LIDAR experiment in Northern Norway. The spectral efficiency of this double interferometer was instrumentally and theoretically examined. The second part of the report presents results of temperature measurements in March 1989, which were made jointly with a Rayleigh LIDAR from the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy. Measured temperatures and Na densities of three nights are presented. (orig.)

  10. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geoscience Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's technological needs.

  11. The German scientific balloon and sounding rocket projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalh, A.F.

    1978-01-01

    This report contains information on the sounding rocket projects: experiment preparation for spacelab (astronomy), aeronomy, magnetosphere, and material science. Except for material science the scientific balloon projects are performed in the some scientific fields, but with a strong emphasis on astronomical research. It is tried to provide by means of tables a survey as complete as possible of the projects for the time since the last symposium in Elmau and of the plans for the future until 1981. The scientific balloon and sounding rocket projects form a small succesful part of the German space research programme. (author)

  12. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Chris; Alken, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 12th revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was issued in December 2014 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/IAGA/vmod/igrf.html). This revision comprises new spherical...... by the British Geological Survey (UK), DTU Space (Denmark), ISTerre (France), IZMIRAN (Russia), NOAA/NGDC (USA), GFZ Potsdam (Germany), NASA/GSFC (USA), IPGP (France), LPG Nantes (France), and ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Each candidate model was carefully evaluated and compared to all other models and a mean model...

  13. Mechanical and thermal design of an experiment aboard the space shuttle: the Spacelab spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrometer designed by ONERA and IASB (Belgium Space Aeronomy Institute) to measure atmospheric trace constituents was flown aboard Spacelab 1 during the 9 th mission of the American Space Shuttle from November 28 to December 8, 1983. After a brief summary of the history of the project related to Spacelab, the mechanical and thermal design of the spectrometer is described. Some methods, calculations and characteristic tests are detailed as examples. The behaviour of the experiment during the mission and the results of the post-flight tests are shortly analyzed in order to prepare the qualification for a reflight [fr

  14. The Contribution of a Geophysical Data Service: The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Menvielle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic indices are basic data in Solar-Terrestrial physics and in operational Space Weather activities. The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices (ISGI is in charge of the derivation and dissemination of the geomagnetic indices that are acknowledged by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA, an IUGG association. Institutes that are not part of ISGI started early in the Internet age to circulate on-line preliminary values of geomagnetic indices. In the absence of quality stamping, this resulted in a very confusing situation. The ISGI label was found to be the simplest and the safest way to insure quality stamping of circulated geomagnetic indices.

  15. Correlative measurements of the stratospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santer, R.; Brogniez, C.; Herman, M.; Diallo, S.; Ackerman, M.

    1992-12-01

    Joint experiments were organized or available during stratospheric flights of a photopolarimeter, referred to as RADIBAL (radiometer balloon). In May 1984, RADIBAL flew simultaneously with another balloonborne experiment conducted by the Institut d'Aeronomie Spatiale de Belgique (IASB), which provides multiwavelength vertical profiles of the aerosol scattering coefficient. At this time, the El Chichon layer was observable quite directly from mountain sites. A ground-based station set up at Pic du Midi allowed an extensive description of the aerosol optical properties. The IASB and the Pic du Midi observations are consistent with the aerosol properties derived from the RADIBAL measurement analysis.

  16. Outstanding Student Paper Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    The following members in the Space Physics & Aeronomy Section received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. Arve Aksnes; Aroh Barjatya; Jacob Bortnik; Amir Caspi; Ruben Delgado; Galen Fowler; Paul G. Hanlon; Sid Henderson; Tara B. Hiebert; Chia-Lin Huang; Steven P. Joy; Eun-Hwa Kim; Colby Lemon; Yingjuan Ma; Elizabeth A. MacDonald; Jaco Minnie; Mitsuo Oka; Yoshitaka Okazaki; Erin J. Rigler; Ina P. Robertson; Patrick A. Roddy; Sang-Il Roh; Albert Y. Shih; Christopher Smithtro; Emma Spanswick; Maria Spasojevic; Hiroki Tanaka; Linghua Wang; Deirdre E. Wendel; Jichun Zhang>

  17. Atomic processes and application in honour of David R. Bates' 60th birthday

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, P G

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Processes and Applications is a collection of review articles that discusses major atomic and molecular processes and their applications to upper atmospheric physics and to astrophysics. The book also serves as a 60th birthday tribute to Dr. David R. Bates. The coverage of the text includes the overview of stratospheric aeronomy; upper atmosphere of the earth; and problems in atmospheric pollution. The book also deals with technical and highly specialized issues including photoionization of atomic systems; atomic structure and oscillator strengths; and atomic scattering computations. Th

  18. International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2009 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy Working Group V‐MOD. It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2005.0, a main field...... model for epoch 2010.0, and a linear predictive secular variation model for 2010.0–2015.0. In this note the equations defining the IGRF model are provided along with the spherical harmonic coefficients for the eleventh generation. Maps of the magnetic declination, inclination and total intensity...

  19. The German scientific balloon and sounding rocket programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    This report contains information on sounding rocket projects in the scientific field of astronomy, aeronomy, magnetosphere, and material science under microgravity. The scientific balloon projects are performed with emphasis on astronomical research. By means of tables it is attempted to give a survey, as complete as possible, of the projects the time since the last symposium in Ajaccio, Corsica, and of preparations and plans for the future until 1983. The scientific balloon and sounding rocket projects form a small successful part of the German space research programme. (Auth.)

  20. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-12

    OpenAIRE

    Erwan Thébault; Christopher C. Finlay; Patrick Alken; Ciaran D. Beggan; Elisabeth Canet; Arnaud Chulliat; Benoit Langlais; V. Lesur; Frank J. Lowes; Chandrasekharan Manoj; Martin Rother; Reyko Schachtschneider

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 12th revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was issued in December 2014 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/IAGA/vmod/igrf.html). This revision comprises new spherical harmonic main field models for epochs 2010.0 (DGRF-2010) and 2015.0 (IGRF-2015) and predictive linear secular variation for the interval 2015.0-2020.0 (SV-2010-2015). Findings: The models were deri...

  1. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    OpenAIRE

    Thébault , Erwan; Finlay , Christopher ,; Beggan , Ciarán ,; Alken , Patrick; Aubert , Julien ,; Barrois , Olivier; Bertrand , François; Bondar , Tatiana; Boness , Axel; Brocco , Laura; Canet , Elisabeth ,; Chambodut , Aude; Chulliat , Arnaud ,; Coïsson , Pierdavide ,; Civet , François

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2010.0, a main field model for epoch 2015.0, and a linear annual predictive secular variation model for 2015.0-2020.0. Here, we present the equations defining the IGRF model, p...

  2. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of earth, atmospheric, and solar-terrestrial sciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1980 to 1981. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas

  3. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of earth, atmospheric, and solar-terrestrial sciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1980 to 1981. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas.

  4. Proceedings of the IRI task force activity 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radicella, Sandro M.

    2001-05-01

    This internal report of the International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) contains presentations delivered during the International Reference Ionosphere Task Force Activity 2000 which took place at the Abdus Salam ICTP during July 2000. The 2000 Task Force Activity is the seventh successful encounter of specialists organized by the URSI-COSPAR IRI Working Group and the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the ICTP of Trieste, Italy. The main topic of this task force activity was the modeling of the topside ionosphere and the development of strategies for modeling of ionospheric variability

  5. Proceedings of the IRI Task Force Activity 2002. 1. ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radicella, S.M.

    2003-06-01

    This ICTP Internal Report contains the list of papers presented, activity reports and the write up of a number of presentations delivered during the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Task Force Activity 2002 which took place at the Abdus Salam ICTP during August 2002. The 2002 Task Force Activity is the ninth successful encounter of specialists organized by the URSI-Cospar IRI Working Group and the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics of Trieste, Italy. The main topics of the meeting were ionosphere variability and topside ionosphere

  6. The coulometric electron capture detector and its application to the selected freons in water and air. Part of a coordinated programme on the analysis of organic compounds by electron capture gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasa, J.

    1981-01-01

    In developing the use of Freon-11 and Freon-12 as environmental tracers in aeronomy, oceanography and hydrology electron capture gas chromatography was used to measure the concentration changes. A detector in the coulometric mode was designed and operated as a solute switch. The detection limit was in the order of 0.2x10 -12 g for a modified head space method in handling aqueous samples. Theoretical analysis of the detector design and the effects of factors including pulsing period, flowrates of carrier gas and the radioactivity of the detector source were discussed and confirmed experimentally

  7. The French balloon and sounding rocket space program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutin/Faye, S.; Sadourny, I.

    1987-08-01

    Stratospheric and long duration flight balloon programs are outlined. Open stratospheric balloons up to 1 million cu m volume are used to carry astronomy, solar system, aeronomy, stratosphere, biology, space physics, and geophysics experiments. The long duration balloons can carry 50 kg payloads at 20 to 30 km altitude for 10 days to several weeks. Pressurized stratospheric balloons, and infrared hot air balloons are used. They are used to study the dynamics of stratospheric waves and atmospheric water vapor. Laboratories participating in sounding rocket programs are listed.

  8. PoSSUM: Polar Suborbital Science in the Upper Mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimuller, J. D.; Fritts, D. C.; Thomas, G. E.; Taylor, M. J.; Mitchell, S.; Lehmacher, G. A.; Watchorn, S. R.; Baumgarten, G.; Plane, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Project PoSSUM (www.projectpossum.org) is a suborbital research project leveraging imaging and remote sensing techniques from Reusable Suborbital Launch Vehicles (rSLVs) to gather critical climate data through use of the PoSSUM Observatory and the PoSSUM Aeronomy Laboratory. An acronym for Polar Suborbital Science in the Upper Mesosphere, PoSSUM grew from the opportunity created by the Noctilucent Cloud Imagery and Tomography Experiment, selected by the NASA Flight Opportunities Program as Experiment 46-S in March 2012. This experiment will employ an rSLV (e.g. the XCOR Lynx Mark II) launched from a high-latitude spaceport (e.g. Eielson AFB, Alaska or Kiruna, Sweden) during a week-long deployment scheduled for July 2015 to address critical questions concerning noctilucent clouds (NLCs) through flights that transition the cloud layer where the clouds will be under direct illumination from the sun. The 2015 Project PoSSUM NLC campaign will use the unique capability of rSLVs to address key under-answered questions pertaining to NLCs. Specifically, PoSSUM will answer: 1) What are the small-scale dynamics of NLCs and what does this tell us about the energy and momentum deposition from the lower atmosphere? 2) What is the seasonal variability of NLCs, mesospheric dynamics, and temperatures? 3) Are structures observed in the OH layer coupled with NLC structures? 4) How do NLCs nucleate? and 5) What is the geometry of NLC particles and how do they stratify? Instrumentation will include video and still-frame visible cameras (PoSSUMCam), infrared cameras, a mesospheric temperatures experiment, a depolarization LiDAR, a mesospheric density and temperatures experiment (MCAT), a mesospheric winds experiment, and a meteoric smoke detector (MASS). The instrument suite used on PoSSUM will mature through subsequent campaigns to develop an integrated, modular laboratory (the ';PoSSUM Observatory') that will provide repeatable, low cost, in-situ NLC and aeronomy observations as well

  9. A Study on Various Meteoroid Disintegration Mechanisms as Observed from the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, A.; Mathews, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    There has been much interest in the meteor physics community recently regarding the form that meteoroid mass flux arrives in the upper atmosphere. Of particular interest are the relative roles of simple ablation, differential ablation, and fragmentation in the meteoroid mass flux observed by the Incoherent Scatter Radars (ISR). We present here the first-ever statistical study showing the relative contribution of the above-mentioned three mechanisms. These are also one of the first meteor results from the newly-operational Resolute Bay ISR. These initial results emphasize that meteoroid disintegration into the upper atmosphere is a complex process in which all the three above-mentioned mechanisms play an important role though fragmentation seems to be the dominant mechanism. These results prove vital in studying how meteoroid mass is deposited in the upper atmosphere which has important implications to the aeronomy of the region and will also contribute in improving current meteoroid disintegration/ablation models.

  10. Atmospheric and Space Sciences: Ionospheres and Plasma Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiǧit, Erdal

    2018-01-01

    The SpringerBriefs on Atmospheric and Space Sciences in two volumes presents a concise and interdisciplinary introduction to the basic theory, observation & modeling of atmospheric and ionospheric coupling processes on Earth. The goal is to contribute toward bridging the gap between meteorology, aeronomy, and planetary science. In addition recent progress in several related research topics, such atmospheric wave coupling and variability, is discussed. Volume 1 will focus on the atmosphere, while Volume 2 will present the ionospheres and the plasma environments. Volume 2 is aimed primarily at (research) students and young researchers that would like to gain quick insight into the basics of space sciences and current research. In combination with the first volume, it also is a useful tool for professors who would like to develop a course in atmospheric and space physics.

  11. Starguides plus a world-wide directory of organizations in astronomy and related space sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Heck, André

    2004-01-01

    StarGuides Plus represents the most comprehensive and accurately validated collection of practical data on organizations involved in astronomy, related space sciences and other related fields This invaluable reference source (and its companion volume, StarBriefs Plus) should be on the reference shelf of every library, organization or individual with any interest in these areas The coverage includes relevant universities, scientific committees, institutions, associations, societies, agencies, companies, bibliographic services, data centers, museums, dealers, distributors, funding organizations, journals, manufacturers, meteorological services, national norms & standard institutes, parent associations & societies, publishers, software producers & distributors, and so on Besides astronomy and associated space sciences, related fields such as aeronautics, aeronomy, astronautics, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, communications, computer sciences, data processing, education, electronics, engineering, en...

  12. Laboratory studies on the excitation and collisional deactivation of metastable atoms and molecules in the aurora and airglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipf, E.C.

    1974-02-01

    The aeronomy group at the University of Pittsburgh is actively engaged in a series of coordinated satellite, sounding rocket, and laboratory studies designed to expand and clarify knowledge of the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres. Three major discoveries have been made that will lead ultimately to a complete and dramatic revision of our ideas on the ionospheres of Mars, Venus, and the Earth and on the origin of their vacuum ultraviolet airglows. The results have already suggested a new generation of ionosphere studies which probably can be carried out best by laser heterodyning techniques. Laboratory studies have also identified, for the first time, the physical mechanism responsible for the remarkable nitric oxide buildup observed in some auroral arcs. This development is an important break-through in auroral physics, and has military ramifications of considerable interest to the Department of Defense. This work may also shed some light on related NO and atomic nitrogen problems in the mesosphere. (U.S.)

  13. Geophysical and solar activity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossy, L.; Lemaire, J.

    1984-04-01

    A large number of geophysicists try to correlate their observations with one or even a series of different geophysical or solar activity indices. Yet the right choice of the most appropriate index with which to correlate depends mainly on our understanding of the physical cause-effect relationship between the new set of observations and the index chosen. This best choice will therefore depend on our good understanding of the methods of measurement and derivation of the adopted index in such correlative studies. It relies also on our awareness of the range of applicability of the indices presently available as well as on our understanding of their limitations. It was to achieve these goals that a series of general lectures on geophysical and solar activity indices was organized by L. Bossy and J. Lemaire (Institut d'Aeronomie Spatiale de Belgique (IASB), Brussels), March 26-29, 1984 at Han-sur-Lesse, Belgium.

  14. Waves from the Sun: to the 100th anniversary of V.A. Troitskaya’s birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmi A.V.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been one hundred years since the birth of the outstanding scientist Professor V.A. Troitskaya. Her remarkable achievements in solar-terrestrial physics are widely known. For many years, Valeria A. Troitskaya was the President of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy. This article deals with only one aspect of the multifaceted creative activity of V.A. Troitskaya. It relates to the problem of sources of ultra-low frequency (ULF electromagnetic oscillations and waves outside Earth’s magnetosphere. We were fortunate to work under the leadership of V.A. Troitskaya on this problem. In this paper, we briefly describe the history from the emergence of the idea of the extramagnetospheric origin of dayside permanent ULF oscillations in the late 1960s to the modern quest made by ground and satellite means for ULF waves excited by solar surface oscillations propagating in the interplanetary medium and reaching Earth.

  15. Preface to special issue: Layered Phenomena in the Mesopause Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xinzhao; Marsh, Daniel R.

    2017-09-01

    Historically, the Layered Phenomena in the Mesopause Region (LPMR) workshops have focused on studies of mesospheric clouds and their related science, including spectacular noctilucent clouds (NLCs), polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs), and polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs). This is because, in the pre-technology era, these high-altitude ( 85 km) clouds revealed the existence of substance above the 'normal atmosphere' - our near-space environment is not empty! The occurrence and nature of these clouds have commanded the attention of atmospheric and space scientists for generations. Modern technologies developed in the last 50 years have enabled scientists to significantly advance our understanding of these layered phenomena. Satellite observations expanded these studies to global scales, while lidar and radar observations from the ground enabled fine-scale studies. The launch of the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite in 2007 brought mesospheric cloud research to a more mature level.

  16. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the twelfth generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thebault, Erwan; Finlay, Christopher; The IGRF Working Group

    2015-04-01

    The IGRF is an internationally-agreed reference model of the Earth's magnetic field produced under the auspices of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy. The IGRF-12 is the latest update of this well-known model which is used each year by many thousands of users for both industrial and scientific purposes. In October 2014, ten institutions worldwide have made contributions to the IGRF. These models were evaluated and the twelfth generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014. In this presentation, we will report on the IGRF activities, briefly describe the candidate models, summarize the evaluation of models performed by different independent teams, show how the IGRF-12 models were calculated and finally discuss some of the main magnetic features of this new model.

  17. Radio techniques for probing the terrestrial ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsucker, R. D.

    The subject of the book is a description of the basic principles of operation, plus the capabilities and limitations of all generic radio techniques employed to investigate the terrestrial ionosphere. The purpose of this book is to present to the reader a balanced treatment of each technique so they can understand how to interpret ionospheric data and decide which techniques are most effective for studying specific phenomena. The first two chapters outline the basic theory underlying the techniques, and each following chapter discusses a separate technique. This monograph is entirely devoted to techniques in aeronomy and space physics. The approach is unique in its presentation of the principles, capabilities and limitations of the most important presently used radio techniques. Typical examples of data are shown for the various techniques, and a brief historical account of the technique development is presented. An extended annotated bibliography of the salient papers in the field is included.

  18. Waves from the Sun: to the 100th anniversary of V.A. Troitskaya's birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, Anatol; Potapov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    It has been one hundred years since the birth of the outstanding scientist Professor V.A. Troitskaya. Her remarkable achievements in solar-terrestrial physics are widely known. For many years, Valeria A. Troitskaya was the President of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy. This article deals with only one aspect of the multifaceted creative activity of V.A. Troitskaya. It relates to the problem of sources of ultra-low frequency (ULF) electromagnetic oscillations and waves outside Earth’s magnetosphere. We were fortunate to work under the leadership of V.A. Troitskaya on this problem. In this paper, we briefly describe the history from the emergence of the idea of the extramagnetospheric origin of dayside permanent ULF oscillations in the late 1960s to the modern quest made by ground and satellite means for ULF waves excited by solar surface oscillations propagating in the interplanetary medium and reaching Earth.

  19. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound underlay of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the earth, atmospheric, and solar/terrestrial sciences that relate to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, which is a part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and comes under the Director of Energy Research, supports under its Geosciences program major Department of Energy laboratories, industry, universities and other governmental agencies. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the overall scope of the individual programs and details of the research performed during 1979-1980. The Geoscience program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related to the Department's technological needs, either directly or indirectly.

  20. Space Weather Research Presented at the 2007 AGU Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-12-01

    AGU's 47th annual Fall Meeting, held 10-14 December 2007 in San Francisco, Calif., was the largest gathering of geoscientists in the Union's history. More than 14,600 people attended. The Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) sections sported excellent turnout, with more than 1300 abstracts submitted over 114 poster and oral sessions. Topics discussed that related to space weather were manifold: the nature of the Sun-Earth system revealed through newly launched satellites, observations and models of ionospheric convection, advances in the understanding of radiation belt physics, Sun-Earth coupling via energetic coupling, data management and archiving into virtual observatories, and the applications of all this research to space weather forecasting and prediction.

  1. The LYRA Instrument Onboard PROBA2: Description and In-Flight Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominique, M.; Hochedez, J.-F.; Schmutz, W.; Dammasch, I. E.; Shapiro, A. I.; Kretzschmar, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Gillotay, D.; Stockman, Y.; BenMoussa, A.

    2013-08-01

    The Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA) is an XUV-EUV-MUV (soft X-ray to mid-ultraviolet) solar radiometer onboard the European Space Agency Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 (PROBA2) mission, which was launched in November 2009. LYRA acquires solar-irradiance measurements at a high cadence (nominally 20 Hz) in four broad spectral channels, from soft X-ray to MUV, which have been chosen for their relevance to solar physics, space weather, and aeronomy. We briefly review the design of the instrument, give an overview of the data products distributed through the instrument website, and describe how the data are calibrated. We also briefly present a summary of the main fields of research currently under investigation by the LYRA consortium.

  2. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences which are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering and Geosciences, part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research, supports the Geosciences Research Program. The participants in this program include Department of Energy laboratories, industry, universities, and other governmental agencies. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, briefly describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar physics, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource modeling and analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's long-range technological needs.

  3. The last SPR dinner awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce

    1992-03-01

    Because the Solar-Planetary Relationships section of AGU has officially changed its name to Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA), the December 10, 1991, section dinner award ceremony at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco was the last of the series. Presumably an SPA dinner award series will be started under President-elect Andy Nagy.We have followed our tradition of recognizing the special talents of section members at the annual dinner. This year we had eight awardees. These awards are given in fun and are intended to be humorous. The selection committee defining the awards (the awards are changed regularly to keep people from trying to win one) and selecting the awardees will have to remain anonymous. (The committee is similar to Skull and Bones, but we are politically correct in that we allow women as members.)

  4. NASA Mars Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiber, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Papers about Mars and Mars exploration are presented, covering topics such as Martian history, geology, volcanism, channels, moons, atmosphere, meteorology, water on the planet, and the possibility of life. The unmanned exploration of Mars is discussed, including the Phobos Mission, the Mars Observer, the Mars Aeronomy Observer, the seismic network, Mars sample return missions, and the Mars Ball, an inflatable-sectored-tire rover concept. Issues dealing with manned exploration of Mars are examined, such as the reasons for exploring Mars, mission scenarios, a transportation system for routine visits, technologies for Mars expeditions, the human factors for Mars missions, life support systems, living and working on Mars, and the report of the National Commission on Space

  5. Review of radio-frequency, nonlinear effects on the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, W.E.; Duncan, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Modification of the ionosphere by high power radio waves in the megahertz band has been intensively investigated over the past two decades. This research has yielded advances in aeronomy, geophysics, and plasma physics with applications to radio communication and has provided a fruitful interaction of radio theorists and experimentalists. There being almost no linear effects of powerful radio waves on the ionosphere, we concentrate on the nonlinear effects. To put the subject in perspective we trace its history beginning in the early 1930s and highlight the important events up to the late 1960s. We then shift to a phenomenological approach and deal in order with ohmic heating, parametric instabilities, self-focusing and kilometer-scale irregularities, meter-scale irregularities, and a collection of recently discovered effects. We conclude with the observation that stronger international cooperation would benefit this research, and describe a list of promising, difficult challenges

  6. A critical note on the IAGA-endorsed Polar Cap (PC) indices: excessive excursions in the real-time index values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) indices were approved by the International Association for Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) in 2013 and made available at the web portal http://pcindex.org" target="_blank">http://pcindex.org holding prompt (real-time) as well as archival index values. The present note provides the first reported examination of the validity of the IAGA-endorsed method to generate real-time PC index values. It is demonstrated that features of the derivation procedure defined by Janzhura and Troshichev (2011) may cause considerable excursions in the real-time PC index values compared to the final index values. In examples based on occasional downloads of index values, the differences between real-time and final values of PC indices were found to exceed 3 mV m-1, which is a magnitude level that may indicate (or hide) strong magnetic storm activity.

  7. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  8. Physics of the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliünas, Vytenis M.

    This book, one in the Cambridge Atmospheric and Space Science Series, joins a growing list of advanced-level textbooks in a field of study and research known under a variety of names: space plasma physics, solar-terrestrial or solar-planetary relations, space weather, or (the official name of the relevant AGU section) space physics and aeronomy. On the basis of graduate courses taught by the author in various departments at the University of Michigan, complete with problems and with appendices of physical constants and mathematical identities, this is indeed a textbook, systematic and severe in its approach. The book is divided into three parts, in length ratios of roughly 6:4:5. Part I, “Theoretical Description of Gases and Plasmas,” starts by writing down Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz transformation (no nonsense about any introductory material of a descriptive or historical nature) and proceeds through particle orbit theory, kinetics, and plasma physics with fluid and MHD approximations to waves, shocks, and energetic particle transport. Part II, “The Upper Atmosphere,” features chapters on the terrestrial upper atmosphere, airglow and aurora, and the ionosphere. Part III, “Sun-Earth Connection,” deals with the Sun, the solar wind, cosmic rays, and the terrestrial magnetosphere. The book thus covers, with two exceptions, just about all the topics of interest to Space Physics and Aeronomy scientists, and then some (the chapter on the Sun, for instance, briefly discusses also topics of the solar interior: thermonuclear energy generation, equilibrium structure, energy transfer, with a page or two on each). One exception reflects a strong geocentric bias: there is not one word in the main text on magnetospheres and ionospheres of other planets and their interaction with the solar wind (they are mentioned in a few problems). The other exception: the chapter on the terrestrial magnetosphere lacks a systematic exposition of the theory of

  9. Candidates for office 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy L. Killeen. AGU member since 1981. Director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Senior Scientist, High Altitude Observatory; Adjunct Professor, University of Michigan. Major areas of interest include space physics and aeronomy remote sensing, and interdisciplinary science education. B.S., Physics and Astronomy (first class honors), 1972, University College London; Ph.D., Atomic and Molecular Physics, 1975, University College London. University of Michigan: Researcher and Professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, 1978-2000 Director of the Space Physics Research Laboratory 1993-1998 Associate Vice-President for Research, 1997-2000. Visiting senior scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 1992. Program Committee, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Council Member, American Meteorological Society; Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics; Chair, Jerome K.Weisner National Policy Symposium on the Integration of Research and Education, 1999. Authored over 140 publications, 57 in AGU journals. Significant publications include: Interaction of low energy positrons with gaseous atoms and molecules, Atomic Physics, 4, 1975; Energetics and dynamics of the thermosphere, Reviews of Geophysics, 1987; The upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, AGU Geophysical Monograph, 1995, Excellence in Teaching and Research awards, College of Engineering, University of Michigan; recipient of two NASA Achievement Awards; former chair, NASA Space Physics Subcommittee; former chair, National Science Foundation (NSF) Coupling, Energetics and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) program; former member, NSF Advisory Committee for Geosciences, and chair of NSF's Atmospheric Sciences Subcommittee, 1999-2002 member, NASA Earth Science Enterprise Advisory Committee; member of various National Academy of Science/National Research Council Committees; cochair, American Association for the Advancement of Science

  10. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound underlay of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the earth, atmospheric, and solar/terrestrial sciences which relate to DOE's many missions. This research may be conducted in the major DOE laboratories, industry, universities and other government agencies. Such support provides for payment of salaries, purchase of equipment and other materials, an allowance for overhead costs, and is formalized by a contract between the Department and the organization performing the work. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the work performed during 1977, include the scope of the work to be performed in 1978 and provide information regarding some of the research planned for 1979. The Division of Engineering, Mathematics, and Geosciences, which is a part of the Office of Energy Research, supports, under its Geoscience Program, research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary relationships, as well as their relationship to the Department's technological needs

  11. History of EISCAT - Part 4: On the German contribution to the early years of EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The decision of the Max Planck Society (MPG) to get involved in the establishment of an incoherent scatter radar in northern Europe was intimately linked to the future of the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy (MPAe) in Katlenburg-Lindau. Delegates of the MPG played an important role in defining the rules for participation in EISCAT during the period from 1973 to 1975. The "technical" period from 1976 to 1981 was mainly devoted to the development of the UHF transmitter and the klystrons. The latter encountered great difficulties, causing substantial delays. During the same period the ionospheric heating facility was established by MPAe at Ramfjordmoen, Norway. The period following the inauguration in August 1981 saw a great number of changes in the leading personnel. In this context much attention had to be given to taxation rules. Besides continuing hardware problems with the UHF radar, severe problems arose with design and manufacturing of the VHF klystrons, requiring changes of the contractor. However, by fall of 1983 the UHF radar was able to reach the intended operational level. In 1984 important steps were made for archiving and for proper exploitation of the EISCAT data.

  12. Comparison of VOC measurements in Nashville, TN, during the southern oxidants study (SOS) 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabmer, W.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.; Stroud, C.; Roberts, J.M.; Fehsenfeld, F.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: During the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) 1999 Nashville campaign ambient air samples were analyzed at Cornelia Fort Airport (CFA) for organic compounds by two independent methods: 1) a gas chromatographic systems operated by NOAAs Aeronomy Laboratory, which performed immediate analysis of collected samples and 2) an in situ proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) system operated by the Univ. of Innsbruck. The sample protocols were quite different for the different methods. The GC system sequentially collected and analyzed air samples each 60 minutes for VOCs. The in-situ PTR-MS system measured more than 20 VOCs on a time shared basis for 5 to 15 seconds respectively, once each 5 minutes. The PTR-MS system is not able to distinguish between isobaric species, therefore acetone and propanal (MVK and MACR) values measured by NOAAs GC were added up prior to comparison with the respective PTR-MS values. For all species mentioned above the different measurement methods show good agreement. (author)

  13. An intercomparison of airborne VOC measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.; Fall, R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: During the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) 2000 ambient air samples were analyzed on-board the NSF/NCAR ELECTRA research aircraft by two VOC measurement techniques: 1) an in-situ gas chromatograph named TACOH (Tropospheric Airborne Chromatograph for Oxy-hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbons), operated by NOAA' Aeronomy Laboratory, and 2) a chemical ionization mass spectrometer named PTR-MS (Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer) and operated by the University of Innsbruck. The sample protocols were quite different for the two methods: the TACOH system collected air samples for 15-60 sec (depending upon altitude) every 15 min, the PTR-MS system monitored selected VOCs on a time-shared basis for 2 sec respectively, once every 4-20 sec, depending upon the number of monitored species. Simultaneous measurements of acetaldehyde, isoprene, the sum* of acetone and propanal, the sum* of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein (* PTR-MS does not distinguish between isobaric species) and toluene show good agreement despite being performed in the complex and highly polluted Houston air matrix. (author)

  14. World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map version 2 (WDMAM v.2) - released for research and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHOI-Dyment, Y.; Lesur, V.; Dyment, J.; Hamoudi, M.; Thebault, E.; Catalan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map is an international initiative carried out under the auspices of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) and the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW). A first version of the map has been published and distributed eight years ago (WDMAM v1; Korhonen et al., 2007). We have produced a candidate which has been accepted as the second version of this map (WDMAM v2) at the International Union of Geophysics and Geodesy in Prag, in June 2015. On land, we adopted an alternative approach avoiding any unnecessary processing on existing aeromagnetic compilations. When available, we used the original aeromagnetic data. As a result the final compilation remains an acceptable representation of the national and international data grids. Over oceanic areas the marine data have been extended. In areas of insufficient data coverage, a model has been computed based on a modified digital grid of the oceanic lithosphere age, considering plate motions in the determination of magnetization vector directions. This model has been further adjusted to the available data, resulting in a better representation of the anomalies. The final grid will be periodically upgraded. Version 2.0 has been released and is available at wdmam.org to support both research and education projects. Colleagues willing to contribute data for future releases (and become a co-author of the map) should contact any of the authors or Jerome Dyment (chair of the WDMAM Task Force) at jdy@ipgp.fr .

  15. Single particle measurements of the chemical composition of cirrus ice residue during CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cziczo, D. J.; Murphy, D. M.; Hudson, P. K.; Thomson, D. S.

    2004-02-01

    The first real-time, in situ, investigation of the chemical composition of the residue of cirrus ice crystals was performed during July 2002. This study was undertaken on a NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft as part of CRYSTAL-FACE, a field campaign which sought to further our understanding of the relation of clouds, water vapor, and climate by characterizing, among other parameters, anvil cirrus formed about the Florida peninsula. A counter flow virtual impactor (CVI) was used to separate cirrus ice from the unactivated interstitial aerosol particles and evaporate condensed-phase water. Residual material, on a crystal-by-crystal basis, was subsequently analyzed using the NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory's Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument. Sampling was performed from 5 to 15 km altitude and from 12° to 28° north latitude within cirrus originating over land and ocean. Chemical composition measurements provided several important results. Sea salt was often incorporated into cirrus, consistent with homogeneous ice formation by aerosol particles from the marine boundary layer. Size measurements showed that large particles preferentially froze over smaller ones. Meteoritic material was found within ice crystals, indicative of a relation between stratospheric aerosol particles and tropospheric clouds. Mineral dust was the dominant residue observed in clouds formed during a dust transport event from the Sahara, consistent with a heterogeneous freezing mechanism. These results show that chemical composition and size are important determinants of which aerosol particles form cirrus ice crystals.

  16. Nitrogen dioxide column content measurements made from an aircraft between 5 deg and 82 deg N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, W A

    1984-01-01

    In the first two weeks of May 1981, the research jet of the German Aerospace Research Estlablishment (DFVLR) was charted to fly a meridional section between 5 deg and 82 deg N. A scanning filter photometer, developed at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie to measure column content values of atmospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide, using ultraviolet and visible absorption techniques, constituted part of the experimental payload for this campaign that was called SIMOC. The vertical NO2 column content above the aircraft, flying at approximately 10 km, was found to decrease rapidly from 6.9 x 10 to the 15th molecules/sq cm to 2.5 x 10 to the 15th molecules/sq cm around 50 deg N and then to increase again north of 75 deg N. A sharp rise in the NO2 content was observed south of the subtropical jet but this could possibly be due to the increased depth of the troposphere above the aircraft in these regions. 8 references.

  17. BIRA-IASB Mars activities and instrument capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, R.; Vandaele, A.-C.; Gillotay, D.; Willame, Y.; Depiesse, C.; Patel, M.; Daerden, F.; Neefs, E.; Ristic, B.; Montmessin, F.

    2009-04-01

    The Belgian Institute of Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) is involved in many areas of Mars exploration, and has been for a long time. Current activities include analysis of SPICAM data, 3D atmospheric modelling as well as instrument development and characterization. This paper will focus on two different instruments to study the Martian atmosphere. UVIS(Patel, 2006) is part of the Exomars payload, that will gather information on the UV levels on the ground, study climatology and sterilisation and also be able to detect organic material in sublimating permafrost. BIRA-IASB is carrying out the characterization and calibration of UVIS. SOIR is an infra-red spectrometer that uses solar occultation measurements to examine major and minor constituents of planetary atmospheres. SOIR is currently orbiting Venus on the VEX spacecraft and has already made several interesting discoveries including the first observations of a new band of a CO2 isotopologue. The data from SOIR-VEX has allowed us to study the instrumental characteristics and perform a sensitivity study(Mahieux, 2008). These properties have been used to simulate realistic SOIR measurements of Mars atmospheric spectra. This work is supported by extensive 3D chemistry modeling work, as described in a paper by Frank Daerden (PS2.9Atmospheres of terrestrial planets). M. R. Patel, et al.,(2006) The UV-VIS spectrometer for the ExoMars mission, in 36th COSPAR Scientific Assembly, Beijing, China. A. Mahieux, et al.,(2008), Appl. Opt. 47 (13), 2252-65.

  18. Mini MAX-DOAS Measurements of Air Pollutants over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staadt, Steffen; Hao, Nan; Trautmann, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    This study continues the work of Clémer et al., (2010) and is aimed to improve trace gas retrievals with mini MAX-DOAS measurements in Nanjing. Based on that work, aerosol extinction vertical profiles are retrieved using the bePRO inversion algorithm developed by the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA- IASB). Afterwards, the tropospheric trace gas vertical profiles and vertical column densities (VCDs) are retrieved by applying the optimal estimation method to the O4 MAX-DOAS measurements. The Profiles for N O2 , S O2 , glyoxal, formaldehyde and nitrous acid are obtained with different results and different settings for the DOAS measurement. The AODs show small positive correlation against the AERONET values. For NO2, the retrieval shows reasonable concentrations in winter as opposed to summer and has small positive correlations with GOME-2 data. The SO2 VCDs are not correlated with the GOME-2 data, due to high uncertainties from MAX-DOAS and satellite retrievals, while the vertical mixing ratios (VMR) show good agreement with in-situ data (SORPES) at Nanjing. Nitrous acid shows a maximum in winter and a minimum in summer, while glyoxal has its maximum in August and September.

  19. Recent developments in the BRAMS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calders, Stijn; Lamy, Hervé; Gamby, Emmanuel; Ranvier, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) initiated the development of BRAMS, a Belgian network of radio receiving stations using forward scattering techniques to detect meteors. The primary goals of the project are (1) to collect data and to provide them to the community; (2) to retrieve information about the meteoroid trajectory; and (3) to study the activity profiles of the main meteor showers. In this paper, the work performed since the 2012 International Meteor Conference in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain, is presented: (1) a software to decode the GPS signal has been developed and added to all BRAMS stations; (2) a workshop about automatic detection of features in radio data was organized in order to discuss about suitable image processing techniques that can be used for radio meteor echoes detection in the BRAMS spectrograms; (3) to assess the quality of such an image processing technique, a big set of manually counted meteors is necessary. A web application has been developed to support this task and facilitate the comparison of counts by different users; (4) to compute the meteoroid flux and for other applications, the radiation pattern of the different antennas must be known. Someone has been hired recently to make simulations of these radiations patterns as well as to carry out measurement campaigns; and (5) detection of solar flares in BRAMS data has been investigated.

  20. Comprehensive calculation of the energy per ion pair or W values for five major planetary upper atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Simon Wedlund

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mean energy W expended in a collision of electrons with atmospheric gases is a useful parameter for fast aeronomy computations. Computing this parameter in transport kinetic models with experimental values can tell us more about the number of processes that have to be taken into account and the uncertainties of the models. We present here computations for several atmospheric gases of planetological interest (CO2, CO, N2, O2, O, CH4, H, He using a family of multi-stream kinetic transport codes. Results for complete atmospheres for Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter and Titan are also shown for the first time. A simple method is derived to calculate W of gas mixtures from single-component gases and is conclusively checked against the W values of these planetary atmospheres. Discrepancies between experimental and theoretical values show where improvements can be made in the measurement of excitation and dissociation cross-sections of specific neutral species, such as CO2 and CO.

  1. A critical note on the IAGA-endorsed Polar Cap index procedure. Effects of solar wind sector structure and reverse polar convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauning, P.

    2015-01-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) has recently endorsed a new Polar Cap (PC) index version to supersede the previous seven different versions of the PCN (North) index and the five different PCS (South) index versions. However, the new PC index has some adverse features which should be known and taken into account by users of the index. It uses in its derivation procedure an ''effective'' quiet day level (QDC) composed of a ''basic'' QDC and an added solar wind sector term related to the azimuthal component (B y ) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The added IMF B y -related terms may introduce unjustified contributions to the PC index of more than 2 index units (mV m -1 ). Furthermore, cases of reverse convection during strong northward IMF B z (NBZ) conditions included in the database for calculation of index coefficients can cause unjustified index enhancements of 0.5-1 mV m -1 during calm conditions, reduction of index values by more than 20% during disturbed conditions, and inconsistencies between index coefficients and index values for the northern and southern polar caps. The aim here is to specify these adverse features and quantify their effects, and to suggest alternative steps for future modifications of the index procedure.

  2. Study of the energy spectra of the major ion species in the ring-current region of the magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Using the University of Maryland/Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft, the author examined the near-equatorial storm-time energy spectra of four major magnetospheric ions, H + , O + , He + , and He ++ over the energy range 1-300 keV/e in the L-range 3-6. The data were obtained during the main phase of all geomagnetic storms with minimum Dst less than -50 in the time period September 1984 to November 1985. During this period, the orbit of the CCE precessed such that the full range of local times was covered. When the spectra are organized by local time, certain features emerge. In particular, there is a dip in the spectra of all ions at 10-20 keV/e in the drawn-to-noon sector, while in the noon-to-dusk sector the proton distribution function drops off sharply below ∼5 keV. These spectra were compared with those predicted by a model of ion drift and loss in the magnetosphere. It was found that the spectra are most consistent with a Volland-Stern electric field with γ = 2 and with a rotation of the nominal dawn-to-dusk electric field eastward by two hours local time

  3. Comparison of VOC measurements in Nashville, TE, during the southern oxidants study (SOS) 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabmer, W.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.; Stroud, C.; Roberts, J.M.; Fehsenfeld, F.C.

    2002-01-01

    During the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) 1999 Nashville campaign ambient air samples were analyzed at Cornelia Fort Airport (CFA) for organic compounds by two independent methods: 1) a gas chromatographic systems operated by NOAAs Aeronomy Laboratory, which performed immediate analysis of collected samples and 2) an in situ proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR M S) system operated by the University of Innsbruck. The sample protocols were quite different for the different methods. The GC system sequentially collected and analyzed air samples each 60 minutes for VOCs. The in-situ PTR-MS system measured more than 20 VOCs on a time shared basis for 5 to 15 seconds respectively, once each five minutes. The PTR-MS system is not able to distinguish between isobaric species, therefor acetone and propanal (MVK and MACR) values measured by NOAAs GC were added up prior to comparison with the respective PTR-MS values. For all species mentioned above the different measurement methods show good agreement. (author)

  4. Radar observations of artificial E-region field-aligned irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nossa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs were generated using HAARP in four different experimental modes and observed with a coherent scatter radar imager located 450 km to the southwest where it could detect field-aligned backscatter. The experiments were conducted in July of 2008, during the Polar Aeronomy and Radio Science Summer School (PARS, during quiet conditions in the daytime when the E layer was dense and absorption was modest. The echoes observed during zenith and magnetic zenith heating experiments were deflected from their nominally anticipated horizontal positions toward the midpoint position. The occurrence of hysteresis when heating with amplitude modulated pulses implied the development of the resonance instability, although the threshold for the onset of instability appeared to be higher than what has been predicted theoretically. Heating experiments involving pump frequencies slightly above and below the second electron gyroharmonic frequency produced no significant differences in the observed echoes. Finally, heating with a pump frequency slightly above the E region critical frequency appears to have produced FAIs at two distinct altitudes where the upper-hybrid resonance condition could be satisfied.

  5. Do minor sudden stratospheric warmings in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) impact coupling between stratosphere and mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) like major warmings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaraiah, S.; Kim, Yong Ha; Liu, Huixin; Ratnam, M. Venkat; Lee, Jaewook

    2017-08-01

    We have investigated the coupling between the stratosphere and mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) during 2010 minor sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). Three episodic SSWs were noticed in 2010. Mesospheric zonal winds between 82 and 92 km obtained from King Sejong Station (62.22°S, 58.78°W) meteor radar showed the significant difference from usual trend. The zonal wind reversal in the mesosphere is noticed a week before the associated SSW similar to 2002 major SSW. The mesosphere wind reversal is also noticed in "Specified Dynamics" version of Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM) and Ground-to-topside model of Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy (GAIA) simulations. The similar zonal wind weakening/reversal in the lower thermosphere between 100 and 140 km is simulated by GAIA. Further, we observed the mesospheric cooling in consistency with SSWs using Microwave Limb Sounder data. However, the GAIA simulations showed warming between 130 and 140 km after few days of SSW. Thus, the observation and model simulation indicate for the first time that the 2010 minor SSW also affects dynamics of the MLT region over SH in a manner similar to 2002 major SSW.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. A xylophone bar magnetometer for micro/pico satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Hervé; Niyonzima, Innocent; Rochus, Pierre; Rochus, Véronique

    2010-10-01

    The Belgian Institute of Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB), "Centre Spatial de Liège" (CSL), "Laboratoire de Techniques Aéronautiques et Spatiales" (LTAS) of University of Liège, and the Microwave Laboratory of University of Louvain-La-Neuve (UCL) are collaborating in order to develop a miniature version of a xylophone bar magnetometer (XBM) using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. The device is based on a classical resonating xylophone bar. A sinusoidal current is supplied to the bar oscillating at the fundamental transverse resonant mode of the bar. When an external magnetic field is present, the resulting Lorentz force causes the bar to vibrate at its fundamental frequency with an amplitude directly proportional to the vertical component of the ambient magnetic field. In this paper we illustrate the working principles of the XBM and the challenges to reach the required sensitivity in space applications (measuring magnetic fields with an accuracy of approximately of 0.1 nT). The optimal dimensions of the MEMS XBM are discussed as well as the constraints on the current flowing through the bar. Analytical calculations as well as simulations with finite element methods have been used. Prototypes have been built in the Microwave Laboratory using silicon on insulator (SOI) and bulk micromachining processes. Several methods to accurately measure the displacement of the bar are proposed.

  7. Use of ground-based wind profiles in mesoscale forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Thomas W.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is presented of recent uses of ground-based wind profile data in mesoscale forecasting. Some of the applications are in real time, and some are after the fact. Not all of the work mentioned here has been published yet, but references are given wherever possible. As Gage and Balsley (1978) point out, sensitive Doppler radars have been used to examine tropospheric wind profiles since the 1970's. It was not until the early 1980's, however, that the potential contribution of these instruments to operational forecasting and numerical weather prediction became apparent. Profiler winds and radiosonde winds compare favorably, usually within a few m/s in speed and 10 degrees in direction (see Hogg et al., 1983), but the obvious advantage of the profiler is its frequent (hourly or more often) sampling of the same volume. The rawinsonde balloon is launched only twice a day and drifts with the wind. In this paper, I will: (1) mention two operational uses of data from a wind profiling system developed jointly by the Wave Propagation and Aeronomy Laboratories of NOAA; (2) describe a number of displays of these same data on a workstation for mesoscale forecasting developed by the Program for Regional Observing and Forecasting Services (PROFS); and (3) explain some interesting diagnostic calculations performed by meteorologists of the Wave Propagation Laboratory.

  8. A critical note on the IAGA-endorsed Polar Cap index procedure. Effects of solar wind sector structure and reverse polar convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauning, P. [Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-07-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) has recently endorsed a new Polar Cap (PC) index version to supersede the previous seven different versions of the PCN (North) index and the five different PCS (South) index versions. However, the new PC index has some adverse features which should be known and taken into account by users of the index. It uses in its derivation procedure an ''effective'' quiet day level (QDC) composed of a ''basic'' QDC and an added solar wind sector term related to the azimuthal component (B{sub y}) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The added IMF B{sub y}-related terms may introduce unjustified contributions to the PC index of more than 2 index units (mV m{sup -1}). Furthermore, cases of reverse convection during strong northward IMF B{sub z} (NBZ) conditions included in the database for calculation of index coefficients can cause unjustified index enhancements of 0.5-1 mV m{sup -1} during calm conditions, reduction of index values by more than 20% during disturbed conditions, and inconsistencies between index coefficients and index values for the northern and southern polar caps. The aim here is to specify these adverse features and quantify their effects, and to suggest alternative steps for future modifications of the index procedure.

  9. Determination of water vapor and ozone profiles in the middle atmosphere by microwave-spectroscopy. Bestimmung von Wasserdampf- und Ozonprofilen in der mittleren Atmosphaere durch Millimeterwellenspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puliafito, S.E.

    1989-10-17

    This work was performed at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie (F.R.G.) and treats the following points: 1. Satellite borne microwave radiometry. Principles for a real-time evaluation of the MAS-Limb-Sounding measurements. (MAS: Millimeter Wave Atmospheric Sounder from Space Shuttle as part of the NASA ATLAS Missions, 1991-1997). (a) Deconvolution of the 60 GHz-antenna. (b) Test of different inversion proceedings. A detailed study of the boundary conditions and 'error influence' as well as a discussion of the radiometer specifications. (c) Near real time inversion of microwave spectral lines of the Earth atmosphere. i. The possibility of a (near) real time evaluation (retrieval of the profiles of the atmospheric components) was proved for the first time with a space proof microprocessor. ii. Data reduction of about a factor > 10{sup 3} in comparison with other methods. 2. Airborne and ground based microwave radiometry. (a) Study of the possibilities of ground- and aircraft based measurements for validation and cross calibration of the satellite measurements. (b) Study of the possibilities of ground based radiometric measurements of water vapour in the Artic or Antartica. Precise boundary conditions were given for the first time in order to perform ground based millimeter radiometric measurements in these areas. (orig.).

  10. Heliospheric modulation of cosmic rays: model and observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimova S.K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the basic model of cosmic ray modulation in the heliosphere, developed in Yu.G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The model has only one free modulation parameter: the ratio of the regular magnetic field to the turbulent one. It may also be applied to the description of cosmic ray intensity variations in a wide energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV. Possible mechanisms of generation of the turbulent field are considered. The primary assumption about the electrical neutrality of the heliosphere appears to be wrong, and the zero potential needed to match the model with observations in the solar equatorial plane can be achieved if the frontal point of the heliosphere, which is flowed around by interstellar gas, lies near the plane. We have revealed that the abnormal rise of cosmic ray intensity at the end of solar cycle 23 is related to the residual modulation produced by the subsonic solar wind behind the front of a standing shock wave. The model is used to describe features of cosmic ray intensity variations in several solar activity cycles.

  11. Proceedings of the IRI Task Force Activity 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radicella, S.M.

    2002-08-01

    This ICTP Internal Report contains the list of papers presented, activity report and the write up of a number of presentations delivered during the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Task Force Activity 2001 which took place at the Abdus Salam ICTP during May 2001, particularly centred in the week from 21-25 May. The 2001 Task Force Activity is the eighth successful encounter of specialists organized by the URSI-Cospar IRI Working Group and the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics of Trieste, Italy. This project continues the IRI Task Force Activities at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy. The primary focus of this activity was the development of a specification model for ionospheric variability. Such a model is high on the wish list of users of ionospheric models. Climatological models like IRI provide monthly mean values of ionospheric parameters. Understandably a satellite designer or operator needs to know not only the monthly average conditions but also the expected deviations from these mean values. The main discussions and presentations took place during the week 21-25 May. The format was similar to last year's activity with presentations and round-table discussions in the morning and follow-on work in small subgroups in front of computer terminals in the afternoon. This Proceedings contains also four papers of the previous IRI Task Force Activity which were omitted

  12. A Review of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena Related to Tropospheric-Ionospheric Coupling Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Klenzing, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of coupling mechanisms between the troposphere and the ionosphere requires a multidisciplinary approach involving several branches of atmospheric sciences, from meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and fulminology to aeronomy, plasma physics, and space weather. In this work, we review low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity from a troposphere-ionosphere coupling perspective. We discuss electromagnetic wave generation, propagation, and resonance phenomena, considering atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric sources, from lightning and transient luminous events at low altitude to Alfven waves and particle precipitation related to solar and magnetospheric processes. We review in situ ionospheric processes as well as surface and space weather phenomena that drive troposphere-ionosphere dynamics. Effects of aerosols, water vapor distribution, thermodynamic parameters, and cloud charge separation and electrification processes on atmospheric electricity and electromagnetic waves are reviewed. We also briefly revisit ionospheric irregularities such as spread-F and explosive spread-F, sporadic-E, traveling ionospheric disturbances, Trimpi effect, and hiss and plasma turbulence. Regarding the role of the lower boundary of the cavity, we review transient surface phenomena, including seismic activity, earthquakes, volcanic processes and dust electrification. The role of surface and atmospheric gravity waves in ionospheric dynamics is also briefly addressed. We summarize analytical and numerical tools and techniques to model low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation and solving inverse problems and summarize in a final section a few challenging subjects that are important for a better understanding of tropospheric-ionospheric coupling mechanisms.

  13. Summaries of FY 91 geosciences research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences which are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering and Geosciences, part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research supports the Geosciences Research Program. The participants in this program include Department of Energy laboratories, academic institutions, and other governmental agencies. Theses activities are formalized by a contract or grant between the Department of Energy and the organization performing the work, providing funds for salaries, equipment, research materials, and overhead. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar physics, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource modeling and analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's long-range technological needs. 2 tabs.

  14. Heterodyne Detection in MM & Sub-mm Waves Developed at Paris Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, G.; Encrenaz, P.

    Millimeter and submillimeter-wave observations provide important informations for the studies of atmospheric chemistry and of astrochemistry (molecular clouds, stars formation, galactic study, comets and cosmology). But, these observations depend strongly on instrumentation techniques and on the site quality. New techniques or higher detector performances result in unprecedented observations and sometimes, the observational needs drive developments of new detector technologies, for example, superconducting junctions (SIS mixers) because of its high sensitivity in heterodyne detection in the millimeter and submillimeter wave range (100 GHz - 700 GHz), HEB (Hot Electron Bolometer) mixers which are being developed by several groups for application in THz observations. For the submillimetre wavelengths heterodyne receivers, the local oscillator (LO) is still a critical element. So far, solid state sources are often not powerful enough for most of the applications at millimetre or sub-millimetre wavelengths: large efforts using new planar components and integrated circuits on membrane substrate or new techniques (photomixing, QCL) are now in progress in few groups. The new large projects as SOFIA, Herschel, ALMA and the post-Herschel missions for astronomy, the other projects for aeronomy, meteorology (Megha-tropiques-Saphir) and for planetary science (ROSETTA, Mars exploration, ...), will benefit from the new developments to hunt more molecules.

  15. 100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 24 October 2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), entitled ''100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays'', was held on 24 October 2012 in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The agenda of the session announced on the RAS Physical Sciences Division website www.gpad.ac.ru included the following reports: (1) Panasyuk M I (Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Lomonosov State University, Moscow) T he contribution of Russian scientists to the centennial history of the development of the physics of cosmic rays ; (2) Ryazhskaya O G (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) O n experiments in underground physics ; (3) Krymskii G F, Berezhko E G (Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Yakutsk) T he origin of cosmic rays ; (4) Stozhkov Yu I (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) C osmic rays in the heliosphere ; (5) Troitsky S V (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) ''Cosmic particles of energies >10 19 eV: a short review of results''. Papers based on reports 2 and 5 are presented below. . On experiments in Underground Physics, O G Ryazhskaya Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 3, Pages 296–304 . Cosmic particles with energies above 10 19 eV: a brief summary of results, S V Troitsky Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 3, Pages 304–310 (conferences and symposia)

  16. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Atmospheric Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Peng, J.; Reppert, K. J.; Callahan, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We have remeasured its rate constant to reduce resulting uncertainties and the measurement extend to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser techniques. H atoms are produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O(D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measures the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone by laser induced fluorescence. We monitor either the H atom decay by 2 photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH(v=9) product time evolution with excitation of the B-X (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in blue B-A bands. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 146-305 K. Small kinetic modeling corrections are made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results fully confirm the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant, and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere. This work was supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program and an NSF Physics summer REU student grant.

  17. Project of experimental study on plasma waves and plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.L.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of this project is to perform experiments with wave phenomena on plasmas. Particular attention will be given to Langmuir and whistler waves due to its relations with several phenomena occuring on space and laboratory plasmas. The new concepts of particle acceleration with electromagnetic waves, the auroral phenomena on the polar regions and the charged particle precipitation to the atmosphere through anomalies of the earth magnetic field are examples where these waves have an important role. In this project we intend to study the propagation of these waves in a quiescent plasma machine. This machine is able to produce a plasma with density and temperature with values similar to what is met in the ionosphere. This project will be a part of the activities of the basic plasma group of the INPE's Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP). It will have the collaboration of the departments of Aeronomy and Geophysics also from INPE, and the collaboration of the Plasma and Gas Physics Laboratory from University of Paris - South, in France. (author)

  18. Opportunities for Suborbital Space and Atmospheric Research Facilities on Blue Origin's New Shepard Crew Capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, E.; DeForest, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    With the emergence of the commercial space industry, researchers now have more options than ever for conducting research aboard space-going platforms. Blue Origin's New Shepard spacecraft offers a large-format crew capsule, capable of carrying a wide range of high-altitude and microgravity payloads above the Karman Line (100 km). With high flight rates and short approval timelines, investigators are able to use data from one flight to refine research objectives and quickly fly again, closing the loop on the scientific method and rapidly advancing technology development. Young investigators have ready access to real-world experiences in building flight hardware, and more involved missions are using this low-barrier environment to raise Technology Readiness Level of components or subsystems. This talk will introduce the standard interfaces and operations for payloads already flying within the New Shepard capsule. We will also explore opportunities for custom facilities that would allow researchers access to the space environment at altitudes between 60 and 100 km. We will discuss the unique science that can be conducted in this region, above where balloons can dwell, but below satellite orbits, including investigations in heliophysics, planetary science, and aeronomy.

  19. El Niño-Southern Oscillation effect on quasi-biennial oscillations of temperature diurnal tides in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang-Yi; Liu, Huixin; Miyoshi, Yasunobu; Liu, Libo; Chang, Loren C.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we evaluate the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) signals in the two dominant temperature diurnal tides, diurnal westward wavenumber 1 (DW1) and diurnal eastward wavenumber 3 (DE3) on the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) scale (18-34 months) from 50 to 100 km altitudes. The tides are derived from the 21-year (January 1996-February 2017) Ground-to-Topside model of Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy (GAIA) temperature simulations and 15-year (February 2002-February 2017) Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED)/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) temperature observations. The results show that ENSO warm phases shorten the period ( 2 years) of the QBO in DW1 amplitude near the equator and DE3 amplitude at low latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. In contrast, the QBO period lengthens ( 2.5 years) during the ENSO neutral and cold phases. Correlation analysis shows the long-lasting effect of ENSO on the tidal QBO in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected electrons above an auroral arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Becker, C.; Schmidt, R.

    1984-04-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocket-borne instrumentation have confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. These experiments were jointly carried out by the University of Minnesota, the National Research Council of Canada and the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie. A total of 234 echoes have been observed in a pitch angle range from 0 0 to 110 0 at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Out of this number, 95 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2, 4 or 8 keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher energy electrons led the lower energy ones by approximately 50 ms. No echoes have been found in the 7.9 keV-detector channels. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. The injection process is briefly discussed as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection. Two consequences of this interaction, namely, strong energy and pitch angle diffusion and electron acceleration are illustrated with several examples. (orig.) [de

  1. Solar-terrestrial disturbances in June-September 1982, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondoh, Tadanori

    1985-01-01

    The x-ray detector on the SMS-GOES satellite observed 77 solar x-ray flares (1 - 8A) with flux above 10 -5 W/m 2 in June, 1982, and 33 SIDs with importance above 2 were observed in Hiraiso, Japan. However, the geomagnetic storm with Dst above 100 nT did not occur at that time since most solar flares occurred near the east rim of the sun. These solar active regions lasted for 5 solar rotations, then, the great geomagnetic storms with Dst above 100 nT occurred on July 13 - 15, September 5 - 7 and September 21 - 23, 1982. These geomagnetic storms were preceded by the solar flares of importance above 2B occurred in the central part of the solar disc. From September 26 to 27, 1982, a great geomagnetic storm which was not accompanied by solar flare occurred. This paper summarized the studies on solar-terrestrial events from June to September, 1982, made by the space physics and aeronomy groups of the Radio Research Laboratories, Japan. The solar flares occurred on July 12, September 4 and 19, 1982, the geomagnetic storms corresponding to them, the cosmic ray storms observed on July 13 - 19, September 6 - 9 and 21 - 26, 1982, global equivalent current system and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Sun-earth connection education through modern views of ancient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J. R.

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) has the responsibility of using the latest science results from the study of solar physics, space physics, and aeronomy to inspire students in the classroom and to inform the public in general. SECEF works with NASA's Sun-Earth Connection spaceflight missions to accomplish this goal. Each year the missions and SECEF combine to promote their science through a major event designed to attract the attention of all. In late 2004 and 2005 the event will be the study of solar observatories created by ancient peoples and a comparison of their knowledge and culture to present understanding. Two solar observatory sites will be featured, Chaco Canyon in the U.S. and Chichen Itza in Mexico. There are many other places throughout the world that could also be featured as solar observatories and some of these may be described on the SECEF web site or used in future occurrences. Special emphasis is placed on events associated with the solstice and equinox dates. It is hoped that there will be happenings around the world on these days and SECEF will work with many museums, science centers, and other groups to help make this happen. Plans for the 2005 Ancient Observatories event and possible future events on the same subject will be described.

  3. New insights for mesospheric OH: multi-quantum vibrational relaxation as a driver for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Kalogerakis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The question of whether mesospheric OH(v rotational population distributions are in equilibrium with the local kinetic temperature has been debated over several decades. Despite several indications for the existence of non-equilibrium effects, the general consensus has been that emissions originating from low rotational levels are thermalized. Sky spectra simultaneously observing several vibrational levels demonstrated reproducible trends in the extracted OH(v rotational temperatures as a function of vibrational excitation. Laboratory experiments provided information on rotational energy transfer and direct evidence for fast multi-quantum OH(high-v vibrational relaxation by O atoms. We examine the relationship of the new relaxation pathways with the behavior exhibited by OH(v rotational population distributions. Rapid OH(high-v + O multi-quantum vibrational relaxation connects high and low vibrational levels and enhances the hot tail of the OH(low-v rotational distributions. The effective rotational temperatures of mesospheric OH(v are found to deviate from local thermodynamic equilibrium for all observed vibrational levels. Dedicated to Tom G. Slanger in celebration of his 5 decades of research in aeronomy.

  4. Making limb and nadir measurements comparable: A common volume study of PMC brightness observed by Odin OSIRIS and AIM CIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benze, Susanne; Gumbel, Jörg; Randall, Cora E.; Karlsson, Bodil; Hultgren, Kristoffer; Lumpe, Jerry D.; Baumgarten, Gerd

    2018-01-01

    Combining limb and nadir satellite observations of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) has long been recognized as problematic due to differences in observation geometry, scattering conditions, and retrieval approaches. This study offers a method of comparing PMC brightness observations from the nadir-viewing Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument and the limb-viewing Odin Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS). OSIRIS and CIPS measurements are made comparable by defining a common volume for overlapping OSIRIS and CIPS observations for two northern hemisphere (NH) PMC seasons: NH08 and NH09. We define a scattering intensity quantity that is suitable for either nadir or limb observations and for different scattering conditions. A known CIPS bias is applied, differences in instrument sensitivity are analyzed and taken into account, and effects of cloud inhomogeneity and common volume definition on the comparison are discussed. Not accounting for instrument sensitivity differences or inhomogeneities in the PMC field, the mean relative difference in cloud brightness (CIPS - OSIRIS) is -102 ± 55%. The differences are largest for coincidences with very inhomogeneous clouds that are dominated by pixels that CIPS reports as non-cloud points. Removing these coincidences, the mean relative difference in cloud brightness reduces to -6 ± 14%. The correlation coefficient between the CIPS and OSIRIS measurements of PMC brightness variations in space and time is remarkably high, at 0.94. Overall, the comparison shows excellent agreement despite different retrieval approaches and observation geometries.

  5. Climatological lower thermosphere winds as seen by ground-based and space-based instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Forbes

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons are made between climatological dynamic fields obtained from ground-based (GB and space-based (SB instruments with a view towards identifying SB/GB intercalibration issues for TIMED and other future aeronomy satellite missions. SB measurements are made from the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS. The GB data originate from meteor radars at Obninsk, (55° N, 37° E, Shigaraki (35° N, 136° E and Jakarta (6° S, 107° E and MF spaced-antenna radars at Hawaii (22° N, 160° W, Christmas I. (2° N, 158° W and Adelaide (35° S, 138° E. We focus on monthly-mean prevailing, diurnal and semidiurnal wind components at 96km, averaged over the 1991-1999 period. We perform space-based (SB analyses for 90° longitude sectors including the GB sites, as well as for the zonal mean. Taking the monthly prevailing zonal winds from these stations as a whole, on average, SB zonal winds exceed GB determinations by ~63%, whereas meridional winds are in much better agreement. The origin of this discrepancy remains unknown, and should receive high priority in initial GB/SB comparisons during the TIMED mission. We perform detailed comparisons between monthly climatologies from Jakarta and the geographically conjugate sites of Shigaraki and Adelaide, including some analyses of interannual variations. SB prevailing, diurnal and semidiurnal tides exceed those measured over Jakarta by factors, on the average, of the order of 2.0, 1.6, 1.3, respectively, for the eastward wind, although much variability exists. For the meridional component, SB/GB ratios for the diurnal and semidiurnal tide are about 1.6 and 1.7. Prevailing and tidal amplitudes at Adelaide are significantly lower than SB values, whereas similar net differences do not occur at the conjugate Northern Hemisphere location of Shigaraki. Adelaide diurnal phases lag SB phases by several hours, but excellent agreement between the two data

  6. Ground testing and flight demonstration of charge management of insulated test masses using UV-LED electron photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Shailendhar; Buchman, Sasha; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Lui, Chin Yang; Soulage, Michael; Faied, Dohy; Hanson, John; Ling, Kuok; Jaroux, Belgacem; Suwaidan, Badr Al; AlRashed, Abdullah; Al-Nassban, Badr; Alaqeel, Faisal; Harbi, Mohammed Al; Salamah, Badr Bin; Othman, Mohammed Bin; Qasim, Bandar Bin; Alfauwaz, Abdulrahman; Al-Majed, Mohammed; DeBra, Daniel; Byer, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The UV-LED mission demonstrates the precise control of the potential of electrically isolated test masses. Test mass charge control is essential for the operation of space accelerometers and drag-free sensors which are at the core of geodesy, aeronomy and precision navigation missions as well as gravitational wave experiments and observatories. Charge management using photoelectrons generated by the 254 nm UV line of Hg was first demonstrated on Gravity Probe B and is presently part of the LISA Pathfinder technology demonstration. The UV-LED mission and prior ground testing demonstrates that AlGaN UVLEDs operating at 255 nm are superior to Hg lamps because of their smaller size, lower power draw, higher dynamic range, and higher control authority. We show laboratory data demonstrating the effectiveness and survivability of the UV-LED devices and performance of the charge management system. We also show flight data from a small satellite experiment that was one of the payloads on KACST’s SaudiSat-4 mission that demonstrates ‘AC charge control’ (UV-LEDs and bias are AC modulated with adjustable relative phase) between a spherical test mass and its housing. The result of the mission brings the UV-LED device Technology Readiness Level (TRL) to TRL-9 and the charge management system to TRL-7. We demonstrate the ability to control the test mass potential on an 89 mm diameter spherical test mass over a 20 mm gap in a drag-free system configuration, with potential measured using an ultra-high impedance contact probe. Finally, the key electrical and optical characteristics of the UV-LEDs showed less than 7.5% change in performance after 12 months in orbit.

  7. Ground testing and flight demonstration of charge management of insulated test masses using UV-LED electron photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraf, Shailendhar; Buchman, Sasha; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Lui, Chin Yang; Alfauwaz, Abdulrahman; DeBra, Daniel; Soulage, Michael; Faied, Dohy; Hanson, John; Ling, Kuok; Jaroux, Belgacem; Suwaidan, Badr Al; AlRashed, Abdullah; Al-Nassban, Badr; Alaqeel, Faisal; Harbi, Mohammed Al; Salamah, Badr Bin; Othman, Mohammed Bin; Qasim, Bandar Bin; Al-Majed, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The UV-LED mission demonstrates the precise control of the potential of electrically isolated test masses. Test mass charge control is essential for the operation of space accelerometers and drag-free sensors which are at the core of geodesy, aeronomy and precision navigation missions as well as gravitational wave experiments and observatories. Charge management using photoelectrons generated by the 254 nm UV line of Hg was first demonstrated on Gravity Probe B and is presently part of the LISA Pathfinder technology demonstration. The UV-LED mission and prior ground testing demonstrates that AlGaN UVLEDs operating at 255 nm are superior to Hg lamps because of their smaller size, lower power draw, higher dynamic range, and higher control authority. We show laboratory data demonstrating the effectiveness and survivability of the UV-LED devices and performance of the charge management system. We also show flight data from a small satellite experiment that was one of the payloads on KACST’s SaudiSat-4 mission that demonstrates ‘AC charge control’ (UV-LEDs and bias are AC modulated with adjustable relative phase) between a spherical test mass and its housing. The result of the mission brings the UV-LED device Technology Readiness Level (TRL) to TRL-9 and the charge management system to TRL-7. We demonstrate the ability to control the test mass potential on an 89 mm diameter spherical test mass over a 20 mm gap in a drag-free system configuration, with potential measured using an ultra-high impedance contact probe. Finally, the key electrical and optical characteristics of the UV-LEDs showed less than 7.5% change in performance after 12 months in orbit. (paper)

  8. The SMM UV observations of Active Region 5395

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Gurman, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft was used extensively to study the spatial morphology and time variability of solar active regions in the far UV (at approx. wavelength of 1370 A) since July 1985. The normal spatial resolution of UVSP observations in this 2nd-order mode is 10 sec., and the highest temporal resolution is 64 milliseconds. To make a full-field, 4 min. by 4 min. image this wavelength using 5 sec. raster steps takes about 3 minutes. UVSP can also make observations of the Sun at approx. wavelength of 2790 with 3 sec. spatial resolution when operated in its 1st-order mode; a full-field image at this wavelength (a so-called SNEW image) takes about 8 minutes. UVSP made thousands of observations (mostly in 2nd-order) of AR 5395 during its transit across the visible solar hemisphere (from 7 to 19 March, inclusive). During this period, UVSP's duty cycle for observing AR 5395 was roughly 40 percent, with the remaining 60 percent of the time being fairly evenly divided between aeronomy studies of the Earth's atmosphere and dead time due to Earth occultation of the Sun. UVSP observed many of the flares tagged to AR 5395, including 26 GOES M-level flares and 3 X-level flares, one of which produced so much UV emission that the safety software of UVSP turned off the detector to avoid damage due to saturation. Images and light curves of some of the more spectacular of the AR 5395 events are presented.

  9. Metrology of the Solar Spectral Irradiance at the Top Of Atmosphere in the Near Infrared using Ground Based Instruments. Final results of the PYR-ILIOS campaign (Mauna Loa Observatory, June-July 2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cessateur, G.; Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.; Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.

    2017-12-01

    The availability of reference spectra for the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) is important for the solar physics, the studies of planetary atmospheres and climatology. The near infrared (NIR) part of these spectra is of great interest for its main role for example, in the Earth's radiative budget. Until recently, some large and unsolved discrepancies (up to 10 %) were observed in the 1.6 μm region between space instruments, models and ground-based measurements. We designed a ground-based instrumentation for SSI measurements at the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA) through atmospheric NIR windows using the Bouguer-Langley technique. The main instrument is a double NIR spectroradiometer designed by Bentham (UK), radiometrically characterized at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy. It was absolute calibrated against a high-temperature blackbody as primary standard for spectral irradiance at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany). The PYR-ILIOS campaign was carried out in June to July 2016 at the Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii, USA, 3396 m a.s.l.) follows the four-month IRESPERAD campaign which was carried out in the summer 2011 at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory (Canary Islands, 2367 m a.s.l.). We present here the results of the 3'week PYR-ILIOS campaign and compare them with the ATLAS 3 spectrum as well as from recently reprocessed NIR solar spectra obtained with SOLAR/SOLSPEC on ISS and SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT. The uncertainty budget of the PYR-ILIOS results will be discussed.

  10. Proceedings of the XIIIth IAGA Workshop on Geomagnetic Observatory Instruments, Data Acquisition, and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    The thirteenth biennial International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Workshop on Geomagnetic Observatory Instruments, Data Acquisition and Processing was held in the United States for the first time on June 9-18, 2008. Hosted by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Geomagnetism Program, the workshop's measurement session was held at the Boulder Observatory and the scientific session was held on the campus of the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colorado. More than 100 participants came from 36 countries and 6 continents. Preparation for the workshop began when the USGS Geomagnetism Program agreed, at the close of the twelfth workshop in Belsk Poland in 2006, to host the next workshop. Working under the leadership of Alan Berarducci, who served as the chairman of the local organizing committee, and Tim White, who served as co-chairman, preparations began in 2007. The Boulder Observatory was extensively renovated and additional observation piers were installed. Meeting space on the Colorado School of Mines campus was arranged, and considerable planning was devoted to managing the many large and small issues that accompany an international meeting. Without the devoted efforts of both Alan and Tim, other Geomagnetism Program staff, and our partners at the Colorado School of Mines, the workshop simply would not have occurred. We express our thanks to Jill McCarthy, the USGS Central Region Geologic Hazards Team Chief Scientist; Carol A. Finn, the Group Leader of the USGS Geomagnetism Program; the USGS International Office; and Melody Francisco of the Office of Special Programs and Continuing Education of the Colorado School of Mines. We also thank the student employees that the Geomagnetism Program has had over the years and leading up to the time of the workshop. For preparation of the proceedings, thanks go to Eddie and Tim. And, finally, we thank our sponsors, the USGS, IAGA, and the Colorado School of Mines.

  11. Mid-latitude mesospheric clouds and their environment from SOFIE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervig, Mark E.; Gerding, Michael; Stevens, Michael H.; Stockwell, Robert; Bailey, Scott M.; Russell, James M.; Stober, Gunter

    2016-11-01

    Observations from the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite are used to examine noctilucent clouds (NLC) and their environment at middle latitudes ( 56°N and 52°S). Because SOFIE is uniquely capable of measuring NLC, water vapor, and temperature simultaneously, the local cloud environment can be specified to examine what controls their formation at mid-latitudes. Compared to higher latitudes, mid-latitude NLCs are less frequent and have lower ice mass density, by roughly a factor of five. Compared to higher latitudes at NLC heights, mid-latitude water vapor is only 12% lower while temperatures are more than 10 K higher. As a result the reduced NLC mass and frequency at mid-latitudes can be attributed primarily to temperature. Middle and high latitude NLCs contain a similar amount of meteoric smoke, which was not anticipated because smoke abundance increases towards the equator in summer. SOFIE indicates that mid-latitude NLCs may or may not be associated with supersaturation with respect to ice. It is speculated that this situation is due in part to SOFIE uncertainties related to the limb measurement geometry combined with the non-uniform nature of NLCs. SOFIE is compared with concurrent NLC, temperature, and wind observations from Kühlungsborn, Germany (54°N) during the 2015 summer. The results indicate good agreement in temperature and NLC occurrence frequency, backscatter, and height. SOFIE indicates that NLCs were less frequent over Europe during 2015 compared to other longitudes, in contrast to previous years at higher latitudes that showed no clear longitude dependence. Comparisons of SOFIE and the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) indicate good agreement in average ice water column (IWC), although differences in occurrence frequency were often large.

  12. The National Science Foundation's Coupling, Energetics and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Student Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sox, L.; Duly, T.; Emery, B.

    2014-12-01

    The National Science Foundation sponsors Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Workshops, which have been held every summer, for the past 29 years. CEDAR Workshops are on the order of a week long and at various locations with the goal of being close to university campuses where CEDAR type scientific research is done. Although there is no formal student group within the CEDAR community, the workshops are very student-focused. Roughly half the Workshop participants are students. There are two Student Representatives on the CEDAR Science Steering Committee (CSSC), the group of scientists who organize the CEDAR Workshops. Each Student Representative is nominated by his or her peers, chosen by the CSSC and then serves a two year term. Each year, one of the Student Representatives is responsible for organizing and moderating a day-long session targeted for students, made up of tutorial talks, which aim to prepare both undergraduate and graduate students for the topics that will be discussed in the main CEDAR Workshop. The theme of this session changes every year. Past themes have included: upper atmospheric instrumentation, numerical modeling, atmospheric waves and tides, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, equatorial aeronomy and many others. Frequently, the Student Workshop has ended with a panel of post-docs, researchers and professors who discuss pressing questions from the students about the next steps they will take in their careers. As the present and past CSSC Student Representatives, we will recount a brief history of the CEDAR Workshops, our experiences serving on the CSSC and organizing the Student Workshop, a summary of the feedback we collected about the Student Workshops and what it's like to be student in the CEDAR community.

  13. Small Whiskbroom Imager for atmospheric compositioN monitorinG (SWING) from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV): Results from the 2014 AROMAT campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlaud, Alexis; Tack, Frederik; Constantin, Daniel; Fayt, Caroline; Maes, Jeroen; Mingireanu, Florin; Mocanu, Ionut; Georgescu, Lucian; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The Small Whiskbroom Imager for atmospheric compositioN monitorinG (SWING) is an instrument dedicated to atmospheric trace gas retrieval from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The payload is based on a compact visible spectrometer and a scanning mirror to collect scattered sunlight. Its weight, size, and power consumption are respectively 920 g, 27x12x12 cm3, and 6 W. The custom-built 2.5 m flying wing UAV is electrically powered, has a typical airspeed of 100 km/h, and can operate at a maximum altitude of 3 km. Both the payload and the UAV were developed in the framework of a collaboration between the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) and the Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Romania. We present here SWING-UAV test flights dedicated to NO2 measurements and performed in Romania on 10 and 11 September 2014, during the Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign. The UAV performed 5 flights in the vicinity of the large thermal power station of Turceni (44.67° N, 23.4° E). The UAV was operated in visual range during the campaign, up to 900 m AGL , downwind of the plant and crossing its exhaust plume. The spectra recorded on flight are analyzed with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. The retrieved NO2 Differential Slant Column Densities (DSCDs) are up to 1.5e17 molec/cm2 and reveal the horizontal gradients around the plant. The DSCDs are converted to vertical columns and compared with coincident car-based DOAS measurements. We also present the near-future perspective of the SWING-UAV observation system, which includes flights in 2015 above the Black Sea to quantify ship emissions, the addition of SO2 as a target species, and autopilot flights at higher altitudes to cover a typical satellite pixel extent (10x10 km2).

  14. Retrieval and validation of MetOp/IASI methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. De Wachter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A new IASI methane product developed at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB is presented. The retrievals are performed with the ASIMUT-ALVL software based on the optimal estimation method (OEM. This paper gives an overview of the forward model and retrieval concept. The usefulness of reconstructed principal component compressed (PCC radiances is highlighted. The information content study carried out in this paper shows that most IASI pixels contain between 0.9 and 1.6 independent pieces of information about the vertical distribution of CH4, with a good sensitivity in the mid- to upper troposphere. A detailed error analysis was performed. The total uncertainty is estimated to be 3.73 % for a CH4 partial column between 4 and 17 km. An extended validation with ground-based CH4 observations at 10 locations was carried out. IASI CH4 partial columns are found to correlate well with the ground-based data for 6 out of the 10 Fourier transform infrared (FTIR stations with correlation coefficients between 0.60 and 0.84. Relative mean differences between IASI and FTIR CH4 range between −2.31 and 4.04 % and are within the systematic uncertainty. For 6 out of the 10 stations the relative mean differences are smaller than ±1 %. The standard deviation of the difference lies between 1.76 and 2.97 % for all the stations.

  15. Comparisons of the error budgets associated with ground-based FTIR measurements of atmospheric CH4 profiles at Île de la Réunion and Jungfraujoch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaelewyn, Gauthier; Duchatelet, Pierre; Vigouroux, Corinne; Dils, Bart; Kumps, Nicolas; Hermans, Christian; Demoulin, Philippe; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Sussmann, Ralf; de Mazière, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) remote measurements of atmospheric constituents at the observatories at Saint-Denis (20.90°S, 55.48°E, 50 m a.s.l., Île de la Réunion) and Jungfraujoch (46.55°N, 7.98°E, 3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland) are affiliated to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The European NDACC FTIR data for CH4 were improved and homogenized among the stations in the EU project HYMN. One important application of these data is their use for the validation of satellite products, like the validation of SCIAMACHY or IASI CH4 columns. Therefore, it is very important that errors and uncertainties associated to the ground-based FTIR CH4 data are well characterized. In this poster we present a comparison of errors on retrieved vertical concentration profiles of CH4 between Saint-Denis and Jungfraujoch. At both stations, we have used the same retrieval algorithm, namely SFIT2 v3.92 developed jointly at the NASA Langley Research Center, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the National Institute of Water and Atmosphere Research (NIWA) at Lauder, New Zealand, and error evaluation tools developed at the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB). The error components investigated in this study are: smoothing, noise, temperature, instrumental line shape (ILS) (in particular the modulation amplitude and phase), spectroscopy (in particular the pressure broadening and intensity), interfering species and solar zenith angle (SZA) error. We will determine if the characteristics of the sites in terms of altitude, geographic locations and atmospheric conditions produce significant differences in the error budgets for the retrieved CH4 vertical profiles

  16. The SPICAV-SOIR instrument probing the atmosphere of Venus: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompet, Loïc; Mahieux, Arnaud; Wilquet, Valérie; Robert, Séverine; Chamberlain, Sarah; Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Occultation in the Infrared (SOIR) channel mounted on top of the SPICAV instrument of the ESA's Venus Express mission has observed the atmosphere of Venus during more than eight years. This IR spectrometer (2.2-4.3 μm) with a high spectral resolution (0.12 cm-1) combined an echelle grating with an acousto-optic tunable filter for order selection. SOIR performed more than 1500 solar occultation measurements leading to about two millions spectra. The Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) was in charge of SOIR's development and operations as well as its data pipeline. BIRA-IASB carried out several studies on the composition of Venus mesosphere and lower thermosphere: carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen halide (HF, HCl, DF, DCl), sulfur dioxide, water (H2O, HDO) as well as sulphuric acid aerosols in the upper haze of Venus. Density and temperature profiles of the upper atmosphere of Venus (60 km to 170 km) at the terminator have been retrieved from SOIR's spectra using different assumptions, wherein the hydrostatic equilibrium and the local thermodynamical equilibrium in the radiative transfer calculations. These results allow us to produce an Atmospheric model of Venus called Venus Atmosphere from SOIR measurements at the Terminator (VAST). Data obtained by SOIR will also contribute to update the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA). Recently, the treatment of the raw data to transmittance has been optimized, and a new dataset of spectra has been produced. All raw spectra (PSA level 2) as well as calibrated spectra (PSA level 3) have been delivered to ESA's Planetary Science Archive (PDSPSA). Consequently the re-analysis of all spectra has been undergone. We will briefly present the improvements implemented in the data pipeline. We will also show a compilation of results obtained by the instrument considering the complete mission duration.

  17. SO2 plume height retrieval from direct fitting of GOME-2 backscattered radiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gent, J.; Spurr, R.; Theys, N.; Lerot, C.; Brenot, H.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2012-04-01

    The use of satellite measurements for SO2 monitoring has become an important aspect in the support of aviation control. Satellite measurements are sometimes the only information available on SO2 concentrations from volcanic eruption events. The detection of SO2 can furthermore serve as a proxy for the presence of volcanic ash that poses a possible hazard to air traffic. In that respect, knowledge of both the total vertical column amount and the effective altitude of the volcanic SO2 plume is valuable information to air traffic control. The Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) hosts the ESA-funded Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). This system provides Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) worldwide with near real-time SO2 and volcanic ash data, derived from measurements from space. We present results from our algorithm for the simultaneous retrieval of total vertical columns of O3 and SO2 and effective SO2 plume height from GOME-2 backscattered radiance measurements. The algorithm is an extension to the GODFIT direct fitting algorithm, initially developed at BIRA-IASB for the derivation of improved total ozone columns from satellite data. The algorithm uses parameterized vertical SO2 profiles which allow for the derivation of the peak height of the SO2 plume, along with the trace gas total column amounts. To illustrate the applicability of the method, we present three case studies on recent volcanic eruptions: Merapi (2010), Grímsvotn (2011), and Nabro (2011). The derived SO2 plume altitude values are validated with the trajectory model FLEXPART and with aerosol altitude estimations from the CALIOP instrument on-board the NASA A-train CALIPSO platform. We find that the effective plume height can be obtained with a precision as fine as 1 km for moderate and strong volcanic events. Since this is valuable information for air traffic, we aim at incorporating the plume height information in the SACS system.

  18. Spiro K. Antiochos Receives 2013 John Adam Fleming Medal: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2014-01-01

    The John Adam Fleming Medal is awarded for "original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences." Originality and technical leadership are exactly the characteristics that distinguish the research of Spiro K. Antiochos. Spiro possesses a truly unique combination of physical insight, creativity, and mastery of the concepts and mathematical and numerical tools of space physics. These talents have allowed him to develop completely original theories for major observational problems and to test and refine those theories using sophisticated numerical simulation codes that he himself helped to develop. Spiro's physical insight is especially impressive. He has an uncanny ability to identify the fundamental aspects of complex problems and to see physical connections where others do not. This can sometimes involve ideas that may initially seem counterintuitive to those with less creativity. Many of Spiro's revolutionary advances have opened up whole new areas of study and shaped the course of space physics. Examples include the breakout model for coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the S-web model for the slow solar wind, and the thermal nonequilibrium model for solar prominences. The breakout model is of special significance to AGU as it strives to promote science for the betterment of humanity. CMEs are enormous explosions on the Sun that can have major "space weather" impacts here on Earth. They affect technologies ranging from communication and navigation systems to electrical power grids. Breakout is the leading theory for why CMEs occur and may one day be the foundation for more accurate space weather forecasting.

  19. Detection and Characterisation of Meteors as a Big Data Citizen Science project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M.

    2017-12-01

    Out of a total around 50,000 meteorites currently known to science, the atmospheric passage was recorded instrumentally in only 30 cases with the potential to derive their atmospheric trajectories and pre-impact heliocentric orbits. Similarly, while the observations of meteors, add thousands of new entries per month to existing databases, it is extremely rare they lead to meteorite recovery. Meteor studies thus represent an excellent example of the Big Data citizen science project, where progress in the field largely depends on the prompt identification and characterisation of meteor events as well as on extensive and valuable contributions by amateur observers. Over the last couple of decades technological advancements in observational techniques have yielded drastic improvements in the quality, quantity and diversity of meteor data, while even more ambitious instruments are about to become operational. This empowers meteor science to boost its experimental and theoretical horizons and seek more advanced scientific goals. We review some of the developments that push meteor science into the Big Data era that requires more complex methodological approaches through interdisciplinary collaborations with other branches of physics and computer science. We argue that meteor science should become an integral part of large surveys in astronomy, aeronomy and space physics, and tackle the complexity of micro-physics of meteor plasma and its interaction with the atmosphere. The recent increased interest in meteor science triggered by the Chelyabinsk fireball helps in building the case for technologically and logistically more ambitious meteor projects. This requires developing new methodological approaches in meteor research, with Big Data science and close collaboration between citizen science, geoscience and astronomy as critical elements. We discuss possibilities for improvements and promote an opportunity for collaboration in meteor science within the currently

  20. Solar events and their influence on the interplanetary medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joselyn, Jo Ann

    The Workshop on Solar Events and Their Influence on the Interplanetary Medium very successfully met its goal “to foster interactions among colleagues, leading to an improved understanding of the unified relationship between solar events and interplanetary disturbances.” Organized by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Space Environment Laboratory and funded by the national Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Solar Maximum Mission Principal Investigators and the Space Environment Laboratory, this meeting was held held September 8—11, 1986, in Estes Park, Colo. A total of 94 scientists, including representatives from Argentina, Germany, Japan, France, Scotland, England, Australia, Poland, Israel, Greece, China and the United States attended. A novel meeting schedule was adopted, with no formal presentations other than a keynote address by Rainer Schwenn of the Max Planck Institut fur Aeronomie (Federal republic of Germany), entitled “Transients on the Sun and Their Effects on the Interplanetary Medium: An Interdisciplinary Challenge” a Gordon A. Newkirk Memorial talk on “Early History of the Coronagraph” by John Eddy of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Interdisciplinary Earth Studies (Boulder, Colo.); and introductory and summary statements by working group leaders. Instead, there were three working groups, which met either independently or with one of the other groups according to a prearranged plan. Suggested roundtable discussion topics were distributed in advance to the members of each group, but primarily, each group was expected to think of questions for the other groups and respond to requests for information from them. As may be expected, for some topics there was group consensus. Other topics were contentious.

  1. Universal power law of the gravity wave manifestation in the AIM CIPS polar mesospheric cloud images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Pingping; Yue, Jia; Russell, James M., III; Siskind, David E.; Randall, Cora E.

    2018-01-01

    We aim to extract a universal law that governs the gravity wave manifestation in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). Gravity wave morphology and the clarity level of display vary throughout the wave population manifested by the PMC albedo data. Higher clarity refers to more distinct exhibition of the features, which often correspond to larger variances and a better-organized nature. A gravity wave tracking algorithm based on the continuous Morlet wavelet transform is applied to the PMC albedo data at 83 km altitude taken by the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument to obtain a large ensemble of the gravity wave detections. The horizontal wavelengths in the range of ˜ 20-60 km are the focus of the study. It shows that the albedo (wave) power statistically increases as the background gets brighter. We resample the wave detections to conform to a normal distribution to examine the wave morphology and display clarity beyond the cloud brightness impact. Sample cases are selected at the two tails and the peak of the normal distribution to represent the full set of wave detections. For these cases the albedo power spectra follow exponential decay toward smaller scales. The high-albedo-power category has the most rapid decay (i.e., exponent = -3.2) and corresponds to the most distinct wave display. The wave display becomes increasingly blurrier for the medium- and low-power categories, which hold the monotonically decreasing spectral exponents of -2.9 and -2.5, respectively. The majority of waves are straight waves whose clarity levels can collapse between the different brightness levels, but in the brighter background the wave signatures seem to exhibit mildly turbulent-like behavior.

  2. HF-START: A Regional Radio Propagation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, K.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.; Nakata, H.; Rougerie, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Jin, H.; Tsugawa, T.; Ishii, M.

    2017-12-01

    HF-START (HF Simulator Targeting for All-users' Regional Telecommunications) is a user-friendly simulator developed to meet the needs of space weather users. Prediction of communications failure due to space weather disturbances is of high priority. Space weather users from various backgrounds with high economic impact, i.e. airlines, telecommunication companies, GPS-related companies, insurance companies, international amateur radio union, etc., recently increase. Space weather information provided by Space Weather Information Center of NICT is, however, too professional to be understood and effectively used by the users. To overcome this issue, I try to translate the research level data to the user level data based on users' needs and provide an immediate usable data. HF-START is positioned to be a space weather product out of laboratory based truly on users' needs. It is originally for radio waves in HF band (3-30 MHz) but higher frequencies up to L band are planned to be covered. Regional ionospheric data in Japan and southeast Asia are employed as a reflector of skywave mode propagation. GAIA (Ground-to-topside model of Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy) model will be used as ionospheric input for global simulation. To evaluate HF-START, an evaluation campaign for Japan region will be launched in coming months. If the campaign successes, it will be expanded to southeast Asia region as well. The final goal of HF-START is to provide the near-realtime necessary radio parameters as well as the warning message of radio communications failure to the radio and space weather users.

  3. Mirror Coronograph for Argentina (MICA). Primera Luz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenborg, G.; Epple, A.; Schwenn, R.; Francile, C.; Rovira, M.

    En Julio de 1997 se terminó con la primera parte de la instalación del ``Coronógrafo de Espejo para la Argentina'' en la estación de altura Carlos U. Cesco (El Leoncito), gracias al esfuerzo de la gente del Max Planck Institut für Aeronomie (Alemania), del OAFA y del IAFE. Dicho coronógrafo forma parte de un programa de ciencia bilateral entre Alemania y Argentina. El propósito del mismo, en conjunción con otros telescopios solares y terrestres, es contribuir a un mejor entendimiento de cuestiones fundamentales de la física solar. Para ello, ya está observando la corona de emisión en el verde (Fe XIV), rojo (Fe X) y Hα entre 1.05 y 2 radios solares aproximadamente. El diseño del instrumento, el cual fuera ya presentado en esta misma reunión en La Plata en 1996, es esencialmente similar al del telescopio LASCO-C1 a bordo del Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). La adquisición de datos se realiza con un CCD de 1280x1024 pixels, codificando en 12 bits, pudiendo ser el mismo operado en forma remota. En esta reunión presentaremos algunas de las observaciones realizadas durante la puesta a punto del instrumento en el período julio-setiembre de 1997. Asimismo expondremos cómo y por qué sus resultados complementarán a los de su par en el espacio.

  4. Ground-based Observations and Atmospheric Modelling of Energetic Electron Precipitation Effects on Antarctic Mesospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, D.; Clilverd, M. A.; Horne, R. B.; Rodger, C. J.; Seppälä, A.; Verronen, P. T.; Andersson, M. E.; Marsh, D. R.; Hendrickx, K.; Megner, L. S.; Kovacs, T.; Feng, W.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the seasonal and diurnal abundances of nitric oxide (NO) and ozone in the Antarctic middle atmosphere during March 2013 to July 2014 is investigated. Geomagnetic storm activity during this period, close to solar maximum, was driven primarily by impulsive coronal mass ejections. Near-continuous ground-based atmospheric measurements have been made by a passive millimetre-wave radiometer deployed at Halley station (75°37'S, 26°14'W, L = 4.6), Antarctica. This location is directly under the region of radiation-belt EEP, at the extremity of magnetospheric substorm-driven EEP, and deep within the polar vortex during Austral winter. Superposed epoch analyses of the ground based data, together with NO observations made by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) onboard the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite, show enhanced mesospheric NO following moderate geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤ -50 nT). Measurements by co-located 30 MHz riometers indicate simultaneous increases in ionisation at 75-90 km directly above Halley when Kp index ≥ 4. Direct NO production by EEP in the upper mesosphere, versus downward transport of NO from the lower thermosphere, is evaluated using a new version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model incorporating the full Sodankylä Ion Neutral Chemistry Model (WACCM SIC). Model ionization rates are derived from the Polar orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) second generation Space Environment Monitor (SEM 2) Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector instrument (MEPED). The model data are compared with observations to quantify the impact of EEP on stratospheric and mesospheric odd nitrogen (NOx), odd hydrogen (HOx), and ozone.

  5. Validation of the CME Geomagnetic forecast alerts under COMESEP alert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbovic, Mateja; Srivastava, Nandita; Khodia, Yamini; Vršnak, Bojan; Devos, Andy; Rodriguez, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    An automated space weather alert system has been developed under the EU FP7 project COMESEP (COronal Mass Ejections and Solar Energetic Particles: http://comesep.aeronomy.be) to forecast solar energetic particles (SEP) and coronal mass ejection (CME) risk levels at Earth. COMESEP alert system uses automated detection tool CACTus to detect potentially threatening CMEs, drag-based model (DBM) to predict their arrival and CME geo-effectiveness tool (CGFT) to predict their geomagnetic impact. Whenever CACTus detects a halo or partial halo CME and issues an alert, DBM calculates its arrival time at Earth and CGFT calculates its geomagnetic risk level. Geomagnetic risk level is calculated based on an estimation of the CME arrival probability and its likely geo-effectiveness, as well as an estimate of the geomagnetic-storm duration. We present the evaluation of the CME risk level forecast with COMESEP alert system based on a study of geo-effective CMEs observed during 2014. The validation of the forecast tool is done by comparing the forecasts with observations. In addition, we test the success rate of the automatic forecasts (without human intervention) against the forecasts with human intervention using advanced versions of DBM and CGFT (self standing tools available at Hvar Observatory website: http://oh.geof.unizg.hr). The results implicate that the success rate of the forecast is higher with human intervention and using more advanced tools. This work has received funding from the European Commission FP7 Project COMESEP (263252). We acknowledge the support of Croatian Science Foundation under the project 6212 „Solar and Stellar Variability".

  6. PC index as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere: Development of magnetic substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshichev, O. A.; Podorozhkina, N. A.; Sormakov, D. A.; Janzhura, A. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index has been approved by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA XXII Assembly, Merida, Mexico, 2013) as a new index of magnetic activity. The PC index can be considered to be a proxy of the solar wind energy that enters the magnetosphere. This distinguishes PC from AL and Dst indices that are more related to the dissipation of energy through auroral currents or storage of energy in the ring current during magnetic substorms or storms. The association of the PC index with the direct coupling of the solar wind energy into the magnetosphere is based upon analysis of the relationship of PC with parameters in the solar wind, on the one hand, and correlation between the time series of PC and the AL index (substorm development), on the other hand. This paper (the first of a series) provides the results of statistical investigations that demonstrate a strong correlation between the behavior of PC and the development of magnetic substorms. Substorms are classified as isolated and expanded. We found that (1) substorms are preceded by growth in the RS index, (2) sudden substorm expansion onsets are related to "leap" or "reverse" signatures in the PC index which are indicative of a sharp increase in the PC growth rate, (3) substorms start to develop when PC exceeds a threshold level 1.5 ± 0.5 mV/m irrespective of the length of the substorm growth phase, and (4) there is a linear relation between the intensity of substorms and PC for all substorm events.

  7. Near InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (NIRIS) for ground-based mesospheric OH(6-2) and O2(0-1) intensity and temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravindra P.; Pallamraju, Duggirala

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a new Near InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (NIRIS) which is capable of simultaneous measurements of OH(6-2) Meinel and O2(0-1) atmospheric band nightglow emission intensities. In this spectrographic technique, rotational line ratios are obtained to derive temperatures corresponding to the emission altitudes of 87 and 94 km. NIRIS has been commissioned for continuous operation from optical aeronomy observatory, Gurushikhar, Mount Abu (24.6°N, 72.8°E) since January 2013. NIRIS uses a diffraction grating of 1200 lines mm^{-1} and 1024× 1024 pixels thermoelectrically cooled CCD camera and has a large field-of-view (FOV) of 80° along the slit orientation. The data analysis methodology adopted for the derivation of mesospheric temperatures is also described in detail. The observed NIRIS temperatures show good correspondence with satellite (SABER) derived temperatures and exhibit both tidal and gravity waves (GW) like features. From the time taken for phase propagation in the emission intensities between these two altitudes, vertical phase speed of gravity waves, cz, is calculated and along with the coherent GW time period `τ ', the vertical wavelength, λ z, is obtained. Using large FOV observations from NIRIS, the meridional wavelengths, λ y, are also calculated. We have used one year of data to study the possible cause(s) for the occurrences of mesospheric temperature inversions (MTIs). From the statistics obtained for 234 nights, it appears that in situ chemical heating is mainly responsible for the observed MTIs than the vertical propagation of the waves. Thus, this paper describes a novel near infrared imaging spectrograph, its working principle, data analysis method for deriving OH and O2 emission intensities and the corresponding rotational temperatures at these altitudes, derivation of gravity wave parameters (τ , cz, λ z, and λ y), and results on the statistical study of MTIs that exist in the earth's mesospheric

  8. Training Early Career Space Weather Researchers and other Space Weather Professionals at the CISM Space Weather Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.; Hughes, W.

    2011-12-01

    This talk will outline the organization of a summer school designed to introduce young professions to a sub-discipline of geophysics. Through out the 10 year life time of the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) the CISM Team has offered a two week summer school that introduces new graduate students and other interested professional to the fundamentals of space weather. The curriculum covers basic concepts in space physics, the hazards of space weather, and the utility of computer models of the space environment. Graduate students attend from both inside and outside CISM, from all the sub-disciplines involved in space weather (solar, heliosphere, geomagnetic, and aeronomy), and from across the nation and around the world. In addition, between 1/4 and 1/3 of the participants each year are professionals involved in space weather in some way, such as: forecasters from NOAA and the Air Force, Air Force satellite program directors, NASA specialists involved in astronaut radiation safety, and representatives from industries affected by space weather. The summer school has adopted modern pedagogy that has been used successfully at the undergraduate level. A typical daily schedule involves three morning lectures followed by an afternoon lab session. During the morning lectures, student interaction is encouraged using "Timeout to Think" questions and peer instruction, along with question cards for students to ask follow up questions. During the afternoon labs students, working in groups of four, answer thought provoking questions using results from simulations and observation data from a variety of source. Through the interactions with each other and the instructors, as well as social interactions during the two weeks, students network and form bonds that will last them through out their careers. We believe that this summer school can be used as a model for summer schools in a wide variety of disciplines.

  9. Finding Multi-scale Connectivity in Our Geospace Observational System: A New Perspective for Total Electron Content Data Through Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranaghan, R. M.; Mannucci, A. J.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Malik, N.

    2017-12-01

    How do we evolve beyond current traditional methods in order to innovate into the future? In what disruptive innovations will the next frontier of space physics and aeronomy (SPA) be grounded? We believe the answer to these compelling, yet equally challenging, questions lies in a shift of focus: from a narrow, field-specific view to a radically inclusive, interdisciplinary new modus operandi at the intersection of SPA and the information and data sciences. Concretely addressing these broader themes, we present results from a novel technique for knowledge discovery in the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (MIT) system: complex network analysis (NA). We share findings from the first NA of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) data, including hemispheric and interplanetary magnetic field clock angle dependencies [1]. Our work shows that NA complements more traditional approaches for the investigation of TEC structure and dynamics, by both reaffirming well-established understanding, giving credence to the method, and identifying new connections, illustrating the exciting potential. We contextualize these new results through a discussion of the potential of data-driven discovery in the MIT system when innovative data science techniques are embraced. We address implications and potentially disruptive data analysis approaches for SPA in terms of: 1) the future of the geospace observational system; 2) understanding multi-scale phenomena; and 3) machine learning. [1] McGranaghan, R. M., A. J. Mannucci, O. Verkhoglyadova, and N. Malik (2017), Finding multiscale connectivity in our geospace observational system: Network analysis of total electron content, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 122, doi:10.1002/2017JA024202.

  10. Obituary: Thomas Michael Donahue, 1921-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, Tamás I.

    2004-12-01

    Thomas M. Donahue, one of the nation's leading space and planetary scientists and a pioneer of space exploration, died Saturday October 16, 2004, from complications following heart surgery. The Edward H. White II Distinguished University Professor of Planetary Science at the University of Michigan, Tom shaped space exploration through his scientific achievements and policy positions. His work started with the first use of sounding rockets following World War II and continued for almost 60 years. Tom was born in Healdton, Oklahoma on May 23, 1921 to Robert Emmet and Mary (Lyndon) Donahue. His father was a plumber in the oil fields when Tom was born (Healdton OK was an oil town) and worked as a plumber in Kansas City for a time. Tom grew up in Kansas City, graduating in 1942 from Rockhurst College in that city with degrees in classics and physics. His graduate work in physics at Johns Hopkins University was interrupted by service in the Army Signal Corps. He obtained his PhD degree in atomic physics from Hopkins in the fall of 1947. After three years as a post-doctoral research associate and assistant professor at Hopkins, Tom joined the University of Pittsburgh Physics Department in 1951. At Pittsburgh he organized an atomic physics and atmospheric science program that led to experimental and theoretical studies of the upper atmosphere of the Earth and other solar system planets with instruments flown on sounding rockets and spacecraft. He became Professor of Physics in 1959 and eventually Director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Sciences and the Space Research Coordination Center at the University. In 1960 he spent a sabbatical year on a Guggenheim Fellowship at the Service d'Aeronomie in Paris, which began collaborations with French colleagues that flourished for more than 40 years. In 1974 he became the Chairman of the Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Department, University of Michigan, a position he held until 1981. In 1986, he was named the Henry

  11. The ASSET intercomparison of stratosphere and lower mesosphere humidity analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Thornton

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the first detailed intercomparison of stratosphere-lower mesosphere water vapour analyses; it builds on earlier results from the EU funded framework V "Assimilation of ENVISAT Data" (ASSET project. Stratospheric water vapour plays an important role in many key atmospheric processes and therefore an improved understanding of its daily variability is desirable. With the availability of high resolution, good quality Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS water vapour profiles, the ability of four different atmospheric models to assimilate these data is tested. MIPAS data have been assimilated over September 2003 into the models of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, the Belgian Institute for Space and Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB, the French Service d'Aéronomie (SA-IPSL and the UK Met Office. The resultant middle atmosphere humidity analyses are compared against independent satellite data from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE, the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II. The MIPAS water vapour profiles are generally well assimilated in the ECMWF, BIRA-IASB and SA systems, producing stratosphere-mesosphere water vapour fields where the main features compare favourably with the independent observations. However, the models are less capable of assimilating the MIPAS data where water vapour values are locally extreme or in regions of strong humidity gradients, such as the southern hemisphere lower stratosphere polar vortex. Differences in the analyses can be attributed to the choice of humidity control variable, how the background error covariance matrix is generated, the model resolution and its complexity, the degree of quality control of the observations and the use of observations near the model boundaries. Due to the poor performance of the Met Office analyses the results are not included in

  12. The ASSET intercomparison of stratosphere and lower mesosphere humidity analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, H. E.; Jackson, D. R.; Bekki, S.; Bormann, N.; Errera, Q.; Geer, A. J.; Lahoz, W. A.; Rharmili, S.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents results from the first detailed intercomparison of stratosphere-lower mesosphere water vapour analyses; it builds on earlier results from the EU funded framework V "Assimilation of ENVISAT Data" (ASSET) project. Stratospheric water vapour plays an important role in many key atmospheric processes and therefore an improved understanding of its daily variability is desirable. With the availability of high resolution, good quality Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) water vapour profiles, the ability of four different atmospheric models to assimilate these data is tested. MIPAS data have been assimilated over September 2003 into the models of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the Belgian Institute for Space and Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB), the French Service d'Aéronomie (SA-IPSL) and the UK Met Office. The resultant middle atmosphere humidity analyses are compared against independent satellite data from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III) and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II). The MIPAS water vapour profiles are generally well assimilated in the ECMWF, BIRA-IASB and SA systems, producing stratosphere-mesosphere water vapour fields where the main features compare favourably with the independent observations. However, the models are less capable of assimilating the MIPAS data where water vapour values are locally extreme or in regions of strong humidity gradients, such as the southern hemisphere lower stratosphere polar vortex. Differences in the analyses can be attributed to the choice of humidity control variable, how the background error covariance matrix is generated, the model resolution and its complexity, the degree of quality control of the observations and the use of observations near the model boundaries. Due to the poor performance of the Met Office analyses the results are not included in the intercomparison

  13. Remote Sounding of the Earth's Atmospheric Limb From a Micro-Satellite Platform: a Feasibility Study of the ALTIUS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancken, D.; Paijmans, B.; Fussen, D.; Neefs, E.; Loodts, N.; Dekemper, E.; Vahellemont, F.; Devos, L.; Moelans, W.; Nevejans, D.; Schroeven-Deceuninck, H.; Bernaerts, D.; Zender, J.

    2008-08-01

    There is more and more interest in the understanding and the monitoring of the physics and chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere and its impact on the climate change. Currently a significantly high number of sounders provide the required data to monitor the changes in atmosphere composition, but a dramatic drop in operational atmosphere monitoring missions is expected around 2010. This drop is mainly visible in sounders capable of a high vertical resolution. Currently, instruments on ENVISAT and METOP provide relevant data but this is envisaged to be insufficient to ensure full spatial and temporal coverage and redundancy in the measurement data set. ALTIUS (Atmospheric Limb Tracker for the Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere) is a remote sounding experiment proposed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA/IASB) for which a feasibility study was initiated with BELSPO (Belgian Science Policy) and ESA support. The main objective of this study phase was to establish a mission concept, to define the required payload and to establish a satellite platform design. The study was led by the BIRA/IASB team and performed in close collaboration with OIP (payload developer) and Verhaert Space (spacecraft developer). The mission scenario includes bright limb observations in basically all directions, solar occultations around the terminator passages and star occultations during eclipse. These observation modes allow imaging the atmosphere with a high vertical resolution. The spacecraft will be operated in a 10:00 sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 695 km, allowing a 3-day revisit time. The envisaged payload for the ALTIUS mission is an imaging spectrometer, observing in the UV, the VIS and the NIR spectral ranges. For each spectral range, an AOTF (Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter) will permit to perform observations of selectable small wavelength domains. A typical set of 10 wavelengths will be recorded within 1 second. The different operational modes impose a

  14. Solar occultation images analysis using Zernike polynomials ­— an ALTIUS imaging spectrometer application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekemper, Emmanuel; Fussen, Didier; Loodts, Nicolas; Neefs, Eddy

    The ALTIUS (Atmospheric Limb Tracker for the Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere) instrument is a major project of the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) in Brussels, Belgium. It has been designed to profit from the benefits of the limb scattering ge-ometry (vertical resolution, global coverage,...), while providing better accuracy on the tangent height knowledge than classical "knee" methods used by scanning spectrometers. The optical concept is based on 3 AOTF's (UV-Vis-NIR) responsible for the instantaneous spectral filtering of the incoming image (complete FOV larger than 100km x 100km at tangent point), ranging from 250nm to 1800nm, with a moderate resolution of a few nm and a typical acquisition time of 1-10s per image. While the primary goal of the instrument is the measurement of ozone with a good vertical resolution, the ability to record full images of the limb can lead to other applications, like solar occultations. With a pixel FOV of 200rad, the full high-sun image is formed of 45x45 pixels, which is sufficient for pattern recognition using moments analysis for instance. The Zernike polynomials form a complete othogonal set of functions over the unit circle. It is well suited for images showing circular shape. Any such image can then be decomposed into a finite set of weighted polynomials, the weighting is called the moments. Due to atmospheric refraction, the sun shape is modified during apparent sunsets and sunrises. The sun appears more flattened which leads to a modification of its zernike moment description. A link between the pressure or the temperature profile (equivalent to air density through the perfect gas law and the hydrostatic equation) and the Zernike moments of a given image can then be made and used to retrieve these atmospheric parameters, with the advantage that the whole sun is used and not only central or edge pixels. Some retrievals will be performed for different conditions and the feasibility of the method

  15. StarGuides Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.

    StarGuides Plus represents the most comprehensive and accurately validated collection of practical data on organizations involved in astronomy, related space sciences and other related fields. This invaluable reference source (and its companion volume, StarBriefs Plus) should be on the reference shelf of every library, organization or individual with any interest in these areas. The coverage includes relevant universities, scientific committees, institutions, associations, societies, agencies, companies, bibliographic services, data centers, museums, dealers, distributors, funding organizations, journals, manufacturers, meteorological services, national norms & standard institutes, parent associations & societies, publishers, software producers & distributors, and so on. Besides astronomy and associated space sciences, related fields such as aeronautics, aeronomy, astronautics, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, communications, computer sciences, data processing, education, electronics, engineering, energetics, environment, geodesy, geophysics, information handling, management, mathematics, meteorology, optics, physics, remote sensing, and so on, are also covered where appropriate. After some thirty years in continuous compilation, verification and updating, StarGuides Plus currently gathers together some 6,000 entries from 100 countries. The information is presented in a clear, uncluttered manner for direct and easy use. For each entry, all practical data are listed: city, postal and electronic-mail addresses, telephone and fax numbers, URLs for WWW access, foundation years, numbers of members and/or numbers of staff, main activities, publications titles (with frequencies, ISS-Numbers and circulations), names and geographical coordinates of observing sites, names of planetariums, awards (prizes and/or distinctions) granted, etc. The entries are listed alphabetically in each country. An exhaustive index gives a breakdown not only by different designations and

  16. The response of Antarctica MLT region for the recent Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) over Southern Hemisphere (SH): An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaraiah, S.; Kim, Y.; Lee, J.; Kim, J. H.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Riggin, D. M.; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    2017-12-01

    A minor Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) was noticed in the southern hemisphere (SH) during the September (day 259) 2010 along with two episodic warmings in early August (day 212) and late October (day 300) 2010. The signature of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) response was detected using the ground based and space borne observations along with the model predictions. The changes in the mesosphere wind field were studied from the observations of both meteor radar and MF radar located at King Sejong Station (62.22°S, 58.78°W) and Rothera (68oS, 68oW), Antarctica, respectively. The zonal winds in the mesosphere reversed approximately a week before the September SSW occurrence. We have also analyzed the MLT tides using both the radars and noticed strong enhancement of semi-diurnal tide (SDT) a few days later the cessation of 2010 SSW. We note the similar enhancement during the 2002 major SSW. Specifically, the SDT amplitude enhancement is greater for the 2010 SSW than 2002 SSW. We found that strong 14-16 day PWs prevailed prior to the 2010 minor SSW and disappeared suddenly after the SSW in the mesosphere by generating the quasi-secondary waves of periodicity 3-9 days. The mesosphere wind reversal is also noticed in "Specified Dynamics" version of Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM) and Ground-to-topside model of Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy (GAIA) simulations. The similar zonal wind weakening/reversal in the lower thermosphere between 100 and 140 km are simulated by GAIA. Further, we observed the mesospheric cooling in consistency with SSWs using Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) data. However, the GAIA simulations showed warming between 130 and 140 km after few days of SSW. Thus, the observation and model simulation indicate for the first time that the 2010 minor SSW also affects dynamics of the MLT region over SH in a manner similar to the 2002 major SSW.

  17. The dynamics in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jared M.

    2008-06-01

    lower boundary winds on Titan's thermospheric structure and dynamics. Ultimately, these numerical experiments with T-GITM function to validate a newly created Titan upper atmosphere model that has been shown to serve as a viable theoretical and numerical tool for the planetary aeronomy community.

  18. AIM satellite-based research bridges the unique scientific aspects of the mission to informal education programs globally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D.; Maggi, B.

    2003-04-01

    The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) component of the satellite-based research mission "Aeronomy of Ice In the Mesosphere" (AIM) will bridge the unique scientific aspects of the mission to informal education organizations. The informal education materials developed by the EPO will utilize AIM data and educate the public about the environmental implications associated with the data. This will assist with creating a scientifically literate workforce and in developing a citizenry capable of making educated decisions related to environmental policies and laws. The objective of the AIM mission is to understand the mechanisms that cause Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) to form, how their presence affects the atmosphere, and how change in the atmosphere affects them. PMCs are sometimes known as Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs) because of their visibility during the night from appropriate locations. The phenomenon of PMCs is an observable indicator of global change, a concern to all citizens. Recent sightings of these clouds over populated regions have compelled AIM educators to expand informal education opportunities to communities worldwide. Collaborations with informal organizations include: Museums/Science Centers; NASA Sun-Earth Connection Forum; Alaska Native Ways of Knowing Project; Amateur Noctilucent Cloud Observers Organization; National Parks Education Programs; After School Science Clubs; Public Broadcasting Associations; and National Public Radio. The Native Ways of Knowing Project is an excellent example of informal collaboration with the AIM EPO. This Alaska based project will assist native peoples of the state with photographing NLCs for the EPO website. It will also aid the EPO with developing materials for informal organizations that incorporate traditional native knowledge and science, related to the sky. Another AIM collaboration that will offer citizens lasting informal education opportunities is the one established with the United States National Parks

  19. PC index as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere and energy accumulated in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Sormakov, Dmitry

    The PC index has been approved by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (Merida, Mexico, 2013) as a new international index of magnetic activity. Application of the PC index as a proxy of a solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere determines a principal distinction of the PC index from AL and Dst indices, which are regarded as characteristics of the energy that realized in magnetosphere in form of substorms and magnetic storms. This conclusion is based on results of analysis of relationships between the polar cap magnetic activity (PC-index) and parameters of the solar wind, on the one hand, relationships between changes of PC and development of magnetospheric substorms (AL-index) and magnetic storms (Dst-index), on the other hand. In this study the relationships between the PC and Dst indices in course of more than 200 magnetic storms observed in epoch of solar maximum (1998-2004) have been examined for different classes of storms separated by their kind and intensity. Results of statistical analysis demonstrate that depression of geomagnetic field starts to develop as soon as PC index steadily excess the threshold level ~1.5 mV/m; the storm intensity (DstMIN) follows, with delay ~ 1 hour, the maximum of PC in course of the storm. Main features of magnetic storms are determined, irrespective of their class and intensity, by the accumulated-mean PC value (PCAM): storm is developed as long as PCAM increases, comes to maximal intensity when PCAM attains the maximum, and starts to decay as soon as PCAM value displays decline. The run of “anomalous” magnetic storm on January 21-22, 2005, lasting many hours (with intensity of ≈ -100 nT) under conditions of northward or close to zero BZ component, is perfectly governed by behavior of the accumulated-mean PCAM index and, therefore, this storm should be regarded as an ordinary phenomenon. The conclusion is made that the PC index provides the unique on-line information on solar wind

  20. Variations in the geomagnetic and gravitational background associated with two strong earthquakes of the May 2012 sequence in the Po Valley Plain (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    , extension, intensity, etc..) compatible with: the classification by IAGA (International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy) of geomagnetic pulsations; emissions of an anthropic type; known natural emissions (Whistler, Chorus, lightning, electrophonic meteoric sounds, plasma, etc..). For this reason, since Radio anomalies are not related to known phenomena they were considered in this study as candidate seismic precursors. Most of the radio anomalies are observed below 32Hz and, generally, between 0.1 and 20Hz and occur in association with an intense increase in the geomagnetic background that precedes the occurrence of a seismic event.

  1. Moving Beyond IGY: An Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Barton, C. E.; Rodger, A. S.; Thompson, B. J.; Fraser, B.; Papitashvili, V.

    2003-12-01

    During the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958), member countries established many new geophysical observatories pursuing the major IGY objectives - to collect geophysical data as widely as possible and to provide free access to these data for all scientists around the globe. Today, geophysics has attained a rather good understanding within traditional regions, i.e., the atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and other such geospheres. At the same time, it has become clear that much of the new and important science is coming from the studies of interfaces and coupling between geospheres. Thus, if geophysical data are made `'transparently'' available to a much wider range of scientists and students than to those who do the observations, then new and exciting discoveries can be expected. An International Association of Geomagnetic and Aeronomy (IAGA) task force, recognizing that a key achievement of the IGY was the establishment of a worldwide system of data centers and physical observatories, proposes that for the 50th anniversary of IGY, the worldwide scientific community should endorse and promote an electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) initiative. The proposed eGY concept would both commemorate the IGY in 2007-2008 and provide a forward impetus to geophysics in 21st century, similar to that provided by the IGY fifty years ago. The IAGA task force strongly advocates: (1) Securing permission and release of existing data; (2) Creating access to information; and (3) Conversion of relevant analog data to digital form. The eGY concept embraces all available and upcoming geophysical data (e.g., atmospheric, ionospheric, geomagnetic, gravity, etc.) through the establishment of a series of virtual geophysical observatories now being `'deployed'' in cyberspace. The eGY concept is modern, global, and timely; it is attractive, pragmatic, and affordable. The eGY is based on the existing and continually developing computing/networking technologies (e.g., XML, Semantic Web

  2. Investigating Near Space Interaction Regions: Developing a Remote Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, M.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Oliversen, R. J.; Jaehnig, K.; Percival, J.; Harlander, J.; Englert, C. R.; Kallio, R.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.; Gardner, D.; Rosborough, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Investigating Near Space Interaction Regions (INSpIRe) effort will (1) establish an adaptable research station capable of contributing to terrestrial and planetary aeronomy; (2) integrate two state-of-the-art second generation Fabry-Perot (FP) and Spatial Heteorodyne Spectrometers (SHS) into a remotely operable configuration; (3) deploy this instrumentation to a clear-air site, establishing a stable, well-calibrated observatory; (4) embark on a series of observations designed to contribute to three major areas of geocoronal research: geocoronal physics, structure/coupling, and variability. This poster describes the development of the INSpIRe remote observatory. Based at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), initiative INSpIRe provides a platform to encourage the next generation of researchers to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to real-world science and engineering. Students at ERAU contribute to the INSpIRe effort's hardware and software needs. Mechanical/optical systems are in design to bring light to any of four instruments. Control software is in development to allow remote users to control everything from dome and optical system operations to calibration and data collection. In April 2016, we also installed and tested our first science instrument in the INSpIRe trailer, the Redline DASH Demonstration Instrument (REDDI). REDDI uses Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) spectroscopy, and its deployment as part of INSpIRe is a collaborative research effort between the Naval Research Lab, St Cloud State University, and ERAU. Similar to a stepped Michelson device, REDDI measures oxygen (630.0 nm) winds from the thermosphere. REDDI is currently mounted in a temporary location under INSpIRe's main siderostat until its entrance optical system can be modified. First light tests produced good signal-to-noise fringes in ten minute integrations, indicating that we will soon be able to measure thermospheric winds from our Daytona Beach testing site

  3. Comparison of GOME tropospheric NO2 columns with NO2 profiles deduced from ground-based in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, D.; Boersma, K. F.; Kaiser, J. W.; Weiss, A. K.; Folini, D.; Eskes, H. J.; Buchmann, B.

    2006-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical tropospheric column densities (VTCs) retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) are compared to coincident ground-based tropospheric NO2 columns. The ground-based columns are deduced from in situ measurements at different altitudes in the Alps for 1997 to June 2003, yielding a unique long-term comparison of GOME NO2 VTC data retrieved by a collaboration of KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute) and BIRA/IASB (Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy) with independently derived tropospheric NO2 profiles. A first comparison relates the GOME retrieved tropospheric columns to the tropospheric columns obtained by integrating the ground-based NO2 measurements. For a second comparison, the tropospheric profiles constructed from the ground-based measurements are first multiplied with the averaging kernel (AK) of the GOME retrieval. The second approach makes the comparison independent from the a priori NO2 profile used in the GOME retrieval. This allows splitting the total difference between the column data sets into two contributions: one that is due to differences between the a priori and the ground-based NO2 profile shapes, and another that can be attributed to uncertainties in both the remaining retrieval parameters (such as, e.g., surface albedo or aerosol concentration) and the ground-based in situ NO2 profiles. For anticyclonic clear sky conditions the comparison indicates a good agreement between the columns (n=157, R=0.70/0.74 for the first/second comparison approach, respectively). The mean relative difference (with respect to the ground-based columns) is -7% with a standard deviation of 40% and GOME on average slightly underestimating the ground-based columns. Both data sets show a similar seasonal behaviour with a distinct maximum of spring NO2 VTCs. Further analysis indicates small GOME columns being systematically smaller than the ground-based ones. The influence of different shapes in the a priori and

  4. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, Roland; Geomon, Ndacc Infrared, Modelling Working Group

    2010-05-01

    GEOmon, NDACC Infrared, and Modelling Working Group: M.P. Chipperfield (2), M. De Mazière (3), J. Notholt (4), S. Barthlott (1), R.L. Batchelor (5,17), R.D. Blatherwick (16), Th. Blumenstock (1), M.T. Coffey (17), P. Duchatelet (6), H. Fast (7), W. Feng (2), A. Goldman (16), D.W.T. Griffith (8), K. Hamann (1), J.W. Hannigan (17), F. Hase (1), N.B. Jones (8), A. Kagawa (9,10), Y. Kasai (9), O. Kirner (19), R. Kohlhepp (1), W. Kouker (1), I. Kramer (1), R. Lindenmaier (5), E. Mahieu (6), R.L. Mittermeier (7), B. Monge-Sanz (2), I. Murata (12), H. Nakajima (13), I. Morino (11), M. Palm (4), C. Paton-Walsh (8), Th. Reddmann (1), M. Rettinger (15), C.P. Rinsland (18), M. Schneider (1), C. Senten (3), B.-M. Sinnhuber (4), D. Smale (14), K. Strong (5), R. Sussmann (15), J.R. Taylor (5), G. Vanhaelewyn (3), T. Warneke (4), C. Whaley (5), M. Wiehle (1), and S.W. Wood (14) (1) Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IMK-ASF, Karlsruhe, Germany, (2) University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, (3) Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB), Brussels, Belgium, (4) University of Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics, Bremen, Germany, (5) Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, (6) University of Liège, Institute of Astrophysics and Geophysics, Liège, Belgium, (7) Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, (8) Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia, (9) National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Tokyo, Japan, (10) Fujitsu FIP Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, (11) Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Japan, (12) Department of Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Japan, (13) Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan, (14) National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd (NIWA), Lauder, New Zealand, (15) Karlsruhe

  5. ALTIUS: a spaceborne AOTF-based UV-VIS-NIR hyperspectral imager for atmospheric remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekemper, Emmanuel; Fussen, Didier; Van Opstal, Bert; Vanhamel, Jurgen; Pieroux, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Mateshvili, Nina; Franssens, Ghislain; Voloshinov, Vitaly; Janssen, Christof; Elandaloussi, Hadj

    2014-10-01

    Since the recent losses of several atmospheric instruments with good vertical sampling capabilities (SAGE II, SAGE III, GOMOS, SCIAMACHY,. . . ), the scientific community is left with very few sounders delivering concentration pro les of key atmospheric species for understanding atmospheric processes and monitoring the radiative balance of the Earth. The situation is so critical that at the horizon 2020, less than five such instruments will be on duty (most probably only 2 or 3), whereas their number topped at more than 15 in the years 2000. In parallel, recent inter-comparison exercises among the climate chemistry models (CCM) and instrument datasets have shown large differences in vertical distribution of constituents (SPARC CCMVal and Data Initiative), stressing the need for more vertically-resolved and accurate data at all latitudes. In this frame, the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (IASB-BIRA) proposed a gap-filler small mission called ALTIUS (Atmospheric Limb Tracker for the Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere), which is currently in preliminary design phase (phase B according to ESA standards). Taking advantage of the good performances of the PROBA platform (PRoject for On-Board Autonomy) in terms of pointing precision and accuracy, on-board processing ressources, and agility, the ALTIUS concept relies on a hyperspectral imager observing limb-scattered radiance and solar/stellar occultations every orbit. The objective is twofold: the imaging feature allows to better assess the tangent height of the sounded air masses (through easier star tracker information validation by scene details recognition), while its spectral capabilities will be good enough to exploit the characteristic signatures of many molecular absorption cross-sections (O3, NO2, CH4, H2O, aerosols,...). The payload will be divided in three independent optical channels, associated to separated spectral ranges (UV: 250- 450 nm, VIS: 440-800 nm, NIR: 900-1800 nm). This approach also

  6. Detailed exploration of Titan with a Montgolfiere aerobot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, T.; Tipex Team

    The International Cassini/Huygens (CH) mission has verified the expectation that Saturn's moon Titan offers many opportunities for studying high-priority planetary and astrobiology science objectives. CH results to date show that this world, though entirely alien in its frigid environment, presents an Earth-like and diverse appearance due to the relative balance of competing forces such as geology/tectonics, meteorology, aeronomy, and cosmic impacts. But with the limitations of a single Huygens probe, and a finite number of Cassini flybys limited in proximity and remote sensing resolution by Titan's thick atmosphere and hazes, there is much science to be done there after the CH mission has ended. Detailed exploration of Titan's surface and lower atmosphere, especially for astrobiological objectives, is best addressed by in situ investigations. The atmosphere and its hazes severely restrict orbital remote sensing: Titan cannot be mapped from orbit in the same manner as Mars, at (essentially) arbitrarily high resolution, and limited infrared (IR) windows allow only gross compositional interpretations. After CH indeed there will be further orbital investigations to be carried out, notably completion of the global mapping by Synthetic Aperture Radar and IR mapping spectrometry begun by CH, at the best resolutions practical from orbit. But to fully understand Titan as an evolving, planetary-scale body and an abode of preserved protobiological chemistry will require a platform that has access to, and mobility at, the surface and the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere. The TiPEx study team weighed the options for Titan in situ exploration, and finds that a mission based on a Montgolfiere (a type of hot-air balloon) aerobot is the best candidate for post-CH exploration. Ground-based platforms of the type used to date on Mars are far too limited in range to sample the diversity of Titan, and do not adequately investigate the lower atmosphere. Titan's cold, dense

  7. Comparison of GOME tropospheric NO2 columns with NO2 profiles deduced from ground-based in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schaub

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 vertical tropospheric column densities (VTCs retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME are compared to coincident ground-based tropospheric NO2 columns. The ground-based columns are deduced from in situ measurements at different altitudes in the Alps for 1997 to June 2003, yielding a unique long-term comparison of GOME NO2 VTC data retrieved by a collaboration of KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute and BIRA/IASB (Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy with independently derived tropospheric NO2 profiles. A first comparison relates the GOME retrieved tropospheric columns to the tropospheric columns obtained by integrating the ground-based NO2 measurements. For a second comparison, the tropospheric profiles constructed from the ground-based measurements are first multiplied with the averaging kernel (AK of the GOME retrieval. The second approach makes the comparison independent from the a priori NO2 profile used in the GOME retrieval. This allows splitting the total difference between the column data sets into two contributions: one that is due to differences between the a priori and the ground-based NO2 profile shapes, and another that can be attributed to uncertainties in both the remaining retrieval parameters (such as, e.g., surface albedo or aerosol concentration and the ground-based in situ NO2 profiles. For anticyclonic clear sky conditions the comparison indicates a good agreement between the columns (n=157, R=0.70/0.74 for the first/second comparison approach, respectively. The mean relative difference (with respect to the ground-based columns is −7% with a standard deviation of 40% and GOME on average slightly underestimating the ground-based columns. Both data sets show a similar seasonal behaviour with a distinct maximum of spring NO2 VTCs. Further analysis indicates small GOME columns being systematically smaller than the ground-based ones. The influence of different shapes in the a

  8. The big comet crash of 1994. Intensive observational campaign at ESO

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    course depend on the exact moments of the impacts. Also at the time of the impacts, a group of French astronomers, headed by Bruno Sicardy of the Observatoire de Paris, will mount a special CCD camera at the Danish telescope, which will be used for different types of observations. They also hope to be able to detect some of the expected light flashes from the Jupiter moons. In addition, this programme will monitor changes in the cloud structure around the impact sites. It may also be possible to obtain low-resolution spectra which will show the temperature of the flashes, but in view of their very short duration, a few seconds at most, this will not be easy. The same instrument will also be used by Nick Thomas of the Max-Planck-Institut fur Aeronomie (Lindau, Germany) to image the Jupiter plasma torus in order to detect possible changes after the impacts. Spectral observations of the comet will be made with the ESO 1.5 m telescope in April by Heike Rauer, also from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Aeronomie. They are expected to lead to a better knowledge about the physical and chemical state of the impacting bodies. For instance, are they really so ``dusty'', as present observations seem to indicate, or do they contain large amounts of gas ? If so, what kind of molecules are present ? This will help to refine the predictions of the impact effects. Imaging and spectral observations of the comet for the same general purposes will also be obtained in early July with the EMMI instrument at the 3.5 m New Technology Telescope by an international team headed by Rita Schulz, formerly at the University of Maryland and now at the Max-Planck-Institut fur Aeronomie. No less than 46 observing hours have been allocated at the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) to an international group headed by Daniel Gautier, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon. During the impacts, the cometary molecules will be mixed with those in the Jovian atmosphere, some of which may come from very deep layers

  9. Obituary: Tor Hagfors, 1930-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksnes, Kaare

    2007-12-01

    Association (EISCAT) and was in charge of the construction of its radar facilities in Scandinavia. In 1982 Tor was back in USA as Director of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center (NAIC), which manages the Arecibo Observatory. At the same time he was Professor of both Astronomy and Electrical Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. In 1992 Hagfors accepted a call as Director of the Max-Planck Institut für Aeronomie in Lindau, Germany, where he remained until his retirement in 1998. During this period he was also Adjunct Professor at the Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, where he helped to start research projects in space research. The University of Tromsö, Norway; University of Nagoya, Japan; and University of Lancaster, UK, also benefited from visits by Tor as a Guest Professor. Hagfors was widely valued as a member of many national and international scientific committees and unions, e. g., as head of a committee on space research for the Norwegian Research Council. He received many honors, notably the Van der Pol Gold Medal (1987), a Senior Humboldt Fellowship (1989), Membership in the Norwegian Academy of Science (1995), Extraordinary Membership in the Royal Astronomical Society (1998), the Sir Granville Beynon Medal (2002), a Doctorate Honoris Causa from the University of Oulu (2002), and a Honorary Doctorate from the University of Tromsö (2003). Tor Hagfors had very wide interests; he was a brilliant researcher who published around 170 scientific papers. His many achievements in radio astronomy, in addition to what is already mentioned, included determination of the dielectric constant of the Moon's surface, radar mapping of the surfaces of Venus and of rapidly rotating planetary bodies, scattering studies of the surfaces of the Galilean satellites and of the interiors of comets and asteroids by radio sounding, and lastly the search for water on Mars by means of Mars Express data. He had a profound knowledge of not only

  10. Europe goes to Mars - preparations are well under way

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    -mail: psri@open.ac.uk HRSC (High/Super Resolution Stereo Camera), Gerhard Neukum, DLR, Institut für Planetenerkundung, Berlin, Germany, tel. +49 30 67055 300, fax. +49 30 67055 303, e-mail: gerhard.neukum@dlr.de MaRS (Radio Science Experiment), Martin Pätzold, University of Cologne, Germany, tel. +49 221 4703385, fax. +49 221 4705198, e-mail: paetzold@geo.uni-koeln.de MARSIS (Subsurface Sounding Radar/Altimeter), Giovanni Picardi, University of Rome, Italy, tel. +39 06 44585455, fax. +39 06 4873300, e-mail: picar@infocom.ing.uniroma1.it OMEGA (IR Mineralogical Mapping Spectrometer), Jean-Pierre Bibring, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay, France, tel. +33 1 69858686, fax. +33 1 69858675, e-mail: bibring@ias.u-psud.fr PFS (Planetary Fourier Spectrometer), Vittorio Formisano, Istituto Fisica Spazio Interplanetario, Rome, Italy, tel. +39 6 49934362, fax. +39 6 49934383, e-mail: formisan@nike.ifsi.rm.cnr.it SPICAM (UV and IR Atmospheric Spectrometer), Jean-Loup Bertaux, Service d'Aéronomie, Verrières-le-Buisson, France, tel. +33 1 64474251, fax. +33 1 6920299, e-mail: jean-loup.bertaux@aerov.jussieu.fr. Additional contact: Christian Muller, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy. B.USOC earth observations coordination, Avenue Circulaire, 3, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium, tel. +32-2-3730372, fax: +32-2-3748423, e- mail: Christian.Muller@oma.be

  11. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldev Arora

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Earth is a complex dynamic system and study of the geomagnetic field can provide
    insight to the dynamic processes operative in the outer core where the main field is
    produced by a geo-dynamo mechanism. By contrast the study of transient geomagnetic
    variations is an important tool for studying the complex solar wind-magnetosphere-
    ionosphere coupling. In addition the currents induced by the time varying external
    current system allow us to image the crust and the upper mantle in terms of
    electric conductivity. Lack of measurements and collection of geomagnetic data from
    certain strategic locations restricts the development of high quality models of main
    geomagnetic field as well as the current systems responsible for transient geomagnetic
    variations. Division V of the International Association of Geomagnetic Aeronomy
    (IAGA jointly with the Interdivisional Commission for Developing Countries organized
    a special symposium «Geomagnetic Measurements in Remote Regions» at General
    Assembly of IUGG held at Perugia (Italy during July 2-12, 2007. Papers were
    presented on data base numerical simulations identifying strategic gaps in the existing
    observatory network where new measurements of geomagnetic field could improve
    upon existing geomagnetic reference models. Special focus was on describing the
    novel design of equipment, modes of data collection and dissemination from remote
    regions. During the symposium, 21 presentations were presented and this issue of
    Annals of Geophysics compiles a selection of papers.
    It is significant that each paper in this special issue is multi-authored by several
    institutions and countries. This emphasizes the importance of worldwide collaboration
    when obtaining and analyzing data from geophysical observations in remote regions.
    With current technology magnetic observatories still require people to take

  12. The Sun as you never saw it before

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    went into creating LASCO and SOHO, and leave aside the many points of scientific importance in the images, I am happy to marvel at a new impression of the busy star that gives us life, and which affects our environment in many ways that we are only now beginning to understand." Transatlantic cooperation The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA. ESA and the European aerospace industry built the spacecraft, and NASA launched it on 2 December 1995. Operating 1,500,000 kilometres out on the sunward side of the Earth, near the position called Lagrangian point L1, SOHO has an uninterrupted view of the Sun from an undisturbed vantage point, and a precision of pointing which makes delicate observations possible. SOHO carries 12 sets of instruments provided by scientific teams, each led by a European or an American principal investigator. They study the solar interior by helioseismology, the solar atmosphere seen by ultraviolet and visible light, and the solar wind and energetic particles. There is much transatlantic collaboration within the various teams. Besides the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, LASCO involves the Max-Planck-Institüt für Aeronomie at Lindau (Germany), the Unversity of Birmingham (England) and Laboratoire d'Astronomie Spatiale at Marseille (France). Sharing LASCO's electronic systems, and many operations and analyses, is SOHO's extreme ultraviolet imager EIT. This is the responsibility of a team led from Orsay (France) and it observes activity in the Sun's hot atmosphere related to the wider events seen by LASCO. Roger Bonnet, who presides over the multinational effort as ESA's Director of Science, shares the enthusiasm for the Christmas movie. "For the first time we see the Sun clearly among the stars, thanks to SOHO and LASCO," Bonnet comments. "Now when we say that the Sun is a typical star, and a key to understanding the whole Universe, that is no longer a theoretical statement

  13. "First Light" for HARPS at La Silla

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    overall stability never before reached by any other astronomical spectrograph , and it is possible to measure any nightly drift with an accuracy never achieved before [1]. During this first commissioning period in February 2003, all instrument functions were tested, as well as the complete data flow system hard- and software. Already during the second test night, the data-reduction pipeline was used to obtain the extracted and wavelength-calibrated spectra in a completely automatic way. The first spectra obtained with HARPS will now allow the construction of templates needed to compute the radial velocities of different types of stars with the best efficiency. The second commissioning period in June will then be used to achieve the optimal performance of this new, very powerful instrument. Astronomers in the ESO community will have the opportunity to observe with HARPS from October 1, 2003. Other research opportunities opening This superb radial velocity machine will also play an important role for the study of stellar interiors by asteroseismology. Oscillation modes were recently discovered in the nearby solar-type star Alpha Centauri A from precise radial velocity measurements carried out with CORALIE (see ESO PR 15/01 ). HARPS is able to carry out similar measurements on fainter stars, thus reaching a much wider range of masses, spectral characteristics and ages. Michel Mayor , Director of the Geneva Observatory and co-discoverer of the first known exoplanet, is confident: "With HARPS operating so well already during the first test nights, there is every reason to believe that we shall soon see some breakthroughs in this field also" . The HARPS Consortium HARPS has been designed and built by an international consortium of research institutes, led by the Observatoire de Genève (Switzerland) and including Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France), Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bern (Switzerland), the Service d'Aeronomie (CNRS, France), as well as ESO La Silla

  14. Once a myth, now an object of study - How the perception of comets has changed over the centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    In February 2004, Rosetta will be setting off on its long journey through our solar system to meet up with Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It will take the European Space Agency (ESA) space probe ten years to reach its destination. The comet, which moves in an elliptical orbit around the Sun, will at rendezvous be some 675 million kilometres from the Sun, near the point in its orbit farthest from the Sun. The meeting point was not chosen at random: at this point the comet is still barely active, it is still in fact a frozen lump of ice and interplanetary dust, in all probability the matter from which our solar system emerged four and a half billion years ago. Rosetta’s job is to find out more about these strange bodies that travel through our solar system. As it moves on, the comet will begin to change. As it approaches the Sun, it will - like all comets - become active: in the warmth of the Sun’s rays, the ices evaporate, tearing small dust particles from the surface. This produces the comet head (the coma) and tail. Only these two phenomena are visible from Earth. The comet nucleus itself is far too tiny - Churyumov-Gerasimenko measures about 4 kilometres across - to be viewed from Earth. As Dr Uwe Keller of the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy in Kaltenburg-Lindau, the scientist responsible for the Osiris camera carried by Rosetta, explains, “Formation of the coma and tail during solar flyby skims several metres of matter off the comet’s surface. In the case of a small comet like Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the shrinkage is a good 1% each time round.” As it flies past the Sun every 6.6 years it can look forward to a short future, especially on a cosmic timescale. Comets - a mystical view Visible cometary phenomena have fascinated human beings from time immemorial - and frightened them too. Even today mystical explanations prevail among some of the Earth’s peoples. The Andaman islanders, a primitive people living in the Gulf of Bengal, see comets as burning

  15. ESA's Rosetta mission and the puzzles that Hale-Bopp left behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    the origin of life on the Earth. The comet specialist Uwe Keller of the Max-Planck Institut fur Aeronomie, Germany, is one of the Giotto veterans who has helped with the planning of Rosetta. He was in charge of Giotto's camera. "Rosetta is the mission we are all waiting for," Dr Keller comments. "After I spent six years analysing our images of the Halley nucleus, I say that basic scientific assumptions about the nature of comets are still contradictory. We shall settle the arguments only by the close, prolonged inspection that Rosetta will make possible." Engineering the Rosetta mission To build up the speed needed to adopt the same orbit around the Sun as Comet Wirtanen, Rosetta must steal energy of motion from the planets, in a swingby of Mars and two swingbys of the Earth. During its far-flung manoeuvres in pursuit of the comet, Rosetta will inspect the asteroids Mimistrobell and Rodari at close quarters. When Rosetta is far from the Earth, or on the wrong side of the Sun, communication will be difficult. The spacecraft will therefore have a high degree of robotic self-reliance. It will also be capable of hibernating for more than two years without attention -- a technique devised by ESA for the later stages of the Giotto mission. Rosetta will rely on solar power, even when more than five times further than the Earth from the Sun. Special low-intensity solar cells are under development for Rosetta. Conditions in this farthest phase of Rosetta's voyage will be very chilly, but ESA's engineers are satisfied that the temperatures inside the spacecraft can be kept within limits by black paint, multilayer insulation and electric heaters. Despite its originality and sophistication, Rosetta will be just a flying box with solar arrays like wings, looking rather like a telecommunications satellite. "Keep it simple," is the motto of John Credland, ESA's project manager for Rosetta. "Simplicity brings reliability," he explains, "and that is my overriding concern for the

  16. Shoemaker-Levy 9/JUPITER Collision Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Information Service (Tel.: +4989-32006276; Fax: +4989-3202362), to obtain a personal invitation. ESO is preparing special arrangements for the Chilean media; they will soon be announced directly to the involved. PHOTO CAPTION ESO PR PHOTO 10/94-1: PORTRAIT OF A DOOMED COMET These two photos from the ESO La Silla observatory show the individual nuclei of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, now headed for collision with Jupiter on 16 - 22 July 1994. The wide-field photo (below, left) was obtained by Klaus Jockers and Galina Chernova (Max-Planck-Institute fur Aeronomie, Katlenburg, Lindau, Germany) on May 1, 1994. For this 5 min exposure in red light they used a CCD camera at the MPIfAe/Hoher List focal reducer at the ESO 1-metre telescope. The entire nuclear train (the "string of pearls") is very well seen, together with the sunlight-reflecting dust from the nuclei, all on one side. On this date, the comet was 654 million km from the Earth and the angular extension of the train was about 5.3 arcmin, corresponding to a projected length of just over 1 million km. A 15 min CCD image was obtained for astrometric purposes on May 11, 1994, by Jean-Francois Claeskens at the Danish 1.5 m telescope at La Silla; it is here reproduced in close-up to show well the individual nuclei, in particular the fainter ones. The bright object to the upper right is a 10th mag star. Note that the stars in the field are somewhat trailed, since the telescope was set to follow the motion of the comet. The first nucleus to hit Jupiter will be "A", here seen 42 mm from the left edge and 33 mm below the upper edge of the large picture. The last is "W", 43 mm above the lower edge and 9 mm from the right edge. The comet was 657 million km from the Earth and the train was somewhat longer, 5.8 arcmin, i.e. the projected length was now 1.1 million km. Technical information: Wide-Field: pixel size 1.5 arcsec; scale on photo: 5.1 arcsec/mm; field size: 12.2 x 6.6 arcmin; 5 min exposure; gunn-r filtre. Close-Up: pixel size 0