WorldWideScience

Sample records for aeronautical community role

  1. The Role of the U.S. Government Technical Report in Aeronautics: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    survey questionnaire. 14 23. Technical Discipline -- for purposes of this study technical disciplines include aeronautics, astronautics, chemistry ...report varies because it serves different roles in communicating within and between organizations. The technical report has been defined etymologically ...and Information Systems - Administrative/Management - Other o Technical Discipline * - Aeronautics - Astronautics - Chemistry and Materials

  2. Role of optical computers in aeronautical control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role that optical computers play in aircraft control is determined. The optical computer has the potential high speed capability required, especially for matrix/matrix operations. The optical computer also has the potential for handling nonlinear simulations in real time. They are also more compatible with fiber optic signal transmission. Optics also permit the use of passive sensors to measure process variables. No electrical energy need be supplied to the sensor. Complex interfacing between optical sensors and the optical computer is avoided if the optical sensor outputs can be directly processed by the optical computer.

  3. A Tool for Measuring NASA's Aeronautics Research Progress Toward Planned Strategic Community Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Pearce, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Description of a tool for portfolio analysis of NASA's Aeronautics research progress toward planned community strategic Outcomes is presented. For efficiency and speed, the tool takes advantage of a function developed in Excels Visual Basic for Applications. The strategic planning process for determining the community Outcomes is also briefly discussed. Stakeholder buy-in, partnership performance, progress of supporting Technical Challenges, and enablement forecast are used as the criteria for evaluating progress toward Outcomes. A few illustrative examples of using the tool are also presented.

  4. Modern aluminium alloys for aeronautical applications. The role of the Al-Li system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godefroid, L.; Bernardes, A.T.; Bastian, F.L.

    1995-01-01

    A great effort has been made for some Aluminum Industries since the ''80 to develop new alloys with weight reduction, to use in aeronautic industry. The system Al-Li is a good example of this effort, because it presents a low density and a greater stiffness than usual alloys. In this paper we compare some Al-Li alloys with respect to mechanical properties: fracture toughness and resistance to crack propagation on fatigue case. The results are discussed, as well as the nowadays status and perspectives for the use of these alloys. (author)

  5. Acoustic Metamaterials in Aeronautics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Palma

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials, man-made composites that are scaled smaller than the wavelength, have demonstrated a huge potential for application in acoustics, allowing the production of sub-wavelength acoustic absorbers, acoustic invisibility, perfect acoustic mirrors and acoustic lenses for hyper focusing, and acoustic illusions and enabling new degrees of freedom in the control of the acoustic field. The zero, or even negative, refractive sound index of metamaterials offers possibilities for the control of acoustic patterns and sound at sub-wavelength scales. Despite the tremendous growth in research on acoustic metamaterials during the last decade, the potential of metamaterial-based technologies in aeronautics has still not been fully explored, and its utilization is still in its infancy. Thus, the principal concepts mentioned above could very well provide a means to develop devices that allow the mitigation of the impact of civil aviation noise on the community. This paper gives a review of the most relevant works on acoustic metamaterials, analyzing them for their potential applicability in aeronautics, and, in this process, identifying possible implementation areas and interesting metabehaviors. It also identifies some technical challenges and possible future directions for research with the goal of unveiling the potential of metamaterials technology in aeronautics.

  6. Aeronautical Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Aeronautical Information System (AIS) is a leased weather automated system that provides a means of collecting and distributing aeronautical weather information...

  7. Utilizing Peer Mentor Roles in Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieske, Laura Jo; Benjamin, Mimi

    2015-01-01

    For a number of learning community programs, peer mentors provide an additional layer of staffing support. This chapter highlights peer mentor roles from a sample of programs and suggests important components for the construction of these roles.

  8. Achieving Aeronautics Leadership: Aeronautics Strategic Enterprise Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    Today, more than ever, aggressive leadership is required to ensure that our national investments in aeronautical research, technology, and facilities are shaped into a coordinated, and high-impact, strategy...

  9. Achieving Aeronautics Leadership: Aeronautics Strategic Enterprise Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Today, more than ever, aggressive leadership is required to ensure that our national investments in aeronautical research, technology, and facilities are shaped into a coordinated, and high-impact, strategy. Under the auspices of the National Science and Technology Council, and in conjunction with the domestic industry, universities, the Department of Defense, and the Federal Aviation Administration - our partners in aeronautics - we propose to provide that leadership, and this document is our plan.

  10. Role of computation fluid dynamics in aeronautical engineering (4). Development and applications of implicit TVD finete volume code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, Eiji; Jounouchi, Tadamasa

    1986-12-01

    Potential analysis in aeronautic design has reached the stage of practical use although it involves problems concerning accuracy and restrictions on its application. On the other hand, numerical analysis using Euler and Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations is based on a highly accurate theory, so is preferable, but has not reached the stage of practical use because it involves problems that shapes that can be analyzed are restricted on account of factors relating to computation lattice generation and because it involves difficulty relating to computation time. The essential factor in numerical analysis is stoutness (numeric stability). From this viewpoint, an Euler/N-S method was developed; the theory begins with TVD finite volume code, and incorporates various types of improvement to raise accuracy and shorten computation time; hence, it satisfies design requirements. The use of this method helps get solution under a wide range of flow condition without any fine adjustments, such as artificial viscosity. (6 figs, 1 tab, 10 refs)

  11. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  12. Aeronautical Information System Replacement -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Aeronautical Information System Replacement is a web-enabled, automation means for the collection and distribution of Service B messages, weather information, flight...

  13. Mobile-ip Aeronautical Network Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AATT), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This report presents the results of a simulation study of mobile-ip for an aeronautical network. The study was performed to determine the performance of the transmission control protocol (TCP) in a mobile-ip environment and to gain an understanding of how long delays, handoffs, and noisy channels affect mobile-ip performance.

  14. Application of Mobile-ip to Space and Aeronautical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kent; Shell, Dan; Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AAT-F), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This paper describes mobile-ip and mobile routers--in particular, the features, capabilities, and initial performance of the mobile router are presented. The application of mobile-router technology to NASA's space and aeronautics programs is also discussed.

  15. Role of Community Radio for Community Development in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anowarul Arif Khan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Community radio is a medium of expressing and sharing views, thoughts, ideas, problems and prospects of rural, disadvantaged, vulnerable and hard to reach population with the mainstream population. As the media of root level people of the disadvantaged areas, Community radio has become popular in recent years and it has opened a new arena for both the policy makers as well as grassroots people to be involved in the development process of their community. There are about 17 Community Radios broadcasting 135 hours programmes in a day across the country. The Community Radio can help us in addressing social, economic, cultural, educational, health, water and sanitation and disaster related issues more effectively and strategically. In order to highlight the importance and effectiveness of community radio for the community development of Bangladesh, this study has been conducted based on the secondary data. This is a group effort that has become successful by the co-operation of many individuals and institutions. Access to Information (a2i Programme would like to express sincere gratitude to Monisha Mohonto, Project Focal and Bakul Mohonto, Program Assistant, BTV for introducing such an innovative project. As this is a new concept, there is no significant study has been conducted. Therefore the study has been directed to explore the importance of community FM radio in Bangladesh particularly in remote and rural areas.

  16. Civilian Aeronautical Futures - The Responsibly Imaginable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1940 Aeronautics has had an immense impact upon Global Human lifestyles and affairs - in both the Civilian and Military arenas. During this period Long distance Train and Ship passenger transport were largely supplanted by Air Travel and Aviation assumed a dominant role in warfare. The early 1940 s to the mid 1970 s was a particularly productive period in terms of Aeronautical Technology. What is interesting is that, since the mid 1970 s, the rate of Aeronautical Technological Progress has been far slower, the basic technology in nearly all of our current Aero Systems dates from the mid 70 s or earlier. This is especially true in terms of Configuration Aerodynamics, Aeronautics appears to have "settled" on the 707, double delta and rotary wing as the approach of choice for Subsonic long haul, supersonic cruise and VTOL respectively. Obviously there have been variants and some niche digression from this/these but in the main Aeronautics, particularly civilian Aeronautics, has become a self-professed "mature", Increasingly "Commodity", Industry. The Industry is far along an existing/deployed technology curve and focused, now for decades, on incremental/evolutionary change - largely Appliers vs. developers of technology. This is, of course, in sharp contrast to the situation in the early-to-later 20th century where Aeronautics was viewed as A Major Technological Engine, much the way IT/Bio/Nano/Energetics/Quantum Technologies are viewed today. A search for Visionary Aeronautical "Futures" papers/projections indicates a decided dearth thereof over the last 20 plus years compared to the previous quarter Century. Aeronautics is part of Aerospace and Aerospace [including Aeronautics] has seen major cutbacks over the last decades. Some numbers for the U.S. Aerospace Industry serve as examples. Order of 600,000 jobs lost, with some 180,000 more on the block over the next 10 years. Approximately 25% of the Aerospace workforce is eligible to retire and the average

  17. NASA's Aeronautics Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    2004-01-01

    Six long-term technology focus areas are: 1. Environmentally Friendly, Clean Burning Engines. Focus: Develop innovative technologies to enable intelligent turbine engines that significantly reduce harmful emissions while maintaining high performance and increasing reliability. 2. New Aircraft Energy Sources and Management. Focus: Discover new energy sources and intelligent management techniques directed towards zero emissions and enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility and new science missions. 3. Quiet Aircraft for Community Friendly Service. Focus: Develop and integrate noise reduction technology to enable unrestricted air transportation service to all communities. 4. Aerodynamic Performance for Fuel Efficiency. Focus: Improve aerodynamic efficiency,structures and materials technologies, and design tools and methodologies to reduce fuel burn and minimize environmental impact and enable new vehicle concepts and capabilities for public mobility and new science missions. 5. Aircraft Weight Reduction and Community Access. Focus: Develop ultralight smart materials and structures, aerodynamic concepts, and lightweight subsystems to increase vehicle efficiency, leading to high altitude long endurance vehicles, planetary aircraft, advanced vertical and short takeoff and landing vehicles and beyond. 6. Smart Aircraft and Autonomous Control. Focus: Enable aircraft to fly with reduced or no human intervention, to optimize flight over multiple regimes, and to provide maintenance on demand towards the goal of a feeling, seeing, sensing, sentient air vehicle.

  18. The role of content marketing in social media content communities

    OpenAIRE

    Charmaine du Plessis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Content marketing has become a leading marketing technique in digital marketing communication and uses the point of view of consumers to build relationships by creating and sharing engaging content in social media that enhance their daily lives. Existing research on social media communities has focused mainly on social media marketing and virtual brand community perspectives while content marketing’s valuable and unobtrusive role in social media content communities has largely bee...

  19. A Role for Community Colleges in Navy Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfin, Peggy A.; White, John D.; Curtin, Lisa A.

    This document from the Center for Naval Analysis (CNA) discusses the role of community colleges in Navy training. CNA conducted a study to discover whether outsourcing courses such as air conditioning and refrigeration and information systems administration to community colleges was feasible and cost effective. Analyses focused on two community…

  20. Role of Women Organizations in Community Development: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper analysed the role of women organizations in the development of rural communities in Orlu Agricultural zone of Imo state. Six communities were purposively selected from three Local Government Areas of the Zone for the study. Semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 120 randomly selected ...

  1. Are Universities Role Models for Communities? A Gender Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE; Octavian MOLDOVAN

    2012-01-01

    The present paper explores the degree in which universities could/should serve as role models for communities from the perspective of gender integration. Although the theoretical/ moral answer would be affirmative (universities should be in such a position that would allow local communities to regard them as role models of gender integration), the primary empirical analysis leads to another conclusion. A brief theoretical review (that connects gender discrimination, sustainable development, u...

  2. Do Faith Communities Have a Role in Addressing Childhood Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalinski, Andra; Dyess, Susan; Grooper, Sareen

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric obesity is a multifaceted phenomenon. A partnership with faith-based communities to address the issue has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to describe the cultural beliefs of faith community leaders regarding childhood obesity and to examine attitudes about their role in addressing the issue. A qualitative descriptive design informed by ethnographic methods and triangulation of multiple data sources was utilized to assess the cultural beliefs of faith community leaders. A purposive sample of 13 leaders (nine females, four males) from seven multicultural and multigenerational local faith communities participated in the study. No more than three participants from any one faith community were enrolled in the study. Twenty-first century lifestyle challenges, accountability of behaviors (a dichotomy that fluctuated between individual responsibility to community and/or social responsibility), and the need for intentionality emerged as themes from the data. Faith community leaders envisioned a role for faith communities in addressing childhood obesity. Findings support the ongoing development of population based health promotion programs through faith community engagement. The findings provide a foundation for nurses partnering with faith communities on health promotion programs targeting childhood obesity to address family health issues in a holistic way. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The role of online community from user and firm perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponnamma Divakaran, Pradeep Kumar

    for firm’s benefits. The overall objective of this doctoral dissertation is to provide insights about how online communities as a collective unit can be exploited for solving some of the problems faced by companies in their product development especially in their pre-launch period. This objective is built...... on the community itself and its characteristics, (2) research focussed on studying the off-line consumer or market behaviour using community as the field setting and (3) research focussed on investigating the various functions and roles of online communities as a collective unit. The first two studies...

  4. Role of community acceptance in sustainable bioenergy projects in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eswarlal, Vimal Kumar; Vasudevan, Geoffrey; Dey, Prasanta Kumar; Vasudevan, Padma

    2014-01-01

    Community acceptance has been identified as one of the key requirements for a sustainable bioenergy project. However less attention has been paid to this aspect from developing nations and small projects perspective. Therefore this research examines the role of community acceptance for sustainable small scale bioenergy projects in India. While addressing the aim, this work identifies influence of community over bioenergy projects, major concerns of communities regarding bioenergy projects and factors influencing perceptions of communities about bioenergy projects. The empirical research was carried out on four bioenergy companies in India as case studies. It has been identified that communities have significant influence over bioenergy projects in India. Local air pollution, inappropriate storage of by-products and credibility of developer are identified as some of the important concerns. Local energy needs, benefits to community from bioenergy companies, level of trust on company and relationship between company and the community are some of the prime factors which influence community's perception on bioenergy projects. This research sheds light on important aspects related to community acceptance of bioenergy projects, and this information would help practitioners in understanding the community perceptions and take appropriate actions to satisfy them

  5. The Role of Departmental Leadership for Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanblaere, Bénédicte; Devos, Geert

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Department heads play a pivotal role in the functioning of departments in secondary schools. However, quantitative research about the role of departmental leadership for the development of professional learning communities (PLCs) in subject departments in secondary schools remains scarce. As PLCs are seen as promising contexts for…

  6. Aeronautical telecommunications network advances, challenges, and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Musa, Sarhan M

    2015-01-01

    Addresses the Challenges of Modern-Day Air Traffic Air traffic control (ATC) directs aircraft in the sky and on the ground to safety, while the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN) comprises all systems and phases that assist in aircraft departure and landing. The Aeronautical Telecommunications Network: Advances, Challenges, and Modeling focuses on the development of ATN and examines the role of the various systems that link aircraft with the ground. The book places special emphasis on ATC-introducing the modern ATC system from the perspective of the user and the developer-and provides a thorough understanding of the operating mechanism of the ATC system. It discusses the evolution of ATC, explaining its structure and how it works; includes design examples; and describes all subsystems of the ATC system. In addition, the book covers relevant tools, techniques, protocols, and architectures in ATN, including MIPv6, air traffic control (ATC), security of air traffic management (ATM), very-high-frequenc...

  7. The role of content marketing in social media content communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine du Plessis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Content marketing has become a leading marketing technique in digital marketing communication and uses the point of view of consumers to build relationships by creating and sharing engaging content in social media that enhance their daily lives. Existing research on social media communities has focused mainly on social media marketing and virtual brand community perspectives while content marketing’s valuable and unobtrusive role in social media content communities has largely been overlooked. Objective: The purpose of this article was to investigate content marketing’s role in social media content communities to engage with the target audience in an innate manner. Method: This study made use of a directed, inductive content analysis of 51 practitioner documents relating to business-to-consumer content marketing practices to add another perspective to existing research on communities in social media. The content analysis was facilitated by using QDA Miner, a widely adopted and reliable qualitative data analysis software programme. Results: Three categories emerged from the data namely building content communities, platform-specific content and understanding channels. These categories provide sufficient evidence of how brands make use of social media content communities to connect with the target audience in an unobtrusive manner, in addition to being present in virtual brand communities. Conclusion: The findings make several contributions to the existing literature. Firstly, it provides a clearer distinction between brand and social media content communities. Secondly, it extends conceptions about social media communities to include content communities and, thirdly, it provides sufficient evidence of how content marketing could benefit a brand by naturally becoming part of social media conversations.

  8. Role theory: a framework to investigate the community nurse role in contemporary health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Kim; Davidson, Patricia M; Daly, John; Halcomb, Elizabeth J

    2007-01-01

    Nurses' perceptions of their role are influenced by societal attitudes, government policies and trends in professional issues. Dynamic factors in contemporary health environments challenge traditional nursing roles, in particular those of community nurses. Role theory is a conceptual framework that defines how individuals behave in social situations and how these behaviours are perceived by external observers. This paper reviews the role theory literature as a conceptual framework to explore community nurses' perceptions of their role. Three theoretical perspectives of role theory have emerged from the literature review: 1. social structuralism 2. symbolic interactionism and 3. the dramaturgical perspective. These philosophical perspectives provide a useful framework to investigate the role of community nurses in the contemporary health care system.

  9. Community perceptions and attitudes on malaria case management and the role of community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owek, Collins J; Oluoch, Elizabeth; Wachira, Juddy; Estambale, Benson; Afrane, Yaw A

    2017-07-04

    Community Case Management of malaria (CCMm) is one of the new approaches adopted by the World Health Organization for malaria endemic countries to reduce the burden of malaria for vulnerable populations. It is based on the evidence that well-trained and supervised community health workers (CHWs) can provide prompt and adequate treatment to fever cases within 24 h to help reduce morbidity and mortality associated with malaria among under-five children. The perception and attitudes of the community members on the CHWs' role is of greater importance for acceptance of their services. The aim of the study was to assess community's perception and attitude towards CCMm and on CHWs who undertake it. This study was conducted in five districts in western Kenya where Community Case Management was being undertaken. This was a qualitative cross-sectional study in which in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with mothers of under-five children and key stakeholders. Overall, there were more positive expressions of perceptions and attitudes of the community members towards the CCMm programme and the role of CHWs. The positive perceptions included among others; recognition and appreciation of services of CHWs, bringing health services to close proximity to the community, avoiding long queues in the health facilities, provision of health education that encourages good health practices, and promotion of positive health-seeking behaviour from within the communities. This programme is not without challenges as some of the negative perceptions expressed by the community members included the fact that some clinicians doubt the capacity of CHWs on dispensing drugs in the community, some CHWs do not keep client's secrets and mistrust of CHWs due to conflicting information by government. It was evident that the community had more positive perceptions and attitudes towards the role of CHWs in CCMm than negative ones. There should however, be deliberate efforts

  10. The rural community care gerontologic nurse entrepreneur: role development strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Rosalie A

    2005-10-01

    Rural elderly individuals are an underserved population with limited access to health care. There is an increasing need for independent community care nurses to provide assistance to home-based elderly individuals with chronic illnesses to prevent unnecessary medical and placement decisions and, thus, allow them to maintain independence and quality of life. This article describes the rural setting and why community care nurses are needed, and explores strategies for implementing the role of the independent nurse entrepreneur in caring for community-based elderly individuals in rural settings.

  11. A Hybrid Satellite-Terrestrial Approach to Aeronautical Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Chomos, Gerald J.; Griner, James H.; Mainger, Steven W.; Martzaklis, Konstantinos S.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid growth in air travel has been projected to continue for the foreseeable future. To maintain a safe and efficient national and global aviation system, significant advances in communications systems supporting aviation are required. Satellites will increasingly play a critical role in the aeronautical communications network. At the same time, current ground-based communications links, primarily very high frequency (VHF), will continue to be employed due to cost advantages and legacy issues. Hence a hybrid satellite-terrestrial network, or group of networks, will emerge. The increased complexity of future aeronautical communications networks dictates that system-level modeling be employed to obtain an optimal system fulfilling a majority of user needs. The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the current and potential future state of aeronautical communications, and is developing a simulation and modeling program to research future communications architectures for national and global aeronautical needs. This paper describes the primary requirements, the current infrastructure, and emerging trends of aeronautical communications, including a growing role for satellite communications. The need for a hybrid communications system architecture approach including both satellite and ground-based communications links is explained. Future aeronautical communication network topologies and key issues in simulation and modeling of future aeronautical communications systems are described.

  12. The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Community College Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Curt Alan

    2016-01-01

    The study explores the role of emotional intelligence in community college leaders using a case study design with mixed-methods, including quantitative and qualitative data. Twenty-one leaders among three cases participated in the study, each completing the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and participating in…

  13. The changing roles of pharmacists in hospital and community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Patrick O Erah

    Available online at http://www.tjpr.freehosting.net. Editorial. The changing roles of pharmacists in hospital and community pharmacy practice in Nigeria. The profession and practice of pharmacy did not start in Nigeria as a well defined health care area of specialization as it is today. Rather, pharmaceutical training was borne.

  14. Community care worker perceptions of their roles in tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ida Okeyo

    Objective: To explore perceptions of CCWs of their role in TB care and TB ... motivated them to become involved in offering patient care. ... ment and the education they provided to patients and to lay community members. ... Peer review under responsibility of Johannesburg University. ..... Some CCWs had family mem-.

  15. An Exploration of Community Learning Disability Nurses' Therapeutic Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsham, Marian

    2012-01-01

    This literature review and primary qualitative research explores therapeutic role from the perspective of Community Learning Disability Nurses. Semi-structured interviews, based on Critical Incident Technique ("Psychol Bull", 51, 1954, 327), and descriptive phenomenological methodology were adopted to elicit data amenable to systematic…

  16. Are Universities Role Models for Communities? A Gender Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores the degree in which universities could/should serve as role models for communities from the perspective of gender integration. Although the theoretical/ moral answer would be affirmative (universities should be in such a position that would allow local communities to regard them as role models of gender integration, the primary empirical analysis leads to another conclusion. A brief theoretical review (that connects gender discrimination, sustainable development, universities and local communities is followed by an empirical analysis that compares the management structures of 12 Romanian Universities of Advanced Research and Education (the best Romanian universities according to a national ranking with those of four local communities where they are located (as geographic proximity would lead to a better diffusion of best practices. Contrary to initial expectations, even in higher education institutions, women are underrepresented both in executive and legislative positions. Since universities are subject to the same major patterns of gender discrimination (such as role theory, glass ceiling and glass elevator as private and public organizations, they lose the moral high ground that theory would suggest. However, medicine and pharmacy universities that can be connected with the traditional roles attributed to women provide better gender integration, but glass escalator phenomena remain present even in these limited fields.

  17. Community structures and role detection in music networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, T.; Balenzuela, P.; Cano, P.; Buldú, Javier M.

    2008-12-01

    We analyze the existence of community structures in two different social networks using data obtained from similarity and collaborative features between musical artists. Our analysis reveals some characteristic organizational patterns and provides information about the driving forces behind the growth of the networks. In the similarity network, we find a strong correlation between clusters of artists and musical genres. On the other hand, the collaboration network shows two different kinds of communities: rather small structures related to music bands and geographic zones, and much bigger communities built upon collaborative clusters with a high number of participants related through the period the artists were active. Finally, we detect the leading artists inside their corresponding communities and analyze their roles in the network by looking at a few topological properties of the nodes.

  18. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo, L. del; Perez-Saez, R.B.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, L.; Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I.; Gonzalez-Martin, P.; Tello, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 μm), sample temperature (200-650 o C) and emission angle (0-85 o ) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  19. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, L. del, E-mail: leire.del-campo@cnrs-orleans.f [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Perez-Saez, R.B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.e [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Gonzalez-Fernandez, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Planta de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Gonzalez-Martin, P. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Parque empresarial San Fernando, Avda. Castilla 2, 28830 San Fernando de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Tello, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-01-21

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 {mu}m), sample temperature (200-650 {sup o}C) and emission angle (0-85{sup o}) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  20. Multipath modeling for aeronautical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, J. H.; Gupta, S. C.; Wilson, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    One of the fundamental technical problems in aeronautical digital communications is that of multipath propagation between aircraft and ground terminal. This paper examines in detail a model of the received multipath signal that is useful for application of modern detection and estimation theories. The model treats arbitrary modulation and covers the selective and nonselective cases. The necessarily nonstationary statistics of the received signal are determined from the link geometry and the surface roughness parameters via a Kirchhoff solution.

  1. Role of Women in Sericulture and Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswarappa Kasi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In any discourse on sociology and anthropology, one fact that clearly emerges is that women can generally be trusted to perform their duties with utmost care and attention. This is more so in the case of agriculture and allied activities. No wonder women are playing a very important role in the sericulture industry. Their qualities like maternal instincts and loving care of those under their charge prove to be very helpful in the successful breeding of silk worms. The sericulture industry has opened up phenomenal employment avenues and helped women to become important players in the decision-making process—whether in the household or in the community at large. The active involvement of women is very essential for the success of the any community development initiative. This has been proved on many occasions all over the world—more so in the developing countries. For instance, the success of Self Help Groups (SHGs in Andhra Pradesh and other states of India is all due to the active role played by women. The thrust of this article is on the role of women in promotion of sericulture activities in the village, and how their participation has led to community development. Given the above backdrop, the present article is based on an empirical work undertaken in Kotha Indlu village, Chittoor District of Andhra Pradesh in South India. Sericulture is an important means for generating employment, income enhancement crop enterprises, and is a most appropriate household activity. In all these activities, women have shown their mettle and performed their tasks most skillfully. In the village under study, women are playing an important role in silk rearing and processing activities. This article will endeavor to show how “sericulture,” an agro-based activity, has brought about overall development of individual households, the village, and the community at large.

  2. A Survey for Assessment of Role of Pharmacist in Community

    OpenAIRE

    P Kapur; M Aqil; M S Alam; S Karim; Himanshu Sharma; P Jinda

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of pharmacist in community setting & consumer’s perception in National Capital
    Region.
    Setting: The study was conducted in National Capital Region of India during the year 2003-04.
    Method: Four pharmacy shops were selected for this study which were not attached to any hospital or clinic. Seventy
    seven consumers, who visited these pharmacies during ...

  3. Leading Edge Aeronautics Research for NASA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The LEARN Project explores the creation of novel concepts and processes with the potential to create new capabilities in aeronautics research through awards to the...

  4. Program of Research in Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    A prospectus of the educational and research opportunities available at the Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences, operated at NASA Langley Research Center in conjunction with George Washington University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences is presented. Requirements of admission to various degree programs are given as well as the course offerings in the areas of acoustics, aeronautics, environmental modelling, materials science, and structures and dynamics. Research facilities for each field of study are described. Presentations and publications (including dissertations and theses) generated by each program are listed as well as faculty members visting scientists and engineers.

  5. 14 CFR 61.99 - Aeronautical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical experience. 61.99 Section 61.99 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Recreational Pilots § 61.99...

  6. The Role of Nurses in Community Awareness and Preventive Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaneh M. Fooladi

    2015-10-01

    as a theoretical framework within that community should be considered to help explain how communities address adversity.2 In a British study, researchers established the importance of the role of nursing in preventive health when nurses added significant improvement to reduce the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease in middle aged patients. Nurses, compared to other healthcare providers, were able to provide health screening and doubled the recorded blood pressure, quadrupled identification of smoking habit, and increased documented weight related issues by fivefold in a primary care setting.3 Community health nursing theory addresses collective concepts of nursing domains in an attempt to rectify environmental, resiliency, and community abilities for healthcare issues among diverse population and avoids simple groupings of aggregates. Conceptual frameworks are introduced to help urban and rural communities implement preventative measures for health and wellbeing of residents through rural-based community health nursing programs.1,4 With this awareness, Iranian nurses in any practice area will find a golden opportunity to encourage, motivate, inform and guide the public to consider health screening, annual check-ups, childhood and adult immunizations and offer health education to patients across the lifespan. The role of nursing does not begin or end in a hospital-based or clinical facility. It is important to remember “Once a nurse, Always a nurse”, which means a nurse can guide and educate the public every minute and in all places, for the mere fact that medicine does NOT. Community health is a major part of nursing profession as Sarah, who graduated from a baccalaureate nursing program 5 years ago, demonstrates her role as a spiritual journey with a firm belief to bring health awareness through motivation. Her usual day begins by telling a 45 year-old male cashier in a supermarket to go for a prostate cancer screening; a 50 year-old woman sitting in

  7. Role of Knowledge Based Communities in Knowledge Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Ion CEPTUREANU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the new economy, knowledge is an essential component of economic and social systems. The organizational focus has to be on building knowledge-based management, development of human resource and building intellectual capital capabilities. Knowledge-based management is defined, at company level, by economic processes that emphasize creation, selling, buying, learning, storing, developing, sharing and protection of knowledge as a decisive condition for profit and long-term sustainability of the company. Hence, knowledge is, concurently, according to a majoritiy of specialists, raw material, capital, product and an essential input. Knowledge-based communities are one of the main constituent elements of a framework for knowledge based management. These are peer networks consisting of practitioners within an organization, supporting each other to perform better through the exchange and sharing of knowledge. Some large companies have contributed or supported the establishment of numerous communities of practice, some of which may have several thousand members. They operate in different ways, are of different sizes, have different areas of interest and addresses knowledge at different levels of its maturity. This article examines the role of knowledge-based communities from the perspective of knowledge based management, given that the arrangements for organizational learning, creating, sharing, use of knowledge within organizations become more heterogeneous and take forms more difficult to predict by managers and specialists.

  8. Influence of ownership type on role orientation, role affinity, and role conflict among community pharmacy managers and owners in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepelkin, Jason; Dobson, Roy Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Ownership of community pharmacies is increasingly being controlled by a relatively small number of corporate entities. The influence of this ownership type should not be ignored, because ownership has the ability to impact pharmacy practice. To examine the relationship between ownership type and community pharmacy managers with regard to role orientation, role affinity, and role conflict. This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey of community pharmacy managers in Canada by means of a self-administered postal questionnaire sent to a stratified sample of community pharmacies. Statistical analysis consisted of exploratory factor analysis with reliability testing on identified constructs. Frequencies, 1-way analyses of variance, and Scheffe post hoc tests were used to determine significant differences among groups, including ownership structure, on each of the constructs. A total of 646 completed questionnaires were received (32.9% response rate). Most of the respondents were males (60.8%), with slightly less than half of the respondents identifying their practice type as an independent pharmacy (44.6%). There were 5 multi-item scale constructs (professional orientation, business orientation, professional affinity, business affinity, and role conflict) arising from the data, which were analyzed against the pharmacy ownership structure (independent, franchise, corporate) independent variable. Analysis revealed significant differences for 3 of the 5 constructs; however, no differences were seen regarding the 2 professionally focused constructs. Community pharmacy managers/owners are generally oriented to their professional role; however, those working in a corporate pharmacy environment are less oriented to their business role when compared with those working in an independent or franchise pharmacy environment. Further research is needed to identify different practice cultures that may exist in various practice settings and the extent to which these cultures

  9. ROMANIAN AERONAUTICAL METEOROLOGY APPLICABLE LEGAL FRAMEWORK –BRIEFING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATALIN POPA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this briefing is toprovide an overview of the aeronautical meteorology legal framework in Romania. In this context, the role and importance of aeronautical meteorology in international air traffic management will be underlined, with focus on the civil aviation activity in Romania. The international legal framework and modalities of implementing these rules at national level will constitute a significant part of the present study., Specific accent will be put on the national regulatory framework and structure, means of updating it, and how it responds to changing regulatory requirements.

  10. The role of community centres in offering protection: UNHCR and Al Ghaith Association in Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Martin-Achard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Community centres play an important role in offering protection for displaced communities, particularly for members of those communities who have specific needs. Somali refugees in Yemen formed the Al Ghaith Association and are now running their own community centres to support fellow refugees. Below, UNHCR and Al Ghaith discuss their approaches.

  11. Role of environmental hazards in fall of community dwelling elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabbir, M.; Shah, S.I.H.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence linking home hazards to falls has not been well established. Falls and fall injury are a major public health concern for the elderly. Fall of elderly is very much affected by environmental hazards. Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in persons older than 60. There is a greater-than-linear increase in the rate of falls with environmental hazards. This cross section survey will not only lay the foundation for further study on this topic but also provide the basis for the development of preventive program of falls for the elders of Pakistan. Objective: To explore the role of environmental hazards of fall in the community dwelling elders is the area which is lacking in research. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted from October to December 2010 in Lahore and its peripheries and also the patients in hospital settings come after fractures or fall injuries. The total number of people included was 100. Community dwelling Elders above 60 years having recent history of at least one fall were included regardless of gender. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS 11.5. Results: There were 71 people out of 100 who fell inside the home, 10 fell outside the home and 18 were not applicable to this question. There were 19% people, who fell repeatedly at one place, 31 people replied about hazard environment where fallen that contribute to fall. According to 24 people they had Safety checks of their home yard and/ or neighborhood which will assist to avoid future fall. Conclusion: Most elderly persons live in a risky home setting. It is vital that environmental hazard be recognized and removed for wellbeing of elderly. (author)

  12. Securing Failed Inner-City Communities: The Military's Role

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khan, Oral

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the threat to internal security posed by violent gangs. This threat was found to be particularly acute in inner-city communities that have over time devolved to a status that the author classified as failed communities...

  13. Community healing and the role of pastoral care of the ill and suffering in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Magezi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The extended family (community in Africa plays a crucial role in the process of healing. However, while the role of the community is invaluable, many scholars overlook its other side. This article argues for a critical consideration of the healing role of the community in Africa and offers a critique of African community healing in the light of pastoral healing. Pastoral healing as a spiritual and faith perspective is juxtaposed with the healing process within African traditional communities. Since these two communities operate from different perspectives, in many cases they are competing forces in the process of healing – a difference that aggravates pain. This article thus carefully describes the process of healing both within a faith community (with its acts of “koinonia” and the African traditional community, and concludes by proposing a healthy integration of these systems.

  14. Supporting the role of community members employed as research staff: Perspectives of community researchers working in addiction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Gala; Alexander, Leslie B; Fisher, Celia B

    2017-08-01

    Community researchers are laypersons who conduct research activities in their own communities. In addiction and HIV research, community researchers are valued for their insider status and knowledge. At the same time, their presence on the research team raises concerns about coercion and confidentiality when community researchers and participants know each other personally, and the work of navigating between the worlds of research and community leads to moral distress and burnout for some community researchers. In this paper, we draw upon the concept of 'moral experience' to explore the local moral worlds of community researchers in the context of addiction research. In February and March 2010, we conducted focus groups with 36 community researchers employed on community-based addiction studies in the United States to elicit perspectives on ethical and moral challenges they face in their work and insights on best practices to support their role in research. Community researchers described how their values were realized or thwarted in the context of research, and their strategies for coping with shifting identities and competing priorities. They delineated how their knowledge could be used to inform development of research protocols and help principal investigators build and maintain trust with the community researchers on their teams. Our findings contribute to current understandings of the moral experiences of community members employed in research, and inform policies and practices for the growing field of community-engaged research. Funders, research organizations, and research ethics boards should develop guidelines and standards to ensure studies have key resources in place to support community researchers and ensure quality and integrity of community-engaged work. Investigators who work with community researchers should ensure channels for frontline staff to provide input on research protocols and to create an atmosphere where challenges and concerns can be

  15. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1977: A chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a chronology of events during the year 1977 in the fields of aeronautical and space research, development, activity, and policy. It includes appendixes, an index, and illustrations. Chronological entries list sources for further inquiry.

  16. Community energy planning in Canada. The role of renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Denis, Genevieve; Parker, Paul

    2009-01-01

    An emerging trend in Canada is the creation of community energy plans, where decisions that used to be left to regional level energy agencies or private individuals are now being considered at the community level. A desire to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to become more energy self-sufficient is driving this change. Theoretically, local level management is desirable because it achieves these goals through improvements in the three areas of energy efficiency, energy conservation and switching to renewable energy sources. The analysis of 10 of the first community energy plans in Canadian communities, ranging in population size from 500 to one million, finds that communities are choosing policies and programs centred on increasing energy efficiency and conservation while renewable energy receives much less attention. Municipal operations were called upon to set higher targets than the general community. Communities that recognized the substantial potential of renewable energy often focused on technologies that the municipal sector could implement, such as bio-fuels for their transportation fleet. Wind, passive solar design, solar photovoltaics and solar thermal options were only recommended in a few cases. Overall, only one of the five larger communities (Calgary) recommended implementing multiple renewable energy technologies while three of the five smaller communities proposed multiple renewable energy sources. The implication is that smaller and more remote communities may be the most willing to lead in the planned introduction of renewable energy systems. (author)

  17. The Role of Communication in Strategic Planning at California Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Cooley, Linda M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Community colleges continue to face an ever-changing environment. California Community Colleges are confronted with state initiatives, accountability, and accreditation changes that require integrated planning processes. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the role of communication as perceived by community college…

  18. The Role of the Executive-Level Student Services Officer within a Community College Organizational Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, John; Hernández, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The unique nature and mission of community colleges directly shapes the role and function of a senior student affairs officer (SSAO). Broadly, the community college mission is shaped by a vision of fulfilling several commitments to local communities. This includes admitting all applicants through an open access admissions policy and providing…

  19. 78 FR 69885 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 13-133] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory... INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Susan L. Minor, Executive Secretary for the Aeronautics Committee, NASA Headquarters...

  20. "I Was More Her Mom than She Was Mine": Role Reversal in a Community Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayseless, Ofra; Bartholomew, Kim; Henderson, Antonia; Trinke, Shanna

    2004-01-01

    Family processes associated with childhood role reversal and related adult outcomes were examined in a community sample 128 adults using a semistructured interview exploring family, friend, and romantic relationships. Women showed stronger role reversal than men, and role reversal was stronger with mothers than with fathers. Role reversal of women…

  1. The Role of Local Leaders in Community Development Programmes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madukwe

    people in need, but a process of empowerment where rural communities can acquire mastery over their .... in each zone to make the study more interactive and participatory oriented. Items discussed were .... Friends and neighbours. 22.00. 3 ... communities because of their high influence on the people. When extension ...

  2. Role of community forest reserves in wildlife conservation in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sacred groves and community forests are common ways for local rural African people to conserve natural resources. The importance of traditional approach in wildlife conservation was evaluated with line transect method utilized to assess five community forests. Comparable species richness with similar size protected ...

  3. Mentoring: A Natural Role for Learning Community Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessenauer, Sarah L.; Law, Kristi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight mentoring as an important piece of leading a learning community. The authors will share a definition of mentoring which is applicable to the learning community experience. Characteristics of mentoring will be described, including types of mentoring and mentor-mentee relationships. The authors will apply…

  4. Assessing students in community settings: the role of peer evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk); D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); A.A. Abdel-Hameed (Ahmed); M.E.M. Mohi Eldin (Magzoub)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe assessment of students in community settings faces unique difficulties. Since students are usually posted in small groups in different community settings and since the learning (largely) takes place outside the classroom, assessing student performance becomes an intrinsically complex

  5. Developing Leaders: The Role of Competencies in Rural Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    Pending retirements underscore the need to develop community college campus leaders. Rural community colleges will be particularly hard-hit by changes in leadership as they represent the majority of 2-year colleges and face unique challenges given their location. To help address the anticipated leadership transition, the American Association of…

  6. The Role of Local Leaders in Community Development Programmes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... like their male counterparts. Incompatibility of government policies with community programmes (= 3.84), insufficient sources of funds (= 3.83), poor implementation of programmes (= 3.80), and gender bias (= 3.77) constituted the major constraints to effective leadership in community development programmes in the area.

  7. An Innovative Role for Faith Community Nursing: Palliative Care Ministry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Judy C

    Although the specialty of palliative nursing and palliative care continues to grow in hospital and outpatient settings, a paucity of home-based palliative services remains. This article discusses a new paradigm of faith-based palliative care ministry using faith community nurses (FCNs). Under the leadership of a palliative care doula (a nurse expert in palliative care), nurses in the faith community can offer critical support to those with serious illness. Models such as this provide stimulating content for FCN practice and opportunity to broaden health ministry within faith communities.

  8. Community Vitality: The Role of Community-Level Resilience Adaptation and Innovation in Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenore Newman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Community level action towards sustainable development has emerged as a key scale of intervention in the effort to address our many serious environmental issues. This is hindered by the large-scale destruction of both urban neighbourhoods and rural villages in the second half of the twentieth century. Communities, whether they are small or large, hubs of experimentation or loci of traditional techniques and methods, can be said to have a level of community vitality that acts as a site of resilience, adaptation and innovation in the face of environmental challenges. This paper outlines how community vitality acts as a cornerstone of sustainable development and suggests some courses for future research. A meta-case analysis of thirty-five Canadian communities reveals the characteristics of community vitality emerging from sustainable development experiments and its relationship to resilience, applied specifically to community development.

  9. A Survey for Assessment of Role of Pharmacist in Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kapur

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: To assess the role of pharmacist in community setting & consumer’s perception in National Capital
    Region.
    Setting: The study was conducted in National Capital Region of India during the year 2003-04.
    Method: Four pharmacy shops were selected for this study which were not attached to any hospital or clinic. Seventy
    seven consumers, who visited these pharmacies during the study period, were selected for this study and
    interviewed just after they visited the pharmacy.
    Key findings: A total of 77 consumers in the age group of 11 to 72 years were included in the present study, of
    which 66.2% were males and 33.8% were females. It is observed that 46.7% consumers came for prescription
    medicines, 23.4% for over the counter medicines. Close to general physicians’ clinics and proximity to home
    were most important reasons given for visiting particular pharmacy. Majority of the consumers (n=56, 72.7%
    rated the advice given by the pharmacist as very useful, only 1(1.3% rated it as not useful at all and 2 (2.6%
    consumers did not respond. Among consumer groups 31 (40.3% thought that pharmacist has a good balance
    between health and business matter and 35.7% were in opinion that pharmacist is more concerned with making
    money, while 5.2% supported that the pharmacist is also interested in the health of his/her customers. The pharmacists
    were ranked at the top with 28(36.4% by the consumers and favoured pharmacy as the most convenient
    place to get advice about staying healthy.
    Conclusion: Most of the consumers in the present study were of the opinion that pharmacist is concerned with the
    health of the consumers, though he/she is also interested in making money. Many respondents were unaware
    about the difference between pharmacist and doctor, most of them consider

  10. A Portfolio Analysis Tool for Measuring NASAs Aeronautics Research Progress toward Planned Strategic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Pearce, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Description of a tool for portfolio analysis of NASA's Aeronautics research progress toward planned community strategic Outcomes is presented. The strategic planning process for determining the community Outcomes is also briefly described. Stakeholder buy-in, partnership performance, progress of supporting Technical Challenges, and enablement forecast are used as the criteria for evaluating progress toward Outcomes. A few illustrative examples are also presented.

  11. Linking community resources in diabetes care: a role for technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Elizabeth L; Peek, Monica E

    2015-07-01

    Designing and implementing effective lifestyle modification strategies remains one of the great challenges in diabetes care. Historically, programs have focused on individual behavior change with little or no attempt to integrate change within the broader social framework or community context. However, these contextual factors have been shown to be associated with poor diabetes outcomes, particularly in low-income minority populations. Recent evidence suggests that one way to address these disparities is to match patient needs to existing community resources. Not only does this position patients to more quickly adapt behavior in a practical way, but this also refers patients back to their local communities where a support mechanism is in place to sustain healthy behavior. Technology offers a new and promising platform for connecting patients to meaningful resources (also referred to as "assets"). This paper summarizes several noteworthy innovations that use technology as a practical bridge between healthcare and community-based resources that promote diabetes self-care.

  12. Improving health in the community: a role for performance monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Durch, Jane; Bailey, Linda A; Stoto, Michael A

    How do communities protect and improve the health of their populations? Health care is part of the answer but so are environmental protections, social and educational services, adequate nutrition, and a host of other activities...

  13. The role of the community nurse in family health care

    OpenAIRE

    JO Goddard

    1981-01-01

    The range of the community nurse’s work in family health care is much wider than that portrayed by the stereotype which many people, both lay and professional, have of it — namely, mother and baby clinics.

  14. The role of nuclear energy in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniatopoulos, C.S.; Gmelin, W.; Schenkel, R.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of the energy policy of the European Community is to achieve a secure supply of energy at reasonable cost and low environmental impact. This overall objective is embedded in the steps taken by the European Community towards the Single European Market. This subject will be addressed briefly, as well as the developments in Eastern Europe including the European Energy Charter. With regard to nuclear energy in the community, facts and issues related to electricity production, the front end and back end of the nuclear fuel cycle and current environmental and safety issues will be presented. A common industrial strategy is required in the community including safety regulations, technical specifications and products for international markets. Concerning safeguards, the Commission is fully committed to the obligations from Chapter VII of the Treaty and to any relevant international agreements concluded by the Community. This is reflected in the close cooperation of the Commission with the IAEA and in the increase of resources, both in staff and budget, which the Commission has allocated to the Safeguards Directorate to cope with the increasing requirements, for example for bulk handling facilities. Based on a request from the European Parliament, the Commission has issued in 1989 a first report on the operation of Euratom Safeguards. The Commission services are currently preparing the second report of this type. Finally, some remarks with regard to the future of nuclear energy and challenges of safeguards in the Community will be made

  15. Emerging Options and Opportunities in Civilian Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the major problems/issues with civilian aeronautics going forward, the contextual ongoing technology revolutions, the several emerging civilian aeronautical "Big Ideas" and associated enabling technological approaches. The ongoing IT Revolution is increasingly providing, as 5 senses virtual presence/reality becomes available, along with Nano/Molecular Manufacturing, virtual alternatives to Physical transportation for both people and goods. Paper examines the potential options available to aeronautics to maintain and perhaps grow "market share" in the context of this evolving competition. Many of these concepts are not new, but the emerging technology landscape is enhancing their viability and marketability. The concepts vary from the "interesting" to the truly revolutionary and all require considerable research. Paper considers the speed range from personal/general aviation to supersonic transports and technologies from energetics to fabrication.

  16. Exploring the perceptions and experiences of community health workers using role identity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlotshwa, Langelihle; Harris, Bronwyn; Schneider, Helen; Moshabela, Mosa

    2015-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) are an integral resource in many health systems, particularly in resource-poor settings. Their identities--'who' they are--play an important role in their hiring, training, and retention. We explore the perceptions, experiences, and identities of CHWs as they adopt a CHW role in rural South Africa, using 'role identity theory'. From April to December 2010, we conducted 18 semi-structured interviews with CHWs volunteering in non-governmental home-based care (HBC) organisations in one rural sub-district in South Africa. The role identity theory framework was used to understand the work of CHWs within their communities, addressing themes, such as entry into, and nature of, caring roles, organisational support, state resourcing, and community acceptability. A thematic content analysis was used to analyse the collected data. The study found that CHWs usually begin their 'caring work' before they formally join HBC organisations, by caring for children, neighbours, mothers, fathers, friends, and the community in some way. CHWs felt that becoming a health worker provided an elevated status within the community, but that it often led community members to believe they were able to control resources. The key role identities assumed by CHWs, as they sought to meet patients' and their own needs, were a complex mix of community 'insider', 'outsider', and 'broker'. Each of these role identities served as a unique way to position, from the CHW's perspective, themselves and the community, given the diversity of needs and expectations. These role identities reveal the tensions CHWs face as 'insider' members of the community and yet at times being treated as 'outsiders', who might be regarded with suspicion, and at the same time, appreciated for the resources that they might possess. Understanding role identities, and how best to support them, may contribute to strategies of retention and sustainability of CHW programmes, as their formalisation in

  17. Invasion in microbial communities: Role of community composition and assembly processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta

    of microbial community assembly. Biotic factors include interactions between different microbial groups as well as the community response to alien species – invaders. Microbial invasions can have significant effects on the composition and functioning of resident communities. There is, however, lack......Microbes contribute to all biogeochemical cycles on earth and are responsible for key biological processes that support the survival of plants and animals. There is increased interest in controlling and managing microbial communities in different ecosystems in order to make targeted microbiological...... processes more effective. In order to manage microbial communities, it is essential to understand the factors that shape and influence microbial community composition. In addition to abiotic factors, such as environmental conditions and resource availability, biotic factors also shape the dynamics...

  18. Multilingual Aeronautical Dictionary (Dictionnaire Aeronautique Multilingue)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    8217See ’aerofoil profile’ DE Bord’Boden-Funkverkehr (ili 20~ AGARD MULTILINGUAL AERONAUTICAL DICTIONARY 10318 air mileage indicator (AMI) ES comunicacion ...Autogenschweissen (nil ES sistema fml autom~tico de comunicacion NE automatische besturing ES soldadura MI autdgena aire-tierra P otooWatmtc FR soudage Wm autogene...AERONAUTICAL DICTIONARY DE Fernmeldesatellit [m) RU 1. maPXWbPOBK& ff1 OTcOKOB RU onPe~ene~me Wn Aesma84HN Komnaca ES satelite Wm do comunicaciones 2

  19. Wireless Sensor Applications in Extreme Aeronautical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA aeronautical programs require rigorous ground and flight testing. Many of the testing environments can be extremely harsh. These environments include cryogenic temperatures and high temperatures (greater than 1500 C). Temperature, pressure, vibration, ionizing radiation, and chemical exposure may all be part of the harsh environment found in testing. This paper presents a survey of research opportunities for universities and industry to develop new wireless sensors that address anticipated structural health monitoring (SHM) and testing needs for aeronautical vehicles. Potential applications of passive wireless sensors for ground testing and high altitude aircraft operations are presented. Some of the challenges and issues of the technology are also presented.

  20. Role of arthropod communities in bioenergy crop litter decomposition†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangerl, Arthur R; Miresmailli, Saber; Nabity, Paul; Lawrance, Allen; Yanahan, Alan; Mitchell, Corey A; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; David, Mark B; Berenbaum, May R; DeLucia, Evan H

    2013-10-01

    The extensive land use conversion expected to occur to meet demands for bioenergy feedstock production will likely have widespread impacts on agroecosystem biodiversity and ecosystem services, including carbon sequestration. Although arthropod detritivores are known to contribute to litter decomposition and thus energy flow and nutrient cycling in many plant communities, their importance in bioenergy feedstock communities has not yet been assessed. We undertook an experimental study quantifying rates of litter mass loss and nutrient cycling in the presence and absence of these organisms in three bioenergy feedstock crops-miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and a planted prairie community. Overall arthropod abundance and litter decomposition rates were similar in all three communities. Despite effective reduction of arthropods in experimental plots via insecticide application, litter decomposition rates, inorganic nitrogen leaching, and carbon-nitrogen ratios did not differ significantly between control (with arthropods) and treatment (without arthropods) plots in any of the three community types. Our findings suggest that changes in arthropod faunal composition associated with widespread adoption of bioenergy feedstock crops may not be associated with profoundly altered arthropod-mediated litter decomposition and nutrient release. © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Optimizing care transitions: the role of the community pharmacist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melody, Karleen T; McCartney, Elizabeth; Sen, Sanchita; Duenas, Gladys

    2016-01-01

    Transitions of care (TOC) refer to the movement of patients across institutions, among providers, between different levels of care, and to and from home. Medication errors that occur during TOC have the potential to result in medical complications that are serious for the patient and costly to the health care system. Positive outcomes have been demonstrated when pharmacists are involved in providing TOC services, including reducing preventable adverse drug reactions, medication-related problems, and rehospitalizations, as well as improving the discharge process. This review explores TOC models involving community pharmacy practice, the current impact of pharmacist interventions in TOC, and patient satisfaction with TOC services provided by community pharmacists. Common barriers and potential solutions to TOC services provided in the community pharmacy, such as patient identification, information gathering, standardization of services, administrative support, reimbursement, and time restraints, are also discussed. PMID:29354539

  2. Carnegie's New Community Engagement Classification: Affirming Higher Education's Role in Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Amy

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (CFAT) stirred the higher education world with the announcement of a new classification for institutions that engage with community. The classification, community engagement, is the first in a set of planned classification schemes resulting from the foundation's reexamination of the…

  3. An evaluation of the role of rural primary school teachers in community development tasks in southern Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Ngalam, Jabi Jack

    1987-01-01

    This thesis investigates the role of rural primary school teachers in community development activities within an integrated rural education centres project (IRECs) in southern Sudan. The study explores five areas of importance for an extended teacher's role in rural areas: (i) the school or community environment, (ii) community perception of the teacher's role and its expectations of the school, (iii) teachers' perception of their own role in the community, (iv) teachers' ...

  4. Forging Professional Learning Communities: The Role of External Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Jill; Kong, Peggy A.

    2018-01-01

    This article explored the effects of external agency on the establishment of professional learning communities (PLCs). The research was undertaken in the context of schools that have chosen to adopt the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate (IB) worldwide. The study employed a two-stage qualitative sequential design…

  5. Clinical role of Cefixime in community-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreshaj, Sh; Doda-Ejupi, T; Tolaj, I Q; Mustafa, A; Kabashi, S; Shala, N; Geca, Nj; Aliu, A; Daka, A; Basha, N

    2011-01-01

    Cefixime is an oral third generation cephalosporin, frequently used in respiratory tract infections (RTI) in the pediatric population. However, in some publications cefixime has demonstrated poor efficacy against staphylococci and streptococci. of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cefixime in the treatment of community-acquired infections in a country where parenteral third generation cephalosporins have been used for a long time. The present study was designed to assess the clinical efficacy, bacteriological eradication rates and tolerability of cefixime in children with community-acquired upper RTI (URTI), lower RTI (LRTI) and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). The study was prospective, open, and included 89 patients, from 6 months to 28 years, of both sexes, with the diagnosis of community-acquired URTI, LRTI and UTI. The treatment with cefixime was successful in 30/30 (100%) patients suffering from acute otitis media (AOM), in 10/12 (83.3%) with acute sinusitis, in 12/12 patients (100%) with pneumonia, in 31/35 (88.57) with uncomplicated UTI. The antibiotic was well tolerated. In 10 days treatment we recorded one case (1.3%) with acute gastroenteritis and two cases (2.6%) of maculopapular rash. Side-effects were transient and disappeared after finishing therapy in all three of the cases. Community-acquired infections, such as AOM, LRTI and UTI, caused by susceptible pathogens, can be treated with cefixime, as a good choice for a successful clinical response.

  6. Role of the source community for the recovery of seagrass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seagrass communities are subject to frequent disturbances that can affect the associated fauna. Seagrass loss in Kenya has been mainly due to extensive grazing by the sea urchin Tripneustes gratilla, leading to habitat fragmentation. The challenge is whether the system can recover fully and function as before. Density ...

  7. the role of community participation in intermittent preventive

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... paid to community participation in malaria control in the past and this ... current Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT)for malaria treatment is ..... Malaria Journal. 2009; 8:292. . 2. Ghana Health Service: Final draft antimalarial drug policy for Ghana, Accra. 2004. 3. Keta District Report. Keta, 2001. 4. Pitt C ...

  8. The Role of Regional Economic Communities in Africa's Economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite pessimistic scholarly assessments of African REC performance, their shared objectives should facilitate the task of creating a continental economic community. Actually, African RECs show noteworthy progress in some areas but they remain hampered by constraints such as overlapping memberships, weak policy ...

  9. Engaging Life: TCUs and Their Role Building Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crazy Bull, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native people, as well as other Indigenous groups throughout the world, have always understood that education is integrated into the social fabric of their communities. As education became formalized through child-care centers, schools, and colleges, tribal people found ways to ensure that it wasn't just sitting in the…

  10. The role of community health workers in supporting South Africa's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community health workers deployed around South Africa's primary health care clinics, supply indispensable support for the world's largest HIV/AIDS treatment programme. Interviews with these workers illuminated the contribution they make to anti-retroviral treatment (ART) of HIV/AIDS patients and the motivations that ...

  11. The Role of Community Book Club in Changing Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dail, Alanna Rochelle; McGee, Lea M.; Edwards, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Community Book Club began as an experimental approach intended to combine professional development for teachers and family literacy for the parents of the preschoolers involved in an Early Reading First project. We collected data on 11 book club meetings over a 2-year time period. Meetings were held at local churches and at each meeting,…

  12. Capitalist Globalisation and the Role of the International Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The principal thesis of this paper is that under contemporary capitalist globalisation, the so-called international community constitutes more of the problem than the solution in the continent's resource and allied conflicts. We argue that the geo-strategic and geo-political interests of. major western and other powers and the ...

  13. School Violence: The Role of Parental and Community Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesneskie, Eric; Block, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This study utilizes the School Survey on Crime and Safety to identify variables that predict lower levels of violence from four domains: school security, school climate, parental involvement, and community involvement. Negative binomial regression was performed and the findings indicate that statistically significant results come from all four…

  14. The role of the community nurse in family health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JO Goddard

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available The range of the community nurse’s work in family health care is much wider than that portrayed by the stereotype which many people, both lay and professional, have of it — namely, mother and baby clinics.

  15. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 9. Aerobasics: An Introduction to Aeronautics - Airplane Performance. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 14 Issue 9 September 2009 pp 916-928. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 1. Aerobasics - An Introduction to Aeronautics - Safety in Aviation. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 15 Issue 1 January 2010 pp 64-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1978: A chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Bette R.

    1986-01-01

    This is the 18th in a series of annual chronologies of significant events in the fields of astronautics and aeronautics. Events covered are international as well as national and political as well as scientific and technical. This series is a reference work for historians, NASA personnel, government agencies, congressional staffs, and the media.

  18. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1974: A chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, N. L.

    1977-01-01

    The 14th volume in the NASA series of day-by-day records of aeronautical and space events has somewhat narrowed its scope and selectivity in its brief accounts from immediately available, open sources. This year the emphasis is even more directly focused on concrete air and space activities. The text continues to reflect some events in other agencies and countries.

  19. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1985: A chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Bette R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is part of a series of annual chronologies of significant events in the fields of astronautics and aeronautics. Events covered are international as well as national, in political as well as scientific and technical areas. This series is an important reference work used by historians, NASA personnel, government agencies, and congressional staffs, as well as the media.

  20. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1976. A chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A chronology of events concerning astronautics and aeronautics for the year 1976 is presented. Some of the many and varied topics include the aerospace industry, planetary exploration, space transportation system, defense department programs, politics, and aerospace medicine. The entries are organized by the month and presented in a news release format.

  1. Experiment In Aeronautical-Mobile/Satellite Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrey, Thomas C.; Lay, Norman E.; Dessouky, Khaled

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of performance of digital mobile/satellite communication terminals of advanced design intended for use in ground stations and airplanes in aeronautical-mobile service. Study was collaboration of NASA, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Communications Satellite Corp. (COMSAT), and International Maritime Satellite System (INMARSAT).

  2. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 2. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics - Airfoils and Wings in Subsonic Flow. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 14 Issue 2 February 2009 pp 191-203 ...

  3. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 5. Aerobasics - An Introduction to Aeronautics - Mini and Micro Airplanes. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 15 Issue 5 May 2010 pp 400-410. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 3. Aerobasics - An Introduction to Aeronautics - The Airplane Structure. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 15 Issue 3 March 2010 pp 206-222. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Aerobasics – An Introduction to Aeronautics - The Airplane Configuration. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 328-345. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 11. Aerobasics – An Introduction to Aeronautics - Airplane Basics. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 13 Issue 11 November 2008 pp 1009-1019. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 4. Aerobasics-An Introduction to Aeronautics - Air Navigation ... Keywords. Dead reckoning; celestial navigation; radio aids to navigation; instrument landing system (ILS); inertial navigation system (INS); global positioning system (GPS).

  8. Community-Based Management of Diabetes in Nepal: Exploring the Potential Role of Female Community Health Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyawali, Bishal

    2016-01-01

    , and this is particularly apparent in the South Asian countries, including Nepal. Despite the growing burden and chronic nature of type 2 diabetes, prevention and control of this disease is far from adequate in these settings. One possibility could be through the involvement of community health workers to prevent, diagnose...... and treat type 2 diabetes. We suggest that involving Female Community Health Volunteers (FCHVs) of Nepal offering culturally appropriate health promotion may be the blue print for community-based management programmes tackling type 2 diabetes. We aim to explore the potential role of FCHVs of Nepal...... for diabetes management at community level. It is anticipated that the study can give valuable information regarding effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility of an innovative way to improve diabetes management in low resource settings....

  9. Ensuring US National Aeronautics Test Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD). However, changes in the Aerospace landscape, primarily the decrease in demand for testing over the last 20 years required an overarching strategy for management of these national assets. Therefore, NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD. Test facility utilization is a critical factor for ATP because it relies on user occupancy fees to recover a substantial part of the operations costs for its facilities. Decreasing utilization is an indicator of excess capacity and in some cases low-risk redundancy (i.e., several facilities with basically the same capability and overall low utilization). However, low utilization does not necessarily translate to lack of strategic importance. Some facilities with relatively low utilization are nonetheless vitally important because of the unique nature of the capability and the foreseeable aeronautics testing needs. Unfortunately, since its inception, the customer base for ATP has continued to shrink. Utilization of ATP wind tunnels has declined by more than 50% from the FY 2006 levels. This significant decrease in customer usage is attributable to several factors, including the overall decline in new programs and projects in the aerospace sector; the impact of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the design, development, and research

  10. 75 FR 17166 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-038)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory... a.m. to 1 p.m.; Eastern Daylight Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Langley Research Center, Building 1219, Room...

  11. 76 FR 16643 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-024)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory.... ADDRESSES: Thursday, April 14, 2011--NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Lilly Drive Building 4825...

  12. 76 FR 58843 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 11-082] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory... Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-0566, or [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  13. 78 FR 10640 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (13-010)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory..., or [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting will be open to the public up to...

  14. 75 FR 41240 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-079)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory....m. to 4 p.m. (local time). ADDRESSES: NASA Glenn Research Center, Building 15, Small Dining...

  15. 78 FR 41114 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-075] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory... planning. DATES: Tuesday, July 30, 2013, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters...

  16. 77 FR 38091 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 12-047] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA..., July 24, 2012, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. local time. ADDRESSES: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC...

  17. 75 FR 50782 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-087)] NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory..., 2010, 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Ames Conference Center, Building 3, 500...

  18. The Role of Rural Communities in the Postsecondary Preparation of Low-Income Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Nathan F.; Holly, L. Neal

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, rural education has been critiqued for contributing to brain drain and social stratification that saps the human, social, and economic resources of rural communities. This article, based on an investigation of six small rural school districts in the same state, offers an alternative view of the role of community groups and…

  19. Game Changers: The Quest to Rethink Institutional Roles and Functions at U.S. Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Bob

    2014-01-01

    When the 10 members of the American Association of Community College's (AACC's) 21st-Century Implementation Team 7 (nine of whom are community college presidents) sat down in 2013 to talk about reforming institutional roles and functions at the nation's two-year career and technical colleges, everyone in the room knew the work before them would be…

  20. The Role of Community Based Orgs (Cbos) In Rural and Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unique firstlady

    It has to work through the hierarchy of the. CBOS who will not only articulate the needs of the members and the entire community at large will also legitimize the programme of government among his people and consequently spur or mobilize them with action. Esenjor (1992) also stated that the role of Community Based ...

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury: Exploring the Role of Cooperative Extension in Kansas Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Debra M.; Garcia, Jane Mertz

    2012-01-01

    TBI"options" helps survivors of traumatic brain injury and their families identify, locate, and contact helpful organizations in their local communities to promote successful living. This article discusses the role of county agents in the program and the support offered by community partners. Results of pre- and post-surveys for both…

  2. The Role of Family Conflict in the Relation between Exposure to Community Violence and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Rochelle J.; Roberts, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the role of family conflict as a mediator in the relation between exposure to community violence and depressive symptoms. Two hundred thirty-two early adolescents (aged 11-16 years) completed a demographics questionnaire, the Survey of Exposure to Community Violence, the 9-item conflict subscale of the Family Environment…

  3. Optimizing identification and management of COPD patients - reviewing the role of the community pharmacist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, Thys; van Boven, Job F. M.; Maguire, Terence; Goyal, Pankaj; Altman, Pablo

    The aim of this paper was to propose key steps for community pharmacist integration into a patient care pathway for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management. A literature search was conducted to identify publications focusing on the role of the community pharmacist in identification

  4. Community Health Workers in Health-Related Missouri Agencies: Role, Professional Development and Health Information Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visker, Joseph; Rhodes, Darson; Cox, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Community Health Workers (CHWs) serve an indispensable but oftten misunderstood and unrecognized role in public health. These individuals constitute the frontline of health care in many communities and are relied upon to provide an assortment of services. Unfortunately, the full extent to which CHWs are utilized is unknown and there is little…

  5. Gulf of Mexico IFR Aeronautical Chart Index - Aeronautical Information Services Digital Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The IFR Enroute Aeronautical Chart series is designed to meet the needs of users who require a digital version chart. This is the visual index to the charts for the...

  6. COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE AND THEIR ROLE IN THE FIELD OF HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarisová, Klára

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Communities of practice are social structures based on voluntary participation of members, who regularly share their knowledge. They are natural and very common phenomenon and they can be found in many organizations as Hewlett Packard, Shell or Daimler Chrysler. This article deals with various definitions of these structures, mentions different types of these communities, the way of their development and also various roles of their members. The article is finally focused on the role of these communities in the field of higher education. The contribution of communities of practice for both areas, research and education, is defined. The article shows the possibilities of how communities of practice could facilitate development in area of higher education.

  7. The role of the neonatal nurse practitioner in the community hospital level I nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) have played a significant role in providing medical coverage to many of the country's Level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Extensive education and experience are required for a nurse practitioner (NP) to become competent in caring for these critically ill newborns. The NNP can take this competence and experience and expand her role out into the community Level I nurseries. Clinical care of the infants and close communication with parents, pediatricians, and the area tertiary center provide a community service with the goal of keeping parents and babies together in the community hospital without compromising the health of the baby. The NNP service, with 24-hour nursery and delivery coverage, supports an ongoing obstetric service to the community hospital. The NNP's experience enables her to provide a neonatal service that encompasses a multitude of advanced practice nursing roles.

  8. Unpacking the Roles of the Facilitator in Higher Education Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, Leonor; Pareja Roblin, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Facilitators are central for the success of professional learning communities (PLCs). Yet, their specific roles in supporting teacher learning remain still largely underexplored. To address this gap, the current multiple case study examines the roles of 4 university PLC facilitators, the strategies they used to support teacher learning, and the…

  9. Capacity development for community health nurses in Pakistan: the assistant manager role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulzar, S A; Mistry, R; Upvall, M J

    2011-09-01

    Community health nurses (CHNs), as leaders in developing countries, can promote successful outcomes in meeting the targets of the Millennium Development Goals. A community-based organization in Pakistan is striving to achieve the goals of maternal and child health through the development of the assistant manager role for community health nursing. The purpose of this study was to assess the perception of the role of the CHN assistant manager, with the goal of strengthening that role. This interpretive, qualitative study included 13 participants already familiar with CHNs in Pakistan. Interviewing was utilized to explore perceptions of the assistant manager role and to uncover challenges currently existing within this new role. Content analysis revealed the following themes: 'role perceptions', 'expectations of the role' and 'collaboration with other community healthcare providers'. Changes to the role are necessary including increased education of the assistant manager CHNs and preparing administration to work with the assistant mangers for effective leadership. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  10. SMART AERONAUTICAL CHART MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Pakdil

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Civil aviation is developing rapidly, and the number of domestic and international operations is increasing exponentially every year than the previous one. Airline companies with increased air traffic and the number of passengers increase the demand of new aircrafts. An aircraft needs not only fuel but also pilot and aeronautical information (charts, digital navigation information, flight plan, and etc. to perform flight operation. One of the most important components in aeronautical information is the terminal chart. Authorized institution in every state is responsible to publish their terminal charts for certain periods. Although these charts are produced in accordance with ICAO’s Annex 4 and Annex 15, cartographic representation and page layout differs in each state’s publication. This situation makes difficult to read them by pilots. In this paper, standard instrument departure (SID charts are analysed to produce by use of cutting-edge and competitive technologies instead of classical computer-aided drawing and vector based graphic applications that are currently used by main chart producers. The goal is to design efficient and commercial chart management system that is able to produce aeronautical charts with same cartographic representation for all states.

  11. Community and Citizenship in Post-Disaster Japan: The Roles of Schools and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Parmenter

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In March 2011, a triple earthquake-tsunami-nuclear disaster rocked northeasternJapan. In this article, the impact of these three disasters on schools,teachers and children will be analysed, with a particular focus on the role ofteachers in saving lives and leading communities, and the role of schools assites and agents of community and citizenship in the disaster situation. Thearticle is structured around four themes, namely, the role of school leadersand teachers, the role of schools as sites of community, changing mediarepresentations of children and communities in the wider national context,and the birth of global citizenship as a meaningful concept. Primary datafrom visits to schools in Miyagi Prefecture and Fukushima Prefecture inJapan in July 2011 and December 2011 are combined with analysis ofsecondary sources written in Japanese to paint a clear picture of thedifferent roles served by teachers and schools at different points in timeduring and after the disasters. This provides insights not only into postdisastercommunities, but also into the role of teachers and function ofschools as agents and sites of community and citizenship in Japanesesociety.

  12. Exploring the perceptions and experiences of community health workers using role identity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langelihle Mlotshwa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community health workers (CHWs are an integral resource in many health systems, particularly in resource-poor settings. Their identities – ‘who’ they are – play an important role in their hiring, training, and retention. We explore the perceptions, experiences, and identities of CHWs as they adopt a CHW role in rural South Africa, using ‘role identity theory’. Design: From April to December 2010, we conducted 18 semi-structured interviews with CHWs volunteering in non-governmental home-based care (HBC organisations in one rural sub-district in South Africa. The role identity theory framework was used to understand the work of CHWs within their communities, addressing themes, such as entry into, and nature of, caring roles, organisational support, state resourcing, and community acceptability. A thematic content analysis was used to analyse the collected data. Results: The study found that CHWs usually begin their ‘caring work’ before they formally join HBC organisations, by caring for children, neighbours, mothers, fathers, friends, and the community in some way. CHWs felt that becoming a health worker provided an elevated status within the community, but that it often led community members to believe they were able to control resources. The key role identities assumed by CHWs, as they sought to meet patients’ and their own needs, were a complex mix of community ‘insider’, ‘outsider’, and ‘broker’. Each of these role identities served as a unique way to position, from the CHW's perspective, themselves and the community, given the diversity of needs and expectations. Conclusions: These role identities reveal the tensions CHWs face as ‘insider’ members of the community and yet at times being treated as ‘outsiders’, who might be regarded with suspicion, and at the same time, appreciated for the resources that they might possess. Understanding role identities, and how best to support them, may

  13. User roles and contributions during the new product development process in collaborative innovation communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Qing; An, Weijin; Peng, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Collaborative innovation (co-innovation) community emerges as a new product design platform where companies involve users in the new product development (NPD) process. Large numbers of users participate and contribute to the process voluntarily. This exploratory study investigates the heterogeneous roles of users based on a global co-innovation project in online community. Content analysis, social network analysis and cluster method are employed to measure user behaviors, distinguish user roles, and analyze user contributions. The study identifies six user roles that emerge during the NPD process in co-innovation community: project leader, active designer, generalist, communicator, passive designer, and observer. The six user roles differ in their contribution forms and quality. This paper contributes to research on co-innovation in online communities, including design team structure, user roles and their contribution to design task and solution, as well as user value along the process. In addition, the study provides practices guidance on implementing project, attracting users, and designing platform for co-innovation community practitioners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Role of a Facilitated Online Workspace Component of a Community of Practice: Knowledge Building and Value Creation for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Bradford Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of an online workspace component of a community in the work of a community of practice. Much has been studied revealing the importance of communities of practice to organizations, project success, and knowledge management and some of these same successes hold true for virtual communities of…

  15. The positive role of the ecological community in the genomicrevolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Dawn; Methe, Barbara; Nelson, Karen; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2006-07-01

    The exponential increase of genomic and metagenomic data,fueled in part by recent advancements in sequencing technology, aregreatly expanding our understanding of the phylogenetic diversity andmetabolic capacity present in the environment. Two of the centralchallenges that bioinformaticians and ecologists alike must face are thedesign of bioinformatic resources that facilitate the analysis of genomicand metagenomic data in a comparative context and the efficient captureand organization of the plethora of descriptive information required tousefully describe these data sets. In this commentary, we review threeinitiatives presented in the "new frontiers" session of the second SCOPEmeeting on Microbial Environmental Genomics (MicroEnGen-II, Shanghai,June 12-15, 2006). These are (1) the Integrated Microbial GenomesResources (IMG), (2) the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and (3) theNatural Environment Research Council (NERC) Environmental BioinformaticsCentre (NEBC). These integrative bioinformatics and data managementinitiatives underscore the increasingly important role ecologists have toplay in the genomic (metagenomic) revolution.

  16. Promotores as researchers: expanding the promotor role in community-based research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Atiba; Lewy, Robin; Dovydaitis, Tiffany; Ricardo, Francine; Kugel, Candace

    2011-09-01

    The community health worker, known as promotor in the Hispanic community, is an accepted member of the public health team whose core role is that of bridging target communities with health services. However, the promotor's role in research has not been considered a core function of their work. This article will present the promotor in the additional role of researcher, as conceived by the Migrant Clinicians Network for the Hombres Unidos Contra La Violencia Familiar (Men United Against Family Violence) sexual violence/intimate partner violence project. The Hombres Unidos project used promotores as survey facilitators, gathering male Hispanic farmworkers' perspectives on the sensitive topic of sexual violence and intimate partner violence. This article demonstrates that when trained, the promotores' linguistic and cultural competence make them a valuable addition to the research team, especially when collecting sensitive information.

  17. Promotores as Researchers: Expanding the Promotor Role in Community-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Atiba; Lewy, Robin; Dovydaitis, Tiffany; Ricardo, Francine; Kugel, Candace

    2011-01-01

    The community health worker, known as promotor in the Hispanic community, is an accepted member of the public health team whose core role is that of bridging target communities with health services. However, the promotor’s role in research has not been considered a core function of their work. This article will present the promotor in the additional role of researcher, as conceived by the Migrant Clinicians Network for the Hombres Unidos Contra La Violencia Familiar (Men United Against Family Violence) sexual violence/intimate partner violence project. The Hombres Unidos project used promotores as survey facilitators, gathering male Hispanic farmworkers’ perspectives on the sensitive topic of sexual violence and intimate partner violence. This article demonstrates that when trained, the promotores’ linguistic and cultural competence make them a valuable addition to the research team, especially when collecting sensitive information. PMID:21427265

  18. The role of biotic interactions in plant community assembly: What is the community species pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švamberková, Eva; Vítová, Alena; Lepš, Jan

    2017-11-01

    Differences in plant species composition between a community and its species pool are considered to reflect the effect of community filters. If we define the species pool as a set of species able to reach a site and form a viable population in a given abiotic environment (i.e. to pass the dispersal and abiotic filter), the difference in species composition should correspond to the effect of biotic interactions. However, most of the operational definitions of the species pool are based on co-occurrence patterns and thus also reflect the effect of biotic relationships, including definitions based on functional plant traits, Ellenberg indicator values or Beals index. We conducted two seed introduction experiments in an oligotrophic wet meadow with the aim of demonstrating that many species excluded, according to the above definitions, from a species pool are in fact able to establish there successfully if competition is removed. In sowing experiments, we studied the establishment and survival of species after the removal of competition (i.e. in artificial gaps) and in intact vegetation. We also investigated inter-annual variability of seed germination and seedling establishment and competitive exclusion of sown species. The investigated species also included those from very different habitats (i.e. species with very low corresponding Beals index or Ellenberg indicator values that were different from the target community weighted mean). Many of these species were able to grow in the focal wet meadow if competition was removed, but they did not establish and survive in the intact community. These species are thus not limited by abiotic conditions, but by the biotic filter. We also recorded a great inter-annual variability in seed germination and seedling establishment. Competitive exclusion of species with different ecological requirements could be quite fast (one and half seasons) in some species, but some non-resident species were able to survive several seasons; the

  19. Solar energy and the aeronautics industry. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, L.

    1985-01-01

    An introduction to the physical aspects of solar energy, incidental energy and variations in solar flux is presented, along with an explanation of the physical principles of obtaining solar energy. The history of the application of solar energy to aeronautics, including the Gossamer Penguin and the Solar Challenger is given. Finally, an analysis of the possibilities of using a reaction motor with hybrid propulsion combining solar energy with traditional fuels as well as calculations of the proposed cycle and its mode of operation are given.

  20. The K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Efforts were focused on web site migration, from UC (University of California) Davis to the National Business Aviation Association's (NBAA) web site. K8AIT (K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook), which has remained an unadvertised web site, receives almost two million hits per month. Project continuation funding with the National Business Aviation Association is being pursued. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between NASA Ames LTP (Learning Technologies Project) and Cislunar has been drafted and approved by NASA's legal department. Additional web content on space flight and the Wright brothers has been added in English and Spanish.

  1. The Role of Cultural Activities in Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiba Tjarve

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture has a critical role in transforming localities into more attractive places to work and invest. Cultural activities and facilities significantly affect the development of the physical environment of cities. But what does it all mean for the local residents of the neighbourhoods? How do they feel or participate in cultural activities organized for them? The overall aim of this study has been to evaluate participation effect on the development of Riga’s neighbourhoods during the year of The European Capital of Culture. During the research, the authors have used the mixed research methodology. The qualitative analysis of the Riga 2014 programme has been done based on the qualitative interviews with the artistic team, project managers and entrepreneurs from Riga’s neighbourhoods; besides, a detailed analysis of Riga 2014 programme events has been performed. The main findings show that cultural life in the neighbourhoods is among the most important factors determining the satisfaction with life by the neighbourhoods’ inhabitants. Personalities, not infrastructure have a crucial importance in the development of neighbourhood cultural life. Cultural activities in neighbourhood should be carried out in close cooperation with the stakeholders from different sectors. This can bring to sustainable and long‑term effects.

  2. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical experience: Airplane category... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a pilot...

  3. IMPLEMENTATION OF AERONAUTICAL LOCAL SATELLITE AUGMENTATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojce Ilcev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This paper introduces development and implementation of new Local Satellite AugmentationSystem as an integration component of the Regional Satellite Augmentation System (RSAS employingcurrent and new Satellite Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS for improvement of the AirTraffic Control (ATC and Air Traffic Management (ATM and for enhancement safety systems includingtransport security and control of flights in all stages, airport approaching, landing, departures and allmovements over airport surface areas. The current first generation of the Global Navigation Satellite SystemGNSS-1 applications are represented by fundamental military solutions for Position, Velocity and Time ofthe satellite navigation and determination systems such as the US GPS and Russian GLONASS (Former-USSR requirements, respectively. The establishment of Aeronautical CNS is also discussed as a part ofGlobal Satellite Augmentation Systems of GPS and GLONASS systems integrated with existing and futureRSAS and LSAS in airports areas. Specific influence and factors related to the Comparison of the Currentand New Aeronautical CNS System including the Integration of RSAS and GNSS solutions are discussedand packet of facts is determined to maximize the new satellite Automatic Dependent Surveillance System(ADSS and Special Effects of the RSAS Networks. The possible future integration of RSAS and GNSS andthe common proposal of the satellite Surface Movement Guidance and Control are presented in thechangeless ways as of importance for future enfacements of ATC and ATM for any hypothetical airportinfrastructure.Keywords: ADSS, ATC, ATM, CNS, GSAS, LRAS, RSAS, SMGC, Special Effects of RSAS.

  4. Leader performance evaluations and role congruity expectations in a community college setting

    OpenAIRE

    Trickey, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the relationships among evaluator attitudes, the role congruity biases many people consciously and unconsciously maintain, evaluation practices, perceptions of leader efficacy and success, and leader persistence in two community college settings, a mixed-methods study was conducted. Leaders are the products of their experiences, environments, the greater society within which they live, their personal attitudes and biases, and the attitudes and role biases of others. Over time, ...

  5. A qualitative exploration of opinions on the community pharmacists' role amongst the general public in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidman, Wendy; Cowley, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    To understand members of the public's opinions and experiences of pharmacy services. This exploratory study employed qualitative methods. Five focus groups were conducted with 26 members of the public resident in Scotland in March 2010. The groups comprised those perceived to be users and non-users of community pharmacy. A topic guide was developed to prompt discussion. Each focus group was recorded, transcribed, anonymised and analysed using thematic analysis. Participants made positive comments about pharmacy services although many preferred to see a general practitioner (GP). Participants discussed using pharmacies for convenience, often because they were unable to access GPs. Pharmacists were perceived principally to be suppliers of medicine, although there was some recognition of roles in dealing with minor ailments and providing advice. For those with serious and long-standing health matters GPs were usually the professional of choice for most health needs. Community pharmacy was seen to offer incomplete services which did not co-ordinate well with other primary-care services. The pharmacy environment and retail setting were not considered to be ideal for private healthcare consultations. This study suggests that despite recent initiatives to extend the role of community pharmacists many members of the general public continue to prefer a GP-led service. Importantly GPs inspire public confidence as well as offering comprehensive services and private consultation facilities. Improved communication and information sharing between community pharmacists and general practice could support community pharmacist-role expansion. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. The role of social engagement and identity in community mobility among older adults aging in place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how neighbourhoods - as physical and social environments - influence community mobility. Seeking an insider's perspective, the study employed an ethnographic research design. Immersed within the daily lives of 6 older adults over an 8-month period, auditory, textual, and visual data was collected using the "go-along" interview method. During these interviews, the researcher accompanied participants on their natural outings while actively exploring their physical and social practices by asking questions, listening, and observing. Findings highlight a process of community mobility that is complex, dynamic and often difficult as participant's ability and willingness to journey into their neighborhoods were challenged by a myriad of individual and environmental factors that changed from one day to the next. Concerned in particular with the social environment, final analysis reveals how key social factors - social engagement and identity - play a critical role in the community mobility of older adults aging in place. Identity and social engagement are important social factors that play a role in community mobility. The need for social engagement and the preservation of identity are such strong motivators for community mobility that they can "trump" poor health, pain, functional ability and hazardous conditions. To effectively promote community mobility, the social lives and needs of individuals must be addressed.

  7. Beyond access: the role of family and community in children's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, Wendy E; Huebner, Colleen E; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Slavkin, Harold C

    2007-05-01

    Children's health outcomes result from the complex interaction of biological determinants with sociocultural, family, and community variables. Dental professionals' efforts to reduce oral health disparities often focus on improving access to dental care. However, this strategy alone cannot eliminate health disparities. Rising rates of early childhood caries create an urgent need to study family and community factors in oral health. Using Los Angeles as a multicultural laboratory for understanding health disparities, the Santa Fe Group convened an experiential conference to consider models of ensuring child and family health within communities. This article summarizes key conference themes and insights regarding 1) children's needs and societal priorities; 2) the science of child health determinants; 3) the rapidly changing demographics of the United States; and 4) the importance of communities that support children and families. Conference participants concluded that to eliminate children's oral health disparities we must change paradigms to promote health, integrate oral health into other health and social programs, and empower communities. Oral health advocates have a key role in ensuring oral health is integrated into policy for children. Dental schools have a leadership role to play in expanding community partnerships and providing education in health determinants. Participants recommended replicating this experiential conference in other venues.

  8. Community nurses' child protection role: views of public health nurses in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Susan

    2011-11-01

    Public health nurses in Ireland are generalist practitioners with a wide range of roles that address the needs of clients in the community across their lifespan. Child protection is one of many of the roles of Irish public health nurses. However, with increasing caseloads, birth rates and aging populations, their child protection role is becoming more difficult to define and practise safely. This paper presents a key finding of a qualitative study that explored the views of a group of public health nurses (n = 10) regarding their role with pre-school children. A significant theme following analysis of the interviews were the nurses\\' expressed concerns on their role in child protection. There is a need to define the role practised by public health nurses in child protection and to achieve a standard for this nationally.

  9. Users' Continuance Intention of Virtual Learning Community Services: The Moderating Role of Usage Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Liu, Yupei; Yan, Weiwei; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Users' continuance intention plays a significant role in the process of information system (IS) service, especially virtual learning community (VLC) services. Following the IS success model and IS post-acceptance model, this study explores the determinants of users' intention to continue using VLCs' service from the perspective of quality,…

  10. Community stakeholders’ perspectives on the role of occupational therapy in primary healthcare: Implications for practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshini Naidoo

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: The understanding of the intervention required by OT in PHC was enhanced through obtaining the views of various stakeholders’ on the role. This study highlighted the gaps in community-based services that OTs should offer in this context.

  11. Community Service and University Roles: An Action Research Based on the Philosophy of Sufficiency Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuangchalerm, Prasart; Chansirisira, Pacharawit

    2012-01-01

    This study employs action research to develop community service through university roles by applying the philosophy of sufficiency economy of His Majesty the King Bhumibol Adulyadej to fulfill villagers' way of life. Participatory learning, seminar, field trip and supervision were employed for strategic plan. Data were collected by participatory…

  12. The Role of a Professional Learning Community in Teacher Change: A Perspective from Beliefs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Angela Choi Fung

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed to examine the role of a professional learning community (PLC) in changing teachers' beliefs and practices. Teachers of a Chinese department in a Hong Kong secondary school were interviewed and observed. The findings indicate that the features of a PLC-facilitating teacher change are development of a coherent…

  13. The role of community conversations in facilitating local HIV competence: case study from rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine; Nhamo, Mercy; Scott, Kerry; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Skovdal, Morten; Gregson, Simon

    2013-04-17

    This paper examines the potential for community conversations to strengthen positive responses to HIV in resource-poor environments. Community conversations are an intervention method through which local people work with a facilitator to collectively identify local strengths and challenges and brainstorm potential strategies for solving local problems. We conducted 18 community conversations (with six groups at three points in time) with a total of 77 participants in rural Zimbabwe (20% HIV positive). Participants were invited to reflect on how they were responding to the challenges of HIV, both as individuals and in community groups, and to think of ways to better support openness about HIV, kindness towards people living with HIV and greater community uptake of HIV prevention and treatment. Community conversations contributed to local HIV competence through (1) enabling participants to brainstorm concrete action plans for responding to HIV, (2) providing a forum to develop a sense of common purpose in relation to implementing these, (3) encouraging and challenging participants to overcome fear, denial and passivity, (4) providing an opportunity for participants to move from seeing themselves as passive recipients of information to active problem solvers, and (5) reducing silence and stigma surrounding HIV. Our discussion cautions that community conversations, while holding great potential to help communities recognize their potential strengths and capacities for responding more effectively to HIV, are not a magic bullet. Poverty, poor harvests and political instability frustrated and limited many participants' efforts to put their plans into action. On the other hand, support from outside the community, in this case the increasing availability of antiretroviral treatment, played a vital role in enabling communities to challenge stigma and envision new, more positive, ways of responding to the epidemic.

  14. The Role of Occupational Therapy in Community-Based Programming: Addressing Childhood Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Kugel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity and poor health habits impact youth’s health and occupational participation. Occupational therapy’s role in preventing and treating obesity continues to emerge in the research literature. This article explores the impact of a community-based program emphasizing health and wellness for female youth. Methods: Five girls 11 to 13 years of age participated in the healthy occupations program. Before and after the program, the participants engaged in an individual semi-structured interview and completed the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and the CATCH Kids Club Questionnaire. The youth participated in a focus group midprogram. Results: The participants were receptive to information regarding healthy behaviors and initiated positive health behavior changes after implementation of a 7-week healthy lifestyle community- based program. Conclusion: Occupational therapy can collaborate with community partners to provide programming focused on health promotion and prevention as part of the interprofessional approach to preventing and treating childhood obesity and building healthier communities.

  15. Doing emotion work in museums: reconceptualising the role of community engagement practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ealasaid Munro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I investigate the practice of community engagement, and suggest that ideas around emotion work and emotional labour might offer new ways of thinking about the role of museum staff in community engagement settings. Through material gathered as part of an ethnographic research project conducted with Glasgow Museums - the city of Glasgow’s municipal museums service - I show that community engagement practitioners routinely utilize emotional performances as part of their work. I argue that, often, the emotion work that is done in these settings is under-valued, and suggest that both scholars of museums and museum professionals need to pay more attention to the interpersonal relationships that might be forged within community engagement settings.

  16. Embracing a competency-based specialty curriculum for community-based nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Pamela F; Swider, Susan M; Breakwell, Susan; Cowell, Julia M; Reising, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The Quad Council competencies for public health nursing (PHN) provide guidance in developing curricula at both the generalist and specialist level. However, these competencies are based on nursing roles in traditional public health agencies and community/public health is defined more broadly than official agency practice. The question arises as to whether community-based specialties require largely the same knowledge and skill set as PHN. The purpose of the competency cross-mapping project reported here was to (a) assess the intersection of the Quad Council competencies with four community-based specialties and (b) ensure the appropriateness of a Quad Council-based curriculum to prepare graduates across these four specialties (home health, occupational health, environmental health, and school nursing). This article details the multistep cross-mapping process, including validation with practice leaders. Results indicate strong alignment of community-based specialty competencies with Quad Council competencies. Community-based specialty-specific content that did not align well is identified, along with examples of didactic and clinical strategies to address gaps. This work indicates that a Quad Council-based curriculum is appropriate to prepare graduates in community-based specialties when attention to the specialty-specific competencies in the clinical setting is included. This work guides the development of a doctorate of nursing practice curriculum in PHN, encompassing the four additional community-based specialties. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Role of Nurses in Community Mental Health Centers: Example of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the community mental health centers, which constitute the core of community based mental health service model, is to register the patients who live in a certain geographical region and have serious mental disorder in the center, to observe them regularly and to bring them back to community by providing their rehabilitation and treatment. The practice of community based mental health, which English health service carries out in one hand for the psychiatry patients’ treatment and care, has many benefits, such as minimizing the sequence of going to hospital. The community mental health nurse, who works as an incidence manager, takes on the responsibility of treatment and care of the patient in the place where he/she lives, and the directly protective effect of this responsibility is an unquestionable fact. With this practice, the process of taking cure in hospital and the cost of treatment and care decrease. In our country, this sub-field of psychiatry is still in its incipient stage. Being familiar with the successful model practices in different countries may constitute a good model for the community mental health nursing practices which are on the first level in our country. For this purpose, the role of the nurses who work for the community mental health service in England is presented in this study.

  18. Building capacity for low-carbon communities: The role of grassroots initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middlemiss, Lucie; Parrish, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Grassroots initiatives for change rely on people with limited power, limited resources and limited ability to influence others. From this position, people acting from the bottom up can change their own actions, seek to influence others around them and seek to change the social structures that they inhabit. These acts are invariably conceived, initiated and enacted within communities, and there is an emerging interest from practitioner, policy and academic circles in the importance of community as a space for realising pro-environmental change. In this paper, we ask what role grassroots initiatives can have in creating low-carbon communities. Using a theoretical framework from work on community-based practice change initiatives, we discuss the interplay between grassroots action and community capacity. We then present two cases of grassroots low-carbon community initiatives in light of this theoretical work. We conclude by discussing key themes emerging from the cases, including the potential for grassroots initiatives to build community capacity for low-carbon practices, and the importance of locally crafted solutions according to the structures specific to place.

  19. Piezoelectric MEMS Microphones for Ground Testing of Aeronautical Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Improving the acoustical environment is critical in aeronautics. Airports and aeronautical systems manufacturers are facing ever-increasing demands to reduce noise...

  20. Piezoelectric MEMS Microphones for Ground Testing of Aeronautical Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Improving the acoustical environment is critical in aeronautics. Airports and aeronautical systems manufacturers are facing ever-increasing demands to reduce noise...

  1. Community reactions to disaster: An emerging role for the school psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernie Stein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article will describe ways in which communities react to severe crises, both on a local and on a national level. Based on experiences in Israel over the past twenty years, including recent traumatic events such as the assassination of prime minister Yitzhak Rabin and the terrorist suicide bombings, and on an intervention in Buenos Aires, Argentina, after the bombing of the Jewish Community Centre in July 1994, a model is presented to describe different stages of reaction. The importance of the creation and development of community prevention and intervention programs is stressed. Emphasis is placed on the role of the schools and the school psychologists in developing and implementing such programs, and on their critical role in dealing immediately with crisis situations and their aftermaths. The prevention program emphasizes the fostering of inner strengths and resources in children and teachers (‘inoculation’, and makes provision for dealing with emotional support for the professionals in charge of helping the community in times of crisis. Finally, a model for the future development of the profession of school psychology into a broader community service is proposed. 

  2. Role Performance of Community Health Volunteers and Its Associated Factors in Kuching District, Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin Hsien Liang Chung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the role performance among KOSPEN community health volunteer in Kuching district and its associated factors. This was a cross-sectional study, conducted in 21 localities in Kuching with a total of 210 respondents. Data were collected using validated interviewer-administered questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. The respondents comprised 55.2% females, 81.9% married, and 41.4% aged above 45 and above and 72.4% completed their education up to secondary school. The result revealed that 59.0% of the respondents agreed and understood their role performances. Multiple Logistics analysis revealed that factors associated with role performance were age group (p=0.003, education level (p<0.001, marital status (p=0.025, prestige and respect (p=0.012, being seen as “doctor” in community (p=0.003, job aids (p=0.009, training location (p=0.001, and supervision by community (p<0.001. To increase and maintain the work performance of CHVs, commitment from the government, policy makers, stakeholders, and the communities is required.

  3. Role Performance of Community Health Volunteers and Its Associated Factors in Kuching District, Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Melvin Hsien Liang; Hazmi, Helmy

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the role performance among KOSPEN community health volunteer in Kuching district and its associated factors. This was a cross-sectional study, conducted in 21 localities in Kuching with a total of 210 respondents. Data were collected using validated interviewer-administered questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. The respondents comprised 55.2% females, 81.9% married, and 41.4% aged above 45 and above and 72.4% completed their education up to secondary school. The result revealed that 59.0% of the respondents agreed and understood their role performances. Multiple Logistics analysis revealed that factors associated with role performance were age group (p = 0.003), education level (p < 0.001), marital status (p = 0.025), prestige and respect (p = 0.012), being seen as “doctor” in community (p = 0.003), job aids (p = 0.009), training location (p = 0.001), and supervision by community (p < 0.001). To increase and maintain the work performance of CHVs, commitment from the government, policy makers, stakeholders, and the communities is required. PMID:28286530

  4. Free-living protozoa in drinking water supplies: community composition and role as hosts for Legionella pneumophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valster, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Free-living protozoa in drinking water supplies: community composition and role as hosts for Legionella pneumophila


    Free-living protozoa, which feed on bacteria, play an important role in the communities of microorganisms and invertebrates in drinking water supplies and in (warm)

  5. Medical students' perspective about role-plays as a teaching strategy in community medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Iram; Mukhtar, Fatima; Hashmi, Noreen Rahat

    2012-04-01

    To assess the students' perspective about role-plays conducted as a teaching methodology in community medicine. A quasi-experimental study. Department of Community Medicine at Fatima Memorial College of Medicine and Dentistry from July to November 2010. A probability technique of simple random sampling was used to collect 63 students from the third and fourth year MBBS who were randomly distributed in five sub-groups. They were variously ascribed the roles of obsceners, participants and helpers. A questionnaire was distributed to collect student's responses. The data was analyzed on SPSS version 17 to compare the responses. Chi-square test was applied and p-value was fixed at andragogy (p = 0.005) and 48 (76.2%) said that it provoked critical thinking about the subject (p = 0.038). Fifty-four students (85.7%) admitted that their attention span was better in role-plays as compared to lectures (p = 0.047). Role-plays were well accepted by the students as an effective teaching methodology and can be incorporated as a part of teaching strategies in Community Medicine.

  6. Role of Community Based Savings Groups (CBSGs) enhancing the utilization of community midwives in Chitral district of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorani, Qayyum Ali; Azam, Iqbal; Shaikh, Babar T; Ranasinghe, Tharanga; Abbas, Shazia; Wali, Shakeela; Rippey, Paul; Javed, Wajiha

    2013-10-11

    Maternal and infant mortality rates in the district of Chitral in Pakistan are alarmingly high. One of the major reasons for this is the inability of women to access skilled care due to the high costs associated with traveling and utilizing such services. The Aga Khan Health Services, Pakistan (AKHSP) in partnership with the national and provincial Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH) program, deployed 28 community midwives (CMWs) in remote villages of Chitral district. This program has also established Community-Based Savings Groups (CBSGs) to support and facilitate access to MNCH services, in particular those delivered by the CMWs. CBSGs are a simple yet cost-effective and sustainable means of providing basic financial services to low income, marginalized, rural populations.The link between CBSGs and utilization of MNCH services is not well understood. This study will assess the relationship between women membership of CBSGs and their utilization of MNCH services, specifically those offered by CMWs, in the community. The research question will be answered through guided interviews of women in the target population who have delivered within one month. The outcome variable will be the utilization of full continuum of skilled MNCH care (disaggregated by 1+ ANC, 1+ PNC and skilled delivery). The primary independent variable of interest will be participation in a CBSG.Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) will be conducted to generate further understanding and information about the social and financial factors that contribute to health behavior and health provider decision-making during pregnancy.Analysis will be tailored to answer how CBSGs, directly or indirectly, facilitate greater financial and/or social access to CMW services for pregnant women. Furthermore, the extent to which financial or social empowerment through a CBSG leads to greater utilization of CMW services. The role of CBSGs and their interlink with the CMWs services to be replicated in other

  7. Robust Control of Aeronautical Electrical Generators for Energy Management Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Giacomo Canciello; Alberto Cavallo; Beniamino Guida

    2017-01-01

    A new strategy for the control of aeronautical electrical generators via sliding manifold selection is proposed, with an associated innovative intelligent energy management strategy used for efficient power transfer between two sources providing energy to aeronautical loads, having different functionalities and priorities. Electric generators used for aeronautical application involve several machines, including a main generator and an exciter. Standard regulators (PI or PID-like) are normally...

  8. Wireless ad hoc networks access for aeronautical communications

    OpenAIRE

    Besse , Frédéric; Garcia , Fabien; Pirovano , Alain; Radzik , José

    2010-01-01

    International audience; There is an increasing interest in the current aeronautical context to offer new services for civil aircraft passengers. For example, airlines want to offer their customers the opportunity to access the Internet, to manage their mails, to watch video on demand, to access corporate VPNs.... All these services represent a new type of air-ground communications called APC (Aeronautical Passenger Communications) in the ATN (Aeronautical Telecommunication Network) context. I...

  9. TEXTILE STRUCTURES FOR AERONAUTICS (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOLER Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D textile structures with better delamination resistance and damage impact tolerance to be applied in composites for structural components is one of the main goals of the aeronautical industry. Textile Research Centre in Canet de Mar has been working since 2008 in this field. Our staff has been designing, developing and producing different textile structures using different production methods and machinery to improve three-dimensional textile structures as fiber reinforcement for composites. This paper describes different tests done in our textile labs from unidirectional structures to woven, knitted or braided 3 D textile structures. Advantages and disadvantages of each textile structure are summarized. The first part of this paper deals with the introduction of our Textile Research Centre in the field of composites and carbon fiber as a main material to produce three – dimensional textile structures. The use of composite materials in aerospace structures has increased over the past decades. Our contribution related to this field consists of the development of three- dimensional textile structures and even the adaptation and improvement of machinery to do it possible. Carbon fiber provides advantages as volumetric fraction and minimum fault occurrence. However carbon fiber has also disadvantages as uncomfortable handling delamination and high cost of material and processing.

  10. The role of community mental health services in supporting oral health outcomes among consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Rebecca; Ho, Hillary; Satur, Julie

    2018-04-16

    People with a lived experience of mental illness are at a higher risk for developing oral diseases and having poorer oral health than the broader population. This paper explores the role of Australian community mental health services in supporting the prevention and management of poor oral health among people living with mental illness. Through focus groups and semi-structured interviews, participants identified the value of receiving oral health support within a community mental health setting, in particular the delivery of basic education, preventive strategies, assistance with making or attending appointments and obtaining priority access to oral health services. Engagement with Community Health Services and referrals generated through the priority access system were identified as key enablers to addressing oral health issues. This study provides new insight into the importance of undertaking an integrated approach to reducing the oral health disparities experienced by those living with mental illness.

  11. Classification of Aeronautics System Health and Safety Documents

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Most complex aerospace systems have many text reports on safety, maintenance, and associated issues. The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) spans several...

  12. FirstAED emergency dispatch, global positioning of community first responders with distinct roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Finn Lund; Schorling, Per; Hansen, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    their roles in a team structure to reduce response times, ensure citizens' safety and offer equal possibility of early defibrillation. First aid is provided by community first responders who use their smartphone. FirstAED global positioning system (GPS)-tracks the nine nearby first responders and enables......FirstAED is a supplement to the existing emergency response systems. The aim is to shorten the community first responder response times at emergency calls to below five minutes in a bridge connected island area. FirstAED defines a way to dispatch the nearby three first responders and organise...... the emergency dispatcher to send an organised team of three first responders with distinct roles to the scene automatically. During the first 24 months the FirstAED system was used 718 times. Three first responders arrived in ∼89% of the cases, and they arrived before the ambulance in ∼94% of the cases. First...

  13. IPv6 Test Bed for Testing Aeronautical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Ryan; Zernic, Michael; Dhas, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Aviation industries in United States and in Europe are undergoing a major paradigm shift in the introduction of new network technologies. In the US, NASA is also actively investigating the feasibility of IPv6 based networks for the aviation needs of the United States. In Europe, the Eurocontrol lead, Internet Protocol for Aviation Exchange (iPAX) Working Group is actively investigating the various ways of migrating the aviation authorities backbone infrastructure from X.25 based networks to an IPv6 based network. For the last 15 years, the global aviation community has pursued the development and implementation of an industry-specific set of communications standards known as the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN). These standards are now beginning to affect the emerging military Global Air Traffic Management (GATM) community as well as the commercial air transport community. Efforts are continuing to gain a full understanding of the differences and similarities between ATN and Internet architectures as related to Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) infrastructure choices. This research paper describes the implementation of the IPv6 test bed at NASA GRC, and Computer Networks & Software, Inc. and these two test beds are interface to Eurocontrol over the IPv4 Internet. This research work looks into the possibility of providing QoS performance for Aviation application in an IPv6 network as is provided in an ATN based network. The test bed consists of three autonomous systems. The autonomous system represents CNS domain, NASA domain and a EUROCONTROL domain. The primary mode of connection between CNS IPv6 testbed and NASA and EUROCONTROL IPv6 testbed is initially a set of IPv6 over IPv4 tunnels. The aviation application under test (CPDLC) consists of two processes running on different IPv6 enabled machines.

  14. Interest communities and flow roles in directed networks: the Twitter network of the UK riots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Garduño-Hernández, Guillermo; Vangelov, Borislav; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2014-12-06

    Directionality is a crucial ingredient in many complex networks in which information, energy or influence are transmitted. In such directed networks, analysing flows (and not only the strength of connections) is crucial to reveal important features of the network that might go undetected if the orientation of connections is ignored. We showcase here a flow-based approach for community detection through the study of the network of the most influential Twitter users during the 2011 riots in England. Firstly, we use directed Markov Stability to extract descriptions of the network at different levels of coarseness in terms of interest communities, i.e. groups of nodes within which flows of information are contained and reinforced. Such interest communities reveal user groupings according to location, profession, employer and topic. The study of flows also allows us to generate an interest distance, which affords a personalized view of the attention in the network as viewed from the vantage point of any given user. Secondly, we analyse the profiles of incoming and outgoing long-range flows with a combined approach of role-based similarity and the novel relaxed minimum spanning tree algorithm to reveal that the users in the network can be classified into five roles. These flow roles go beyond the standard leader/follower dichotomy and differ from classifications based on regular/structural equivalence. We then show that the interest communities fall into distinct informational organigrams characterized by a different mix of user roles reflecting the quality of dialogue within them. Our generic framework can be used to provide insight into how flows are generated, distributed, preserved and consumed in directed networks.

  15. A survey for assessment of the role of pharmacist in community pharmacy services

    OpenAIRE

    H Sharma; D Jindal; M Aqil; M S Alam; S Karim; P Kapur

    2009-01-01

    Objective : To assess the role of a pharmacist in a community setting and the consumer′s perception in the National Capital Region. Setting : The study was conducted in the National Capital Region of India during the year 2003 - 2004. Materials and Methods : Four pharmacies were selected for this study, which were not attached to any hospital or clinic. Seventy-seven consumers, who visited these pharmacies during the study period, were selected for this study and interviewed just after they v...

  16. Community support for campus approaches to sustainable energy use: The role of 'town-gown' relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McComas, Katherine A.; Stedman, Richard; Sol Hart, P.

    2011-01-01

    Across the United States, universities are grappling with challenges associated with adopting approaches to more sustainable energy use. One approach has been to develop energy-related projects in their local, host communities. Because host communities can play a major role in the successful planning and implementation of these projects, understanding the factors relating to their support is important. Building on research that suggests that procedural fairness is one such key factor, this study examines community members' support of six approaches a local university could implement to work towards a goal of carbon neutrality. The results of a mail survey (N=677) found that perceived fairness of campus decision makers was significantly related to community support for the proposed approaches; however, beliefs about the efficacy of the different approaches to address challenges associated with climate change had the strongest relationship with support. The results also suggest that residents prefer changes in the energy infrastructure, such as the development of wind power, over the purchase of carbon offsets. We discuss the results in terms of actions that universities may take to foster community engagement in decision-making for university-sponsored sustainable energy projects. - Research highlights: → Residents were surveyed about support of a local university's energy choices. → Perceived fairness of campus authorities related to local support. → Beliefs about ability of energy choices to address climate change predicted support.

  17. The Role of Reconciling Values in Efforts to Build Community Resilience to Global Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainie, S. C.; Ferguson, D. B.; Martinez, A.

    2017-12-01

    Global environmental change has increasingly forced researchers and policy makers to reckon with the practical and philosophical need to integrate Indigenous knowledge with western science to support sustainable, resilient communities. Despite the recognition that integration of different ways of knowing offers a compelling approach for building long-term resilience, balancing the power dynamic that favors mainstream epistemologies over other ways of knowing remains elusive. Indigenous scholars themselves often speak of "walking in two worlds," acknowledging the distinction between Indigenous knowledge and western science and the difficulty of weaving together the two approaches. Central to the distinction between different ways of knowing are the core values that drive development and application of new knowledge. The DIKW pyramid describes the hierarchical relationships between wisdom, knowledge, information, and data. In these relationships, values drive how one turns data into information, then knowledge and wisdom. Thus, if building community resilience relies on integrating Indigenous science and Western science, a central point of focus must be on establishing which of the core values from these different knowledge systems can contribute and which may impede the goal of supporting community resilience. For example, does the absence of Western science data collection protocols (a core value of empirical science) eliminate the utility of community observations of environmental change from efforts to understand system change? Indigenous data sovereignty, an emerging framework, asserts Indigenous rights to information and promotes the role of community knowledge in creating metrics, outcomes, and ultimately actions toward resilient communities. Indigenous data sovereignty acknowledges that context and values shape data in addition to providing a lens for interpreting data. Can principles for the governance of Indigenous data, such as recognizing and supporting

  18. The role of coral-associated bacterial communities in Australian Subtropical White Syndrome of Turbinaria mesenterina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Scott; Bent, Elizabeth; Borneman, James; Pereg, Lily

    2012-01-01

    Australian Subtropical White Syndrome (ASWS) is an infectious, temperature dependent disease of the subtropical coral Turbinaria mesenterina involving a hitherto unknown transmissible causative agent. This report describes significant changes in the coral associated bacterial community as the disease progresses from the apparently healthy tissue of ASWS affected coral colonies, to areas of the colony affected by ASWS lesions, to the dead coral skeleton exposed by ASWS. In an effort to better understand the potential roles of bacteria in the formation of disease lesions, the effect of antibacterials on the rate of lesion progression was tested, and both culture based and culture independent techniques were used to investigate the bacterial communities associated with colonies of T. mesenterina. Culture-independent analysis was performed using the Oligonucleotide Fingerprinting of Ribosomal Genes (OFRG) technique, which allowed a library of 8094 cloned bacterial 16S ribosomal genes to be analysed. Interestingly, the bacterial communities associated with both healthy and disease affected corals were very diverse and ASWS associated communities were not characterized by a single dominant organism. Treatment with antibacterials had a significant effect on the rate of progress of disease lesions (p = 0.006), suggesting that bacteria may play direct roles as the causative agents of ASWS. A number of potential aetiological agents of ASWS were identified in both the culture-based and culture-independent studies. In the culture-independent study an Alphaproteobacterium closely related to Roseovarius crassostreae, the apparent aetiological agent of juvenile oyster disease, was found to be significantly associated with disease lesions. In the culture-based study Vibrio harveyi was consistently associated with ASWS affected coral colonies and was not isolated from any healthy colonies. The differing results of the culture based and culture-independent studies highlight the

  19. The role of coral-associated bacterial communities in Australian Subtropical White Syndrome of Turbinaria mesenterina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Godwin

    Full Text Available Australian Subtropical White Syndrome (ASWS is an infectious, temperature dependent disease of the subtropical coral Turbinaria mesenterina involving a hitherto unknown transmissible causative agent. This report describes significant changes in the coral associated bacterial community as the disease progresses from the apparently healthy tissue of ASWS affected coral colonies, to areas of the colony affected by ASWS lesions, to the dead coral skeleton exposed by ASWS. In an effort to better understand the potential roles of bacteria in the formation of disease lesions, the effect of antibacterials on the rate of lesion progression was tested, and both culture based and culture independent techniques were used to investigate the bacterial communities associated with colonies of T. mesenterina. Culture-independent analysis was performed using the Oligonucleotide Fingerprinting of Ribosomal Genes (OFRG technique, which allowed a library of 8094 cloned bacterial 16S ribosomal genes to be analysed. Interestingly, the bacterial communities associated with both healthy and disease affected corals were very diverse and ASWS associated communities were not characterized by a single dominant organism. Treatment with antibacterials had a significant effect on the rate of progress of disease lesions (p = 0.006, suggesting that bacteria may play direct roles as the causative agents of ASWS. A number of potential aetiological agents of ASWS were identified in both the culture-based and culture-independent studies. In the culture-independent study an Alphaproteobacterium closely related to Roseovarius crassostreae, the apparent aetiological agent of juvenile oyster disease, was found to be significantly associated with disease lesions. In the culture-based study Vibrio harveyi was consistently associated with ASWS affected coral colonies and was not isolated from any healthy colonies. The differing results of the culture based and culture-independent studies

  20. 76 FR 183 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-172)] NASA Advisory Council... the NASA Advisory Council. The meeting will be held for the purpose of soliciting from the aeronautics... 20546, (202) 358-0566, or [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting will be open...

  1. Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    stability Science & Innovation Collaboration Careers Community Environment Science & Innovation Recruitment Events Community Commitment Giving Campaigns, Drives Economic Development Employee Funded neighbor pledge: contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development

  2. Building a sense of virtual community: the role of the features of social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Wen; Lin, Chiun-Sin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, social networking sites have received increased attention because of the potential of this medium to transform business by building virtual communities. However, theoretical and empirical studies investigating how specific features of social networking sites contribute to building a sense of virtual community (SOVC)-an important dimension of a successful virtual community-are rare. Furthermore, SOVC scales have been developed, and research on this issue has been called for, but few studies have heeded this call. On the basis of prior literature, this study proposes that perceptions of the three most salient features of social networking sites-system quality (SQ), information quality (IQ), and social information exchange (SIE)-play a key role in fostering SOVC. In particular, SQ is proposed to increase IQ and SIE, and SIE is proposed to enhance IQ, both of which thereafter build SOVC. The research model was examined in the context of Facebook, one of the most popular social networking sites in the world. We adopted Blanchard's scales to measure SOVC. Data gathered using a Web-based questionnaire, and analyzed with partial least squares, were utilized to test the model. The results demonstrate that SIE, SQ, and IQ are the factors that form SOVC. The findings also suggest that SQ plays a fundamental role in supporting SIE and IQ in social networking sites. Implications for theory, practice, and future research directions are discussed.

  3. Householder engagement with energy consumption feedback: the role of community action and communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, Kevin; Rettie, Ruth; Roberts, Tom C.

    2016-01-01

    The provision of energy consumption feedback on in-home displays (IHDs) has a prominent role in government strategies for domestic energy demand reduction. Research suggests that IHDs can support energy consumption reduction, but also that engagement with IHDs can be limited to men and is often short-term. In this paper, we draw on research carried out in Smart Communities, a two-year project in which electricity and gas consumption feedback played a key role. This study was distinctive because it was accompanied by a weekly email communications programme and was provided within the context of community action. Project findings suggest that, although by no means panaceas, approaches such as these can support long-term engagement with energy consumption feedback, including by women, and can support behaviour change. - Highlights: • We examine the challenge of householder engagement with energy consumption feedback. • The potential of ‘community action’ and ‘communications’ is explored. • These approaches are shown to support long-term engagement by householders. • These approaches are also shown to support greater engagement by women. • Recommendations for future IHD platforms and smart meter roll-outs are presented.

  4. Sense of Community on Twitter and Instagram: Exploring the Roles of Motives and Parasocial Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blight, Michael G; Ruppel, Erin K; Schoenbauer, Kelsea V

    2017-05-01

    Although research has explored the ways in which people form virtual communities to converse about media figures, television shows, and similar topics, little research has examined the link between virtual communities and the parasocial relationships (PSRs) that are often the focus of these conversations and users' experiences in those virtual communities. We examined sense of community (SOC) on Twitter and Instagram as a function of users' motives for use and users' PSR on the sites. In addition to examining the relative importance of different motives for using Twitter and Instagram, we predicted that PSR would mediate the association between motives for use and SOC. Results of an online survey revealed that Instagram users (n = 276) reported stronger social interaction motives than did Twitter users (n = 223). Social interaction and expressive information sharing motives were directly positively associated with SOC for users of both sites. Instagram users also exhibited indirect effects of expressive information sharing and companionship motives on SOC, through PSR. These findings suggest potentially influential differences between Twitter and Instagram, particularly regarding the role of PSR in fostering a general SOC.

  5. The role and results of the European Community's R and D work on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Girardi, F.

    1985-01-01

    The titles of R and D programmes generally relate to a scientific discipline, a technology or a project: biotechnology, nuclear fission, etc. This is not so in the case of radioactive wastes, where R and D is focused on the management aspect. The role of R and D in general, and the contribution made by the Community programme in particular, are described and discussed with this in mind. Community R and D in the field of radioactive waste emerges as a powerful tool for establishing a broad consensus on delicate scientific questions such as the feasibility and long-term safety of the final storage of high activity wastes. Such a consensus is based on the many results obtained jointly by Community research teams over the last ten years. The implementation of three projects concerning experimental underground facilities in the context of the Community's new five-year (1985-1989) programme will provide the additional information that is needed before the large industrial disposal facilities of the future can be built

  6. The roles of host evolutionary relationships (genus: Nasonia) and development in structuring microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Robert M; Bordenstein, Seth R

    2012-02-01

    The comparative structure of bacterial communities among closely related host species remains relatively unexplored. For instance, as speciation events progress from incipient to complete stages, does divergence in the composition of the species' microbial communities parallel the divergence of host nuclear genes? To address this question, we used the recently diverged species of the parasitoid wasp genus Nasonia to test whether the evolutionary relationships of their bacterial microbiotas recapitulate the Nasonia phylogenetic history. We also assessed microbial diversity in Nasonia at different stages of development to determine the role that host age plays in microbiota structure. The results indicate that all three species of Nasonia share simple larval microbiotas dominated by the γ-proteobacteria class; however, bacterial species diversity increases as Nasonia develop into pupae and adults. Finally, under identical environmental conditions, the relationships of the microbial communities reflect the phylogeny of the Nasonia host species at multiple developmental stages, which suggests that the structure of an animal's microbial community is closely allied with divergence of host genes. These findings highlight the importance of host evolutionary relationships on microbiota composition and have broad implications for future studies of microbial symbiosis and animal speciation. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. ROLES OF COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haradhan Kumar MOHAJAN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available At present one of the most important concepts in social learning theory is the idea of communities of practice (CoP, which describes a learning theory with a strong relationship to the social construction of knowledge. A CoP is a collection of people who engage on performing a common activity for the welfare both of members of the community and the society. In modern society, it is used in some form of high levels of skills, knowledge and proficiency to perform the jobs properly. It plays an important role in the sharing of knowledge and creating value for both their members and organizations. A CoP is composed of three crucial characteristics: domain, community, and practice, which provide a guide to the development of community. The paper describes structural components, basic characteristics, and essential elements of a CoP. It also highlights benefits, importance, and the challenges and barriers of a CoP. In addition, it describes virtual CoP in brief. The main aim of this study is to explore the ins and out of a CoP in some details

  8. Community-based native seed production for restoration in Brazil - the role of science and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, I B; de Urzedo, D I; Piña-Rodrigues, F C M; Vieira, D L M; de Rezende, G M; Sampaio, A B; Junqueira, R G P

    2018-05-20

    Large-scale restoration programmes in the tropics require large volumes of high quality, genetically diverse and locally adapted seeds from a large number of species. However, scarcity of native seeds is a critical restriction to achieve restoration targets. In this paper, we analyse three successful community-based networks that supply native seeds and seedlings for Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado restoration projects. In addition, we propose directions to promote local participation, legal, technical and commercialisation issues for up-scaling the market of native seeds for restoration with high quality and social justice. We argue that effective community-based restoration arrangements should follow some principles: (i) seed production must be based on real market demand; (ii) non-governmental and governmental organisations have a key role in supporting local organisation, legal requirements and selling processes; (iii) local ecological knowledge and labour should be valued, enabling local communities to promote large-scale seed production; (iv) applied research can help develop appropriate techniques and solve technical issues. The case studies from Brazil and principles presented here can be useful for the up-scaling restoration ecology efforts in many other parts of the world and especially in tropical countries where improving rural community income is a strategy for biodiversity conservation and restoration. © 2018 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  9. Empowering Effective STEM Role Models to Promote STEM Equity in Local Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, T.; Taylor, J.

    2017-12-01

    Empowering Effective STEM Role Models, a three-hour training developed and successfully implemented by NASA Langley Research Center's Science Directorate, is an effort to encourage STEM professionals to serve as role models within their community. The training is designed to help participants reflect on their identity as a role model and provide research-based strategies to effectively engage youth, particularly girls, in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Research shows that even though girls and boys do not demonstrate a significant difference in their ability to be successful in mathematics and science, there is a significant difference in their confidence level when participating in STEM subject matter and pursuing STEM careers. The Langley training model prepares professionals to disrupt this pattern and take on the habits and skills of effective role models. The training model is based on other successful models and resources for role modeling in STEM including SciGirls; the National Girls Collaborative; and publications by the American Association of University Women and the National Academies. It includes a significant reflection component, and participants walk through situation-based scenarios to practice a focused suite of research-based strategies. These strategies can be implemented in a variety of situations and adapted to the needs of groups that are underrepresented in STEM fields. Underpinning the training and the discussions is the fostering of a growth mindset and promoting perseverance. "The Power of Yet" becomes a means whereby role models encourage students to believe in themselves, working toward reaching their goals and dreams in the area of STEM. To provide additional support, NASA Langley role model trainers are available to work with a champion at other organizations to facilitate the training. This champion helps recruit participants, seeks leadership buy-in, and helps provide valuable insights for needs and

  10. The Role of Perceptions for Community-Based Marine Resource Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Beyerl

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Every community-based marine resource management (CBMRM inherently takes place in a highly complex social-ecological environment, and stakeholder perceptions related to various aspects of the natural and social environment guide behavior in every stage of the management process. This paper provides an introduction to the psychology of perception with regard to marine resource management. In particular, it offers a typology of CBMRM relevant perceptions along with an analysis of psychological, societal, and physical factors that modulate them. Based on this analysis, we propose the introduction of specially trained local Perception Experts (PE’s, whose role will be to recognize and reflect individual perceptions of involved stakeholders, and to communicate them at community meetings where decisions are made. This empirically testable addition to current CBMRM schemes could help to increase participation, develop management measures that fit the capacities of the involved stakeholders more accurately, and hence, contribute to a faster rehabilitation of marine resources.

  11. THE ROLE OF MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES OF AIRWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Fedosenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the results of studies on the composition of microbial communities in the airways of healthy subjects and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Modern technologies of molecular-genetic identification methods of microorganisms allow to perform a deep analysis  of  the  respiratory  microbiom.  It  is  of  considerable  interest  to  determine  the  role  of  the microbiome in the development of human diseases of the bronchopulmonary system, and to understand the impact of the microbes communities as a course of disease and the important factor for the efficacy of current therapy.

  12. Coincidence of role expectations between staff and volunteer members of drug free community coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Marc B; Sapere, Heather; Daviau, John

    2017-08-01

    Community coalitions have proliferated as a means of addressing a range of complex community problems. Such coalitions often consist of a small paid staff and volunteer members. The present study examines one likely contributor to coalition effectiveness: the degree of agreement on role expectations between paid staff and volunteer members. Role confusion occurs when paid staff and volunteers differ in their expectations of who is responsible for accomplishing specific tasks. Staff and volunteer members from 69 randomly selected Drug Free Coalitions in the United States as well as 21 Drug Free Coalitions in Connecticut were asked to respond to an online survey asking about 37 specific coalition tasks critical for effective coalition functioning and the degree to which paid staff and/or voluntary members should be responsible for accomplishing each. Our final sample consisted of 476 individuals from 35 coalitions. Using coalitions as the unit of analysis, we found significant differences between paid staff and volunteer coalition members on nine tasks reflecting four domains: meeting leadership and participation, (2) planning and implementation leadership, (3) publicity/media relations, and (4) logistical functions. Implications of these differences and ways that evaluators could help coalitions deal with differing role expectations were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections: role for an emerging antibacterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Aguilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Aguilar1, María-José Giménez1, José Barberán21Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid; 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The nasopharynx is the ecological niche where evolution towards resistance occurs in respiratory tract isolates. Dynamics of different bacterial populations in antibiotic-free multibacterial niches are the baseline that antibiotic treatments can alter by shifting the competitive balance in favor of resistant populations. For this reason, antibiotic resistance is increasingly being considered to be an ecological problem. Traditionally, resistance has implied the need for development of new antibiotics for which basic efficacy and safety data are required prior to licensing. Antibiotic development is mainly focused on demonstrating clinical efficacy and setting susceptibility breakpoints for efficacy prediction. However, additional information on pharmacodynamic data predicting absence of selection of resistance and of resistant subpopulations, and specific surveillance on resistance to core antibiotics (to detect emerging resistances and its link with antibiotic consumption in the community are valuable data in defining the role of a new antibiotic, not only from the perspective of its therapeutic potential but also from the ecologic perspective (countering resistances to core antibiotics in the community. The documented information on cefditoren gleaned from published studies in recent years is an example of the role for an emerging oral antibacterial facing current antibiotic resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.Keywords: respiratory tract infection, antibiotic resistance, cefditoren, community

  14. Role of environmental heterogeneity in structuring the macrobenthic community in a tropical sandy beach, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sivadas, S.; Ingole, B.S.; Ganesan, P.; Sautya, S.; Nanajkar, M.

    In most ecosystems, community structure emerges as a result of the complex interaction between biotic and environmental variables. Sandy beaches connected to adjacent ecosystem like estuaries/creeks provide an opportunity to understand the role...

  15. The roles and needs of community health workers in developing countries: an exploratory case study in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khalala, G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available counseling and testing. Community Health Workers play a significant role in primary health care provision to vulnerable communities[5][6]. Although the importance of Community Health Workers in the provision of primary health care to rural... slightly urbanized (Soweto). In terms of data collection, group interviews and questionnaires were used as data collection tools. 1) Selection of case studies Case study was chosen as an appropriate approach as this study sought to explore...

  16. Exploring current and potential roles of Australian community pharmacists in gout management: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counsell, Allyce B; Nguyen, Amy D; Baysari, Melissa T; Kannangara, Diluk R W; McLachlan, Andrew J; Day, Richard O

    2018-05-09

    Gout is an increasingly prevalent form of inflammatory arthritis. Although effective treatments for gout exist, current management is suboptimal due to low medication adherence rates and treatments that are non-concordant with guidelines. Medications are the mainstay and most effective form of gout management. Thus, there is potential for community pharmacists to play an important primary health care role in gout management, however their current role and their potential to improve management of gout treatment is currently unclear. The purpose of the study is to explore the views of Australian pharmacists on their roles in gout management and to identify factors influencing their involvement in gout management. A convenience sample of community pharmacists were invited to participate using a snowballing recruitment strategy. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 15 pharmacists of varying age, gender and pharmacy experience. Interviews focused on pharmacists' experiences of managing gout, interactions with people living with gout and their perceived roles and responsibilities in gout management. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and independently analysed by two reviewers to identify themes. The main role of pharmacists reported in gout management was providing patient education. The greatest facilitator to pharmacists involvement in gout management was identified to be pharmacists' good understanding of gout and its management. Barriers to pharmacists involvement were identified to be difficulties in monitoring adherence to gout medications, low priority given to gout in the pharmacy compared to other chronic health conditions, and lack of specific training and/or continuing education in gout prevention and management. Pharmacists can expand their primary health care role in gout management, particularly in the area of ongoing provision of education to people living with gout and in monitoring medication adherence in patients. However, a

  17. Free-living protozoa in drinking water supplies: community composition and role as hosts for Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Valster, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Free-living protozoa in drinking water supplies: community composition and role as hosts for Legionella pneumophila Free-living protozoa, which feed on bacteria, play an important role in the communities of microorganisms and invertebrates in drinking water supplies and in (warm) tap water installations. Several bacteria, including opportunistic human pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila, are able to survive and replicate within protozoan hosts, and certain free-living protozoa are opp...

  18. Tensions in firm-community collaboration and the role of intermediaries in exploiting synergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsdahl Lauritzen, Ghita; Salomo, Søren

    2013-01-01

    and firms have become central to value creation. This is also reflected in an increasing interest in user-driven innovation. However, from the context in which firms and communities intersect, tensions arise due to undefined boundaries and a lack of clear roles. Although, intermediaries such as service...... and as dilemmas relating to power, identity, and competence that must be balanced in order to encourage and benefit from user contributions. Introducing Systems theory this paper shows that what is currently described as dilemmas that must be managed, are in fact paradoxes that are mutually enabling and must...

  19. Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1986-1990: A Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawdiak, Ihor Y.; Miro, Ramon J.; Stueland, Sam

    1997-01-01

    This chronology of events in aeronautics, aviation, space science, and space exploration was prepared by the Federal Research Division of the LibrarY of Congress for the History Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It covers the years 1996-1990 and continues the series of annual chronologies published by NASA. The present volume returns to the format used in the Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1979-1984: A Chronology volume. It also integrates in a single table the information presented in two or three previous publications.

  20. Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1991-1995: A Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawdiak, Ihor Y. (Compiler); Shetland, Charles (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This chronology of events in aeronautics, aviation, space science, and space exploration was prepared by the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress and RSIS for the History Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It covers the years 1991-1995 and continues the series of annual chronologies published by NASA. The present volume uses the format of the previous edition of this series, Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1986-1990: A Chronology. It also integrates, in the appendices, information presented in previous publication

  1. An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics Test Program Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD), however an overarching strategy for management of these national assets was needed. Therefore, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD Test Resources Management Center (TRMC), stewards of the DoD test and evaluation infrastructure. Since then, approximately seventy percent of the ATP budget has been directed to underpin fixed and variable costs of facility operations within its portfolio and the balance towards strategic investments in its test facilities, including maintenance and capability upgrades. Also, a strong guiding coalition was established through the National Partnership for Aeronautics Testing (NPAT), with governance by the senior leadership of NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) and the DoD's TRMC. As part of its strategic planning, ATP has performed or participated in many studies and analyses, including assessments of major NASA and DoD aeronautics test capabilities, test facility condition evaluations and market research. The ATP strategy has also benefitted from unpublished RAND research and analysis by Ant n et al. (2009). Together, these various studies, reports and assessments serve as a foundation for a new, five year strategic plan that will guide ATP through FY 2014. Our vision for the future is a balanced

  2. Smoking cessation counseling in Qatar: community pharmacists' attitudes, role perceptions and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Al Nakeeb, Reem Raad; Al-Qudah, Raja'a Ali

    2012-08-01

    Smoking is a major public health problem in Qatar. The potential for community pharmacists to offer smoking cessation counseling in this country can be high. To determine the current smoking cessation practices of community pharmacists in Qatar, to examine their attitudes about tobacco use and smoking cessation, to evaluate their perceptions about performing professional roles with respect to smoking cessation and to assess their perceived barriers for smoking cessation counseling in the pharmacy setting in Qatar. Community pharmacies in Qatar. The objectives were addressed in a cross sectional survey of community pharmacists in Qatar from June 2010 to October 2010. A phone call was made to all community pharmacists in Qatar (318 pharmacists) inviting them to participate. Consenting pharmacists anonymously completed the survey either online or as paper using fax. Data was analyzed using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS®) Version 18. Qatar community pharmacists' smoking cessation practices, their attitudes toward tobacco use, smoking cessation and smoking cessation counseling and their perceived barriers for smoking cessation counseling. Over 5 months, we collected 127 surveys (40 % response rate). Only 21 % of respondents reported that they always or most of the time asked their patients if they smoke. When the patients' smoking status was identified, advising quitting and assessing readiness to quit were always or most of the time performed by 66 and 52 % of respondents respectively. Only 15 % always or most of the time arranged follow-up with smokers and 22 % always or most of the time made smoking cessation referrals. Most respondents (>80 %) agreed that smoking could cause adverse health effects and that smoking cessation could decrease the risk of these effects. In addition, the majority (>80 %) believed that smoking cessation counseling was an important activity and was an efficient use of their time. The top two perceived barriers for smoking

  3. NASA Ames Sustainability Initiatives: Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Sustainable Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    In support of the mission-specific challenges of aeronautics and space exploration, NASA Ames produces a wealth of research and technology advancements with significant relevance to larger issues of planetary sustainability. NASA research on NexGen airspace solutions and its development of autonomous and intelligent technologies will revolutionize both the nation's air transporation systems and have applicability to the low altitude flight economy and to both air and ground transporation, more generally. NASA's understanding of the Earth as a complex of integrated systems contributes to humanity's perception of the sustainability of our home planet. Research at NASA Ames on closed environment life support systems produces directly applicable lessons on energy, water, and resource management in ground-based infrastructure. Moreover, every NASA campus is a 'city'; including an urbanscape and a workplace including scientists, human relations specialists, plumbers, engineers, facility managers, construction trades, transportation managers, software developers, leaders, financial planners, technologists, electricians, students, accountants, and even lawyers. NASA is applying the lessons of our mission-related activities to our urbanscapes and infrastructure, and also anticipates a leadership role in developing future environments for living and working in space.

  4. A review of the role of Haemophilus influenzae in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary PE Slack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an era when Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib conjugate vaccine is widely used, the incidence of Hib as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has dramatically declined. Non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi strains and, occasionally, other encapsulated serotypes of H. influenzae are now the cause of the majority of invasive H. influenzae infections, including bacteraemic CAP. NTHi have long been recognised as an important cause of lower respiratory tract infection, including pneumonia, in adults, especially those with underlying diseases. The role of NTHi as a cause of non-bacteraemic CAP in children is less clear. In this review the evidence for the role of NTHi and capsulated strains of H. influenzae will be examined.

  5. Role of art centres for Aboriginal Australians living with dementia in remote communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Melissa; Mackell, Paulene; Lin, Xiaoping; Farthing, Annie; Jensen, Heather; Meredith, Maree; Haralambous, Betty

    2017-06-01

    To explore the role art centres in remote communities play for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians living with dementia. A comprehensive literature search was undertaken, with no restrictions on articles regarding year of publication. Art programmes have been found to be of benefit to both people living with dementia and their carers, particularly when programmes are administered in environments that are culturally revered. Findings indicate remote art centres play a key role in maintaining traditions, culture and practices unique to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, but there is a gap in knowledge regarding how they cater for the needs of people with dementia. Addressing this gap will be helpful in remote areas where prevalence of dementia is up to five times that of non-Aboriginal people, and there are limited health and support services. Further research is required to explore strengths and gaps of current practices. © 2017 AJA Inc.

  6. Community perceptions towards the new role of traditional birth attendants as birth companions and nutrition advocates in Kakamega County, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anono, Esther L; Ochola, Sophie; Wawire, Salome; Ogada, Irene; Ndedda, Crispin; Kung'u, Jacqueline K

    2018-02-01

    Delivery with skilled birth attendants is important for reducing maternal mortality in developing countries. However, traditional birth attendants (TBAs) are abundant in such settings, managing deliveries without the skills and resources necessary to prevent mortality in this situations. Interventions that have been proposed to mitigate the situation include redefining the role of TBAs to nutrition advocates and birth companions for pregnant women to health facilities. We thus explored community perceptions on these new roles of TBAs, as birth companions and nutrition advocates, and their influence on health facility deliveries in Kakamega County, Kenya. Qualitative data was collected through key informant interviews with health workers and focus group discussions with lactating mothers, pregnant women, husbands, community leaders, community health volunteers, and TBA. Content analysis was conducted; data was organized into subthemes and conclusions made from each subtheme using Atlas.ti software. TBAs adopted their birth companion role as the majority offered companionship to mothers delivering at health facilities. Mothers were happy with this role as TBAs continued providing companionship even after delivery. The community members were happy with the new role of TBAs and reported increased deliveries at the health facilities. In contrast, TBAs did not adopt the nutrition advocacy role sufficiently. We found that redefining the role of the TBAs into birth companions to support facility-based delivery is thus feasible and acceptable. Nutrition advocacy by the TBAs should be strengthened to maximize on the opportunity provided by the close association between TBAs and mothers and the community. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The roles of community health workers in management of non-communicable diseases in an urban township

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lungiswa P. Tsolekile

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community health workers (CHWs are increasingly being recognised as a crucial part of the health workforce in South Africa and other parts of the world. CHWs have taken on a variety of roles, including community empowerment, provision of services and linking communities with health facilities. Their roles are better understood in the areas of maternal and child health and infectious diseases (HIV infection, malaria and tuberculosis. Aim: This study seeks to explore the current roles of CHWs working with non-communicable diseases (NCDs. Setting: The study was conducted in an urban township in Cape Town, South Africa. Method: A qualitative naturalistic research design utilising observations and in-depth interviews with CHWs and their supervisors working in Khayelitsha was used. Results: CHWs have multiple roles in the care of NCDs. They act as health educators, advisors, rehabilitation workers and support group facilitators. They further screen for complications of illness and assist community members to navigate the health system. These roles are shaped both by expectations of the health system and in response to community needs. Conclusion: This study indicates the complexities of the roles of CHWs working with NCDs. Understanding the actual roles of CHWs provides insights into not only the competencies required to enable them to fulfil their daily functions, but also the type of training required to fill the present gaps.

  8. The Role of the Bacterial Community of an Agroecosystem in Simazine Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ciccoli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of pesticides and fertilizers in agricultural practice is the main source of soil and groundwater contamination. S-Triazines are among the most used herbicides in the world for selective weed control in several types of crops. The homeostatic capability of an agroecosystem to remove a triazinic herbicide, simazine, was assessed in microcosms treated with the herbicide in presence/absence of urea fertilizer. The latter, as well as a fertilizer, is also one of the last by-products before simazine mineralization. The biodegradation, in terms of disappearance of 50% of the initial concentration (DT50, was compared to the degradation and metabolite formation occurring in sterilized soil. Moreover, the bacterial community response was assessed in terms of abundance and community structure by the epifluorescence direct count method and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The results show that the microbial community has a primary role in simazine degradation and that this process is due to the presence of a microbial pool working in succession and of which the metabolism may be modulated by exogenous sources of nitrogen, like urea. The latter influences the degradative pathway with a greater formation and accumulation of the desethyl-simazine metabolite, which is a hazardous contaminant of soil and groundwater ecosystems, as well as its parent compound.

  9. The Role of the Bacterial Community of an Agroecosystem in Simazine Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Barra Caracciolo

    Full Text Available The use of pesticides and fertilizers in agricultural practice is the main source of soil and groundwater contamination. S-Triazines are among the most used herbicides in the world for selective weed control in several types of crops. The homeostatic capability of an agroecosystem to remove a triazinic herbicide, simazine, was assessed in microcosms treated with the herbicide in presence/absence of urea fertilizer. The latter, as well as a fertilizer, is also one of the last by-products before simazine mineralization. The biodegradation, in terms of disappearance of 50% of the initial concentration (DT50, was compared to the degradation and metabolite formation occurring in sterilized soil. Moreover, the bacterial community response was assessed in terms of abundance and community structure by the epifluorescence direct count method and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The results show that the microbial community has a primary role in simazine degradation and that this process is due to the presence of a microbial pool working in succession and of which the metabolism may be modulated by exogenous sources of nitrogen, like urea. The latter influences the degradative pathway with a greater formation and accumulation of the desethyl-simazine metabolite, which is a hazardous contaminant of soil and groundwater ecosystems, as well as its parent compound.

  10. University implementing its community service role through curriculum development in a regional college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Keerberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The three roles of a higher education institution are teaching, research and community service. The objective of the article is to analyse how a university regional college can implement the task of community service via its curriculum development. The theoretical base lies on the positions of internationally recognised scientists of education policy as well as OECD definitions and clarifications that are compared to the cases of the regional colleges (in Narva and Kuressaare of two universities (respectively University of Tartu and Tallinn University of Technology. The set task enables to study as a whole such components as the content and design of curricula, teaching and assessment methods, extracurricular activities, topics and supervision of students’ research works, cooperation with partners. A comprehensive approach is a precondition of a well-functioning curriculum, with community service being the unifying aspect. The results of current study are applicable in case of the analysed curricula and colleges, they partly applicable in case of any other similar curricula and units. Prerequisites of the colleges' network evolvement, holistic impact and compliance with the region-specific needs is a significant topic the additional study of which has already begun.

  11. Attitude and Entrepreneurial Intention Among Rural Community: the Mediating Role of Entrepreneurial Opportunity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahalan Norziani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship has been well documented to have an economic and social implication for the nation to increase income. Most of developing countries give further consideration to include entrepreneurship as an agenda to help the poor to increase the living standard. In fact, entrepreneurship offers various business opportunities for rural communities to achieve better quality of life. However, the crucial part of doing business is to recognize business opportunity. Entrepreneurship and opportunity are two terms that complement each other. Opportunity recognition enables the entrepreneur to identify a good idea and transform it into a business concept. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between attitude (attitude toward money, attitude toward start-up and entrepreneurial intention. This paper also intends to understand the role of entrepreneurial opportunity recognition as a mediator between attitude and entrepreneurial intention. The aim of this research is to support training providers, to identify input for entrepreneurial training, specifically developing business concepts among rural community. From the practical perspective, it might help the government to understand the necessity to encourage entrepreneurial movement among rural community as to ensure business ideas flow. This research employed the quantitative method of data collection. The questionnaires were distributed to 500 local populations according to districts and villages. The findings of this study showed that both attitude (attitude toward money, attitude toward start-up influence entrepreneurial intention. The relationship between attitude toward start-up and entrepreneurial intention was mediated by opportunity recognition.

  12. The Role of Multicultural Media in Connecting Municipal Governments with Ethnocultural Communities: The Case of Ottawa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Veronis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to advance understanding of the role ethnic and multicultural media can play in connecting municipal governments and Ethnocultural and Immigrant Communities (EICs. Using an innovative mixed-methods approach and methodological triangulation, we compare the access to and use of multicultural media among four EICs—the Chinese, Latin American, Somali and South Asian—in Ottawa, Canada. Our cross-comparative study yields three main findings: 1 members of participating communities proactively and strategically use a variety of sources to access information about local services; 2 noteworthy differences exist in the access to and use of different types of media both across and within the four EICs, due to demographic and cultural differences; and 3 participants shared challenges and opportunities that multicultural media afford to better connect municipal government and EICs. The paper’s findings make important empirical contributions to the literature on the integrative potential of ethnic and multicultural media by strengthening the reliability of data, validity of findings, and broadening and deepening understanding the role multicultural media play in promoting collaboration between city governments and diverse EICs.

  13. Lessons Learned for Online Health Community Moderator Roles: A Mixed-Methods Study of Moderators Resigning From WebMD Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Rebecca; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2016-01-01

    Background Online health community (OHC) moderators help facilitate conversations and provide information to members. However, the necessity of the moderator in helping members achieve goals by providing the support they need remains unclear, with some prior research suggesting that moderation is unnecessary or even harmful for close-knit OHCs. Similarly, members’ perceptions of moderator roles are underexplored. Starting January of 2013, WebMD moderators stopped working for WebMD communities. This event provided an opportunity for us to study the perceived role of moderators in OHCs. Objective We examine the OHC members’ perception on OHC moderators by studying their reactions toward the departure of moderators in their communities. We also analyzed the relative posting activity on OHCs before and after the departure of moderators from the communities among all members and those who discussed moderators’ departures. Methods We applied a mixed-methods approach to study the posts of all 55 moderated WebMD communities by querying the terms relating to discussions surrounding moderators’ disappearance from the WebMD community. We performed open and axial coding and affinity diagramming to thematically analyze patients’ reactions to the disappeared moderators. The number of posts and poster groups (members and moderators) were analyzed over time to understand posting patterns around moderators’ departure. Results Of 821 posts retrieved under 95 threads, a total of 166 open codes were generated. The codes were then grouped into 2 main themes with 6 total subthemes. First, patients attempted to understand why moderators had left and what could be done to fill the void left by the missing moderators. During these discussions, the posts revealed that patients believed that moderators played critical roles in the communities by making the communities vibrant and healthy, finding solutions, and giving medical information. Some patients felt personally attached

  14. Applied simulation and optimization : in logistics, industrial and aeronautical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujica Mota, Miguel; De la Mota, Idalia Flores; Guimarans Serrano, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Presenting techniques, case-studies and methodologies that combine the use of simulation approaches with optimization techniques for facing problems in manufacturing, logistics, or aeronautical problems, this book provides solutions to common industrial problems in several fields, which range from

  15. Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1979-1984: A chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Bette R.; Ritchie, Eleanor H.

    1989-01-01

    This volume of the Astronautics and Aeronautics series covers 1979 through 1984. The series provides a chronological presentation of all significant events and developments in space exploration and the administration of the space program during the period covered.

  16. Fundamentals of Aerospace Engineering: An introductory course to aeronautical engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Soler, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Fundamentals of Aerospace Engineering is a text book that provides an introductory, thorough overview of aeronautical engineering, and it is aimed at serving as reference for an undergraduate course on aerospace engineering.

  17. "Sitting in different chairs:" roles of the community health workers in the Poder es Salud/Power for Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, S A; Wiggins, N; Michael, Y L; Luhr, G; Jordan, J; Lopez, A

    2008-07-01

    Evaluations of Community Health Worker programs consistently document improvements in health, yet few articles clearly describe the roles of Community Health Workers (CHWs) from the CHWs' perspective. This article presents the CHWs' points of view regarding the various roles they played in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project, Poder es Salud/Power for Health in Portland, Oregon, including their roles as community organizers and co-researchers. Authors draw from an analysis of transcript data from in-depth interviews conducted with CHWs to present a description of the strategies employed by the CHWs to build leadership skills and knowledge among community members. CHWs also discuss their own personal and professional development. The analysis of the interviews suggests that CHWs valued their multiple roles with Poder es Salud/Power for Health and their participation on the project's Steering Committee. Based on CHWs' descriptions of their work, this type of involvement appears to build the CHWs' leadership skills and sense of efficacy to create change in their communities. By serving as community organizers and participating as producers of research, rather than acting merely as a deliverer of the intervention activities, the CHWs were able to build skills that make them more successful as CHWs.

  18. Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Art in context of community is the theme of this newsletter. The theme is introduced in an editorial "Community-Enlarging the Definition" (Kit Grauer). Related articles include: (1) "The Children's Bridge is not Destroyed: Heart in the Middle of the World" (Emil Robert Tanay); (2) "Making Bridges: The Sock Doll…

  19. A Vision in Aeronautics: The K-12 Wind Tunnel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A Vision in Aeronautics, a project within the NASA Lewis Research Center's Information Infrastructure Technologies and Applications (IITA) K-12 Program, employs small-scale, subsonic wind tunnels to inspire students to explore the world of aeronautics and computers. Recently, two educational K-12 wind tunnels were built in the Cleveland area. During the 1995-1996 school year, preliminary testing occurred in both tunnels.

  20. Role of community pharmacists in the prevention and management of the metabolic syndrome in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram G; Awad, Abdelmoneim I; Kombian, Samuel B

    2013-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors and its prevalence is alarmingly high in Kuwait, affecting nearly one third of the adult population. There is lack of information about the role of community pharmacists in the care of patients with the metabolic syndrome. To assess the awareness and opinions of community pharmacists about the metabolic syndrome and identify the services they provide for identification, management and monitoring of patients with the metabolic syndrome. Community pharmacies in Kuwait. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed on a randomly selected sample of 225 community pharmacists. Data were collected via face-to-face structured interview of the pharmacists using a pre-tested questionnaire. Pharmacists' knowledge and views on the metabolic syndrome, monitoring services provided, self-reported practices and perceived effectiveness of the various management interventions for the metabolic syndrome. The response rate was 97.8 %. Nine pharmacists claimed to know about the metabolic syndrome, but only one pharmacist could identify the condition correctly. After being given a definition of the metabolic syndrome, 67.7 % of respondents strongly agreed that its prevalence was rising in Kuwait. Nearly two thirds of respondents reported providing height and weight measurement service while 82.7 and 59.5 % of pharmacies provided blood pressure and blood glucose measurements, respectively. Waist circumference and lipid profile measurements were the least provided services (1.8 %). Respondents claimed to be involved in counseling patients on lifestyle modifications including increased exercise (98.1 %) and weight reduction through diet (96.9 %). Most pharmacists were involved in encouraging patients' adherence with prescribed treatments (98.6 %) and perceived these as the most effective intervention for the management of the metabolic syndrome (95.0 %). Respondents were less involved in monitoring patients' response

  1. Piloting the role of a pharmacist in a community palliative care multidisciplinary team: an Australian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Box Margaret

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the home is the most common setting for the provision of palliative care in Australia, a common problem encountered here is the inability of patient/carers to manage medications, which can lead to misadventure and hospitalisation. This can be averted through detection and resolution of drug related problems (DRPs by a pharmacist; however, they are rarely included as members of the palliative care team. The aim of this study was to pilot a model of care that supports the role of a pharmacist in a community palliative care team. A component of the study was to develop a cost-effective model for continuing the inclusion of a pharmacist within a community palliative care service. Methods The study was undertaken (February March 2009-June 2010 in three phases. Development (Phase 1 involved a literature review; scoping the pharmacist's role; creating tools for recording DRPs and interventions, a communication and education strategy, a care pathway and evidence based patient information. These were then implemented in Phase 2. Evaluation (Phase 3 of the impact of the pharmacist's role from the perspectives of team members was undertaken using an online survey and focus group. Impact on clinical outcomes was determined by the number of patients screened to assess their risk of medication misadventure, as well as the number of medication reviews and interventions performed to resolve DRPs. Results The pharmacist screened most patients (88.4%, 373/422 referred to the palliative care service to assess their risk of medication misadventure, and undertook 52 home visits. Medication reviews were commonly conducted at the majority of home visits (88%, 46/52, and a variety of DRPs (113 were detected at this point, the most common being "patient requests drug information" (25%, 28/113 and "condition not adequately treated" (22%, 25/113. The pharmacist made 120 recommendations in relation to her interventions. Fifty percent of online

  2. Vision sensing techniques in aeronautics and astronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    The close relationship between sensing and other tasks in orbital space, and the integral role of vision sensing in practical aerospace applications, are illustrated. Typical space mission-vision tasks encompass the docking of space vehicles, the detection of unexpected objects, the diagnosis of spacecraft damage, and the inspection of critical spacecraft components. Attention is presently given to image functions, the 'windowing' of a view, the number of cameras required for inspection tasks, the choice of incoherent or coherent (laser) illumination, three-dimensional-to-two-dimensional model-matching, edge- and region-segmentation techniques, and motion analysis for tracking.

  3. Community Intellectual Disability Nurses' Public Health Roles in the United Kingdom: An Exploratory Documentary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuba, Kay; Gates, Bob; Cozens, Maria

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how public health policy in the United Kingdom was reflected in community intellectual disability nurses' (CIDNs)' job descriptions and person's specifications. The role of CIDNs has evolved due to policy changes. As these roles evolve, job descriptions and person specifications are important in highlighting…

  4. The changing roles of community nurses: the case of health plan nurses in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissanholtz-Gannot, Rachel; Rosen, Bruce; Hirschfeld, Miriam

    2017-12-23

    In Israel, approximately one-third of the country's nurses work in community settings - primarily as salaried employees in Israel's four non-profit health plans. Many health system leaders believe that the roles of health plan nurses have changed significantly in recent years due to a mix of universal developments (such as population aging and academization of the profession) and Israel-specific changes (such as the introduction of extensive quality monitoring in primary care). The main objectives of the study were to identify recent changes in the roles of health plan nurses and their current areas of activity. It also explored the experience of front-line nurses with regard to autonomy, work satisfaction, and barriers to further role development. The study integrated interviews and surveys of nurses and other professionals conducted across 4 years. Data generated from earlier study components were used to guide questions and focus for later components. In 2013, in-depth interviews were held with 55 senior nursing and medical professionals supplemented by interviews in mid-2017 with the head nurses in the four health plans. In addition, a national survey was conducted in 2014-5 among a representative sample of 1019 community nurses who work for the health plans and who are engaged in direct patient care. Six hundred ninety-two nurses responded to the survey, yielding a response rate of 69%. The survey sample consisted of an equal number of nurses from each health plan, and the observations were weighted accordingly. Senior professionals identified general themes associated with a shift in nursing roles, including a transition from reactive to initiated work, increased specialization, and a shifting of tasks from hospitals to community settings. They identified the current main areas of activity in the health plans as being: routine care, chronic care, health promotion, quality monitoring and improvement, specialized care (such as wound care), and home care. In

  5. Plant community resistance to invasion by Bromus species: The roles of community attributes, Bromus interactions with plant communities, and Bromus traits [Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanne C. Chambers; Matthew J. Germino; Jayne Belnap; Cynthia S. Brown; Eugene W. Schupp; Samuel B. St. Clair

    2016-01-01

    The factors that determine plant community resistance to exotic annual Bromus species (Bromus hereafter) are diverse and context specific. They are influenced by the environmental characteristics and attributes of the community, the traits of Bromus species, and the direct and indirect interactions of Bromus with the plant community. Environmental factors, in...

  6. Role of community pharmacists in asthma - Australian research highlighting pathways for future primary care models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, B; Krass, I; Smith, L; Bosnic-Anticevich, S; Armour, C

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic conditions affecting the Australian population. Amongst primary healthcare professionals, pharmacists are the most accessible and this places pharmacists in an excellent position to play a role in the management of asthma. Globally, trials of many community pharmacy-based asthma care models have provided evidence that pharmacist delivered interventions can improve clinical, humanistic and economic outcomes for asthma patients. In Australia, a decade of coordinated research efforts, in various aspects of asthma care, has culminated in the implementation trial of the Pharmacy Asthma Management Service (PAMS), a comprehensive disease management model.There has been research investigating asthma medication adherence through data mining, ways in which usual asthma care can be improved. Our research has focused on self-management education, inhaler technique interventions, spirometry trials, interprofessional models of care, and regional trials addressing the particular needs of rural communities. We have determined that inhaler technique education is a necessity and should be repeated if correct technique is to be maintained. We have identified this effectiveness of health promotion and health education, conducted within and outside the confines of the pharmacy, in public for a and settings such as schools, and established that this outreach role is particularly well received and increases the opportunity for people with asthma to engage in their asthma management.Our research has identified that asthma patients have needs which pharmacists delivering specialized models of care, can address. There is a lot of evidence for the effectiveness of asthma care by pharmacists, the future must involve integration of this role into primary care.

  7. Role of community pharmacists in asthma – Australian research highlighting pathways for future primary care models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the most common chronic conditions affecting the Australian population. Amongst primary healthcare professionals, pharmacists are the most accessible and this places pharmacists in an excellent position to play a role in the management of asthma. Globally, trials of many community pharmacy-based asthma care models have provided evidence that pharmacist delivered interventions can improve clinical, humanistic and economic outcomes for asthma patients. In Australia, a decade of coordinated research efforts, in various aspects of asthma care, has culminated in the implementation trial of the Pharmacy Asthma Management Service (PAMS, a comprehensive disease management model. There has been research investigating asthma medication adherence through data mining, ways in which usual asthma care can be improved. Our research has focused on self-management education, inhaler technique interventions, spirometry trials, interprofessional models of care, and regional trials addressing the particular needs of rural communities. We have determined that inhaler technique education is a necessity and should be repeated if correct technique is to be maintained. We have identified this effectiveness of health promotion and health education, conducted within and outside the confines of the pharmacy, in public for a and settings such as schools, and established that this outreach role is particularly well received and increases the opportunity for people with asthma to engage in their asthma management. Our research has identified that asthma patients have needs which pharmacists delivering specialized models of care, can address. There is a lot of evidence for the effectiveness of asthma care by pharmacists, the future must involve integration of this role into primary care.

  8. Between-year changes in community composition shape species’ roles in an Arctic plant–pollinator network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirtwill, Alyssa R.; Roslin, Tomas; Rasmussen, Claus

    2018-01-01

    Inter-annual turnover in community composition can affect the richness and functioning of ecological communities. If incoming and outgoing species do not interact with the same partners, ecological functions such as pollination may be disrupted. Here, we explore the extent to which turnover affects...... in species’ roles between networks. Variation in the roles of plants and pollinators tended to increase with the amount of community turnover, although a negative interaction between turnover in the plant and pollinator assemblages complicated this trend for the roles of pollinators. This suggests...... species’ roles – as defined based on their participation in different motifs positions – in a series of temporally replicated plant–pollinator networks from high-Arctic Zackenberg, Greenland. We observed substantial turnover in the plant and pollinator assemblages, combined with significant variation...

  9. Exploring the role of GIS during community health assessment problem solving: experiences of public health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scotch Matthew

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Community health assessment (CHA involves the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS in conjunction with other software to analyze health and population data and perform numerical-spatial problem solving. There has been little research on identifying how public health professionals integrate this software during typical problem solving scenarios. A better understanding of this is needed to answer the "What" and the "How". The "What" identifies the specific software being used and the "How" explains the way they are integrated together during problem solving steps. This level of understanding will highlight the role of GIS utilization during problem solving and suggest to developers how GIS can be enhanced to better support data analysis during community health assessment. Results An online survey was developed to identify the information technology used during CHA analysis. The tasks were broken down into steps and for our analysis these steps were categorized by action: Data Management/Access, Data Navigation, Geographic Comparison, Detection of Spatial Boundaries, Spatial Modelling, and Ranking Analysis. 27 CHA professionals completed the survey, with the majority of participants (14 being from health departments. Statistical software (e.g. SPSS was the most popular software for all but one of the types of steps. For this step (detection of spatial boundaries, GIS was identified as the most popular technology. Conclusion Most CHA professionals indicated they use statistical software in conjunction with GIS. The statistical software appears to drive the analysis, while GIS is used primarily for simple spatial display (and not complex spatial analysis. This purpose of this survey was to thoroughly examine into the process of problem solving during community health assessment data analysis and to gauge how GIS is integrated with other software for this purpose. These findings suggest that GIS is used more for spatial

  10. Gender roles and perceptions of malaria risk in agricultural communities of Mwea Division in Central Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldu, Dawit Okubatsion; Haile, Zelalem Teka

    2015-01-01

    We examined gender differences in the perception of high malaria risk in women and factors associated with a high number of malaria episodes in the Mwea Division of Central Kenya. Ethnographic and successive free listing interviews (an open-ended data collection technique used to show the relation of items in a given domain) with 53 key informants and structured interviews conducted from June to October 2010 with 250 respondents who represented the socioeconomic and geographical diversity of the area were analyzed. Qualitative text analysis and inferential statistics were employed. While a greater proportion of men (51.6%) attributed women's high malaria risk to their "biological weakness," most women believed that their high malaria risk was related to their role in the agricultural fields (43.6%) and to their household responsibilities (23.1%). Compared to men, women were more likely to work in wet aspects of agricultural activities (χ(2) (2, N = 153) = 13.47, p gender roles in agricultural communities in Mwea may play an important role in explaining disparity in reported malaria incidence. While identification of ecological and economic determinants of malaria is important, gender-based research can make a significant contribution to the development of effective and sustainable malaria reduction strategies.

  11. Multifaceted Role of Pneumolysin in the Pathogenesis of Myocardial Injury in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Anderson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pneumolysin (PLY, a member of the family of Gram-positive bacterial, cholesterol-dependent, β-barrel pore-forming cytolysins, is the major protein virulence factor of the dangerous respiratory pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus. PLY plays a major role in the pathogenesis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, promoting colonization and invasion of the upper and lower respiratory tracts respectively, as well as extra-pulmonary dissemination of the pneumococcus. Notwithstanding its role in causing acute lung injury in severe CAP, PLY has also been implicated in the development of potentially fatal acute and delayed-onset cardiovascular events, which are now recognized as being fairly common complications of this condition. This review is focused firstly on updating mechanisms involved in the immunopathogenesis of PLY-mediated myocardial damage, specifically the direct cardiotoxic and immunosuppressive activities, as well as the indirect pro-inflammatory/pro-thrombotic activities of the toxin. Secondly, on PLY-targeted therapeutic strategies including, among others, macrolide antibiotics, natural product antagonists, cholesterol-containing liposomes, and fully humanized monoclonal antibodies, as well as on vaccine-based preventive strategies. These sections are preceded by overviews of CAP in general, the role of the pneumococcus as the causative pathogen, the occurrence and types of CAP-associated cardiac complication, and the structure and biological activities of PLY.

  12. What is the role of community capabilities for maternal health? An exploration of community capabilities as determinants to institutional deliveries in Bangladesh, India, and Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Paina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While community capabilities are recognized as important factors in developing resilient health systems and communities, appropriate metrics for these have not yet been developed. Furthermore, the role of community capabilities on access to maternal health services has been underexplored. In this paper, we summarize the development of a community capability score based on the Future Health System (FHS project’s experience in Bangladesh, India, and Uganda, and, examine the role of community capabilities as determinants of institutional delivery in these three contexts. Methods We developed a community capability score using a pooled dataset containing cross-sectional household survey data from Bangladesh, India, and Uganda. Our main outcome of interest was whether the woman delivered in an institution. Our predictor variables included the community capability score, as well as a series of previously identified determinants of maternal health. We calculate both population-averaged effects (using GEE logistic regression, as well as sub-national level effects (using a mixed effects model. Results Our final sample for analysis included 2775 women, of which 1238 were from Bangladesh, 1199 from India, and 338 from Uganda. We found that individual-level determinants of institutional deliveries, such as maternal education, parity, and ante-natal care access were significant in our analysis and had a strong impact on a woman’s odds of delivering in an institution. We also found that, in addition to individual-level determinants, greater community capability was significantly associated with higher odds of institutional delivery. For every additional capability, the odds of institutional delivery would increase by up to almost 6 %. Conclusion Individual-level characteristics are strong determinants of whether a woman delivered in an institution. However, we found that community capability also plays an important role, and should be

  13. 78 FR 13383 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory (SCI) AGENCY: Office of Procurement, National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Public Availability of the FY 2012 Service Contract...

  14. 76 FR 6827 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration FY 2010 Service Contract...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: National Aeronautic and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of public availability of FY 2010 Service Contract Inventories. [[Page 6828...

  15. 77 FR 7183 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Public Availability of Analysis of the FY 2010 Service Contract Inventories and...

  16. Species interactions within a fouling diatom community: Roles of nutrients, initial inoculum and competitive strategies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A

    Diatoms constitute an important component of the fouling community. Although a lot of work has dealt with the fouling diatom community structure, work on the species interactions within the community is still meager. In this regard, a study...

  17. Disaster preparedness networks in rural Midwest communities: Organizational roles, collaborations, and support for older residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Zhu, Xi; Robinson, Erin L; Schroer, Audrey

    2018-05-17

    This study investigated the roles and interconnections among community organizations belonging to local disaster coalitions in Midwest in supporting older residents. Representatives from 44 organizations participated in one-time survey. Most were non-profit (68%) or federal/state/local government agencies (23%). The analyses of 761 relationships showed stronger collaborations in assessment (average strength=2.88 on a 5-point scale), emergency response (2.72), and planning (2.61); and weaker collaborations in co-sponsoring programs (1.71) and supporting older residents (2.03). The extent of collaboration (network density) to support older adults was also low. Coalitions may enhance network density and centralization by developing sub-committee structure and strengthening existing collaborations.

  18. The role of benthic macrophytes and their associated macroinvertebrate community in coastal lagoon resistance to eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Javier; Marín, Arnaldo

    2009-12-01

    Eutrophication is widely recognised as one of the major menaces to coastal environments, particularly enclosed bays and lagoons. Although there is a general understanding of the consequences of eutrophication in these systems, there is a lack of sufficient knowledge concerning biotic feedbacks that influence eutrophication patterns and the resistance capacity of coastal environments. In this paper, the isotope ratios of main producers and consumers of a Mediterranean lagoon were examined in order to elucidate the fate of anthropogenic inputs from the main watercourse flowing into the lagoon. The results of the study of stable isotope data in the Mar Menor lagoon reflected that the whole benthic community plays an important role as a natural 'filter' that removes excess nutrients from the water column and stores them in the sediments, thereby enhancing lagoon resistance to eutrophication.

  19. The role of benthic macrophytes and their associated macroinvertebrate community in coastal lagoon resistance to eutrophication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloret, Javier; Marin, Arnaldo

    2009-01-01

    Eutrophication is widely recognised as one of the major menaces to coastal environments, particularly enclosed bays and lagoons. Although there is a general understanding of the consequences of eutrophication in these systems, there is a lack of sufficient knowledge concerning biotic feedbacks that influence eutrophication patterns and the resistance capacity of coastal environments. In this paper, the isotope ratios of main producers and consumers of a Mediterranean lagoon were examined in order to elucidate the fate of anthropogenic inputs from the main watercourse flowing into the lagoon. The results of the study of stable isotope data in the Mar Menor lagoon reflected that the whole benthic community plays an important role as a natural 'filter' that removes excess nutrients from the water column and stores them in the sediments, thereby enhancing lagoon resistance to eutrophication.

  20. Elder abuse: The role of general practitioners in community-based screening and multidisciplinary action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Nola M; Mansfield, Elise

    2018-04-01

    There are growing calls for elder abuse screening to be conducted by a range of community-based service providers, including general practitioners (GPs), practice nurses, home care workers and lawyers. Improved screening may be a valuable first step towards improving elder abuse detection and response; however, practitioners need evidence-based strategies for screening and follow-up. This article summarises several brief screening tools for various forms of elder abuse. Screening tool properties and evidence gaps are noted. As elder abuse often requires multidisciplinary responses, initiatives to connect health, legal and other service providers are highlighted. GPs are trusted professionals who are well placed to identify older patients at risk of, or experiencing, various forms of abuse. They should be aware of available screening tools and consider how best to incorporate them into their own practice. They also play an important role in multidisciplinary action to address elder abuse.  .

  1. Charity and community: the role of nonprofit ownership in a managed health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, M; Gray, B; Bradley, E

    1996-01-01

    As American medicine has been transformed by the growth of managed care, so too have questions about the appropriate role of nonprofit ownership in the health care system. The standards for community benefit that are increasingly applied to nonprofit hospitals are, at best, only partially relevant to expectations for nonprofit managed care plans. Can we expect nonprofit ownership to substantially affect the behavior of an increasingly competitive managed care industry dealing with insured populations? Drawing from historical interpretations of tax exemption in health care and from the theoretical literature on the implications of ownership for organizational behavior, we identify five forms of community benefit that might be associated with nonprofit forms of managed care. Using data from a national survey of firms providing third-party utilization review services in 1993, we test for ownership-related differences in these five dimensions. Nonprofit utilization review firms generally provide more public goods, such as information dissemination, and are more "community oriented" than proprietary firms, but they are not distinguishable from their for-profit counterparts in addressing the implications of medical quality or the cost of the review process. However, a subgroup of nonprofit review organizations with medical origins are more likely to address quality issues than are either for-profit firms or other nonprofit agencies. Evidence on responses to information asymmetries is mixed but suggests that some ownership related differences exist. The term "charitable" is thus capable of a definition far broader than merely the relief of the poor. While it is true that in the past Congress and the federal courts have conditioned the hospital's charitable status on the level of free or below cost care that it provided for indigents, there is no authority for the conclusion that the determination of "charitable" status was always so limited. Such an inflexible

  2. Online communities of practice and their role in educational development: a systematic appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Lynn

    2014-04-01

    Practice teachers and academics have a role in developing knowledge and promoting evidence-based practice with their students in a supportive and creative learning environment. Recent advances in technology are enabling communities of practice' (CoPs) to be developed online and may present a valuable opportunity to form greater connections between educators. To explore this idea, the author conducted a systematic appraisal of published evidence relating to the impact of using an online CoP (OCoP) to develop knowledge among healthcare educators. Three academic databases were targeted for articles and the search retrieved nine articles that were analysed for quality. The findings identified that an OCoP offers a 'polycontextual' environment that can enhance knowledge development, strengthen social ties and build social capital. Communities that support tacit knowledge development, information sharing and problem solving are most valued and existing information and communication technology (ICT) tools can be used to promote usability and accessibility. Recognising the value of tacit knowledge and using ICT for educational development within workload hours will require a shift in cultural thinking at both an individual and organisational level.

  3. Community care worker perceptions of their roles in tuberculosis care and their information needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Okeyo

    2016-10-01

    Objective: To explore perceptions of CCWs of their role in TB care and TB information needs. Methods: CCWs working with TB patients were recruited from Grahamstown Hospice and local primary healthcare clinics in Grahamstown. Focus group discussions and semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 CCWs using a question guide. Data were thematically analysed. Results: Three themes emerged from data analysis. Firstly, altruism was identified as the major motivational factor, with a desire to help others often stimulated by previously caring for sick relatives. Some CCWs had experienced being patients needing care, which motivated them to become involved in offering patient care. Secondly, CCWs reported great fulfilment and pride in their work as they believed they made a meaningful impact on patients' lives and in the surrounding community, and were respected for this contribution. Thirdly, most identified a need for further training and access to additional information about TB, particularly MDR- and XDR-TB, in order to reinforce both their own knowledge and to educate patients about drug-resistant TB. Conclusion: CCWs were motivated and proud of their contribution to TB patient management and the education they provided to patients and to lay community members.Ongoing training was identified as a need, along with access to quality information materials to improve their knowledge and facilitate patient counselling.

  4. A community perspective on the role of fathers during pregnancy: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Defining male involvement during pregnancy is essential for the development of future research and appropriate interventions to optimize services aiming to improve birth outcomes. Study Aim: To define male involvement during pregnancy and obtain community-based recommendations for interventions to improve male involvement during pregnancy. Methods We conducted focus groups with mothers and fathers from the National Healthy Start Association program in order to obtain detailed descriptions of male involvement activities, benefits, barriers, and proposed solutions for increasing male involvement during pregnancy. The majority of participants were African American parents. Results The involved “male” was identified as either the biological father, or, the current male partner of the pregnant woman. Both men and women described the ideal, involved father or male partner as present, accessible, available, understanding, willing to learn about the pregnancy process and eager to provide emotional, physical and financial support to the woman carrying the child. Women emphasized a sense of “togetherness” during the pregnancy. Suggestions included creating male-targeted prenatal programs, enhancing current interventions targeting females, and increasing healthcare providers’ awareness of the importance of men’s involvement during pregnancy. Conclusions Individual, family, community, societal and policy factors play a role in barring or diminishing the involvement of fathers during pregnancy. Future research and interventions should target these factors and their interaction in order to increase fathers’ involvement and thereby improve pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23497131

  5. The role of local environment and geographical distance in determining community composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi at the landscape scale

    OpenAIRE

    Hazard, Christina; Gosling, Paul; van der Gast, Christopher J; Mitchell, Derek T; Doohan, Fiona M; Bending, Gary D

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular fungi have a major role in directing the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems yet little is known about their biogeographical distribution. The Baas-Becking hypothesis (‘everything is everywhere, but, the environment selects') was tested by investigating the distribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) at the landscape scale and the influence of environmental factors and geographical distance in determining community composition. AMF communities in Trifolium repens and Loliu...

  6. Family members facilitating community re-integration and return to productivity following traumatic brain injury - motivations, roles and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Alicia; Lin, Jenny; Stergiou-Kita, Mary

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of family members in supporting community re-integration and return to productive occupations of the traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivor in order to: (i) describe family members' supportive roles, (ii) determine challenges family members experience in supporting the TBI survivor; and (iii) identify supports that family members require to maintain and enhance their roles. This qualitative descriptive study involved 14 interviews with immediate family members of TBI survivors. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Family members expressed strong motivation and engaged in six key roles to support TBI survivors: researcher, case manager, advocate, coach, activities of daily living (ADL)/instrumental ADLs and emotional supporter. Personal and family stressors and challenges navigating the health care system were perceived as challenges in meeting demands of their supportive roles. Stigma also presented a barrier to successful community and vocational re-integration. Subsequently, family members desired more education related to the functional implications of TBI, to be connected to health care and community resources, and sought a greater family-centred care approach. Family members require on-going counseling and community supports to prevent burnout and allow for their continued engagement in their supportive roles. Further education on how to navigate the health care system, access community programs and rights to workplace accommodation is also warranted. Family members are strongly motivated to support survivors' return to productive occupation following a traumatic brain injury, but require counseling and community support to enable their on-going engagement and prevent burnout. Family members can be further empowered through the implementation of family-centred care. Family members requested further education on the long-term functional implications of TBI, how to navigate the health care system, how to access community

  7. The shifting dynamics of social roles and project ownership over the lifecycle of a community-based participatory research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsberg, Jon; Macridis, Soultana; Garcia Bengoechea, Enrique; Macaulay, Ann C; Moore, Spencer

    2017-06-01

    . Community based participatory research (CBPR) is often initiated by academic researchers, yet relies on meaningful community engagement and ownership to have lasting impact. Little is understood about how ownership shifts from academic to community partners. . We examined a CBPR project over its life course and asked: what does the evolution of ownership look like from project initiation by an academic (non-community) champion (T1); to maturation-when the intervention is ready to be deployed (T2); to independence-the time when the original champion steps aside (T3); and finally, to its maintenance-when the community has had an opportunity to function independently of the original academic champion (T4)? . Using sociometric (whole network) social network analysis, knowledge leadership was measured using 'in-degree centrality'. Stakeholder network structure was measured using 'centralisation' and 'core-periphery analysis'. Friedman rank sum test was used to measure change in actor roles over time from T1 to T4. . Project stakeholder roles were observed to shift significantly (P project maintenance (T4). Community stakeholders emerged into positions of knowledge leadership, while the roles of academic partners diminished in importance. The overall stakeholder network demonstrated a structural shift towards a core of densely interacting community stakeholders. . This was the first study to use Social network analysis to document a shift in ownership from academic to community partners, indicating community self-determination over the research process. Further analysis of qualitative data will determine which participatory actions or strategies were responsible for this observed change. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Exploring an increased role for Australian community pharmacy in mental health professional service delivery: evaluation of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattingh, H Laetitia; Scahill, Shane; Fowler, Jane L; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2016-12-01

    Australian general practitioners primarily treat mental health problems by prescribing medication dispensed by community pharmacists. Pharmacists therefore have regular interactions with mental health consumers and carers. This narrative review explored the potential role of community pharmacy in mental health services. Medline, CINAHL, ProQuest, Emerald, PsycINFO, Science Direct, PubMed, Web of Knowledge and IPA were utilised. The Cochrane Library as well as grey literature and "lay" search engines such as GoogleScholar were also searched. Four systematic reviews and ten community pharmacy randomised controlled trials were identified. Various relevant reviews outlining the impact of community pharmacy based disease state or medicines management services were also identified. International studies involving professional service interventions for mental health consumers could be contextualised for the Australian setting. Australian studies of pharmacy professional services for chronic physical health conditions provided further guidance for the expansion of community pharmacy mental health professional services.

  9. Lay perspectives on lay health worker roles, boundaries and participation within three UK community-based health promotion projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, J; Kinsella, K; Meah, A

    2012-08-01

    This paper examines lay interpretations of lay health worker roles within three UK community-based health promotion projects. It argues that understanding lay health worker roles requires critical analysis of the complex interrelationships between professionals, lay workers and the communities receiving a programme. Findings are presented that are drawn from a qualitative study of lay engagement in public health programme delivery where a key objective was to examine the perspectives of community members with the experience of receiving services delivered by lay health workers. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 46 programme recipients from three case study projects; a breastfeeding peer support service, a walking for health scheme and a neighbourhood health project. The results show how participants interpreted the function and responsibilities of lay health workers and how those roles provided personalized support and facilitated engagement in group activities. Further insights into community participation processes are provided revealing the potential for active engagement in both formal and informal roles. The paper concludes that social relationships are core to understanding lay health worker programmes and therefore analysis needs to take account of the capacity for community members to move within a spectrum of participation defined by increasing responsibility for others.

  10. A Constructive Reframing of Student Roles and Systems Learning in Medical Education Using a Communities of Practice Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Thompson, Britta M; Haidet, Paul; Mann, Karen; Wolpaw, Daniel R

    2017-12-01

    Health systems are in the midst of a transformation that is being driven by a variety of forces. This has important implications for medical educators because clinical practice environments play a key role in learning and professional development, and evolving health systems are beginning to demand that providers have "systems-ready" knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Such implications provide a clear mandate for medical schools to modify their goals and prepare physicians to practice flexibly within teams and effectively contribute to the improvement of health care delivery. In this context, the concepts of value-added medical education, authentic student roles, and health systems science are emerging as increasingly important. In this Article, the authors use a lens informed by communities of practice theory to explore these three concepts, examining the implications that the communities of practice theory has in the constructive reframing of educational practices-particularly common student roles and experiences-and charting future directions for medical education that better align with the needs of the health care system. The authors apply several key features of the communities of practice theory to current experiential roles for students, then propose a new approach to students' clinical experiences-value-added clinical systems learning roles-that provides students with opportunities to make meaningful contributions to patient care while learning health systems science at the patient and population level. Finally, the authors discuss implications for professional role formation and anticipated challenges to the design and implementation of value-added clinical systems learning roles.

  11. A Digital Library for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the digital library (DL) for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the NACA Technical Report Server (NACATRS). The predecessor organization for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), NACA existed from 1915 until 1958. The primary manifestation of NACA's research was the NACA report series. We describe the process of converting this collection of reports to digital format and making it available on the World Wide Web (WWW) and is a node in the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). We describe the current state of the project, the resulting DL technology developed from the project, and the future plans for NACATRS.

  12. Astronautics and Aeronautics: A Chronology, 1996-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marieke; Swanson, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    This report is a chronological compilation of narrative summaries of news reports and government documents highlighting significant events and developments in United States and foreign aeronautics and astronautics. It covers the years 1996 through 2000. These summaries provide a day-by-day recounting of major activities, such as administrative developments, awards, launches, scientific discoveries, corporate and government research results, and other events in countries with aeronautics and astronautics programs. Researchers used the archives and files housed in the NASA History Division, as well as reports and databases on the NASA Web site.

  13. Astronautics and Aeronautics: A Chronology, 2001-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, William Noel; Lewis, Marieke

    2010-01-01

    This report is a chronological compilation of narrative summaries of news reports and government documents highlighting significant events and developments in U.S. and foreign aeronautics and astronautics. It covers the years 2001 through 2005. These summaries provide a day-by-day recounting of major activities, such as administrative developments, awards, launches, scientific discoveries, corporate and government research results, and other events in countries with aeronautics and astronautics programs. Researchers used the archives and files housed in the NASA History Division, as well as reports and databases on the NASA Web site.

  14. The application of artificial intelligence technology to aeronautical system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, E. E.; Kidwell, G. H.; Rogan, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the automation of one class of aeronautical design activity using artificial intelligence and advanced software techniques. Its purpose is to suggest concepts, terminology, and approaches that may be useful in enhancing design automation. By understanding the basic concepts and tasks in design, and the technologies that are available, it will be possible to produce, in the future, systems whose capabilities far exceed those of today's methods. Some of the tasks that will be discussed have already been automated and are in production use, resulting in significant productivity benefits. The concepts and techniques discussed are applicable to all design activity, though aeronautical applications are specifically presented.

  15. The role of 'hidden' community volunteers in community-based health service delivery platforms: examples from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Natalie; Sanders, David; Van Damme, Wim; Besada, Donela; Daviaud, Emmanuelle; Oliphant, Nicholas P; Berzal, Rocio; Mason, John; Doherty, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Community-based research on child survival in sub-Saharan Africa has focussed on the increased provision of curative health services by a formalised cadre of lay community health workers (CHWs), but we have identified a particular configuration, that deserves closer scrutiny. We identified a two-tiered CHW system, with the first tier being the lessor known or 'hidden' community/village level volunteers and the second tier being formal, paid CHWs, in Ethiopia, Mali, and Niger. Whilst the disease-focussed tasks of the formal CHW tier may be more amenable to classic epidemiological surveillance, we postulate that understanding the relationship between formalised CHWs and volunteer cadres, in terms of scope, location of practice and ratio to population, would be important for a comprehensive evaluation of child survival in these countries. We report on the findings from our joint qualitative and quantitative investigations, highlighting the need to recognise the 'hidden' contribution of volunteers. We need to better characterize the volunteers' interaction with community-based and primary care services and to better understand ways to improve the volunteer systems with the right type of investments. This is particularly important for considering the models for scale-up of CHWs in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Do Community Characteristics Relate to Young Adult College Students' Credit Card Debt? The Hypothesized Role of Collective Institutional Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedline, Terri; West, Stacia; Rosell, Nehemiah; Serido, Joyce; Shim, Soyeon

    2017-03-01

    This study examines the extent of emergent, outstanding credit card debt among young adult college students and investigates whether any associations existed between this credit card debt and the characteristics of the communities in which these students grew up or lived. Using data (N = 748) from a longitudinal survey and merging community characteristics measured at the zip code level, we confirmed that a community's unemployment rate, average total debt, average credit score, and number of bank branch offices were associated with a young adult college student's acquisition and accumulation of credit card debt. For example, a community's higher unemployment rate and lower number of bank branches were associated with a young adult college student's greater accumulated debt. Community characteristics had the strongest associations with credit card debt, especially after controlling for individual characteristics (i.e., a young adult college student's race and financial independence) and familial characteristics (i.e., their parents' income and parents' discussions of financial matters while growing up at home). The findings may help to understand the unique roles that communities play in shaping children and young adults' financial capability, and how communities can be better capacitated to support the financial goals of their residents. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  17. The role of local environment and geographical distance in determining community composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi at the landscape scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, Christina; Gosling, Paul; van der Gast, Christopher J; Mitchell, Derek T; Doohan, Fiona M; Bending, Gary D

    2013-03-01

    Arbuscular fungi have a major role in directing the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems yet little is known about their biogeographical distribution. The Baas-Becking hypothesis ('everything is everywhere, but, the environment selects') was tested by investigating the distribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) at the landscape scale and the influence of environmental factors and geographical distance in determining community composition. AMF communities in Trifolium repens and Lolium perenne roots were assessed in 40 geographically dispersed sites in Ireland representing different land uses and soil types. Field sampling and laboratory bioassays were used, with AMF communities characterised using 18S rRNA terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Landscape-scale distribution of AMF was driven by the local environment. AMF community composition was influenced by abiotic variables (pH, rainfall and soil type), but not land use or geographical distance. Trifolium repens and L. perenne supported contrasting communities of AMF, and the communities colonising each plant species were consistent across pasture habitats and over distance. Furthermore, L. perenne AMF communities grouped by soil type within pasture habitats. This is the largest and most comprehensive study that has investigated the landscape-scale distribution of AMF. Our findings support the Baas-Becking hypothesis at the landscape scale and demonstrate the strong influence the local environment has on determining AMF community composition.

  18. Rethinking Teaching in STEM Education in a Community College: Role of Instructional Consultation and Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Shelley Chih-Hsian

    Community college faculty members educate almost half of all U.S. undergraduates, who are often more diverse and more academically underprepared when compared to undergraduate students who attend four-year institutions. In addition, faculty members in community colleges are facing increased accountability for meeting student learning outcomes, expectations to adjust their teaching practices to include active learning practices, and expectations to incorporate more technologies into the classroom. Faculty developers are one of the support structures that faculty members can look to in order to meet those challenges. A survey of literature in faculty development suggests that instructional consultation can play an important role in shaping and transforming teaching practices. Hence, this action research study examined my work using instructional consulting with four full-time STEM faculty colleagues in order to examine and shape their teaching practices with and without the use of digital technologies. The two foci of the research, examining shifts in faculty participants' teaching practices, and my instructional consulting practices, were informed by Thomas and Brown's (2011) social view of learning and the concept of teaching and learning in a "co-learning" environment. Two dominant factors emerged regarding faculty participants' shift in teaching practices. These factors concerned: 1) the perception of control and 2) individual faculty participant's comfort level, expectations, and readiness. In addition to these two dominant factors, the instructional consultation process also supported a range of shifts in either mindset and/or teaching practices. My analysis showed that the use of digital technologies was not an essential factor in shifting faculty participant mindset and/or teaching practices, instead digital technologies were used to enhance the teaching process and students' learning experiences.

  19. Building low carbon communities in China: The role of individual’s behaviour change and engagement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Ping; Chen, Yihui; Xu, Bin; Dong, Wenbo; Kennedy, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Low carbon sustainability has been addressed in China’s national development strategies. This research explores individual behaviour change and engagement in building low carbon communities in China through a case study looking at the building of a low carbon campus at Fudan University, Shanghai. Individual behaviour directly influences the overall energy consumption and carbon emissions on Fudan University’s campus. Even though relevant polices have been issued for energy conservation, the energy consumption increased by 5% every year, which suggests that the “top-down” approach telling students and staff “what to do” does not work effectively. Based on a comprehensive method which includes the individual and social aspects related to the energy behaviour, the research analyses the promotion of individual engagement in building a low carbon campus through behaviour change based on four main aspects: (1) awareness raising and behaviour forming; (2) approaches to encourage behaviour change; (3) beyond the barriers and the constraints; and (4) systems and mechanisms for the long-term engagement. A low carbon management system is proposed for not only addressing management and technical solutions at the university level, but also based on the contributions from behaviour changes in establishing a low carbon campus at Fudan University at the individual level. - Highlights: • The “top-down” approach is not an effective way to building low carbon communities in China. • Individuals’ behaviour change and engagement play a key role in low carbon sustainability. • Awareness raising, proper approaches and sound mechanisms are necessary to encourage long-term behaviour changes. • An integrated management system is developed for comprehensibly establishing a low carbon campus at Fudan University

  20. Powerless Spectators, Coping Actors, and Adaptive Co-managers: a Synthesis of the Role of Communities in Ecosystem Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo Fabricius

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide a synthesis of the papers in the Special Issue, the Communities Ecosystems and Livelihoods component of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA, and other recent publications on the adaptive capacity of communities and their role in ecosystem management. Communities adapt because they face enormous challenges due to policies, conflicts, demographic factors, ecological change, and changes in their livelihood options, but the appropriateness of their responses varies. Based on our synthesis, three broad categories of adaptive communities are identified. "Powerless spectator" communities have a low adaptive capacity and weak capacity to govern, do not have financial or technological options, and lack natural resources, skills, institutions, and networks. "Coping actor" communities have the capacity to adapt, but are not managing social-ecological systems. They lack the capacity for governance because of lack of leadership, of vision, and of motivation, and their responses are typically short term. "Adaptive manager" communities have both adaptive capacity and governance capacity to sustain and internalize this adaptation. They invest in the long-term management of ecosystem services. Such communities are not only aware of the threats, but also take appropriate action for long-term sustainability. Adaptive co-management becomes possible through leadership and vision, the formation of knowledge networks, the existence or development of polycentric institutions, the establishment and maintenance of links between culture and management, the existence of enabling policies, and high levels of motivation in all role players. Adaptive co-managers are empowered, but empowerment is a consequence of the capacity for governance and the capacity to adapt, rather than a starting point. Communities that are able to enhance their adaptive capacity can deal with challenges such as conflicts, make difficult trade-offs between their short- and long

  1. HRET patient safety leadership fellowship: the role of "community" in patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Kathryn Kraft

    2010-01-01

    Community engagement is widely endorsed but poorly defined as a strategy to improve patient safety. With strong evidence that engaging patients can positively influence health outcomes, it is presumed that community engagement could improve patient safety. Leaning on the models from other disciplines such as public health, the adequate knowledge and application of the principles of community engagement are critical for this approach to be effective. This article provides a description of the theories supporting patient partnership and community engagement, reviews critical elements of successful community-based programs, and identifies the potential for empowering communities to improve patient safety.

  2. Mucormycosis in two community hospitals and the role of infectious disease consultation: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yue Dai,1 James W Walker,1 Ruba A Halloush,2 Faisal A Khasawneh3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 2Amarillo Pathology Group, 3Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX, USA Background: Mucorales are ubiquitous filamentous fungi that can cause a devastating, invasive infection. This order has become an increasingly important pathogen during the last two decades, due to the dramatic increase in patients with predisposing factors. The aim of this retrospective study was to report the clinical characteristics, therapeutic options, and outcomes of patients diagnosed with mucormycosis in community hospitals in Amarillo, Texas, and to reflect on the role of infectious disease (ID physicians in managing this potentially life-threatening problem. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective chart review of patients hospitalized with mucormycosis in two community hospitals in Amarillo between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2011. Results: Ten patients were diagnosed with mucormycosis during the study period, with a mean age of 58.8 years. There were five cases of pulmonary infection, two cases of cutaneous infection, two cases of rhinocerebral infection, and one case of gastrointestinal infection. Poorly controlled diabetes was the most common risk factor, identified in six patients, followed by hematological malignancy, immunosuppression, and trauma. ID physicians were consulted in all cases, albeit late in some cases. Nine patients received antifungal therapy, and five patients received surgical debridement. Lipid formulations of amphotericin B were prescribed for eight patients, used alone in two cases, and combined with caspofungin and posaconazole in one and five cases, respectively. One patient was treated with posaconazole alone. Eight patients were discharged from the hospital alive. The mortality rate at 6-month

  3. Plant community resistance to invasion by Bromus species – the roles of community attributes, Bromus Interactions with plant communities, and Bromus traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jeanne; Germino, Matthew; Belnap, Jayne; Brown, Cynthia; Schupp, Eugene W.; St. Clair, Samuel B

    2016-01-01

    The factors that determine plant community resistance to exotic annual Bromus species (Bromushereafter) are diverse and context specific. They are influenced by the environmental characteristics and attributes of the community, the traits of Bromus species, and the direct and indirect interactions of Bromus with the plant community. Environmental factors, in particular ambient and soil temperatures, have significant effects on the ability of Bromus to establish and spread. Seasonality of precipitation relative to temperature influences plant community resistance toBromus through effects on soil water storage, timing of water and nutrient availability, and dominant plant life forms. Differences among plant communities in how well soil resource use by the plant community matches resource supply rates can influence the magnitude of resource fluctuations due to either climate or disturbance and thus the opportunities for invasion. The spatial and temporal patterns of resource availability and acquisition of growth resources by Bromus versus native species strongly influence resistance to invasion. Traits of Bromus that confer a “priority advantage” for resource use in many communities include early-season germination and high growth and reproductive rates. Resistance to Bromus can be overwhelmed by high propagule supply, low innate seed dormancy, and large, if short-lived, seed banks. Biological crusts can inhibit germination and establishment of invasive annual plants, including several annual Bromus species, but are effective only in the absence of disturbance. Herbivores can have negative direct effects on Bromus, but positive indirect effects through decreases in competitors. Management strategies can be improved through increased understanding of community resistance to exotic annual Bromus species.

  4. Cross-Cultural “Allies” in Immigrant Community Practice: Roles of foreign-trained former Montagnard health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Xin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This pilot case study describes foreign-trained former Montagnard refugee physicians’ practice experiences in Vietnam and their current community health worker and “ally” roles within the Montagnard refugee community. It highlights key features that facilitate cross-culturally responsive health care. We interviewed five Vietnam-trained former Montagnard refugee physicians using an open-ended interview format during March, 2012. We used content analysis procedures to identify key themes characterizing Montagnard physicians’ former and current practice experiences and emphasizing the roles they currently play in their new homeland. Montagnard physicians were fighting infectious diseases in homeland Vietnamese communities. Since coming to the U.S., Montagnard physicians have reoriented their competencies to fit within a community health workers model, and have shifted practice to fighting chronic disease in this refugee community. Tasks now include describing and contextualizing unique characteristics of the Montagnard languages and cultures to outside constituents. They become cross-cultural allies to the U.S. health care and facilitate individuals’ medical adherence with mainstream physicians’ orders. They ensure accuracy of interpretation of Montagnard patients’ medical complaints during a medical visit. Our findings reveal the potential roles that can be ascribed to a cross-cultural ally and can be built into practice to fulfill the Montagnard community’s unmet health needs: oral historian, mediator, facilitator/negotiator, quality assurer, psychosocial confidant, and health advocate. Normal 0 false false false EN-US ZH-CN X-NONE

  5. The Vernier System at the Faculty of Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budajová, Kristína; Komová, Eva; Berežný, Štefan; Glaser-Opitz, Henrich

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an educational challenge which was prepared for students at the faculty of Aeronautics, Technical University of Košice. Our goal is to improve the methods of the practical training by introducing modern automation and information technologies to the experiments and to the processing of acquired data. We have updated our…

  6. Evaluating CMA Equalization of SOQPSK-TG for Aeronautical Telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Program through the U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation (PEO STRI) under contract W900KK-13-C-0026 ( PAQ ...Report: Preamble assisted equalization for aeronautical telemetry ( PAQ ),‖ Brigham Young University, Technical Report, 2014, submitted to the Spectrum

  7. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1972. [a chronology of events

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Important events of the U. S. space program during 1972 are recorded in a chronology which encompasses all NASA, NASA related, and international cooperative efforts in aeronautics and astronautics. Personnel and budget concerns are documented, along with the major developments in aircraft research, manned space flight, and interplanetary exploration.

  8. 75 FR 54221 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... Aeronautical Navigation Services (AeroNav Services) Group, Regulatory Support and Coordination Team, AJW-372...: The ACF is separated into two distinct groups. The Instrument Procedures Group (IPG) will meet October 26, 2010 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Charting Group will meet October 27 and 28, 2010 from 8:30 a.m...

  9. 76 FR 12211 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Aeronautical Navigation Products Group (AeroNav Products), Regulatory Support and Coordination Team, AJV-3B...: The ACF is separated into two distinct groups. The Instrument Procedures Group (IPG) will meet April 26, 2011 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Charting Group will meet April 27 and 28, 2011 from 8:30 a.m...

  10. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ..., Building 152, Dailey Road, NASA Research Park, NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, CA 95035... Committee, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-0566... Christensen, Protocol Specialist, Office of the Center Director, NASA ARC, Moffett Field, CA. For questions...

  11. The Role of School and Community-Based Programs in Aiding Latina/o High School Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Donna M.; Kiyama, Judy Marquez

    2015-01-01

    This study documents the important role school and community-based programs have for sustaining the persistence of Latina/o high school students in an urban, low achieving school district. Consensus among student participants revealed these programs provided a safe space where students were able to develop "confianza" (mutual trust) with…

  12. Conceptualization and Support of the Role of Teachers Serving as Team Leaders in a Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Lanelle

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the results of a phenomenological qualitative investigation into the new role of teachers serving as team leaders in a professional learning community, as well as the support team leaders need from members and principals to be effective. Collaborative teacher teams in 6 schools that have been developing as professional learning…

  13. Role of small-scale sawmilling in household and community livelihoods – Case studies in the Eastern Cape

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Horn, J

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available on the role of SSM in household and community livelihoods in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. It has therefore not been possible to evaluate whether SSM is a suitable entry point for support to livelihood enhancement and / or pro-poor enterprise...

  14. Trait assembly of woody plants in communities across sub-alpine gradients: Identifying the role of limiting similarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, B.; Zhang, J.; Liu, Y.; Li, Z.; Huang, X.; Yang, W.; Prinzing, A.

    2012-01-01

    Questions - Plant species can be assembled into communities through habitat filtering or species competition, but their relative roles are still debated. We do not know whether there is limited similarity between co-existing species when accounting for the parallel effect of abiotic habitat

  15. Exploring Partnerships between Local Communities and Timber Companies: An Experiment Using the Role-Playing Games Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Purnomo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooperation among stakeholders is widely accepted as an effective management strategy. This paper describes an experimental study that explores this cooperation using role-playing games, which is formulated within a multiagent simulation framework. This framework enables participants to take active roles in mimicking the collaborative decision environment and the behaviors and attitudes of the different stakeholders. The paper examines a forest plantation company in South Sumatra, Indonesia, which has cooperated with local communities since 2000. The experimental pilot study described in this paper explored the role of communication in partnership relationships between the company and the local communities living within and around the surroundings of the company's plantation. These partnerships were explored and analyzed using the gaming approach involving university students taking the role of forest stakeholders, from both the timber company and the local communities. Lessons learned from the game provided the rationale for the establishment of a communication institution called “Forum Sebahu Sejalan.” This formal forum was constituted after a facilitated ex-postinteraction between representatives from the timber company and local communities. Results and observations drawn from the interactions show the potentials of the RPG approach and the formal forum in crafting resilient partnerships among stakeholders.

  16. The Role of Arts Participation in Students' Academic and Nonacademic Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study of School, Home, and Community Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Mansour, Marianne; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory A. D.; Sudmalis, David

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study draws on positive youth development frameworks and ecological models to examine the role of school-, home- and community-based arts participation in students' academic (e.g., motivation, engagement) and nonacademic (e.g., self-esteem, life satisfaction) outcomes. The study is based on 643 elementary and high school students…

  17. Exploring Partnerships between Local Communities and Timber Companies: An Experiment Using the Role-Playing Games Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purnomo, H.; Guizol, Ph.; Mendoza, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Cooperation among stake holders is widely accepted as an effective management strategy. This paper describes an experimental study that explores this cooperation using role-playing games, which is formulated within a multi agent simulation framework. This framework enables participants to take active roles in mimicking the collaborative decision environment and the behaviors and attitudes of the different stake holders. The paper examines a forest plantation company in South Sumatra, Indonesia, which has cooperated with local communities since 2000. The experimental pilot study described in this paper explored the role of communication in partnership relationships between the company and the local communities living within and around the surroundings of the company's plantation. These partnerships were explored and analyzed using the gaming approach involving university students taking the role of forest stake holders, from both the timber company and the local communities. Lessons learned from the game provided the rationale for the establishment of a communication institution called Forum Sebahu Sejalan. This formal forum was constituted after a facilitated ex-post interaction between representatives from the timber company and local communities. Results and observations drawn from the interactions show the potentials of the RPG approach and the formal forum in crafting resilient partnerships among stake holders.

  18. The Role of Silence at the Retreats of a Buddhist Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Huszár

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to establish that the definition of silence as simply an absence of something or as the background of communication proves to be inadequate in a number of communicative instances. The interpretation of silence is culturally determined, and the underappreciation of its role is typical in low-context Western cultures; this is also evinced by the neglect of the topic in the literature. The present study will describe the communicative functions of silence through the findings of field work conducted at the retreats of a Buddhist community in Hungary, providing empirical input for the relevant theoretical constructs. The research findings show that silence is accorded a central role in essentially every component of the retreat (meditations, relaxation, ceremonies, teachings, small-group sharings, meals and rest; and while each event at the retreat focuses primarily on a different specific function of communication, the entire retreat does involve the linkage, affecting, revelational and – to a certain extent – activating functions (to follow the five-element typology of J. Vernon Jensen, as well as – to a lesser extent – the judgmental function. The research also shows that it requires time for individuals in a low-context culture to recognize the “point” of silence – something that the retreats provide the right opportunity for. In fact, the insights the individuals arrived at through these occasions could be put to use in their daily lives, helping their problem-solving and social relationships and in general improving their quality of life.

  19. The Building of a Responsible Research Community: The Role of Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lategan, Laetus O. K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks into the importance of a responsible research community and how ethics can contribute towards the building of such a community. The paper starts off by outlining the many challenges facing a responsible research community. These challenges range from doing research, transferring the research results, commercialising the…

  20. Social justice and intercountry adoptions: the role of the U.S. social work community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, Jini L; Rotabi, Karen; Bunkers, Kelley M

    2013-10-01

    Using social justice as the conceptual foundation, the authors present the structural barriers to socially just intercountry adoptions (ICAs) that can exploit and oppress vulnerable children and families participating in ICAs. They argue that such practices threaten the integrity of social work practice in that arena and the survival of ICA as a placement option. Government structures, disparity of power between countries and families on both sides, perceptions regarding poverty, cultural incompetence, misconceptions about orphans and orphanages, lack of knowledge about the impact of institution-based care, and the profit motive are driving forces behind the growing shadow of unethical ICAs. The U.S. social work community has a large role and responsibility in addressing these concerns as the United States receives the most children adopted through ICAs of all receiving countries. In addition to the centrality of social justice as a core value of the profession, the responsibility to carry out ethical and socially just ICA has recently increased as a matter of law, under the implementation legislation to the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. While acknowledging that these issues are complex, authors provide suggestions for corrective policy and practice measures.

  1. Possible future roles for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR) in the community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    Possible roles for HTR in different European nuclear energy strategies are examined from the standpoint of long-term uranium and capital conservation. Two different growth scenarios for European Community electrical energy demand have been assumed (fig. 1). Both curves have been developed from existing short-term forecasts and commitments already made by member states. The lower curve represents a realistic minimum development of per capita energy demand from 3.3 toe/y in 1975 to a ceiling of 6.1 toe/year in 2035 that still lies 30% below current U.S. consumption. Electricity is assumed to increase its share of the total energy market from 28% (1976) to 35%. The higher growth curve represents an increase in overall energy consumption to a level corresponding to 8 toe per capita per year, while the electricity share increase to 67% of the overall demand. It is appreciated that such an increase in the electricity share of the overall demand is unrealistic; its consideration in the present study must therefore be regarded as tending to explore an extreme case of electricity demand growth. A long-term view is taken to show how far future developments are affected by decisions taken in the medium-term. Saturation is assumed in order to force complete development of steady state conditions, in which the relationship between different reactors can be readily discerned and capital needs compared. At saturation uranium price and availability become unimportant in systems containing thermal and breeder reactors in symbiosis

  2. America’s Evolution of Women and Their Roles in the Intelligence Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. Martin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of women in the Intelligence Community has evolved over time and captures the use of their skills to further assist, perpetuate, and lead intelligence operations globally. This paper serves as a historical overview of some of the techniques of the early female spies and highlights the successes of the modern woman’s contributions to the intelligence mission. Emerging female operations officers often face obstacles: dealing with bias within the bureaucracy, issues of female equality within certain cultures, and experiencing slower rates of promotion. This has meant a lack of females in competitive leadership positions. Female mentors and former intelligence members explore avenues for surviving and thriving within the CIA. Women must have high standards of performance and professionalism and grasp the politics of advancement in a male-dominated hierarchical agency. Communication in leadership training and awareness is key, as seen in the CIA's 1991 “glass ceiling” study and 2013 Director’s Advisory Group on Women in Leadership (DAG report on the statistics of the lack of women in senior management. The current trend of women serving in top positions in intelligence organizations should offer encouragement and promote further changes within the American culture.

  3. Predictors of suicidal ideation in a community sample: roles of anger, self-esteem, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jin-Mahn; Park, Jong-Il; Oh, Keun-Young; Lee, Keon-Hak; Kim, Myung Sig; Yoon, Myeong-Sook; Ko, Sung-Hee; Cho, Hye-Chung; Chung, Young-Chul

    2014-04-30

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the relationships of anger, self-esteem, and depression with suicidal ideation. A survey was conducted in a wide range of community areas across Jeollabuk-do Province, Korea. A total of 2964 subjects (mean age=44.4yr) participated in this study. Hierarchical regression was used to investigate predictors of suicidal ideation in terms of their sociodemographic characteristics, depression, self-esteem, and anger. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that anger and self-esteem were significantly associated with suicidal ideation regardless of age and after controlling for depression. Moderation analysis showed that the impact of anger on suicidal ideation was significantly greater among females than males in adolescents, but not in other age groups. Additionally, there were some differences in sociodemographic predictors of suicidal ideation among age groups. Predictors included gender and family harmony in adolescents, marital status and family harmony in middle-aged individuals, and economic status and family harmony in elderly individuals. Our results revealed that anger and self-esteem play important roles in suicidal ideation beyond the effect of depression. Development and implementation of preventive strategies, including management of anger and self-esteem, could possibly reduce suicidal ideation and subsequent suicide attempts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of journals in building up communities: the experience of Ciência em Tela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Isabel; de Souza Barros, Susana

    2015-12-01

    Ciência em Tela is an open access Brazilian science teacher education online journal that has been published twice a year since 2008 and which encourages the participation of professionals with different backgrounds and the submission of a variety of textual genres, besides research papers. Another feature is that the journal includes practicing schoolteachers not only as authors but also as reviewers, which not only provides those who submit contributions to the journal with an early feedback from their target audience but also helps empower schoolteachers by placing them in a discursive situation in which they are producers, as opposed to consumers, of discourses about science education. In this paper we describe the background to and main aspects of the journal's innovative editorial policy, which seeks to bridge gaps between communities and institutions linked to science education, as well as to discuss the challenges that arise from it, in particular, issues concerning internationalisation and funding, as well as the role of journals in times of colonisation and commodification of knowledge and of discourses.

  5. Incidence of invasive macrophytes on methylmercury budget in temperate lakes: Central role of bacterial periphytic communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentès, Sophie; Monperrus, Mathilde; Legeay, Alexia; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Davail, Stephane; André, Jean-Marc; Guyoneaud, Rémy

    2013-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated high mercury (Hg) methylation and demethylation in the periphyton associated with floating roots in tropical ecosystems. The importance of aquatic plants on methylmercury production in three temperate ecosystems from south-western France was evaluated through Hg species concentrations, and Hg methylation/demethylation activities by using stable isotopic tracers ( 199 Hg(II), Me 201 Hg). Hg accumulation and high methylation and demethylation yields were detected in plant roots and periphyton, whereas results for sediment and water were low to insignificant. The presence of sulfate reducing prokaryotes was detected in all compartments (T-RFLP based on dsrAB amplified through nested PCR) and their main role in Hg methylation could be demonstrated. In turn, sulfate reduction inhibition did not affect demethylation activities. The estimation of net MeHg budgets in these ecosystems suggested that aquatic rhizosphere is the principal location for methylmercury production and may represent an important source for the contamination of the aquatic food chain. - Highlights: ► Both Hg methylation and demethylation occur in the periphyton of temperate ecosystems. ► Aquatic rhizosphere is the main compartment for net methylmercury production. ► Sulfate reducers are detected in all ecosystem compartments (water, sediment, periphyton). ► Sulfate reducers are responsible for methylmercury production in aquatic roots. - The incidence of periphytic microbial communities on net methylmercury production is highlighted in temperate aquatic ecosystems.

  6. Establishing a professional profile of community health workers: results from a national study of roles, activities and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Maia; Reinschmidt, Kerstin M; Schachter, Ken A; Davidson, Chris L; Sabo, Samantha J; De Zapien, Jill Guernsey; Carvajal, Scott C

    2012-04-01

    Community Health Workers (CHWs) have gained national recognition for their role in addressing health disparities and are increasingly integrated into the health care delivery system. There is a lack of consensus, however, regarding empirical evidence on the impact of CHW interventions on health outcomes. In this paper, we present results from the 2010 National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey (NCHWAS) in an effort to strengthen a generalized understanding of the CHW profession that can be integrated into ongoing efforts to improve the health care delivery system. Results indicate that regardless of geographical location, work setting, and demographic characteristics, CHWs generally share similar professional characteristics, training preparation, and job activities. CHWs are likely to be female, representative of the community they serve, and to work in community health centers, clinics, community-based organizations, and health departments. The most common type of training is on-the-job and conference training. Most CHWs work with clients, groups, other CHWs and less frequently community leaders to address health issues, the most common of which are chronic disease, prevention and health care access. Descriptions of CHW activities documented in the survey demonstrate that CHWs apply core competencies in a synergistic manner in an effort to assure that their clients get the services they need. NCHWAS findings suggest that over the past 50 years, the CHW field has become standardized in response to the unmet needs of their communities. In research and practice, the field would benefit from being considered a health profession rather than an intervention.

  7. The role of microbial communities in phosphorus cycling during litter decomposition in a tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret Sevilla, E.; Brodie, E.; Bouskill, N.; Hao, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient with a reduced availability in tropical forests. In these ecosystems, P is recycled highly efficiently through resorption and mineralization and P immobilization in the microbial biomass prevents its loss through occlusion in the soil mineral fraction. To improve models of ecosystem response to global change, further studies of the above and belowground plant and microbial traits related to P availability and uptake, are required. In tropical forests, high temperature and rainfall lead to some of the highest rates of litter decomposition on earth. Litter decomposition is a complex process mediated by a range of trophic groups: meso and microfauna initiate litter turnover through litter fragmentation facilitating colonization by fungi, and bacteria mediate the mineralization of organic matter and release of nutrients. To determine the important functional traits of these players in the efficient cycling of P in soils with low P availability, we are performing a leaf litter decomposition experiment in a humid tropical forest in Puerto Rico. Nylon litterbags with three mesh sizes (2mm, 20 μm and 0.45 μm) containing litter with different chemistry (tabonuco and palm) will be deployed on soil surface and sampled 6 times throughout 12 months. The use of different mesh sizes will allow us to identify the leading roles in litter turnover by physical allowance and/or exclusion of the decomposers. The 2 mm bags allow meso and microfauna, roots, fungi and bacteria. 20 μm bags will exclude fauna and roots and 0.45 μm only allow some bacteria. We hypothesize that fungi will dominate over bacteria in earlier stages of the decomposition with a higher production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. On the other hand, bacterial biomass is expected to increase with time. Qualitative changes in both fungal and bacterial communities along the decomposition process are also expected leading to changes in enzyme activity. We also postulate an

  8. Roles, responsibilities and characteristics of lay community health workers involved in diabetes prevention programmes: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Aim To examine the characteristics of community health workers (CHWs) involved in diabetes prevention programmes (DPPs) and their contributions to expected outcomes. Methods Electronic databases including PubMed-MEDLINE, EBSCOHost, and SCOPUS/EMBASE were searched for studies published between January 2000 and March 2016. All studies that used CHWs to implement DPP in ≥18-year-old participants without diabetes but at high risk for developing the condition, irrespective of the study design, setting or outcomes measured, were included. Results were synthesized narratively. Results Forty papers of 30 studies were identified. Studies were mainly community-based and conducted in minority populations in USA. Sample sizes ranged from 20 participants in a single community to 2369 participants in 46 communities. Although CHWs were generally from the local community, their qualifications, work experience and training received differed across studies. Overall the training was culturally sensitive and/or appropriate, covering topics such as the importance of good nutrition and the benefits of increased physical activity, communication and leadership. CHWs delivered a variety of interventions and also screened or recruited participants. The shared culture and language between CHWs and participants likely contributed to better programme implementation and successful outcomes. Conclusions The complexity of DPPs and the diverse CHW roles preclude attributing specific outcomes to CHW involvement. Nevertheless, documenting potential CHW roles and the relevant training required may optimise CHW contributions and facilitate their involvement in DPPs in the future. PMID:29216263

  9. Roles, responsibilities and characteristics of lay community health workers involved in diabetes prevention programmes: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian Hill

    Full Text Available To examine the characteristics of community health workers (CHWs involved in diabetes prevention programmes (DPPs and their contributions to expected outcomes.Electronic databases including PubMed-MEDLINE, EBSCOHost, and SCOPUS/EMBASE were searched for studies published between January 2000 and March 2016. All studies that used CHWs to implement DPP in ≥18-year-old participants without diabetes but at high risk for developing the condition, irrespective of the study design, setting or outcomes measured, were included. Results were synthesized narratively.Forty papers of 30 studies were identified. Studies were mainly community-based and conducted in minority populations in USA. Sample sizes ranged from 20 participants in a single community to 2369 participants in 46 communities. Although CHWs were generally from the local community, their qualifications, work experience and training received differed across studies. Overall the training was culturally sensitive and/or appropriate, covering topics such as the importance of good nutrition and the benefits of increased physical activity, communication and leadership. CHWs delivered a variety of interventions and also screened or recruited participants. The shared culture and language between CHWs and participants likely contributed to better programme implementation and successful outcomes.The complexity of DPPs and the diverse CHW roles preclude attributing specific outcomes to CHW involvement. Nevertheless, documenting potential CHW roles and the relevant training required may optimise CHW contributions and facilitate their involvement in DPPs in the future.

  10. A heuristic framework for understanding the role of participatory decision making in community-based non-profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Kimberly D; Perkins, Douglas D; Cooper, Daniel G; Jones, Diana L

    2011-06-01

    This paper explores the role of member participation in decision-making (PDM) from an organizational learning (OL) perspective. Community-based organizations (CBOs) serve as mediators between the individual and the local community, often providing the means for community member participation and benefiting organizationally from members' input. Community psychologists have recognized these benefits; however, the field has paid less attention to the role participation plays in increasing CBOs' capacity to meet community needs. We present a framework for exploring how CBO contextual factors influence the use of participatory decision-making structures and practices, and how these affect OL. We then use the framework to examine PDM in qualitative case study analysis of four CBOs: a youth development organization, a faith-based social action coalition, a low-income neighborhood organization, and a large human service agency. We found that organizational form, energy, and culture each had a differential impact on participation in decision making within CBOs. We highlight how OL is constrained in CBOs and document how civic aims and voluntary membership enhanced participation and learning.

  11. The relative role of dispersal and local interactions for alpine plant community diversity under simulated climate warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klanderud, K.; Totland, Oe. [Norwegian Univ. of Life Science, Dept. of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Aas (Norway)

    2007-08-15

    Most studies on factors determining diversity are conducted in temperate or warm regions, whereas studies in climatically harsh and low productivity areas, such as alpine regions, are rare. We examined the relative roles of seed availability and different biotic and abiotic factors for the diversity of an alpine plant community in southern Norway. Furthermore, because climate warming is predicted to be an important driver of alpine species diversity, we assessed how the relative impacts of dispersal and local interactions on diversity might change under experimental warming (open top chambers, OTCs). Addition of seeds from 27 regional species increased community diversity. The establishment of the species was negatively related both to the diversity of the existing system and the cover of the abundant dwarf shrub Dryas octopetala. These results show that both species dispersal limitation and local biotic interactions are important factors for alpine plant community diversity. Despite relatively harsh environmental conditions and low productivity, competition from the resident vegetation appeared to have a greater role for species establishment and diversity than facilitation and experimental warming. Higher temperature appeared to increase the negative relationship between resident species diversity and species establishment. This may suggest that climate warming can increase the role of interspecific competition for alpine plant community structure, and thus alter the long-term effects of biotic interactions on diversity. (au)

  12. Perception of community pharmacists toward their current professional role in the healthcare system of Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayes, Ibrahim Khalid; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Abduelkarem, Abduelmula R

    2015-07-01

    The new paradigm to pharmacy profession has changed the focus of pharmacists from product-centered to patient-oriented. This change has brought new set of beliefs and assumptions on the way services should be delivered to pharmacy clients. The main aim of this study was to explore the perception of community pharmacists on their current professional role in Dubai. Key findings show that community pharmacists are more directed toward business than patients. They almost dispense all categories of medicines over-the-counter without the need of prescriptions. However, a new trend of pharmacists in Dubai is to provide enhanced pharmacy services such as consultation to patients upon request.

  13. "They See Us as Resource": The Role of a Community-Based Youth Center in Supporting the Academic Lives of Low-Income Chinese American Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nga-Wing Anjela

    2008-01-01

    Based on a 15-week ethnographic-based research, this article examines the role of a community-based youth center in supporting the academic lives of Chinese American youth from low-income families in an east coast city I call "Harborview." This study demonstrates the significant role that community-based organizations play for low-income immigrant…

  14. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Chen, L. Y.; Neudeck, P. G.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Zhou, H. J.; Makel, D.; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Aeronautic and Space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of most interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring emission monitoring and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensor is based on progress two types of technology: 1) Micro-machining and micro-fabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this micro-fabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  15. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautics and Space Applications III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L. Y.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, Z.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Liu, M.; hide

    1999-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  16. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Two areas of particular interest are safety monitoring and emission monitoring. In safety monitoring, detection of low concentrations of hydrogen at potentially low temperatures is important while for emission monitoring the detection of nitrogen oxides, hydrogen, hydrocarbons and oxygen is of interest. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. (2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this general area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2001 Accountability Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent Agency established to plan and manage the future of the Nation's civil aeronautics and space program. This Accountability Report covers Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 (October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001), with discussion of some subsequent events The Report contains an overview addressing the Agency's critical programs and financial performance and includes highlights of performance organized by goals and objectives of the Enterprises and Crosscutting Processes. The Report also summarizes NASA's stewardship over budget and financial resources, including audited financial statements and footnotes. The financial statements reflect an overall position of offices and activities, including assets and liabilities, as well as results of operations, pursuant to requirements of Federal law (31 U.S.C. 3515(b)). The auditor's opinions on NASA's financial statements, reports on internal controls, and compliance with laws and regulations are included in this Report.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Fiscal Year 2001 Accountability Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent Agency established to plan and manage the future of the Nation's civil aeronautics and space program. This Accountability Report covers Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 (October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001), with discussion of some subsequent events. The Report contains an overview addressing the Agency's critical programs and financial performance and includes highlights of performance organized by goals and objectives of the Enterprises and Crosscutting Processes. The Report also summarizes NASA's stewardship over budget and financial resources, including audited financial statements and footnotes. The financial statements reflect an overall position of offices and activities, including assets and liabilities, as well as results of operations, pursuant to requirements of Federal law (31 U.S.C. 3515(b)). The auditor's opinions on NASA's financial statements, reports on internal controls, and compliance with laws and regulations are included in this report.

  19. The role of communities in sustainable land and forest management: The case of Nyanga, Zvimba and Guruve districts of Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Matsvange

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Forest benefit analysis is vital in ensuring sustainable community-based natural resources management. Forest depletion and degradation are key issues in rural Zimbabwe and strategies to enhance sustainable forest management are continually sought. This study was carried out to assess the impact of forests on communities from Nyanga, Guruve and Zvimba districts of Zimbabwe. It is based on a Big Lottery Fund project implemented by Progressio-UK and Environment Africa. Itfocuses on identifying replicable community forest and landmanagement strategies and the level of benefits accruing to the community. Analysis of change was based on the Income and Food Security and Forest benefits, which also constitutes the tools used during the research. The study confirms the high rate of deforestation and the increased realisation by communities to initiate practical measures aimed at protecting and sustaining forest and land resources from which they derive economic and social benefits. The results highlight the value of community structures (Farmer Field Schools and Environmental Action Groups as conduits for natural resource management. The interconnectivity among forests, agricultural systems and the integral role of people are recognised as key to climate change adaptation. Keywords: Forest benefits; sustainability,;livelihoods; farmer field schools

  20. ‘Pieces of kit’ are not enough: the role of infrastructure in community resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orr Paula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flood resilience is about the ability of people and places to cope with, recover from and adapt to flooding in ways that maintain quality of life and identities. In the past UK flood risk management prioritised engineering solutions to prevent flooding (barriers, walls, etc; today there is greater emphasis on resilience. Cutter et al (2010 developed a model that describes community resilience capacities/resources in terms of social, institutional, infrastructure and economic resilience along with community capital. This paper draws on the findings of an evaluation of thirteen flood resilience community ‘pathfinder’ projects run in England between 2013 – 2015, which aimed to enable and stimulate communities to develop innovative local solutions and improve resilience to flooding. Actions to improve flood infrastructure included installing property resilience measures or setting up community flood stores providing equipment to deal with emergencies. The paper explores the way that ‘infrastructure resilience capacities’ were developed and examines how physical infrastructure contributed to community flood resilience. It finds that the development of infrastructure resilience depends on strong relations between community members (‘community capital’ as well as relationships between community organisations and flood management institutions (‘institutional resilience’. The conclusions discuss the implications for infrastructure schemes in other places.

  1. Correlates of Community-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening in a Rural Population: The Role of Fatalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Richard A; Collins, Tom

    2017-09-01

    One largely unexplored barrier to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is fatalistic beliefs about cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify correlates of ever having endoscopy screenings for CRC and to determine whether fatalism plays a unique role. Because evidence suggests that cancer-associated fatalistic beliefs may be particularly common among rural Americans, the study was conducted in a medically underserved area of rural Appalachia.  METHODS: Rural residents (N = 260) between 51 and 75 years of age, from a medically underserved area of Appalachia, Kentucky, were recruited for a cross-sectional study. The outcome measure was assessed by a single item asking whether participants ever had a colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy. Demographic and health-related correlates of this outcome were selected based on past studies of rural populations. A single item assessed perceptions of fatalism regarding CRC. Age-adjusted analyses of correlates testing significant at the bivariate level were conducted.  RESULTS: The analytic sample was limited to 135 rural residents indicating they had ever had CRC endoscopy and 107 indicating never having endoscopy. In age-adjusted analyses, only the measure of fatalism had a significant association with having endoscopy. Those endorsing the statement pertaining to fatalism were 2.3 times more likely (95% CI = 1.24-4.27, P = .008) than the remainder to indicate never having endoscopy.  CONCLUSIONS: A community-based approach to the promotion of endoscopy for CRC screening could focus on overcoming CRC-associated fatalism, thereby potentially bringing more unscreened people to endoscopy clinics. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  2. Tribology needs for future space and aeronautical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Future aeronautical and space missions will push tribology technology beyond its current capability. The objective is to discuss the current state of the art of tribology as it is applied to advanced aircraft and spacecraft. Areas of discussion include materials lubrication mechanisms, factors affecting lubrication, current and future tribological problem areas, potential new lubrication techniques, and perceived technology requirements that need to be met in order to solve these tribology problems.

  3. The Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) 2002 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents and overview of the Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL). It covers the University of Nebraska's areas of research, and its outreach to students at Native American schools as part of AERIAL. The report contains three papers: "Airborne Remote Sensing (ARS) for Agricultural Research and Commercialization Application" (White Paper), "Validated Numerical Models for the Convective Extinction of Fuel Droplets (CEFD)", and "The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS): Research Collaborations with the NASA Langley Research Center".

  4. Aeronautical Cast Ti Alloy and Forming Technology Development

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Meijuan; NAN Hai; JU Zhongqiang; GAO Fuhui; QIE Xiwang; ZHU Langping

    2016-01-01

    The application and feature of Ti alloy and TiAl alloy for aviation at home and abroad were briefly introduced. According to the patent application status in Ti alloy field, the development of Ti alloy casting technology was analyzed in the recent thirty years, especially the transformation in aviation. Along with the development of aeronautional manufacturing technology and demand of high performance aircraft, Ti alloy casting is changing towards to be large, integral and complicated, and th...

  5. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Soil Abiotic Conditions in the Establishment of a Dry Grassland Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Knappová

    Full Text Available The importance of soil biota in the composition of mature plant communities is commonly acknowledged. In contrast, the role of soil biota in the early establishment of new plant communities and their relative importance for soil abiotic conditions are still poorly understood.The aim of this study was to understand the effects of soil origin and soil fungal communities on the composition of a newly established dry grassland plant community. We used soil from two different origins (dry grassland and abandoned field with different pH and nutrient and mineral content. Grassland microcosms were established by sowing seeds of 54 species of dry grassland plants into the studied soils. To suppress soil fungi, half of the pots were regularly treated with fungicide. In this way, we studied the independent and combined effects of soil origin and soil community on the establishment of dry grassland communities.The effect of suppressing the soil fungal community on the richness and composition of the plant communities was much stronger than the effect of soil origin. Contrary to our expectations, the effects of these two factors were largely additive, indicating the same degree of importance of soil fungal communities in the establishment of species-rich plant communities in the soils from both origins. The negative effect of suppressing soil fungi on species richness, however, occurred later in the soil from the abandoned field than in the soil from the grassland. This result likely occurred because the negative effects of the suppression of fungi in the field soil were caused mainly by changes in plant community composition and increased competition. In contrast, in the grassland soil, the absence of soil fungi was limiting for plants already at the early stages of their establishment, i.e., in the phases of germination and early recruitment. While fungicide affects not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also other biota, our data indicate that changes

  6. Identifying role of perceived quality and satisfaction on the utilization status of the community clinic services; Bangladesh context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rizwanul M; Abdullah, Mamun S; Rahman, Anisur M; Alam, Ashraful M

    2016-06-24

    . Perception related to the quality of management, administration, physical environment of the service point and satisfaction addressing health promotion and women health issues played significant role on community clinic's services utilization. Besides parental education and income, client's perception and satisfaction played significant role in community clinic service utilization. Provider's perception of service quality should be studied. The study findings will enable policy-makers to improve quality of primary health care services, realizing providers' and patients' ideas of community clinic service quality.

  7. Robust Control of Aeronautical Electrical Generators for Energy Management Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Canciello

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy for the control of aeronautical electrical generators via sliding manifold selection is proposed, with an associated innovative intelligent energy management strategy used for efficient power transfer between two sources providing energy to aeronautical loads, having different functionalities and priorities. Electric generators used for aeronautical application involve several machines, including a main generator and an exciter. Standard regulators (PI or PID-like are normally used for the rectification of the generator voltage to be used to supply a high-voltage DC bus. The regulation is obtained by acting on a DC/DC converter that imposes the field voltage of the exciter. In this paper, the field voltage is fed to the generator windings by using a second-order sliding mode controller, resulting into a stable, robust (against disturbances action and a fast convergence to the desired reference. By using this strategy, an energy management strategy is proposed that dynamically changes the voltage set point, in order to intelligently transfer power between two voltage busses. Detailed simulation results are provided in order to show the effectiveness of the proposed energy management strategy in different scenarios.

  8. The Role of Soil Organic Matter, Nutrients, and Microbial Community Structure on the Performance of Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney-Varga, J. N.; Dunaj, S. J.; Vallino, J. J.; Hines, M. E.; Gay, M.; Kobyljanec, C.

    2011-12-01

    communities, while the quality of available organic matter may have played a significant role in supporting high performing microbial communities.

  9. Violent Victimization in the Community and Children's Subsequent Peer Rejection: The Mediating Role of Emotion Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brynn M.; Schwartz, David; Gorman, Andrea Hopmeyer; Nakamoto, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a short-term longitudinal study of the relation between violent victimization in the community and peer rejection among 199 children (mean age = 9.02 years) attending two urban Los Angeles area elementary schools. We used a multi-informant approach to assess victimization by community violence, peer group victimization, peer…

  10. The role of religion in the formation of cross-community relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Kidwai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual life is a priority in many conflict-affected communities, perhaps especially in situations of displacement. It is rarely prioritised by aid agencies, yet may be central to the formation and maintaining of strong and effective cross-community relationships.

  11. The Role of Community Based Orgs (Cbos) In Rural and Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result showed that community based organizations are veritable agents of development in ensuring the agricultural and rural transformation of Delta State. The study recommended that there is need to develop a link between the state and community us so as to increase the managerial and professional capabilities of ...

  12. The Counselor's Role in the Black Ghetto: Neglected Aspects of Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Frank

    Counselors working with black ghetto populations must consider the geography, moral values, and commonality of interests of the community. The counselor is primarily concerned with the deployment of community resources and, when resources are scarce, the counselor must become an advocate. Counselors striving to change the blacks' perceptions of…

  13. The protective role of maternal racial socialization for African American adolescents exposed to community violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jessica S; Lambert, Sharon F; Smith Bynum, Mia

    2015-08-01

    Urban African American youth's disproportionate exposure to community violence and increased risk for its adverse consequences have heightened interest in identifying protective factors that mitigate the effects of community violence exposure for these youth. Thus, the present study examined whether maternal racial socialization messages protect African American adolescents against the adverse effects of community violence exposure. Participants were a community sample of African American adolescents (N = 106; mean age = 15.41 years) and their female guardians. For community-violence-exposed youth, maternal racial socialization messages protected against aggressive behaviors and depressive symptoms, such that maternal messages about cultural pride attenuated the association between community violence exposure and parent-reported aggressive behaviors, and cultural appreciation of legacy messages attenuated the association between community violence exposure and adolescent-reported depressive symptoms. Findings highlight the need to integrate race-relevant factors into preventive interventions targeting African American youth at risk for or exposed to community violence, and suggest that family interventions promoting parents' efficacy to implement racial socialization practices are useful for youth exposed to violence. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. The role of community in the development of elite handball and football players in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Niels Nygaard; Nielsen, André Bjørn; Elbe, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    populated communities (100 to sports. The limited number of elite players in both sports from rural communities may...... be due to national talent development strategies that do not incorporate development support for clubs in rural areas. Additionally, the results of the study clearly suggest the need to include the youth player population to advance research findings in birthplace effect studies....

  15. Community Stories and Institutional Stewardship: Digital Curation's Dual Roles of Story Creation and Resource Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Sue; Anderson-Wilk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Our institutions of record are facing a new digital knowledge management challenge: stakeholder communities are now expecting customized Web interfaces to institutional knowledge repositories, online environments where community members can contribute content and see themselves represented, as well as access archived resources. Digital curation…

  16. Reviving a Community's Adult Education Past: A Case Study of the Library's Role in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Catherine J.

    2010-01-01

    Amidst calls for libraries to regain their socially progressive roots and connections to community, this study analyzes two interwoven cases of nonformal, community education in northeastern Nova Scotia, initiated by libraries that aimed to revive those links. Through a reading circle and a people's school, librarians used historical materials on…

  17. Quality of life in healthcare providers: the roles of Sense of Community and coping strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-09-01

    Results: Sense of Community at work predicted greater Compassion Satisfaction, independent of coping style, gender, or job characteristics. Conclusions: These preliminary findings suggest that workplace Sense of Community is associated with an individual’s reported Compassion Satisfaction and may help explain resilience in healthcare staff.

  18. Maneuvering the Role as a Community College Artist-Educator: Scholarship Assessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, John R.; Murray, John P.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how Texas community college artist-educators balance artistic productivity with their teaching responsibilities. The 98 survey respondents represented 76.6% of a stratified random sample of the full-time instructors in visual arts departments within the 50 Texas public community college districts. Access to studio space and…

  19. Strengthening the Role of Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges: Campus Discussion Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Engagement matters, and it is critical for student success and for community college faculty and staff who are responsible for helping students learn and achieve their goals. It is particularly critical for community colleges to find ways to engage part-time faculty who are responsible for such a significant part of most students' college…

  20. The role of community participation in the control of bird hazards at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of measures to prevent bird hazards from occurring. One of the most important methods of bird hazard control involves participation of local communities around the airport. This paper illustrates the different ways in which the airport works with the community to control bird collisions with aircraft at Entebbe International ...

  1. Understanding the Role of Trust in Virtual Communities of Practice: Perspectives from Members and Businesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thu Pho, Hang; Saustrup, Nina; Tambo, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Trust has different connotations characterized by various aspects such as sociology, psychology and economics. However, the focus of this paper is on trust within virtual context in the field of digital information, where trust reflects human-computer interaction. Virtual communities have extended...... the reach of our interactions beyond the geographical limitations of traditional communities, forming new kinds of communities based on shared practice (Wenger 2006). On this basis, we emphasize trust in virtual communities of practice (VCoPs) where online groups exchange information, knowledge...... and experience. This paper is qualitative based on literature studies and employs a comparative methodology in studying trust, trust perception and psycho-social relations to VCoPs. This paper investigates three case studies of virtual community providers (VCPs) (Facebook, LinkedIn and Experts-Exchange) grounded...

  2. Community integration and participation: the role of the social network in latin american migrants in a rural province (Teruel, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gil-Lacruz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Social network play an important role in both the decision to emigrate and the choice of location. Related to migrants and its social net, very little is known about patterns of integration and community participation in rural and low population density contexts in Spain. This article explores these issues and is based on a study, in the province of Teruel (Spain, using a sample of 324 Latin American migrants over the age of 18, selected by sex and place of residence. A standardised test - the Musitu and Gracia AC-90 Community Social Support Questionnaire and open questions were employed. ANOVAS analysis showed significant differences in community integration and participation in accordance with socioeconomic, motivational and social interaction variables.

  3. Inter-Provincial Migration Intentions of Family Physicians in Canada: The Roles of Income and Community Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Haizhen; Olfert, M Rose

    2015-11-01

    The inter-provincial migration patterns of family physicians in canada show that some provinces like newfoundland and saskatchewan experience persistent net out-migration, while others, including ontario and british columbia, are destinations more often than origins of migrants. Governments in provinces exhibiting net out-migration have responded with a number of incentive and recruitment programs. In this study, we investigate the determinants of the stated interprovincial migration intentions of 3,995 rural and urban family physicians in the 2010 wave of the national physician survey. We consider a range of physician characteristics, community attributes and working conditions. We find that in the intention to move, higher compensation has a modest effect, while the community characteristics have a consistently important influence. Our results suggest that policy and program designers should acknowledge the critical role of community-level living and working conditions in their family physician recruitment and retention efforts. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  4. Habitat connectivity shapes urban arthropod communities: the key role of green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaker, S; Ghazoul, J; Obrist, M K; Moretti, M

    2014-04-01

    The installation of green roofs, defined here as rooftops with a shallow soil cover and extensive vegetation, has been proposed as a possible measure to mitigate the loss of green space caused by the steady growth of cities. However, the effectiveness of green roofs in supporting arthropod communities, and the extent to which they facilitate connectivity of these communities within the urban environment is currently largely unknown. We investigated the variation of species community composition (beta diversity) of four arthropod groups with contrasting mobility (Carabidae, Araneae, Curculionidae, and Apidae) on 40 green roofs and 40 extensively managed green sites on the ground in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. With redundancy analysis and variation partitioning, we (1) disentangled the relative importance of local environmental conditions, the surrounding land cover composition, and habitat connectivity on species community composition, (2) searched for specific spatial scales of habitat connectivity for the different arthropod groups, and (3) discussed the ecological and functional value of green roofs in cities. Our study revealed that on green roofs community composition of high-mobility arthropod groups (bees and weevils) were mainly shaped by habitat connectivity, while low-mobility arthropod groups (carabids and spiders) were more influenced by local environmental conditions. A similar but less pronounced pattern was found for ground communities. The high importance of habitat connectivity in shaping high-mobility species community composition indicates that these green roof communities are substantially connected by the frequent exchange of individuals among surrounding green roofs. On the other hand, low-mobility species communities on green roofs are more likely connected to ground sites than to other green roofs. The integration of green roofs in urban spatial planning strategies has great potential to enable higher connectivity among green spaces, so

  5. Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texter, P. Cardie

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration funded project, Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities has been in operation since July, 1995. This project operated as a collaboration with Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications, the Federal Aviation Administration, Bridgewater State College and four targeted "core sites" in the greater Boston area. In its first and second years, a video series on aeronautics and aviation science was developed and broadcast via "live, interactive" satellite feed. Accompanying teacher and student supplementary instructional materials for grades 6-9 were produced and disseminated by the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (MCET). In the MCET grant application it states that project Take Off! in its initial phase would recruit and train teachers at "core" sites in the greater Boston area, as well as opening participation to other on-line users of MCET's satellite feeds. "Core site" classrooms would become equipped so that teachers and students might become engaged in an interactive format which aimed at not only involving the students during the "live" broadcast of the instructional video series, but which would encourage participation in electronic information gathering and sharing among participants. As a Take Off! project goal, four schools with a higher than average proportion of minority and underrepresented youth were invited to become involved with the project to give these students the opportunity to consider career exploration and development in the field of science aviation and aeronautics. The four sites chosen to participate in this project were: East Boston High School, Dorchester High School, Randolph Junior-Senior High School and Malden High School. In year 3 Dorchester was unable to continue to fully participate and exited out. Danvers was added to the "core site" list in year 3. In consideration of Goals 2000, the National Science Foundation

  6. Is there a role for pharmacists in multidisciplinary health-care teams at community outreach events for the homeless?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincent; Patounas, Marea; Dornbusch, Debbie; Tran, Hung; Watson, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness is a significant public health problem. It is well-documented that people experiencing homelessness exhibit more serious illnesses and have poorer health than the general population. The provision of services and interventions by health-care professionals, including pharmacists, may make a simple yet important contribution to improved health outcomes in those experiencing homelessness, but evidence of roles and interventions is limited and variable. In Australia, the Queensland University of Technology Health Clinic connects with the homeless community by taking part in community outreach events. This paper provides details of one such event, as well as the roles, interventions and experiences of pharmacists. Participation and inclusion of pharmacists in a multidisciplinary health-care team approach at homeless outreach events should be supported and encouraged.

  7. Plankton community structure and role of Oithona similis on the western coast of Greenland during the winter-spring transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora-Terol, Sara; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Saiz, Enric

    2013-01-01

    The cyclopoid copepod Oithona similis is one of the most abundant copepods in the oceans, and has a potentially important role in pelagic food webs. However, there is a lack of knowledge on aspects of Oithona's biology and function in plankton communities. In the present study, we aimed to assess...... and compare its trophic role in Greenlandic coastal waters during the winter-spring transition, with a focus on its winter behaviour, when large calanoids are not present in the surface layer. Two locations were studied: waters offshore from Godthåbsfjord (Nuuk) in winter, and Qeqertarsuaq (Disko Bay...

  8. A pivotal role for ocean eddies in the distribution of microbial communities across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddarthan Venkatachalam

    Full Text Available Mesoscale variability and associated eddy fluxes play crucial roles in ocean circulation dynamics and the ecology of the upper ocean. In doing so, these features are biologically important, providing a mechanism for the mixing and exchange of nutrients and biota within the ocean. Transient mesoscale eddies in the Southern Ocean are known to relocate zooplankton communities across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC and are important foraging grounds for marine top predators. In this study we investigated the role of cyclonic and anti-cyclonic eddies formed at the South-West Indian Ridge on the spatial variability and diversity of microbial communities. We focused on two contrasting adjacent eddies within the Antarctic Polar Frontal Zone to determine how these features may influence the microbial communities within this region. The water masses and microbiota of the two eddies, representative of a cyclonic cold core from the Antarctic zone and an anti-cyclonic warm-core from the Subantarctic zone, were compared. The data reveal that the two eddies entrain distinct microbial communities from their points of origin that are maintained for up to ten months. Our findings highlight the ecological impact that changes, brought by the translocation of eddies across the ACC, have on microbial diversity.

  9. THE ROLE OF LEADERSHIP IN COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP, ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES AND DECISION-MAKING PROCESS IN ADDRESSING CRIME ISSUES, AND TERRORISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferid Azemi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research paper explains the role of leadership style in building community partnership and in this way also addressing many crime issues and terrorism. The methods used during this research paper are the deep insight of understanding leadership collaboration and organizational changes through literature review. A qualitative design was applied for face-to-face interview with a high ranking member of Kosovo Police. This interview shed light on the role of leadership style and challenges that are related to police reformation and also organizational changes. Through this paper, police leadership may be viewed differently, and seem to be very complex. Community partnership and shared decision-making process were emphasized during this study. This research paper also focused on integrity, ethics and strategic planning. Community partnership, organizational changes, and shared decision-making process are related to leadership style. Leadership style may have either positive or adverse effect on addressing crime rate and terrorism. Depending on the style leaders implement, certain components such as community partnership, or organizational change or even shared decision-making process may fail to function. This is why leadership style seems to bring some very interesting conclusions on this research.

  10. The role of community pharmacists in screening and subsequent management of chronic respiratory diseases: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Fathima, Mariam; Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of community pharmacists in provision of screening with/without subsequent management of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and uncontrolled asthma. Methods An extensive literature search using four databases (ie. Medline, PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) and Scopus) with search terms pharmacy, screening, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to the years 2003-2013, those in E...

  11. The role of community pharmacists in screening and subsequent management of chronic respiratory diseases: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Fathima, Mariam; Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of community pharmacists in provision of screening with/without subsequent management of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and uncontrolled asthma. Methods: An extensive literature search using four databases (ie. Medline, PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) and Scopus) with search terms pharmacy, screening, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to the years 2003-2013, those in...

  12. The role and the results of the European Community's R and D work on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Girardi, F.

    1986-01-01

    The role and results of the European Community's research and development (R and D) work on radioactive waste management are described. The R and D work includes: radioactive waste conditioning, characterization and storage, materials science studies for the storage, geological media confinement studies, and radionuclide migration investigations. Financial management and the long term, and the socio-political aspects of waste management, are also discussed. (U.K.)

  13. The power of community : the role of ownership in social marketing of wind projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roscoe, D. [Scotian Windfields, Dartmouth, NS (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed the benefits of community ownership for wind power projects in Nova Scotia. The community economic development investment fund (CEDIF) is a pool of capital funds formed by selling shares to people within a defined community. CEDIFs are created to operate or invest in local business as part of a government initiative to provide incentives for local business development. Those eligible for CEDIFs include incorporated organizations with a minimum of 25 investors, and when 6 of the maximum 12 directors are from the local community. No investors may own more than 20 per cent. CEDIF incentives include pre-approved holdings for registered savings plans; a 30 per cent non-refundable equity tax credit against Nova Scotia taxes, and additional credits for maintaining investment. Local WindFields investors have invested in the Scotian WindFields in order to develop renewable energy projects. Community ownership of wind power projects can result in greater acceptance of wind power as well as increased economic prosperity and employment. Community ownership can also lead to improved land lease opportunities and relationships between contractors, local businesses, and federal and provincial governments. Details of wind power projects in Nova Scotia were provided. It was concluded that wind power developers should consider community ownership of wind projects. tabs., figs.

  14. An Opportunity for Healing and Holistic Care: Exploring the Roles of Health Care Providers Working Within Northern Canadian Aboriginal Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Zaida; Holmes, Dave; Chartrand, Larry

    2016-05-22

    The purpose of this qualitative study was exploring what the roles and challenges of health care providers working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities are and what resources can help support or impede their efforts in working toward addressing health inequities within these communities. The qualitative research conducted was influenced by a postcolonial epistemology. The works of theorists Fanon on colonization and racial construction, Kristeva on semiotics and abjection, and Foucault on power/knowledge, governmentality, and biopower were used in providing a theoretical framework. Critical discourse analysis of 25 semistructured interviews with health care providers was used to gain a better understanding of their roles and challenges while working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities. Within this research study, three significant findings emerged from the data. First, the Aboriginal person's identity was constructed in relation to the health care provider's role of delivering essential health services. Second, health care providers were not treating the "ill" patient, but rather treating the patient for being "ill." Third, health care providers were treating the Aboriginal person for being "Aboriginal" by separating the patient from his or her identity. The treatment involved reforming the Aboriginal patient from the condition of being "Aboriginal." © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. [The role of the floodplain gradient in structuring of testate amoebae communities in the Ilych River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeĭ, Iu A; Malysheva, E A; Lapteva, E M; Komarov, A A; Taskaeva, A A

    2012-01-01

    Forty-two testate amoebae taxa were identified in alluvial soils of floodplain islands in the Ilych River. Among the pedo- and eurybionts, there were aquatic rhizopods. Along the floodplain transect (willow --> meadow --> deciduous forest --> coniferous forest), the testate amoebae community changed directly. There are spatially homogeneous (low beta-diversity) testacean communities but species rich on the local level (high alpha-diversity) within forests. Within willows and meadows, communities are characterized by low alpha-diversity and high heterogeneity that leads to high gamma-diversity.

  16. Routines of Riparian Women of the Amazon Region: Activities and Roles in the Family, at Work and in the Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuzeli Maria de Almeida Pinto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the perception of the routines of women who live in Amazon riverside communities, identifying the roles and activities related to domestic work, açaí gathering and actions in community associations. The participants were three women from two island communities in Belem, Ilha Grande and Combu, who earn their living solely from açaí gathering, work at home and in community associations. The instruments used were the sociodemographic schedule (ISD, the Inventory of Routine (IR and Field Diary (DC. All activities are defined by gender. Although riparian women follow the rigid family concepts of gender division in regards to labor, the participation women in paid professional activities, in this case, açaí gathering, has increased. The woman’s place in riparian family structure is considered dynamic and encompasses a cluster of systems that maintain interdependent relationships. In this sense, the context acts as a facilitator for development, producing constancy and change in the characteristics of riverside women and during the course of her life, family and community.

  17. The role of quorum sensing signalling in EPS production and the assembly of a sludge community into aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuan Hao; Koh, Kai Shyang; Xie, Chao; Tay, Martin; Zhou, Yan; Williams, Rohan; Ng, Wun Jern; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) signalling has been extensively studied in single species populations. However, the ecological role of QS in complex, multi-species communities, particularly in the context of community assembly, has neither been experimentally explored nor theoretically addressed. Here, we performed a long-term bioreactor ecology study to address the links between QS, organization and composition of complex microbial communities. The conversion of floccular biomass to highly structured granules was found to be non-random, but strongly and positively correlated with N-acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL)-mediated QS. Specific AHLs were elevated up to 100-fold and were strongly associated with the initiation of granulation. Similarly, the levels of particular AHLs decreased markedly during the granular disintegration phase. Metadata analysis indicated that granulation was accompanied by changes in extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production and AHL add-back studies also resulted in increased EPS synthesis. In contrast to the commonly reported nanomolar to micromolar signal concentrations in pure culture laboratory systems, QS signalling in the granulation ecosystem occurred at picomolar to nanomolar concentrations of AHLs. Given that low concentrations of AHLs quantified in this study were sufficient to activate AHL bioreporters in situ in complex granular communities, AHL mediated QS may be a common feature in many natural and engineered ecosystems, where it coordinates community behaviour.

  18. Expanding the clinical role of community pharmacy: A qualitative ethnographic study of medication reviews in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Sarah J; Miller, Fiona A; Abrahamyan, Lusine; Rac, Valeria E

    2018-03-01

    Medication reviews by community pharmacists are an increasingly common strategy to improve medication management for chronic conditions, and are part of wider efforts to make more effective use of community-based health professionals. To identify opportunities to optimize the medication review program in Ontario, Canada, we explored how providers and clients interpret and operationalize medication reviews within everyday community pharmacy practice. We conducted a qualitative ethnographic study at four pharmacies in Ontario, Canada, including non-participant observation of provider and client activities and interactions with specific attention to medication reviews, as well as brief ethnographic interviews with providers and clients, and in-depth, semi-structured interviews with providers. We report on 72h of field research, observation of 178 routine pharmacist-client interactions and 29 medication reviews, 62 brief ethnographic interviews with providers and clients, and 7 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with providers. We found that medication reviews were variably conducted across the dimensions of duration, provider type, location, and interaction style, and that local contexts and system-wide developments influence their meaning and practice. Medication reviews are exemplary of policy efforts to enhance the role of community pharmacies within health systems and the scope of practice of pharmacists as healthcare professionals. Our study highlights the importance of the local structure of community pharmacy practice and the clinical aspirations of pharmacists in the delivery of medication reviews. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A survey for assessment of the role of pharmacist in community pharmacy services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To assess the role of a pharmacist in a community setting and the consumer′s perception in the National Capital Region. Setting : The study was conducted in the National Capital Region of India during the year 2003 - 2004. Materials and Methods : Four pharmacies were selected for this study, which were not attached to any hospital or clinic. Seventy-seven consumers, who visited these pharmacies during the study period, were selected for this study and interviewed just after they visited the pharmacy. Results : A total of 77 consumers in the age group of 11 to 72 years were included in the present study, of which 66.2% were males and 33.8% were females. It was observed that 46.7% of the consumers came for prescription medicines and 23.4% for over-the-counter medicines. Close to the general physicians′ clinics and proximity to home were the most important reasons given for visiting a particular pharmacy. A majority of the consumers (n = 56, 72.7% rated the advice given by the pharmacist as very useful, only one (1.3% rated it as not useful at all and two (2.6% consumers did not respond. Among the consumer groups 31 (40.3% thought that the pharmacist had a good balance between health and business matters, 35.7% were of the opinion that the pharmacist was more concerned with making money, while 5.2% supported that the pharmacist was also interested in the health of his / her customers. The pharmacists were ranked at the top by 28 (36.4% consumers, and favored pharmacy as the most convenient place to get advice about staying healthy. Conclusion : Most of the consumers in the present study were of the opinion that a pharmacist is concerned with the health of the consumers, although he / she was also interested in making money. Many respondents were unaware about the difference between a pharmacist and a doctor, most of them considered the pharmacist to be a doctor and this was the main problem in concluding that the pharmacy was the

  20. The Role of Community Organizations in the Transformation of the Social Development Model in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jette

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Community organizations have played a major role in the delivery of social services in Québec since the 1970s. Their activities aimed to provide an alternative to the heteronomous, bureaucratic practices of the public sector. But their desire to move away from the public sector did not prevent them from demanding financial support from the state. Historically, these associations' struggles have led to the establishment of an original partnership and a funding mode whereby they could retain their organizations' autonomy. This autonomy was the guarantee of both their specificity and their ability to innovate in terms of social practices. While this state recognition certainly remains in some respects ambivalent, it is nonetheless undeniable that these associations today constitute a significant component of the Québec model of social development. / Les organismes communautaires jouent un rôle important dans la prestation de services sociaux au Québec depuis les années 1970. Leurs activités se sont développées dans l'optique d'apporter une alternative aux pratiques hétéronomes et bureaucratiques du secteur public. Cette volonté de se distancier du secteur public ne les a toutefois pas empêchés de revendiquer le soutien financier de l'État. Historiquement, les luttes menées par ces associations se sont donc traduites par la mise en place d'un partenariat original et l'établissement d'une mode de financement qui leur permet de préserver l'autonomie de leur organisation. Cette autonomie est le gage de leur spécificité et de leur capacité d'innover sur le plan des pratiques sociales. Certes, cette reconnaissance étatique demeure à certains égards ambiguë. Néanmoins, il est indéniable que ces associations constituent aujourd'hui un élément important du modèle québécois du développement social.

  1. The role of emergent vegetation in structuring aquatic insect communities in peatland drainage ditches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whatley, M.H.; van Loon, E.E.; Vonk, J.A.; van der Geest, H.G.; Admiraal, W.

    2014-01-01

    Availability of macrophyte habitat is recognized as an important driver of aquatic insect communities in peatland drainage ditches; however, eutrophication can lead to the decline of submerged vegetation. While emergent vegetation is able to persist in eutrophicated ditches, vegetation removal,

  2. The role of Aboriginal community attachment in promoting lifestyle changes after hepatitis C diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Brener

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research assessed whether greater attachment to an Aboriginal community buffers against the negative effects of stigma and promotes positive health outcomes. Aboriginal Australians ( n  = 203 living with hepatitis C completed a survey assessing community attachment, stigma, resilience, quality of life, treatment intent, hepatitis C knowledge and positive lifestyle changes. A stronger sense of community attachment was associated with greater resilience, increased quality of life, less hepatitis C–related stigma and with increased lifestyle changes after diagnosis. Hence, community attachment can buffer against the negative health effects of stigma and may promote the resources to engage in positive behaviour changes, ultimately increasing long-term health outcomes.

  3. Diversity reduces invasibility in experimental plant communities: the role of plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ruijven, J.; De Deyn, G.B.; Berendse, F.

    2003-01-01

    Several studies have presented experimental evidence that diversity reduces invasibility in grassland communities. The interpretation of these results has been disputed recently and it was proposed that sampling effects were responsible for the observed decrease of invasibility with diversity. The

  4. The roles of community pharmacists in cardiovascular disease prevention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence in the international literature forpharmacist involvement in the prevention and managementof cardiovascular disease (CVD conditions in primary care.Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have confirmed thesignificant clinical benefits of pharmacist interventions for arange of CVD conditions and risk factors. Evidence generatedin research studies of Australian community pharmacistinvolvement in CVD prevention and management issummarised in this article.Commonwealth funding through the Community PharmacyAgreements has facilitated research to establish the feasibilityand effectiveness of new models of primary care involvingcommunity pharmacists. Australian community pharmacistshave been shown to effect positive clinical, humanistic andeconomic outcomes in patients with CVD conditions.Improvements in blood pressure, lipid levels, medicationadherence and CVD risk have been demonstrated usingdifferent study designs. Satisfaction for GPs, pharmacists andconsumers has also been reported. Perceived ‘turf’encroachment, expertise of the pharmacist, space, time andremuneration are challenges to the implementation of diseasemanagement services involving community pharmacists.

  5. The Role of The Ecomuseo Dei Terrazzamenti E Della Vite, (Cortemilia, Italy in Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Murtas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available One important reaction to globalization in the twenty-first century has been the democratization of culture and heritage. Local communities have increasingly attempted to recognise and conserve their heritage resources and use them to create sustainable economic development through ecotourism and cultural tourism. Ecomuseum philosophy and practical processes, although they originated in France, have been used in many countries to enable local residents to define, validate and celebrate local distinctiveness and local identity. This article introduces and critiques these philosophies and processes and then describes how one community in the north of Italy (Cortemilia used them to harness the natural and cultural resources of its locality to enable local people to re-identify their own ‘sense of place’ and rekindle pride in their community. The conclusion compares the processes and outcomes in Cortemilia with two other ecomuseums created to aid community development.

  6. How physician and community pharmacist perceptions of the community pharmacist role in Australian primary care influence the quality of collaborative chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieck, Allison; Pettigrew, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Community pharmacists (CPs) have been changing their role to focus on patient-centred services to improve the quality of chronic disease management (CDM) in primary care. However, CPs have not been readily included in collaborative CDM with other primary care professionals such as physicians. There is little understanding of the CP role change and whether it affects the utilisation of CPs in primary care collaborative CDM. To explore physician and CP perceptions of the CP's role in Australian primary care and how these perceptions may influence the quality of physician/CP CDM programmes. Data were collected from physicians and CPs using semi-structured interviews. A qualitative methodology utilising thematic analysis was employed during data analysis. Qualitative methodology trustworthiness techniques, negative case analysis and member checking were utilised to substantiate the resultant themes. A total of 22 physicians and 22 CPs were interviewed. Strong themes emerged regarding the participant perceptions of the CP's CDM role in primary care. The majority of interviewed physicians perceived that CPs did not have the appropriate CDM knowledge to complement physician knowledge to provide improved CDM compared with what they could provide on their own. Most of the interviewed CPs expressed a willingness and capability to undertake CDM; however, they were struggling to provide sustainable CDM in the business setting within which they function in the primary care environment. Role theory was selected as it provided the optimum explanation of the resultant themes. First, physician lack of confidence in the appropriateness of CP CDM knowledge causes physicians to be confused about the role CPs would undertake in a collaborative CDM that would benefit the physicians and their patients. Thus, by increasing physician awareness of CP CDM knowledge, physicians may see CPs as suitable CDM collaborators. Second, CPs are experiencing role conflict and stress in trying to change

  7. Influencing consumer engagement in online customer communities: The role of interactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy Mpinganjira

    2016-08-01

    Originality and value of research: Little research exists on consumer engagement, resulting in limited understanding of the concept as well as its antecedents. Focusing on online customer communities, this article contributes to addressing this gap in literature. Managers of online customer communities can use the findings to monitor levels of consumer engagement on their sites and find ways of enhancing it.

  8. The Role of the Military in Building Political Community: The Case of the Two German States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    community is represented primarily by three vital intervening outcomes of the political socialization process: a distinct political culture, a separate...case-study attempts to first identify any conscious political socialization processes implemented by the two militaries, and then tries to link these processes to the two distinct German political communities....rapidly engineer political change in these cases, the resurrection and maintenance of a military may especially contribute to the process of political

  9. Community health workers: A crucial role in newborn health care and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Aboubaker

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence from research and implementation to show that community health workers, when appropriately trained, supplied, supported and supervised, can identify and correctly treat most children for pneumonia, diarrhoea and malaria. Community management of childhood illness is an important contribution to the remarkable progress in reducing child mortality. Globally, the rate of under–five mortality has decreased by nearly half, from 90 deaths per 1000 live births in 1990 to 46 in 2013.

  10. Roles of organizers and champions in building campus-community prevention partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakocs, Ronda C; Tiwari, Rashmi; Vehige, Tamara; DeJong, William

    2008-01-01

    A campus-community partnership can be an effective vehicle for launching environmental strategies to prevent college alcohol-related problems. In this study, the authors' primary aim was identifying key factors that facilitate or impede colleges' efforts to build campus-community partnerships. From fall 2004 to summer 2006, administrators at five 4-year colleges participated in a multisite case study. Level of partnership development was the primary outcome. Three interrelated factors facilitated higher-developed partnerships: college staff assigned to facilitate the partnerships who worked as community organizers, higher-level college administrators who served as aggressive champions, and community initiation of the partnership. The authors did not observe this trio of factors among the less-developed partnerships. A lack of administrative support made it more difficult for a champion to emerge, a college administrator who staunchly advocated for a campus-community partnership, and for those assigned to facilitate the partnership to carry out their work. Colleges should appoint higher-level administrators to serve as champions, while also ensuring that those assigned to facilitate a partnership can apply community organizing skills.

  11. Community Lenses Revealing the Role of Sociocultural Environment on Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belon, Ana Paula; Nieuwendyk, Laura M.; Vallianatos, Helen; Nykiforuk, Candace I. J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify perceptions of how sociocultural environment enabled and hindered physical activity (PA) participation. Design Community-based participatory research. Setting Two semirural and two urban communities located in Alberta, Canada. Participants Thirty-five people (74.3% females, 71.4% aged 25–64 years) across the four communities. Method PhotoVoice activities occurred over 3 months during the spring of 2009. Participants were asked to document perceived environmental attributes that might foster or inhibit PA in their community. Photographs and narratives were shared in one-on-one interviews. Line-by-line coding of the transcripts was independently conducted by two researchers using an inductive approach. Codes were arranged into themes and subthemes, which were then organized into the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity (ANGELO) framework. Results Six main themes (accompanied by subthemes) emerged: sociocultural aesthetics, safety, social involvement, PA motivation, cultural ideas of recreation, and car culture. Representative quotes and photographs illustrate enablers and obstacles identified by participants. Conclusion This PhotoVoice study revealed how aspects of participants’ sociocultural environments shaped their decisions to be physically active. Providing more PA resources is only one step in the promotion of supportive environments. Strategies should also account for the beautification and maintenance of communities, increasing feelings of safety, enhancement of social support among community members, popularization of PA, and mitigating car culture, among others. PMID:25973966

  12. The role of community in the development of elite handball and football players in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, N N; Nielsen, A B; Elbe, A-M; Karbing, D S

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the place of early development in a sample of Danish male elite and youth handball and football players. The sample included 366 handball and football players from the elite Danish league in the season 2011-2012 and a comparison sample of youth players under the age of 12 from 2003, including 147,221 football and 26,290 handball players. Odds ratio analysis showed that both population size and density significantly affected the proportional number of youth players per community and the odds of athletes reaching an elite level in football and handball. The odds for youth player registrations in both handball and football increased in rural in contrast to urban communities. However, elite football players primarily came from communities of high density (>1000 pop./km(2)), whereas elite handball players primarily came from less densely populated communities (100 to <250 pop./km(2)). Furthermore, there seems to be a relation between representation of elite and talent clubs in different communities and the probability of becoming an elite player in both sports. The limited number of elite players in both sports from rural communities may be due to national talent development strategies that do not incorporate development support for clubs in rural areas. Additionally, the results of the study clearly suggest the need to include the youth player population to advance research findings in birthplace effect studies.

  13. Bridging the gap between basic science and clinical practice: a role for community clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Michelle

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translating the extraordinary scientific and technological advances occurring in medical research laboratories into care for patients in communities throughout the country has been a major challenge. One contributing factor has been the relative absence of community practitioners from the US biomedical research enterprise. Identifying and addressing the barriers that prevent their participation in research should help bridge the gap between basic research and practice to improve quality of care for all Americans. Methods We interviewed over 200 clinicians and other healthcare stakeholders from 2004 through 2005 to develop a conceptual framework and set of strategies for engaging a stable cadre of community clinicians in a clinical research program. Results Lack of engagement of community practitioners, lack of necessary infrastructure, and the current misalignment of financial incentives and research participation emerged as the three primary barriers to community clinician research participation. Although every effort was made to learn key motivators for engagement in clinical research from interviewees, we did not observe their behavior and self-report by clinicians does not always track with their behavior. Conclusions A paradigm shift involving acknowledgement of the value of clinicians in the context of community research, establishment of a stable infrastructure to support a cohort of clinicians across time and research studies, and realignment of incentives to encourage participation in clinical research is required.

  14. The Role of Abiotic Environmental Conditions and Herbivory in Shaping Bacterial Community Composition in Floral Nectar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuni-Blank, Michal; Izhaki, Ido; Laviad, Sivan; Bar-Massada, Avi; Gerchman, Yoram; Halpern, Malka

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the processes that drive community assembly has long been a central theme in ecology. For microorganisms, a traditional prevailing hypothesis states that “everything is everywhere, but the environment selects”. Although the bacterial community in floral nectar may be affected by both atmosphere (air-borne bacteria) and animals as dispersal vectors, the environmental and geographic factors that shape microbial communities in floral nectar are unknown. We studied culturable bacterial communities in Asphodelus aestivus floral nectar and in its typical herbivorous bug Capsodes infuscatus, along an aridity gradient. Bacteria were sampled from floral nectar and bugs at four sites, spanning a geographical range of 200 km from Mediterranean to semi-arid conditions, under open and bagged flower treatments. In agreement with the niche assembly hypothesis, the differences in bacterial community compositions were explained by differences in abiotic environmental conditions. These results suggest that microbial model systems are useful for addressing macro-ecological questions. In addition, similar bacterial communities were found in the nectar and on the surface of the bugs that were documented visiting the flowers. These similarities imply that floral nectar bacteria dispersal is shaped not only by air borne bacteria and nectar consumers as previously reported, but also by visiting vectors like the mirid bugs. PMID:24922317

  15. Community Lenses Revealing the Role of Sociocultural Environment on Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belon, Ana Paula; Nieuwendyk, Laura M; Vallianatos, Helen; Nykiforuk, Candace I J

    2016-01-01

    To identify perceptions of how sociocultural environment enabled and hindered physical activity (PA) participation. Community-based participatory research. Two semirural and two urban communities located in Alberta, Canada. Thirty-five people (74.3% females, 71.4% aged 25-64 years) across the four communities. PhotoVoice activities occurred over 3 months during the spring of 2009. Participants were asked to document perceived environmental attributes that might foster or inhibit PA in their community. Photographs and narratives were shared in one-on-one interviews. Line-by-line coding of the transcripts was independently conducted by two researchers using an inductive approach. Codes were arranged into themes and subthemes, which were then organized into the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity (ANGELO) framework. Six main themes (accompanied by subthemes) emerged: sociocultural aesthetics, safety, social involvement, PA motivation, cultural ideas of recreation, and car culture. Representative quotes and photographs illustrate enablers and obstacles identified by participants. This PhotoVoice study revealed how aspects of participants' sociocultural environments shaped their decisions to be physically active. Providing more PA resources is only one step in the promotion of supportive environments. Strategies should also account for the beautification and maintenance of communities, increasing feelings of safety, enhancement of social support among community members, popularization of PA, and mitigating car culture, among others.

  16. The Role of Microbial Community Composition in Controlling Soil Respiration Responses to Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, Marc D; Karhu, Kristiina; Khachane, Amit; Dungait, Jennifer A J; Fraser, Fiona; Hopkins, David W; Wookey, Philip A; Singh, Brajesh K; Freitag, Thomas E; Hartley, Iain P; Prosser, James I

    2016-01-01

    Rising global temperatures may increase the rates of soil organic matter decomposition by heterotrophic microorganisms, potentially accelerating climate change further by releasing additional carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, the possibility that microbial community responses to prolonged warming may modify the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration creates large uncertainty in the strength of this positive feedback. Both compensatory responses (decreasing temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in the long-term) and enhancing responses (increasing temperature sensitivity) have been reported, but the mechanisms underlying these responses are poorly understood. In this study, microbial biomass, community structure and the activities of dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase enzymes were determined for 18 soils that had previously demonstrated either no response or varying magnitude of enhancing or compensatory responses of temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic microbial respiration to prolonged cooling. The soil cooling approach, in contrast to warming experiments, discriminates between microbial community responses and the consequences of substrate depletion, by minimising changes in substrate availability. The initial microbial community composition, determined by molecular analysis of soils showing contrasting respiration responses to cooling, provided evidence that the magnitude of enhancing responses was partly related to microbial community composition. There was also evidence that higher relative abundance of saprophytic Basidiomycota may explain the compensatory response observed in one soil, but neither microbial biomass nor enzymatic capacity were significantly affected by cooling. Our findings emphasise the key importance of soil microbial community responses for feedbacks to global change, but also highlight important areas where our understanding remains limited.

  17. 78 FR 10248 - Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... proposal to change a portion of airport land from aeronautical use to non-aeronautical use and to authorize the sale of the airport property. The Will County Department of Highways has offered fair market value...

  18. Experiences of HIV stigma: the role of visible symptoms, HIV centrality and community attachment for people living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Loren; Callander, Denton; Slavin, Sean; de Wit, John

    2013-01-01

    For many people living with HIV (PLHIV), disclosure or concealment of their HIV status may be under their personal control; however, for PLHIV with visible symptoms of their illness, disclosure may no longer be a choice. Previous research suggests that those with visible HIV symptoms have poorer mental and physical health than those without visible HIV symptoms. This study aimed to extend these findings and assess the role of perceived centrality of HIV in the lives of PLHIV as well as the role of attachment to an HIV-positive community in understanding the negative effects on health and well-being for PLHIV with visible HIV symptoms. Participants were 697 PLHIV who completed an online survey that assessed symptom visibility, HIV-status disclosure, perceived stigma, health and well-being, how central HIV was to identity and HIV community attachment. Results indicate that those with visible symptoms experienced more HIV-related stigma and had poorer outcomes on a range of psychological and mental health measures than those who were able to conceal their stigma. These effects remained after controlling for length of time since diagnosis, time on HIV treatment, perceived health satisfaction and age. PLHIV with visible symptoms also reported that HIV was more central to their identity and reported greater attachment to an HIV-positive community. Furthermore, findings suggest that while HIV centrality appears to increase the negative effects of having visible symptoms associated with HIV, greater community attachment seems to ameliorate these effects. This suggests the need for a nuanced understanding of the implications of visible HIV symptoms for PLHIV. The study also highlights the potential benefits of HIV-positive community attachment in buffering PLHIV from the negative effect of visible HIV symptoms on their health and well-being.

  19. The role of community pharmacists in screening and subsequent management of chronic respiratory diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Mariam; Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol L

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of community pharmacists in provision of screening with/without subsequent management of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and uncontrolled asthma. An extensive literature search using four databases (ie. Medline, PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) and Scopus) with search terms pharmacy, screening, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to the years 2003-2013, those in English and those reporting research with humans. Data retrieval, analysis and result presentation employed a scoping review method. Seventeen articles met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, of which fifteen studies were based on people with asthma and two were based on people with COPD. Only seven asthma studies and one COPD study involved screening followed by subsequent management. More than half of the people screened were found to be poorly controlled and up to 62% of people were identified at high risk for COPD by community pharmacists. The studies varied in the method and type of asthma control assessment/screening, the type of intervention provided and the outcomes measured. The limitations of the reviewed studies included varying definitions of asthma control, different study methodologies, and the lack of long-term follow-up. While many different methods were used for risk assessment and management services by the pharmacists, all the studies demonstrated that community pharmacists were capable of identifying people with poorly controlled asthma and undiagnosed COPD and providing them with suitable interventions. The literature review identified that community pharmacists can play an effective role in screening of people with poorly controlled asthma and undiagnosed COPD along with delivering management interventions. However, there is very little literature available on screening for these chronic respiratory conditions. Future research should focus on development of patient care

  20. The role of community pharmacists in screening and subsequent management of chronic respiratory diseases: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Mariam; Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol L.

    Objective The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of community pharmacists in provision of screening with/without subsequent management of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and uncontrolled asthma. Methods An extensive literature search using four databases (ie. Medline, PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) and Scopus) with search terms pharmacy, screening, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to the years 2003-2013, those in English and those reporting research with humans. Data retrieval, analysis and result presentation employed a scoping review method. Results Seventeen articles met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, of which fifteen studies were based on people with asthma and two were based on people with COPD. Only seven asthma studies and one COPD study involved screening followed by subsequent management. More than half of the people screened were found to be poorly controlled and up to 62% of people were identified at high risk for COPD by community pharmacists. The studies varied in the method and type of asthma control assessment/screening, the type of intervention provided and the outcomes measured. The limitations of the reviewed studies included varying definitions of asthma control, different study methodologies, and the lack of long-term follow-up. While many different methods were used for risk assessment and management services by the pharmacists, all the studies demonstrated that community pharmacists were capable of identifying people with poorly controlled asthma and undiagnosed COPD and providing them with suitable interventions. Conclusions The literature review identified that community pharmacists can play an effective role in screening of people with poorly controlled asthma and undiagnosed COPD along with delivering management interventions. However, there is very little literature available on screening for these chronic respiratory conditions. Future research should focus

  1. Survey on Public Awareness On AIDS- Role Of Government And Non Government Agencies In A Rural South Indian Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balagnesh G

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: What is the level of Public awareness on AIDS in a rural community and to what extent the government and non-government agencies have played their role in creating the awareness? Objectives: (i To study the public awareness on AIDS in a rural community (ii To Study role of government and non-government agencies in creating the awareness on AIDS. Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: Rural area under S. V. Medical College Triputi (AP Participants: 100 males (15-45 yrs and 100 females (15-45 yrs. Study variables: Awareness on AIDS, Government and non-government agencies. Statistical Analysis: Percentages Results: Most of the persons interviewed had minimal knowledge on AIDS. Quite a large section of the ‘ study population was ignorant over the safety offered by condoms in preventing AIDS. Doordarshan and Newspaper agencies played much role in creation the awareness on AIDS, while the non-government agencies like Lions’ Club, Rotary Club. Indian Junior Chamber etc. played no role in creating the awareness on AIDS in the study area. Recommendations: Government health sector should take more responsibility in educating the people and creating adequate awareness on AIDS. Non-government agencies should involve themselves in creating awareness on AIDS.

  2. A Flexible System for Simulating Aeronautical Telecommunication Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Kurt; Overstreet, C. M.; Andey, R.

    1998-01-01

    At Old Dominion University, we have built Aeronautical Telecommunication Network (ATN) Simulator with NASA being the fund provider. It provides a means to evaluate the impact of modified router scheduling algorithms on the network efficiency, to perform capacity studies on various network topologies and to monitor and study various aspects of ATN through graphical user interface (GUI). In this paper we describe briefly about the proposed ATN model and our abstraction of this model. Later we describe our simulator architecture highlighting some of the design specifications, scheduling algorithms and user interface. At the end, we have provided the results of performance studies on this simulator.

  3. FY11 Facility Assessment Study for Aeronautics Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, John A.; Sydnor, George H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the approach and results for the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) FY11 Facility Assessment Project. ATP commissioned assessments in FY07 and FY11 to aid in the understanding of the current condition and reliability of its facilities and their ability to meet current and future (five year horizon) test requirements. The principle output of the assessment was a database of facility unique, prioritized investments projects with budgetary cost estimates. This database was also used to identify trends for the condition of facility systems.

  4. Arc tracking energy balance for copper and aluminum aeronautic cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, T; Valensi, F; Teulet, P; Cressault, Y; Zink, T; Caussé, R

    2017-01-01

    Arc tracking tests have been carried out between two voluntarily damaged aeronautic cables. Copper or aluminum conductors have been exposed to short circuits under alternating current. Various data have been recorded (arc voltage and current, radiated power and ablated mass), enabling to determine a power balance, in which every contribution is estimated. The total power is mainly transferred to the cables (between 50 and 65%, depending on the current and the cable type), and causes the melting and partial vaporization of the metallic core and insulating material, or is conducted or radiated. The other part is deposited into the arc column, being either radiated, convected or conducted. (paper)

  5. Study of anisotropic mechanical properties for aeronautical PMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shang

    Full Text Available For the properties of polymer are relative to its structure, the main purpose of the present work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the aeronautical PMMA which has been treated by the directional tensile technology. Isodyne images reveal the stress state in directional PMMA. And then, an anisotropic mechanical model is established. Furthermore, all mechanical parameters are measured by the digital image correlation method. Finally, based on the anisotropic mechanical model and mechanical parameters, the FEM numerical simulation and experimental methods are applied to analyze the fracture mechanical properties along different directions.

  6. Take Off! Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Funded by National Aeronautic and Space Administration's High Performance Computing and Communications/ Learning Technologies Project (HPCC/LTP) Cooperative Agreement, Aeronautics and aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities was operative from July 1995 through July 1998. This project operated as a collaboration with Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications, the Federal Aviation Administration, Bridgewater State College and four targeted "core sites" in the greater Boston area: Dorchester, Malden, East Boston and Randolph. In its first and second years, a video series with a participatory website on aeronautics and aviation science was developed and broadcast via "live, interactive" satellite feed. Accompanying teacher and student supplementary instructional materials for grades 6-12 were produced and disseminated by the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (MCET). In year three, the project team redesigned the website, edited 14 videos to a five part thematic unit, and developed a teacher's guide to the video and web materials supplement for MAC and PC platforms, aligned with national standards. In the MCET grant application it states that project Take Off! in its initial phase would recruit and train teachers at "core" sites in the greater Boston area, as well as opening participation to other on-line users of MCET's satellite feeds. "Core site" classrooms would become equipped so that teachers and students might become engaged in an interactive format which aimed at not only involving the students during the "live" broadcast of the instructional video series, but which would encourage participation in electronic information gathering and sharing among participants. As a Take Off! project goal, four schools with a higher than average proportion of minority and underrepresented youth were invited to become involved with the project to give these students the opportunity to consider career exploration and development

  7. The role of culture in substance abuse treatment programs for American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legha, Rupinder Kaur; Novins, Douglas

    2012-07-01

    Culture figures prominently in discussions regarding the etiology of alcohol and substance abuse in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, and a substantial body of literature suggests that it is critical to developing meaningful treatment interventions. However, no study has characterized how programs integrate culture into their services. Furthermore, reports regarding the associated challenges are limited. Twenty key informant interviews with administrators and 15 focus groups with clinicians were conducted in 18 alcohol and substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Transcripts were coded to identify relevant themes. Substance abuse treatment programs for AI/AN communities are integrating culture into their services in two discrete ways: by implementing specific cultural practices and by adapting Western treatment models. More important, however, are the fundamental principles that shape these programs and their interactions with the people and communities they serve. These foundational beliefs and values, defined in this study as the core cultural constructs that validate and incorporate AI/AN experience and world view, include an emphasis on community and family, meaningful relationships with and respect for clients, a homelike atmosphere within the program setting, and an “open door” policy for clients. The primary challenges for integrating these cultural practices include AI/AN communities' cultural diversity and limited socioeconomic resources to design and implement these practices. The prominence of foundational beliefs and values is striking and suggests a broader definition of culture when designing services. This definition of foundational beliefs and values should help other diverse communities culturally adapt their substance abuse interventions in more meaningful ways.

  8. National Cancer Institute's leadership role in promoting State and Community Tobacco Control research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginexi, Elizabeth M; Vollinger, Robert E

    2016-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has been at the vanguard of funding tobacco control research for decades with major efforts such as the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) in 1988 and the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) in 1991, followed by the Tobacco Research Initiative for State and Community Interventions in 1999. Most recently, in 2011, the NCI launched the State and Community Tobacco Control (SCTC) Research Initiative to address gaps in secondhand smoke policies, tax and pricing policies, mass media countermeasures, community and social norms and tobacco marketing. The initiative supported large scale research projects and time-sensitive ancillary pilot studies in response to expressed needs of state and community partners. This special issue of Tobacco Control showcases exciting findings from the SCTC. In this introductory article, we provide a brief account of NCI's historical commitment to promoting research to inform tobacco control policy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. The role of physicians in a community-wide program for prevention of cardiovascular disease: the Minnesota Heart Health Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmark, M B; Leupker, R V; Grimm, R; Kottke, T E; Blackburn, H

    1988-01-01

    The Minnesota Heart Health Program (MHHP) aims to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality by reducing risk factors among the mass of residents in three midwestern communities. A major aspect of the program is the involvement of community physicians because they have high credibility as citizen leaders, especially on health issues. In the MHHP, physicians contributed in a number of ways. The initial contacts with physicians resulted in their providing support and introductions to other community leaders, whose active support was also gained. Physicians sit as members of the central Community Advisory Borads of MHHP and serve on the executive committees of these boards. All MHHP issues related to medical practice are brought before Physicians' Advisory Groups in each community for resolution. Primary care physicians attend MHHP continuing education programs. In a survey of 109 physicians in one of the MHHP communities, 95 percent of respondents believed cigarette smoking to be an important risk factor for CVD, but only 15 percent judged themselves to be effective in dealing with patients who smoked. Forty-one percent of respondents said that elevated blood cholesterol is an important risk factor, but only 20 percent felt effective in treating the condition. Only 18 percent of the physicians in the sample believed that a poor eating pattern plays a substantial role in CVD, and 9 percent felt effective in counseling patients about eating habits. This pattern of results indicates the need not only for continuing education about risk factors for CVD, but also for training to improve patient counseling skills. PMID:3136495

  10. The role of cooperatives in sustaining the livelihoods of rural communities: The case of rural cooperatives in Shurugwi District, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smart Mhembwe

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of the research was to analyse the role of cooperatives in sustaining the livelihoods of local rural communities in Shurugwi District in Zimbabwe. Descriptive survey design was used in this mixed method approach to the study. A questionnaire, interviews and observation methods were employed as the main research instruments. Purposive sampling technique was adopted and data were collected from government officials and from members of the six cooperatives in Shurugwi District. A total of 50 research participants were involved in the study. It was found that cooperatives were established as a strategy to sustain livelihoods of rural communities. With the adoption of cooperatives, people in the rural communities managed to generate employment, boost food production, empower the marginalised, especially women, and promote social cohesion and integration, thereby improving their livelihoods and reducing poverty. Most cooperatives face a number of challenges that include lack of financial support, poor management and lack of management skills, and lack of competitive markets to sell their produce. The study recommends that the government and the banking sector render financial support to cooperatives in rural communities to allow them to expand and diversify their business operations; constant training on leadership and management skills is provided to cooperatives’ members. There is also a need for cooperatives, especially those in the agricultural sector, to form some producer associations so as to easily market their produce. Lastly, the study recommends that future research should focus on investigating issues that hinder the growth of the cooperative movement in rural communities of Zimbabwe. It is hoped that policy-makers, the academia and communities would benefit from the study.

  11. The role of community health centers in assessing the social determinants of health for planning and policy: the example of frontier New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Sean; Stone, Lisa Cacari; Wilger, Susan; Cantor, Jeremy; Guzman, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the experience of a frontier-based community health center when it utilized the Tool for Health and Resilience in Vulnerable Environments (THRIVE) for assessing social determinants of health with a local health consortium. Community members (N = 357) rated safety, jobs, housing, and education among the top health issues. Community leaders integrated these health priorities in a countywide strategic planning process. This example of a frontier county in New Mexico demonstrates the critical role that community health centers play when engaging with local residents to assess community health needs for strategic planning and policy development.

  12. Prenatal care utilization in Zimbabwe: Examining the role of community-level factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makate, Marshall; Makate, Clifton

    2017-12-01

    This paper assesses the importance of community-level factors on prenatal care utilization in Zimbabwe. The analysis is performed using data from the two most recent rounds of the nationally representative Demographic and Health Survey for Zimbabwe conducted in 2005/06 and 2010/11 linked with other community-level data. We use logistic, generalized linear regressions as well as multilevel mixed models to examine the factors associated with the frequency, timing and quality of prenatal care. Our results suggest that contraceptive prevalence, religious composition, density of nurses, health expenditures per capita and availability of government hospitals in communities are important predictors of prenatal care use in Zimbabwe. These findings have important implications for public health policy in Zimbabwe - a country with unfavorable maternal and child health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The adoption of Firm-Hosted Online Communities: an empirical investigation into the role of service quality and social interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkindale, David; Ram, Jiwat; Chen, Howard

    2018-02-01

    Online communities are a powerful device for collaborative creativity and innovation. Developments in Web 2.0 technologies have given rise to such interactions through firm-hosted online communities (FHOCs) - firm-run online information services that also provide self-help to a community. We devise a model that seeks to explain the factors that encourage people to become members of a FHOC and test the model using structural equation modelling based on data collected from 511 users of a FHOC. The study finds that: (a) an understanding of Perceived Usefulness (PU) plays a mediating role between Behavioural Intention (BI) to adopt FHOC and Trust, as well as Interface design; b) Networking among users has an indirect effect on BI; and c) design of the Interface has a direct influence on BI. A managerial implication is that Networking plays a role in the way supplementary services, including blogs and discussion forums, are perceived. Theoretically, when service quality is decomposed into components such as core services and supplementary services, it also positively influences PU.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonigal, Kathleen A.; Pietrzyk, Robert a.; Johnson, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository (Repository) is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. Samples from the International Space Station (ISS), including blood and urine, will be collected, processed and archived during the preflight, inflight and postflight phases of ISS missions. This investigation has been developed to archive biosamples for use as a resource for future space flight related research. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can study space flight related changes and investigate physiological markers. The development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository will allow for the collection, processing, storage, maintenance, and ethical distribution of biosamples to meet goals of scientific and programmatic relevance to the space program. Archiving of the biosamples will provide future research opportunities including investigating patterns of physiological changes, analysis of components unknown at this time or analyses performed by new methodologies.

  15. Interference Analysis for an Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of aeronautical communications for airport surface applications has been identified through a NASA research program and an international collaborative future communications study. The result, endorsed by both the United States and European regulatory agencies is called AeroMACS (Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System) and is based upon the IEEE 802.16e mobile wireless standard. Coordinated efforts to develop appropriate aviation standards for the AeroMACS system are now underway within RTCA (United States) and Eurocae (Europe). AeroMACS will be implemented in a recently allocated frequency band, 5091-5150 MHz. As this band is also occupied by fixed satellite service uplinks, AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. The aspects of AeroMACS operation that present potential interference to the fixed satellite service are under analysis in order to enable the definition of standards that assure that such interference will be avoided. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been involved in this analysis, and the first results of modeling and simulation efforts directed at this analysis are the subject of this presentation.

  16. The role of schools in promoting inclusive communities in contexts of diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreouli, Eleni; Howarth, Caroline; Sonn, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Against the background of evidence for links between ill-health and prejudice, in this article we discuss how to promote inclusive communities in contexts of diversity. A brief critical overview of dominant psychological approaches to prejudice reduction reveals the apolitical nature of these approaches, and thus, we argue for a more contextual and political model on how to promote inclusive communities. Drawing on examples of different school practices on cultural diversity from across England, we argue that we need to develop a perspective that connects local contexts of everyday practice, resistance and agency to the institutional and structural realities of prejudice.

  17. Exploring the role of intermediary organizations in firm and user community collaborations: Resolving or multiplying paradoxes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsdahl Lauritzen, Ghita

    2015-01-01

    Research on user innovation shows that innovation can be impeded by the conflicting demands that arise in the context of collaborations between firms and their user communities. One stream of research, however, applies a paradox lens to argue that intermediary organizations can help to resolve...... these conflicts, by bridging the opposing logics in which they originate. On the basis of an embedded case study, this article suggests that instead of resolving a paradox of innovation, intermediaries create new paradoxical tensions. Further, I argue that mediating firm-community collaboration is not a matter...

  18. Urban shrinkage, local housing markets and the role of voluntary community organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    of that municipalities’ tax income drop and they therefore need to reduce or completely withdraw public services. The aim of the paper is to explore what options, if any, are available to local communities and local governments to counteract these detrimental economic, spatial and social developments? It is discussed...... why and how communities’ social capital enables voluntary initiatives to grow and if there are options available to local government to encourage and strengthen voluntary community-based organisations. Evidence from two case studies shows a number of successful initiatives by both municipalities...

  19. Profiling microbial community structures across six large oilfields in China and the potential role of dominant microorganisms in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Li, Jiwei; Jiang, Lei; Sun, Zhilei; Fu, Meiyan; Peng, Xiaotong

    2015-10-01

    Successful bioremediation of oil pollution is based on a comprehensive understanding of the in situ physicochemical conditions and indigenous microbial communities as well as the interaction between microorganisms and geochemical variables. Nineteen oil-contaminated soil samples and five uncontaminated controls were taken from six major oilfields across different geoclimatic regions in China to investigate the spatial distribution of the microbial ecosystem. Microbial community analysis revealed remarkable variation in microbial diversity between oil-contaminated soils taken from different oilfields. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) further demonstrated that a suite of in situ geochemical parameters, including soil moisture and sulfate concentrations, were among the factors that influenced the overall microbial community structure and composition. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the vast majority of sequences were related to the genera Arthrobacter, Dietzia, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Marinobacter, many of which contain known oil-degrading or oil-emulsifying species. Remarkably, a number of archaeal genera including Halalkalicoccus, Natronomonas, Haloterrigena, and Natrinema were found in relatively high abundance in some of the oil-contaminated soil samples, indicating that these Euryarchaeota may play an important ecological role in some oil-contaminated soils. This study offers a direct and reliable reference of the diversity of the microbial community in various oil-contaminated soils and may influence strategies for in situ bioremediation of oil pollution.

  20. Changes in community perspectives on the roles and rules of church forests in northern Ethiopia: evidence from a panel survey of four Ethiopian Orthodox communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis William Reynolds

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Some of the only Afromontane forest in northern Ethiopia today is on lands managed by followers of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, where for centuries priests and communities have conserved forest groves around church buildings. The ecological value of the thousands of church forests in Ethiopia has been widely acknowledged, but little is known about the diverse local institutions that govern these resources, or how such institutions might be changing in response to Ethiopia’s rapid recent economic development. This study uses a unique panel survey to explore changes in community perspectives on the social and ecological roles of church forests, and rules governing church forest use, in four Orthodox communities over time. Our sample consists of 122 household surveys conducted in 2002 and a further 122 surveys from 2014, with 71 households interviewed in both periods. We find that reported uses of church forests vary across forests and over time, with larger forests more likely to be used for extractive purposes such as firewood and construction timber, while smaller forests have become more restricted to renewable or non-extractive uses such as natural medicines, honey, and prayer. Results of logistic regression suggest church followers’ support for preserving church forests increases with age and access to alternative sources of firewood – including exotic Eucalyptus spp. plantations which are increasingly widespread in northern Ethiopia. We also observe a shift since 2002 away from an expectation that church followers themselves hold responsibility for rule enforcement in church forests to a perceived sharing of responsibility by church authorities (i.e. priests and government (i.e. police in 2014. Together the progressive introduction of exotic tree species in church forests combined with the erosion of religious norms surrounding local forest governance may threaten the integrity and diversity of these unique social-ecological systems.

  1. The role local initiatives in community based disaster risk management in Kemijen, Semarang City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzie, W. Z.; Sariffudin, S.

    2017-06-01

    Community-based disaster risk reduction is one of the homegrown initiatives efforts and community empowerment oriented in disaster management. This approach is very important because no one can understand the conditions in a region better than the local communities. Therefore, the implementation of CBDRM always emphasize local initiatives in decision making. The existence of local initiative is necessary specially to anticipate the impact of climate change which is increasingly affecting towns in coastal areas, including settlements in Semarang. Kemijen Urban Village is one of the informal settlements in Semarang, which has the highest intensity of flood that is 12 times during 5 years (2011-2015). The research question is how the level of local initiatives in flood disaster management in Kemijen, Semarang? This study aims to assess the level of local initiatives in Kemijen as the community adaptive capacity of flood prevention in pre-disaster, emergency response, and post-disaster. Local initiatives assessed on water supply, sanitation, food, shelter, health, drainage maintenance and waste management. This study shows the level of local initiatives in pre-disaster and post-disaster is almost same and bigger than the response phase. Scoring results showed that pre-disaster is 35.002, 27.9577 for emergency response, and post-disaster is 34.9862 with each category that is independent, empowered, and independent. This study also shows that local initiatives in Kemijen largely formed by individual initiative and only a few were formed by a collective initiative.

  2. The Role of Glass in Interior Architecture: Aesthetics, Community, and Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziff, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Advances in glass technologies are being applied in contemporary interior architecture. Glass forms and surfaces are appearing in settings and applications that offer vivid aesthetic experiences for users, but create ambiguous messages concerning community and privacy. Where a modernist application of glass may have been directed toward creating a…

  3. Strengthening the Role of Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges. Focus Group Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Center for Community College Student Engagement encourages colleges to hold focus groups with part-time and full-time faculty to learn about differences in the faculty and their experience at their college and to complement survey data. Survey responses tell the "what" about faculty's experiences; through conducting focus groups,…

  4. The Role of Community Colleges in Advancing Upward Mobility: A Demos Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a short background on Demos, a public policy organization that works on issues of political and economic inequality. Demos views community colleges as a linchpin in the American higher education system, and it has worked over several years to research ways to increase state support for higher education and direct support…

  5. The Role of English Debating Tournament in the Face of the ASEAN Economy Community (AEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husnawadi; Syamsudarni

    2016-01-01

    Since its establishment in the late 2015, the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) with English as the official language has forced its participating countries to improve the quality of English language teaching, in the hope to prepare their people to be globally competitive, as the lack of English proficiency remains the main challenge across the…

  6. Role of environment and hydrography in determining the picoplankton community structure of Sagami Bay, Japan

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Saino, T.; Horimoto, N.; Kanda, J.; Ishimaru, T.

    -28 x 10 sup(11) cells m sup(-2) followed by Prochlorococcus (1-5 x 10 sup(11) cells m sup(-2)) and picoeukaryotes during the warm period. Heterotrophic bacteria dominated the picoplankton community throughout the year, especially in the warm period...

  7. The role of ex-offenders in implementing the Community Work ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hefere

    a positive impact through the community work done by ex-offenders who talk to .... It is hoped that upon their release many will stop engaging in criminal activities .... life stories to tell others (especially the youth) that 'crime is not good' and that ...

  8. Roles of the economic community of West African states in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The decision to deepen cooperation among the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in the struggle against insurgencies in Mali and Nigeria has inspired a lively debate among scholars. Since no large-scale war has occurred between ECOWAS member states since its founding in 1975, it is reasonable ...

  9. The subtidal gully fish community of the eastern Cape and the role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-02-25

    Feb 25, 1988 ... The subtidal gully fish community of the eastern Cape and the ... relation to previous studies of intertidal pools in the eastern and western Cape, ... transient species, particularly two species in the family ..... schooling species (27%) made up the balance. ..... consistent with other work that has shown greater.

  10. Community care worker perceptions of their roles in tuberculosis care and their information needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Okeyo

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: CCWs were motivated and proud of their contribution to TB patient management and the education they provided to patients and to lay community members. Ongoing training was identified as a need, along with access to quality information materials to improve their knowledge and facilitate patient counselling.

  11. Barriers to community-based drug dependence treatment: implications for police roles, collaborations and performance indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Du, Chunhua; Cai, Thomas; Han, Qingfeng; Yuan, Huanhuan; Luo, Tingyan; Ren, Guoliang; Mburu, Gitau; Wang, Bangyuan; Golichenko, Olga; Zhang, Chaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, people who use drugs (PWUD) are among the populations at highest risk for HIV infection. In China, PWUD are primarily sentenced to compulsory detainment centres, in which access to healthcare, including HIV treatment and prevention services, is limited or non-existent. In 2008, China's 2008 Anti-Drug Law encouraged the development and use of community-based drug dependence rehabilitation, yet there is limited evidence evaluating the efficacy and challenges of this model in China. In this study, we explore these challenges and describe how cooperation between law enforcement and health departments can meet the needs of PWUD. Methods In 2015, we conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with all four staff members and 16 clients of the Ping An Centre No. 1 for community-based drug treatment, three local police officers and three officials from the local Centre for Disease Control. Interviews explored obstacles in implementing community-based drug dependence treatment and efforts to resolve these difficulties. Transcripts were coded and analyzed with qualitative data analysis software (MAXQDA 11). Results We identified three challenges to community-based drug treatment at the Ping An Centre No. 1: (1) suboptimal coordination among parties involved, (2) a divergence in attitudes towards PWUD and harm reduction between law enforcement and health officials and (3) conflicting performance targets for police and health officials that undermine the shared goal of treatment. We also identified the take-home methadone maintenance treatment model at the Ping An Centre No. 1 as an example of an early successful collaboration between the police, the health department and PWUD. Conclusions To overcome barriers to effective community-based drug treatment, we recommend aligning the goals of law enforcement and public health agencies towards health-based performance indicators. Furthermore, tensions between PWUD and police need to be addressed and trust

  12. Strengthening the role of Community Health Representatives in the Navajo Nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline King

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strengthening Community Health Worker systems has been recognized to improve access to chronic disease prevention and management efforts in low-resource communities. The Community Outreach and Patient Empowerment (COPE Program is a Native non-profit organization with formal partnerships with both the Navajo Nation Community Health Representative (CHR Program and the clinical facilities serving the Navajo Nation. COPE works to better integrate CHRs into the local health care system through training, strengthening care coordination, and a standardized culturally appropriate suite of health promotion materials for CHRs to deliver to high-risk individuals in their homes. Methods The objective of this mixed methods, cross sectional evaluation of a longitudinal cohort study was to explore how the COPE Program has effected CHR teams over the past 6 years. COPE staff surveyed CHRs in concurrent years (2014 and 2015 about their perceptions of and experience working with COPE, including potential effects COPE may have had on communication among patients, CHRs, and hospital-based providers. COPE staff also conducted focus groups with all eight Navajo Nation CHR teams. Results CHRs and other stakeholders who viewed our results agree that COPE has improved clinic-community linkages, primarily through strengthened collaborations between Public Health Nurses and CHRs, and access to the Electronic Health Records. CHRs perceived that COPE’s programmatic support has strengthened their validity and reputation with providers and clients, and has enhanced their ability to positively effect health outcomes among their clients. CHRs report an improved ability to deliver health coaching to their clients. Survey results show that 80.2% of CHRs feel strongly positive that COPE trainings are useful, while 44.6% of CHRs felt that communication and teamwork had improved because of COPE. Conclusions These findings suggest that CHRs have experienced

  13. What role could community pharmacists in Malaysia play in diabetes self-management education and support? The views of individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E Lyn; Wong, Pei Se; Tan, Ming Yeong; Sheridan, Janie

    2018-04-01

    This study explored the experiences and views of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) on their diabetes self-management and potential roles for community pharmacists in diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) in Malaysia. A qualitative study, using semi-structured, face-to-face interviews, was conducted with patients with T2D attending a primary care health clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed inductively. Fourteen participants with T2D were interviewed. Data were coded into five main themes: experience and perception of diabetes self-management, constraints of the current healthcare system, perception of the community pharmacist and community pharmacies, perceived roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care, and challenges in utilising community pharmacies to provide DSME/S. There were misconceptions about diabetes management that may be attributed to a lack of knowledge. Although participants described potential roles for community pharmacists in education, medication review and continuity of care, these roles were mostly non-clinically oriented. Participants were not confident about community pharmacists making recommendations and changes to the prescribed treatment regimens. While participants recognised the advantages of convenience of a community pharmacy-based diabetes care service, they raised concerns over the retail nature and the community pharmacy environment for providing such services. This study highlighted the need to improve the care provision for people with T2D. Participants with T2D identified potential, but limited roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care. Participants expressed concerns that need to be addressed if effective diabetes care is to be provided from community pharmacies in Malaysia. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. THE ROLE OF COMMUNICATION OF COMMUNITY FIGURE IN AFFECTING THE VOTERS’ CHOICE IN THE ELECTION OF PEMATANGSIANTAR CITY, NORTH SUMATERA PROVINCE, 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Aswan Jaya; Katimin

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the role of community leaders in influencing voter choice in Pematangsiantar City Head Election 2016. this research is a qualitative research with indication that every data in this research is expressed descriptively without using numbers and symbols. The research data is taken from interviews and direct case studies in the field by meeting community leaders and community members directly involved in the election of Pematang Siantar. The results show...

  15. Supporting self management of type 2 diabetes: is there a role for the community pharmacist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhippayom T

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Teerapon Dhippayom,1 Ines Krass21Pharmaceutical Care Research Unit, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Evidence supports the efficacy of pharmacy services in type 2 diabetes (T2D. However, little is known about consumer perspectives on the role of community pharmacists in diabetes care. The objectives of this study were to identify potential unmet needs and explore preferences for pharmacist-delivered support for T2D.Methods: A qualitative study using focus groups was conducted in Sydney, Australia. Patients with T2D who were members of the Australian Diabetes Council in Sydney, Australia, were recruited through a survey on medication use in T2D. Five focus groups with a total of 32 consumers with T2D were recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed.Results: The key themes were 1 the experiences of diabetes services received, 2 the potential to deliver self-management services, and 3 the suggested role of pharmacist in supporting diabetes management. Gaps in understanding and some degree of nonadherence to self-management signaled a potential for self-management support delivered by pharmacists. However, consumers still perceive that the main role of pharmacists in diabetes care centers on drug management services, with some enhancements to support adherence and continuity of supply. Barriers to diabetes care services included time constraints and a perceived lack of interest by pharmacists.Conclusion: Given the unmet needs in diabetes self-management, opportunities exist for pharmacists to be involved in diabetes care. The challenge is for pharmacists to upgrade their diabetes knowledge and skills, organize their workflow, and become proactive in delivering diabetes care support.Keywords: diabetes care, community pharmacy, community pharmacist, self-management, preference

  16. Expanding the Role of Maryland Community Colleges in K-12 Teacher Preparation: Benefits and Costs of Implementing the Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jennifer Vest

    2012-01-01

    This study uses benefit-cost analysis to compare three alternative scenarios for implementing the Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) degree in Maryland community colleges. The first policy scenario is that community colleges retain their traditional role in K-12 teacher preparation by providing lower-division transfer courses and programs for…

  17. Potential Roles of Mhealth for Community Health Workers: Formative Research With End Users in Uganda and Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thondoo, Meelan; Strachan, Daniel Ll; Nakirunda, Maureen; Ndima, Sozinho; Muiambo, Abel; Källander, Karin; Hill, Zelee

    2015-07-23

    Community health workers are reemerging as an essential component of health systems in low-income countries. However, there are concerns that unless they are adequately supported, their motivation and performance will be suboptimal. mHealth presents an opportunity to improve support for community health workers; however, most interventions to date have been designed through a top-down approach, rarely involve the end user, and have not focused on motivation. To use formative research to explore the views of community health workers in Uganda and Mozambique on the potential role of mHealth in their work delivering integrated community case management of children. We conducted 24 in-depth interviews and 5 focus group discussions with community health workers in Uganda and Mozambique. Data were collected on: current phone use, preferred phone and charger characteristics, and perceptions of a range of potential mHealth interventions. Interviews were conducted in the local language, were audio recorded and converted into expanded notes. Interviews were coded for key thematic areas using both deductive and inductive codes. Deductive codes included mHealth's potential impact on motivation and performance. The most salient roles of mHealth in improving performance and motivation were reducing the need for travel, improving efficiency and planning, receiving feedback and information, and improving communication with supervisors and other community health workers. This was mostly through improved voice and short message service (SMS) text communication. Specific components of mHealth interventions that participants felt could improve motivation included increasing their visibility and credibility through branding of phones; providing an SMS response to data submission; and sending SMS messages about the importance of their work and achievements, rather than just reminders or technical messages. Participants identified feasibility issues related to the language of SMS

  18. Qualitative study of the role of men in maternal health in resource-limited communities in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Kathryn; Nelson, Brett D; McPherson, Heather; Ahn, Roy; Oguttu, Monica; Burke, Thomas F

    2016-12-01

    To better understand the beliefs of men and women in western Kenya regarding the appropriate role of men in maternal health and to identify barriers to greater involvement. Between June 1 and July 31, 2014, a cross-sectional qualitative study enrolled lay men, lay women, and community health workers from Kisumu and Nyamira counties in western Kenya. Semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted and qualitative approaches were utilized to analyze the transcripts and identify common themes. In total, 134 individuals participated in 18 focus group discussions. Participants discussed the role of men and a general consensus was recorded that it was a man's duty to protect women during pregnancy. When discussing obstacles to male involvement, female participants highlighted gender dynamics and male participants raised financial limitations. There was considerable discrepancy between how men described their roles and how they actually behaved, although educated men appeared to describe themselves as performing more supportive behaviors compared with male participants with less education. It is suggested that interventions aimed at increasing male involvement should incorporate the existing culturally sanctioned roles men perform as a foundation upon which to build, rather than attempting to construct roles that oppose prevailing norms. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Robust Timing Synchronization in Aeronautical Mobile Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fu-Qin; Pinchak, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    This work details a study of robust synchronization schemes suitable for satellite to mobile aeronautical applications. A new scheme, the Modified Sliding Window Synchronizer (MSWS), is devised and compared with existing schemes, including the traditional Early-Late Gate Synchronizer (ELGS), the Gardner Zero-Crossing Detector (GZCD), and the Sliding Window Synchronizer (SWS). Performance of the synchronization schemes is evaluated by a set of metrics that indicate performance in digital communications systems. The metrics are convergence time, mean square phase error (or root mean-square phase error), lowest SNR for locking, initial frequency offset performance, midstream frequency offset performance, and system complexity. The performance of the synchronizers is evaluated by means of Matlab simulation models. A simulation platform is devised to model the satellite to mobile aeronautical channel, consisting of a Quadrature Phase Shift Keying modulator, an additive white Gaussian noise channel, and a demodulator front end. Simulation results show that the MSWS provides the most robust performance at the cost of system complexity. The GZCD provides a good tradeoff between robustness and system complexity for communication systems that require high symbol rates or low overall system costs. The ELGS has a high system complexity despite its average performance. Overall, the SWS, originally designed for multi-carrier systems, performs very poorly in single-carrier communications systems. Table 5.1 in Section 5 provides a ranking of each of the synchronization schemes in terms of the metrics set forth in Section 4.1. Details of comparison are given in Section 5. Based on the results presented in Table 5, it is safe to say that the most robust synchronization scheme examined in this work is the high-sample-rate Modified Sliding Window Synchronizer. A close second is its low-sample-rate cousin. The tradeoff between complexity and lowest mean-square phase error determines

  20. Aeronautics Autonomy Testbed Capability (AATC) Team Developed Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Phillip J.

    2018-01-01

    In 2015, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) formed a multi-center, interdisciplinary team of engineers from three different aeronautics research centers who were tasked with improving NASA autonomy research capabilities. This group was subsequently named the Aeronautics Autonomy Testbed Capability (AATC) team. To aid in confronting the autonomy research directive, NASA contracted IDEO, a design firm, to provide consultants and guides to educate NASA engineers through the practice of design thinking, which is an unconventional method for aerospace design processes. The team then began learning about autonomy research challenges by conducting interviews with a diverse group of researchers and pilots, military personnel and civilians, experts and amateurs. Part of this design thinking process involved developing ideas for products or programs known as concepts that could enable real world fulfillment of the most important latent needs identified through analysis of the interviews. The concepts are intended to be sacrificial, intermediate steps in the design thinking process and are presented in this report to record the efforts of the AATC group. Descriptions are provided in present tense to allow for further ideation and imagining the concept as reality as was attempted during the teams discussions and interviews. This does not indicate that the concepts are actually in practice within NASA though there may be similar existing programs independent of AATC. These concepts were primarily created at two distinct stages during the design thinking process. After the initial interviews, there was a workshop for concept development and the resulting ideas are shown in this work as from the First Round. As part of succeeding interviews, the team members presented the First Round concepts to refine the understanding of existing research needs. This knowledge was then used to generate an additional set of concepts denoted as the Second Round. Some

  1. Task shifting--Ghana's community mental health workers' experiences and perceptions of their roles and scope of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O; Osei, Akwasi; Farren, Conor K; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2015-01-01

    Because of the absence of adequate numbers of psychiatrists, the bulk of mental health care at the community level in Ghana is provided by community mental health workers (CMHWs). To examine the role and scope of practice of CMHWs in Ghana from their own perspectives and to make recommendations to improve the care they provide. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 164 CMHWs from all the 10 administrative regions of Ghana, comprising 71 (43.3%) community psychiatric nurses (CPNs), 19 (11.6%) clinical psychiatric officers (CPOs), and 74 (45.1%) community mental health officers (CMHOs). Overall, only 39 (23.8%) CMHWs worked closely with psychiatrists, 64 (39%) worked closely with social workers, 46 (28%) worked closely with psychologists and 13 (7.9%) worked closely with occupational therapists. A lower proportion of CMHOs worked closely with psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers compared with CPOs and CPNs. There was no significant difference in the proportion of the different CMHW types who expressed confidence in their ability to diagnose any of the commonly named mental health conditions except personality disorders. However, a lower proportion of CMHOs than CPOs and CPNs expressed confidence in their ability to treat all the disorders. The CMHWs ranked schizophrenia as the most frequently treated mental health condition and there was no statistically significant difference in the reported frequency with which the three groups of CMHWs treated any of the mental health conditions. Mental health policy makers and coordinators need to thoroughly review the training curriculum and also evaluate the job descriptions of all CMHWs in Ghana to ensure that they are consistent with the demands and health-care needs of patients they care for in their communities. For example, as CMHOs and CPNs prescribe medication even though they are not expected to do so, it may be worth exploring the merits of including the prescription of common psychotropic medication in

  2. Task shifting – Ghana's community mental health workers’ experiences and perceptions of their roles and scope of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent I. O. Agyapong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of the absence of adequate numbers of psychiatrists, the bulk of mental health care at the community level in Ghana is provided by community mental health workers (CMHWs. Objective: To examine the role and scope of practice of CMHWs in Ghana from their own perspectives and to make recommendations to improve the care they provide. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 164 CMHWs from all the 10 administrative regions of Ghana, comprising 71 (43.3% community psychiatric nurses (CPNs, 19 (11.6% clinical psychiatric officers (CPOs, and 74 (45.1% community mental health officers (CMHOs. Results: Overall, only 39 (23.8% CMHWs worked closely with psychiatrists, 64 (39% worked closely with social workers, 46 (28% worked closely with psychologists and 13 (7.9% worked closely with occupational therapists. A lower proportion of CMHOs worked closely with psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers compared with CPOs and CPNs. There was no significant difference in the proportion of the different CMHW types who expressed confidence in their ability to diagnose any of the commonly named mental health conditions except personality disorders. However, a lower proportion of CMHOs than CPOs and CPNs expressed confidence in their ability to treat all the disorders. The CMHWs ranked schizophrenia as the most frequently treated mental health condition and there was no statistically significant difference in the reported frequency with which the three groups of CMHWs treated any of the mental health conditions. Conclusions: Mental health policy makers and coordinators need to thoroughly review the training curriculum and also evaluate the job descriptions of all CMHWs in Ghana to ensure that they are consistent with the demands and health-care needs of patients they care for in their communities. For example, as CMHOs and CPNs prescribe medication even though they are not expected to do so, it may be worth exploring the merits of

  3. Task shifting – Ghana's community mental health workers’ experiences and perceptions of their roles and scope of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyapong, Vincent I. O.; Osei, Akwasi; Farren, Conor K.; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2015-01-01

    Background Because of the absence of adequate numbers of psychiatrists, the bulk of mental health care at the community level in Ghana is provided by community mental health workers (CMHWs). Objective To examine the role and scope of practice of CMHWs in Ghana from their own perspectives and to make recommendations to improve the care they provide. Design We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 164 CMHWs from all the 10 administrative regions of Ghana, comprising 71 (43.3%) community psychiatric nurses (CPNs), 19 (11.6%) clinical psychiatric officers (CPOs), and 74 (45.1%) community mental health officers (CMHOs). Results Overall, only 39 (23.8%) CMHWs worked closely with psychiatrists, 64 (39%) worked closely with social workers, 46 (28%) worked closely with psychologists and 13 (7.9%) worked closely with occupational therapists. A lower proportion of CMHOs worked closely with psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers compared with CPOs and CPNs. There was no significant difference in the proportion of the different CMHW types who expressed confidence in their ability to diagnose any of the commonly named mental health conditions except personality disorders. However, a lower proportion of CMHOs than CPOs and CPNs expressed confidence in their ability to treat all the disorders. The CMHWs ranked schizophrenia as the most frequently treated mental health condition and there was no statistically significant difference in the reported frequency with which the three groups of CMHWs treated any of the mental health conditions. Conclusions Mental health policy makers and coordinators need to thoroughly review the training curriculum and also evaluate the job descriptions of all CMHWs in Ghana to ensure that they are consistent with the demands and health-care needs of patients they care for in their communities. For example, as CMHOs and CPNs prescribe medication even though they are not expected to do so, it may be worth exploring the merits of including the

  4. Role for Occupational Therapy in Community Mental Health: Using Policy to Advance Scholarship of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Lisa; Burson, Kathrine A; Januszewski, Celeste; Pitts, Deborah B; Preissner, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapists must be aware of professional and policy trends. More importantly, occupational therapists must be involved in efforts to influence policy both for the profession and for the people they serve (Bonder, 1987). Using the state of Illinois as an example, this article reviews the policies and initiatives that impact service decisions for persons with psychiatric disabilities as well as the rationale for including occupational therapy in community mental health service provision. Despite challenges in building a workforce of occupational therapists in the mental health system, this article makes the argument that the current climate of emerging policy and litigation combined with the supporting evidence provides the impetus to strengthen mental health as a primary area of practice. Implications for scholarship of practice related to occupational therapy services in community mental health programs for individuals with psychiatric disability are discussed.

  5. Successful global assessments and monitoring: The roles of the international community and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, H.G.

    1991-01-01

    Successful global assessments and monitoring of natural resources requires teamwork between participating nations and the international communities charged with the responsibility for collecting and disseminating information. In an attempt to identify emerging information needs and to promote coordination, the International Union of Forestry Research Organizations (IUFRO) and other national and international groups held a major conference and workshop in Venice, Italy, on global monitoring last September. The results of the meeting and subsequent events in Montreal indicated a need for more aggressive leadership at the international level and more cooperation at the national level. This paper reports on the outcome of the Venice conference and list some things that the international community and the United States must do to make global assessments and monitoring a reality

  6. Exploring the role of intermediaries in firm-user community collaborations: resolving or multiplying conflicts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsdahl Lauritzen, Ghita

    2015-01-01

    in which they originate. Nevertheless, despite its popularity there is still a paucity of studies on intermediaries mediating firm-community collaboration. On the basis of an embedded case study, this article suggests that instead of resolving conflicts, intermediaries create a new membership construct......Research on user innovation shows that innovation can be impeded by the conflicting demands that arise in the context of collaborations between firms and their user communities. Studies argue that intermediary organizations can help to resolve these conflicts, by bridging the opposing logics...... from which new tensions arise. I propose that if intermediary organizations foster a clearer view of this membership construct, the result can be an innovative synthesis of opposing logics. Thus, I suggest a novel approach to the debate about user innovation by arguing that mediating firm...

  7. Purim: Transformation of the role of the holiday in the life of Belgrade Jewish community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this research is on the function of the holiday Purim in the life of Belgrade Jewish community. In diachronic perspective we are looking at general and local characteristics of the holiday, and different levels of its celebration (private, public sphere. In the studied community this holiday has undergone a transformation from a religious to a secular feast followed by revitalization of its religious context. This paper analyzes the mechanisms of various levels of recovery and conceptualization of this holiday, on the institutionalized level and in the form of spontaneous personal initiatives. We are looking at different functions of this holiday in broad social context and their diachronic changes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177027: Multietnicitet, multukulturalizam, migracije savremeni procesi

  8. The role and organisation of community palliative specialist nursing teams in rural England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeater, Maria; Staton, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    This article describes a study that used a qualitative approach, purposive sampling and semi-structured telephone interviews conducted with specialist palliative care nurses from six rural community teams in England. The study investigated how services were organised and the issues of delivering specialist palliative nursing care in a rural area. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The findings showed many similarities in that the majority of patients in rural areas were not accessing hospice services and there was a greater reliance on care at home. However, the challenges in delivering care ranged from managing patient expectations, geographical distance, lack of technology to support remote working and education for the specialist palliative care teams. The study makes specific recommendations for rural community specialist palliative care teams.

  9. The role of community health workers in improving child health programmes in Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altmann Mathias

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality of children under the age of five remains one of the most important public health challenges in developing countries. In rural settings, the promotion of household and community health practices through community health workers (CHWs is among the key strategies to improve child health. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of CHWs in the promotion of basic child heath services in rural Mali. Methods A community-based cross-sectional survey was undertaken using multi-stage cluster sampling of wards and villages. Data was collected through questionnaires among 401 child-caregivers and registers of 72 CHWs. Results Of 401 households suppose to receive a visit by a CHW, 219 (54.6%; confidence interval 95%; 49.6-59.5 had received at least one visit in the last three months before the survey. The mother is the most important caregiver (97%; high percentage being illiterate. Caregivers treat fever and diarrhoea with the correct regimen in 40% and 11% of cases respectively. Comparative analysis between households with and without CHW visits showed a positive influence of CHWs on family health practices: knowledge on the management of child fever (p = Conclusion Continuous training, transport means, adequate supervision and motivation of CHWs through the introduction of financial incentives and remuneration are among key factors to improve the work of CHWs in rural communities. Poor performance of basic household health practices can be related to irregular supply of drugs and the need of appropriate follow-up by CHWs.

  10. The Role of Romanian Communities in the Diaspora to Promote Romanian International Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolae Neacsu; Monica Neacsu

    2012-01-01

    Due to its natural and antropic tourist resources–cultural, historical, religious, technical, economic and socio–demographic – Romania can answer a large scale of travel motivations and accordingly, it may attract more and more tourist circulation. An important resource to increase tourist circulation to Romania is the Romanian community all over the world, in the way in which the national authorities, the travel agents, the professional associations etc will be able to influence the leadersh...

  11. Core Self-Evaluations and Job Satisfaction: The Role of Organizational and Community Embeddedness.

    OpenAIRE

    Oyler, Jennifer D.

    2007-01-01

    This study extends job embeddedness and job satisfaction theory in several notable directions. As hypothesized, structural equation modeling revealed that community embeddedness was a partial mediator of the relationship between core self-evaluations and job satisfaction. Contrary to job embeddedness theory, this study found that organizational embeddedness and job satisfaction were best represented by a single latent factor. Thus, organizational embeddedness did not act as a mediator of the ...

  12. The Critical Role of the Research Community in Space Weather Planning and Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert M.; Behnke, Richard A.; Moretto, Therese

    2018-03-01

    The explosion of interest in space weather in the last 25 years has been due to a confluence of efforts all over the globe, motivated by the recognition that events on the Sun and the consequent conditions in interplanetary space and Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere can have serious impacts on vital technological systems. The fundamental research conducted at universities, government laboratories, and in the private sector has led to tremendous improvements in the ability to forecast space weather events and predict their impacts on human technology and health. The mobilization of the research community that made this progress possible was the result of a series of actions taken by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to build a national program aimed at space weather. The path forward for space weather is to build on those successes through continued involvement of the research community and support for programs aimed at strengthening basic research and education in academia, the private sector, and government laboratories. Investments in space weather are most effective when applied at the intersection of research and applications. Thus, to achieve the goals set forth originally by the National Space Weather Program, the research community must be fully engaged in the planning, implementation, and execution of space weather activities, currently being coordinated by the Space Weather Operations, Research, and Mitigation Subcommittee under the National Science and Technology Council.

  13. Pond tadpoles with generalized morphology: is it time to reconsider their functional roles in aquatic communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petranka, James W; Kennedy, Caroline A

    1999-09-01

    With rare exceptions, anuran larvae have traditionally been considered to occupy lower trophic levels in aquatic communities where they function as microphagous suspension feeders. This view is being challenged by studies showing that tadpoles with generalized morphology often function as macrophagous predators. Here, we review the literature concerning macrophagy by tadpoles and provide two additional examples involving generalized tadpoles. In the first, we demonstrate with laboratory and field experiments that wood frog (Rana sylvatica) tadpoles are major predators of macroinvertebrates in ponds. In the second, we show that green frog (R. clamitans) tadpoles can cause catastrophic reproductive failure of the wood frog via egg predation. These results and data from other studies challenge the assumption that generalized tadpoles function as filter-feeding omnivores, and question the general applicability of community organization models which assume that predation risk increases with pond permanence. We suggest that predation risk is greater in temporary ponds than in more permanent ponds for many organisms that are vulnerable to predation by tadpoles. This being so, a conditional model based upon interactions that are species-specific, life-stage-specific, and context-dependent may better explain community organization along hydrological gradients than models which assume that temporary ponds have few or no predators.

  14. The role of macrobiota in structuring microbial communities along rocky shores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Pfister

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rocky shore microbial diversity presents an excellent system to test for microbial habitat specificity or generality, enabling us to decipher how common macrobiota shape microbial community structure. At two coastal locations in the northeast Pacific Ocean, we show that microbial composition was significantly different between inert surfaces, the biogenic surfaces that included rocky shore animals and an alga, and the water column plankton. While all sampled entities had a core of common OTUs, rare OTUs drove differences among biotic and abiotic substrates. For the mussel Mytilus californianus, the shell surface harbored greater alpha diversity compared to internal tissues of the gill and siphon. Strikingly, a 7-year experimental removal of this mussel from tidepools did not significantly alter the microbial community structure of microbes associated with inert surfaces when compared with unmanipulated tidepools. However, bacterial taxa associated with nitrate reduction had greater relative abundance with mussels present, suggesting an impact of increased animal-derived nitrogen on a subset of microbial metabolism. Because the presence of mussels did not affect the structure and diversity of the microbial community on adjacent inert substrates, microbes in this rocky shore environment may be predominantly affected through direct physical association with macrobiota.

  15. The role of mangrove revegetation as a means of restoring macrofaunal communities along degraded coasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Daniel; Turra, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    As coastal habitats face unprecedented pressure globally, there is a need to better understand how revegetation can fortify or restore biodiversity. We examined the early-stage outcomes of mangrove revegetation efforts for benthic invertebrate communities within degraded mangrove habitats in south eastern Brazil. We followed changes in macrofaunal abundance and species richness within small-scale Avicennia schaueriana revegetation plots over a 12month period. The assemblages of revegetation plots (RP) became progressively more diverse when compared to structural (SC) and blank controls (BC). The trajectory of change also differed with RP communities demonstrating convergence with those of remnant mangrove forest. After 12months, RP had greater abundances of crustaceans (41%) and polychaetes (13%) as well as higher but variable numbers of gastropods and bivalves than both SC and BC. A spatial examination of revegetation outcomes showed that success may vary across sheltered vs. exposed coastal microhabitats. Indeed, subsequent analysis using generalised linear mixed models pointed to a stronger influence of tidal height, than many of the commonly attributed sedimentary variables such as grain-size and organic matter content as determinants of community structure. Given the encouraging results of this study, we advocate an intensification of revegetation initiatives to augment natural recovery, increase benthic biodiversity and restore ecosystems services to degraded coasts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Developing professional identity in nursing academics: the role of communities of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Nicola; Ferguson, Dorothy; Wilkie, George; Corcoran, Terry; Simpson, Liz

    2009-08-01

    This paper analyses the current standing of nursing within the wider United Kingdom (UK) higher education (HE) environment and considers the development of academic identity within the sector, introducing a technology mediated approach to professional learning and development. A community of practice (CoP) is a way of learning based on collaboration among peers. Individuals come together virtually or physically, with a common purpose, defined by knowledge rather than task [Wenger, E., 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning and Identity, sixth ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge]. In 2008, a small team of academics at Glasgow Caledonian University, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health created and implemented iCoP, a project undertaken to pilot an international CoP, where novices and expert academics collaborated to debate and discuss the complex transition from clinician to academic. Although not intended as a conventional research project, the developmental journey and emerging online discussion provide an insight into the collective thoughts and opinions of a multi-national group of novice academics. The article also highlights the key challenges, problems and limitations of working in an international online arena with professionals who traditionally work and thrive in a face to face, real time environment.

  17. The role of discourse practices in the emergence of marginal status of Messianic Jewish communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Panteleeva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The author attempts to analyze the most significant stages of the developing of the Messianic conception within Judaism as well as the cultural and historical conditions and mechanisms which contributed to the marginalizing of Messianic Jewish communities within Judaism. The main research instrument used by the author is the discourse analysis method proposed by M. Foucault as well as the method of problematization developed and systematized later by Castel. Given methodology presupposes a reconstruction of historical events as refracted by their modern perception; the aims are, fi rstly, to discover invariant models or continuity that are instrumental in preserving the identity of problematization in its constant transformations and, secondly, to single out the principles of varying, that is the variant models of the phenomenon under study. In our case, the problematization emerges at the moment when abruption or marginalization of Messianic Jewish communities takes place. At the end the author arrives at the following conclusions: with respect to Messianic Judaism it is obvious that in the course of its historical development the term «Messianic» has acquired and appropriated negative connotations which was preconditioned mainly by the fact that Messianic communities and groups which shared and actively propagated the Messianic ideas in the society were perceived and declared by the dominant religious tradition as unacceptable, heretical or marginal phenomena destabilizing the established order.

  18. The central role of community benefits in resource development decision making in the Northwest Territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donihee, J.

    1999-01-01

    In the northern territories of Canada the government requirement to provide local benefits to residents has been adopted and enshrined in land claims settlements, and consideration of the benefits that can be provided to First Nations when oil and gas exploration and development occurs on or near aboriginal land is mandatory. Access to their lands will depend on more than fair levels of rent or compensation for damages to the land itself. It also depends on the wider benefits that the project can offer to the whole community. Provision for the negotiation of benefits agreements ought be built into the planning for oil and gas projects in the north, and, as a result, the early establishment of a positive relationship with local communities is necessary. Even though the law mandates that there be a negotiation of a benefits agreement, the process is bilateral and the outcome rests within the control of the two parties. An early agreement on benefits issues is seen positively by the government in the overall legal context. The new legal regimes affecting oil and gas operations have provided First Nations with settled land claims with greater confidence about the part they can play in the development process, and joint ventures are being formed between oil and gas companies and aboriginal communities to cooperate in oil and gas activities. These new relationships are only in the development stage, and, as experiences accumulates, First Nations will understand better what level of benefits are reasonable and possible from oil and gas exploration and development

  19. Revisiting the concept of growth monitoring and its possible role in community-based nutrition programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangasaryan, Nuné; Arabi, Mandana; Schultink, Werner

    2011-03-01

    Community-based growth monitoring (GM) and growth monitoring and promotion (GMP) have been implemented worldwide. The literature provides controversial messages regarding their effectiveness. Numerous countries have GM as their main community-based activity and need guidance for future programming. The notion of GM is usually clear, but the follow-up actions include a range of activities and interventions, all under the heading of "promotion." We suggested definitions, objectives, and outcomes of the GM and GMP. By providing some clarity on these conceptual issues we attempted to provide a basis for consensus building and development of recommendations on when this activity should be promoted or discouraged. We reviewed basic concepts and global experience of GM and GMP using publications about GM and GMP, UNICEF country reports and other publications, field observations, and reports of recent expert consultations. Realistic added benefits are suggested as compared with general counseling that could also be delivered outside the GM session. We provide a narrow definition of "promotion" in GMP, in which actions are tailored to the results of monitoring, as well as suggest quality implementation criteria. GM, even if complemented by a promotional package, can have only a limited impact if it is not part of a comprehensive program. GMP cannot be viewed as a competitor to highly effective interventions, but may serve as a possible platform for their delivery. The decision to build community-based programs on a GMP platform should be based on consideration of benefits, feasibility of quality implementation, and capacity of human resources.

  20. Role of direct funduscopy in screening for diabetic retinopathy in communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hua Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the application of direct funduscopy in screening for diabetic retinopathy in communities. METHODS:After mydriasis, 265 patients with diabetes mellitus(DMin communities were examined for fundus by direct funduscopy. The patients with diabetic retinopathy(DRwere further received fluorescence fundus angiography(FFAafter referral to superior hospitals.RESULTS:Within the 265 patients with DM, 79 patients were diagnosed as DR and the positive rate of DR was 29.8%. Among the patients with DR, there were 46 patients with non- proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand 33 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR; the positive rate was respectively 17.4% and 12.5%. All patients with DR were further diagnosed by FFA after referral. Three patients with NPDR were diagnosed with PDR, and 22 patients received laser treatment.CONCLUSION:Ordinary application of direct funduscopy in patients with DM in communities would early detect the DR. It is very necessary to master direct funduscopy for general practitioners.

  1. The Meaning of Patient Empowerment in the Digital Age: The Role of Online Patient-Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Eugenia; Salinas, Rodrigo; Coquedano, Carla; Simon, Marie-Pierre; Bousquet, Cedric; Ferrer, Marcela; Zorrilla, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, patient empowerment has been used as a strategy for health promotion. The rise of online communities of patients represents a good example of how patient empowerment occurs, independently of the intervention of existing healthcare providers and insurers, allowing thus a more accurate definition of meaning of this concept. We describe two situations related with the development of health-related social networks: (1) The emergence of a new biomedical research model in which patients lead research, shifting the equilibrium of power from the professionals to research subjects themselves, and (2) The emergence of Lay Crowd-Sourced Expertise in these communities, arising from the daily exchange among patients affected by chronic conditions and their relatives, giving place to a new era of bottom-up data generation, previously unknown in biomedical sciences. We enrich these descriptions by analyzing interviews to key actors of these "on line" communities": Michael Chekroun, founder of "Carenity, France", and Paul Wicks Vice President at "PatientsLikeMe, USA".

  2. Role of grass-legume communities in revegetation of a subalpine mine site in British Columbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, K

    1982-01-01

    This study describes an investigation of the potential for pioneer grass-legume communities to stabilize and ameliorate geologically-fresh soil leading to the establishment of a self-sustaining, progressive plant succession on a surface-mined subalpine site. The study area is located 2000 m above sea level in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Field studies revealed chronological trends in grass-legume communities at four sites revegetated during 1974-1978 including: species composition, legumes (Trifolium repens L., T. hybridum L. and Medicago sativa L.) performing increasingly poorly on the older sites; biomass changes, a shoot to root ratio (S/R) decreasing from 2.3 to 0.2 as the communities aged; and litter accumulation which continued even on the oldest site. Fertilizer (13-16-10) operationally applied at 150-391 kg/ha enhanced the growth of Dactylis gomerata L. and litter degradation, and acidified the soil. Nitrogen fertilization was also associated with two clear inverse relationships identified between D. glomerata and Festuca rubra L. biomass, and between soil pH and phosphorus levels. In greenhouse tests grasses were revealed to be more efficient soil nitrogen consumers than were legumes and nitrogen fixation decreased significantly (P < 0.01) and linearly with increasing grass seeding rates.

  3. Applied simulation and optimization in logistics, industrial and aeronautical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Mota, Idalia; Serrano, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Presenting techniques, case-studies and methodologies that combine the use of simulation approaches with optimization techniques for facing problems in manufacturing, logistics, or aeronautical problems, this book provides solutions to common industrial problems in several fields, which range from manufacturing to aviation problems, where the common denominator is the combination of simulation’s flexibility with optimization techniques’ robustness. Providing readers with a comprehensive guide to tackle similar issues in industrial environments, this text explores novel ways to face industrial problems through hybrid approaches (simulation-optimization) that benefit from the advantages of both paradigms, in order to give solutions to important problems in service industry, production processes, or supply chains, such as scheduling, routing problems and resource allocations, among others.

  4. Current and future translation trends in aeronautics and astronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Timothy

    1986-01-01

    The pattern of translation activity in aeronautics and astronautics is reviewed. It is argued that the international nature of the aerospace industry and the commercialization of space have increased the need for the translation of scientific literature in the aerospace field. Various factors which can affect the quality of translations are examined. The need to translate the activities of the Soviets, Germans, and French in materials science in microgravity, of the Japanese, Germans, and French in the development of industrial ceramics, and of the Chinese in launching and communications satellites is discussed. It is noted that due to increases in multilateral and bilateral relationships in the aerospace industry, the amount of translation from non-English source material into non-English text will increase and the most important languages will be French and German, with an increasing demand for Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, and Italian translations.

  5. Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, James M.; Hall, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To help increase the capacity and efficiency of the nation s airports, a secure wideband wireless communications system is proposed for use on the airport surface. This paper provides an overview of the research and development process for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). AeroMACS is based on a specific commercial profile of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 standard known as Wireless Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access or WiMAX (WiMax Forum). The paper includes background on the need for global interoperability in air/ground data communications, describes potential AeroMACS applications, addresses allocated frequency spectrum constraints, summarizes the international standardization process, and provides findings and recommendations from the world s first AeroMACS prototype implemented in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

  6. A review of the Magnus effect in aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Jost

    2012-11-01

    The Magnus effect is well-known for its influence on the flight path of a spinning ball. Besides ball games, the method of producing a lift force by spinning a body of revolution in cross-flow was not used in any kind of commercial application until the year 1924, when Anton Flettner invented and built the first rotor ship Buckau. This sailboat extracted its propulsive force from the airflow around two large rotating cylinders. It attracted attention wherever it was presented to the public and inspired scientists and engineers to use a rotating cylinder as a lifting device for aircraft. This article reviews the application of Magnus effect devices and concepts in aeronautics that have been investigated by various researchers and concludes with discussions on future challenges in their application.

  7. TRENDS: The aeronautical post-test database management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, W. S.; Bondi, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    TRENDS, an engineering-test database operating system developed by NASA to support rotorcraft flight tests, is described. Capabilities and characteristics of the system are presented, with examples of its use in recalling and analyzing rotorcraft flight-test data from a TRENDS database. The importance of system user-friendliness in gaining users' acceptance is stressed, as is the importance of integrating supporting narrative data with numerical data in engineering-test databases. Considerations relevant to the creation and maintenance of flight-test database are discussed and TRENDS' solutions to database management problems are described. Requirements, constraints, and other considerations which led to the system's configuration are discussed and some of the lessons learned during TRENDS' development are presented. Potential applications of TRENDS to a wide range of aeronautical and other engineering tests are identified.

  8. Nonlinear Acoustic and Ultrasonic NDT of Aeronautical Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Abeele, Koen; Katkowski, Tomasz; Mattei, Christophe

    2006-05-01

    In response to the demand for innovative microdamage inspection systems, with high sensitivity and undoubted accuracy, we are currently investigating the use and robustness of several acoustic and ultrasonic NDT techniques based on Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) for the characterization of microdamage in aeronautical components. In this report, we illustrate the results of an amplitude dependent analysis of the resonance behaviour, both in time (signal reverberation) and in frequency (sweep) domain. The technique is applied to intact and damaged samples of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) composites after thermal loading or mechanical fatigue. The method shows a considerable gain in sensitivity and an incontestable interpretation of the results for nonlinear signatures in comparison with the linear characteristics. For highly fatigued samples, slow dynamical effects are observed.

  9. Vortex methods in aeronautics: how to make things work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voutsinas, S.G.

    2004-01-01

    Vortex methods constitute a particular class in CFD. They are grid-free, they use Lagrangian co-ordinates and most importantly they use vorticity as mail flow variable instead of the velocity. In aeronautics they are in use for over than 20 years with quite impressing results. However, rather a limited number of researchers would prefer them. This could be due to some particularities vortex methods have in their implementation. In view of trying to clarify thins, the present paper reviews the current state of art and details some of the 'difficult' points of vortex methods. Although the focus is mainly on rotor problems, the presented techniques can be used in other applications as well. (author)

  10. Virtual Knowledge Brokering: Describing the Roles and Strategies Used by Knowledge Brokers in a Pediatric Physiotherapy Virtual Community of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtubise, Karen; Rivard, Lisa; Héguy, Léa; Berbari, Jade; Camden, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge transfer in pediatric rehabilitation is challenging and requires active, multifaceted strategies. The use of knowledge brokers (KBs) is one such strategy noted to promote clinician behavior change. The success of using KBs to transfer knowledge relies on their ability to adapt to ever-changing clinical contexts. In addition, with the rapid growth of online platforms as knowledge transfer forums, KBs must become effective in virtual environments. Although the role of KBs has been studied in various clinical contexts, their emerging role in specific online environments designed to support evidence-based behavior change has not yet been described. Our objective is to describe the roles of, and strategies used by, four KBs involved in a virtual community of practice to guide and inform future online KB interventions. A descriptive design guided this study and a thematic content analysis process was used to analyze online KB postings. The Promoting Action on Research in Health Sciences knowledge transfer framework and online andragogical learning theories assisted in the coding. A thematic map was created illustrating the links between KBs' strategies and emerging roles in the virtual environment. We analyzed 95 posts and identified three roles: 1) context architect: promoting a respectful learning environment, 2) knowledge sharing promoter: building capacity, and 3) linkage creator: connecting research-to-practice. Strategies used by KBs reflected invitational, constructivism, and connectivism approaches, with roles and strategies changing over time. This study increases our understanding of the actions of KBs in virtual contexts to foster uptake of research evidence in pediatric physiotherapy. Our results provide valuable information about the knowledge and skills required by individuals to fulfill this role in virtual environments.

  11. Role Of Non-Governmental Organizations Leadership In The Implementation Of Community Development Projects In Arumeru District Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabu Ally Mtunge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the role of leadership in the implementation of community development projects by local non-governmental organizations in Arumeru District Tanzania. The study applied survey design which covered the sample of 46 respondents including District Executive Director District Social Workers Non-Governmental Organization leaders workers and volunteers and community members in Arumeru district Tanzania. The study employed simple random sampling technique in order to ensure equal chance of an individual being involved in this study as inferential statistics considered. Data collected from a sample of 46 NGOs employees using a semi-structured questionnaire with both closed and open-ended questions. The collected data analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistical tools used included frequencies mean and standard deviation while inferential statistical tool used was correlation. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences SPSS version 19 used for analyzing the data collected. The study achieved a response of 46 out of a sample of 47 representing a response rate of 97.87. The results show that a significant number of NGOs 34.8 had not completed their projects 21.7 stated that less than five projects were complete and 43.5 of the respondents confirmed that more than five projects not completed over the last one year. Regarding the influence of leadership on implementation of project spearmans rank correlation revealed a very strong positive correlation 0.910 between of leadership vision and implementation of community development projects a strong positive correlation between communication and implementation of community development projects rho 0.730 n 46 p .001 strong positive correlation between commitment and implementation of community developmental projects which was statistically significant rs .601 p .000 and a positive correlation between accountability and

  12. [The role of the mental health community in an evolving mental health system. State of knowledge and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Guy; Fleury, Marie-Josée

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this article are: 1) to trace the history and role of mental health community organizations (MHCO) in the Quebec mental health system as well as their specific values and practices; and 2) to examine the impact of the Quebec Mental Health Plan 2005-2010 on the functioning of community organizations and their relations with the public healthcare system. This article draws upon writings produced by the principal provincial and regional community organization associations in Québec, as well as results of previous studies related to inter-organizational relations among MHCO. The Quebec community-based system consists of several successive generations of the MHCO, each constructed within a particular context. Before 1960, the Canadian Mental Health Association offered activities for promotion and prevention in mental health and participated in the development of several MHCO. The 1970s witnessed the formation of groups aimed at the protection of human rights and the first alternative resources. During the 1980s and 90s, a proliferation of MHCO followed upon their formal recognition by the Ministère de la Santé et des services sociaux (MSSS). These new organizations were established not so much in opposition, or as an alternative, to the public mental health system, but in complement with it. By 2012-13, there were 412 MCHO financed by the MSSS offering services to the population. Roughly half were located in the regions of Montreal, Montérégie and the Capitale Nationale. The MHCO are distinguished from public institutions by a number of characteristics: 1) treatment based not on diagnosis but on the overall situation of the person; 2) shared experience with peers; and 3) empowerment, inviting the person to become involved in decisions concerning his/her treatment and service use as well as decisions that concern the functioning of the organization; 4) establishment of more egalitarian relationships between service users and treating professionals

  13. Early childhood development: the role of community based childcare centres in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munthali, Alister C; Mvula, Peter M; Silo, Lois

    2014-01-01

    Somatic changes including growth and development of the brain of a human being occur very early in life. Programmes that enhance early childhood development (ECD) therefore should be part of the national agenda. Cognizant of this fact, the Malawi Government together with development partners facilitated the establishment of community-based child care centres (CBCCs) which are owned and managed by community members. This study was aimed at understanding how CBCCs operated and their core functions. Using information from databases kept by the District Social Welfare Officers from all the 28 districts in Malawi, coupled with snowballing, all functioning CBCCs were enumerated. A questionnaire was administered to the head of the CBCC or a care giver. Highly trained Research Assistants also carried our observations of the structures around the centres and the activities that actually happened. Data was analysed using a Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Communities provide structures, support for care givers, food, utensils, labour and play materials for the children in CBCCs. The first ECD centre was established in 1966 but the real surge in establishing these happened towards the end of the 1990s and by 2007 there were 5,665 CBCCs in Malawi caring for 407,468 children aged between 3 and 5 years. CBCCs were established to provide pre-primary school learning, and in some cases provide special care to orphans and other vulnerable. Despite the fact that most CBCC premises and structures fell short of the standards laid down by the CBCC profile, the activities and services provided were mostly to the book. Children were provided with nutritious foods and subjected to play that stimulated their cognitive and mental development. Despite the fact that some members of the community do not realize the value of the CBCCs, the existence of these institutions is an opportunity for the community to take care of their children communally, a task that has become imperative as a

  14. The role of haloaerosolotherapy in immunorehabilitation of convalescents after community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Lemko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Investigation of the peculiarities of different haloaerosoltherapy regimes influence (treatment with different intensity of haloaerosol load upon non-specific defense and cellular immunity at convalescents after community acquired pneumonia. Objectives: patients with community acquired pneumonia in the early convalescence period (after completing antibiotic therapy, who received treatment in conditions of artificial rock salt aerosol medium (haloaerosoltherapy. Material and Methods. 42 patients with non-severe community acquired pneumonia were examined in the early convalescence period before and after the course of haloaerosoltherapy, which was prescribed after antibacterial therapy. Immunological studies included: evaluation of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (PhAN - the percentage of phagocytic neutrophils, phagocytic number (PhN - average number of latex particles absorbed by a neutrophil; metabolism of neutrophils in the test with nitroblue tetrasolium (NBT-test spontaneous and induced, which allowed to assess the functional reserve of neutrophils (FR; calculation of cytochemical coefficient (CCC for lysosomal cationic proteins (LCP and for myeloperoxidase (MPO of neutrophils; number of T- and B-lymphocytes and their subpopulations (CD3+ -, CD4+ -, CD8+ -, CD22+ - lymphocytes, calculation the number of 0- lymphocytes and the ratio of CD4+ /CD8+ lymphocytes. Laboratory examinations were also conducted in 21 practically healthy individuals (control group. Two regimes of haloaerosoltherapy were used in recovery treatment of patients with community acquired pneumonia: treating complex №1 (TC-1 with standard haloaerosol load and with increased haloaerosol load (TC-2. Results. After completion the antibiotic therapy at patients with community acquired pneumonia the moderate inhibition of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (47,6±0,58% to 55,5±1,14% in control group remained and was accompanied with a decrease in neutrophil bactericidal

  15. The emotional context facing nursing home residents' families: a call for role reinforcement strategies from nursing homes and the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2008-01-01

    Identify useful concepts related to the emotional context facing family members of nursing home residents. These concepts can be used in future studies to design and test interventions that benefit family caregivers. Secondary data analyses of qualitative ethnographic data. Two nursing homes in a large Midwestern city; 8 months of data collection in each. 44 family members of nursing home residents whose health was considered, "declining." Role theory was used to design and help interpret the findings. Data included transcripts of conversations between family members and researchers and were analyzed using a coding scheme developed for the secondary analysis. Comments about emotions related to the social role of family member were grouped into three categories: relief related to admission, stress, and decision making support/stress. Subcategories of stress include the role strain associated with "competing concerns" and the psychological pressures of 1) witnessing the decline of a loved one in a nursing home, and 2) guilt about placement. Decision-making was discussed as a challenge which family members did not want to face alone; support from the resident, health care professionals, and other family members was appreciated. Family members may benefit from role reinforcement activities provided by nursing home staff and community members. All nursing home staff members (in particular social workers) and physicians are called upon to provide educationa and support regarding nursing home admissions, during the decline of the resident, and especially regarding medical decision-making. Community groups are asked to support the family member by offering assistance with concrete tasks (driving, visiting, etc.) and social support.

  16. Research and Development Progress of National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites on Advanced Aeronautical Resin Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Bintai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applications and research progress in advanced aeronautical resin matrix composites by National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites (LAC were summarized. A novel interlaminar toughening technology employing ultra-thin TP non-woven fabric was developed in LAC, which significantly improved the compression after impact (CAI performances of composite laminates.Newly designed multilayer sandwich stealth composite structures exhibited a good broadband radar absorbing properties at 1-18 GHz.There were remarkable developments in high toughness and high temperature resin matrix composites, covering major composite processing technologies such as prepreg-autoclave procedure, liquid composite molding and automation manufacture, etc. Finally, numerical simulation and optimization methods were deliberately utilized in the study of composites curing behavior, resin flow and curing deformation. A composite material database was also established.In conclusion, LAC has been a great support for the development of aeronautical equipment, playing such roles as innovation leading, system dominating, foundation supporting and application ensuring of aerocomposites.

  17. Living Conditions and Psychological Distress in Latino Migrant Day Laborers: The Role of Cultural and Community Protective Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organista, Kurt C; Ngo, Samantha; Neilands, Torsten B; Kral, Alex H

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between typically difficult living conditions and psychological distress in Latino migrant day laborers (LMDLs), with attention to the potentially protective roles of contact with family in country of origin (i.e., communication, sending money, etc.), availability of local culture (i.e., food, music, people from one's country of origin), and utilization of community resources perceived to be culturally competent (i.e., services that are respectful, able to serve Latinos, able to solve problems, in Spanish, etc.). Participants were 344 LMDLs surveyed in the San Francisco Bay Area. As hypothesized: (a) difficult living conditions were related to depression, anxiety, and desesperación [desperation], the latter a popular Latino idiom of psychological distress recently validated on LMDLs; (b) contact with family moderated the relation between difficult living conditions and depression and desesperación but not anxiety and (c) access to local culture, and utilization of community resources, mediated the relation between difficult living conditions and depression and desesperación but not anxiety. Implications for intervening at local and larger levels in order to provide some protection against distress built into the LMDL experience in the United States are discussed. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  18. Relations between Political Violence and Child Adjustment: A Four-Wave Test of the Role of Emotional Insecurity about Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, E. Mark; Taylor, Laura K.; Merrilees, Christine E.; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Shirlow, Peter; Cairns, Ed

    2015-01-01

    This study further explored the impact of sectarian violence and children’s emotional insecurity about community on child maladjustment using a four-wave longitudinal design. The study included 999 mother-child dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (482 boys, 517 girls). Across the four-waves, child mean age was 12.19 (SD = 1.82), 13.24 (SD = 1.83), 13.61 (SD = 1.99), and 14.66 years (SD = 1.96), respectively. Building on previous studies of the role of emotional insecurity in child adjustment, the current study examines within-person change in emotional insecurity using latent growth curve analyses. The results showed that children’s trajectories of emotional insecurity about community were related to risk for developing conduct and emotion problems. These findings controlled for earlier adjustment problems, age and gender, and took into account the time-varying nature of experience with sectarian violence. Discussion considers the implications for children’s emotional insecurity about community for relations between political violence and children’s adjustment, including the significance of trajectories of emotional insecurity over time. PMID:23527495

  19. The role of microbial community composition and groundwater chemistry in determining isoproturon degradation potential in UK aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew; Llewellyn, Neville; Smith, Jennifer; van der Gast, Christopher; Lilley, Andrew; Singer, Andrew; Thompson, Ian

    2004-07-01

    The community response of indigenous sandstone, chalk and limestone groundwater microorganisms to the addition of the commonly used herbicide isoproturon was examined. The addition of 100 microg l(-1) isoproturon generally caused an increase in species diversity determined by chemotaxonomic analysis (fatty methyl ester analysis) of isolates resulting from incubation of cultures at 18 degrees C for 4 days. Amongst the groundwater samples to which isoproturon was added, isoproturon degradation rates were correlated with increasing dominance of a few species. However, the changes in community profile associated with isoproturon degradation varied from site to site. Repeated sub-culturing with 100 microg l(-1) isoproturon and sterile groundwater was carried out to examine whether this level of pesticide could exert a selection pressure, and hence stimulate more rapid degradation. Significantly increased degradation was observed in a groundwater sample from the chalk, but not in sandstone, or limestone samples. The addition of filter-sterilised sandstone groundwater to bacteria on filter paper from slow degrading limestone sites significantly improved their degrading performance. The addition of filter-sterilised limestone groundwater to the sandstone bacteria reduced their degradation rate only slightly. The data suggested that the nature of the indigenous community does influence pesticide degradation in groundwater, but that the groundwater chemistry may also play a role.

  20. New Roles for Pharmacists in Community Mental Health Care: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rubio-Valera

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Medicines are a major treatment modality for many mental illnesses, and with the growing burden of mental disorders worldwide pharmacists are ideally positioned to play a greater role in supporting people with a mental illness. This narrative review aims to describe the evidence for pharmacist-delivered services in mental health care and address the barriers and facilitators to increasing the uptake of pharmacist services as part of the broader mental health care team. This narrative review is divided into three main sections: (1 the role of the pharmacist in mental health care in multidisciplinary teams and in supporting early detection of mental illness; (2 the pharmacists’ role in supporting quality use of medicines in medication review, strategies to improve medication adherence and antipsychotic polypharmacy, and shared decision making; and (3 barriers and facilitators to the implementation of mental health pharmacy services with a focus on organizational culture and mental health stigma. In the first section, the review presents new roles for pharmacists within multidisciplinary teams, such as in case conferencing or collaborative drug therapy management; and new roles that would benefit from increased pharmacist involvement, such as the early detection of mental health conditions, development of care plans and follow up of people with mental health problems. The second section describes the impact of medication review services and other pharmacist-led interventions designed to reduce inappropriate use of psychotropic medicines and improve medication adherence. Other new potential roles discussed include the management of antipsychotic polypharmacy and involvement in patient-centered care. Finally, barriers related to pharmacists’ attitudes, stigma and skills in the care of patients with mental health problems and barriers affecting pharmacist-physician collaboration are described, along with strategies to reduce mental health stigma.

  1. The Role of Multicultural Media in Connecting Municipal Governments with Ethnocultural and Immigrant Communities: The Case of Ottawa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Veronis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to advance understanding of the role ethnic and multicultural media can play in connecting municipal governments and Ethnocultural and Immigrant Communities (EICs. Using an innovative mixed-methods approach and methodological triangulation, we compare the access to and use of multicultural media among four EICs—the Chinese, Latin American, Somali, and South Asian—in Ottawa, Canada. Our cross-comparative study yields three main findings: 1 members of participating communities proactively and strategically use a variety of sources to access information about local services; 2 noteworthy differences exist in the access to and use of different types of media both across and within the four EICs, due to demographic and cultural differences; and 3 participants shared challenges and opportunities that multicultural media afford to better connect municipal government and EICs. The paper’s findings make important empirical contributions to the literature on the integrative potential of ethnic and multicultural media by strengthening the reliability of data, validity of findings, and broadening and deepening understanding the role multicultural media play in promoting collaboration between city governments and diverse EICs.

  2. Do no harm: the role of community pharmacists in regulating public access to prescription drugs in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahnassi, Anas

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacists have a crucial role to ensure regulated public access to prescription drugs. The study aimed to investigate the views of community pharmacists practising in Saudi Arabia on their role in the unauthorised supply of prescription drugs, consider the possible contributory factors and report pharmacists' suggested strategies to regulate supply. One hundred community pharmacists were invited to participate in an interview-based survey, including questions on demographic characteristics, and the unauthorised supply of prescription drugs. Descriptive statistics were conducted, and associations between categorical responses tested; a P value of ≤0.05 was considered significant. Responses to open questions were analysed thematically. In Saudi Arabia, there is widespread unregulated supply of prescription drugs; pharmacists are under pressure from patients to provide prescription drugs for a wide range of clinical conditions. There are safety and appropriateness concerns when drugs are provided based on patient demand rather than clinical need. Pharmacists do not maintain patient records with information on drugs supplied and associated actions. While most pharmacists supply prescription drugs without the necessary prescriber authorisation, they also this may jeopardise patients safety. While we have many concerns about this practice its present form, we believe pharmacists should have certain prescribing privileges within their areas of competence. A legal framework is needed to guarantee proper pharmacists' training, support, mentorship and access to the tools required to provide safe pharmacy practice. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Exploring the roles of cannot-link constraint in community detection via Multi-variance Mixed Gaussian Generative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Meng; Jin, Di; He, Dongxiao; Fu, Huazhu; Wang, Jing; Cao, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Due to the demand for performance improvement and the existence of prior information, semi-supervised community detection with pairwise constraints becomes a hot topic. Most existing methods have been successfully encoding the must-link constraints, but neglect the opposite ones, i.e., the cannot-link constraints, which can force the exclusion between nodes. In this paper, we are interested in understanding the role of cannot-link constraints and effectively encoding pairwise constraints. Towards these goals, we define an integral generative process jointly considering the network topology, must-link and cannot-link constraints. We propose to characterize this process as a Multi-variance Mixed Gaussian Generative (MMGG) Model to address diverse degrees of confidences that exist in network topology and pairwise constraints and formulate it as a weighted nonnegative matrix factorization problem. The experiments on artificial and real-world networks not only illustrate the superiority of our proposed MMGG, but also, most importantly, reveal the roles of pairwise constraints. That is, though the must-link is more important than cannot-link when either of them is available, both must-link and cannot-link are equally important when both of them are available. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work on discovering and exploring the importance of cannot-link constraints in semi-supervised community detection. PMID:28678864

  4. Spatial structure of the meroplankton community along a Patagonian fjord - The role of changing freshwater inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerhoff, Erika; Tapia, Fabián J.; Castro, Leonardo R.

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater inputs are major drivers of circulation, hydrographic structure, and productivity patterns along estuarine systems. We assessed the degree to which meroplankton community structure in the Baker/Martinez fjord complex (Chilean Patagonia, 47.5°S) responds to spatial and temporal changes in hydrographic conditions driven by seasonal changes in Baker river outflow. Zooplankton and hydrographic measurements were conducted along the fjord in early spring (October) and late summer (February), when river outflow was minimal and maximal, respectively. Major meroplankton groups found on these surveys were larval barnacles, crabs, bivalves and gastropods. There was a clear change in community structure between October and February, explained by a switch in the numerically dominant group from barnacle to bivalve larvae. This change in community structure was related to changes in hydrographic structure along the fjord, which are mainly associated with seasonal changes in the Baker river outflow. A variance partition analysis showed no significant spatial trend that could account for the variation in meroplankton along the Martinez channel, whereas temporal variability and environmental variables accounted for 36.6% and 27.6% of the variance, respectively. When comparing meroplankton among the Baker and Martinez channels in October, changes in environmental variables explained 44.9% of total variance, whereas spatial variability accounted for 23.5%. Early and late-stage barnacle larvae (i.e. nauplii and cyprids) were more abundant in water with lower temperature, and higher dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll-a concentration, whereas bivalve larvae were more strongly associated to warmer waters. The seasonal shift in numerical dominance, from barnacle larvae in early spring to bivalve larvae in late summer, suggests that reproduction of these groups is triggered by substantially different sets of conditions, both in terms of hydrography and food availability. The

  5. Micro-hydro power in the UK: The role of communities in an emerging energy resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracken, L.J.; Bulkeley, H.A.; Maynard, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Research around micro-hydro power is focused on technical aspects with limited understanding of the social organisation and environmental implications. We examine the ways in which micro-hydro is engaged by people and organisations as a means of contributing to the UK's policy ambition for renewable energy. We bring to the fore the way in which expertise is used and contested. A web based review of micro-hydro schemes in the UK was undertaken and a detailed evaluation of two schemes in the North of England was conducted to determine how expertise and contestation figures in community schemes. Results demonstrate a rapid expansion of micro-hydro in the UK. Ownership/control is highly ‘community based’. Until now research around micro-hydro has been dominated by technical approaches with schemes defined in terms of hardware. We propose a third dimension to Walker and Cass's (2007) classification of renewable energy developments: the environmental dimension. We suggest this dimension of micro-hydro is critical, both in terms of the extent to which resources can be realised but also the ways in which it might attract controversy, in particular around how expertise is used and valued. - Highlights: • Analysis of micro-hydro schemes in the UK demonstrates a recent rapid expansion. • We propose a third dimension to renewable energy developments: the environmental dimension. • The environmental dimension of micro-hydro determines how resources are realised. • Environmental features underpin the controversy which can emerge around schemes. • The ownership of micro-hydro schemes is highly ‘community based’

  6. The role of deep convection on the dynamics of the North Atlantic phytoplankton community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, Christian

    waters and suggests that it is the convective overturning within the mixed layer, that enables cell to thrive under these conditions. To investigate the role of acclimation during winter and during the onset of the spring bloom, an adaptive Individual-Based-Model (IBM) was developed, allowing to test......, in particular during the onset of thermal stratification in spring. The finding of this thesis have important implication for our understanding of carbon sequestration during winter and for the role of the North Atlantic as a carbon sink, in particular in a scenario of climate change...

  7. Staff Turnover in Assertive Community Treatment (Act) Teams: The Role of Team Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi; Wholey, Douglas R; Cain, Cindy; Natafgi, Nabil

    2017-03-01

    Staff turnover in Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams can result in interrupted services and diminished support for clients. This paper examines the effect of team climate, defined as team members' shared perceptions of their work environment, on turnover and individual outcomes that mediate the climate-turnover relationship. We focus on two climate dimensions: safety and quality climate and constructive conflict climate. Using survey data collected from 26 ACT teams, our analyses highlight the importance of safety and quality climate in reducing turnover, and job satisfaction as the main mediator linking team climate to turnover. The findings offer practical implications for team management.

  8. Trophic role and top-down control of a subarctic protozooplankton community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Karen; Swalethorp, Rasmus; Kjellerup, Sanne

    2014-01-01

    % of phytoplankton biomass d−1. The highest copepod biomass (24 g C m−2) occurred in spring, with Metridia longa alone contributing up to 92% of the biomass. A grazing experiment with M. longa feeding on a natural plankton assemblage confirmed that this species cleared cells in the size range 10 to 60 μm...... with an average clearance rate of 2.4 ml μg C−1 d−1. The copepod community, dominated by the genera Calanus, Metridia, Pseudocalanus, Oithona, Microsetella and Triconia/Oncaea, accounted for 72 to 93% of the copepod biomass in the spring. After the large calanoid copepod species left the surface layer...

  9. The potential roles of bacterial communities in coral defence: A case study at Talang-talang reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuek, Felicity W. I.; Lim, Li-Fang; Ngu, Lin-Hui; Mujahid, Aazani; Lim, Po-Teen; Leaw, Chui-Pin; Müller, Moritz

    2015-06-01

    highlight the role of the coral SML bacterial community in the coral's defence.

  10. The role of community mental health nurses caring for people with schizophrenia in Taiwan: a substantive grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuan-Yi; Yen, Wen-Jiuan; Liu, Shwu-Jiuan; Lin, Chouh-Jiuan

    2008-03-01

    The aim was to develop a practice theory that can be used to guide the direction of community nursing practice to help clients with schizophrenia and those who care for them. Substantive grounded theory was developed through use of grounded theory method of Strauss and Corbin. Two groups of participants in Taiwan were selected using theoretical sampling: one group consisted of community mental health nurses and the other group was clients with schizophrenia and those who cared for them. The number of participants in each group was determined by theoretical saturation. Semi-structured one-to-one in-depth interviews and unstructured non-participant observation were utilized for data collection. Data analysis involved three stages: open, axial and selective coding. During the process of coding and analysis, both inductive and deductive thinking were utilized and the constant comparative analysis process continued until data saturation occurred. To establish trustworthiness, the four criteria of credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability were followed along with field trial, audit trial, member check and peer debriefing for reliability and validity. A substantive grounded theory, the role of community mental health nurses caring for people with schizophrenia in Taiwan, was developed through utilization of grounded theory method of Strauss and Corbin. In this paper, results and discussion focus on causal conditions, context, intervening conditions, consequences and phenomenon. The theory is the first to contribute knowledge about the field of mental health home visiting services in Taiwan to provide guidance for the delivery of quality care to assist people in the community with schizophrenia and their carers.

  11. The Role of Transdisciplinary Approach and Community Participation in Village Scale Groundwater Management: Insights from Gujarat and Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant Maheshwari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable use of groundwater is becoming critical in India and requires effective participation from local communities along with technical, social, economic, policy and political inputs. Access to groundwater for farming communities is also an emotional and complex issue as their livelihood and survival depends on it. In this article, we report on transdisciplinary approaches to understanding the issues, challenges and options for improving sustainability of groundwater use in States of Gujarat and Rajasthan, India. In this project, called Managed Aquifer Recharge through Village level Intervention (MARVI, the research is focused on developing a suitable participatory approach and methodology with associated tools that will assist in improving supply and demand management of groundwater. The study was conducted in the Meghraj watershed in Aravalli district, Gujarat, and the Dharta watershed in Udaipur district, Rajasthan, India. The study involved the collection of hydrologic, agronomic and socio-economic data and engagement of local village and school communities through their role in groundwater monitoring, field trials, photovoice activities and education campaigns. The study revealed that availability of relevant and reliable data related to the various aspects of groundwater and developing trust and support between local communities, NGOs and government agencies are the key to moving towards a dialogue to decide on what to do to achieve sustainable use of groundwater. The analysis of long-term water table data indicated considerable fluctuation in groundwater levels from year to year or a net lowering of the water table, but the levels tend to recover during wet years. This provides hope that by improving management of recharge structures and groundwater pumping, we can assist in stabilizing the local water table. Our interventions through Bhujal Jankaars (BJs, (a Hindi word meaning “groundwater informed” volunteers, schools

  12. Online Community and User-Generated Content: Understanding the Role of Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeong Ha

    2010-01-01

    Models of user generated content (UGC) creation such as Facebook, MySpace, and YouTube are facing robust growth accelerated by the adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and standards. These business models offer a fascinating avenue for exploring the role of social influence online. This dissertation is motivated by the success of YouTube, which is…

  13. Cultivating a Community of Effective Special Education Teachers: Local Special Education Administrators' Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Elizabeth; Benedict, Amber; Thomas, Rachel; Kimerling, Jenna; Choi, Nari; McLeskey, James

    2017-01-01

    Evidence of the powerful impact teachers have on student achievement has led to an intensive focus on cultivating effective teachers, including special education teachers (SETs). Local special education administrators (LSEAs) share responsibility for cultivating effective SETs throughout their districts. However, the roles LSEAs play in this…

  14. The human microbiota: the role of microbial communities in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Elena Botero Palacio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, there has been increasing awareness of the massive number of microorganisms, collectively known as the human microbiota, that are associated with humans. This microbiota outnumbers the host cells by approximately a factor of ten and contains a large repertoire of microbial genome-encoded metabolic processes. The diverse human microbiota and its associated metabolic potential can provide the host with novel functions that can influence host health and disease status in ways that still need to be analyzed. The microbiota varies with age, with features that depend on the body site, host lifestyle and health status. The challenge is therefore to identify and characterize these microbial communities and use this information to learn how they function and how they can influence the host in terms of health and well-being. Here we provide an overview of some of the recent studies involving the human microbiota and about how these communities might affect host health and disease. A special emphasis is given to studies related to tuberculosis, a disease that claims over one million lives each year worldwide and still represents a challenge for control in many countries, including Colombia.

  15. Parenting and youth sexual risk in context: The role of community factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrum, Nada M; Armistead, Lisa P; Tully, Erin C; Cook, Sarah L; Skinner, Donald

    2017-06-01

    Black South African youth are disproportionately affected by HIV, and risky sexual behaviors increase youths' vulnerability to infection. U.S.-based research has highlighted several contextual influences on sexual risk, but these processes have not been examined in a South African context. In a convenience sample of Black South African caregivers and their 10-14-year-old youth (M age  = 11.7, SD = 1.4; 52.5% female), we examined the relation between parenting and youth sexual risk within the context of community-level processes, including neighborhood quality and maternal social support. Hypotheses were evaluated using structural equation modeling. Results revealed that better neighborhood quality and more social support predicted positive parenting, which in turn predicted less youth sexual risk. There was a significant indirect effect from neighborhood quality to youth sexual risk via parenting. Results highlight the importance of the community context in parenting and youth sexual risk in this understudied sample. HIV prevention-interventions should be informed by these contextual factors. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient-provider language concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nosaiba; Admi, Hanna; Shadmi, Efrat

    2014-01-01

    Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients' discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient-provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0-100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient-provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients' discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients.

  17. Threats and climate risks into vulnerable populations. The role of education in the community resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Javier GONZÁLEZ-GAUDIANO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, challenges in the contemporary world lead to the education to propose its current themes. Environmental education is not an exception. The magnitude and complexity of global environmental problems such as the climate change, the ocean acidification and the loss of the biodiversity have generated issues that had attracted pedagogical attention for decades. This article presents the early results of a study aimed at assessing the perception of risk and vulnerability of communities that frequently are affected by extreme hydrometeorological phenomena. These findings could be a starting point for the design of educational programs aimed at strengthening community resilience. We start from the assumption based on socio-cognitive factors that determine the dispositions in order to the populations can act under similar circumstances, we can find key elements that allow us to infer their reactions to difficult situations. This considering their previous experience and their singularities in the adaptation to climate change, in the social learning in extreme situations and in the identification of their strengths and weaknesses.

  18. Board composition and firm reputation: The role of business experts, support specialists and community influentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma García-Meca

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyze the influence of board resource diversity on firm reputation. We classify board members as business experts, support specialists, political directors and other community influentials, in an effort to address whether business, technical expertise or political ties in the boardroom affect stakeholders’ opinion and, therefore, firm reputation.This study confirms that not all outside directors are equally effective in improving firm reputation, and that certain kinds of outside directors, especially business experts, help increase it. However, the findings note an inverted U-shaped non-linear relationship with these directors, which means that the effect of business experts on reputation is positive up to a point, after which the relationship becomes negative. The findings also evidence that, contrary to popular beliefs, directors with previous experience as politicians are not negatively viewed by stakeholders. Moreover, this type of community influential directors has positive effects on firm reputation in regulated firms as well as in those of the public work sector. JEL classification: G30, Keywords: Reputation, Board, Expertise, Corporate governance, Directors

  19. The role of anxiety symptoms in school performance in a community sample of children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Arrigo Valentina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety symptoms are relatively common among children and adolescents and can interfere with functioning. The prevalence of anxiety and the relationship between anxiety and school performance were examined among elementary, middle, and high school students. Methods Samples of elementary (N = 131, age 8–10 years, middle (N = 267, age 11–13 years, and high school (N = 80, age 14–16 years children were recruited from four public schools in a predominantly middle-class community in Catania, Italy. Children completed the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC. T-scores were computed for the MASC total scores, and considered to be in the anxious range if 65 or above. Current academic grades were obtained from school records. Results Of the 478 children, 35 (7.3% had a MASC T-score in the anxious range. The rate of children in the anxious range was 2.3% in elementary, 7.9% in middle, and 15.9% in high school (χ2 = 7.8, df = 2, p 2 = 11.68, df = 2, p Conclusion In this community sample of children and adolescents attending elementary through high school, the prevalence of abnormally high self-reported levels of anxiety increased in frequency with age and was negatively associated with school performance.

  20. Measuring Biodiversity in Forest Communities – A Role of Biodiversity Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakićević Milena

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity refers to genetic, species and ecosystems varieties within an area. Two main characteristics that should be investigated when considering biodiversity are richness and evenness. Richness is related to the number of different species in the analyzed area, while evenness corresponds to the homogeneity of the abundance of species. For quantifying these features, many indices have been defined, and this paper offers an overview of the most commonly used biodiversity indices, such as Shannon, Simpson, Margalef and Berger-Parker. The paper explains the process of calculating these indices on the case study example of four forest communities and discusses the results obtained. The Jaccard index analysis is used to discover a similarity between the analyzed forest communities. Results from this part of the research are visualized by creating appropriate dendrograms for making the interpretation easier. Calculating and analyzing these indices is useful not only for forest ecosystems, but for the other types of ecosystems as well, including agro-ecosystems. Biodiversity indices can be obtained in thespecialized software, for instance in EstimateS (Statistical Estimation of Species Richness and Shared Species from Samples, or by programming in the statistical package R, as it was done in this research.

  1. The role of hypoxia in structuring macrobenthos community off the Louisiana shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivarudrappa, S. K.; Briggs, K.

    2013-12-01

    Core samples were collected from 24 box cores belonging to four different provinces with varying hypoxia frequency and history in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Macrobenthos from these four provinces were sampled in spring, summer and late-summer seasons. According to historical data of bottom water oxygen concentration since 1985, the control province was exposed to hypoxia rarefaction curves of expected species diversity. Impact of grain size and organic matter concentration on the community structure was assessed using non-metric multi-dimensional scaling. Different species dominated by their abundance or their biomass at all four provinces, but the effect was magnified in the provinces other than the control. Capitellid, cossurid and spionid polychaetes dominated by abundance, whereas maldanid and nephtyid polychaetes and Nemerteans dominated by biomass. This implies that the fauna responsible for dominance by their abundance were small, opportunistic deposit feeders, and that large carnivores contributed to dominance by their biomass. Although species and abundance changed from province to province and season to season, the functional groups were nevertheless dominated, in order, by subsurface deposit feeders, surface deposit feeders, and carnivores at all provinces in all three seasons. This study provides insight into compositional changes in the macrobenthic community due to hypoxia and subsequent recovery from hypoxia on the northern Gulf of Mexico shelf between the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers.

  2. The Lisbon Treaty and the role of the European Parliament in the European Atomic Energy Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.

    2008-01-01

    In June 2007, the European Council commissioned an intergovernmental conference to draft a 'treaty of reform' of the European Union. The wording of the treaty was signed by the heads of state and government of the member countries on December 13, 2007. The ongoing process of ratification in the 27 EU member countries is to be completed before the next elections to the European Parliament in June 2009. The treaty is now referred to as 'Lisbon Treaty'. The Lisbon Treaty (Treaty Amending the Treaty about the European Union and the Treaty Establishing the European Community) does not replace the European Treaties currently in force, but merely amends them. Also the 'Treaty Establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM)' is amended in this way. On the basis of the contributions about 'The German Presidency Program of the Council Working Group on Nuclear Issues - an Interim Report' (W. Sandtner and S. Thomas) and 'Euratom Treaty and Intergovernmental Conference' (S. Thomas), current links to the Euratom Treaty with potential amendments are presented and commented upon. (orig.)

  3. Discerning the role of faith communities in responding to urban youth marginalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald W. Nel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Urban youth marginalisation became a key consideration in scholarly and policy literature in the 1990s. This entailed a shift from an emphasis on youth in relation to activism in the struggle to overcome colonial racism – popularly known as ‘the struggle against apartheid’ – to an emphasis on youth as the object of social inquiry and social welfare programmes. Irrespective of how we valuate this shift, the question in this article is how urban faith communities and youth ministry research are to respond to the agency of youth as dialogue partners – with a focus on social cohesion. This article explores this shift in scholarship on urban youth movements, especially for the period since 1994. It draws from the perspectives of my recent doctoral studies (Nel 2013 in constructing a creative dialogue with youth movements. The ultimate aim of this article is to provide a grounded basis for constructing a methodology for a postcolonial urban theology. In addition, it aims to inform the ongoing Youth at the Margins (YOMA comparative study on the contribution of faith-based organisations to social cohesion in South Africa and Nordic Europe, with the Riverlea community, in Johannesburg, as one of the case studies.

  4. Social inclusion and the Fatosphere: the role of an online weblogging community in fostering social inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickins, Marissa; Browning, Colette; Feldman, Susan; Thomas, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    Overweight and obesity are one of the most salient issues within society today, and the stigmatisation of overweight individuals is prevalent and widespread. Utilising interviews with 44 individuals who blog within an online fat acceptance community known as the Fatosphere, participants' perceptions of inclusion and exclusion were examined within their offline and online environments. Additionally, the effect this had on their offline lives was examined. Participants described a profound sense of exclusion within their offline lives through three agencies: the medicalisation of 'fatness', the weight loss industry and the media, which echoed descriptions of moral judgement. Furthermore, a sense of inclusion was described within the Fatosphere through the protection and support that they found within this 'safe space'. The effects of the Fatosphere influenced their lives in both negative and positive ways, allowing them to better deal with stigma and discrimination, but sometimes effecting their offline relationships in a negative manner. The Fatosphere provides a unique opportunity for corpulent individuals to engage in a community that is removed from the prominent weight-related discourse within modern society. © 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  5. Fundamental Aeronautics Program: Overview of Project Work in Supersonic Cruise Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, part of NASA?s Fundamental Aeronautics Program, contains a number of technical challenge areas which include sonic boom community response, airport noise, high altitude emissions, cruise efficiency, light weight durable engines/airframes, and integrated multi-discipline system design. This presentation provides an overview of the current (2011) activities in the supersonic cruise efficiency technical challenge, and is focused specifically on propulsion technologies. The intent is to develop and validate high-performance supersonic inlet and nozzle technologies. Additional work is planned for design and analysis tools for highly-integrated low-noise, low-boom applications. If successful, the payoffs include improved technologies and tools for optimized propulsion systems, propulsion technologies for a minimized sonic boom signature, and a balanced approach to meeting efficiency and community noise goals. In this propulsion area, the work is divided into advanced supersonic inlet concepts, advanced supersonic nozzle concepts, low fidelity computational tool development, high fidelity computational tools, and improved sensors and measurement capability. The current work in each area is summarized.

  6. Fundamental Aeronautics Program: Overview of Propulsion Work in the Supersonic Cruise Efficiency Technical Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, part of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, contains a number of technical challenge areas which include sonic boom community response, airport noise, high altitude emissions, cruise efficiency, light weight durable engines/airframes, and integrated multi-discipline system design. This presentation provides an overview of the current (2012) activities in the supersonic cruise efficiency technical challenge, and is focused specifically on propulsion technologies. The intent is to develop and validate high-performance supersonic inlet and nozzle technologies. Additional work is planned for design and analysis tools for highly-integrated low-noise, low-boom applications. If successful, the payoffs include improved technologies and tools for optimized propulsion systems, propulsion technologies for a minimized sonic boom signature, and a balanced approach to meeting efficiency and community noise goals. In this propulsion area, the work is divided into advanced supersonic inlet concepts, advanced supersonic nozzle concepts, low fidelity computational tool development, high fidelity computational tools, and improved sensors and measurement capability. The current work in each area is summarized.

  7. Assisting role redesign: a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of a podiatry assistant role to a community health setting utilising a traineeship approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Anna M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing demands for podiatry combined with workforce shortages due to attrition, part-time working practices and rural healthcare shortages means that in some geographic areas in Australia there are insufficient professionals to meet service demand. Although podiatry assistants have been introduced to help relieve workforce shortages there has been little evaluation of their impact on patient, staff and/or service outcomes. This research explores the processes and outcomes of a ‘trainee’ approach to introducing a podiatry assistant (PA role to a community setting in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT Government Health Service Directorate. Method A qualitative methodology was employed involving interviews and focus groups with service managers, qualified practitioners, the assistant, service users and consumer representatives. Perspectives of the implementation process; the traineeship approach; the underlying mechanisms that help or hinder the implementation process; and the perceived impact of the role were explored. Data were analysed using the Richie and Spencer Framework approach. Results Although the impact of the PA role had not been measured at the time of the evaluation, the implementation of the PA traineeship was considered a success in terms of enabling the transfer of a basic foot-care service from nursing back to podiatry; releasing Enrolled Nurses (ENs from foot-care duties; an increase in the number of treatments delivered by the podiatry service; and high levels of stakeholder satisfaction with the role. It was perceived that the transfer of the basic foot-care role from nursing to podiatry through the use of a PA impacted on communication and feedback loops between the PA and the podiatry service; the nursing-podiatry relationship; clinical governance around the foot-care service; and continuity of care for clients through the podiatry service. The traineeship was considered successful in terms of

  8. Assisting role redesign: a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of a podiatry assistant role to a community health setting utilising a traineeship approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anna M; Nancarrow, Susan A; Wiseman, Leah; Maher, Kerryn; Boyce, Rosalie A; Borthwick, Alan M; Murphy, Karen

    2012-11-27

    Increasing demands for podiatry combined with workforce shortages due to attrition, part-time working practices and rural healthcare shortages means that in some geographic areas in Australia there are insufficient professionals to meet service demand. Although podiatry assistants have been introduced to help relieve workforce shortages there has been little evaluation of their impact on patient, staff and/or service outcomes. This research explores the processes and outcomes of a 'trainee' approach to introducing a podiatry assistant (PA) role to a community setting in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Government Health Service Directorate. A qualitative methodology was employed involving interviews and focus groups with service managers, qualified practitioners, the assistant, service users and consumer representatives. Perspectives of the implementation process; the traineeship approach; the underlying mechanisms that help or hinder the implementation process; and the perceived impact of the role were explored. Data were analysed using the Richie and Spencer Framework approach. Although the impact of the PA role had not been measured at the time of the evaluation, the implementation of the PA traineeship was considered a success in terms of enabling the transfer of a basic foot-care service from nursing back to podiatry; releasing Enrolled Nurses (ENs) from foot-care duties; an increase in the number of treatments delivered by the podiatry service; and high levels of stakeholder satisfaction with the role. It was perceived that the transfer of the basic foot-care role from nursing to podiatry through the use of a PA impacted on communication and feedback loops between the PA and the podiatry service; the nursing-podiatry relationship; clinical governance around the foot-care service; and continuity of care for clients through the podiatry service. The traineeship was considered successful in terms of producing a PA whose skills were shaped by and directly

  9. Graduate Professional Education from a Community of Practice Perspective: The Role of Social and Technical Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polin, Linda G.

    This chapter describes academic life at the intersection of three related topics: community of practice (CoP), a pedagogical model; digital culture, as embodied in the current and future student population; and post-secondary education, in particular graduate professional education. The aim is to illustrate ways in which social computing applications enable the use of a CoP model in graduate professional education. The illustrations are drawn from two hybrid, or blended, degree programs (a mix of face-to-face and online interactions) at the graduate school of education and psychology at Pepperdine University. These fully accredited programs have each been in operation for more than a decade. One is the MA degree in educational technology, begun in 1998; the other is the EdD degree in educational technology leadership, begun in 1995.

  10. Changing roles in community health care: Delegation of insulin injections to health care support workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Julie; McCaskill, Kelly; Alton, Sarah; Levesley, Maria; Hemingway, Cath; Farndon, Lisa

    2018-01-02

    Diabetes is a common long-term condition affecting many people many of whom require support with their insulin injections at home. These injections are often carried out by community nurses if individuals are unable to self-manage their condition. This paper describes a pilot project where health care support workers were trained to administer insulin at home for suitable patients. Four patients took part in the pilot study and two support workers were trained to give the insulin injections. The project was evaluated well by all those who took part. It freed up 80 hours of nursing time while also providing the support workers with an extended scope of practice and associated increased in job satisfaction. No untoward medication errors were reported as a result of this initiative. This project will now be rolled out to the wider nursing teams with a staggered approach to the delivery of the training to ensure there is not a detrimental effect on patient care.

  11. What is the role of culture, diversity, and community engagement in transdisciplinary translational science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Phillip W; Kim, Mimi M; Clinton-Sherrod, A Monique; Yaros, Anna; Richmond, Alan N; Jackson, Melvin; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2016-03-01

    Concepts of culture and diversity are necessary considerations in the scientific application of theory generation and developmental processes of preventive interventions; yet, culture and/or diversity are often overlooked until later stages (e.g., adaptation [T3] and dissemination [T4]) of the translational science process. Here, we present a conceptual framework focused on the seamless incorporation of culture and diversity throughout the various stages of the translational science process (T1-T5). Informed by a community-engaged research approach, this framework guides integration of cultural and diversity considerations at each phase with emphasis on the importance and value of "citizen scientists" being research partners to promote ecological validity. The integrated partnership covers the first phase of intervention development through final phases that ultimately facilitate more global, universal translation of changes in attitudes, norms, and systems. Our comprehensive model for incorporating culture and diversity into translational research provides a basis for further discussion and translational science development.

  12. The role of perceived interactivity in virtual communities: building trust and increasing stickiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Meng, Yuan; Wang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Although previous research has explored factors affecting trust building in websites, little research has been analysed from the perceived interactivity perspective in virtual communities (VCs). A research model for verifying interactivity antecedents to trust and its impact on member stickiness behaviour is presented. Two social interactivity components and two system interactivity components are, respectively, theorised as process-based antecedents and institution-based antecedents to trust in the model. Data were collected from 310 members of VCs to test the model. The results show that connectedness and reciprocity are important antecedents to trust in members, while responsiveness and active control are important antecedents to trust in systems. The results also indicate that trust has significant influence on the members' duration and retention, which are two dimensions of member stickiness measured in this research. These findings have theoretical implications for online interaction-related literature and critical business implications for practitioners of VCs.

  13. The IAEA Nuclear Data Center its role in the International Scientific Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1976-07-01

    The role of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section as an international data information and analysis center for the co-ordination of the world-wide collection, exchange and dissemination of nuclear data is described. Emphasis is put on the recent activities of the center in the assessment of nuclear data needs in various branches of science and technology, and on its projected development as a global referral center for nuclear data. (author)

  14. THE ROLE OF MICRO FINANCIAL INSTITUTION TO IMPROVE SOCIO-ECONOMIC OF THE RURAL COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Aziz Arisudi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro f inancial inst itut ion had an important role to improve the socio-economicof the rural communit ies. However, in its effort , the result in improving the socio-economicof the rural communit ies, part icularly among the poor is st ill low. The access for the ruralcommunit ies for low interest credit was also limited. The object ives of this research were asfollows. First , to analyze the factors that drove the rural communit ies to borrow money f rommicro credit inst itut ions. Second, to analyze the role of micro credit inst itut ions and itsimpacts on the rural communit ies’ socio-economic, Third, to analyze the rural communit ies’coping st rategies, Fourth, to evaluate the rural communit ies’ percept ions on micro creditinterest rate. This research used both qualitat ive and quant itat ive methods. The results ofthis research were as follows. First , the factors causing rural communit ies to borrow moneyf rom micro credit inst itut ions were to cover their living cost , provision and addit ion of capital.The micro credit inst itut ion had considerably lower interest rate than rentener, and theprocedures were simple and fast . Second, the role of micro credit inst itut ions to improve therural communit ies socio-economic was st ill low. Third, the interest rate of the micro creditinst itut ions was comparably fair and lower than the unlicensed micro bank.

  15. Reflections on the role of the pharmacy regulatory authority in enhancing quality related event reporting in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Bishop, Andrea C; Mahaffey, Thomas; Mackinnon, Neil J; Ashcroft, Darren M; Zwicker, Bev; Reid, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Given the demanding nature of providing pharmacy services, coupled with the expanded scope of practice of the professions in jurisdictions around the world, greater commitment to continuous quality improvement through adoption of quality-related event (QRE) reporting is necessary to ensure patient safety. Pharmacy regulatory authorities (PRAs) are in a unique position to enhance QRE reporting and learning through the standardization of expected practice. This study was aimed to gain a better understanding of the perceived roles of PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning in community pharmacies, and identifying regulatory best practices to execute such roles. A purposive case sampling approach was used to identify PRA staff members from two groups (Deputy registrars and pharmacy inspectors) in 10 Canadian jurisdictions to participate in focus groups in the fall of 2011. Focus groups were used to explore perceptions of the role of PRAs in enhancing and promoting QRE reporting and learning, and perceived barriers to effective implementation in practice. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Two focus groups were conducted, one with seven Deputy registrars/Practice managers, and one with nine pharmacy inspectors. Five themes were identified, including (1) defining QRE reporting and compliance, (2) navigating role conflict, (3) educating for enhanced QRE reporting and learning, (4) promoting the positive/removing the fear of QREs, and (5) tailoring QRE reporting and learning consistency. Overall, participants perceived a strong role for PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning and providing education for pharmacies to support their compliance with reporting standards. However, PRAs must navigate the conflict inherent in both educating and promoting a process for achieving a standard while simultaneously inspecting compliance to that standard. Ensuring pharmacies have autonomy in operationalizing standards may help to mitigate this conflict

  16. REFLECTIONS ON THE ROLE OF THE PHARMACY REGULATORY AUTHORITY IN ENHANCING QUALITY RELATED EVENT REPORTING IN COMMUNITY PHARMACIESi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A.; Bishop, Andrea C.; Mahaffey, Thomas; MacKinnon, Neil J.; Ashcroft, Darren; Zwicker, Bev; Reid, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the demanding nature of providing pharmacy services, coupled with the expanded scope of practice of the professions in jurisdictions around the world, greater commitment to continuous quality improvement through adoption of quality related event (QRE) reporting is necessary to ensure patient safety. Pharmacy regulatory authorities (PRAs) are in a unique position to enhance QRE reporting and learning through the standardization of expected practice Objective This study aims to better understand the perceived roles of PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning in community pharmacies and identifying regulatory best practices to execute such roles. Methods A purposive case sampling approach was used to identify PRA staff members from two groups (deputy registrars and pharmacy inspectors) in 10 Canadian jurisdictions to participate in focus groups in the fall of 2011. Focus groups were used to explore perceptions of the role of PRAs in enhancing and promoting QRE reporting and learning, and perceived barriers to effective implementation in practice. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Results Two focus groups were conducted, one with seven deputy registrars/practice managers and one with nine pharmacy inspectors. Five themes were identified, including (1) defining QRE reporting and compliance, (2) navigating role conflict, (3) educating for enhanced QRE reporting and learning, (4) promoting the positive/removing the fear of QREs, and (5) tailoring QRE reporting and learning consistency. Conclusions Overall, participants perceived a strong role for PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning and providing education for pharmacies to support their compliance with reporting standards. However, PRAs must navigate the conflict inherent in both educating and promoting a process for achieving a standard while simultaneously inspecting compliance to that standard. Ensuring pharmacies have autonomy in operationalizing standards may

  17. The role of brand communities within the athletic footwear industry : an assessment of selected brand communities with a focus on the Swiss athletic footwear industry

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Adidas’s launch of the “Adidas Runners” community, Asics “FrontRunners” and Nike’s “Training Club” are only a few communities that have been established within past years. This evolution highlights the rise of so-called brand communities. The idea of customer communities arose with the internet in the beginning of the 21st century. This phenomenon brings customer engagement and relationship marketing to a new level. Brand communities – if well implied – allow companies to conne...

  18. The Economic Importance of Adequate Aeronautical Telemetry Spectrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kahn, Carolyn A

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: (1) The flight test community faces a telemetry spectrum crunch; (2) Amount of spectrum now allocated for ATM is not sufficient to meet needs, and requirements have been steadily growing...

  19. Laser deposition of coatings for aeronautical and industrials turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teleginski, V. [Instituto Federal de Sao Paulo (IFSP), SP (Brazil); Silva, S.A.; Riva, R.; Vasconcelos, G. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Silva Pita, G.R. [Universidade Braz Cubas, Mogi das Cruzes, SP (Brazil); Yamin, L.S. [Escola Tecnica Everardo Passos (ETEP), Sao Jose dos Campos, DP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Zirconium-based ceramic materials are widely employed as Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC), due to its excellent wear and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. The application of TBC includes aeronautical and industrials turbine blades. The working conditions include oxidizing environments and temperatures above 1000°C. The zirconium-based ceramics are developed in such a way that the microstructural control is possible through the control of chemical composition, fabrication route and, thermal treatment. The present paper proposes a laser route to deposit the TBC coating, where the microstructural control is a function of power density and interaction time between the laser beam and the material. The main objective of this work is to study the influence of the CO2 laser beam (Synrad Evolution 125) parameters: power density and interaction time, on the deposition process of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders on NiCrAlY/AISI 316L substrates. The resulting coating surface and interface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that is possible to match laser parameters of scanning speed and intensity to produce homogenous coatings. The X-Ray analyses show that the obtained ceramic coating has reduced number of phases, with prevalence of tetragonal phase.(author)

  20. PEMFC for aeronautic applications: A review on the durability aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyantyi, Noluntu; Parsons, Adrian; Sita, Cordellia; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2017-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) not only offer more efficient electrical energy conversion, relative to on-ground/backup turbines but generate by-products useful in aircraft such as heat for ice prevention, deoxygenated air for fire retardation and drinkable water for use on-board. Consequently, several projects (e.g. DLR-H2 Antares and RAPID2000) have successfully tested PEMFC-powered auxiliary unit (APU) for manned/unmanned aircraft. Despite the progress from flying PEMFC-powered small aircraft with 20 kW power output as high as 1 000 m at 100 km/h to 33 kW at 2 558 m, 176 km/h [1, 2, 3], durability and reliability remain key challenges. This review reports on the inadequate understanding of behaviour of PEMFC under aeronautic conditions and the lack of predictive methods conducive for aircraft that provide real-time information on the State of Health of PEMFCs. -To minimize performance loss due to high altitude and inclination by adjusting cathode stoichiometric ratio. -To improve quality of oxygen-depleted air by controlling operating temperature and stoichiometric ratio. -Need to devise real time prediction methods conducive for determining PEMFC SoH in aircraft.

  1. Crack path in aeronautical titanium alloy under ultrasonic torsion loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikitin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses features of fatigue crack initiation and growth in aeronautical VT3-1 titanium alloy under pure torsion loading in gigacycle regime. Two materials: extruded and forged VT3-1 titanium alloys were studied. Torsion fatigue tests were performed up to fatigue life of 109 cycles. The results of the torsion tests were compared with previously obtained results under fully reversed axial loading on the same alloys. It has been shown that independently on production process as surface as well subsurface crack initiation may appear under ultrasonic torsion loading despite the maximum stress amplitude located at the specimen surface. In the case of surface crack initiation, a scenario of crack initiation and growth is similar to HCF regime except an additional possibility for internal crack branching. In the case of subsurface crack, the initiation site is located below the specimen surface (about 200 μm and is not clearly related to any material flaw. Internal crack initiation is produced by shear stress in maximum shear plane and early crack growth is in Mode II. Crack branching is limited in the case of internal crack initiation compared to surface one. A typical ‘fish-eye’ crack can be observed at the torsion fracture surface, but mechanism of crack initiation seems not to be the same than under axial fatigue loading.

  2. The role of a family for internal dose formation in rural community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasova, N.V.; Rozhko, A.V.; Stavrov, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Despite correct evaluation of agricultural land contamination of a settlement and the activity of foodstuffs, it is impossible to explain dose formation in rural community. And without this knowledge it is impossible to estimate correctly decision-making. The dose formation research was provided earlier in rural community based on the concept describing that the individual with his personal characteristics, social and economic statuses during his practical activity interacting with the contaminated environment, actively contributes to dose formation. Such approach only partly allows revealing dose formation mechanisms though there are some unclear issues: for example, high doses at some children. At the same time children, as well as all residents are the members of families. Direct consumption of food stuffs is provided within a family. It is preceded with the formation of psycho-emotional perception of radiation danger factor. There have been used the data of internal doses of the inhabitants obtained by the results of WBC-measurements. Simultaneously with performing of WBC measurements by interviewing of adult members of a family there was revealed the frequency of visits to forest and consumption rate of its 'gifts'. The method of a family analysis of internal dose formation is the classification of families by set of the informative attributes describing dose formation in a family such as an average internal dose at a member of a family; family total dose; the description of a family 'contact' with a forest; the number of family members; the number of children in a family; average age and the educational level of adult members of a family; gender and occupation of the head of a family; age and education of the head of a family. As a result of multivariate classification of families in the settlement there was obtained 10 different classes providing complete imagination about a variety of families' types. The average doses in classes essentially

  3. Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) Year 2 Report and Year 3 Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Box, Richard C.; Fink, Mary M.; Gogos, Geroge; Lehrer, Henry R.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Tarry, Scott E.; Vlasek, Karisa D.

    2003-01-01

    The Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL): a comprehensive, multi-faceted NASA EPSCoR 2000 initiative, contributes to the strategic research and technology priorities of NASA while intensifying Nebraska s rapidly growing aeronautics research and development endeavors. AERIAL enables Nebraska researchers to: (a) continue strengthening their collaborative relationships with NASA Field Centers, Codes, and Enterprises; (b) increase the capacity of higher education throughout Nebraska to invigorate and expand aeronautics research; and (c) expedite the development of aeronautics-related research infrastructure and industry in the state. This report contains a summary of AERIAL's activities and accomplishments during the second year of implementation. The AERIAL Year 3 proposal is also included.

  4. Development of a Comprehensive Digital Avionics Curriculum for the Aeronautical Engineer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hofer, Thomas W

    2006-01-01

    ... avionics curriculum does not yet exist that satisfies the needs of graduates who will serve as aeronautical engineers involved with the development, integration, testing, fielding, and supporting...

  5. Functional role of fouling community on an artificial reef at the northern coast of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werther Krohling

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The northern coast of Rio de Janeiro State lacks natural consolidate substrates, making it a proper environment to the development of researches using artificial structures. After studies about the type of substrate, concrete seems to be the most appropriate for studying fouling community development. This research was carried out to investigate the functional role of biofouling in the development of the ichthyic community in the north of Rio de Janeiro State. Percentage data of the epibenthic organisms' coverage and samples of the fish community with gillnet and visual census showed that biofouling in artificial reefs might have more than one functional role, acting as a facilitator in the recruitment of fish species and as a link in the trophic marine chain. Through the increase of localized structural complexity provided by the reef itself and by the fouling organisms which act as "engineering species", additional protection options are offered to the ichthyic community, especially recruits. Also, the epibiont biomass represents an important link in the food web, acting either as a direct source or in the transference of energy to higher trophic levels. Through the relationship between the ichthyic and fouling communities we concluded that the functional role of the latter in artificial reef habitats could be characterized mainly as shelter and feeding grounds for few fish species.O litoral norte do Estado do Rio de Janeiro possui uma escassez de substrato consolidado natural tornando o ambiente propício para o desenvolvimento de pesquisas com estruturas artificiais. Após estudos conclusivos sobre o tipo de substrato, o concreto parece ser o mais apropriado para o desenvolvimento da comunidade incrustante. Novas pesquisas foram realizadas para investigar o papel funcional da bioincrustação no desenvolvimento da comunidade íctica no norte do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Dados de porcentagem de cobertura dos organismos epibênticos e

  6. Gender roles, food system biodiversity, and food security in Indigenous Peoples' communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnlein, Harriet V

    2017-11-01

    Traditional knowledge and practice of Indigenous Peoples related to their food use and well-being is a wealth of information for academic study and for public health nutrition. Despite unique long-evolved heritages of knowledge of ecosystem resources, Indigenous Peoples comprise 15% of the global poor, but only 5% of the world's population, and they experience poverty, discrimination, and poor nutritional health at far greater rates than mainstream populations in their nations of residence. These disparities are unacceptable in all human rights frameworks, and the call to alleviate them resonates through all human development programmes and the United Nations organizations. The scholars contributing to this special issue of Maternal and Child Nutrition describe how gender roles and the right to food for several cultures of Indigenous Peoples can be fostered to protect their unique foods and traditions, providing food sovereignty and food and nutrition security benefits, especially for women and children. Aspects of societal maternal or paternal lineality and locality, division of labour, spirituality and decision-making are described. These factors structure the impact of gender roles with Indigenous worldviews on the dynamics of family food access, its availability and use, and the use of local food biodiversity. Cultures of Indigenous Peoples in Ecuador, Nigeria, Thailand, India, Canada, Japan, and Morocco are discussed. This publication is a work of the Task Force on Traditional, Indigenous and Cultural Food and Nutrition of the International Union of Nutritional Sciences. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The role of advocacy in occasioning community and organizational change in a medical-legal partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Carpenter, Kaston D; Collie-Akers, Vicki; Colvin, Jeffrey D; Cronin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities among low-income individuals remain a significant problem. A number of social determinants are associated with adverse health outcomes. Medical-legal partnerships address legal concerns of low-income individuals to improve health and wellness in adults and children. The Medical-Legal Partnership at Legal Aid of Western Missouri provides free direct legal services for patients with legal concerns affecting health. There is limited evidence regarding the association between advocacy-related efforts and changes within both the medical-legal partnership structure and in health-care facilities. Three health-care organizations in Kansas City, MO participated in implementing the medical-legal partnership model between 2007 and 2010. Advocacy efforts conducted by key medical-legal partnership personnel were strongly associated with changes in health-care organizations and within the medical-legal partnership structure. This study extends the current evidence base by examining the types of advocacy efforts required to bring about community and organizational changes.

  8. Pathogens, prejudice, and politics: the role of the global health community in the European refugee crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mishal S; Osei-Kofi, Anna; Omar, Abbas; Kirkbride, Hilary; Kessel, Anthony; Abbara, Aula; Heymann, David; Zumla, Alimuddin; Dar, Osman

    2016-08-01

    Involuntary migration is a crucially important global challenge from an economic, social, and public health perspective. The number of displaced people reached an unprecedented level in 2015, at a total of 60 million worldwide, with more than 1 million crossing into Europe in the past year alone. Migrants and refugees are often perceived to carry a higher load of infectious diseases, despite no systematic association. We propose three important contributions that the global health community can make to help address infectious disease risks and global health inequalities worldwide, with a particular focus on the refugee crisis in Europe. First, policy decisions should be based on a sound evidence base regarding health risks and burdens to health systems, rather than prejudice or unfounded fears. Second, for incoming refugees, we must focus on building inclusive, cost-effective health services to promote collective health security. Finally, alongside protracted conflicts, widening of health and socioeconomic inequalities between high-income and lower-income countries should be acknowledged as major drivers for the global refugee crisis, and fully considered in planning long-term solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence based policy making in the European Union. The role of the scientific community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majcen, Spela [Euro-Mediterranean Univ. (EMUNI), Portoroz (Slovenia)

    2017-03-15

    In the times when the acquis of the European Union (EU) has developed so far as to reach a high level of technical complexity, in particular in certain policy fields such as environmental legislation, it is important to look at what kind of information and data policy decisions are based on. This position paper looks at the extent to which evidence-based decision-making process is being considered in the EU institutions when it comes to adopting legislation in the field of environment at the EU level. The paper calls for closer collaboration between scientists and decision-makers in view of ensuring that correct data is understood and taken into consideration when drafting, amending, negotiating and adopting new legal texts at all levels of the EU decision-making process. It concludes that better awareness of the need for such collaboration among the decision-makers as well as the scientific community would benefit the process and quality of the final outcomes (legislation).

  10. Evidence based policy making in the European Union: the role of the scientific community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcen, Špela

    2017-03-01

    In the times when the acquis of the European Union (EU) has developed so far as to reach a high level of technical complexity, in particular in certain policy fields such as environmental legislation, it is important to look at what kind of information and data policy decisions are based on. This position paper looks at the extent to which evidence-based decision-making process is being considered in the EU institutions when it comes to adopting legislation in the field of environment at the EU level. The paper calls for closer collaboration between scientists and decision-makers in view of ensuring that correct data is understood and taken into consideration when drafting, amending, negotiating and adopting new legal texts at all levels of the EU decision-making process. It concludes that better awareness of the need for such collaboration among the decision-makers as well as the scientific community would benefit the process and quality of the final outcomes (legislation).

  11. The role of anxiety symptoms in school performance in a community sample of children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Luigi; Ducci, Francesca; Scoto, Maria Cristina; Passaniti, Eleonora; D'Arrigo, Valentina Genitori; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2007-12-05

    Anxiety symptoms are relatively common among children and adolescents and can interfere with functioning. The prevalence of anxiety and the relationship between anxiety and school performance were examined among elementary, middle, and high school students. Samples of elementary (N = 131, age 8-10 years), middle (N = 267, age 11-13 years), and high school (N = 80, age 14-16 years) children were recruited from four public schools in a predominantly middle-class community in Catania, Italy. Children completed the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC). T-scores were computed for the MASC total scores, and considered to be in the anxious range if 65 or above. Current academic grades were obtained from school records. Of the 478 children, 35 (7.3%) had a MASC T-score in the anxious range. The rate of children in the anxious range was 2.3% in elementary, 7.9% in middle, and 15.9% in high school (chi2 = 7.8, df = 2, p children and adolescents attending elementary through high school, the prevalence of abnormally high self-reported levels of anxiety increased in frequency with age and was negatively associated with school performance.

  12. Evidence based policy making in the European Union. The role of the scientific community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majcen, Spela

    2017-01-01

    In the times when the acquis of the European Union (EU) has developed so far as to reach a high level of technical complexity, in particular in certain policy fields such as environmental legislation, it is important to look at what kind of information and data policy decisions are based on. This position paper looks at the extent to which evidence-based decision-making process is being considered in the EU institutions when it comes to adopting legislation in the field of environment at the EU level. The paper calls for closer collaboration between scientists and decision-makers in view of ensuring that correct data is understood and taken into consideration when drafting, amending, negotiating and adopting new legal texts at all levels of the EU decision-making process. It concludes that better awareness of the need for such collaboration among the decision-makers as well as the scientific community would benefit the process and quality of the final outcomes (legislation).

  13. A Systematic Review of Community Health Workers' Role in Occupational Safety and Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Jennifer E; Nichols, Helen M; Clouser, Jessica M; Check, Pietra; Edwards, Lori; Bush, Ashley M; Padilla, Yancy; Betz, Gail

    2018-03-03

    We systematically reviewed the literature to describe how community health workers (CHWs) are involved in occupational health and safety research and to identify areas for future research and research practice strategies. We searched five electronic databases from July 2015 through July 2016. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study took place in the United States, (2) published as a full peer-review manuscript in English, (3) conducted occupational health and safety research, and (4) CHWs were involved in the research. The majority of 17 included studies took place in the agriculture industry (76%). CHWs were often involved in study implementation/design and research participant contact. Rationale for CHW involvement in research was due to local connections/acceptance, existing knowledge/skills, communication ability, and access to participants. Barriers to CHW involvement in research included competing demands on CHWs, recruitment and training difficulties, problems about research rigor and issues with proper data collection. Involving CHWs in occupational health and safety research has potential for improving inclusion of diverse, vulnerable and geographically isolated populations. Further research is needed to assess the challenges and opportunities of involving CHWs in this research and to develop evidence-based training strategies to teach CHWs to be lay-health researchers.

  14. Understanding the role of individual consumer-provider relationships within assertive community treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Matejkowski, Jason

    2010-08-01

    The widespread adoption of assertive community treatment has resulted in a shift from an individual model to a team model of case management. The shift has had implications for individual relationships between case managers and consumers, but still little is known about how these relationships develop in teams. This exploratory mixed methods study looked at how case managers and consumers negotiate individual relationships within a team model. Quantitative methods identified high and low service intensity relationships between consumers and case managers and qualitative methods explored and compared these relationships. Consumers in high service intensity relationships described a preference for certain case managers and the burden of working with multiple people. Case managers invested high service intensity relationships with special therapeutic value, articulated the challenges of coordinating care across the team, and utilized team limit setting techniques. In contrast, low service intensity relationships were more likely to reflect integration with the entire team. Findings suggest that teams need to consider how individual relationships enhance care for their consumers and how to nurture these relationships while maintaining the support necessary for case managers and consumers.

  15. Measuring the Social Sustainability of Urban Communities: The Role of Local Authorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdana NEAMŢU

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the topic of social sustainability which in the last years has attracted interest from both the academia and political decision-makers and analyzes emerging issues on the social sustainability agenda such as urban governance, citizens’ empowerment and participation, sense of place, urban livability etc. The article focuses on how social sustainability of a community can be evaluated: it looks at existing methodologies, metrics and tools and uses the indicators from the Egan report (UK to illustrate the shifts currently taking place in the realm of sustainability assessment. The empirical research strives to determine whether public servants working in urban planning or in other areas that are closely related to planning are in favor of introducing at the local level a sustainability assessment system (research carried out in medium and large municipalities from the North-Western region of Romania. The main conclusion which can be derived from both literature and practice is that the themes under the umbrella of social sustainability are changing and that sustainability assessment is currently in the process of being better understood and used at the local level.

  16. The Role of Women in Strengthening Communities Against Radicalisation and Violent Extremism in Kenya: A Theoritical Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owiso, Michael Omondi; Mbulwa, Faith

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the roles women play in strengthening communities against radicalisation and violent extremism. Radicalisation and violent extremism are precursor to terrorism and focusing on them amounts to preventing terrorism at an earlier stage, before it is too late for non coercive...... measures. The realisation that traditional methods of combating terrorism are expensive and destruct development gravely affecting women, who in the first place it seeks to protect, has led to handling its root causes which is radicalism and violent extremism with non coercive measure. Further, the number...... radicalised and become violent extremist who can engage in terror, is a measure to both in targeting front-end prevention of radicalisation as well as developing infrastructures for de-radicalisation. This study was guided by three theories that is; Frustration Aggression Hypothesis and Relative Deprivation...

  17. Dealing with corruption in South African civil society: Orientating Christian communities for their role in a post-apartheid context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich W. de Wet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the full spectrum of Christian communities are challenged to realign themselves in addressing the impact of corruption on the contemporary South-African society can be a relevant indicator of civil society�s state and functionality in a post-apartheid democratic context. Utilising the interpretative and normative tools of practical-theological research, the researcher attempts to point out markers for Christian communities towards orientating themselves regarding their role in a complex landscape and in an asymmetrically shaped public sphere. The discussion includes an analysis of the current shape of civil society, an interpretation of the complex landscape of perceptions regarding corruption and an overview of the dilemmas faced by some of the major Christian church traditions in the post-apartheid South African context concerning their truthful presence in civil society. The discussion concludes by making a case for the need to anchor the realignment of the prophetic voice and the revitalisation of the transformative presence in a profound and far-reaching theological reorientation. Tension fields that involve critical and constructive action in a situation of endemic corruption cannot be negotiated without ridding the own presence from potential corruptive elements like hidden exclusivity, half-hearted concern and compromise.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Making use of the interdisciplinary results of social sciences and civil-society studies, the author provides an overview for Christian communities and their leaders in theologically orientating themselves for an appropriate angle of approach in entering the public sphere with a view on authentic and impactful participation in anti-corruption dialogue and actions. The key finding of the research amounts to the following: Tension fields that involve critical and constructive action in a situation of endemic corruption cannot be negotiated without

  18. Fruit and vegetable consumption in the former Soviet Union: the role of individual- and community-level factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryakin, Yevgeniy; Rocco, Lorenzo; Suhrcke, Marc; Roberts, Bayard; McKee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    To explain patterns of fruit and vegetable consumption in nine former Soviet Union countries by exploring the influence of a range of individual- and community-level determinants. Cross-sectional nationally representative surveys and area profiles were undertaken in 2010 in nine countries of the former Soviet Union as part of the Health in Times of Transition (HITT) study. Individual- and area-level determinants were analysed, taking into account potential confounding at the individual and area level. Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine. Adult survey respondents (n 17 998) aged 18-95 years. Being male, increasing age, lack of education and lack of financial resources were associated with lower probability of consuming adequate amounts of fruit or vegetables. Daily fruit or vegetable consumption was positively correlated with the number of shops selling fruit and vegetables (for women) and with the number of convenience stores (for men). Billboard advertising of snacks and sweet drinks was negatively related to daily fruit or vegetable consumption, although the reverse was true for billboards advertising soft drinks. Men living near a fast-food outlet had a lower probability of fruit or vegetable consumption, while the opposite was true for the number of local food restaurants. Overall fruit and vegetable consumption in the former Soviet Union is inadequate, particularly among lower socio-economic groups. Both individual- and community-level factors play a role in explaining inadequate nutrition and thus provide potential entry points for policy interventions, while the nuanced influence of community factors informs the agenda for future research.

  19. Community violence exposure and post-traumatic stress reactions among Gambian youth: the moderating role of positive school climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Deborah A; Roberts, William C; Schwab-Stone, Mary E

    2011-01-01

    Community violence exposure among youth can lead to various negative outcomes, including post-traumatic stress symptoms. Research in the Western world indicates that a number of social support factors may moderate the relation between violence exposure and internalizing symptoms. Little research has been carried out in non-Western countries. This study aimed to fill this gap by exploring the relations among violence exposure, parental warmth, positive school climate, and post-traumatic stress reactions among youth in The Republic of The Gambia, Africa. A school-based survey of youth behaviors, feelings, attitudes, and perceptions was administered to 653 students at senior secondary schools in four Gambian communities. Students reported high levels of exposure to violence. Over half of students reported witnessing someone threatened with serious physical harm, beaten up or mugged, attacked or stabbed with a knife/piece of glass, or seriously wounded in an incident of violence. Nearly half of students reported being beaten up or mugged during the past year, and nearly a quarter reported being threatened with serious physical harm. There were no sex differences in levels of exposure. Traumatic stress symptoms were common, especially among females. Both violence witnessing and violent victimization significantly predicted post-traumatic stress symptoms, and positive school climate moderated the relationship. Among youth victimized by violence, positive school climate was most strongly correlated with lower levels of post-traumatic stress at low levels of exposure. Among youth who had witnessed violence, positive school climate was most strongly correlated with lower levels of post-traumatic stress at high levels of exposure. Community-based programs that bring together parents, schools, and youth may play an important role in combating the negative effects of some types of violence exposure among Gambian youth. Youth experiencing high levels of violent victimization

  20. Understanding the Role and Impact of Effective Country and Community Leadership in Progress Toward the Global Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Charles; Pillay, Yogan

    2017-05-01

    Individual leadership and leaders have played pivotal roles in the history of efforts to end the AIDS epidemic. The goal of this article is to reflect on and understand how leadership and leaders have impacted and enabled the success of the Global Plan Towards the Elimination of New HIV Infections among Children by 2015 and Keeping their Mothers Alive (Global Plan). To accomplish this goal, multiple interviews were conducted with individuals in positions of leadership who had been identified as people whose actions drove progress. Interviewees were selected from all levels of traditional hierarchies and sectors to provide a more complete account and representation of leadership, with a particular emphasis on the community, district, and country levels. The leaders interviewed provide insight into their work, motivations, and approaches to effective leadership. Through their experiences, they shed light on the strategies they used to drive changes in policy, programs, practice, and communities that allowed for progress toward the goals of the Global Plan. Leaders also identify future challenges and areas of improvement in the effort to end the AIDS epidemic that they feel require leadership and urgent action. In conclusion, this article identifies common characteristics of effective leadership and reflects on the experiences of individuals who are leaders in the effort to end the AIDS epidemic, and how their lessons learned can be applied to help realize future global public health goals.