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Sample records for aerodynamic size separator

  1. Indigenous development and performance evaluation of BARC aerodynamic size separator (BASS)

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, S; Khan, A; Mayya, Y S; Narayanan, K P; Purwar, R C; Sapra, B K; Sunny, F

    2002-01-01

    Commercially available cascade impactors, commonly used for aerodynamic size separation of aerosol particles, are based on the principle of inertial impaction. As of now, these instruments are imported at a cost of several lakhs of rupees; hence an effort has been made to develop an aerodynamic particle sizer indigenously in BARC. This unit, referred to as BARC Aerodynamic Size Separator (BASS), separates aerosols into seven size classes ranging from 0.53 mu m to 10 mu m and operates at a flow rate of 45 Ipm. Intercomparison studies between the standard Andersen Mark-II (Grasbey Andersen Inc.) impactor and BASS using nebulizer generated aerosols have consistently shown excellent performance by BASS in all respects. In particular, BASS yielded the parameters of polydisperse aerosols quite accurately. Experiments to evaluate the individual stage cut-off diameters show that these are within 8% of their designed value for all stages except the higher two stages which indicate about 30% lower values than the desig...

  2. Indigenous development and performance evaluation of BARC aerodynamic size separator (BASS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sanjay; Purwar, R.C.; Das, Tanmoy; Narayanan, K.P.; Sapra, B.K.; Sunny, Faby; Khan, Arshad; Mayya, Y.S.

    2002-06-01

    Commercially available cascade impactors, commonly used for aerodynamic size separation of aerosol particles, are based on the principle of inertial impaction. As of now, these instruments are imported at a cost of several lakhs of rupees; hence an effort has been made to develop an aerodynamic particle sizer indigenously in BARC. This unit, referred to as BARC Aerodynamic Size Separator (BASS), separates aerosols into seven size classes ranging from 0.53 μm to 10 μm and operates at a flow rate of 45 Ipm. Intercomparison studies between the standard Andersen Mark-II (Grasbey Andersen Inc.) impactor and BASS using nebulizer generated aerosols have consistently shown excellent performance by BASS in all respects. In particular, BASS yielded the parameters of polydisperse aerosols quite accurately. Experiments to evaluate the individual stage cut-off diameters show that these are within 8% of their designed value for all stages except the higher two stages which indicate about 30% lower values than the designed ones. The replotting of all the mass distribution data using the experimental cut-off diameters showed perfect lognormal fits, thereby indicating that these diameters are closer to the true stage cut-off diameters for BASS. The studies show that BASS will be suitable for determining the particle size distributions in the context of the radiological safety programmes of DAE. Being indigenous in design, it may be fabricated on a commercial scale at a cost far less than that of the imported units. Such a venture will greatly help several national programmes on atmospheric pollution being carried out by many laboratories and institutions across the country. (author)

  3. Detection limit improvements forecasted at CTBTO IMS radionuclide stations based on size separation of aerosols by aerodynamic diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biegalski, S.; Ezekoye, O.A.; Pena, J.M.; Waye, S.; Pickering, M.

    2008-01-01

    Studies show that aerosols with natural activity have an aerodynamic diameter in the range of 0.1 to 1 μm. In contrast, nuclear explosions generally produce radioactive aerosols with aerodynamic diameters less than 0.1 μm and greater than 1 μm. These differences in aerosol sizes are quite fortuitous because they allow aerosol aerodynamic diameter to be utilized as a physical property to separate aerosols of natural origin from those produced in a nuclear explosion. Data collected in Austin, TX and at U.S. CTBT IMS radionuclide stations have been utilized to forecast detection limit improvements possible given an aerosol size separation capability. (author)

  4. Laser assisted aerodynamic isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H. van den

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the efficiency of conventional aerodynamic isotope seperation can be improved by two orders of magnitude with the aid of a relatively weak cw infrared laser which is used to induce isotopically selective condensation. Overall isotope enrichment factors in excess of 2 are obtained as compared to about 1.02 in the conventional seperation. Sulphur isotopes in SF 6 as well as Silicon isotopes in SiF 4 and Bromine isotopes in CF 3 Br are seperated on a laboratory scale. Infrared vibrational predissociation by itself and in combination with isotopically selective condensation are also shown to be effective new ways of isotope separation. (orig.) [de

  5. Aerodynamic isotope separation processes for uranium enrichment: process requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malling, G.F.; Von Halle, E.

    1976-01-01

    The pressing need for enriched uranium to fuel nuclear power reactors, requiring that as many as ten large uranium isotope separation plants be built during the next twenty years, has inspired an increase of interest in isotope separation processes for uranium enrichment. Aerodynamic isotope separation processes have been prominently mentioned along with the gas centrifuge process and the laser isotope separation methods as alternatives to the gaseous diffusion process, currently in use, for these future plants. Commonly included in the category of aerodynamic isotope separation processes are: (a) the separation nozzle process; (b) opposed gas jets; (c) the gas vortex; (d) the separation probes; (e) interacting molecular beams; (f) jet penetration processes; and (g) time of flight separation processes. A number of these aerodynamic isotope separation processes depend, as does the gas centrifuge process, on pressure diffusion associated with curved streamlines for the basic separation effect. Much can be deduced about the process characteristics and the economic potential of such processes from a simple and elementary process model. In particular, the benefit to be gained from a light carrier gas added to the uranium feed is clearly demonstrated. The model also illustrates the importance of transient effects in this class of processes

  6. Aerodynamic effects in isotope separation by gaseous diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bert, L.A.; Prosperetti, A.; Fiocchi, R.

    1978-01-01

    The turbulent flow of an isotopic mixture in a porous-walled pipe is considered in the presence of suction through the wall. A simple model is formulated for the evaluation of aerodynamic effects on the separation efficiency. The predictions of the model are found to compare very favourably with experiment. In the limit of small suction velocities, results obtained by other investigators for diffusion in a turbulent steam are recovered. (author)

  7. An innovative device for powders classification based on combined aerodynamic and electrostatic separation of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriou, Bruno; Mayer-Laigle, Claire; Maalel, Firas; Plissot, Jorys; Rouau, Xavier

    2017-06-01

    An innovative separator have been developed which aims at sorting out powders fractions according to aerodynamic and electrostatic properties of particles. The prototype is composed of a projection unit, a separation module and a classification/collection zone. The projection part is ensured by a pressurized gun. The separation module is conceived to disperse particles according to front and transverse directions. At the output of the gun, electrodes can be disposed to deviate the trajectory of charged particles. The classification part is made of a series of collecting bins. Starch, fine ash powders, and mixtures of these two materials were used to test the working of the separator. The efficiency of the separation was assessed by yields and particle sizes distribution of the collected fractions in the different bins. An aerodynamic classification was achieved along the main axis, with the finest particles crossing larger distances. With a blend of starch and ash, particles from both materials were unevenly distributed in the classifyier, opening the way to a possible separation based simply on aerodynamic properties. When an electric deviation was applied in addition to the projection of powders, the distribution of particles in the collecting part was modified.

  8. An innovative device for powders classification based on combined aerodynamic and electrostatic separation of particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriou Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An innovative separator have been developed which aims at sorting out powders fractions according to aerodynamic and electrostatic properties of particles. The prototype is composed of a projection unit, a separation module and a classification/collection zone. The projection part is ensured by a pressurized gun. The separation module is conceived to disperse particles according to front and transverse directions. At the output of the gun, electrodes can be disposed to deviate the trajectory of charged particles. The classification part is made of a series of collecting bins. Starch, fine ash powders, and mixtures of these two materials were used to test the working of the separator. The efficiency of the separation was assessed by yields and particle sizes distribution of the collected fractions in the different bins. An aerodynamic classification was achieved along the main axis, with the finest particles crossing larger distances. With a blend of starch and ash, particles from both materials were unevenly distributed in the classifyier, opening the way to a possible separation based simply on aerodynamic properties. When an electric deviation was applied in addition to the projection of powders, the distribution of particles in the collecting part was modified.

  9. 1st Stage Separation Aerodynamics Of VEGA Launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genito, M.; Paglia, F.; Mogavero, A.; Barbagallo, D.

    2011-05-01

    VEGA is an European launch vehicle under development by the Prime Contractor ELV S.p.A. in the frame of an ESA contract. It is constituted by four stages, dedicated to the scientific/commercial market of small satellites (300 ÷ 2500 kg) into Low Earth Orbits, with inclinations ranging from 5.2° up to Sun Synchronous Orbits and with altitude ranging from 300 to 1500 km. Aim of this paper is to present a study of flow field due to retro-rockets impingement during the 1st stage VEGA separation phase. In particular the main goal of the present work is to present the aerodynamic activities performed for the justification of the separation phase.

  10. Aerodynamics and Percolation: Unfolding Laminar Separation Bubble on Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traphan, Dominik; Wester, Tom T. B.; Gülker, Gerd; Peinke, Joachim; Lind, Pedro G.

    2018-04-01

    As a fundamental phenomenon of fluid mechanics, recent studies suggested laminar-turbulent transition belonging to the universality class of directed percolation. Here, the onset of a laminar separation bubble on an airfoil is analyzed in terms of the directed percolation model using particle image velocimetry data. Our findings indicate a clear significance of percolation models in a general flow situation beyond fundamental ones. We show that our results are robust against fluctuations of the parameter, namely, the threshold of turbulence intensity, that maps velocimetry data into binary cells (turbulent or laminar). In particular, this percolation approach enables the precise determination of the transition point of the laminar separation bubble, an important problem in aerodynamics.

  11. Uranium isotopic separation by aerodynamic methods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovitz, P.; Anderson, J.B.; Brook, J.W.; Calia, V.S.; Greene, G.T.

    1979-06-01

    Two aerodynamic separation techniques for uranium enrichment were investigated for technical feasibility and economic viability. These techniques are known as the Jet Membrane and Velocity Slip Processes. Both analytical and laboratory studies were conducted to explore the technical feasibility of the subject processes. The Jet Membrane Process Studies demonstrated that the process was feasible and that a condensable gas carrier is available. The Velocity Slip Studies demonstrated the predicted effects and did not identify a suitable condensable gas carrier. Hence the Velocity Slip Process exhibited a larger power consumption than did the Jet Membrane Process. An independent contractor prepared detailed cost estimates of the process. The independent results indicated that, based on the same costing ground rules, the Velocity Slip process would require 16 times the fixed capital costs and 12 times the cost per separative work unit as compared to the Jet Membrane Process. The same cost structure indicated that the cost per separative work unit for the Jet Membrane process would be two to three times that for the Gas Centrifuge process. There are a number of uncertainties associated with these cost estimates, such that, in the extreme, the costs might be the same. Further, more detailed cost analysis would be required to resolve the uncertainties associated with the initial cost estimates. The conduct of new studies was not considered to be appropriate for EPRI because of the changes in enrichment program management and security philosophy discussed in the text

  12. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Kolomenskiy

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering.

  13. An assessment of glass microspheres for use as number-based aerodynamic size standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, M.H.E.; Marshall, I.A.; Mitchell, J.P.; Rideal, G.

    1989-08-01

    Polydisperse, non-porous microspheres are required with well-defined aerodynamic properties to determine if enhanced settling of micron-sized aerosol particles occurs in the presence of larger particles (gravitational agglomeration). Glass spheres with claimed unimodal narrow distributions were evaluated using a TSI Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS33B). The size fractions containing particles in the range from 1 to 5 μm aerodynamic diameter were truly unimodal, but the fractions which were supposed to consist solely of particles larger than 5 μm aerodynamic diameter contained a significant proportion of submicron particles. (author)

  14. Intercomparison of 15 Aerodynamic Particle Size Spectrometers (APS 3321): Uncertainties in Particle Sizing and Number Size Distribution.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Weinhold, K.; Zíková, Naděžda; dos Santos, S.M.; Marinoni, A.; Bischof, O.F.; Kykal, C.; Ries, L.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 1545-1551 ISSN 1867-1381 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 262254 - ACTRIS Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : counting efficiency * aerodynamic particle size spectrometers * laboratory study Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.089, year: 2016

  15. The impact of size and shape of particles of undergrowth and herbs mixtures on aerodynamic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Panasiewicz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the size and shape of a selected group of herbs (dried juniper berries Juniperus communis, dry blueberries Vaccinium myrtillus, petals of cornflower Centaurea cyanus on the value of the volatility coefficient, the coefficient of sphericity and the critical speed was analysed in the presented research. A laboratory anemometer to measure the speed of air was used. The determination of the volatility coefficient of particular size fractions was conducted on the basis of critical speed values, calculated as an average established after five measurements. The established aerodynamic properties of particular mixtures allow the determination and the assessment of differences among fractions of valuable resources and different impurities. The presented data might constitute a basis to determine the scope of differences among them and establish interrelations which allow the application of proper parameters for the pneumatic separation process in practice.

  16. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olawoyin, L.

    1995-09-01

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by 222 Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It's major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented

  17. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olawoyin, L.

    1995-09-01

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by {sup 222}Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It`s major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented.

  18. Aerodynamic Limits on Large Civil Tiltrotor Sizing and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, C W.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Large Civil Tiltrotor (2nd generation, or LCTR2) is a useful reference design for technology impact studies. The present paper takes a broad view of technology assessment by examining the extremes of what aerodynamic improvements might hope to accomplish. Performance was analyzed with aerodynamically idealized rotor, wing, and airframe, representing the physical limits of a large tiltrotor. The analysis was repeated with more realistic assumptions, which revealed that increased maximum rotor lift capability is potentially more effective in improving overall vehicle efficiency than higher rotor or wing efficiency. To balance these purely theoretical studies, some practical limitations on airframe layout are also discussed, along with their implications for wing design. Performance of a less efficient but more practical aircraft with non-tilting nacelles is presented.

  19. Fission-nuclide concentrations of ambient aerosol separated by size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csepregi, T.; Kovacs, L.; Maschek, I.; Szterjopulos, K.

    1984-01-01

    Examinations were carried on the radionuclides in aerosol deposited on filters of an air-conditioning plant with high air flow rate. For nuclide concentration of ambient air qualitative and quantitative analyses were made by gamma spectrometry. Methods have been developed for sample preparation, size fractionation by sedimentation technique and measurement of air flow. The collected aerosol particles was separated into five size fractions from 1 to 5 μm and the aerosol fractions were analysed. The mass/size distribution of the particles processed by sedimentation has been compared with that of the ambient aerosol separated by a slot impactor Hungarian type. Because the aggregation caused by the resuspensationtechnique would be assumed, electronmicrophotos were made on processed and unprocessed aerosols. On the basis of them the particle aggregation may be negligible. Otherwise, the derivation of concentration needs to know the exact air volume. For this aim the technical parameters of the aerodynamic system have also been measured in two different ways. The paper reports on the size dependence of fission products originating from the present global late fallout for a two years monitoring period. The results are compared with the daily beta activity concentration of aerosol samples taken by an other sampling unit. (Author)

  20. A Reduced-Complexity Investigation of Blunt Leading-Edge Separation Motivated by UCAV Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Boelens, Okko J.

    2015-01-01

    A reduced complexity investigation for blunt-leading-edge vortical separation has been undertaken. The overall approach is to design the fundamental work in such a way so that it relates to the aerodynamics of a more complex Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) concept known as SACCON. Some of the challenges associated with both the vehicle-class aerodynamics and the fundamental vortical flows are reviewed, and principles from a hierarchical complexity approach are used to relate flow fundamentals to system-level interests. The work is part of roughly 6-year research program on blunt-leading-edge separation pertinent to UCAVs, and was conducted under the NATO Science and Technology Organization, Applied Vehicle Technology panel.

  1. Separation nozzle: an aerodynamic device for large-scale enrichment of uranium-235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, E.W.; Bley, P.; Ehrfeld, U.; Ehrfeld, W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper gives a review of the flow and diffusion phenomena in the separation nozzle. It is shown that admixing of a light auxiliary gas offers inherent advantages for the separation of heavy isotopic molecules in a centrifugal flow. The UF 6 is accelerated to a high speed ratio by the light gas already at a low expansion of the mixture--i.e., favorable conditions for centrifugal separation are obtained while aerodynamic losses are kept low. In addition, isotope separation is enhanced because of the different diffusion velocities of the isotopes relative to the light gas. Typical rarefaction phenomena are observed in the curved jet; the molecular velocity distribution is bimodal in large regions of the flow, and a velocity slip between the heavy UF 6 and the light auxiliary gas occurs

  2. Aerodynamics of wings at low Reynolds numbers: Boundary layer separation and reattachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, John

    Due to advances in electronics technology, it is now possible to build small scale flying and swimming vehicles. These vehicles will have size and velocity scales similar to small birds and fish, and their characteristic Reynolds number will be between 104 and 105. Currently, these flying and swimming vehicles do not perform well, and very little research has been done to characterize them, or to explain why they perform so poorly. This dissertation documents three basic investigations into the performance of small scale lifting surfaces, with Reynolds numbers near 104. Part I. Low Reynolds number aerodynamics. Three airfoil shapes were studied at Reynolds numbers of 1 and 2x104: a flat plate airfoil, a circular arc cambered airfoil, and the Eppler 387 airfoil. Lift and drag force measurements were made on both 2D and 3D conditions, with the 3D wings having an aspect ratio of 6, and the 2D condition being approximated by placing end plates at the wing tips. Comparisons to the limited number of previous measurements show adequate agreement. Previous studies have been inconclusive on whether lifting line theory can be applied to this range of Re, but this study shows that lifting line theory can be applied when there are no sudden changes in the slope of the force curves. This is highly dependent on the airfoil shape of the wing, and explains why previous studies have been inconclusive. Part II. The laminar separation bubble. The Eppler 387 airfoil was studied at two higher Reynolds numbers: 3 and 6x10 4. Previous studies at a Reynolds number of 6x104 had shown this airfoil experiences a drag increase at moderate lift, and a subsequent drag decrease at high lift. Previous studies suggested that the drag increase is caused by a laminar separation bubble, but the experiments used to show this were conducted at higher Reynolds numbers and extrapolated down. Force measurements were combined with flow field measurements at Reynolds numbers 3 and 6x104 to determine whether

  3. Glottal aerodynamics in compliant, life-sized vocal fold models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Michael; Dowell, Grant; Krane, Michael

    2013-11-01

    This talk presents high-speed PIV measurements in compliant, life-sized models of the vocal folds. A clearer understanding of the fluid-structure interaction of voiced speech, how it produces sound, and how it varies with pathology is required to improve clinical diagnosis and treatment of vocal disorders. Physical models of the vocal folds can answer questions regarding the fundamental physics of speech, as well as the ability of clinical measures to detect the presence and extent of disorder. Flow fields were recorded in the supraglottal region of the models to estimate terms in the equations of fluid motion, and their relative importance. Experiments were conducted over a range of driving pressures with flow rates, given by a ball flowmeter, and subglottal pressures, given by a micro-manometer, reported for each case. Imaging of vocal fold motion, vector fields showing glottal jet behavior, and terms estimated by control volume analysis will be presented. The use of these results for a comparison with clinical measures, and for the estimation of aeroacoustic source strengths will be discussed. Acknowledge support from NIH R01 DC005642.

  4. Aerodynamic Analyses and Database Development for Ares I Vehicle First Stage Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Pei, Jing; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Holland, Scott D.; Covell, Peter F.; Klopfer, Goetz, H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the aerodynamic analysis and database development for the first stage separation of the Ares I A106 Crew Launch Vehicle configuration. Separate databases were created for the first stage and upper stage. Each database consists of three components: isolated or free-stream coefficients, power-off proximity increments, and power-on proximity increments. The power-on database consists of three parts, all plumes firing at nominal conditions, the one booster deceleration motor out condition, and the one ullage settling motor out condition. The isolated and power-off incremental databases were developed using wind tunnel test data. The power-on proximity increments were developed using CFD solutions.

  5. COMPUTING EXPERIMENT FOR ASSESSMENT OF AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF SEPARATE ELEMENTS IN THE STRUCTURE OF THE FUSELAGE OF A HELICOPTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Ivchin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present publication describes the calculation of helicopter fuselage aerodynamic characteristics and its separate elements, by computing experiment. On the basis of program commercial package CFX ANSYS the technique has been mastered and longitudinal and lateral characteristics of the helicopter fuselage on the various flight modes are calculated.

  6. An Influence Function Method for Predicting Store Aerodynamic Characteristics during Weapon Separation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-14

    8217 AO-Ail 777 GRUMMAN AEROSPACE CORP BETHPAGE NY F/G 20/4 AN INFLUENCE FUNCTION METHOD FOR PREDICTING STORE AERODYNAMIC C--ETCCU) MAY 8 1 R MEYER, A...CENKO, S YARDS UNCLASSIFIED N ’.**~~N**n I EHEEKI j~j .25 Q~4 111110 111_L 5. AN INFLUENCE FUNCTION METHOD FOR PREDICTING STORE AERODYNAMIC...extended to their logical conclusion one is led quite naturally to consideration of an " Influence Function Method" for I predicting store aerodynamic

  7. Particle size- and concentration-dependent separation of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, Kerstin, E-mail: witte@micromod.de [University of Rostock, Institute of Physics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 23, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str. 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Müller, Knut; Grüttner, Cordula; Westphal, Fritz [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str. 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Johansson, Christer [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, 40014 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are of great interest for several biomedical applications. When the size of the particles decreases, the magnetic moment of the particles decreases. This leads to a significant increase in the separation time by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, in the present study the separation processes of bionized nanoferrites (BNF) with different sizes and concentrations were investigated with the commercial Sepmag Q system. It was found that an increasing initial particle concentration leads to a reduction of the separation time for large nanoparticles due to the higher probability of building chains. Small nanoparticles showed exactly the opposite behavior with rising particle concentration up to 0.1 mg(Fe)/ml. For higher iron concentrations the separation time remains constant and the measured Z-average decreases in the supernatant at same time intervals. At half separation time a high yield with decreasing hydrodynamic diameter of particles can be obtained using higher initial particle concentrations. - Highlights: • Size dependent separation processes of multicore nanoparticles. • Concentration dependent separation processes of multicore nanoparticles. • Increasing separation time with rising concentrations for small particles. • Large particles show typical cooperative magnetophoresis behavior.

  8. Wind tunnel experiments on flow separation control of an Unmanned Air Vehicle by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Kang; Liang Hua

    2016-01-01

    Plasma flow control (PFC) is a new kind of active flow control technology, which can improve the aerodynamic performances of aircrafts remarkably. The flow separation control of an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (NDPAA) is investigated experimentally in this paper. Experimental results show that the applied voltages for both the nanosecond discharge and the millisecond discharge are nearly the same, but the current for nanosecond discharge (30 A) is much bigger than that for millisecond discharge (0.1 A). The flow field induced by the NDPAA is similar to a shock wave upward, and has a maximal velocity of less than 0.5 m/s. Fast heating effect for nanosecond discharge induces shock waves in the quiescent air. The lasting time of the shock waves is about 80 μs and its spread velocity is nearly 380 m/s. By using the NDPAA, the flow separation on the suction side of the UAV can be totally suppressed and the critical stall angle of attack increases from 20° to 27° with a maximal lift coefficient increment of 11.24%. The flow separation can be suppressed when the discharge voltage is larger than the threshold value, and the optimum operation frequency for the NDPAA is the one which makes the Strouhal number equal one. The NDPAA is more effective than the millisecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (MDPAA) in boundary layer flow control. The main mechanism for nanosecond discharge is shock effect. Shock effect is more effective in flow control than momentum effect in high speed flow control. (paper)

  9. Appropriate Separator Sizing: A Modified Stewart and Arnold Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Boukadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil and gas separators were one of the first pieces of production equipment to be used in the petroleum industry. The different stages of separation are completed using the following three principles: gravity, centrifugal force, and impingement. The sizes of the oil droplets, in the production water, are based mainly on the choke valve pressure drop. The choke valve pressure drop creates a shearing effect; this reduces the ability of the droplets to combine. One of the goals of oil separation is to reduce the shearing effect of the choke. Separators are conventionally designed based on initial flow rates; as a result, the separator is no longer able to accommodate totality of produced fluids. Changing fluid flow rates as well as emulsion viscosity effect separator design. The reduction in vessel performance results in recorded measurements that do not match actual production levels inducing doubt into any history matching process and distorting reservoir management programs. In this paper, the new model takes into account flow rates and emulsion viscosity. The generated vessel length, vessel diameter, and slenderness ratio monographs are used to select appropriate separator size based on required retention time. Model results are compared to API 12J standards.

  10. Method and apparatus for physical separation of different sized nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christopher B.; Saunders, Steven R.

    2012-07-10

    The present application provides apparatuses and methods for the size-selective fractionation of ligand-capped nanoparticles that utilizes the tunable thermophysical properties of gas-expanded liquids. The nanoparticle size separation processes are based on the controlled reduction of the solvent strength of an organic phase nanoparticle dispersion through increases in concentration of the antisolvent gas, such as CO.sub.2, via pressurization. The method of nanomaterial separation contains preparing a vessel having a solvent and dispersed nanoparticles, pressurizing the chamber with a gaseous antisolvent, and causing a first amount of the nanoparticles to precipitate, transporting the solution to a second vessel, pressurizing the second vessel with the gaseous antisolvent and causing further nanoparticles to separate from the solution.

  11. Toward ideal separation by size-exclusion chromatography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Netopilík, Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1487, 3 March (2017), s. 139-146 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC17-04258J Grant - others:OPPK(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24504 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : size-exclusion chromatography * separation mechanism * band broadening function Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.981, year: 2016

  12. Drop Size Distribution - Based Separation of Stratiform and Convective Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurai, Merhala; Gatlin, Patrick; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    For applications in hydrology and meteorology, it is often desirable to separate regions of stratiform and convective rain from meteorological radar observations, both from ground-based polarimetric radars and from space-based dual frequency radars. In a previous study by Bringi et al. (2009), dual frequency profiler and dual polarization radar (C-POL) observations in Darwin, Australia, had shown that stratiform and convective rain could be separated in the log10(Nw) versus Do domain, where Do is the mean volume diameter and Nw is the scaling parameter which is proportional to the ratio of water content to the mass weighted mean diameter. Note, Nw and Do are two of the main drop size distribution (DSD) parameters. In a later study, Thurai et al (2010) confirmed that both the dual-frequency profiler based stratiform-convective rain separation and the C-POL radar based separation were consistent with each other. In this paper, we test this separation method using DSD measurements from a ground based 2D video disdrometer (2DVD), along with simultaneous observations from a collocated, vertically-pointing, X-band profiling radar (XPR). The measurements were made in Huntsville, Alabama. One-minute DSDs from 2DVD are used as input to an appropriate gamma fitting procedure to determine Nw and Do. The fitted parameters - after averaging over 3-minutes - are plotted against each other and compared with a predefined separation line. An index is used to determine how far the points lie from the separation line (as described in Thurai et al. 2010). Negative index values indicate stratiform rain and positive index indicate convective rain, and, moreover, points which lie somewhat close to the separation line are considered 'mixed' or 'transition' type precipitation. The XPR observations are used to evaluate/test the 2DVD data-based classification. A 'bright-band' detection algorithm was used to classify each vertical reflectivity profile as either stratiform or convective

  13. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cooney

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Cooney1, Anthony J Hickey21Department of Biomedical Engineering; 2School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process.Keywords: diesel exhaust particles, aerosol, inhalation toxicology

  14. TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF AERODYNAMIC SHAPE OF MEDIUM SIZED PERSPECTIVE HELICOPTER FUSELAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the initial stage of work out of the helicopter body aerodynamic configuration. The main pur- pose of this work is to design the model of the fuselage and to minimize its drag.The analysis of experimental data obtained in TsAGI and other research centers was made at the first stage of the work. All features of flow around parts of the fuselage obtained from experimental data were taken into account. The de- pendencies of the fuselage component drag, such as the bow, fairings exhaust pipes of helicopter, sponsons, and tail sectionof the fuselage, on their form are described in this article.At the second stage the fuselage geometry was created in program SolidWorks. All the features of the flow around various fuselage components derived from the experimental data were considered in designing.The third stage is calculating of fuselage model aerodynamic characteristics. The calculations were made in the program ANSYS CFX (TsAGI License №501024. Boundary conditions were chosen so as to correspond to normal at- mospheric conditions at 1,000 meters with velocity of flight is V = 85 m/s. The output of the hot jet from engines is takinginto account in computation. The purpose of this calculation is to find the optimal angle of the engine exhaust pipe whenthe hot spray does not intersect with the tail and stabilizer and creates the maximum of propulsive force. The volume of the grid in computational domain is approximately 13 million cells.Data analysis has shown that the fuselage has a 20% less drag at cruising flight (аf = -4 ° compared to the original model. The hot jets do not intersect with the tail and stabilizers at cruising flight so the fuselage is protected from overheating.

  15. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  16. Size-selective separation of submicron particles in suspensions with ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Susumu; Oka, Naoyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Aqueous suspensions containing silica or polystyrene latex were ultrasonically atomized for separating particles of a specific size. With the help of a fog involving fine liquid droplets with a narrow size distribution, submicron particles in a limited size-range were successfully separated from suspensions. Performance of the separation was characterized by analyzing the size and the concentration of collected particles with a high resolution method. Irradiation of 2.4MHz ultrasound to sample suspensions allowed the separation of particles of specific size from 90 to 320nm without regarding the type of material. Addition of a small amount of nonionic surfactant, PONPE20 to SiO2 suspensions enhanced the collection of finer particles, and achieved a remarkable increase in the number of collected particles. Degassing of the sample suspension resulted in eliminating the separation performance. Dissolved air in suspensions plays an important role in this separation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    reduction of bluff-body noise. Xiaoyu Wang and Xiaofeng Sun discuss the interaction of fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method. S Saito and his colleagues in JAXA report the development of active devices for reducing helicopter noise. The paper by A Tamura and M Tsutahara proposes a brand new methodology for aerodynamic sound by applying the lattice Boltzmann finite difference method. As the method solves the fluctuation of air density directly, it has the advantage of not requiring modeling of the sound generation. M A Langthjem and M Nakano solve the hole-tone feedback cycle in jet flow by a numerical method. Y Ogami and S Akishita propose the application of a line-vortex method to the three-dimensional separated flow from a bluff body. I hope that a second issue on aerodynamic sound will be published in FDR in the not too distant future.

  18. Microfluidic size separation of cells and particles using a swinging bucket centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular separation is crucial for downstream analysis. Separation technique mainly relies on centrifugal sedimentation. However, minuscule sample volume separation and extraction is difficult with conventional centrifuge. Furthermore, conventional centrifuge requires density gradient centrifugation which is laborious and time-consuming. To overcome this challenge, we present a novel size-selective bioparticles separation microfluidic chip on a swinging bucket minifuge. Size separation is achieved using passive pressure driven centrifugal fluid flows coupled with centrifugal force acting on the particles within the microfluidic chip. By adopting centrifugal microfluidics on a swinging bucket rotor, we achieved over 95% efficiency in separating mixed 20 μm and 2 μm colloidal dispersions from its liquid medium. Furthermore, by manipulating the hydrodynamic resistance, we performed size separation of mixed microbeads, achieving size efficiency of up to 90%. To further validate our device utility, we loaded spiked whole blood with MCF-7 cells into our microfluidic device and subjected it to centrifugal force for a mere duration of 10 s, thereby achieving a separation efficiency of over 75%. Overall, our centrifugal microfluidic device enables extremely rapid and label-free enrichment of different sized cells and particles with high efficiency.

  19. Modeling of changes in particle size distribution of solids in multistage separation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagereva E.A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presented method of calculation of the separation of solid particles from gas streams to multistage separation sys-tems, consisting of a number of sequentially installed separational devices of various design and principle of operation. It is based on a separate analysis of the sequential processes of capture and transmission of individual fractions of solid particles of a polydisperse structure. The technique provides information about changes in particle size distribution of solids with the passage of the gas flow in the treatment system and allows you to specifically select the effective combination of different types of separators.

  20. Application of ferrofluid density separation to particles in the micrometer-size range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebin, R.S. Jr.; Johnson, J.W.; Robertson, D.M.

    1976-02-01

    A device designed and described by AVCO* as a ''Ferrofluid Density Separator''/sup (1)/ develops an apparent fluid density from nominally 2 to 20 g/cm 3 dependent on the magnitude of an imposed magnetic field gradient. The ferrofluid retains other normal properties of a liquid. One of these devices and a concentration series of ferrofluids were obtained in order to determine the practicality of separating groups of micrometer-size particles into density fractions. Such separations would be of enormous value in the study of various particle burdens because particles of interest are almost always diluted with overwhelming amounts of other particles. The results of a study of separations of micrometer-size particles with the ferrofluid density separator are presented

  1. Study on the Effect and Mechanism of Aerodynamic Measures for the Vortex-Induced Vibration of Separate Pairs of Box Girders in Cable-Stayed Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Xin He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although not always resulting in catastrophic failures, vortex-induced vibration (VIV response can seriously impact the fatigue life and functionality of bridges, especially for separate pairs of box girders in cable-stayed bridges. This study investigates the effects of three aerodynamic measures: grating, inclined web plate, and the baffles on separated box girders in the cable-stayed bridges. The experimental result indicates that the grating of different opening ratios can control the vortex-induced vibration effectively, and the optimized grating opening ratio set in this paper is 40%. Increasing the angle of inclined web plate has a great control on mitigation of the vortex-induced vibration. However, there is an optimum angle where the amplitude of vortex-induced vibration is the smallest at low wind speed. The amplitude of vortex-induced vibration becomes larger with the increase of the web inclined angle that exceeds the optimum angle. Comparatively, the baffles installed on both sides of the inclined webs are more effective to restrain the vortex-induced resonance. The Computational Fluent Dynamics (CFD software is utilized to investigate the mechanism of the experimental results.

  2. Aerodynamic potpourri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  3. Multivariate data analysis as a semi-quantitative tool for interpretive evaluation of comparability or equivalence of aerodynamic particle size distribution profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuai; Hickey, Anthony J

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the performance of multivariate data analysis, especially orthogonal partial least square (OPLS) analysis, as a semi-quantitative tool to evaluate the comparability or equivalence of aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) profiles of orally inhaled and nasal drug products (OINDP). Monte Carlo simulation was employed to reconstitute APSD profiles based on 55 realistic scenarios proposed by the Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) working group. OPLS analyses with different data pretreatment methods were performed on each of the reconstituted profiles. Compared to unit-variance scaling, equivalence determined based on OPLS analysis with Pareto scaling was shown to be more consistent with the working group assessment. Chi-square statistics was employed to compare the performance of OPLS analysis (Pareto scaling) with that of the combination test (i.e., chi-square ratio statistics and population bioequivalence test for impactor-sized mass) in terms of achieving greater consistency with the working group evaluation. A p value of 0.036 suggested that OPLS analysis with Pareto scaling may be more predictive than the combination test with respect to consistency. Furthermore, OPLS analysis may also be employed to analyze part of the APSD profiles that contribute to the calculation of the mass median aerodynamic diameter. Our results show that OPLS analysis performed on partial deposition sites do not interfere with the performance on all deposition sites.

  4. A Theoretical Study of the Separation Principle in Size Exclusion Chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yanwei; Teraoka, Iwao; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2010-01-01

    as a function of the retention volume, results for both linear and branched polyethylene molecules lie nearly on the master curve determined by linear polystyrene standards. Our findings support the equilibrium thermodynamic separation principle in SEC. Since the mean span dimension is a purely geometric size......The principle of polymer separation in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) is studied based on a classical equilibrium partitioning theory. The task is to examine the correlation between the mean span dimension of polymer chains and their equilibrium partition coefficients with confining pores...

  5. Sensitive and predictable separation of microfluidic droplets by size using in-line passive filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ruihua; Ung, W Lloyd; Heyman, John A; Weitz, David A

    2017-01-01

    Active manipulation of droplets is crucial in droplet microfluidics. However, droplet polydispersity decreases the accuracy of active manipulation. We develop a microfluidic "droplet filter" that accurately separates droplets by size. The droplet filter has a sharp size cutoff and is capable of distinguishing droplets differing in volume by 20%. A simple model explains the behavior of the droplets as they pass through the filter. We show application of the filter in improving dielectric sorting efficiency.

  6. Ultrathin self-assembled anionic polymer membranes for superfast size-selective separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Zhang, Qiu Gen; Han, Guang Lu; Gong, Yi; Zhu, Ai Mei; Liu, Qing Lin

    2013-10-01

    Nanoporous membranes with superior separation performance have become more crucial with increasing concerns in functional nanomaterials. Here novel ultrahigh permeable nanoporous membranes have been fabricated on macroporous supports by self-assembly of anionic polymer on copper hydroxide nanostrand templates in organic solution. This facile approach has a great potential for the fabrication of ultrathin anionic polymer membranes as a general method. The as-fabricated self-assembled membranes have a mean pore size of 5-12 nm and an adjustable thickness as low as 85 nm. They allow superfast permeation of water, and exhibit excellent size-selective separation properties and good fouling resistance for negatively-charged solutes during filtration. The 85 nm thick membrane has an ultrahigh water flux (3306 l m-2 h-1 bar-1) that is an order of magnitude larger than commercial membranes, and can highly efficiently separate 5 and 15 nm gold nanoparticles from their mixtures. The newly developed nanoporous membranes have a wide application in separation and purification of biomacromolecules and nanoparticles.Nanoporous membranes with superior separation performance have become more crucial with increasing concerns in functional nanomaterials. Here novel ultrahigh permeable nanoporous membranes have been fabricated on macroporous supports by self-assembly of anionic polymer on copper hydroxide nanostrand templates in organic solution. This facile approach has a great potential for the fabrication of ultrathin anionic polymer membranes as a general method. The as-fabricated self-assembled membranes have a mean pore size of 5-12 nm and an adjustable thickness as low as 85 nm. They allow superfast permeation of water, and exhibit excellent size-selective separation properties and good fouling resistance for negatively-charged solutes during filtration. The 85 nm thick membrane has an ultrahigh water flux (3306 l m-2 h-1 bar-1) that is an order of magnitude larger than

  7. Size-amplified acoustofluidic separation of circulating tumor cells with removable microbeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiqin; Ao, Zheng; Cai, Bo; Shu, Xi; Chen, Keke; Rao, Lang; Luo, Changliang; Wang, Fu-Bin; Liu, Wei; Bondesson, Maria; Guo, Shishang; Guo, Feng

    2018-06-01

    Isolation and analysis of rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is of great interest in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment efficacy evaluation. Acoustofluidic cell separation becomes an attractive method due to its contactless, noninvasive, simple, and versatile features. However, the indistinctive physical difference between CTCs and normal blood cells limits the purity of CTCs using current acoustic methods. Herein, we demonstrate a size-amplified acoustic separation and release of CTCs with removable microbeads. CTCs selectively bound to size-amplifiers (40 μm-diameter anti-EpCAM/gelatin-coated SiO2 microbeads) have significant physical differences (size and mechanics) compared to normal blood cells, resulting in an amplification of acoustic radiation force approximately a hundredfold over that of bare CTCs or normal blood cells. Therefore, CTCs can be efficiently sorted out with size-amplifiers in a traveling surface acoustic wave microfluidic device and released from size-amplifiers by enzymatic degradation for further purification or downstream analysis. We demonstrate a cell separation from blood samples with a total efficiency (E total) of ∼ 77%, purity (P) of ∼ 96%, and viability (V) of ∼83% after releasing cells from size-amplifiers. Our method substantially improves the emerging application of rare cell purification for translational medicine.

  8. Nanoparticle separation based on size-dependent aggregation of nanoparticles due to the critical Casimir effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongyu; Stan, Gheorghe; Liu, Yun

    2018-02-21

    Nanoparticles typically have an inherent wide size distribution that may affect the performance and reliability of many nanomaterials. Because the synthesis and purification of nanoparticles with desirable sizes are crucial to the applications of nanoparticles in various fields including medicine, biology, health care, and energy, there is a great need to search for more efficient and generic methods for size-selective nanoparticle purification/separation. Here we propose and conclusively demonstrate the effectiveness of a size-selective particle purification/separation method based on the critical Casimir force. The critical Casimir force is a generic interaction between colloidal particles near the solvent critical point and has been extensively studied in the past several decades due to its importance in reversibly controlling the aggregation and stability of colloidal particles. Combining multiple experimental techniques, we found that the critical Casimir force-induced aggregation depends on relative particle sizes in a system with larger ones aggregating first and the smaller ones remaining in solution. Based on this observation, a new size-dependent nanoparticle purification/separation method is proposed and demonstrated to be very efficient in purifying commercial silica nanoparticles in the lutidine/water binary solvent. Due to the ubiquity of the critical Casimir force for many colloidal particles in binary solvents, this method might be applicable to many types of colloidal particles.

  9. Influence of shape and size of the particles on jigging separation of plastics mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Fernando; Castilho, Ana

    2016-02-01

    Plastics are popular for numerous applications due to their high versatility and favourable properties such as endurance, lightness and cheapness. Therefore the generation of plastic waste is constantly increasing, becoming one of the larger categories in municipal solid waste. Almost all plastic materials are recyclable, but for the recycling to be possible it is necessary to separate the different types of plastics. The aim of this research was to evaluate the performance of the jig separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. For this study six granulated plastics had been used: Polystyrene (PS), Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET-S, PET-D) and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC-M, PVC-D). Plastics mixtures were subjected to jigging in a laboratorial Denver mineral jig. The results showed that the quality of the jigging separation varies with the mixture, the density differences and with the size and shape of the particles. In the case of particles with more regular shapes the quality of separation of bi-component plastic mixtures improved with the increase of the particle size. For lamellar particles the influence of particle size was minimal. In general, the beneficiation of plastics with similar densities was not effective, since the separation efficiency was lower than 25%. However, in bi-component plastic mixtures that join a low density plastic (PS) with a high density one (PMMA, PET-S, PET-D, PVC-M and PVC-D), the quality of the jigging separation was greatly improved. The PS grade in the sunk was less than 1% for all the plastic mixtures. Jigging proved to be an effective method for the separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. Jigging separation will be enhanced if the less dense plastic, that overflows, has a lamellar shape and if the denser plastic, that sinks, has a regular one. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Size enlargement of radioactive and hazardous species and their separation by microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.; Buckley, L.P.

    1993-01-01

    Separation and volume reduction of aqueous solutions involving membranes is evolving into an expanding and diversified field. Numerous commercially successful membranes and their applications are now available. Among different driving forces used in membrane separation, pressure-driven separation has gained wide application. Depending on the size of the dissolved species in solution to be separated, the pressure needed to achieve the desired separation varies. The microfiltration and ultrafiltration membrane systems are low-pressure processes that generally operate below 350 kPa. To exploit these membranes in applications involving the removal of dissolved contaminants from solutions, it is essential to create a suitable size for the dissolved contaminants, so that the membranes can effectively retain them while producing a filtrate stream essentially free of contaminants. Size enlargement of the dissolved contaminants can be achieved through solution conditioning with the addition of one or a combination of chemical reagents and powdered materials. Examples of typical additives include: pH chemicals, polyelectrolytes, microorganisms and powdered adsorption/ion-exchange materials. In many situations, adequate control and optimization of the system chemistry and hydraulic conditions provide high selectivity and efficiency for contaminant removal. This paper summarizes removal efficiency data for cadmium, lead, mercury, uranium, arsenic, strontium-90/85, cesium-137 and iron. These data resulted from various initiatives on membrane technology undertaken during the past five years by the Waste Processing Technology group at Chalk River Laboratories. The technology involves size enlargement of contaminants present in waste solution, and their separation using either microfiltration or ultrafiltration. The data support remedial applications involving treatment of contaminated groundwater and soils

  11. Acoustophoretic separation of airborne millimeter-size particles by a Fresnel lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Ahmet; Korozlu, Nurettin; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2017-03-01

    We numerically demonstrate acoustophoretic separation of spherical solid particles in air by means of an acoustic Fresnel lens. Beside gravitational and drag forces, freely-falling millimeter-size particles experience large acoustic radiation forces around the focus of the lens, where interplay of forces lead to differentiation of particle trajectories with respect to either size or material properties. Due to the strong acoustic field at the focus, radiation force can divert particles with source intensities significantly smaller than those required for acoustic levitation in a standing field. When the lens is designed to have a focal length of 100 mm at 25 kHz, finite-element method simulations reveal a sharp focus with a full-width at half-maximum of 0.5 wavelenghts and a field enhancement of 18 dB. Through numerical calculation of forces and simulation of particle trajectories, we demonstrate size-based separation of acrylic particles at a source sound pressure level of 153 dB such that particles with diameters larger than 0.5 mm are admitted into the central hole, whereas smaller particles are rejected. Besides, efficient separation of particles with similar acoustic properties such as polyethylene, polystyrene and acrylic particles of the same size is also demonstrated.

  12. Chemical-Reaction-Controlled Phase Separated Drops: Formation, Size Selection, and Coarsening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, Jean David; Lee, Chiu Fan

    2018-02-01

    Phase separation under nonequilibrium conditions is exploited by biological cells to organize their cytoplasm but remains poorly understood as a physical phenomenon. Here, we study a ternary fluid model in which phase-separating molecules can be converted into soluble molecules, and vice versa, via chemical reactions. We elucidate using analytical and simulation methods how drop size, formation, and coarsening can be controlled by the chemical reaction rates, and categorize the qualitative behavior of the system into distinct regimes. Ostwald ripening arrest occurs above critical reaction rates, demonstrating that this transition belongs entirely to the nonequilibrium regime. Our model is a minimal representation of the cell cytoplasm.

  13. Otolith shape and size: The importance of age when determining indices for fish-stock separation

    OpenAIRE

    Mapp, James; Hunter, Ewan; Van Der Kooij, Jeroen; Songer, Sally; Fisher, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Stock-separation of highly mobile Clupeids (sprat – Sprattus sprattus and herring – Clupea harengus) using otolith morphometrics was explored. Analysis focused on three stock discrimination problems with the aim of reassigning individual otoliths to source populations using experiments undertaken using a machine learning environment known as \\{WEKA\\} (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis). Six feature sets encoding combinations of size and shape together with nine learning algorithms we...

  14. ON THE IMPACT OF FLIGHT SAFETY CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS ON THE AERODYNAMIC EFFICIENCY OF COMMERCIAL AIRPLANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir I. Shevyakov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the issue of aerodynamics efficiency implementation taking into account certification requirements for flight safety. Aerodynamics efficiency means high aerodynamic performance (depending on the airplane size, aerodynamic performance in cruise flight, high aerodynamic performance at takeoff, as well as lift performance at landing.The author estimated the impact on aerodynamics efficiency of both the requirements for aerodynamics performance and requirements for aircraft systems, noncompliance with which may result in significant change of expected operating conditions. It was shown that the use of supercritical wing profiles may result in flight mode limitations due to failure of the required buffeting capacities. It does not allow engaging all the advantages of aerodynamics layout and requires special design solutions to prevent such cases.There were reviewed certification requirements for flight level pressure altitude accuracy and icing conditions warning sysytem. The research presented the methods of aerodynamic efficiency increase by meeting the requirements for reduced vertical separation minima flights and in icing conditions, including requirements for air data probes. Reduced vertical separation minima flight requirements are met by means of efficient air data probes location. Theoretical methods of flow calculation determine areas on the airplane skin surface where static probes minimize errors depending on angle-of-attack and sideslip. It was shown that if certification requirements are not met and in case of flight out of reduced vertical separation minima area, aerodynamics efficiency is significantly reduced and fuel consumption can be increased by 10% and higher. Suggested approaches implementation allows increasing commercial airplanes competitiveness.

  15. Creation of Wood Dust during Wood Processing: Size Analysis, Dust Separation, and Occupational Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mračková

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical separators and fabric filters are being used to remove airborne fine particles generated during the processing and handling of wood. Such particles might have a harmful effect on employee health, not only in small- but also in large-scale wood processing facilities. The amount of wood dust and its dispersion conditions vary according to geometric boundary conditions. Thus, the dispersion conditions could be changed by changing the linear size of the particles. Moreover, the smaller the particles are, the more harmful they can be. It is necessary to become familiar with properties, from a health point of view, of wood dust generated from processing. Wood dust has to be sucked away from the processing area. The fractional separation efficiency of wood dust can be improved using exhaust and filtering devices. Filtration efficiency depends on moisture content, particle size, and device performance. Because of the carcinogenicity of wood dust, the concentration of wood dust in air has to be monitored regularly. Based on the results hereof, a conclusion can be made that both mechanical separators of types SEA and SEB as well as the fabric filters with FINET PES 1 textile are suitable for the separation of wet saw dust from all types of wooden waste produced within the process.

  16. Weaning and separation stress: maternal motivation decreases with litter age and litter size in farmed mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Sørensen, Dennis Dam; Larsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    and maternal motivation around the time of weaning and separation. Therefore, we investigated effects of separating the dam from the litter using brown first-parity farm mink dams (n = 374) taken away from the litter either day 49 ± 1 (7w, n = 185) or day 56 ± 1 (8w, n = 189) after birth. The aim...... was to investigate whether the dams experienced stress/had a different motivation to be reunited with the litter after7 and 8 weeks, estimated by non-invasive determination of cortisol (FCM: Faecal Cortisol Metabolites)and dam behaviour including calls the first week after separation (D0: Day of removal, D1: next.......024). We interpret these results as a higher maternal motivation in dams at 7 weeks than at 8 weeks after birth. Additionally, the separation-induced calling in dams decreased with increasing litter size (P = 0.022). Thus in addition to litter age, the size of the litter is important for the maternal...

  17. Reducing Data Size Inequality during Finite Element Model Separation into Superelements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Berchun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work considers two methods of automatic separation of final element model into super-elements to decrease computing resource demand when solving the linearly - elastic problems of solid mechanics. The first method represents an algorithm to separate a final element grid into simply connected sub-regions according to the set specific number of nodes in the super-element. The second method is based on the generation of a super-element with the set specific data size of the coefficient matrix of the system of equations of the internal nodes balance, which are eliminated during super-element transformation. Both methods are based on the theory of graphs. The data size of a matrix of coefficients is assessed on the assumption that the further solution of a task will use Holetsky’s method. Before assessment of data size, a KatkhillaMackey's (Cuthill-McKee algorithm renumbers the internal nodes of a super-element both to decrease a profile width of the appropriate matrix of the system of equations of balance and to reduce the number of nonzero elements. Test examples show work results of abovementioned methods compared in terms of inequality of generated super-element separation according to the number of nodes and data size of the coefficient matrix of the system of equations of the internal nodes balance. It is shown that the offered approach provides smaller inequality of data size of super-element matrixes, with slightly increasing inequality by the number of tops.

  18. Fractionation of Exosomes and DNA using Size-Based Separation at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Benjamin; Smith, Joshua; Wang, Chao; Gifford, Stacey; Brink, Markus; Bruce, Robert; Solovitzky, Gustavo; Austin, Robert; Astier, Yann

    Exosomes, a key target of ``liquid biopsies'', are nano-vesicles found in nearly all biological fluids. Exosomes are secreted by eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells alike, and contain information about their originating cells, including surface proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, and nucleic acids. One challenge in studying exosome morphology is the difficulty of sorting exosomes by size and surface markers. Common separation techniques for exosomes include ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration, for preparation of large volume samples, but these techniques often show contamination and significant heterogeneity between preparations. To date, deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) pillar arrays in silicon have proven an efficient technology to sort, separate, and enrich micron-scale particles including human parasites, eukaryotic cells, blood cells, and circulating tumor cells in blood; however, the DLD technology has never been translated to the true nanoscale, where it could function on bio-colloids such as exosomes. We have fabricated nanoscale DLD (nanoDLD) arrays capable of rapidly sorting colloids down to 20 nm in continuous flow, and demonstrated size sorting of individual exosome vesicles and dsDNA polymers, opening the potential for on-chip biomolecule separation and diagnosti

  19. Flexible single-layer ionic organic-inorganic frameworks towards precise nano-size separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Liang; Wang, Shan; Zhou, Ding; Zhang, Hao; Li, Bao; Wu, Lixin

    2016-02-01

    Consecutive two-dimensional frameworks comprised of molecular or cluster building blocks in large area represent ideal candidates for membranes sieving molecules and nano-objects, but challenges still remain in methodology and practical preparation. Here we exploit a new strategy to build soft single-layer ionic organic-inorganic frameworks via electrostatic interaction without preferential binding direction in water. Upon consideration of steric effect and additional interaction, polyanionic clusters as connection nodes and cationic pseudorotaxanes acting as bridging monomers connect with each other to form a single-layer ionic self-assembled framework with 1.4 nm layer thickness. Such soft supramolecular polymer frameworks possess uniform and adjustable ortho-tetragonal nanoporous structure in pore size of 3.4-4.1 nm and exhibit greatly convenient solution processability. The stable membranes maintaining uniform porous structure demonstrate precisely size-selective separation of semiconductor quantum dots within 0.1 nm of accuracy and may hold promise for practical applications in selective transport, molecular separation and dialysis systems.

  20. An investigation of paper based microfluidic devices for size based separation and extraction applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Z W; Wu, R G; Wang, Z P; Tan, H L

    2015-09-01

    Conventional microfluidic devices are typically complex and expensive. The devices require the use of pneumatic control systems or highly precise pumps to control the flow in the devices. This work investigates an alternative method using paper based microfluidic devices to replace conventional microfluidic devices. Size based separation and extraction experiments conducted were able to separate free dye from a mixed protein and dye solution. Experimental results showed that pure fluorescein isothiocyanate could be separated from a solution of mixed fluorescein isothiocyanate and fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled bovine serum albumin. The analysis readings obtained from a spectrophotometer clearly show that the extracted tartrazine sample did not contain any amount of Blue-BSA, because its absorbance value was 0.000 measured at a wavelength of 590nm, which correlated to Blue-BSA. These demonstrate that paper based microfluidic devices, which are inexpensive and easy to implement, can potentially replace their conventional counterparts by the use of simple geometry designs and the capillary action. These findings will potentially help in future developments of paper based microfluidic devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Charge- and Size-Selective Molecular Separation using Ultrathin Cellulose Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Puspasari, Tiara

    2016-08-30

    To date, it is still a challenge to prepare high-flux and highselectivity microporous membranes thinner than 20 nm without introducing defects. In this work, we report for the first time the application of cellulose membranes for selective separation of small molecules. A freestanding cellulose membrane as thin as 10 nm has been prepared through regeneration of trimethylsilyl cellulose (TMSC). The freestanding membrane can be transferred to any desired substrate and shows a normalized flux as high as 700 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 when supported by a porous alumina disc. According to filtration experiments, the membrane exhibits precise size-sieving performances with an estimated pore size between 1.5–3.5 nm depending on the regeneration period and initial TMSC concentration. A perfect discrimination of anionic molecules over neutral species is demonstrated. Moreover, the membrane demonstrates high reproducibility, high scale-up potential, and excellent stability over two months.

  2. CALCULATION OF ROCKET NOSE FAIRING SHELLS AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir T. Kalugin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of the detachable elements of transport systems are introduced, they allow to calculate the trajectories of these elements after their separation and determine the size of elements impact areas. Special consideration is given to head fairing shells, containing cylindrical, conical and spherical sections. Head fairing shells have high lift-to-drag ratio and the widest impact areas. Aerodynamics of bodies of such configurations has been insufficiently studied. The paper presents the numerical results of modeling the flow around a typical head fairing shell in free flight. Open source OpenFOAM package is used for numerical simulation. The aerodynamic characteristics at trans- and supersonic velocities are obtained, flow pattern transformation with the change of the angle of attack and Mach number is analyzed. The possibility of OpenFOAM package for aerodynamic calculations of thin shells is shown. The analysis of the obtained results demonstrate that there are many complex shock waves interacting with each other at flow supersonic speeds, at subsonic speeds vast regions of flow separations are observed. The authors identify intervals of angles of attack, where different types of flow structures are realized, both for trans- and supersonic flow speeds. The flow pattern change affects the aerodynamic characteristics, the aerodynamic coefficients significantly change with increase of the angle of attack. There are two trim angles of attack at all examined flow velocities. The results obtained can be used to develop a passive stabilization system for fairing shell that will balance the body at the angle of attack with minimum lift-to-drag ratio and will reduce random deviations.

  3. Natural aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Scorer, R S

    1958-01-01

    Natural Aerodynamics focuses on the mathematics of any problem in air motion.This book discusses the general form of the law of fluid motion, relationship between pressure and wind, production of vortex filaments, and conduction of vorticity by viscosity. The flow at moderate Reynolds numbers, turbulence in a stably stratified fluid, natural exploitation of atmospheric thermals, and plumes in turbulent crosswinds are also elaborated. This text likewise considers the waves produced by thermals, transformation of thin layer clouds, method of small perturbations, and dangers of extra-polation.Thi

  4. Tunable separations based on a molecular size effect for biomolecules by poly(ethylene glycol) gel-based capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takuya; Nishimura, Naoki; Furuta, Hayato; Kubota, Kei; Naito, Toyohiro; Otsuka, Koji

    2017-11-10

    We report novel capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels for the effective separations of biomolecules containing sugars and DNAs based on a molecular size effect. The gel capillaries were prepared in a fused silica capillary modified with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate using a variety of the PEG-based hydrogels. After the fundamental evaluations in CGE regarding the separation based on the molecular size effect depending on the crosslinking density, the optimized capillary provided the efficient separation of glucose ladder (G1 to G20). In addition, another capillary showed the successful separation of DNA ladder in the range of 10-1100 base pair, which is superior to an authentic acrylamide-based gel capillary. For both glucose and DNA ladders, the separation ranges against the molecular size were simply controllable by alteration of the concentration and/or units of ethylene oxide in the PEG-based crosslinker. Finally, we demonstrated the separations of real samples, which included sugars carved out from monoclonal antibodies, mAbs, and then the efficient separations based on the molecular size effect were achieved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A multilayer concentric filter device to diminish clogging for separation of particles and microalgae based on size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Chen, Yu-An; Liu, Yi-Ju; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2014-04-21

    Microalgae species have great economic importance; they are a source of medicines, health foods, animal feeds, industrial pigments, cosmetic additives and biodiesel. Specific microalgae species collected from the environment must be isolated for examination and further application, but their varied size and culture conditions make their isolation using conventional methods, such as filtration, streaking plate and flow cytometric sorting, labour-intensive and costly. A separation device based on size is one of the most rapid, simple and inexpensive methods to separate microalgae, but this approach encounters major disadvantages of clogging and multiple filtration steps when the size of microalgae varies over a wide range. In this work, we propose a multilayer concentric filter device with varied pore size and is driven by a centrifugation force. The device, which includes multiple filter layers, was employed to separate a heterogeneous population of microparticles into several subpopulations by filtration in one step. A cross-flow to attenuate prospective clogging was generated by altering the rate of rotation instantly through the relative motion between the fluid and the filter according to the structural design of the device. Mixed microparticles of varied size were tested to demonstrate that clogging was significantly suppressed due to a highly efficient separation. Microalgae in a heterogeneous population collected from an environmental soil collection were separated and enriched into four subpopulations according to size in a one step filtration process. A microalgae sample contaminated with bacteria and insect eggs was also tested to prove the decontamination capability of the device.

  6. TAD- THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrowman, J.

    1994-01-01

    This theoretical aerodynamics program, TAD, was developed to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding rocket configurations. These slender, axisymmetric finned vehicle configurations have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high speed armament. Over a given range of Mach numbers, TAD will compute the normal force coefficient derivative, the center-of-pressure, the roll forcing moment coefficient derivative, the roll damping moment coefficient derivative, and the pitch damping moment coefficient derivative of a sounding rocket configured vehicle. The vehicle may consist of a sharp pointed nose of cone or tangent ogive shape, up to nine other body divisions of conical shoulder, conical boattail, or circular cylinder shape, and fins of trapezoid planform shape with constant cross section and either three or four fins per fin set. The characteristics computed by TAD have been shown to be accurate to within ten percent of experimental data in the supersonic region. The TAD program calculates the characteristics of separate portions of the vehicle, calculates the interference between separate portions of the vehicle, and then combines the results to form a total vehicle solution. Also, TAD can be used to calculate the characteristics of the body or fins separately as an aid in the design process. Input to the TAD program consists of simple descriptions of the body and fin geometries and the Mach range of interest. Output includes the aerodynamic characteristics of the total vehicle, or user-selected portions, at specified points over the mach range. The TAD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 360 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 123K of 8 bit bytes. The TAD program was originally developed in 1967 and last updated in 1972.

  7. Separating attoliter-sized compartments using fluid pore-spanning lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzara, Thomas D; Carnarius, Christian; Kocun, Marta; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2011-09-27

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is a porous material having aligned cylindrical compartments with 55-60 nm diameter pores, and being several micrometers deep. A protocol was developed to generate pore-spanning fluid lipid bilayers separating the attoliter-sized compartments of the nanoporous material from the bulk solution, while preserving the optical transparency of the AAO. The AAO was selectively functionalized by silane chemistry to spread giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) resulting in large continuous membrane patches covering the pores. Formation of fluid single lipid bilayers through GUV rupture could be readily observed by fluorescence microscopy and further supported by conservation of membrane surface area, before and after GUV rupture. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching gave low immobile fractions (5-15%) and lipid diffusion coefficients similar to those found for bilayers on silica. The entrapment of molecules within the porous underlying cylindrical compartments, as well as the exclusion of macromolecules from the nanopores, demonstrate the barrier function of the pore-spanning membranes and could be investigated in three-dimensions using confocal laser scanning fluorescence imaging. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Design and fabrication of a micro fluidic circuit for the separation of micron sized particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khumalo, F

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a micro fluidic circuit for the separation of micro particles is being investigated. There are a wide range of available separation techniques such as acoustic, laminar flow, split flow, optical trapping and centrifugal forces...

  9. Performance and separation occurrence of binary probit regression estimator using maximum likelihood method and Firths approach under different sample size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusiana, Evellin Dewi

    2017-12-01

    The parameters of binary probit regression model are commonly estimated by using Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) method. However, MLE method has limitation if the binary data contains separation. Separation is the condition where there are one or several independent variables that exactly grouped the categories in binary response. It will result the estimators of MLE method become non-convergent, so that they cannot be used in modeling. One of the effort to resolve the separation is using Firths approach instead. This research has two aims. First, to identify the chance of separation occurrence in binary probit regression model between MLE method and Firths approach. Second, to compare the performance of binary probit regression model estimator that obtained by MLE method and Firths approach using RMSE criteria. Those are performed using simulation method and under different sample size. The results showed that the chance of separation occurrence in MLE method for small sample size is higher than Firths approach. On the other hand, for larger sample size, the probability decreased and relatively identic between MLE method and Firths approach. Meanwhile, Firths estimators have smaller RMSE than MLEs especially for smaller sample sizes. But for larger sample sizes, the RMSEs are not much different. It means that Firths estimators outperformed MLE estimator.

  10. The Role of Separation Bubbles on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils, Including Stall and Post-Stall, at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsun H.; Cebeci, Tuncer

    2007-01-01

    Airfoils at high Reynolds numbers, in general, have small separation bubbles that are usually confined to the leading edge. Since the Reynolds number is large, the turbulence model for the transition region between the laminar and turbulent flow is not important. Furthermore, the onset of transition occurs either at separation or prior to separation and can be predicted satisfactorily by empirical correlations when the incident angle is small and can be assumed to correspond to laminar separation when the correlations do not apply, i.e., at high incidence angles.

  11. Size exclusion chromatography for semipreparative scale separation of Au38(SR)24 and Au40(SR)24 and larger clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppe, Stefan; Boudon, Julien; Dolamic, Igor; Dass, Amala; Bürgi, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) on a semipreparative scale (10 mg and more) was used to size-select ultrasmall gold nanoclusters (<2 nm) from polydisperse mixtures. In particular, the ubiquitous byproducts of the etching process toward Au(38)(SR)(24) (SR, thiolate) clusters were separated and gained in high monodispersity (based on mass spectrometry). The isolated fractions were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, MALDI mass spectrometry, HPLC, and electron microscopy. Most notably, the separation of Au(38)(SR)(24) and Au(40)(SR)(24) clusters is demonstrated.

  12. Separation of large DNA molecules by applying pulsed electric field to size exclusion chromatography-based microchip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Naoki; Itoh, Shintaro; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Zhang, Hedong

    2018-02-01

    Through electrophoresis driven by a pulsed electric field, we succeeded in separating large DNA molecules with an electrophoretic microchip based on size exclusion chromatography (SEC), which was proposed in our previous study. The conditions of the pulsed electric field required to achieve the separation were determined by numerical analyses using our originally proposed separation model. From the numerical results, we succeeded in separating large DNA molecules (λ DNA and T4 DNA) within 1600 s, which was approximately half of that achieved under a direct electric field in our previous study. Our SEC-based electrophoresis microchip will be one of the effective tools to meet the growing demand of faster and more convenient separation of large DNA molecules, especially in the field of epidemiological research of infectious diseases.

  13. Ultrasonic Sorter for Handling and Collecting Dust or Soil Particles Separated by Size/Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, I.; Pinto, A.

    2018-04-01

    A new device is proposed consisting of an endless screw attached to a small sorter actuated by ultrasounds where particles collect from soil or dust to be separated and collected in different reservoirs for their return to the Earth.

  14. Volatile and non-volatile elements in grain-size separated samples of Apollo 17 lunar soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovanoli, R.; Gunten, H.R. von; Kraehenbuehl, U.; Meyer, G.; Wegmueller, F.; Gruetter, A.; Wyttenbach, A.

    1977-01-01

    Three samples of Apollo 17 lunar soils (75081, 72501 and 72461) were separated into 9 grain-size fractions between 540 and 1 μm mean diameter. In order to detect mineral fractionations caused during the separation procedures major elements were determined by instrumental neutron activation analyses performed on small aliquots of the separated samples. Twenty elements were measured in each size fraction using instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation techniques. The concentration of the main elements in sample 75081 does not change with the grain-size. Exceptions are Fe and Ti which decrease slightly and Al which increases slightly with the decrease in the grain-size. These changes in the composition in main elements suggest a decrease in Ilmenite and an increase in Anorthite with decreasing grain-size. However, it can be concluded that the mineral composition of the fractions changes less than a factor of 2. Samples 72501 and 72461 are not yet analyzed for the main elements. (Auth.)

  15. High resolution gamma spectrometry of size-separated soils from high background areas of Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.R.; Sadasivan, S.; Nambi, K.S.V.

    1992-01-01

    Soil samples from a high background area of Kerala were analysed for their natural radionuclide content and distribution with particle size. The samples exhibited inhomogeneity in activity distribution. The smaller size particles had higher activity. The open air dose estimates are also presented. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Factors determining the average body size of geographically separated Arctodiaptomus salinus (Daday, 1885) populations

    OpenAIRE

    Anufriieva, Elena V.; Shadrin, Nickolai V.

    2014-01-01

    Arctodiaptomus salinus inhabits water bodies across Eurasia and North Africa. Based on our own data and that from the literature, we analyzed the influences of several factors on the intra- and inter-population variability of this species. A strong negative linear correlation between temperature and average body size in the Crimean and African populations was found, in which the parameters might be influenced by salinity. Meanwhile, asignificant negative correlation between female body size a...

  17. Factors determining the average body size of geographically separated Arctodiaptomus salinus (Daday, 1885) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anufriieva, Elena V; Shadrin, Nickolai V

    2014-03-01

    Arctodiaptomus salinus inhabits water bodies across Eurasia and North Africa. Based on our own data and that from the literature, we analyzed the influences of several factors on the intra- and inter-population variability of this species. A strong negative linear correlation between temperature and average body size in the Crimean and African populations was found, in which the parameters might be influenced by salinity. Meanwhile, a significant negative correlation between female body size and the altitude of habitats was found by comparing body size in populations from different regions. Individuals from environments with highly varying abiotic parameters, e.g. temporary reservoirs, had a larger body size than individuals from permanent water bodies. The changes in average body mass in populations were at 11.4 times, whereas, those in individual metabolic activities were at 6.2 times. Moreover, two size groups of A. salinus in the Crimean and the Siberian lakes were observed. The ratio of female length to male length fluctuated between 1.02 and 1.30. The average size of A. salinus in populations and its variations were determined by both genetic and environmental factors. However, the parities of these factors were unequal in either spatial or temporal scales.

  18. Weaning and separation stress: maternal motivation decreases with litter age and litter size in farmed mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Sørensen, Dennis Dam; Larsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    was to investigate whether the dams experienced stress/had a different motivation to be reunited with the litter after7 and 8 weeks, estimated by non-invasive determination of cortisol (FCM: Faecal Cortisol Metabolites)and dam behaviour including calls the first week after separation (D0: Day of removal, D1: next......The optimal timing of separating the mink dam from the litter is suggested to be a balance between the partly conflicting needs of the mother and the kits. Early removal of the dam or partial removal of the litter may protect the dam against exhaustion. Little is, however, known about dam stress...... and maternal motivation around the time of weaning and separation. Therefore, we investigated effects of separating the dam from the litter using brown first-parity farm mink dams (n = 374) taken away from the litter either day 49 ± 1 (7w, n = 185) or day 56 ± 1 (8w, n = 189) after birth. The aim...

  19. New composite separator pellet to increase power density and reduce size of thermal batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondy, Lisa Ann [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Christine Cardinal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grillet, Anne Mary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Soehnel, Melissa Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barringer, David Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); DiAntonio, Christopher Brian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chavez, Thomas P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ingersoll, David T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hughes, Lindsey Gloe [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, Lindsey R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fitchett, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We show that it is possible to manufacture strong macroporous ceramic films that can be backfilled with electrolyte to form rigid separator pellets suitable for use in thermal batteries. Several new ceramic manufacturing processes are developed to produce sintered magnesium oxide foams with connected porosities of over 80% by volume and with sufficient strength to withstand the battery manufacturing steps. The effects of processing parameters are quantified, and methods to imbibe electrolyte into the ceramic scaffold demonstrated. Preliminary single cell battery testing show that some of our first generation pellets exhibit longer voltage life with comparable resistance at the critical early times to that exhibited by a traditional pressed pellets. Although more development work is needed to optimize the processes to create these rigid separator pellets, the results indicate the potential of such ceramic separator pellets to be equal, if not superior to, current pressed pellets. Furthermore, they could be a replacement for critical material that is no longer available, as well as improving battery separator strength, decreasing production costs, and leading to shorter battery stacks for long-life batteries.

  20. Accomplishing simple, solubility-based separations of rare earth elements with complexes bearing size-sensitive molecular apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Justin A; Cole, Bren E; Boreen, Michael A; Lippincott, Connor A; Manor, Brian C; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2016-12-27

    Rare earth (RE) metals are critical components of electronic materials and permanent magnets. Recycling of consumer materials is a promising new source of rare REs. To incentivize recycling, there is a clear need for the development of simple methods for targeted separations of mixtures of RE metal salts. Metal complexes of a tripodal hydroxylaminato ligand, TriNOx 3- , featured a size-sensitive aperture formed of its three η 2 -(N,O) ligand arms. Exposure of cations in the aperture induced a self-associative equilibrium comprising RE(TriNOx)THF and [RE(TriNOx)] 2 species. Differences in the equilibrium constants K dimer for early and late metals enabled simple separations through leaching. Separations were performed on RE1/RE2 mixtures, where RE1 = La-Sm and RE2 = Gd-Lu, with emphasis on Eu/Y separations for potential applications in the recycling of phosphor waste from compact fluorescent light bulbs. Using the leaching method, separations factors approaching 2,000 were obtained for early-late RE combinations. Following solvent optimization, >95% pure samples of Eu were obtained with a 67% recovery for the technologically relevant Eu/Y separation.

  1. Enveloping Aerodynamic Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Kerry T. (Inventor); Aaron, Kim M. (Inventor); McRonald, Angus D. (Inventor); Gates, Kristin L. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    An inflatable aerodynamic deceleration method and system is provided for use with an atmospheric entry payload. The inflatable aerodynamic decelerator includes an inflatable envelope and an inflatant, wherein the inflatant is configured to fill the inflatable envelope to an inflated state such that the inflatable envelope surrounds the atmospheric entry payload, causing aerodynamic forces to decelerate the atmospheric entry payload.

  2. Neutron activation analysis of size-separated airborne dust particles, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Atsushi; Ishii, Taka; Tomiyama, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Isao.

    1976-01-01

    The size distribution of the component element concentration in particle floating matters contained in the atmosphere is related closely to atmospheric pollution. In this paper, the results of the neutron activation analysis and the measurement of size distribution of component element concentration are reported, which were carried out in Minami-ku, Kyoto, in May and November, 1975, by collecting airbone dust with Andersen air samples. The activation of samples was carried out with the research reactor in Kyoto University. The gamma-ray spectra of the samples were measured with a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector. The size distributions of Al, Sc, Th and Ti showed the similar pattern. The concentration of Zn was abnormally high as compared with that in other districts, and it is related to the local industry in this district. The size distribution of airborne dust usually follows the logarithmic normal distribution when it is not affected by atmospheric pollution. Accordingly, the size distribution of the concentration also follows the same distribution. The accumulated percentages of the concentrations of Al, Sc and Th fall on the same straight line, and it means that these elements were contained in the same particles as the components. Also it was decided that the particles of Al, Sc, Th, Fe and Ti were soil particles. (Kako, I.)

  3. Separation of both fibrous and globular proteins on the basis of molecular weight using high-performance size exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, J A

    1983-11-01

    A high-performance size exclusion liquid chromatographic system has been used to separate proteins with different shapes solely on the basis of their molecular weights. After the effects of ionic and hydrophobic interactions with the stationary phase have been overcome, protein elution is normally governed by their effective size in solution. Conditions are described under which proteins, with isoelectric points within the normal operating pH range of the columns, are eluted independent of their Stokes' radii. Even fibrous proteins with axial ratios of 50 elute according to their known molecular weights over the range 2000-2,000,000.

  4. Measurement of liquid mixing characteristics in large-sized ion exchange column for isotope separation by stepwise response method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Saito, Keiichiro; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Itoi, Toshiaki.

    1981-07-01

    Liquid mixing in a large-sized ion exchange column for isotope separation was measured by the step-wise response method, using NaCl solution as tracer. A 50 cm diameter column was packed with an ion exchange resin of 200 μm in mean diameter. Experiments were carried out for several types of distributor and collector, which were attached to each end of the column. The smallest mixing was observed for the perforated plate type of the collector, coupled with a minimum stagnant volume above the ion exchange resin bed. The 50 cm diameter column exhibited the better characteristics of liquid mixing than the 2 cm diameter column for which the good performance of lithium isotope separation had already been confirmed. These results indicate that a large increment of throughput is attainable by the scale-up of column diameter with the same performance of isotope separation as for the 2 cm diameter column. (author)

  5. Separation and chemical characterization of finely-sized fly-ash particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Laul, J.C.; Nielson, K.K.; Smith, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    The concentrations of 43 major, minor, and trace elements were measured by x-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption, and instrumental neutron activation for nine well-defined size fractions, with mass median diameters of 0.5 μ to 50 μm, of fly ash from a western coal-fired steam plant. There was generally good agreement in concentrations of elements analyzed by more than one technique. Concentration profiles as a function of mean particle size were established for various elements. Based on the concentration profiles, the elements can be divided into three distinct groups. One group consists primarily of the volatile elements or elements partially volatilized during coal combustion (examples include As, Se, Zn, Ga, etc.), and their concentrations decrease with increasing particle size. A second group, which shows a minor or direct dependence on particle size, as in the case of Si, is apparently associated primarily with the fly-ash matrix. The last group of elements, which includes Ca, Sr, Y, and the rare earths, shows small changes in their concentration profiles with a maximum in concentration at approximately 5 μm. 6 tables, 6 figures

  6. Surface phase separation, dewetting feature size, and crystal morphology in thin films of polystyrene/poly(ε-caprolactone) blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; He, Zhoukun; Li, Yuhan; Chen, Feng; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qing; Deng, Hua; Fu, Qiang

    2012-12-01

    Thin films of polystyrene (PS)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) blends were prepared by spin-coating and characterized by tapping mode force microscopy (AFM). Effects of the relative concentration of PS in polymer solution on the surface phase separation and dewetting feature size of the blend films were systematically studied. Due to the coupling of phase separation, dewetting, and crystallization of the blend films with the evaporation of solvent during spin-coating, different size of PS islands decorated with various PCL crystal structures including spherulite-like, flat-on individual lamellae, and flat-on dendritic crystal were obtained in the blend films by changing the film composition. The average distance of PS islands was shown to increase with the relative concentration of PS in casting solution. For a given ratio of PS/PCL, the feature size of PS appeared to increase linearly with the square of PS concentration while the PCL concentration only determined the crystal morphology of the blend films with no influence on the upper PS domain features. This is explained in terms of vertical phase separation and spinodal dewetting of the PS rich layer from the underlying PCL rich layer, leading to the upper PS dewetting process and the underlying PCL crystalline process to be mutually independent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Separating the Classes of Recursively Enumerable Languages Based on Machine Size

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    van Leeuwen, J.; Wiedermann, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2015), s. 677-695 ISSN 0129-0541 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/10/1333 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA15-04960S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : recursively enumerable languages * RE hierarchy * finite languages * machine size * descriptional complexity * Turing machines with advice Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.467, year: 2015

  8. Density fractions versus size separates: does physical fractionation isolate functional soil compartments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Moni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical fractionation is a widely used methodology to study soil organic matter (SOM dynamics, but concerns have been raised that the available fractionation methods do not well describe functional SOM pools. In this study we explore whether physical fractionation techniques isolate soil compartments in a meaningful and functionally relevant way for the investigation of litter-derived nitrogen dynamics at the decadal timescale. We do so by performing aggregate density fractionation (ADF and particle size-density fractionation (PSDF on mineral soil samples from two European beech forests a decade after application of 15N labelled litter.

    Both density and size-based fractionation methods suggested that litter-derived nitrogen became increasingly associated with the mineral phase as decomposition progressed, within aggregates and onto mineral surfaces. However, scientists investigating specific aspects of litter-derived nitrogen dynamics are pointed towards ADF when adsorption and aggregation processes are of interest, whereas PSDF is the superior tool to research the fate of particulate organic matter (POM.

    Some methodological caveats were observed mainly for the PSDF procedure, the most important one being that fine fractions isolated after sonication can not be linked to any defined decomposition pathway or protective mechanism. This also implies that historical assumptions about the "adsorbed" state of carbon associated with fine fractions need to be re-evaluated. Finally, this work demonstrates that establishing a comprehensive picture of whole soil OM dynamics requires a combination of both methodologies and we offer a suggestion for an efficient combination of the density and size-based approaches.

  9. Size-selective separation of polydisperse gold nanoparticles in supercritical ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dylan P; Satherley, John

    2009-04-09

    The aim of this study was to use supercritical ethane to selectively disperse alkanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles of one size from a polydisperse sample in order to recover a monodisperse fraction of the nanoparticles. A disperse sample of metal nanoparticles with diameters in the range of 1-5 nm was prepared using established techniques then further purified by Soxhlet extraction. The purified sample was subjected to supercritical ethane at a temperature of 318 K in the pressure range 50-276 bar. Particles were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, TEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. The results show that with increasing pressure the dispersibility of the nanoparticles increases, this effect is most pronounced for smaller nanoparticles. At the highest pressure investigated a sample of the particles was effectively stripped of all the smaller particles leaving a monodisperse sample. The relationship between dispersibility and supercritical fluid density for two different size samples of alkanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles was considered using the Chrastil chemical equilibrium model.

  10. Hyperbranched polyglycerol-grafted titanium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, derivatization, characterization, size separation, and toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hongmei; Maruyama, Kyouhei; Amano, Tsukuru; Murakami, Takashi; Komatsu, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    We have been developing surface functionalization of various nanoparticles including nanodiamond and iron oxide nanoparticles in view of biomedical applications. In this context, TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NP) are functionalized with polyglycerol (PG) to provide water-dispersible TiO2-PG, which is further derivatized through multi-step organic transformations. The resulting TiO2-PG and its derivatives are fully characterized by various analyses including solution-phase 1H and 13C NMR. TiO2-PG was size-tuned with centrifugation by changing the acceleration and duration. At last, no cytotoxicity of TiO2 NP, TiO2-PG, and TiO2-PG functionalized with RGD peptide was observed under dark conditions.

  11. Zirconium-titanium-phosphate nanoparticles. Triton X-100 based size modification, characterization and application in radiochemical separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Sen, B.; Chattopadhyay, P. [Burdwan Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-07-01

    Zirconium-titanium-phosphate nanoparticles (ZTP) of different sizes were synthesized using tritron X-100 (polyethylene glycol-p-isooctylphenyl ether) surfactant. The materials were characterized by FTIR and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structural and morphological details of the material were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SEM study was followed by energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis (EDS) for elemental analysis of the sample. The important peaks of the XRD spectra were analyzed to determine the probable composition of the material. The particle sizes were determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) method. Ion exchange capacity was measured for different metal ions with sizes of the ZTP nanoparticles and size-dependent ion exchange property of the material was investigated thoroughly. The nanomaterial of the smallest size of around 5 nm was employed to separate carrier-free {sup 137m}Ba from {sup 137}Cs in column chromatographic technique using 1.0 M HNO{sub 3} as eluting agent at pH = 5. (orig.)

  12. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  13. Origin of stretched-exponential photoluminescence relaxation in size-separated silicon nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L. Brown

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A detailed understanding of the photoluminescence (PL from silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs is convoluted by the complexity of the decay mechanism, including a stretched-exponential relaxation and the presence of both nanosecond and microsecond time scales. In this publication, we analyze the microsecond PL decay of size-resolved SiNC fractions in both full-spectrum (FS and spectrally resolved (SR configurations, where the stretching exponent and lifetime are used to deduce a probability distribution function (PDF of decay rates. For the PL decay measured at peak emission, we find a systematic shift and narrowing of the PDF in comparison to the FS measurements. In a similar fashion, we resolve the PL lifetime of the ‘blue’, ‘peak’, and ‘red’ regions of the spectrum and map PL decays of different photon energy onto their corresponding location in the PDF. A general trend is observed where higher and lower photon energies are correlated with shorter and longer lifetimes, respectively, which we relate to the PL line width and electron-phonon coupling.

  14. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    dynamic stall, leading edge defect imposes a greater influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil than steady conditions. By increasing in defect length, it is found that the separated area becomes more intense and moves forward along the suction surface. Leading edge defect has significant influence on the aerodynamic and flow characteristics of the airfoil, which will reach a stable status with enough large defect size. The leading edge separation bubble, circulation in the defect cavity and intense tailing edge vortex are the main features of flow around defective airfoils.

  15. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    unchanged. In dynamic stall, leading edge defect imposes a greater influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil than steady conditions. By increasing in defect length, it is found that the separated area becomes more intense and moves forward along the suction surface.Leading edge defect has significant influence on the aerodynamic and flow characteristics of the airfoil, which will reach a stable status with enough large defect size. The leading edge separation bubble, circulation in the defect cavity and intense tailing edge vortex are the main features of flow around defective airfoils.

  16. Aerodynamic Drag Scoping Work.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voskuilen, Tyler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Erickson, Lindsay Crowl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knaus, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    This memo summarizes the aerodynamic drag scoping work done for Goodyear in early FY18. The work is to evaluate the feasibility of using Sierra/Low-Mach (Fuego) for drag predictions of rolling tires, particularly focused on the effects of tire features such as lettering, sidewall geometry, rim geometry, and interaction with the vehicle body. The work is broken into two parts. Part 1 consisted of investigation of a canonical validation problem (turbulent flow over a cylinder) using existing tools with different meshes and turbulence models. Part 2 involved calculating drag differences over plate geometries with simple features (ridges and grooves) defined by Goodyear of approximately the size of interest for a tire. The results of part 1 show the level of noise to be expected in a drag calculation and highlight the sensitivity of absolute predictions to model parameters such as mesh size and turbulence model. There is 20-30% noise in the experimental measurements on the canonical cylinder problem, and a similar level of variation between different meshes and turbulence models. Part 2 shows that there is a notable difference in the predicted drag on the sample plate geometries, however, the computational cost of extending the LES model to a full tire would be significant. This cost could be reduced by implementation of more sophisticated wall and turbulence models (e.g. detached eddy simulations - DES) and by focusing the mesh refinement on feature subsets with the goal of comparing configurations rather than absolute predictivity for the whole tire.

  17. Insights into chromatographic separation using core-shell metal-organic frameworks: Size exclusion and polarity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Silvestre, Martin E; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-09-11

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) [Cu3(BTC)2(H2O)3]n (also known as HKUST-1; BTC, benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid) were synthesized as homogeneous shell onto carboxyl functionalized magnetic microparticles through a liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) process. The as-synthesized core-shell HKUST-1 magnetic microparticles composites were characterized by XRD and SEM, and used as stationary phase in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of the unique properties of MOFs onto the chromatographic performance are demonstrated by the experiments. First, remarkable separation of pyridine and bipyridine is achieved, although both molecules show a strong interaction between the Cu-ions in HKUST-1 and the nitrogen atoms in their heterocyles. The difference can be explained due to size exclusion of bipyridine from the well defined pore structure of crystalline HKUST-1. Second, the enormous variety of possible interactions of sample molecules with the metal ions and linkers within MOFs allows for specifically tailored solid phases for challenging separation tasks. For example, baseline separation of three chloroaniline (CLA) isomers tested can be achieved without the need for gradient elution modes. Along with the experimental HPLC runs, in-depth modelling with a recently developed chromatography modelling software (ChromX) was applied and proofs the software to be a powerful tool for exploring the separation potential of thin MOF films. The pore diffusivity of pyridine and CLA isomers within HKUST-1 are found to be around 2.3×10(-15)m(2)s(-1). While the affinity of HKUST-1 to the tested molecules strongly differs, the maximum capacities are in the same range, with 0.37molL(-1) for pyridine and 0.23molL(-1) for CLA isomers, corresponding to 4.0 and 2.5 molecules per MOF unit cell, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Seed-mediated synthesis of silver nanocrystals with controlled sizes and shapes in droplet microreactors separated by air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yi; Tong, Limin; Xia, Younan

    2013-12-17

    Silver nanocrystals with uniform sizes were synthesized in droplet microreactors through seed-mediated growth. The key to the success of this synthesis is the use of air as a carrier phase to generate the droplets. The air not only separates the reaction solution into droplets but also provides O2 for the generation of reducing agent (glycolaldehyde). It also serves as a buffer space for the diffusion of NO, which is formed in situ due to the oxidative etching of Ag nanocrystals with twin defects. For the first time, we were able to generate Ag nanocrystals with controlled sizes and shapes in continuous production by using droplet microreactors. For Ag nanocubes, their edge lengths could be readily controlled in the range of 30-100 nm by varying the reaction time, the amount of seeds, and the concentration of AgNO3 in the droplets. Furthermore, we demonstrated the synthesis of Ag octahedra in the droplet microreactors. We believe that the air-driven droplet generation device can be extended to other noble metals for the production of nanocrystals with controlled sizes and shapes.

  19. Analysis of flow separation over aerodynamic airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Sánchez, Sergio Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Energy industries are nowadays struggling with the most effcient source of energy generation. The list of energy resources is huge starting with traditional coal and going through the different technologies until reaching the controversial nuclear reactors. One of the most interesting areas in energy generation is the renewable energy technologies. Among the different renewable energy sources, this project will be focused on eolic energy generation via horizontal axis wind turbine...

  20. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic species in an isotopic mixture including a first species having a first isotope and a second species having a second isotope are separated by selectively exciting the first species in preference to the second species and then reacting the selectively excited first species with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product having a mass different from the original species and separating the product from the balance of the mixture in a centrifugal separating device such as centrifuge or aerodynamic nozzle. In the centrifuge the isotopic mixture is passed into a rotor where it is irradiated through a window. Heavier and lighter components can be withdrawn. The irradiated mixture experiences a large centrifugal force and is separated in a deflection area into lighter and heavier components. (UK)

  1. Tactical missile aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsch, Michael J. (Editor); Nielsen, Jack N. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on tactical missile aerodynamics discusses autopilot-related aerodynamic design considerations, flow visualization methods' role in the study of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics, low aspect ratio wing behavior at high angle-of-attack, supersonic airbreathing propulsion system inlet design, missile bodies with noncircular cross section and bank-to-turn maneuvering capabilities, 'waverider' supersonic cruise missile concepts and design methods, asymmetric vortex sheding phenomena from bodies-of-revolution, and swept shock wave/boundary layer interaction phenomena. Also discussed are the assessment of aerodynamic drag in tactical missiles, the analysis of supersonic missile aerodynamic heating, the 'equivalent angle-of-attack' concept for engineering analysis, the vortex cloud model for body vortex shedding and tracking, paneling methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility, the application of supersonic full potential method to missile bodies, Euler space marching methods for missiles, three-dimensional missile boundary layers, and an analysis of exhaust plumes and their interaction with missile airframes.

  2. Small-sized test of gravity separation and preliminary assessment of technology and economics in Guangshigou granite pegmatite type uranium deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhifu, Sun; Mingyue, Feng; Jiashu, Rong; Ziyang, Xu [Beijing Research Inst. of Uranium Geology (China)

    1994-11-01

    The small-sized test of gravity separation in Guangshigou granite pegmatite type uranium deposit has found a new avenue for the industrial utilization of ores from such uranium deposit, especially those low grade ones. The test has proved that the gravity separation is superior to hydrometallurgy in the aspect of uranium recovery from ores of the granite pegmatite type uranium deposit, by-product recovery and protection against environmental pollution.

  3. Small-sized test of gravity separation and preliminary assessment of technology and economics in Guangshigou granite pegmatite type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhifu; Feng Mingyue; Rong Jiashu; Xu Ziyang

    1994-01-01

    The small-sized test of gravity separation in Guangshigou granite pegmatite type uranium deposit has found a new avenue for the industrial utilization of ores from such uranium deposit, especially those low grade ones. The test has proved that the gravity separation is superior to hydrometallurgy in the aspect of uranium recovery from ores of the granite pegmatite type uranium deposit, by-product recovery and protection against environmental pollution

  4. Conference on Low Reynolds Number Airfoil Aerodynamics, Notre Dame, IN, June 16-18, 1985, Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, T. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Topics of interest in the design, flow modeling and visualization, and turbulence and flow separation effects for low Reynolds number (Re) airfoils are discussed. Design methods are presented for Re from 50,000-500,000, including a viscous-inviscid coupling method and by using a constrained pitching moment. The effects of pressure gradients, unsteady viscous aerodynamics and separation bubbles are investigated, with particular note made of factors which most influence the size and location of separation bubbles and control their effects. Attention is also given to experimentation with low Re airfoils and to numerical models of symmetry breaking and lift hysteresis from separation. Both steady and unsteady flow experiments are reviewed, with the trials having been held in wind tunnels and the free atmosphere. The topics discussed are of interest to designers of RPVs, high altitude aircraft, sailplanes, ultralights and wind turbines.

  5. System for determining aerodynamic imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Gary B. (Inventor); Cheung, Benny K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A system is provided for determining tracking error in a propeller or rotor driven aircraft by determining differences in the aerodynamic loading on the propeller or rotor blades of the aircraft. The system includes a microphone disposed relative to the blades during the rotation thereof so as to receive separate pressure pulses produced by each of the blades during the passage thereof by the microphone. A low pass filter filters the output signal produced by the microphone, the low pass filter having an upper cut-off frequency set below the frequency at which the blades pass by the microphone. A sensor produces an output signal after each complete revolution of the blades, and a recording display device displays the outputs of the low pass filter and sensor so as to enable evaluation of the relative magnitudes of the pressure pulses produced by passage of the blades by the microphone during each complete revolution of the blades.

  6. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  7. Aerodynamically shaped vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Velte, Clara Marika; Øye, Stig

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamically shaped vortex generator has been proposed, manufactured and tested in a wind tunnel. The effect on the overall performance when applied on a thick airfoil is an increased lift to drag ratio compared with standard vortex generators. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  8. The effects of cultivation on the organic matter of total soil and in the different soil particle size separates using radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazineu, M.H.P.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of cultivation on the organic matter and nutrients in the total soil and in five particle size separates were studied through chemical analyses and radiocarbon dating. Samples were taken from the A and B horizons of an uncultivated field and of fields cultivated during 5,60 and 90 years which had never received treatment with fertilizers. (M.A.) [pt

  9. Effect of static shape deformation on aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinghui; Lin, Guiping; Bu, Xueqin; Fu, Shiming; Chao, Yanmeng

    2017-07-01

    The inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (IAD), which allows heavier and larger payloads and offers flexibility in landing site selection at higher altitudes, possesses potential superiority in next generation space transport system. However, due to the flexibilities of material and structure assembly, IAD inevitably experiences surface deformation during atmospheric entry, which in turn alters the flowfield around the vehicle and leads to the variations of aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics. In the current study, the effect of the static shape deformation on the hypersonic aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of a stacked tori Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) is demonstrated and analyzed in detail by solving compressible Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model. The deformed shape is obtained by structural modeling in the presence of maximum aerodynamic pressure during entry. The numerical results show that the undulating shape deformation makes significant difference to flow structure. In particular, the more curved outboard forebody surface results in local flow separations and reattachments in valleys, which consequently yields remarkable fluctuations of surface conditions with pressure rising in valleys yet dropping on crests while shear stress and heat flux falling in valleys yet rising on crests. Accordingly, compared with the initial (undeformed) shape, the corresponding differences of surface conditions get more striking outboard, with maximum augmentations of 379 pa, 2224 pa, and 19.0 W/cm2, i.e., 9.8%, 305.9%, and 101.6% for the pressure, shear stress and heat flux respectively. Moreover, it is found that, with the increase of angle of attack, the aerodynamic characters and surface heating vary and the aeroheating disparities are evident between the deformed and initial shape. For the deformable HIAD model investigated in this study, the more intense surface conditions and changed flight

  10. Accomplishing simple, solubility-based separations of rare earth elements with complexes bearing size-sensitive molecular apertures

    OpenAIRE

    Bogart, Justin A.; Cole, Bren E.; Boreen, Michael A.; Lippincott, Connor A.; Manor, Brian C.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth metals, La���Lu, Sc, and Y, are essential components of electronic materials and permanent magnets in diverse technologies. But, their mining and separations chemistry are unsustainable and plagued with supply problems. Recycling of consumer materials containing rare earths is a promising new source of these critical materials but similarly requires efficient separations. We report the use of a tripodal hydroxylaminato ligand, TriNOx3���, with rare earth cations that enable fast, e...

  11. The use of nylon and glass fiber filter separators with different pore sizes in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Separators are needed in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to reduce electrode spacing and preventing electrode short circuiting. The use of nylon and glass fiber filter separators in single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs was examined for their effect on performance. Larger pore nylon mesh were used that had regular mesh weaves with pores ranging from 10 to 160 μm, while smaller pore-size nylon filters (0.2-0.45 μm) and glass fiber filters (0.7-2.0 μm) had a more random structure. The pore size of both types of nylon filters had a direct and predictable effect on power production, with power increasing from 443 ± 27 to 650 ± 7 mW m-2 for pore sizes of 0.2 and 0.45 μm, and from 769 ± 65 to 941 ± 47 mW m-2 for 10 to 160 μm. In contrast, changes in pore sizes of the glass fiber filters resulted in a relatively narrow change in power (732 ± 48 to 779 ± 43 mW m-2) for pore sizes of 0.7 to 2 μm. An ideal separator should increase both power density and Coulombic efficiency (CE). However, CEs measured for the different separators were inversely correlated with power production, demonstrating that materials which reduced the oxygen diffusion into the reactor also hindered proton transport to the cathode, reducing power production through increased internal resistance. Our results highlight the need to develop separators that control oxygen transfer and facilitate proton transfer to the cathode. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Geometrical separation method for lipoproteins using bioformulated-fiber matrix electrophoresis: size of high-density lipoprotein does not reflect its density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Mari; Seo, Makoto; Inoue, Takayuki; Ikeda, Takeshi; Kogure, Akinori; Inoue, Ikuo; Katayama, Shigehiro; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2011-02-01

    The increasing number of patients with metabolic syndrome is a critical global problem. In this study, we describe a novel geometrical electrophoretic separation method using a bioformulated-fiber matrix to analyze high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. HDL particles are generally considered to be a beneficial component of the cholesterol fraction. Conventional electrophoresis is widely used but is not necessarily suitable for analyzing HDL particles. Furthermore, a higher HDL density is generally believed to correlate with a smaller particle size. Here, we use a novel geometrical separation technique incorporating recently developed nanotechnology (Nata de Coco) to contradict this belief. A dyslipidemia patient given a 1-month treatment of fenofibrate showed an inverse relationship between HDL density and size. Direct microscopic observation and morphological observation of fractionated HDL particles confirmed a lack of relationship between particle density and size. This new technique may improve diagnostic accuracy and medical treatment for lipid related diseases.

  13. Size fractionation of waste-to-energy boiler ash enables separation of a coarse fraction with low dioxin concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidemann, E.; Allegrini, Elisa; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) formed in modern Waste-to-Energy plants are primarily found in the generated ashes and air pollution control residues, which are usually disposed of as hazardous waste. The objective of this study was to explore the occurrence of PCDD....../F in different grain size fractions in the boiler ash, i.e. ash originating from the convection pass of the boiler. If a correlation between particle size and dioxin concentrations could be found, size fractionation of the ashes could reduce the total amount of hazardous waste. Boiler ash samples from ten...... sections of a boiler's convective part were collected over three sampling days, sieved into three different size fractions - 0.355. mm - and analysed for PCDD/F. The coarse fraction (>0.355. mm) in the first sections of the horizontal convection pass appeared to be of low toxicity with respect to dioxin...

  14. The Effects of Family Size, Birth Order, Sibling Separation and Crowding on the Academic Achievement of Boys and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Ena Vazquez; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Family constellation variables such as family size, birth order, spacing of children, and crowding were significantly associated with academic achievement when IQ was controlled. The effects of family constellation variables were found to be sex specific. (RC)

  15. Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its second edition, it has been entirely updated and substantially extended to reflect advances in technology, research into rotor aerodynamics and the structural...... response of the wind turbine structure. Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element...... Momentum method is also covered, as are eigenmodes and the dynamic behavior of a turbine. The new material includes a description of the effects of the dynamics and how this can be modeled in an aeroelastic code, which is widely used in the design and verification of modern wind turbines. Further...

  16. Computational electromagnetic-aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Joseph J S

    2016-01-01

    Presents numerical algorithms, procedures, and techniques required to solve engineering problems relating to the interactions between electromagnetic fields, fluid flow, and interdisciplinary technology for aerodynamics, electromagnetics, chemical-physics kinetics, and plasmadynamics This book addresses modeling and simulation science and technology for studying ionized gas phenomena in engineering applications. Computational Electromagnetic-Aerodynamics is organized into ten chapters. Chapter one to three introduce the fundamental concepts of plasmadynamics, chemical-physics of ionization, classical magnetohydrodynamics, and their extensions to plasma-based flow control actuators, high-speed flows of interplanetary re-entry, and ion thrusters in space exploration. Chapter four to six explain numerical algorithms and procedures for solving Maxwell’s equation in the time domain for computational electromagnetics, plasma wave propagation, and the time-dependent c mpressible Navier-Stokes equation for aerodyn...

  17. 1.9 μm superficially porous packing material with radially oriented pores and tailored pore size for ultra-fast separation of small molecules and biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yi; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ci; Xia, Simin; Zhang, Xiaodan; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-08-22

    In this work, 1.9 μm reversed-phase packing materials with superficially porous structure were prepared to achieve the rapid and high efficient separation of peptides and proteins. The silica particles were synthesized via three steps, nonporous silica particle preparation by a modified seeded growth method, mesoporous shell formation by a one pot templated dissolution and redeposition strategy, and pore size expansion via acid-refluxing. By such a method, 1.9 μm superficially porous materials with 0.18 μm shell thickness and tailored pore diameter (10 nm, 15 nm) were obtained. After pore enlargement, the formerly dense arrays of mesoporous structure changed, the radially oriented pores dominated the superficially porous structure. The chromatographic performance of such particles was investigated after C18 derivatization. For packing materials with 1.9 μm diameter and 10 nm pore size, the column efficiency could reach 211,300 plates per m for naphthalene. To achieve the high resolution separation of peptides and proteins, particles with pore diameter of 15 nm were tailored, by which the baseline separation of 5 peptides and 5 intact proteins could be respectively achieved within 1 min, demonstrating the superiority in the high efficiency and high throughput analysis of biomolecules. Furthermore, BSA digests were well separated with peak capacity of 120 in 30 min on a 15 cm-long column. Finally, we compared our columns with a 1.7 μm Kinetex C18 column under the same conditions, our particles with 10nm pore size demonstrated similar performance for separation of the large intact proteins. Moreover, the particles with 15 nm pore size showed more symmetrical peaks for the separation of large proteins (BSA, OVA and IgG) and provided rapid separation of protein extracts from Escherichia coli in 5 min. All these results indicated that the synthesized 1.9 μm superficially porous silica packing materials would be promising in the ultra-fast and high

  18. Improving separation of polymers by size-exclusion and liquid chromatography on the background of the theoretical model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Netopilík, Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2017), s. 89 ISSN 2169-0022. [World Congress on Materials Science and Engineering /9./. 12.06.2017-14.06.2017, Rome] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC17-04258J Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : model of separation * skew * excess Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  19. ISOLATED AERODYNAMIC SURFACE CALCULUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENUŞ Marilena

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes to present a few steps for calculating the dynamics of flight. From an organizational perspective, the paper is structured in three parts. The first part provides essential information that needs to be taken into account when designing an aircraft wing. The second part presents the basic steps in the wing design procedure and finally, the third part contains the diagrams in which one can find the aerodynamic coefficient of a specifying wing.

  20. Research on aerodynamic means of isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattolica, R.J.; Gallagher, R.J.; Talbot, L.; Willis, D.R.; Hurlbut, F.C.; Fiszdon, W.; Anderson, J.B.

    1978-03-01

    The results of a research program directed toward the understanding of the fundamental gas dynamics involved in aerodynamic isotope enrichment are summarized. The specific aerodynamic isotope enrichment method which was examined in this research is based on a velocity slip phenomenon which occurs in the rarefied hypersonic expansion of a heavy molecular weight gas and a light carrier gas in a nozzle or free jet. This particular aerodynamic method was chosen for study because it contains the fundamental molecular physics of other more complex techniques within the context of a one-dimensional flow without boundary effects. From both an experimental and theoretical modeling perspective this provides an excellent basis for testing the experimental and numerical tools with which to investigate more complex aerodynamic isotope enrichment processes. This report consists of three separate parts. Part I contains a theoretical analysis of the velocity slip effect in free jet expansions of binary and ternary gas mixtures. The analysis, based on a source flow model and using moment equations is derived from the Boltzmann equation using the hypersonic approximation. Part II contains the experimental measurements of velocity slip. The numerical simulation of the slip process was carried out by using a Monte-Carlo numerical technique. In addition, comparisons between the theoretical analysis of Part I and the experiments are presented. Part III describes impact pressure measurements of free jet expansions from slot shaped two dimensional nozzles. At least two methods of aerodynamic isotope enrichment (opposed jet and velocity slip) would depend on the use of this type of two dimensional expansion. Flow surveys of single free jet and the interferene of crossed free jets are presented

  1. aerodynamics and heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Rajadas

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary optimization procedure, with the integration of aerodynamic and heat transfer criteria, has been developed for the design of gas turbine blades. Two different optimization formulations have been used. In the first formulation, the maximum temperature in the blade section is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint is imposed on the blade average temperature and a lower bound constraint is imposed on the blade tangential force coefficient. In the second formulation, the blade average and maximum temperatures are chosen as objective functions. In both formulations, bounds are imposed on the velocity gradients at several points along the surface of the airfoil to eliminate leading edge velocity spikes which deteriorate aerodynamic performance. Shape optimization is performed using the blade external and coolant path geometric parameters as design variables. Aerodynamic analysis is performed using a panel code. Heat transfer analysis is performed using the finite element method. A gradient based procedure in conjunction with an approximate analysis technique is used for optimization. The results obtained using both optimization techniques are compared with a reference geometry. Both techniques yield significant improvements with the multiobjective formulation resulting in slightly superior design.

  2. Size fractionation of waste-to-energy boiler ash enables separation of a coarse fraction with low dioxin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, E; Allegrini, E; Fruergaard Astrup, T; Hulgaard, T; Riber, C; Jansson, S

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) formed in modern Waste-to-Energy plants are primarily found in the generated ashes and air pollution control residues, which are usually disposed of as hazardous waste. The objective of this study was to explore the occurrence of PCDD/F in different grain size fractions in the boiler ash, i.e. ash originating from the convection pass of the boiler. If a correlation between particle size and dioxin concentrations could be found, size fractionation of the ashes could reduce the total amount of hazardous waste. Boiler ash samples from ten sections of a boiler's convective part were collected over three sampling days, sieved into three different size fractions - 0.355 mm - and analysed for PCDD/F. The coarse fraction (>0.355 mm) in the first sections of the horizontal convection pass appeared to be of low toxicity with respect to dioxin content. While the total mass of the coarse fraction in this boiler was relatively small, sieving could reduce the amount of ash containing toxic PCDD/F by around 0.5 kg per tonne input waste or around 15% of the collected boiler ash from the convection pass. The mid-size fraction in this study covered a wide size range (0.09-0.355 mm) and possibly a low toxicity fraction could be identified by splitting this fraction into more narrow size ranges. The ashes exhibited uniform PCDD/F homologue patterns which suggests a stable and continuous generation of PCDD/F. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical simulation of aerodynamic sound radiated from a two-dimensional airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    飯田, 明由; 大田黒, 俊夫; 加藤, 千幸; Akiyoshi, Iida; Toshio, Otaguro; Chisachi, Kato; 日立機研; 日立機研; 東大生研; Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd.; Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd.; University of Tokyo

    2000-01-01

    An aerodynamic sound radiated from a two-dimensional airfoil has been computed with the Lighthill-Curle's theory. The predicted sound pressure level is agreement with the measured one. Distribution of vortex sound sources is also estimated based on the correlation between the unsteady vorticity fluctuations and the aerodynamic sound. The distribution of vortex sound source reveals that separated shear layers generate aerodynamic sound. This result is help to understand noise reduction method....

  4. Improvement of Gold Leaching from a Refractory Gold Concentrate Calcine by Separate Pretreatment of Coarse and Fine Size Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A total gold extraction of 70.2% could only be reached via direct cyanidation from a refractory As-, S- and C-bearing gold concentrate calcine, and the gold extraction varied noticeably with different size fractions. The reasons for unsatisfactory gold extraction from the calcine were studied through analyses of chemical composition, chemical phase and SEM-EDS of different sizes of particles. It was found that a significant segregation of compositions occurred during the grinding of gold ore before flotation. As a result, for the calcine obtained after oxidative roasting, the encapsulation of gold by iron oxides was easily engendered in finer particles, whilst in coarser particles the gold encapsulation by silicates was inclined to occur likely due to melted silicates blocking the porosity of particles. The improvement of gold leaching from different size fractions was further investigated through pretreatments with alkali washing, acid pickling or sulfuric acid curing-water leaching. Finally, a novel process was recommended and the total gold extraction from the calcine could be increased substantially to 93.6% by the purposeful pretreatment with alkali washing for the relatively coarse size fraction (+37 μm and sulfuric acid curing–water leaching for the fine size fraction (−37 μm.

  5. Membrane wing aerodynamics for micro air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yongsheng; Shyy, Wei; Viieru, Dragos; Zhang, Baoning

    2003-10-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a wing deteriorates considerably as the Reynolds number decreases from 10 6 to 10 4. In particular, flow separation can result in substantial change in effective airfoil shape and cause reduced aerodynamic performance. Lately, there has been growing interest in developing suitable techniques for sustained and robust flight of micro air vehicles (MAVs) with a wingspan of 15 cm or smaller, flight speed around 10 m/ s, and a corresponding Reynolds number of 10 4-10 5. This paper reviews the aerodynamics of membrane and corresponding rigid wings under the MAV flight conditions. The membrane wing is observed to yield desirable characteristics in delaying stall as well as adapting to the unsteady flight environment, which is intrinsic to the designated flight speed. Flow structures associated with the low Reynolds number and low aspect ratio wing, such as pressure distribution, separation bubble and tip vortex are reviewed. Structural dynamics in response to the surrounding flow field is presented to highlight the multiple time-scale phenomena. Based on the computational capabilities for treating moving boundary problems, wing shape optimization can be conducted in automated manners. To enhance the lift, the effect of endplates is evaluated. The proper orthogonal decomposition method is also discussed as an economic tool to describe the flow structure around a wing and to facilitate flow and vehicle control.

  6. Signal or noise? Separating grain size-dependent Nd isotope variability from provenance shifts in Indus delta sediments, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonell, T. N.; Li, Y.; Blusztajn, J.; Giosan, L.; Clift, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    Rare earth element (REE) radioisotope systems, such as neodymium (Nd), have been traditionally used as powerful tracers of source provenance, chemical weathering intensity, and sedimentary processes over geologic timescales. More recently, the effects of physical fractionation (hydraulic sorting) of sediments during transport have called into question the utility of Nd isotopes as a provenance tool. Is source terrane Nd provenance resolvable if sediment transport strongly induces noise? Can grain-size sorting effects be quantified? This study works to address such questions by utilizing grain size analysis, trace element geochemistry, and Nd isotope geochemistry of bulk and grain-size fractions (Pakistan. Here we evaluate how grain size effects drive Nd isotope variability and further resolve the total uncertainties associated with Nd isotope compositions of bulk sediments. Results from the Indus delta indicate bulk sediment ɛNd compositions are most similar to the <63 µm fraction as a result of strong mineralogical control on bulk compositions by silt- to clay-sized monazite and/or allanite. Replicate analyses determine that the best reproducibility (± 0.15 ɛNd points) is observed in the 125-250 µm fraction. The bulk and finest fractions display the worst reproducibility (±0.3 ɛNd points). Standard deviations (2σ) indicate that bulk sediment uncertainties are no more than ±1.0 ɛNd points. This argues that excursions of ≥1.0 ɛNd points in any bulk Indus delta sediments must in part reflect an external shift in provenance irrespective of sample composition, grain size, and grain size distribution. Sample standard deviations (2s) estimate that any terrigenous bulk sediment composition should vary no greater than ±1.1 ɛNd points if provenance remains constant. Findings from this study indicate that although there are grain-size dependent Nd isotope effects, they are minimal in the Indus delta such that resolvable provenance-driven trends can be

  7. Particle-size distribution of fission products in airborne dust collected at Tsukuba from April to June 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooe, Hiroko; Seki, Riki; Ikeda, Nagao

    1988-01-01

    The radioactivity released by the reactor accident at Chernobyl was detected in surface air at Tsukuba, Japan. Gamma-spectrometry of airborne dust collected using aerodynamic separation showed higher concentrations of radionuclides in fine particles. The particle-size distribution of radionuclides changed with time. (author)

  8. A high gradient and strength bioseparator with nano-sized immunomagnetic particles for specific separation and efficient concentration of E. coli O157:H7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jianhan; Li, Min; Li, Yanbin; Chen, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Sample pretreatment is a key to rapid screening of pathogens for prevention and control of foodborne diseases. Magnetic immunoseparation is a specific method based on antibody–antigen reaction to capture the target bacteria and concentrate them in a smaller-volume buffer. The use of nano-sized magnetic particles could improve the separation efficiency of bacteria but require much higher gradient and strength magnetic field. In this study, a strong magnetic bioseparator with a mean field strength of 1.35 T and a mean gradient of 90 T/m was developed with the use of the 30 nm and 180 nm magnetic particles to specifically separate and efficiently concentrate foodborne bacterial pathogens using Escherichia coli O157:H7 as a model bacterium. The polyclonal antibodies against E. coli were evaluated using Dot ELISA analysis for their good affinity with the target bacteria and then used to modify the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles by 1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC·HCl) method and streptavidin-biotin binding. The magnetic particle concentrations were optimized to be 40 µg/ml and 100 µg/ml for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively, the immunoreaction time was optimized to be 45 min for both sizes of particles, and the separation times were optimized to be 60 min and 2 min for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively. The total magnetic separation time was 2 h and 1 h for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that the bioseparator with the use of either 30 nm or 180 nm immunomagnetic particles could achieve a separation efficiency of >90% for E. coli O157:H7 at the concentrations ranging from 10 2 to 10 5 cfu/ml. No obvious interferences from non-target foodborne pathogens, such as SalmonellaTyphimurium and Listeria innocua, were found. For overall consideration of the consuming time, the cost, and the separation efficiency, the 180 nm magnetic particles are practical for

  9. A high gradient and strength bioseparator with nano-sized immunomagnetic particles for specific separation and efficient concentration of E. coli O157:H7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jianhan, E-mail: jianhan@cau.edu.cn [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Agricultural Information Acquisition Technology (Beijing), 17 East Tsinghua Road, China Agricultural University, Mailbox 125, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Min [College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li, Yanbin [College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Chen, Qi [Modern Precision Agriculture System Integration Research Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Sample pretreatment is a key to rapid screening of pathogens for prevention and control of foodborne diseases. Magnetic immunoseparation is a specific method based on antibody–antigen reaction to capture the target bacteria and concentrate them in a smaller-volume buffer. The use of nano-sized magnetic particles could improve the separation efficiency of bacteria but require much higher gradient and strength magnetic field. In this study, a strong magnetic bioseparator with a mean field strength of 1.35 T and a mean gradient of 90 T/m was developed with the use of the 30 nm and 180 nm magnetic particles to specifically separate and efficiently concentrate foodborne bacterial pathogens using Escherichia coli O157:H7 as a model bacterium. The polyclonal antibodies against E. coli were evaluated using Dot ELISA analysis for their good affinity with the target bacteria and then used to modify the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles by 1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC·HCl) method and streptavidin-biotin binding. The magnetic particle concentrations were optimized to be 40 µg/ml and 100 µg/ml for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively, the immunoreaction time was optimized to be 45 min for both sizes of particles, and the separation times were optimized to be 60 min and 2 min for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively. The total magnetic separation time was 2 h and 1 h for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that the bioseparator with the use of either 30 nm or 180 nm immunomagnetic particles could achieve a separation efficiency of >90% for E. coli O157:H7 at the concentrations ranging from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 5} cfu/ml. No obvious interferences from non-target foodborne pathogens, such as SalmonellaTyphimurium and Listeria innocua, were found. For overall consideration of the consuming time, the cost, and the separation efficiency, the 180 nm magnetic particles are

  10. Size-regulated group separation of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles using centrifuge and their magnetic resonance contrast properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jongeun; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Young-Nam; Yeom, Areum; Jeong, Heejeong; Lim, Yong Taik; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) have been the subject of extensive research over recent decades. The particle size of MNPs varies widely and is known to influence their physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. There are two commonly used methods for synthesizing MNPs, organometallic and aqueous solution coprecipitation. The former has the advantage of being able to control the particle size more effectively; however, the resulting particles require a hydrophilic coating in order to be rendered water soluble. The MNPs produced using the latter method are intrinsically water soluble, but they have a relatively wide particle size distribution. Size-controlled water-soluble MNPs have great potential as MRI CAs and in cell sorting and labeling applications. In the present study, we synthesized CoFe2O4 MNPs using an aqueous solution coprecipitation method. The MNPs were subsequently separated into four groups depending on size, by the use of centrifugation at different speeds. The crystal shapes and size distributions of the particles in the four groups were measured and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using X-ray diffraction analysis, the MNPs were found to have an inverse spinel structure. Four MNP groups with well-selected semi-Gaussian-like diameter distributions were obtained, with measured T2 relaxivities ( r 2) at 4.7 T and room temperature in the range of 60 to 300 mM-1s-1, depending on the particle size. This size regulation method has great promise for applications that require homogeneous-sized MNPs made by an aqueous solution coprecipitation method. Any group of the CoFe2O4 MNPs could be used as initial base cores of MRI T2 CAs, with almost unique T2 relaxivity owing to size regulation. The methodology reported here opens up many possibilities for biosensing applications and disease diagnosis.

  11. Targeting high value metals in lithium-ion battery recycling via shredding and size-based separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Gaustad, Gabrielle; Babbitt, Callie W

    2016-05-01

    Development of lithium-ion battery recycling systems is a current focus of much research; however, significant research remains to optimize the process. One key area not studied is the utilization of mechanical pre-recycling steps to improve overall yield. This work proposes a pre-recycling process, including mechanical shredding and size-based sorting steps, with the goal of potential future scale-up to the industrial level. This pre-recycling process aims to achieve material segregation with a focus on the metallic portion and provide clear targets for subsequent recycling processes. The results show that contained metallic materials can be segregated into different size fractions at different levels. For example, for lithium cobalt oxide batteries, cobalt content has been improved from 35% by weight in the metallic portion before this pre-recycling process to 82% in the ultrafine (6mm). However, size fractions across multiple battery chemistries showed significant variability in material concentration. This finding indicates that sorting by cathode before pre-treatment could reduce the uncertainty of input materials and therefore improve the purity of output streams. Thus, battery labeling systems may be an important step towards implementation of any pre-recycling process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tunable Rare Earth fcu-MOF Platform: Access to Adsorption Kinetics Driven Gas/Vapor Separations via Pore Size Contraction

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Dongxu; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shekhah, Osama; Jiang, Hao; Adil, Karim; Cairns, Amy J; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Reticular chemistry approach was successfully employed to deliberately construct new rare-earth (RE, i.e. Eu3+, Tb3+ and Y3+) fcu metal‒organic frameworks (MOFs) with restricted window apertures. Controlled and selective access to the resultant contracted fcu-MOF pores permits the achievement of the requisite sorbate cut-off ideal for selective adsorption kinetics separation and/or molecular sieving of gases and vapors. Predetermined reaction conditions that permitted the formation in-situ of the 12-connected RE hexanuclear molecular building block (MBB) and the establishment of the RE-fcu-MOF plat-form, especially in the presence of 2-fluorobenzoic acid (2-FBA) as a modulator and a structure directing agent, were used to synthesize isostructural RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOFs based on a relatively bulkier 2-connected bridging ligand, namely 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate (1,4-NDC). The subsequent RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOF structural features, contracted windows/pores and high concentration of open metal sites combined with exceptional hydrothermal and chemical stabilities, yielded nota-ble gas/solvent separation properties, driven mostly by adsorption kinetics as exemplified in this work for n-butane/methane, butanol/methanol and butanol/water pair systems.

  13. Tunable Rare Earth fcu-MOF Platform: Access to Adsorption Kinetics Driven Gas/Vapor Separations via Pore Size Contraction

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Dongxu

    2015-03-31

    Reticular chemistry approach was successfully employed to deliberately construct new rare-earth (RE, i.e. Eu3+, Tb3+ and Y3+) fcu metal‒organic frameworks (MOFs) with restricted window apertures. Controlled and selective access to the resultant contracted fcu-MOF pores permits the achievement of the requisite sorbate cut-off ideal for selective adsorption kinetics separation and/or molecular sieving of gases and vapors. Predetermined reaction conditions that permitted the formation in-situ of the 12-connected RE hexanuclear molecular building block (MBB) and the establishment of the RE-fcu-MOF plat-form, especially in the presence of 2-fluorobenzoic acid (2-FBA) as a modulator and a structure directing agent, were used to synthesize isostructural RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOFs based on a relatively bulkier 2-connected bridging ligand, namely 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate (1,4-NDC). The subsequent RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOF structural features, contracted windows/pores and high concentration of open metal sites combined with exceptional hydrothermal and chemical stabilities, yielded nota-ble gas/solvent separation properties, driven mostly by adsorption kinetics as exemplified in this work for n-butane/methane, butanol/methanol and butanol/water pair systems.

  14. Tunable Rare Earth fcu-MOF Platform: Access to Adsorption Kinetics Driven Gas/Vapor Separations via Pore Size Contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dong-Xu; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shekhah, Osama; Jiang, Hao; Adil, Karim; Cairns, Amy J; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-04-22

    Reticular chemistry approach was successfully employed to deliberately construct new rare-earth (RE, i.e., Eu(3+), Tb(3+), and Y(3+)) fcu metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with restricted window apertures. Controlled and selective access to the resultant contracted fcu-MOF pores permits the achievement of the requisite sorbate cutoff, ideal for selective adsorption kinetics based separation and/or molecular sieving of gases and vapors. Predetermined reaction conditions that permitted the formation in situ of the 12-connected RE hexanuclear molecular building block (MBB) and the establishment of the first RE-fcu-MOF platform, especially in the presence of 2-fluorobenzoic acid (2-FBA) as a modulator and a structure directing agent, were used to synthesize isostructural RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOFs based on a relatively bulkier 2-connected bridging ligand, namely 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate (1,4-NDC). The subsequent RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOF structural features, contracted windows/pores and high concentration of open metal sites combined with exceptional hydrothermal and chemical stabilities, yielded notable gas/solvent separation properties, driven mostly by adsorption kinetics as exemplified in this work for n-butane/methane, butanol/methanol, and butanol/water pair systems.

  15. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Martin O L

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design a classical pitch and torque regulator to control rotational speed and power, while the section on structural dynamics has been extended with a simplified mechanical system explaining the phenomena of forward and backward whirling modes. Readers will also benefit from a new chapter on Vertical Axis W

  16. Aeroelastic Limit-Cycle Oscillations resulting from Aerodynamic Non-Linearities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, A.C.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Aerodynamic non-linearities, such as shock waves, boundary layer separation or boundary layer transition, may cause an amplitude limitation of the oscillations induced by the fluid flow around a structure. These aeroelastic limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs) resulting from aerodynamic non-linearities

  17. Microparticle Separation by Cyclonic Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karback, Keegan; Leith, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    The ability to separate particles based on their size has wide ranging applications from the industrial to the medical. Currently, cyclonic separators are primarily used in agriculture and manufacturing to syphon out contaminates or products from an air supply. This has led us to believe that cyclonic separation has more applications than the agricultural and industrial. Using the OpenFoam computational package, we were able to determine the flow parameters of a vortex in a cyclonic separator in order to segregate dust particles to a cutoff size of tens of nanometers. To test the model, we constructed an experiment to separate a test dust of various sized particles. We filled a chamber with Arizona test dust and utilized an acoustic suspension technique to segregate particles finer than a coarse cutoff size and introduce them into the cyclonic separation apparatus where they were further separated via a vortex following our computational model. The size of the particles separated from this experiment will be used to further refine our model. Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado University of Denver, Dr. Randall Tagg, Dr. Richard Krantz.

  18. Aerodynamic Optimization Design of a Multistage Centrifugal Steam Turbine and Its Off-Design Performance Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Li; Dian-Gui Huang

    2017-01-01

    Centrifugal turbine which has less land occupation, simple structure, and high aerodynamic efficiency is suitable to be used as small to medium size steam turbines or waste heat recovery plant. In this paper, one-dimensional design of a multistage centrifugal steam turbine was performed by using in-house one-dimensional aerodynamic design program. In addition, three-dimensional numerical simulation was also performed in order to analyze design and off-design aerodynamic performance of the pro...

  19. Aerodynamic design of the National Rotor Testbed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Christopher Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A new wind turbine blade has been designed for the National Rotor Testbed (NRT) project and for future experiments at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility with a specific focus on scaled wakes. This report shows the aerodynamic design of new blades that can produce a wake that has similitude to utility scale blades despite the difference in size and location in the atmospheric boundary layer. Dimensionless quantities circulation, induction, thrust coefficient, and tip-speed-ratio were kept equal between rotor scales in region 2 of operation. The new NRT design matched the aerodynamic quantities of the most common wind turbine in the United States, the GE 1.5sle turbine with 37c model blades. The NRT blade design is presented along with its performance subject to the winds at SWiFT. The design requirements determined by the SWiFT experimental test campaign are shown to be met.

  20. Numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, V.L.; Ballhaus, W.F. Jr.; Bailey, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program is designed to provide a leading-edge computational capability to the aerospace community. It was recognized early in the program that, in addition to more advanced computers, the entire computational process ranging from problem formulation to publication of results needed to be improved to realize the full impact of computational aerodynamics. Therefore, the NAS Program has been structured to focus on the development of a complete system that can be upgraded periodically with minimum impact on the user and on the inventory of applications software. The implementation phase of the program is now under way. It is based upon nearly 8 yr of study and should culminate in an initial operational capability before 1986. The objective of this paper is fivefold: 1) to discuss the factors motivating the NAS program, 2) to provide a history of the activity, 3) to describe each of the elements of the processing-system network, 4) to outline the proposed allocation of time to users of the facility, and 5) to describe some of the candidate problems being considered for the first benchmark codes

  1. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  2. Ion exchange separation of plutonium and gallium (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent, and (3) facility size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, S.

    1997-01-01

    The following report summarizes an effort intended to estimate within an order-of-magnitude the (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent amounts, and (3) facility size, for ion exchange (IX) separation of plutonium and gallium. This analysis is based upon processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr. The technical basis for this summary is detailed in a separate document, open-quotes Preconceptual Design for Separation of Plutonium and Gallium by Ion Exchangeclose quotes. The material balances of this separate document are based strictly on stoichiometric amounts rather than details of actual operating experience, in order to avoid classification as Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This approximation neglets the thermodynamics and kinetics which can significantly impact the amount of reagents required. Consequently, the material resource requirements and waste amounts presented here would normally be considered minimums for processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr; however, the author has compared the inventory estimates presented with that of an actual operating facility and found them similar. Additionally, the facility floor space presented here is based upon actual plutonium processing systems and can be considered a nominal estimate

  3. Influence of the weighing bar size to determine optimal time of biodiesel-glycerol separation by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambun, R.; Sibagariang, Y.; Manurung, J.

    2018-02-01

    The buoyancy weighing-bar method is a novel method in the particle size distribution measurement. This method can measure particle size distributions of the settling particles and floating particles. In this study, the buoyancy weighing-bar method is applied to determine optimal time of biodiesel-glycerol separation. The buoyancy weighing-bar method can be applied to determine the separation time because biodiesel and glycerol have the different densities. The influences of diameter of weighing-bar by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method would be experimentally investigated. The diameters of weighing-bar in this experiment are 8 mm, 10 mm, 15 mm and 20 mm, while the graduated cylinder (diameter : 65 mm) is used as vessel. The samples used in this experiment are the mixture of 95 % of biodiesel and 5 % of glycerol. The data obtained by the buoyancy weighing-bar method are analized by using the gas chromatography to determine the purity of biodiesel. Based on the data obtained, the buoyancy weighing-bar method can be used to detect the separation time of biodiesel-glycerol by using the weighing-bar diameter of 8 mm, 10 mm, 15 mm and 20 mm, but the most accuracy in determination the biodiesel-glycerol separation time is obtained by using the weighing-bar diameter of 20 mm. The biodiesel purity of 97.97 % could be detected at 64 minutes by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method when the weighing-bar diameter of 20 mm is used.

  4. Multistage-multiorifice flow fractionation (MS-MOFF): continuous size-based separation of microspheres using multiple series of contraction/expansion microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Tae Seok; Kwon, Kiho; Park, Jae Chan; Lee, Jeong-Gun; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2011-01-07

    Previously we introduced a novel hydrodynamic method using a multi-orifice microchannel for size-based particle separation, which is called a multi-orifice flow fractionation (MOFF). The MOFF has several advantages such as continuous, non-intrusive, and minimal power consumption. However, it has a limitation that the recovery yield is relatively low. Although the recovery may be increased by adjusting parameters such as the Reynolds number and central collecting region, poor purity inevitably followed. We newly designed and fabricated a microfluidic channel for multi-stage multi-orifice flow fractionation (MS-MOFF), which is made by combining three multi-orifice segments, and consists of 3 inlets, 3 filters, 3 multi-orifice segments and 5 outlets. The structure and dimensions of the MS-MOFF were determined by the hydrodynamic principles to have constant Reynolds numbers at each multi-orifice segment. Polystyrene microspheres of two different sizes (7 μm and 15 μm) were tested. With this device, we made an attempt to improve recovery and minimize loss of purity by collecting and re-separating non-selected particles of the first separation. The final recovery successfully increased from 73.2% to 88.7% while the final purity slightly decreased from 91.4% to 89.1% (for 15 μm). These values were never achievable with the single-stage MOFF (SS-MOFF) having only one multi-orifice segment in our previous work. The MS-MOFF channel will be useful for clinical applications, such as separation of circulating tumor cells (CTC) or rare cells from human blood samples.

  5. Test-retest reliability for aerodynamic measures of voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Shaheen N; Novaleski, Carolyn K; Yingling, Julie R

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intrasubject reliability of aerodynamic characteristics of the voice within typical/normal speakers across testing sessions using the Phonatory Aerodynamic System (PAS 6600; KayPENTAX, Montvale, NJ). Participants were 60 healthy young adults (30 males and 30 females) between the ages 18 and 31 years with perceptually typical voice. Participants were tested using the PAS 6600 (Phonatory Aerodynamic System) on two separate days with approximately 1 week between each session at approximately the same time of day. Four PAS protocols were conducted (vital capacity, maximum sustained phonation, comfortable sustained phonation, and voicing efficiency) and measures of expiratory volume, maximum phonation time, mean expiratory airflow (during vowel production) and target airflow (obtained via syllable repetition), peak air pressure, aerodynamic power, aerodynamic resistance, and aerodynamic efficiency were obtained during each testing session. Associated acoustic measures of vocal intensity and frequency were also collected. All phonations were elicited at comfortable pitch and loudness. All aerodynamic and associated variables evaluated in this study showed useable test-retest reliability (ie, intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs] ≥ 0.60). A high degree of mean test-retest reliability was found across all subjects for aerodynamic and associated acoustic measurements of vital capacity, maximum sustained phonation, glottal resistance, and vocal intensity (all with ICCs > 0.75). Although strong ICCs were observed for measures of glottal power and mean expiratory airflow in males, weaker overall results for these measures (ICC range: 0.60-0.67) were observed in females subjects and sizable coefficients of variation were observed for measures of power, resistance, and efficiency in both men and women. Differences in degree of reliability from measure to measure were revealed in greater detail using methods such as ICCs and

  6. Influence of Different Diffuser Angle on Sedan's Aerodynamic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingjun; Zhang, Rui; Ye, Jian; Yan, Xu; Zhao, Zhiming

    The aerodynamic characteristics have a great influence on the fuel economics and the steering stability of a high speed vehicle. The underbody rear diffuser is one of important aerodynamic add-on devices. The parameters of the diffuser, including the diffuser angle, the number and the shape of separators, the shape of the end plate and etc, will affect the underbody flow and the wake. Here, just the influence of the diffuser angle was investigated without separator and the end plate. The method of Computational Fluid Dynamics was adopted to study the aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified sedan with a different diffuser angle respectively. The diffuser angle was set to 0°, 3°, 6°, 9.8° and 12° respectively. The diffuser angle of the original model is 9.8°. The conclusions were drawn that when the diffuser angle increases, the underbody flow and especially the wake change greatly and the pressure change correspondingly; as a result, the total aerodynamic drag coefficients of car first decrease and then increases, while the total aerodynamic lift coefficients decrease.

  7. Comparison of the microdosimetric event-size method and the twin-chamber method of separating dose into neutron and gamma components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Skaggs, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    Microdosimetric measurements of event-size spectra, made with a proportional counter, are being used increasingly for separation of dose components in mixed n-γ fields. Measurements in fields produced by 8.3 MeV deuteron bombardment of thick beryllium and deuterium targets were made in air and at 6 and 12 cm depth in water with a spherical tissue-equivalent (TE) proportional counter and with a pair of calibrated ion chambers (TE-TE and Mg-Ar). The dose results obtained with the two methods agree well for the neutron components, but the gamma components do not demonstrate consistent agreement. An important source of error in the microdosimetric method is the matching of the spectra measured at different gain settings to cover the large range of event sizes. The effect of this and other sources of error is analysed. (author)

  8. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating rates ...

  9. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating ratesto the ...

  10. Darrieus rotor aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, P. C.

    1982-05-01

    A summary of the progress of modeling the aerodynamic effects on the blades of a Darrieus wind turbine is presented. Interference is discussed in terms of blade/blade wake interaction and improvements in single and multiple stream tube models, of vortex simulations of blades and their wakes, and a hybrid momentum/vortex code to combine fast computation time with interference-describing capabilities. An empirical model has been developed for treating the properties of dynamic stall such as airfoil geometry, Reynolds number, reduced frequency, angle-of-attack, and Mach number. Pitching circulation has been subjected to simulation as potential flow about a two-dimensional flat plate, along with applications of the concepts of virtual camber and virtual incidence, with a cambered airfoil operating in a rectilinear flowfield. Finally, a need to develop a loading model suitable for nonsymmetrical blade sections is indicated, as well as blade behavior in a dynamic, curvilinear regime.

  11. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  12. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design...... Turbines (VAWT). Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element Momentum method...... is also covered, as are eigenmodes and the dynamic behaviour of a turbine. The book describes the effects of the dynamics and how this can be modelled in an aeroelastic code, which is widely used in the design and verification of modern wind turbines. Furthermore, it examines how to calculate...

  13. Introduction to transonic aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Written to teach students the nature of transonic flow and its mathematical foundation, this book offers a much-needed introduction to transonic aerodynamics. The authors present a quantitative and qualitative assessment of subsonic, supersonic, and transonic flow around bodies in two and three dimensions. The book reviews the governing equations and explores their applications and limitations as employed in modeling and computational fluid dynamics.  Some concepts, such as shock and expansion theory, are examined from a numerical perspective. Others, including shock-boundary-layer interaction, are discussed from a qualitative point of view. The book includes 60 examples and more than 200 practice problems. The authors also offer analytical methods such as Method of Characteristics (MOC) that allow readers to practice with the subject matter.  The result is a wealth of insight into transonic flow phenomena and their impact on aircraft design, including compressibility effects, shock and expansion waves, sho...

  14. Cable Aerodynamic Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, Kenneth

    to a categorization of the different control technics together with an identification of two key mechanisms for reduction of the design drag force. During this project extensive experimental work examining the aerodynamics of the currently used cable surface modifications together with new innovative proposals have...... been conducted. The two current prevailing systems consisting of helically filleted cables and cables with a pattern-indented surface were directly compared under the same conditions and both applications were found with attractive properties. The pattern-indented surface maintained a low supercritical...... of reducing the intensity of the axial flow and disrupting the near wake flow structures. Similar studies during wet conditions with artificial simulation of light rain in the wind tunnel showed that the plain cable suffered from severe rain-wind induced vibrations. But despite the presence of both upper...

  15. Reciprocity relations in aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslet, Max A; Spreiter, John R

    1953-01-01

    Reverse flow theorems in aerodynamics are shown to be based on the same general concepts involved in many reciprocity theorems in the physical sciences. Reciprocal theorems for both steady and unsteady motion are found as a logical consequence of this approach. No restrictions on wing plan form or flight Mach number are made beyond those required in linearized compressible-flow analysis. A number of examples are listed, including general integral theorems for lifting, rolling, and pitching wings and for wings in nonuniform downwash fields. Correspondence is also established between the buildup of circulation with time of a wing starting impulsively from rest and the buildup of lift of the same wing moving in the reverse direction into a sharp-edged gust.

  16. Aerodynamic instabilities in governing valves of steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, J.M.; Pluviose, M.

    1991-01-01

    The capacity of a.c. turbogenerators in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is regulated by means of governing valves located at the inlet of the high-pressure turbine. The conditions created in these valves (due to the throttling of the steam) involve the generation of a jet structure, possibly supersonic. Aerodynamic instabilities could potentially excite the mechanical structure. These aerodynamic phenomena are studied in this paper by means of a two-dimensional numerical model. Viscous effects are taken into account with heuristic criteria on separation and reattachment. Detailed experimental analysis of the flow behaviour is compared with the numerical prediction of stability limits. (Author)

  17. Aerodynamics profile not in stationary flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Загорулько

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available  Consider the question about influence of unsteady flight on the size of drag and lift coefficients of theaerodynamic profile. Distinctive features of this investigation are obtaining data about aerodynamic drag chancing in process unsteady on high angle at attack and oscillation profile in subsonic and transonic flight. Given analysis of oscillation profile show, that dynamic loops accompany change of lift and dray force. The researches show that it is necessary to clarity the mathematic model of the airplane flight dynamics by introducing numbers, with take into account unsteady effects.

  18. Fundamentals of modern unsteady aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gülçat, Ülgen

    2010-01-01

    This introduction to the principles of unsteady aerodynamics covers all the core concepts, provides readers with a review of the fundamental physics, terminology and basic equations, and covers hot new topics such as the use of flapping wings for propulsion.

  19. Naval Aerodynamics Test Facility (NATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NATF specializes in Aerodynamics testing of scaled and fullsized Naval models, research into flow physics found on US Navy planes and ships, aerosol testing and...

  20. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an entry and descent technology to enhance and enable robotic and scientific missions to destinations with atmospheres.The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic...

  1. Introduction to wind turbine aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffarczyk, Alois Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wind-Turbine Aerodynamics is a self-contained textbook which shows how to come from the basics of fluid mechanics to modern wind turbine blade design. It presents a fundamentals of fluid dynamics and inflow conditions, and gives a extensive introduction into theories describing the aerodynamics of wind turbines. After introducing experiments the book applies the knowledge to explore the impact on blade design.The book is an introduction for professionals and students of very varying levels.

  2. Dynamic soaring: aerodynamics for albatrosses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio L/D, albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant L/D. Analytic solutions to the simplified equations provide an instructive and appealing example of fixed-wing aerodynamics suitable for undergraduate demonstration

  3. Aerodynamical calculation of turbomachinery bladings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruehauf, H.H.

    1978-01-01

    Various flow models are presented in comparison to one another, these flow models being obtained from the basic equations of turbomachinery aerodynamics by means of a series of simplifying assumptions on the spatial distribution of the flow quantities. The simplifying assumptions are analysed precisely. With their knowledge it is possible to construct more accurate simplified flow models, which are necessary for the efficient aerodynamical development of highperformance turbomachinery bladings by means of numerical methods. (orig.) 891 HP [de

  4. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird. Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust – two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc., and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  5. Wind turbine aerodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.A. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Wind Energy Group

    2010-07-01

    The need for clean, renewable electricity in remote communities of Canada and the world was discussed in this presentation. The University of Waterloo Wind Energy Laboratory (WEL) performs research in a large scale indoor environment on wind turbines, blade aerodynamics, and aeroacoustics. A key area of research involves developing turbines for remote off-grid communities where climatic conditions are challenging. This presentation outlined research that is underway on wind energy and off-grid renewable energy systems. Many communities in Canada and remote communities in the rest of the world are not connected to the grid and are dependent on other means to supply electrical energy to their community. Remote communities in northern Canada have no road access and diesel is the dominant source of electrical energy for these communities. All of the community supply of diesel comes from brief winter road access or by air. The presentation discussed existing diesel systems and the solution of developing local renewable energy sources such as wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal, and solar power. Research goals, wind energy activities, experimental equipment, and the results were also presented. Research projects have been developed in wind energy; hydrogen generation/storage/utilization; power electronics/microgrid; and community engagement. figs.

  6. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  7. The space shuttle ascent vehicle aerodynamic challenges configuration design and data base development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, C. C.; Young, J. C.; Roberts, B. B.; Craig, M. K.; Hamilton, J. T.; Boyle, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    The phase B Space Shuttle systems definition studies resulted in a generic configuration consisting of a delta wing orbiter, and two solid rocket boosters (SRB) attached to an external fuel tank (ET). The initial challenge facing the aerodynamic community was aerodynamically optimizing, within limits, this configuration. As the Shuttle program developed and the sensitivities of the vehicle to aerodynamics were better understood the requirements of the aerodynamic data base grew. Adequately characterizing the vehicle to support the various design studies exploded the size of the data base to proportions that created a data modeling/management challenge for the aerodynamicist. The ascent aerodynamic data base originated primarily from wind tunnel test results. The complexity of the configuration rendered conventional analytic methods of little use. Initial wind tunnel tests provided results which included undesirable effects from model support tructure, inadequate element proximity, and inadequate plume simulation. The challenge to improve the quality of test results by determining the extent of these undesirable effects and subsequently develop testing techniques to eliminate them was imposed on the aerodynamic community. The challenges to the ascent aerodynamics community documented are unique due to the aerodynamic complexity of the Shuttle launch. Never before was such a complex vehicle aerodynamically characterized. The challenges were met with innovative engineering analyses/methodology development and wind tunnel testing techniques.

  8. Investigation of Aerodynamic Capabilities of Flying Fish in Gliding Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Choi, H.

    In the present study, we experimentally investigate the aerodynamic capabilities of flying fish. We consider four different flying fish models, which are darkedged-wing flying fishes stuffed in actual gliding posture. Some morphological parameters of flying fish such as lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins, incidence angles of pectoral and pelvic fins are considered to examine their effect on the aerodynamic performance. We directly measure the aerodynamic properties (lift, drag, and pitching moment) for different morphological parameters of flying fish models. For the present flying fish models, the maximum lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio are similar to those of medium-sized birds such as the vulture, nighthawk and petrel. The pectoral fins are found to enhance the lift-to-drag ratio and the longitudinal static stability of gliding flight. On the other hand, the lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio decrease with increasing lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins.

  9. Aerodynamic Characteristic of the Active Compliant Trailing Edge Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Rui; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli; Li, Dawei

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel Morphing Wing structure known as the Active Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE). ACTE structures are designed using the concept of “distributed compliance” and wing skins of ACTE are fabricated from high-strength fiberglass composites laminates. Through the relative sliding between upper and lower wing skins which are connected by a linear guide pairs, the wing is able to achieve a large continuous deformation. In order to present an investigation about aerodynamics and noise characteristics of ACTE, a series of 2D airfoil analyses are established. The aerodynamic characteristics between ACTE and conventional deflection airfoil are analyzed and compared, and the impacts of different ACTE structure design parameters on aerodynamic characteristics are discussed. The airfoils mentioned above include two types (NACA0012 and NACA64A005.92). The computing results demonstrate that: compared with the conventional plane flap airfoil, the morphing wing using ACTE structures has the capability to improve aerodynamic characteristic and flow separation characteristic. In order to study the noise level of ACTE, flow field analysis using LES model is done to provide noise source data, and then the FW-H method is used to get the far field noise levels. The simulation results show that: compared with the conventional flap/aileron airfoil, the ACTE configuration is better to suppress the flow separation and lower the overall sound pressure level.

  10. Behaviour of non-spherical particles in the TSI aerodynamic particle sizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, I.A.

    1991-02-01

    The TSI Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS33B) is a real-time monitor which is capable of measuring aerosols in terms of this most relevant size parameter for the assessment of occupational risk. The influence of particle shape on APS33B performance has been investigated using a range of monodisperse, regular-shaped and non-porous solid particles in the size range from about 6 to 14 μm aerodynamic diameter. (author)

  11. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan

    , and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the current version......The meshless and remeshed Discrete Vortex Method (DVM) has been widely used in academia and by the industry to model two-dimensional flow around bluff bodies. The implementation “DVMFLOW” [1] is used by the bridge design company COWI to determine and visualise the flow field around bridge sections...

  12. Unsteady effects in flows past stationary airfoils with Gurney flaps due to unsteady flow separations at low Reynolds numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Dan MATEESCU

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the unsteady flows past stationary airfoils equipped with Gurney flaps at low Reynolds numbers, aiming to study the unsteady behavior of the aerodynamic coefficients due to the flow separations occurring at these Reynolds numbers. The Gurney flaps are simple but very efficient lift-increasing devices, which due to their mechanical simplicity are of particular interest for the small size micro-air-vehicles (MAV) flying at low speed and very low Reynolds numb...

  13. Fundamentals of modern unsteady aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gülçat, Ülgen

    2016-01-01

    In this book, the author introduces the concept of unsteady aerodynamics and its underlying principles. He provides the readers with a comprehensive review of the fundamental physics of free and forced unsteadiness, the terminology and basic equations of aerodynamics ranging from incompressible flow to hypersonics. The book also covers modern topics related to the developments made in recent years, especially in relation to wing flapping for propulsion. The book is written for graduate and senior year undergraduate students in aerodynamics and also serves as a reference for experienced researchers. Each chapter includes ample examples, questions, problems and relevant references.   The treatment of these modern topics has been completely revised end expanded for the new edition. It now includes new numerical examples, a section on the ground effect, and state-space representation.

  14. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  15. The aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels

    2013-01-01

    In the paper we present state-of-the-art of research in wind turbine aerodynamics. We start be giving a brief historical review and a survey over aerodynamic research in wind energy. Next, we focus on some recent research results obtained by our wind energy group at Department of Mechanical...... Engineering at DTU. In particular, we show some new results on the classical problem of the ideal rotor and present a series of new results from an on-going research project dealing with the modelling and simulation of turbulent flow structures in the wake behind wind turbines....

  16. Bifurcation Analysis with Aerodynamic-Structure Uncertainties by the Nonintrusive PCE Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linpeng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An aeroelastic model for airfoil with a third-order stiffness in both pitch and plunge degree of freedom (DOF and the modified Leishman–Beddoes (LB model were built and validated. The nonintrusive polynomial chaos expansion (PCE based on tensor product is applied to quantify the uncertainty of aerodynamic and structure parameters on the aerodynamic force and aeroelastic behavior. The uncertain limit cycle oscillation (LCO and bifurcation are simulated in the time domain with the stochastic PCE method. Bifurcation diagrams with uncertainties were quantified. The Monte Carlo simulation (MCS is also applied for comparison. From the current work, it can be concluded that the nonintrusive polynomial chaos expansion can give an acceptable accuracy and have a much higher calculation efficiency than MCS. For aerodynamic model, uncertainties of aerodynamic parameters affect the aerodynamic force significantly at the stage from separation to stall at upstroke and at the stage from stall to reattach at return. For aeroelastic model, both uncertainties of aerodynamic parameters and structure parameters impact bifurcation position. Structure uncertainty of parameters is more sensitive for bifurcation. When the nonlinear stall flutter and bifurcation are concerned, more attention should be paid to the separation process of aerodynamics and parameters about pitch DOF in structure.

  17. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics : Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second

  18. Ground effect aerodynamics of racing cars

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xin; Toet, Willem; Zerihan, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    We review the progress made during the last thirty years on ground effect aerodynamics associated with race cars, in particular open wheel race cars. Ground effect aerodynamics of race cars is concerned with generating downforce, principally via low pressure on the surfaces nearest to the ground. The “ground effected” parts of an open wheeled car's aerodynamics are the most aerodynamically efficient and contribute less drag than that associated with, for example, an upper rear wing. Whilst dr...

  19. Aerodynamic Aspects of Wind Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the most important aerodynamic research topics in the field of wind energy. Wind turbine aerodynamics concerns the modeling and prediction of aerodynamic forces, such as performance predictions of wind farms, and the design of specific parts of wind turbines, such as rotor...

  20. Wind Turbine Aerodynamics from an Aerospace Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Garrel, Arne; ten Pas, Sebastiaan; Venner, Cornelis H.; van Muijden, Jaap

    2018-01-01

    The current challenges in wind turbine aerodynamics simulations share a number of similarities with the challenges that the aerospace industry has faced in the past. Some of the current challenges in the aerospace aerodynamics community are also relevant for today’s wind turbine aerodynamics

  1. Combination of size selective binding ability of 18-crown-6 dissolved in aqueous phase and extractive properties of an amic acid; toward enhancement of rare earths separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safarbali, Reyhaneh; Yaftian, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbanloo, Massomeh [Zanjan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). PhaseEquilibria Research Lab.; Zamani, Abbasali [Zanjan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Environmental Science Research Lab.

    2016-11-15

    The separation of La(III), Eu(III) and Er(III) ions by an amic acid, N,N-dioctyldiglycolamic acid (HL), dissolved in carbon tetrachloride has been improved in the presence of 18-crown-6 (18C6) in aqueous phase as a selective masking agent. The interaction between the studied metal ions and 18C6 resulted a shift in the extraction curve of the studied metal ions versus pH toward higher pH region. The displacement of the extraction curves was more pronounced for lanthanum ions and was varied as La(III) > Eu(III) > Er(III). This order of complexing ability of 18C6 toward the studied ions was attributed to the size adaptation of the ions and that of the crown ether cavity. The stability constants of the lanthanide-crown ether complexes in aqueous phase were evaluated. The influence of temperature on the extraction of studied metal ions from aqueous phase in the absence and the presence of 18C6 was tested in the range 298-308 K. This investigation allowed evaluating the thermodynamic parameters associated with the extraction process and those of the complexation of cations by 18C6 in the aqueous phase.

  2. [Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Mora, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    By accelerating a gas containing suspended particles or large molecules through a converging nozzle, the suspended species may be focused and therefore used to write fine lines on a surface. Our objective was to study the limits on how narrow this focal region could be as a function of particle size. We find that, for monodisperse particles with masses m p some 3.6 x 10 5 times larger than the molecular mass m of the carrier gas (diameters above some 100 angstrom), there is no fundamental obstacle to directly write submicron features. However, this conclusion has been verified experimentally only with particles larger than 0.1 μm. Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies on the defocusing role of Brownian motion for very small particles or heavy molecules have shown that high resolution (purely aerodynamic) focusing is impossible with volatile molecules whose masses are typically smaller than 1000 Dalton. For these, the minimal focal diameter after optimization appears to be 5√(m/m p ) times the nozzle diameter d n . But combinations of focused lasers and aerodynamic focusing appear as promising for direct writing with molecular precursors. Theoretical and numerical schemes capable of predicting the evolution of the focusing beam, including Brownian motion effects, have been developed, although further numerical work would be desirable. 11 refs

  3. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  4. The aerodynamics of sailing apparel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.J.; Van Deursen, B.; Howe, C.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the effect of changes in sailing apparel on aerodynamic drag, starting from the assumption that drag reduction of sailing apparel will increase the speed of an Olympic class sailing boat (in this case the Laser, a single-handed Olympic dinghy), mainly on upwind courses. Due to the

  5. Diving-flight aerodynamics of a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ponitz

    Full Text Available This study investigates the aerodynamics of the falcon Falco peregrinus while diving. During a dive peregrines can reach velocities of more than 320 km h⁻¹. Unfortunately, in freely roaming falcons, these high velocities prohibit a precise determination of flight parameters such as velocity and acceleration as well as body shape and wing contour. Therefore, individual F. peregrinus were trained to dive in front of a vertical dam with a height of 60 m. The presence of a well-defined background allowed us to reconstruct the flight path and the body shape of the falcon during certain flight phases. Flight trajectories were obtained with a stereo high-speed camera system. In addition, body images of the falcon were taken from two perspectives with a high-resolution digital camera. The dam allowed us to match the high-resolution images obtained from the digital camera with the corresponding images taken with the high-speed cameras. Using these data we built a life-size model of F. peregrinus and used it to measure the drag and lift forces in a wind-tunnel. We compared these forces acting on the model with the data obtained from the 3-D flight path trajectory of the diving F. peregrinus. Visualizations of the flow in the wind-tunnel uncovered details of the flow structure around the falcon's body, which suggests local regions with separation of flow. High-resolution pictures of the diving peregrine indicate that feathers pop-up in the equivalent regions, where flow separation in the model falcon occurred.

  6. Aerodynamics and Control of Quadrotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangura, Moses

    Quadrotors are aerial vehicles with a four motor-rotor assembly for generating lift and controllability. Their light weight, ease of design and simple dynamics have increased their use in aerial robotics research. There are many quadrotors that are commercially available or under development. Commercial off-the-shelf quadrotors usually lack the ability to be reprogrammed and are unsuitable for use as research platforms. The open-source code developed in this thesis differs from other open-source systems by focusing on the key performance road blocks in implementing high performance experimental quadrotor platforms for research: motor-rotor control for thrust regulation, velocity and attitude estimation, and control for position regulation and trajectory tracking. In all three of these fundamental subsystems, code sub modules for implementation on commonly available hardware are provided. In addition, the thesis provides guidance on scoping and commissioning open-source hardware components to build a custom quadrotor. A key contribution of the thesis is then a design methodology for the development of experimental quadrotor platforms from open-source or commercial off-the-shelf software and hardware components that have active community support. Quadrotors built following the methodology allows the user access to the operation of the subsystems and, in particular, the user can tune the gains of the observers and controllers in order to push the overall system to its performance limits. This enables the quadrotor framework to be used for a variety of applications such as heavy lifting and high performance aggressive manoeuvres by both the hobby and academic communities. To address the question of thrust control, momentum and blade element theories are used to develop aerodynamic models for rotor blades specific to quadrotors. With the aerodynamic models, a novel thrust estimation and control scheme that improves on existing RPM (revolutions per minute) control of

  7. New processes for uranium isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanstrum, P.R.; Levin, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the status and prospects for processes other than gaseous diffusion, gas centrifuge, and separation nozzle for uranium isotope separation is presented. The incentive for the development of these processes is the increasing requirements for enriched uranium as fuel for nuclear power plants and the potential for reducing the high costs of enrichment. The latest nuclear power projections are converted to uranium enrichment requirements. The size and timing of the market for new enrichment processes are then determined by subtracting the existing and planned uranium enrichment capacities. It is estimated that to supply this market would require the construction of a large new enrichment plant of 9,000,000 SWU per year capacity, costing about $3 billion each (in 1976 dollars) about every year till the year 2000. A very comprehensive review of uranium isotope separation processes was made in 1971 by the Uranium Isotope Separation Review Ad Hoc Committee of the USAEC. Many of the processes discussed in that review are of little current interest. However, because of new approaches or remaining uncertainties about potential, there is considerable effort or continuing interest in a number of alternative processes. The status and prospects for attaining the requirements for competitive economics are presented for these processes, which include laser, chemical exchange, aerodynamic other than separation nozzle, and plasma processes. A qualitative summary comparison of these processes is made with the gaseous diffusion, gas centrifuge, and separation nozzle processes. In order to complete the overview of new processes for uranium isotope separation, a generic program schedule of typical steps beyond the basic process determination which are required, such as subsystem, module, pilot plant, and finally plant construction, before large-scale production can be attained is presented. Also the present value savings through the year 2000 is shown for various

  8. PyFly: A fast, portable aerodynamics simulator

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia, D.; Ghommem, M.; Collier, N.; Varga, B.O.N.; Calo, V.M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a fast, user-friendly implementation of a potential flow solver based on the unsteady vortex lattice method (UVLM), namely PyFly. UVLM computes the aerodynamic loads applied on lifting surfaces while capturing the unsteady effects such as the added mass forces, the growth of bound circulation, and the wake while assuming that the flow separation location is known a priori. This method is based on discretizing the body surface into a lattice of vortex rings and relies on the Biot–Savart law to construct the velocity field at every point in the simulated domain. We introduce the pointwise approximation approach to simulate the interactions of the far-field vortices to overcome the computational burden associated with the classical implementation of UVLM. The computational framework uses the Python programming language to provide an easy to handle user interface while the computational kernels are written in Fortran. The mixed language approach enables high performance regarding solution time and great flexibility concerning easiness of code adaptation to different system configurations and applications. The computational tool predicts the unsteady aerodynamic behavior of multiple moving bodies (e.g., flapping wings, rotating blades, suspension bridges) subject to incoming air. The aerodynamic simulator can also deal with enclosure effects, multi-body interactions, and B-spline representation of body shapes. We simulate different aerodynamic problems to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of PyFly.

  9. PyFly: A fast, portable aerodynamics simulator

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia, D.

    2018-03-18

    We present a fast, user-friendly implementation of a potential flow solver based on the unsteady vortex lattice method (UVLM), namely PyFly. UVLM computes the aerodynamic loads applied on lifting surfaces while capturing the unsteady effects such as the added mass forces, the growth of bound circulation, and the wake while assuming that the flow separation location is known a priori. This method is based on discretizing the body surface into a lattice of vortex rings and relies on the Biot–Savart law to construct the velocity field at every point in the simulated domain. We introduce the pointwise approximation approach to simulate the interactions of the far-field vortices to overcome the computational burden associated with the classical implementation of UVLM. The computational framework uses the Python programming language to provide an easy to handle user interface while the computational kernels are written in Fortran. The mixed language approach enables high performance regarding solution time and great flexibility concerning easiness of code adaptation to different system configurations and applications. The computational tool predicts the unsteady aerodynamic behavior of multiple moving bodies (e.g., flapping wings, rotating blades, suspension bridges) subject to incoming air. The aerodynamic simulator can also deal with enclosure effects, multi-body interactions, and B-spline representation of body shapes. We simulate different aerodynamic problems to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of PyFly.

  10. Mechanism of unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of an elliptic airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of elliptic airfoil are quite different from the case of conventional airfoil for Reynolds number varying from about 104 to 106. In order to reveal the fundamental mechanism, the unsteady flow around a stationary two-dimensional elliptic airfoil with 16% relative thickness has been simulated using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations and the γ-Reθt‾ transition turbulence model at different angles of attack for flow Reynolds number of 5 × 105. The aerodynamic coefficients and the pressure distribution obtained by computation are in good agreement with experimental data, which indicates that the numerical method works well. Through this study, the mechanism of the unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil is analyzed and discussed based on the computational predictions coupled with the wind tunnel results. It is considered that the boundary layer transition at the leading edge and the unsteady flow separation vortices at the trailing edge are the causes of the case. Furthermore, a valuable insight into the physics of how the flow behavior affects the elliptic airfoil’s aerodynamics is provided.

  11. Efficient computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients for aeroelastic analysis on a transputer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janetzke, David C.; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1991-01-01

    Aeroelastic analysis is multi-disciplinary and computationally expensive. Hence, it can greatly benefit from parallel processing. As part of an effort to develop an aeroelastic capability on a distributed memory transputer network, a parallel algorithm for the computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients is implemented on a network of 32 transputers. The aerodynamic influence coefficients are calculated using a 3-D unsteady aerodynamic model and a parallel discretization. Efficiencies up to 85 percent were demonstrated using 32 processors. The effect of subtask ordering, problem size, and network topology are presented. A comparison to results on a shared memory computer indicates that higher speedup is achieved on the distributed memory system.

  12. Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

    1977-12-01

    This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

  13. Sparse grid-based polynomial chaos expansion for aerodynamics of an airfoil with uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing WU

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainties can generate fluctuations with aerodynamic characteristics. Uncertainty Quantification (UQ is applied to compute its impact on the aerodynamic characteristics. In addition, the contribution of each uncertainty to aerodynamic characteristics should be computed by uncertainty sensitivity analysis. Non-Intrusive Polynomial Chaos (NIPC has been successfully applied to uncertainty quantification and uncertainty sensitivity analysis. However, the non-intrusive polynomial chaos method becomes inefficient as the number of random variables adopted to describe uncertainties increases. This deficiency becomes significant in stochastic aerodynamic analysis considering the geometric uncertainty because the description of geometric uncertainty generally needs many parameters. To solve the deficiency, a Sparse Grid-based Polynomial Chaos (SGPC expansion is used to do uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for stochastic aerodynamic analysis considering geometric and operational uncertainties. It is proved that the method is more efficient than non-intrusive polynomial chaos and Monte Carlo Simulation (MSC method for the stochastic aerodynamic analysis. By uncertainty quantification, it can be learnt that the flow characteristics of shock wave and boundary layer separation are sensitive to the geometric uncertainty in transonic region. The uncertainty sensitivity analysis reveals the individual and coupled effects among the uncertainty parameters. Keywords: Non-intrusive polynomial chaos, Sparse grid, Stochastic aerodynamic analysis, Uncertainty sensitivity analysis, Uncertainty quantification

  14. Towards a virtual platform for aerodynamic design, performance assessment and optimization of horizontal axis wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Valdivieso, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study and improvement of the techniques involved on a virtual platform for the simulation of the Aerodynamics of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines, with the ultimate objective of making Wind Energy more competitive. Navier-Stokes equations govern Aerodynamics, which is an unresolved and very active field of research due to the current inability to capture the relevant the scales both in time and space for nowadays industrial-size machines (with rotors over 100 m...

  15. Unsteady effects in flows past stationary airfoils with Gurney flaps due to unsteady flow separations at low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan MATEESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of the unsteady flows past stationary airfoils equipped with Gurney flaps at low Reynolds numbers, aiming to study the unsteady behavior of the aerodynamic coefficients due to the flow separations occurring at these Reynolds numbers. The Gurney flaps are simple but very efficient lift-increasing devices, which due to their mechanical simplicity are of particular interest for the small size micro-air-vehicles (MAV flying at low speed and very low Reynolds number. The unsteady aerodynamic analysis is performed with an efficient time-accurate numerical method developed for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations at low Reynolds numbers, which is second-order-accurate in time and space. The paper presents solutions for the unsteady aerodynamic coefficients of lift and drag and for the lift-to-drag ratio of several symmetric and cambered airfoils with Gurney flaps. It was found that although the airfoil is considered stationary, starting from a relatively small incidence (about 8 degrees the flow becomes unsteady due to the unsteadiness of the flow separations occurring at low Reynolds numbers, and the aerodynamic coefficients display periodic oscillations in time. A detailed study is presented in the paper on the influence of various geometric and flow parameters, such as the Gurney flap height, Reynolds number, airfoil relative thickness and relative camber, on the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag and lift-to-drag ratio. The flow separation is also studied with the aid of flow visualizations illustrating the changes in the flow pattern at various moments in time.

  16. Uncertainty Quantification in Numerical Aerodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander; Matthies, Hermann G.; Liu, Dishi; Schillings, Claudia; Schulz, Volker

    2017-01-01

    In numerical section we compares five methods, including quasi-Monte Carlo quadrature, polynomial chaos with coefficients determined by sparse quadrature and gradient-enhanced version of Kriging, radial basis functions and point collocation polynomial chaos, in their efficiency in estimating statistics of aerodynamic performance upon random perturbation to the airfoil geometry [D.Liu et al '17]. For modeling we used the TAU code, developed in DLR, Germany.

  17. Aerodynamic instability: A case history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The identification, diagnosis, and final correction of complex machinery malfunctions typically require the correlation of many parameters such as mechanical construction, process influence, maintenance history, and vibration response characteristics. The progression is reviewed of field testing, diagnosis, and final correction of a specific machinery instability problem. The case history presented addresses a unique low frequency instability problem on a high pressure barrel compressor. The malfunction was eventually diagnosed as a fluidic mechanism that manifested as an aerodynamic disturbance to the rotor assembly.

  18. Studies on aerodynamic interferences between the components of transport airplane using unstructured Navier-Stokes simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.; Ye, Z.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that the aerodynamic interference flows widely exist between the components of conventional transport airplane, for example, the wing-fuselage juncture flow, wing-pylon-nacelle flow and tail-fuselage juncture flow. The main characteristic of these aerodynamic interferences is flow separation, which will increase the drag, reduce the lift and cause adverse influence on the stability and controllability of the airplane. Therefore, the modern civil transport designers should do their best to eliminate negative effects of aerodynamic interferences, which demands that the aerodynamic interferences between the aircraft components should be predicted and analyzed accurately. Today's CFD techniques provide us powerful and efficient analysis tools to achieve this objective. In this paper, computational investigations of the interferences between transport aircraft components have been carried out by using a viscous flow solver based on mixed element type unstructured meshes. (author)

  19. Aerodynamic Optimization Design of a Multistage Centrifugal Steam Turbine and Its Off-Design Performance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal turbine which has less land occupation, simple structure, and high aerodynamic efficiency is suitable to be used as small to medium size steam turbines or waste heat recovery plant. In this paper, one-dimensional design of a multistage centrifugal steam turbine was performed by using in-house one-dimensional aerodynamic design program. In addition, three-dimensional numerical simulation was also performed in order to analyze design and off-design aerodynamic performance of the proposed centrifugal steam turbine. The results exhibit reasonable flow field and smooth streamline; the aerodynamic performance of the designed turbine meets our initial expectations. These results indicate that the one-dimensional aerodynamic design program is reliable and effective. The off-design aerodynamic performance of centrifugal steam turbine was analyzed, and the results show that the mass flow increases with the decrease of the pressure ratio at a constant speed, until the critical mass flow is reached. The efficiency curve with the pressure ratio has an optimum efficiency point. And the pressure ratio of the optimum efficiency agrees well with that of the one-dimensional design. The shaft power decreases as the pressure ratio increases at a constant speed. Overall, the centrifugal turbine has a wide range and good off-design aerodynamic performance.

  20. Aerodynamic Characteristics of High Speed Trains under Cross Wind Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Wu, S. P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Numerical simulation for the two models in cross-wind was carried out in this paper. The three-dimensional compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations(RANS), combined with the standard k-ɛ turbulence model, were solved on multi-block hybrid grids by second order upwind finite volume technique. The impact of fairing on aerodynamic characteristics of the train models was analyzed. It is shown that, the flow separates on the fairing and a strong vortex is generated, the pressure on the upper middle car decreases dramatically, which leads to a large lift force. The fairing changes the basic patterns around the trains. In addition, formulas of the coefficient of aerodynamic force at small yaw angles up to 24° were expressed.

  1. Aerodynamic Analysis of Trailing Edge Enlarged Wind Turbine Airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Haoran; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2014-01-01

    characteristics of blunt trailing edge airfoils are caused by blunt body vortices at low angles of attack, and by the combined effect of separation and blunt body vortices at large angles of attack. With the increase of thickness of blunt trailing edge, the vibration amplitudes of lift and drag curves increase......The aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils generated from the DU- 91-W2-250, DU-97-W-300 and DU-96-W-350 airfoils by enlarging the thickness of trailing edge symmetrically from the location of maximum thickness to chord to the trailing edge were analyzed by using CFD and RFOIL...... methods at a chord Reynolds number of 3 × 106. The goal of this study is to analyze the aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils with different thicknesses of trailing edge and maximum thicknesses to chord. The steady results calculated by the fully turbulent k-ω SST, transitional k-ω SST...

  2. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Deformable Thin Airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, William Paul

    2009-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic theories are essential in the analysis of bird and insect flight. The study of these types of locomotion is vital in the development of flapping wing aircraft. This paper uses potential flow aerodynamics to extend the unsteady aerodynamic theory of Theodorsen and Garrick (which is restricted to rigid airfoil motion) to deformable thin airfoils. Frequency-domain lift, pitching moment and thrust expressions are derived for an airfoil undergoing harmonic oscillations and def...

  3. Low-Reynolds Number Aerodynamics of an 8.9 Percent Scale Semispan Swept Wing for Assessment of Icing Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Woodard, Brian S.; Diebold, Jeffrey M.; Moens, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Aerodynamic assessment of icing effects on swept wings is an important component of a larger effort to improve three-dimensional icing simulation capabilities. An understanding of ice-shape geometric fidelity and Reynolds and Mach number effects on the iced-wing aerodynamics is needed to guide the development and validation of ice-accretion simulation tools. To this end, wind-tunnel testing and computational flow simulations were carried out for an 8.9 percent-scale semispan wing based upon the Common Research Model airplane configuration. The wind-tunnel testing was conducted at the Wichita State University 7 by 10 ft Beech wind tunnel from Reynolds numbers of 0.8×10(exp 6) to 2.4×10(exp 6) and corresponding Mach numbers of 0.09 to 0.27. This paper presents the results of initial studies investigating the model mounting configuration, clean-wing aerodynamics and effects of artificial ice roughness. Four different model mounting configurations were considered and a circular splitter plate combined with a streamlined shroud was selected as the baseline geometry for the remainder of the experiments and computational simulations. A detailed study of the clean-wing aerodynamics and stall characteristics was made. In all cases, the flow over the outboard sections of the wing separated as the wing stalled with the inboard sections near the root maintaining attached flow. Computational flow simulations were carried out with the ONERA elsA software that solves the compressible, threedimensional RANS equations. The computations were carried out in either fully turbulent mode or with natural transition. Better agreement between the experimental and computational results was obtained when considering computations with free transition compared to turbulent solutions. These results indicate that experimental evolution of the clean wing performance coefficients were due to the effect of three-dimensional transition location and that this must be taken into account for future

  4. Aerodynamics and vortical structures in hovering fruitflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao

    2015-03-01

    We measure the wing kinematics and morphological parameters of seven freely hovering fruitflies and numerically compute the flows of the flapping wings. The computed mean lift approximately equals to the measured weight and the mean horizontal force is approximately zero, validating the computational model. Because of the very small relative velocity of the wing, the mean lift coefficient required to support the weight is rather large, around 1.8, and the Reynolds number of the wing is low, around 100. How such a large lift is produced at such a low Reynolds number is explained by combining the wing motion data, the computed vortical structures, and the theory of vorticity dynamics. It has been shown that two unsteady mechanisms are responsible for the high lift. One is referred as to "fast pitching-up rotation": at the start of an up- or downstroke when the wing has very small speed, it fast pitches down to a small angle of attack, and then, when its speed is higher, it fast pitches up to the angle it normally uses. When the wing pitches up while moving forward, large vorticity is produced and sheds at the trailing edge, and vorticity of opposite sign is produced near the leading edge and on the upper surface, resulting in a large time rate of change of the first moment of vorticity (or fluid impulse), hence a large aerodynamic force. The other is the well known "delayed stall" mechanism: in the mid-portion of the up- or downstroke the wing moves at large angle of attack (about 45 deg) and the leading-edge-vortex (LEV) moves with the wing; thus, the vortex ring, formed by the LEV, the tip vortices, and the starting vortex, expands in size continuously, producing a large time rate of change of fluid impulse or a large aerodynamic force.

  5. Experimental Research of Influence of a Relative Particles Positioning in a Gas Stream on Characteristics of their Aerodynamic Traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkov Roman S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cycle of experimental studies on determination of length of aerodynamic traces of the particles which are flowed round by an air stream is executed. When carrying out researches, panoramic optical methods for diagnostics of multiphase flows of PIV and PTV were used. Velocities of an air flow were varied in the range of 1-3 m/s. The sizes of particles changed from 1mm to 5 mm. The defining influence of the sizes of particles and velocities of an air stream on length of aerodynamic traces is established. Influence of a relative positioning of particles on features of formation of an aerodynamic trace is shown.

  6. The use of nylon and glass fiber filter separators with different pore sizes in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Cheng, Shaoan; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    on performance. Larger pore nylon mesh were used that had regular mesh weaves with pores ranging from 10 to 160 μm, while smaller pore-size nylon filters (0.2-0.45 μm) and glass fiber filters (0.7-2.0 μm) had a more random structure. The pore size of both types

  7. Elemental study of aerodynamic profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanero, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    In teaching fluid Mechanics, it would be convenient to provide the students with simple theoretical tools which allow them to deal with real and of technological interest situations. For instance, the apparently simple fluid motion around wing sections of arbitrary shape can not be overcome by using the mathematical methods available for students. In this article we present a simple theoretical procedure to analyze this problem. In the proposed method the role played by the analytical and numerical calculations are greatly reduced in order to emphasize the purely aerodynamic concepts. (Author) 3 refs. 001ES0100130

  8. Uncertainty Quantification in Numerical Aerodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2017-05-16

    We consider uncertainty quantification problem in aerodynamic simulations. We identify input uncertainties, classify them, suggest an appropriate statistical model and, finally, estimate propagation of these uncertainties into the solution (pressure, velocity and density fields as well as the lift and drag coefficients). The deterministic problem under consideration is a compressible transonic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Strokes flow around an airfoil with random/uncertain data. Input uncertainties include: uncertain angle of attack, the Mach number, random perturbations in the airfoil geometry, mesh, shock location, turbulence model and parameters of this turbulence model. This problem requires efficient numerical/statistical methods since it is computationally expensive, especially for the uncertainties caused by random geometry variations which involve a large number of variables. In numerical section we compares five methods, including quasi-Monte Carlo quadrature, polynomial chaos with coefficients determined by sparse quadrature and gradient-enhanced version of Kriging, radial basis functions and point collocation polynomial chaos, in their efficiency in estimating statistics of aerodynamic performance upon random perturbation to the airfoil geometry [D.Liu et al \\'17]. For modeling we used the TAU code, developed in DLR, Germany.

  9. Future Computer Requirements for Computational Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in computational aerodynamics are discussed as well as motivations for and potential benefits of a National Aerodynamic Simulation Facility having the capability to solve fluid dynamic equations at speeds two to three orders of magnitude faster than presently possible with general computers. Two contracted efforts to define processor architectures for such a facility are summarized.

  10. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  11. Aerodynamical study of a photovoltaic solar tracker

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez Castillo, José Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Investigate the aerodynamic features of ground-mounted solar trackers under atmospheric boundary layer flows. Study and identify the aerodynamical interactions of solar trackers when they are displayed as an array. State of the art. Literature review about CFD applied to solar panels. Analytic approach of the problem. Application of CFD analysis. Validation of the results. Discussion of the results. Improvements proposal.

  12. Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Martin; Jutte, Christine; Mangalam, Arun

    2011-01-01

    A Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing (DASP) toolbox was designed and fabricated for flight test applications with an Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) mounted under the fuselage of an F-15B on the Flight Test Fixture (FTF). DASP monitors and processes the aerodynamics with the structural dynamics using nonintrusive, surface-mounted, hot-film sensing. This aerodynamic measurement tool benefits programs devoted to static/dynamic load alleviation, body freedom flutter suppression, buffet control, improvement of aerodynamic efficiency through cruise control, supersonic wave drag reduction through shock control, etc. This DASP toolbox measures local and global unsteady aerodynamic load distribution with distributed sensing. It determines correlation between aerodynamic observables (aero forces) and structural dynamics, and allows control authority increase through aeroelastic shaping and active flow control. It offers improvements in flutter suppression and, in particular, body freedom flutter suppression, as well as aerodynamic performance of wings for increased range/endurance of manned/ unmanned flight vehicles. Other improvements include inlet performance with closed-loop active flow control, and development and validation of advanced analytical and computational tools for unsteady aerodynamics.

  13. Review paper on wind turbine aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the development and description of the aerodynamic models used to estimate the aerodynamic loads on wind turbine constructions. This includes a status of the capabilities of computation fluid dynamics and the need for reliable airfoil data for the simpler engineering models...

  14. Aerodynamics of wind turbines emerging topics

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines with topics ranging from Fundamental to Application of horizontal axis wind turbines, this book presents advanced topics including: Basic Theory for Wind turbine Blade Aerodynamics, Computational Methods, and Special Structural Reinforcement Technique for Wind Turbine Blades.

  15. Bayesian inference of nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics from aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, Rimple [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Poirel, Dominique [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Pettit, Chris [Department of Aerospace Engineering, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Khalil, Mohammad [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Sarkar, Abhijit, E-mail: abhijit.sarkar@carleton.ca [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    A Bayesian model selection and parameter estimation algorithm is applied to investigate the influence of nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamic loads on the limit cycle oscillation (LCO) of a pitching airfoil in the transitional Reynolds number regime. At small angles of attack, laminar boundary layer trailing edge separation causes negative aerodynamic damping leading to the LCO. The fluid–structure interaction of the rigid, but elastically mounted, airfoil and nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics is represented by two coupled nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations containing uncertain parameters and model approximation errors. Several plausible aerodynamic models with increasing complexity are proposed to describe the aeroelastic system leading to LCO. The likelihood in the posterior parameter probability density function (pdf) is available semi-analytically using the extended Kalman filter for the state estimation of the coupled nonlinear structural and unsteady aerodynamic model. The posterior parameter pdf is sampled using a parallel and adaptive Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The posterior probability of each model is estimated using the Chib–Jeliazkov method that directly uses the posterior MCMC samples for evidence (marginal likelihood) computation. The Bayesian algorithm is validated through a numerical study and then applied to model the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic loads using wind-tunnel test data at various Reynolds numbers.

  16. High angle of attack aerodynamics subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Rom, Josef

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamics of aircraft at high angles of attack is a subject which is being pursued diligently, because the modern agile fighter aircraft and many of the current generation of missiles must perform well at very high incidence, near and beyond stall. However, a comprehensive presentation of the methods and results applicable to the studies of the complex aerodynamics at high angle of attack has not been covered in monographs or textbooks. This book is not the usual textbook in that it goes beyond just presenting the basic theoretical and experimental know-how, since it contains reference material to practical calculation methods and technical and experimental results which can be useful to the practicing aerospace engineers and scientists. It can certainly be used as a text and reference book for graduate courses on subjects related to high angles of attack aerodynamics and for topics related to three-dimensional separation in viscous flow courses. In addition, the book is addressed to the aerodynamicist...

  17. Shark skin-inspired designs that improve aerodynamic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domel, August G; Saadat, Mehdi; Weaver, James C; Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Bertoldi, Katia; Lauder, George V

    2018-02-01

    There have been significant efforts recently aimed at improving the aerodynamic performance of aerofoils through the modification of their surfaces. Inspired by the drag-reducing properties of the tooth-like denticles that cover the skin of sharks, we describe here experimental and simulation-based investigations into the aerodynamic effects of novel denticle-inspired designs placed along the suction side of an aerofoil. Through parametric modelling to query a wide range of different designs, we discovered a set of denticle-inspired surface structures that achieve simultaneous drag reduction and lift generation on an aerofoil, resulting in lift-to-drag ratio improvements comparable to the best-reported for traditional low-profile vortex generators and even outperforming these existing designs at low angles of attack with improvements of up to 323%. Such behaviour is enabled by two concurrent mechanisms: (i) a separation bubble in the denticle's wake altering the flow pressure distribution of the aerofoil to enhance suction and (ii) streamwise vortices that replenish momentum loss in the boundary layer due to skin friction. Our findings not only open new avenues for improved aerodynamic design, but also provide new perspective on the role of the complex and potentially multifunctional morphology of shark denticles for increased swimming efficiency. © 2018 The Author(s).

  18. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  19. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag

  20. Novel Aerodynamic Design for Formula SAE Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentongo, Samuel; Carter, Austin; Cecil, Christopher; Feier, Ioan

    2017-11-01

    This paper identifies and evaluates the design characteristics of a novel airfoil that harnesses the Magnus Effect, applying a moving-surface boundary-layer control (MSBC) method to a Formula SAE Vehicle. The MSBC minimizes adverse pressure gradient and delays boundary layer separation through the use of a conveyor belt that interacts with the airfoil boundary layer. The MSBC allows dynamic control of the aerodynamic coefficients by variation of the belt speed, minimizing drag in high speed straights and maximizing downforce during vehicle cornering. A conveyer belt wing measuring approximately 0.9 x 0.9m in planform was designed and built to test the mechanical setup for such a MSBC wing. This study follows the relationship between inputted power and outputted surface velocity, with the goal being to maximize speed output vs. power input. The greatest hindrance to maximizing speed output is friction among belts, rollers, and stationary members. The maximum belt speed achieved during testing was 5.9 m/s with a power input of 48.8 W, which corresponds to 45.8 N of downforce based on 2D CFD results. Ongoing progress on this project is presented. United States Air Force Academy.

  1. Building Integrated Active Flow Control: Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Tall Buildings Using Fluid-Based Aerodynamic Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicovich, David

    material and energy consumption profiles of tall building. To date, the increasing use of light-weight and high-strength materials in tall buildings, with greater flexibility and reduced damping, has increased susceptibility to dynamic wind load effects that limit the gains afforded by incorporating these new materials. Wind, particularly fluctuating wind and its interaction with buildings induces two main responses; alongwind - in the direction of the flow and crosswind - perpendicular to the flow. The main risk associated with this vulnerability is resonant oscillations induced by von-Karman-like vortex shedding at or near the natural frequency of the structure caused by flow separation. Dynamic wind loading effects often increase with a power of wind speed greater than 3, thus increasingly, tall buildings pay a significant price in material to increase the natural frequency and/or the damping to overcome this response. In particular, crosswind response often governs serviceability (human habitability) design criteria of slender buildings. Currently, reducing crosswind response relies on a Solid-based Aerodynamic Modification (SAM), either by changing structural or geometric characteristics such as the tower shape or through the addition of damping systems. While this approach has merit it has two major drawbacks: firstly, the loss of valuable rentable areas and high construction costs due to increased structural requirements for mass and stiffness, further contributing towards the high consumption of non-renewable resources by the commercial building sector. For example, in order to insure human comfort within an acceptable range of crosswind response induced accelerations at the top of a building, an aerodynamically efficient plan shape comes at the expense of floor area. To compensate for the loss of valuable area compensatory stories are required, resulting in an increase in wind loads and construction costs. Secondly, a limited, if at all, ability to adaptively

  2. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Thin, High-Performance Airfoil for Use in Ground Fluids Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Clark, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The FAA has worked with Transport Canada and others to develop allowance times for aircraft operating in ice-pellet precipitation. Wind-tunnel testing has been carried out to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids contaminated with ice pellets using a thin, high-performance wing section at the National Research Council of Canada Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel. The objective of this paper is to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of this wing section in order to better understand the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination. Aerodynamic performance data, boundary-layer surveys and flow visualization were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 6.0×10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.12. The clean, baseline model exhibited leading-edge stall characteristics including a leading-edge laminar separation bubble and minimal or no separation on the trailing edge of the main element or flap. These results were consistent with expected 2-D aerodynamics and showed no anomalies that could adversely affect the evaluation of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on the wing. Tests conducted with roughness and leading-edge flow disturbances helped to explain the aerodynamic impact of the anti-icing fluids and contamination. The stalling characteristics of the wing section with fluid and contamination appear to be driven at least partially by the effects of a secondary wave of fluid that forms near the leading edge as the wing is rotated in the simulated takeoff profile. These results have provided a much more complete understanding of the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on this wing section. This is important since these results are used, in part, to develop the ice-pellet allowance times that are applicable to many different airplanes.

  3. Effect of Moving Surface on NACA 63218 Aerodynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahiaoui Tayeb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 63218 airfoil by using moving surface. Different numerical cases are considered: the first one is the numerical simulation of non-modified airfoil NACA 63218 according at different angle of attack and the second one a set of moving cylinder is placed on leading edge of the airfoil. The rotational velocity of the cylinder is varied to establish the effect of momentum injection on modified airfoil aerodynamic performances. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model.

  4. Aerodynamic and related hydrodynamic studies using water facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    Related problems, experiences and advancements in aeronautical and maritime fluid dynamics through the use of water facilities are reviewed. In recent years there has been an increasing use of water facilities for aerodynamic investigations. These include water tunnels, towing channels, and stationary tanks. Examples include basic research problems as well as flow fields around fighter aircraft, inlet flows, recirculation flow patterns associated with VTOL, ramjet simulation, etc., and, in general, 3-D flows with vortices or separated regimes as prominent features. The Symposium was organized to provide an appropriate forum for the exchange of information within the aeronautical and maritime fluid dynamics community.

  5. The Aerodynamics of Frisbee Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Baumback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This project will describe the physics of a common Frisbee in flight. The aerodynamic forces acting on the Frisbee are lift and drag, with lift being explained by Bernoulli‘s equation and drag by the Prandtl relationship. Using V. R. Morrison‘s model for the 2-dimensional trajectory of a Frisbee, equations for the x- and y- components of the Frisbee‘s motion were written in Microsoft Excel and the path of the Frisbee was illustrated. Variables such as angle of attack, area, and attack velocity were altered to see their effect on the Frisbee‘s path and to speculate on ways to achieve maximum distance and height.

  6. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  7. Comparison of advanced aerodynamic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWilliam, M.; Cline, S.; Lawton, S.; Crawford, C. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada). Inst. for Integrated Energy Systems; Victoria Univ., BC (Canada). Sustainable Systems Design Laboratory

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed the development of aerodynamic tools for designing sweep and out-of-plane curvatures for wind turbine blades. Potential flow and vortex methods are used to simulate individual vortex elements at the blade and in the wake, and are appropriate modelling tools are both out-of-plane and sweep curvatures. Centrifugal pumping, hub loss, and turbulent wake models are used to correct the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, where a blade's wake is modelled as a momentum balance between the far upstream and downstream. Wake shape can be numerically solved using the vortex theory. Wake vorticity is then integrated to characterize rotor conditions. Potential flow and vortex methods are used to account for the influence of the rotor and to model the wake structure. Details of experimental studies and validation test cases using the modelling methods were provided. tabs., figs.

  8. Numerical analysis of the effect of plasma flow control on enhancing the aerodynamic characteristics of stratospheric screw propeller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yufeng; Nie Wansheng

    2012-01-01

    Based on the body force aerodynamic actuation mechanism of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma, the effect of plasma flow control on enhancing the aerodynamic characteristics of ten blade elements equably along the stratospheric screw propeller blade was numerical studied. Then the effect of plasma flow control enhancing the aerodynamic characteristics of stratospheric screw propeller was compared that by the blade element theory method. The results show that the flow separate phenomena will easily happen in the root region and top end region of screw propeller, and the blade elements in the root region of screw propeller may work on the negative attack angle condition. DBD plasma flow control can entirely restrain the faintish flow separate phenomena in middle region of screw propeller. Although DBD plasma flow control can not entirely restrain the badly flow separate phenomena in top end region of screw propeller, it also can enhance the aerodynamic characteristics of blade elements in these regions in same degree. But effect of DBD plasma flow control on enhancing the aerodynamic characteristics of the blade elements working on the negative attack angle condition is ineffectively. It can be concluded that DBD plasma flow control can enhance the aerodynamic characteristics of stratospheric screw propeller, the thrust of the whole propeller and the propeller efficiency in the case of plasma on will increases by a factor of 28.27% and 12.3% respectively compared with that in the case of plasma off studied. (authors)

  9. Aerodynamic Interactions During Laser Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieret, J.; Terry, M. J.; Ward, B. A.

    1986-11-01

    Most laser cutting systems utilise a gas jet to remove molten or vaporised material from the kerf. The speed, economy and quality of the cut can be strongly dependent on the aerodynamic conditions created by the nozzle, workpiece proximity and kerf shape. Adverse conditions can be established that may lead to an unwelcome lack of reproducibility of cut quality. Relatively low gas nozzle pressures can result in supersonic flow in the jet with its associated shock fronts. When the nozzle is placed at conventional distances (1-2mm) above the workpiece, the force exerted by the gas on the workpiece and the cut products (the cutting pressure) can be significantly less than the nozzle pressure. Higher cutting pressures can be achieved by increasing the height of the nozzle above the workpiece, to a more damage resistant zone, provided that the shock structure of the jet is taken into account. Conventional conical nozzles with circular exits can be operated with conditions that will result in cutting pressures up to 3 Bar (g) in the more distant zone. At higher pressures in circular tipped nozzles the cutting pressure in this zone decays to inadequate levels. Investigations of a large number of non-circular nozzle tip shapes have resulted in the selection of a few specific shapes that can provide cutting pressures in excess of 6 Bar(g) at distances of 4 to 7mm from the nozzle tip. Since there is a strong correlation between cutting pressure and the speed and quality of laser cutting, the paper describes the aerodynamic requirements for achieving the above effects and reports the cutting results arising from the different nozzle designs and conditions. The results of the work of other investigators, who report anomalous laser cutting results, will be examined and reviewed in the light of the above work.

  10. Aerodynamic Noise Generated by Shinkansen Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    KITAGAWA, T.; NAGAKURA, K.

    2000-03-01

    The noise value (A -weighted sound pressure level, SLOW) generated by Shinkansen trains, now running at 220-300 km/h, should be less than 75 dB(A) at the trackside. Shinkansen noise, such as rolling noise, concrete support structure noise, and aerodynamic noise are generated by various parts of Shinkansen trains. Among these aerodynamic noise is important because it is the major contribution to the noise generated by the coaches running at high speed. In order to reduce the aerodynamic noise, a number of improvements to coaches have been made. As a result, the aerodynamic noise has been reduced, but it still remains significant. In addition, some aerodynamic noise generated from the lower parts of cars remains. In order to investigate the contributions of these noises, a method of analyzing Shinkansen noise has been developed and applied to the measured data of Shinkansen noise at speeds between 120 and 315 km/h. As a result, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) Aerodynamic noise generated from the upper parts of cars was reduced considerably by smoothing car surfaces. (2) Aerodynamic noise generated from the lower parts of cars has a major influence upon the wayside noise.

  11. NASA Iced Aerodynamics and Controls Current Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Gene

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the state of current research in the area of aerodynamics and aircraft control with ice conditions by the Aviation Safety Program, part of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Controls Project (IRAC). Included in the presentation is a overview of the modeling efforts. The objective of the modeling is to develop experimental and computational methods to model and predict aircraft response during adverse flight conditions, including icing. The Aircraft icing modeling efforts includes the Ice-Contaminated Aerodynamics Modeling, which examines the effects of ice contamination on aircraft aerodynamics, and CFD modeling of ice-contaminated aircraft aerodynamics, and Advanced Ice Accretion Process Modeling which examines the physics of ice accretion, and works on computational modeling of ice accretions. The IRAC testbed, a Generic Transport Model (GTM) and its use in the investigation of the effects of icing on its aerodynamics is also reviewed. This has led to a more thorough understanding and models, both theoretical and empirical of icing physics and ice accretion for airframes, advanced 3D ice accretion prediction codes, CFD methods for iced aerodynamics and better understanding of aircraft iced aerodynamics and its effects on control surface effectiveness.

  12. Aerodynamics of Ventilation in Termite Mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailoor, Shantanu; Yaghoobian, Neda; Turner, Scott; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-11-01

    Fungus-cultivating termites collectively build massive, complex mounds which are much larger than the size of an individual termite and effectively use natural wind and solar energy, as well as the energy generated by the colony's own metabolic activity to maintain the necessary environmental condition for the colony's survival. We seek to understand the aerodynamics of ventilation and thermoregulation of termite mounds through computational modeling. A simplified model accounting for key mound features, such as soil porosity and internal conduit network, is subjected to external draft conditions. The role of surface flow conditions in the generation of internal flow patterns and the ability of the mound to transport gases and heat from the nursery are examined. The understanding gained from our study could be used to guide sustainable bio-inspired passive HVAC system design, which could help optimize energy utilization in commercial and residential buildings. This research is supported by a seed Grant from the Environment, Energy Sustainability and Health Institute of the Johns Hopkins University.

  13. A method to separate and quantify the effects of indentation size, residual stress and plastic damage when mapping properties using instrumented indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, X D; Jennett, N M

    2017-01-01

    Instrumented indentation is a convenient and increasingly rapid method of high resolution mapping of surface properties. There is, however, significant untapped potential for the quantification of these properties, which is only possible by solving a number of serious issues that affect the absolute values for mechanical properties obtained from small indentations. The three most pressing currently are the quantification of: the indentation size effect (ISE), residual stress, and pile-up and sink-in—which is itself affected by residual stress and ISE. Hardness based indentation mapping is unable to distinguish these effects. We describe a procedure that uses an elastic modulus as an internal reference and combines the information available from an indentation modulus map, a hardness map, and a determination of the ISE coefficient (using self-similar geometry indentation) to correct for the effects of stress, pile up and the indentation size effect, to leave a quantified map of plastic damage and grain refinement hardening in a surface. This procedure is used to map the residual stress in a cross-section of the machined surface of a previously stress free metal. The effect of surface grinding is compared to milling and is shown to cause different amounts of work hardening, increase in residual stress, and surface grain size reduction. The potential use of this procedure for mapping coatings in cross-section is discussed. (paper)

  14. A method to separate and quantify the effects of indentation size, residual stress and plastic damage when mapping properties using instrumented indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, X. D.; Jennett, N. M.

    2017-11-01

    Instrumented indentation is a convenient and increasingly rapid method of high resolution mapping of surface properties. There is, however, significant untapped potential for the quantification of these properties, which is only possible by solving a number of serious issues that affect the absolute values for mechanical properties obtained from small indentations. The three most pressing currently are the quantification of: the indentation size effect (ISE), residual stress, and pile-up and sink-in—which is itself affected by residual stress and ISE. Hardness based indentation mapping is unable to distinguish these effects. We describe a procedure that uses an elastic modulus as an internal reference and combines the information available from an indentation modulus map, a hardness map, and a determination of the ISE coefficient (using self-similar geometry indentation) to correct for the effects of stress, pile up and the indentation size effect, to leave a quantified map of plastic damage and grain refinement hardening in a surface. This procedure is used to map the residual stress in a cross-section of the machined surface of a previously stress free metal. The effect of surface grinding is compared to milling and is shown to cause different amounts of work hardening, increase in residual stress, and surface grain size reduction. The potential use of this procedure for mapping coatings in cross-section is discussed.

  15. Size-separated particle fractions of stainless steel welding fume particles - A multi-analytical characterization focusing on surface oxide speciation and release of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, N; Belleville, L; Cha, Y; Olofsson, U; Odnevall Wallinder, I; Persson, K-A; Hedberg, Y S

    2018-01-15

    Welding fume of stainless steels is potentially health hazardous. The aim of this study was to investigate the manganese (Mn) and chromium (Cr) speciation of welding fume particles and their extent of metal release relevant for an inhalation scenario, as a function of particle size, welding method (manual metal arc welding, metal arc welding using an active shielding gas), different electrodes (solid wires and flux-cored wires) and shielding gases, and base alloy (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex stainless steel LDX2101). Metal release investigations were performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.3, 37°, 24h. The particles were characterized by means of microscopic, spectroscopic, and electroanalytical methods. Cr was predominantly released from particles of the welding fume when exposed in PBS [3-96% of the total amount of Cr, of which up to 70% as Cr(VI)], followed by Mn, nickel, and iron. Duplex stainless steel welded with a flux-cored wire generated a welding fume that released most Cr(VI). Nano-sized particles released a significantly higher amount of nickel compared with micron-sized particle fractions. The welding fume did not contain any solitary known chromate compounds, but multi-elemental highly oxidized oxide(s) (iron, Cr, and Mn, possibly bismuth and silicon). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Separation of benzene from alkanes using 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethylsulfate ionic liquid at several temperatures and atmospheric pressure: Effect of the size of the aliphatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Emilio J.; Calvar, Noelia; Gomez, Elena; Dominguez, Angeles

    2010-01-01

    The ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethylsulfate, [EMpy][ESO 4 ], was studied for the separation of benzene from aliphatic hydrocarbons (octane or nonane) by solvent extraction through the determination of the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) of the ternary systems: {octane (1) + benzene (2) + [EMpy][ESO 4 ] (3)} and {nonane (1) + benzene (2) + [EMpy][ESO 4 ] (3)} at T = (283.15 and 298.15) K and atmospheric pressure. Binodal curves were determined using the 'cloud point' method, and tie-line compositions were obtained by density measurements. The values of selectivity and distribution coefficient, derived from the tie-line data, were used to decide if this ionic liquid can be used as potential solvent for the separation of benzene from aliphatic hydrocarbons using liquid extraction. These results were analyzed and compared to those previously reported for the systems {hexane + benzene + [EMpy][ESO 4 ]} and {heptane + benzene + [EMpy][ESO 4 ]}. The experimental results show that this ionic liquid is suitable for the extraction of benzene from mixtures containing octane and nonane. The consistency of tie-line data was ascertained by applying the Othmer-Tobias and Hand equations. The experimental results for the ternary systems were well correlated with the NRTL model. No literature data were found for the mixtures discussed in this paper.

  17. AEROSTATIC AND AERODYNAMIC MODULES OF A HYBRID BUOYANT AIRCRAFT: AN ANALYTICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ul Haque

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An analytical approach is essential for the estimation of the requirements of aerodynamic and aerostatic lift for a hybrid buoyant aircraft. Such aircrafts have two different modules to balance the weight of aircraft; aerostatic module and aerodynamic module. Both these modules are to be treated separately for estimation of the mass budget of propulsion systems and required power. In the present work, existing relationships of aircraft and airship are reviewed for its further application for these modules. Limitations of such relationships are also disussed and it is precieved that it will provide a strating point for better understanding of design anatomy of such aircraft.

  18. Performance of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Models in Predicting Separated Flows: Study of the Hump Flow Model Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Daniele; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2012-01-01

    Separation can be seen in most aerodynamic flows, but accurate prediction of separated flows is still a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The behavior of several Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models in predicting the separated ow over a wall-mounted hump is studied. The strengths and weaknesses of the most popular RANS models (Spalart-Allmaras, k-epsilon, k-omega, k-omega-SST) are evaluated using the open source software OpenFOAM. The hump ow modeled in this work has been documented in the 2004 CFD Validation Workshop on Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control. Only the baseline case is treated; the slot flow control cases are not considered in this paper. Particular attention is given to predicting the size of the recirculation bubble, the position of the reattachment point, and the velocity profiles downstream of the hump.

  19. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 8th, Portland, OR, Aug. 20-22, 1990, Technical Papers. Parts 1 ampersand 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in CFD methods and their validation, vortices and vortical flows, STOL/VSTOL aerodynamics, boundary layer transition and separation, wing airfoil aerodynamics, laminar flow, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics, CFD for wing airfoil and nacelle applications, wind tunnel testing, flight testing, missile aerodynamics, unsteady flow, configuration aerodynamics, and multiple body/interference flows. Attention is given to the numerical simulation of vortical flows over close-coupled canard-wing configuration, propulsive lift augmentation by side fences, road-vehicle aerodynamics, a shock-capturing method for multidimensional flow, transition-detection studies in a cryogenic environment, a three-dimensional Euler analysis of ducted propfan flowfields, multiple vortex and shock interaction at subsonic and supersonic speeds, and a Navier-Stokes simulation of waverider flowfields. Also discussed are the induced drag of crescent-shaped wings, the preliminary design aerodynamics of missile inlets, finite wing lift prediction at high angles-of-attack, optimal supersonic/hypersonic bodies, and adaptive grid embedding for the two-dimensional Euler equations

  20. Aerodynamic analysis of Pegasus - Computations vs reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Michael R.; Lesieutre, Daniel J.; Whittaker, C. H.; Curry, Robert E.; Moulton, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    Pegasus, a three-stage, air-launched, winged space booster was developed to provide fast and efficient commercial launch services for small satellites. The aerodynamic design and analysis of Pegasus was conducted without benefit of wind tunnel tests using only computational aerodynamic and fluid dynamic methods. Flight test data from the first two operational flights of Pegasus are now available, and they provide an opportunity to validate the accuracy of the predicted pre-flight aerodynamic characteristics. Comparisons of measured and predicted flight characteristics are presented and discussed. Results show that the computational methods provide reasonable aerodynamic design information with acceptable margins. Post-flight analyses illustrate certain areas in which improvements are desired.

  1. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopéz Jiménez, Francisco; Upadhyaya, Priyank; Kumar, Shanmugam; Reis, Pedro

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  2. Experimental study of canard UAV aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayotov Hristian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents the aerodynamic characteristics of a canard fixed-wing unmanned aircraft TERES-02. A wind tunnel experiment is conducted using a specially designed model of the aircraft. The model is produced through the methods of rapid prototyping using a FDM 3D printer. Aerodynamic corrections are made and thorough analysis and discussion of the results is carried out. The obtained results can be used to determine the accuracy of numerical methods for analysis of aircraft performance.

  3. Aerodynamic improvement of a delta wing in combination with leading edge flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadateru Ishide

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various studies of micro air vehicle (MAV and unmanned air vehicle (UAV have been reported from wide range points of view. The aim of this study is to research the aerodynamic improvement of delta wing in low Reynold’s number region to develop an applicative these air vehicle. As an attractive tool in delta wing, leading edge flap (LEF is employed to directly modify the strength and structure of vortices originating from the separation point along the leading edge. Various configurations of LEF such as drooping apex flap and upward deflected flap are used in combination to enhance the aerodynamic characteristics in the delta wing. The fluid force measurement by six component load cell and particle image velocimetry (PIV analysis are performed as the experimental method. The relations between the aerodynamic superiority and the vortex behavior around the models are demonstrated.

  4. Aerodynamic Efficiency Analysis on Modified Drag Generator of Tanker-Ship Using Symmetrical Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moranova, Starida; Rahmat Hadiyatul A., S. T.; Indra Permana S., S. T.

    2018-04-01

    Time reduction of tanker ship spent in the sea should be applied for solving problems occured in oil and gas distribution, such as the unpunctuality of the distribution and oil spilling. The aerodynamic design for some parts that considered as drag generators is presumed to be one of the solution, utilizing our demand of the increasing speed. This paper suggests two examples of the more-aerodynamic design of a part in the tanker that is considered a drag generator, and reports the value of drag generated from the basic and the suggested aerodynamic designs. The new designs are made by adding the NACA airfoil to the cross section of the drag generator. The scenario is assumed with a 39 km/hour speed of tanker, neglecting the hydrodynamic effects occured in the tanker by cutting it at the waterline which separated the drag between air and water. The results of produced drag in each design are calculated by Computational Fluid Dynamic method.

  5. Measured wavenumber: frequency spectrum associated with acoustic and aerodynamic wall pressure fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguillat, Blandine; Ricot, Denis; Bailly, Christophe; Robert, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    Direct measurements of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of wall pressure fluctuations beneath a turbulent plane channel flow have been performed in an anechoic wind tunnel. A rotative array has been designed that allows the measurement of a complete map, 63×63 measuring points, of cross-power spectral densities over a large area. An original post-processing has been developed to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic exciting loadings by transforming space-frequency data into wavenumber-frequency spectra. The acoustic part has also been estimated from a simple Corcos-like model including the contribution of a diffuse sound field. The measured acoustic contribution to the surface pressure fluctuations is 5% of the measured aerodynamic surface pressure fluctuations for a velocity and boundary layer thickness relevant for automotive interior noise applications. This shows that for aerodynamically induced car interior noise, both contributions to the surface pressure fluctuations on car windows have to be taken into account.

  6. Aerodynamic study of time-trial helmets in cycling racing using CFD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, F; Taiar, R; Polidori, G; Trenchard, H; Grappe, F

    2018-01-23

    The aerodynamic drag of three different time-trial cycling helmets was analyzed numerically for two different cyclist head positions. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods were used to investigate the detailed airflow patterns around the cyclist for a constant velocity of 15 m/s without wind. The CFD simulations have focused on the aerodynamic drag effects in terms of wall shear stress maps and pressure coefficient distributions on the cyclist/helmet system. For a given head position, the helmet shape, by itself, obtained a weak effect on a cyclist's aerodynamic performance (CFD results have also shown that both helmet shape and head position significantly influence drag forces, pressure and wall shear stress distributions on the whole cyclist's body due to the change in the near-wake behavior and in location of corresponding separation and attachment areas around the cyclist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental study of wind-turbine airfoil aerodynamics in high turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devinant, Ph.; Laverne, T.; Hureau, J. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et d' Energetique Ecole Superieure de l' Energie et des Materiaux Universite d' Orleans, rue Leonard de Vinci F-45072 , Cedex 2 Orleans (France)

    2002-06-01

    Wind turbines very often have to operate in high turbulence related, for example, with lower layers atmospheric turbulence or wakes of other wind turbines. Most available data on airfoil aerodynamics concerns mainly aeronautical applications, which are characterized by a low level of turbulence (generally less than 1%) and low angles of attack. This paper presents wind tunnel test data for the aerodynamic properties-lift, drag, pitching moment, pressure distributions-of an airfoil used on a wind turbine when subjected to incident flow turbulence levels of 0.5-16% and placed at angles of attack up to 90. The results show that the aerodynamic behavior of the airfoil can be strongly affected by the turbulence level both qualitatively and quantitatively. This effect is especially evidenced in the angle of attack range corresponding to airfoil stall, as the boundary layer separation point advances along the leeward surface of the airfoil.

  8. Aerodynamic Analysis of Morphing Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Caleb; Macphee, David; Carlisle, Madeline

    2016-11-01

    Interest in morphing blades has grown with applications for wind turbines and other aerodynamic blades. This passive control method has advantages over active control methods such as lower manufacturing and upkeep costs. This study has investigated the lift and drag forces on individual blades with experimental and computational analysis. The goal has been to show that these blades delay stall and provide larger lift-to-drag ratios at various angles of attack. Rigid and flexible airfoils were cast from polyurethane and silicone respectively, then lift and drag forces were collected from a load cell during 2-D testing in a wind tunnel. Experimental data was used to validate computational models in OpenFOAM. A finite volume fluid-structure-interaction solver was used to model the flexible blade in fluid flow. Preliminary results indicate delay in stall and larger lift-to-drag ratios by maintaining more optimal angles of attack when flexing. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  9. Nasal aerodynamics protects brain and lung from inhaled dust in subterranean diggers, Ellobius talpinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Moshkin; D.V. Petrovski; A.E. Akulov; A.V. Romashchenko; L.A. Gerlinskaya; V.L. Ganimedov; M.I. Muchnaya; A.S. Sadovsky; I.V. Koptyug; A.A. Savelov; S. Yu Troitsky; Y.M. Moshkn; V.I. Bukhtiyarov; N.A. Kolchanov; R.Z. Sagdeev; V.M. Fomin

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInhalation of air-dispersed sub-micrometre and nano-sized particles presents a risk factor for animal and human health. Here, we show that nasal aerodynamics plays a pivotal role in the protection of the subterranean mole vole Ellobius talpinus from an increased exposure to

  10. ATEFlap aerodynamic model, a dynamic stall model including the effects of trailing edge flap deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergami, L.; Gaunaa, M.

    2012-02-15

    The report presents the ATEFlap aerodynamic model, which computes the unsteady lift, drag and moment on a 2D airfoil section equipped with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap. The model captures the unsteady response related to the effects of the vorticity shed into the wake, and the dynamics of flow separation a thin-airfoil potential flow model is merged with a dynamic stall model of the Beddoes-Leishmann type. The inputs required by the model are steady data for lift, drag, and moment coefficients as function of angle of attack and flap deflection. Further steady data used by the Beddoes- Leishmann dynamic stall model are computed in an external preprocessor application, which gives the user the possibility to verify, and eventually correct, the steady data passed to the aerodynamic model. The ATEFlap aerodynamic model is integrated in the aeroelastic simulation tool HAWC2, thus al- lowing to simulate the response of a wind turbine with trailing edge flaps on the rotor. The algorithms used by the preprocessor, and by aerodynamic model are presented, and modifications to previous implementations of the aerodynamic model are briefly discussed. The performance and the validity of the model are verified by comparing the dynamic response computed by the ATEFlap with solutions from CFD simulations. (Author)

  11. Modeling of Aerodynamic Force Acting in Tunnel for Analysis of Riding Comfort in a Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikko, Satoshi; Tanifuji, Katsuya; Sakanoue, Kei; Nanba, Kouichiro

    In this paper, we aimed to model the aerodynamic force that acts on a train running at high speed in a tunnel. An analytical model of the aerodynamic force is developed from pressure data measured on car-body sides of a test train running at the maximum revenue operation speed. The simulation of an 8-car train running while being subjected to the modeled aerodynamic force gives the following results. The simulated car-body vibration corresponds to the actual vibration both qualitatively and quantitatively for the cars at the rear of the train. The separation of the airflow at the tail-end of the train increases the yawing vibration of the tail-end car while it has little effect on the car-body vibration of the adjoining car. Also, the effect of the moving velocity of the aerodynamic force on the car-body vibration is clarified that the simulation under the assumption of a stationary aerodynamic force can markedly increase the car-body vibration.

  12. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing unsteady aerodynamic forces from simulated measured strain data is proposed in this study. First, the deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the unsteady strain using the two-step approach. Velocities and accelerations of the structure are computed using the autoregressive moving average model, on-line parameter estimator, low-pass filter, and a least-squares curve fitting method together with analytical derivatives with respect to time. Finally, aerodynamic forces over the wing are computed using modal aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices, a rational function approximation, and a time-marching algorithm. A cantilevered rectangular wing built and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia, USA) in 1959 is used to validate the simple approach. Unsteady aerodynamic forces as well as wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and strains are computed using the CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an MSC/NASTRAN code (MSC Software Corporation, Newport Beach, California, USA), and these CFL3D-based results are assumed as measured quantities. Based on the measured strains, wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and aerodynamic forces are computed using the proposed approach. These computed deflections, velocities, accelerations, and unsteady aerodynamic forces are compared with the CFL3D/NASTRAN-based results. In general, computed aerodynamic forces based on the lifting surface theory in subsonic speeds are in good agreement with the target aerodynamic forces generated using CFL3D code with the Euler equation. Excellent aeroelastic responses are obtained even with unsteady strain data under the signal to noise ratio of -9.8dB. The deflections, velocities, and accelerations at each sensor location are independent of structural and aerodynamic models. Therefore, the distributed strain data together with the current proposed approaches can be used as distributed deflection

  13. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction for a Generic Truck Using Geometrically Optimized Rear Cabin Bumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Ait Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous surge in gas prices has raised major concerns about vehicle fuel efficiency, and drag reduction devices offer a promising strategy. In this paper, we investigate the mechanisms by which geometrically optimized bumps, placed on the rear end of the cabin roof of a generic truck, reduce aerodynamic drag. The incorporation of these devices requires proper choices of the size, location, and overall geometry. In the following analysis we identify these factors using a novel methodology. The numerical technique combines automatic modeling of the add-ons, computational fluid dynamics and optimization using orthogonal arrays, and probabilistic restarts. Numerical results showed reduction in aerodynamic drag between 6% and 10%.

  14. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Sixing; Huang, Tony Jun; Ma, Fen; Zeng, Xiangqun; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device. (paper)

  15. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sixing; Ma, Fen; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E.; Zeng, Xiangqun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device.

  16. Separations chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Infrared spectra of Pu(IV) polymer show effects of CO 2 adsorption and of aging. Uv light (300 nm) increases the rate of reduction of PuO 2 2+ and Pu 4+ to Pu 3+ and the Pu--U separation factor using TBP. Distribution ratios for Zr and Hf between Dowex 50W--X8 resin and H 2 SO 4 solutions were found to decrease sharply with H 2 SO 4 content. Octylphenyl acid phosphate, a mixture of monooctylphenyl and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids, is being studied for U recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid. A study of HNO 3 leaching of Ra from U ores was completed. Effects of particle size of the packed bed on the dispersion of the boundary of the miscible phase used in oil recovery are being studied. Effects of sulfonates on toluene--n-butanol--water phase relations were determined, as were the effects of salts and solutes on the max water content of 1:1 toluene--alcohol solutions. A study was begun of hydrocarbon solubility in water--surfactant--alcohol. The mechanism of the formation of hydrous ZrO 2 --polyacrylate membranes and their use for sulfate rejection were studied. Salt rejection through hyperfiltration by clay membranes (bentonite and kaolin) was also investigated. Preliminary results are given for hyperfiltration of wood-pulping wastes by ZrO 2 membranes. 13 figures

  17. Parallel computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients for aeroelastic analysis on a transputer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janetzke, D. C.; Murthy, D. V.

    1991-01-01

    Aeroelastic analysis is mult-disciplinary and computationally expensive. Hence, it can greatly benefit from parallel processing. As part of an effort to develop an aeroelastic analysis capability on a distributed-memory transputer network, a parallel algorithm for the computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients is implemented on a network of 32 transputers. The aerodynamic influence coefficients are calculated using a three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic model and a panel discretization. Efficiencies up to 85 percent are demonstrated using 32 processors. The effects of subtask ordering, problem size and network topology are presented. A comparison to results on a shared-memory computer indicates that higher speedup is achieved on the distributed-memory system.

  18. Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

    1977-12-01

    The successful development of reliable, cost competitive horizontal axis, propeller-type wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is strongly dependent on the availability of advanced technology for each of the system components. This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

  19. Modulation of leading edge vorticity and aerodynamic forces in flexible flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2011-09-01

    In diverse biological flight systems, the leading edge vortex has been implicated as a flow feature of key importance in the generation of flight forces. Unlike fixed wings, flapping wings can translate at higher angles of attack without stalling because their leading edge vorticity is more stable than the corresponding fixed wing case. Hence, the leading edge vorticity has often been suggested as the primary determinant of the high forces generated by flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary to modulate the size and strength of the leading edge vorticity independently of the gross kinematics while simultaneously monitoring the forces generated by the wing. In a recent study, we observed that forces generated by wings with flexible trailing margins showed a direct dependence on the flexural stiffness of the wing. Based on that study, we hypothesized that trailing edge flexion directly influences leading edge vorticity, and thereby the magnitude of aerodynamic forces on the flexible flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, we visualized the flows on wings of varying flexural stiffness using a custom 2D digital particle image velocimetry system, while simultaneously monitoring the magnitude of the aerodynamic forces. Our data show that as flexion decreases, the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity increases and enhances aerodynamic forces, thus confirming that the leading edge vortex is indeed a key feature for aerodynamic force generation in flapping flight. The data shown here thus support the hypothesis that camber influences instantaneous aerodynamic forces through modulation of the leading edge vorticity.

  20. New insights into the wind-dust relationship in sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment from wind tunnel experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad; Zobeck, Ted M.; Kocurek, Gary; Yang, Zong-Liang; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous parameterizations have been developed for predicting wind erosion, yet the physical mechanism of dust emission is not fully understood. Sandblasting is thought to be the primary mechanism, but recent studies suggest that dust emission by direct aerodynamic entrainment can be significant under certain conditions. In this work, using wind tunnel experiments, we investigated some of the lesser understood aspects of dust emission in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment for three soil types, namely clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam. First, we explored the role of erodible surface roughness on dust emitted by aerodynamic entrainment. Second, we compared the emitted dust concentration in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment under a range of wind friction velocities. Finally, we explored the sensitivity of emitted dust particle size distribution (PSD) to soil type and wind friction velocity in these two processes. The dust concentration in aerodynamic entrainment showed strong positive correlation, no significant correlation, and weak negative correlation, for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively, with the erodible soil surface roughness. The dust in aerodynamic entrainment was significant constituting up to 28.3, 41.4, and 146.4% compared to sandblasting for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively. PSD of emitted dust was sensitive to soil type in both sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment. PSD was sensitive to the friction velocity in aerodynamic entrainment but not in sandblasting. Our results highlight the need to consider the details of sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment processes in parameterizing dust emission in global/regional climate models.

  1. New insights into the wind-dust relationship in sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment from wind tunnel experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad

    2016-01-22

    Numerous parameterizations have been developed for predicting wind erosion, yet the physical mechanism of dust emission is not fully understood. Sandblasting is thought to be the primary mechanism, but recent studies suggest that dust emission by direct aerodynamic entrainment can be significant under certain conditions. In this work, using wind tunnel experiments, we investigated some of the lesser understood aspects of dust emission in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment for three soil types, namely clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam. First, we explored the role of erodible surface roughness on dust emitted by aerodynamic entrainment. Second, we compared the emitted dust concentration in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment under a range of wind friction velocities. Finally, we explored the sensitivity of emitted dust particle size distribution (PSD) to soil type and wind friction velocity in these two processes. The dust concentration in aerodynamic entrainment showed strong positive correlation, no significant correlation, and weak negative correlation, for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively, with the erodible soil surface roughness. The dust in aerodynamic entrainment was significant constituting up to 28.3, 41.4, and 146.4% compared to sandblasting for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively. PSD of emitted dust was sensitive to soil type in both sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment. PSD was sensitive to the friction velocity in aerodynamic entrainment but not in sandblasting. Our results highlight the need to consider the details of sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment processes in parameterizing dust emission in global/regional climate models.

  2. Take-off aerodynamics in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmavirta, M; Kivekäs, J; Komi, P V

    2001-04-01

    The effect of aerodynamic forces on the force-time characteristics of the simulated ski jumping take-off was examined in a wind tunnel. Vertical and horizontal ground reaction forces were recorded with a force plate installed under the wind tunnel floor. The jumpers performed take-offs in non-wind conditions and in various wind conditions (21-33 m s(-1)). EMGs of the important take-off muscles were recorded from one jumper. The dramatic decrease in take-off time found in all jumpers can be considered as the result of the influence of aerodynamic lift. The loss in impulse due to the shorter force production time with the same take-off force is compensated with the increase in lift force, resulting in a higher vertical velocity (V(v)) than is expected from the conventional calculation of V(v) from the force impulse. The wind conditions emphasized the explosiveness of the ski jumping take-off. The aerodynamic lift and drag forces which characterize the aerodynamic quality of the initial take-off position (static in-run position) varied widely even between the examined elite ski jumpers. According to the computer simulation these differences can decisively affect jumping distance. The proper utilization of the prevailing aerodynamic forces before and during take-off is a very important prerequisite for achieving a good flight position.

  3. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Time-Dependent Effects of Glaze Ice on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Tabatabaei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to estimate the dynamic loads acting over a glaze-iced airfoil. This work studies the performance of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS simulations in predicting the oscillations over an iced airfoil. The structure and size of time-averaged vortices are compared to measurements. Furthermore, the accuracy of a two-equation eddy viscosity turbulence model, the shear stress transport (SST model, is investigated in the case of the dynamic load analysis over a glaze-iced airfoil. The computational fluid dynamic analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of critical ice accretions on a 0.610 m chord NACA 0011 airfoil. Leading edge glaze ice accretion was simulated with flat plates (spoiler-ice extending along the span of the blade. Aerodynamic performance coefficients and pressure profiles were calculated and validated for the Reynolds number of 1.83 × 106. Furthermore, turbulent separation bubbles were studied. The numerical results confirm both time-dependent phenomena observed in previous similar measurements: (1 low-frequency mode, with a Strouhal number Sth≈0,013–0.02, and (2 higher frequency mode with a Strouhal number StL≈0,059–0.69. The higher frequency motion has the same characteristics as the shedding mode and the lower frequency motion has the flapping mode characteristics.

  5. Evaluation of differences between dual salt-pH gradient elution and mono gradient elution using a thermodynamic model: Simultaneous separation of six monoclonal antibody charge and size variants on preparative-scale ion exchange chromatographic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi Feng; Jöhnck, Matthias; Frech, Christian

    2018-02-21

    The efficiencies of mono gradient elution and dual salt-pH gradient elution for separation of six mAb charge and size variants on a preparative-scale ion exchange chromatographic resin are compared in this study. Results showed that opposite dual salt-pH gradient elution with increasing pH gradient and simultaneously decreasing salt gradient is best suited for the separation of these mAb charge and size variants on Eshmuno ® CPX. Besides giving high binding capacity, this type of opposite dual salt-pH gradient also provides better resolved mAb variant peaks and lower conductivity in the elution pools compared to single pH or salt gradients. To have a mechanistic understanding of the differences in mAb variants retention behaviors of mono pH gradient, parallel dual salt-pH gradient, and opposite dual salt-pH gradient, a linear gradient elution model was used. After determining the model parameters using the linear gradient elution model, 2D plots were used to show the pH and salt dependencies of the reciprocals of distribution coefficient, equilibrium constant, and effective ionic capacity of the mAb variants in these gradient elution systems. Comparison of the 2D plots indicated that the advantage of opposite dual salt-pH gradient system with increasing pH gradient and simultaneously decreasing salt gradient is the noncontinuous increased acceleration of protein migration. Furthermore, the fitted model parameters can be used for the prediction and optimization of mAb variants separation in dual salt-pH gradient and step elution. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Entrainment separator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.; Leith, D.

    1976-01-01

    Clean and dust-loaded ACS entrainment separators mounted upstream of HEPA filters were exposed to a combination of fine water mist and steam at about 70 0 C from one to four hours. In every trial, the ACS entrainment separator prevented measurable deterioration of performance in the following HEPA filter. Droplet size-efficiency evaluation of the ACS entrainment separators showed that, within the accuracy of the measurements, they meet all service requirements and are fully equal to the best separator units available for service on pressurized water reactors

  7. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  8. Summary analysis of the Gemini entry aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitnah, A. M.; Howes, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic data that were derived in 1967 from the analysis of flight-generated data for the Gemini entry module are presented. These data represent the aerodynamic characteristics exhibited by the vehicle during the entry portion of Gemini 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions. For the Gemini, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions, the flight-generated lift-to-drag ratios and corresponding angles of attack are compared with the wind tunnel data. These comparisons show that the flight generated lift-to-drag ratios are consistently lower than were anticipated from the tunnel data. Numerous data uncertainties are cited that provide an insight into the problems that are related to an analysis of flight data developed from instrumentation systems, the primary functions of which are other than the evaluation of flight aerodynamic performance.

  9. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  10. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schepers, J.G.

    1997-06-01

    The Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) has often been involved in industrial projects, in which blade geometries are created automatic by means of numerical optimisation. Usually, these projects aim at the determination of the aerodynamic optimal wind turbine blade, i.e. the goal is to design a blade which is optimal with regard to energy yield. In other cases, blades have been designed which are optimal with regard to cost of generated energy. However, it is obvious that the wind turbine blade designs which result from these optimisations, are not necessarily optimal with regard to noise emission. In this paper an example is shown of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the ECN-program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. 11 figs., 8 refs

  11. Physics of badminton shuttlecocks. Part 1 : aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Caroline; Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    We study experimentally shuttlecocks dynamics. In this part we show that shuttlecock trajectory is highly different from classical parabola. When one takes into account the aerodynamic drag, the flight of the shuttlecock quickly curves downwards and almost reaches a vertical asymptote. We solve the equation of motion with gravity and drag at high Reynolds number and find an analytical expression of the reach. At high velocity, this reach does not depend on velocity anymore. Even if you develop your muscles you will not manage to launch the shuttlecock very far because of the ``aerodynamic wall.'' As a consequence you can predict the length of the field. We then discuss the extend of the aerodynamic wall to other projectiles like sports balls and its importance.

  12. Influence of inflow angle on flexible flap aerodynamic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, H Y; Ye, Z; Li, Z M; Li, C

    2013-01-01

    Large scale wind turbines have larger blade lengths and weights, which creates new challenges for blade design. This paper selects NREL S809 airfoil, and uses the parameterized technology to realize the flexible trailing edge deformation, researches the dynamic aerodynamic characteristics in the process of continuous flexible deformation, analyses the influence of inflow angle on flexible flap aerodynamic performance, in order to further realize the flexible wind turbine blade design and provides some references for the active control scheme. The results show that compared with the original airfoil, proper trailing edge deformation can improve the lift coefficient, reduce the drag coefficient, and thereby more efficiently realize flow field active control. With inflow angle increases, dynamic lift-drag coefficient hysteresis loop shape deviation occurs, even turns into different shapes. Appropriate swing angle can improve the flap lift coefficient, but may cause early separation of flow. To improve the overall performance of wind turbine blades, different angular control should be used at different cross sections, in order to achieve the best performance

  13. WOOD STOVE EMISSIONS: PARTICLE SIZE AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes wood stove particle size and chemical composition data gathered to date. [NOTE: In 1995, EPA estimated that residential wood combustion (RWC), including fireplaces, accounted for a significant fraction of national particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter...

  14. Particle Methods in Bluff Body Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj

    . The implementation is two-dimensional and sequential. The implementation is validated against the analytic solution to the Perlman test case and by free-space simulations of the onset flow around fixed and rotating circular cylinders and bluff body flows around bridge sections. Finally a three-dimensional vortex...... is important. This dissertation focuses on the use of vortex particle methods and computational efficiency. The work is divided into three parts. A novel method for the simulation of the aerodynamic admittance in bluff body aerodynamics is presented. The method involves a model for describing oncoming...... section during the construction phase and the swimming motion of the medusa Aurelia aurita....

  15. Aerodynamic window for a laser fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Wataru

    1983-01-01

    Since the window of a laser system absorbs a part of the laser energy, the output power is determined by the characteristics of the window. The use of an aerodynamic window has been studied. The required characteristics are to keep the large pressure difference. An equation of motion of a vortex was presented and analyzed. The operation power of the system was studied. A multi-stage aerodynamic window was proposed to reduce the power. When the jet flow of 0.3 of the Mach number is used, the operation power will be several Megawatt, and the length of an optical path will be about 100 m. (Kato, T.)

  16. Modification of Flow Structure Over a Van Model By Suction Flow Control to Reduce Aerodynamics Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinaldi Harinaldi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Automobile aerodynamic studies are typically undertaken to improve safety and increase fuel efficiency as well as to  find new innovation in automobile technology to deal with the problem of energy crisis and global warming. Some car companies have the objective to develop control solutions that enable to reduce the aerodynamic drag of vehicle and  significant modification progress is still possible by reducing the mass, rolling friction or aerodynamic drag. Some flow  control method provides the possibility to modify the flow separation to reduce the development of the swirling structures around the vehicle. In this study, a family van is modeled with a modified form of Ahmed's body by changing the orientation of the flow from its original form (modified/reversed Ahmed body. This model is equipped with a suction on the rear side to comprehensively examine the pressure field modifications that occur. The investigation combines computational and experimental work. Computational approach used  a commercial software with standard k-epsilon flow turbulence model, and the objectives was  to determine the characteristics of the flow field and aerodynamic drag reduction that occurred in the test model. Experimental approach used load cell in order to validate the aerodynamic drag reduction obtained by computational approach. The results show that the application of a suction in the rear part of the van model give the effect of reducing the wake and the vortex formation. Futhermore, aerodynamic drag reduction close to 13.86% for the computational approach and 16.32% for the experimental have been obtained.

  17. Pigeons produce aerodynamic torques through changes in wing trajectory during low speed aerial turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Ivo G; Badger, Marc A; Pierson, Alyssa N; Bassman, Lori C; Biewener, Andrew A

    2015-02-01

    The complexity of low speed maneuvering flight is apparent from the combination of two critical aspects of this behavior: high power and precise control. To understand how such control is achieved, we examined the underlying kinematics and resulting aerodynamic mechanisms of low speed turning flight in the pigeon (Columba livia). Three birds were trained to perform 90 deg level turns in a stereotypical fashion and detailed three-dimensional (3D) kinematics were recorded at high speeds. Applying the angular momentum principle, we used mechanical modeling based on time-varying 3D inertia properties of individual sections of the pigeon's body to separate angular accelerations of the torso based on aerodynamics from those based on inertial effects. Directly measured angular accelerations of the torso were predicted by aerodynamic torques, justifying inferences of aerodynamic torque generation based on inside wing versus outside wing kinematics. Surprisingly, contralateral asymmetries in wing speed did not appear to underlie the 90 deg aerial turns, nor did contralateral differences in wing area, angle of attack, wingbeat amplitude or timing. Instead, torso angular accelerations into the turn were associated with the outside wing sweeping more anteriorly compared with a more laterally directed inside wing. In addition to moving through a relatively more retracted path, the inside wing was also more strongly pronated about its long axis compared with the outside wing, offsetting any difference in aerodynamic angle of attack that might arise from the observed asymmetry in wing trajectories. Therefore, to generate roll and pitch torques into the turn, pigeons simply reorient their wing trajectories toward the desired flight direction. As a result, by acting above the center of mass, the net aerodynamic force produced by the wings is directed inward, generating the necessary torques for turning. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Research status and trend of wind turbine aerodynamic noise?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong LI; Baohong BAI; Yingbo XU; Min JIANG

    2016-01-01

    The main components of the wind turbine aerodynamic noise are introduced. A detailed review is given on the theoretical prediction, experimental measurement, and numerical simulation methods of wind turbine noise, with speci?c attention to appli-cations. Furthermore, suppression techniques of wind turbine aerodynamic noise are discussed. The perspective of future research on the wind turbine aerodynamic noise is presented.

  19. A separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopyuk, S.G.; Dyachenko, A.Ye.; Mukhametov, M.N.; Prokopov, O.I.

    1982-01-01

    A separator is proposed which contains separating slanted plates and baffle plates installed at a distance to them at an acute angle to them. To increase the effectiveness of separating a gas and liquid stream and the throughput through reducing the secondary carry away of the liquid drops and to reduce the hydraulic resistance, as well, openings are made in the plates. The horizontal projections of each opening from the lower and upper surfaces of the plate do not overlap each other.

  20. Leading-Edge Flow Sensing for Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Aditya

    The identification of inflow air data quantities such as airspeed, angle of attack, and local lift coefficient on various sections of a wing or rotor blade provides the capability for load monitoring, aerodynamic diagnostics, and control on devices ranging from air vehicles to wind turbines. Real-time measurement of aerodynamic parameters during flight provides the ability to enhance aircraft operating capabilities while preventing dangerous stall situations. This thesis presents a novel Leading-Edge Flow Sensing (LEFS) algorithm for the determination of the air -data parameters using discrete surface pressures measured at a few ports in the vicinity of the leading edge of a wing or blade section. The approach approximates the leading-edge region of the airfoil as a parabola and uses pressure distribution from the exact potential-ow solution for the parabola to _t the pressures measured from the ports. Pressures sensed at five discrete locations near the leading edge of an airfoil are given as input to the algorithm to solve the model using a simple nonlinear regression. The algorithm directly computes the inflow velocity, the stagnation-point location, section angle of attack and lift coefficient. The performance of the algorithm is assessed using computational and experimental data in the literature for airfoils under different ow conditions. The results show good correlation between the actual and predicted aerodynamic quantities within the pre-stall regime, even for a rotating blade section. Sensing the deviation of the aerodynamic behavior from the linear regime requires additional information on the location of ow separation on the airfoil surface. Bio-inspired artificial hair sensors were explored as a part of the current research for stall detection. The response of such artificial micro-structures can identify critical ow characteristics, which relate directly to the stall behavior. The response of the microfences was recorded via an optical microscope for

  1. Aerodynamics and thermal physics of helicopter ice accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yiqiang

    Ice accretion on aircraft introduces significant loss in airfoil performance. Reduced lift-to- drag ratio reduces the vehicle capability to maintain altitude and also limits its maneuverability. Current ice accretion performance degradation modeling approaches are calibrated only to a limited envelope of liquid water content, impact velocity, temperature, and water droplet size; consequently inaccurate aerodynamic performance degradations are estimated. The reduced ice accretion prediction capabilities in the glaze ice regime are primarily due to a lack of knowledge of surface roughness induced by ice accretion. A comprehensive understanding of the ice roughness effects on airfoil heat transfer, ice accretion shapes, and ultimately aerodynamics performance is critical for the design of ice protection systems. Surface roughness effects on both heat transfer and aerodynamic performance degradation on airfoils have been experimentally evaluated. Novel techniques, such as ice molding and casting methods and transient heat transfer measurement using non-intrusive thermal imaging methods, were developed at the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility at Penn State. A novel heat transfer scaling method specifically for turbulent flow regime was also conceived. A heat transfer scaling parameter, labeled as Coefficient of Stanton and Reynolds Number (CSR = Stx/Rex --0.2), has been validated against reference data found in the literature for rough flat plates with Reynolds number (Re) up to 1x107, for rough cylinders with Re ranging from 3x104 to 4x106, and for turbine blades with Re from 7.5x105 to 7x106. This is the first time that the effect of Reynolds number is shown to be successfully eliminated on heat transfer magnitudes measured on rough surfaces. Analytical models for ice roughness distribution, heat transfer prediction, and aerodynamics performance degradation due to ice accretion have also been developed. The ice roughness prediction model was

  2. On the properties and mechanisms of microjet arrays in crossflow for the control of flow separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Erik J.

    By utilizing passive and active methods of flow control, the aerodynamic performance of external and internal components can be greatly improved. Recently however, the benefits of applying active flow control methods to turbomachinery components for improved fuel efficiency, reduced engine size, and greater operational envelope has sparked a renewed interest in some of these flow control techniques. The more attractive of these, is active control in the form of jets in cross flow. With their ability to be turned on and off, as well as their negligible effect on drag when not being actuated, they are well suited for applications such as compressor and turbine blades, engine inlet diffusers, internal engine passages, and general external aerodynamics. This study consists of two parts. The first is the application of active control on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) cascade to determine the effectiveness of microjet actuators on flow separation at relatively low speeds. The second study, motivated by the first, involves a parametric study on a more canonical model to examine the effects of various microjet parameters on the efficacy of separation control and to provide a better understanding of the relevant flow physics governing this control approach. With data obtained from velocity measurements across the wide parametric range, correlations for the growth of the counter-rotating vortex pairs generated by these actuators are deduced. From the information and models obtained throughout the study, basic suggestions for microjet actuator design are presented.

  3. Comparison of Theodorsen's Unsteady Aerodynamic Forces with Doublet Lattice Generalized Aerodynamic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Boyd, III

    2017-01-01

    This paper identifies the unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments for a typical section contained in the NACA Report No. 496, "General Theory of Aerodynamic Instability and the Mechanism of Flutter," by Theodore Theodorsen. These quantities are named Theodorsen's aerodynamic forces (TAFs). The TAFs are compared to the generalized aerodynamic forces (GAFs) for a very high aspect ratio wing (AR = 20) at zero Mach number computed by the doublet lattice method. Agreement between TAFs and GAFs is very-good-to-excellent. The paper also reveals that simple proportionality relationships that are known to exist between the real parts of some GAFs and the imaginary parts of others also hold for the real and imaginary parts of the corresponding TAFs.

  4. Raman spectroscopic identification of size-selected airborne particles for quantitative exposure assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, Brian; Gorbunov, Boris; Price, Mark C; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for the quantification of chemically distinguished airborne particulate matter, required for health risk assessment. Rather than simply detecting chemical compounds in a sample, we demonstrate an approach for the quantification of exposure to airborne particles and nanomaterials. In line with increasing concerns over the proliferation of engineered particles we consider detection of synthetically produced ZnO crystals. A multi-stage approach is presented whereby the particles are first aerodynamically size segregated from a lab-generated single component aerosol in an impaction sampler. These size fractionated samples are subsequently analysed by Raman spectroscopy. Imaging analysis is applied to Raman spatial maps to provide chemically specific quantification of airborne exposure against background which is critical for health risk evaluation of exposure to airborne particles. Here we present a first proof-of-concept study of the methodology utilising particles in the 2–4 μm aerodynamic diameter range to allow for validation of the approach by comparison to optical microscopy. The results show that the combination of these techniques provides independent size and chemical discrimination of particles. Thereby a method is provided to allow quantitative and chemically distinguished measurements of aerosol concentrations separated into exposure relevant size fractions. (paper)

  5. IEA joint action. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-12-31

    In the period 1992-1997 the IEA Annex XIV `Field Rotor Aerodynamics` was carried out. Within its framework 5 institutes from 4 different countries participated in performing detailed aerodynamic measurements on full-scale wind turbines. The Annex was successfully completed and resulted in a unique database of aerodynamic measurements. The database is stored on an ECN disc (available through ftp) and on a CD-ROM. It is expected that this base will be used extensively in the development and validation of new aerodynamic models. Nevertheless at the end of IEA Annex XIV, it was recommended to perform a new IEA Annex due to the following reasons: In Annex XIV several data exchange rounds appeared to be necessary before a satisfactory result was achieved. This is due to the huge amount of data which had to be supplied, by which a thorough inspection of all data is very difficult and very time consuming; Most experimental facilities are still operational and new, very useful, measurements are expected in the near future; The definition of angle of attack and dynamic pressure in the rotating environment is less straightforward than in the wind tunnel. The conclusion from Annex XIV was that the uncertainty which results from these different definitions is still too large and more investigation in this field is required. (EG)

  6. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewicz, P.; Kulak, M.; Karczewski, M.

    2014-08-01

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  7. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leśniewicz, P; Kulak, M; Karczewski, M

    2014-01-01

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  8. Aerodynamics and flow characterisation of multistage rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, G.; Prakash, M. V. S.

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this paper is to conduct a systematic flow analysis on single, double and multistage rockets using ANSYS software. Today non-air breathing propulsion is increasing dramatically for the enhancement of space exploration. The rocket propulsion is playing vital role in carrying the payload to the destination. Day to day rocket aerodynamic performance and flow characterization analysis has becoming challenging task to the researchers. Taking this task as motivation a systematic literature is conducted to achieve better aerodynamic and flow characterization on various rocket models. The analyses on rocket models are very little especially in numerical side and experimental area. Each rocket stage analysis conducted for different Mach numbers and having different flow varying angle of attacks for finding the critical efficiency performance parameters like pressure, density and velocity. After successful completion of the analysis the research reveals that flow around the rocket body for Mach number 4 and 5 best suitable for designed payload. Another major objective of this paper is to bring best aerodynamics flow characterizations in both aero and mechanical features. This paper also brings feature prospectus of rocket stage technology in the field of aerodynamic design.

  9. Recent Experiments at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackeret, J

    1925-01-01

    This report presents the results of various experiments carried out at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute. These include: experiments with Joukowski wing profiles; experiments on an airplane model with a built-in motor and functioning propeller; and the rotating cylinder (Magnus Effect).

  10. Aerodynamic performance and particle image velocimetery of piezo actuated biomimetic manduca sexta engineered wings towards the design and application of a flapping wing flight vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Anthony M.

    Considerable research and investigation has been conducted on the aerodynamic performance, and the predominate flow physics of the Manduca Sexta size of biomimetically designed and fabricated wings as part of the AFIT FWMAV design project. Despite a burgeoning interest and research into the diverse field of flapping wing flight and biomimicry, the aerodynamics of flapping wing flight remains a nebulous field of science with considerable variance into the theoretical abstractions surrounding aerodynamic mechanisms responsible for aerial performance. Traditional FWMAV flight models assume a form of a quasi-steady approximation of wing aerodynamics based on an infinite wing blade element model (BEM). An accurate estimation of the lift, drag, and side force coefficients is a critical component of autonomous stability and control models. This research focused on two separate experimental avenues into the aerodynamics of AFIT's engineered hawkmoth wings|forces and flow visualization. 1. Six degree of freedom force balance testing, and high speed video analysis was conducted on 30°, 45°, and 60° angle stop wings. A novel, non-intrusive optical tracking algorithm was developed utilizing a combination of a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and ComputerVision (OpenCV) tools to track the wing in motion from multiple cameras. A complete mapping of the wing's kinematic angles as a function of driving amplitude was performed. The stroke angle, elevation angle, and angle of attack were tabulated for all three wings at driving amplitudes ranging from A=0.3 to A=0.6. The wing kinematics together with the force balance data was used to develop several aerodynamic force coefficient models. A combined translational and rotational aerodynamic model predicted lift forces within 10%, and vertical forces within 6%. The total power consumption was calculated for each of the three wings, and a Figure of Merit was calculated for each wing as a general expression of the overall efficiency of

  11. Liquid-phase separation with the rotational particle separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemenade, van H.P.; Mondt, E.; Hendriks, A.J.A.M.; Verbeek, P.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, the rotational particle separator (RPS) was introduced as a new technique for separating solid and/or liquid particles of 0.1 m and larger from gases. In this patented technique the principles of centrifugation are exploited to enhance separation of small-sized phases and particulate

  12. Development of an engineering level prediction method for high angle of attack aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenthel, Patrick H.; Rodman, Laura C.; Nixon, David

    1993-01-01

    The present work is concerned with predicting the unsteady flow considered to be the cause of the structural failure of twin vertical tail aircraft. An engineering tool has been produced for high angle of attack aerodynamics using the simplest physical models. The main innovation behind this work is its emphasis on the modeling of two key aspects of the dominant physics associated with high angle-of-attack airflows, namely unsteady separation and vortex breakdown.

  13. The role of flow field structure in determining the aerodynamic response of a delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, Gregory Alan

    Delta wings have long been known to exhibit nonlinear aerodynamic responses as a result of the presence of helical leading-edge vortices. This nonlinearity, found under both steady-state and unsteady conditions, is particularly profound in the presence of vortex burst. Modeling such aerodynamic responses with the Nonlinear Indicial Response (NIR) methodology provides a means of simulating these nonlinearities through its inclusion of motion history in addition to superposition. The NIR model also includes provisions for a finite number of discrete locations where the aerodynamic response is discontinuous with response to a state variable. These critical states also separate regions of states where the unsteady aerodynamic responses are potentially of highly-disparate characters. Although these critical states have been found in the past, their relationship with flow field bifurcation is uncertain. The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the relationship between nonlinear aerodynamic responses, critical states and flow field bifurcations from an experimental approach. This task has been accomplished by comparing a comprehensive database of skin-friction line topologies with static and unsteady aerodynamic responses. These data were collected using a 65sp° delta wing which rolled about an inclined longitudinal body axis. In this study, compelling, but not conclusive, evidence was found to suggest that a bifurcation in the skin-friction line topology was a necessary condition for the presence of a critical state. Although the presence of critical states was well predicted through careful observation and analysis of highly-resolved static loading data alone, their precise placement as a function of the independent variable was aided through the consideration of the locations of skin-friction line bifurcations. Furthermore, these static data were found to contain indications of the basic lagged or unlagged behavior of the unsteady aerodynamic response. This

  14. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnels use scale models to characterize aerodynamic coefficients, Wind tunnel testing can be slow and costly due to high personnel overhead and intensive power utilization. Although manual curve fitting can be done, it is highly efficient to use a neural network to define the complex relationship between variables. Numerical simulation of complex vehicles on the wide range of conditions required for flight simulation requires static and dynamic data. Static data at low Mach numbers and angles of attack may be obtained with simpler Euler codes. Static data of stalled vehicles where zones of flow separation are usually present at higher angles of attack require Navier-Stokes simulations which are costly due to the large processing time required to attain convergence. Preliminary dynamic data may be obtained with simpler methods based on correlations and vortex methods; however, accurate prediction of the dynamic coefficients requires complex and costly numerical simulations. A reliable and fast method of predicting complex aerodynamic coefficients for flight simulation I'S presented using a neural network. The training data for the neural network are derived from numerical simulations and wind-tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of the flow characteristics and the control surfaces of the vehicle. The basic coefficients of lift, drag and pitching moment are expressed as functions of angles of attack and Mach number. The modeled and training aerodynamic coefficients show good agreement. This method shows excellent potential for rapid development of aerodynamic models for flight simulation. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used to optimize a previously built Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that reliably predicts aerodynamic coefficients. Results indicate that the GA provided an efficient method of optimizing the ANN model to predict aerodynamic coefficients. The reliability of the ANN using the GA includes prediction of aerodynamic

  15. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method of isotope separation is described which involves the use of a laser photon beam to selectively induce energy level transitions of an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated. The use of the technique for 235 U enrichment is demonstrated. (UK)

  16. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-06

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing.

  17. Wind turbines. Unsteady aerodynamics and inflow noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riget Broe, B.

    2009-12-15

    Aerodynamical noise from wind turbines due to atmospheric turbulence has the highest emphasis in semi-empirical models. However it is an open question whether inflow noise has a high emphasis. This illustrates the need to investigate and improve the semi-empirical model for noise due to atmospheric turbulence. Three different aerodynamical models are investigated in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics. Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil. An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input. The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models for lift distribution is for completely anisotropic turbulence and the other for perfectly isotropic turbulence, and so is also the corresponding models for the lift fluctuations derived from the models for lift distribution. The models for lift distribution and lift are compared with pressure data which are obtained by microphones placed flush with the surface of an aerofoil. The pressure data are from two experiments in a wind tunnel, one experiment with a NACA0015 profile and a second with a NACA63415 profile. The turbulence is measured by a triple wired hotwire instrument in the experiment with a NACA0015 profile. Comparison of the aerodynamical models with data shows that the models capture the general characteristics of the measurements, but the data are hampered by background noise from the fan propellers in the wind tunnel. The measurements are in between the completely anisotropic turbulent model and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model by the measurements

  18. Separation techniques: Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Chromatography is an important biophysical technique that enables the separation, identification, and purification of the components of a mixture for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Proteins can be purified based on characteristics such as size and shape, total charge, hydrophobic groups present on the surface, and binding capacity with the stationary phase. Four separation techniques based on molecular characteristics and interaction type use mechanisms of ion exchange, surface adsorption, partition, and size exclusion. Other chromatography techniques are based on the stationary bed, including column, thin layer, and paper chromatography. Column chromatography is one of the most common methods of protein purification. PMID:28058406

  19. Assessment of CFD Estimation of Aerodynamic Characteristics of Basic Reusable Rocket Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Keiichiro; Fujii, Kozo

    Flow-fields around the basic SSTO-rocket configurations are numerically simulated by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations. Simulations of the Apollo-like configuration is first carried out, where the results are compared with NASA experiments and the prediction ability of the RANS simulation is discussed. The angle of attack of the freestream ranges from 0° to 180° and the freestream Mach number ranges from 0.7 to 2.0. Computed aerodynamic coefficients for the Apollo-like configuration agree well with the experiments under a wide range of flow conditions. The flow simulations around the slender Apollo-type configuration are carried out next and the results are compared with the experiments. Computed aerodynamic coefficients also agree well with the experiments. Flow-fields are dominated by the three-dimensional massively separated flow, which should be captured for accurate aerodynamic prediction. Grid refinement effects on the computed aerodynamic coefficients are investigated comprehensively.

  20. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  1. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to molecular and atomic isotope separation and is particularly applicable to the separation of 235 U from other uranium isotopes including 238 U. In the method described a desired isotope is separated mechanically from an atomic or molecular beam formed from an isotope mixture utilising the isotropic recoil momenta resulting from selective excitation of the desired isotope species by radiation, followed by ionization or dissociation by radiation or electron attachment. By forming a matrix of UF 6 molecules in HBr molecules so as to collapse the V 3 vibrational mode of the UF 6 molecule the 235 UF 6 molecules are selectively excited to promote reduction of UF 6 molecules containing 235 U and facilitate separation. (UK)

  2. Separations chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Results of studies on the photochemistry of aqueous Pu solutions and the stability of iodine in liquid and gaseous CO 2 are reported. Progress is reported in studies on: the preparation of macroporous bodies filled with oxides and sulfides to be used as adsorbents; the beneficiation of photographic wastes; the anion exchange adsorption of transition elements from thiosulfate solutions; advanced filtration applications of energy significance; high-resolution separations; and, the examination of the separation agents, octylphenylphosphoric acid (OPPA) and trihexyl phosphate (THP)

  3. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for separating isotopes in which photo-excitation of selected isotope species is used together with the reaction of the excited species with postive ions of predetermined ionization energy, other excited species, or free electrons to produce ions or ion fragments of the selected species. Ions and electrons are produced by an electrical discharge, and separation is achieved through radial ambipolar diffusion, electrostatic techniques, or magnetohydrodynamic methods

  4. Numerical investigation of different tip shapes for wind turbine blades. Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagaard Madsen, H.; Fuglsang, P.

    1996-12-01

    The aerodynamic optimization of the tip region is discussed and it is concluded that in principle there is no main difference to the optimization problem of the rest of the blade except that the performance of the aerodynamic models as, e.g., the blade element momentum theory (BEM) is more uncertain in this region due to the complex, three dimensional flow field. It is shown that an optimization of an entire blade in general leads to a slender tip with a chord decreasing to zero at the blade tip. Finally, the influence on the blade aerodynamics from minor changes of the planform in the tip region is illustrated. Two common aeroacoustic models are reviewed. The aerodynamic input parameters to both models are strength of the tip vortex and the length of the separated flow bubble formed by the tip vortex at the trailing edge. In the original aeroacoustic models these two parameters are calculated from empirical relations based on different experiments, e.g., using flow visualization. In the present work the two parameters was compared with the results of a CFD calculation of the flow around a rectangular shaped tip. The principal influence of sweep of the tip axis has also been investigated from detailed CFD simulations. It is found that sweeping the leading edge towards the trailing edge results in a stronger flow separation at moderate and high angles of attack compared to, when the trailing edge is swept towards the leading edge. This can have a considerable influence on the total loading on the blade. Similar tendencies have been found in full scale experiments. At the end of the report the application of the results from the present study are discussed for practical tip design. As the tip noise is linked to the strength of the tip vortex and the extension of the separation region these two parameters should be reduced in order to lower the tip noise. (Abstract Truncated)

  5. In vivo measurement of aerodynamic weight support in freely flying birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-11-01

    Birds dynamically change the shape of their wing during the stroke to support their body weight aerodynamically. The wing is partially folded during the upstroke, which suggests that the upstroke of birds might not actively contribute to aerodynamic force production. This hypothesis is supported by the significant mass difference between the large pectoralis muscle that powers the down-stroke and the much smaller supracoracoideus that drives the upstroke. Previous works used indirect or incomplete techniques to measure the total force generated by bird wings ranging from muscle force, airflow, wing surface pressure, to detailed kinematics measurements coupled with bird mass-distribution models to derive net force through second derivatives. We have validated a new method that measures aerodynamic force in vivo time-resolved directly in freely flying birds which can resolve this question. The validation of the method, using independent force measurements on a quadcopter with pulsating thrust, show the aerodynamic force and impulse are measured within 2% accuracy and time-resolved. We demonstrate results for quad-copters and birds of similar weight and size. The method is scalable and can be applied to both engineered and natural flyers across taxa. The first author invented the method, the second and third authors validated the method and present results for quadcopters and birds.

  6. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  7. Visualization of numerically simulated aerodynamic flow fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hian, Q.L.; Damodaran, M.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe the development and the application of an interactive integrated software to visualize numerically simulated aerodynamic flow fields so as to enable the practitioner of computational fluid dynamics to diagnose the numerical simulation and to elucidate essential flow physics from the simulation. The input to the software is the numerical database crunched by a supercomputer and typically consists of flow variables and computational grid geometry. This flow visualization system (FVS), written in C language is targetted at the Personal IRIS Workstations. In order to demonstrate the various visualization modules, the paper also describes the application of this software to visualize two- and three-dimensional flow fields past aerodynamic configurations which have been numerically simulated on the NEC-SXIA Supercomputer. 6 refs

  8. Influence of Icing on Bridge Cable Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Frej Henningsen, Jesper; Olsen, Idar

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the relevance of ice accretion for wind-induced vibration of structural bridge cables has been recognised and became a subject of research in bridge engineering. Full-scale monitoring and observation indicate that light precipitation at moderate low temperatures between zero and -5......°C may lead to large amplitude vibrations of bridge cables under wind action. For the prediction of aerodynamic instability quasi-steady models have been developed estimating the cable response magnitude based on structural properties and aerodynamic force coefficients for drag, lift and torsion...... forces of different bridge cables types. The experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel facility capable amongst others to simulate incloud icing conditions....

  9. Specialized computer architectures for computational aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    In recent years, computational fluid dynamics has made significant progress in modelling aerodynamic phenomena. Currently, one of the major barriers to future development lies in the compute-intensive nature of the numerical formulations and the relative high cost of performing these computations on commercially available general purpose computers, a cost high with respect to dollar expenditure and/or elapsed time. Today's computing technology will support a program designed to create specialized computing facilities to be dedicated to the important problems of computational aerodynamics. One of the still unresolved questions is the organization of the computing components in such a facility. The characteristics of fluid dynamic problems which will have significant impact on the choice of computer architecture for a specialized facility are reviewed.

  10. Flight Test Maneuvers for Efficient Aerodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Novel flight test maneuvers for efficient aerodynamic modeling were developed and demonstrated in flight. Orthogonal optimized multi-sine inputs were applied to aircraft control surfaces to excite aircraft dynamic response in all six degrees of freedom simultaneously while keeping the aircraft close to chosen reference flight conditions. Each maneuver was designed for a specific modeling task that cannot be adequately or efficiently accomplished using conventional flight test maneuvers. All of the new maneuvers were first described and explained, then demonstrated on a subscale jet transport aircraft in flight. Real-time and post-flight modeling results obtained using equation-error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were used to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the new maneuvers, as well as the quality of the aerodynamic models that can be identified from the resultant flight data.

  11. Aerodynamic Modelling and Optimization of Axial Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft

    A numerically efficient mathematical model for the aerodynamics oflow speed axial fans of the arbitrary vortex flow type has been developed.The model is based on a blade-element principle, whereby therotor is divided into a number of annular streamtubes.For each of these streamtubes relations......-Raphson method, andsolutions converged to machine accuracy are found at small computing costs.The model has been validated against published measurementson various fan configurations,comprising two rotor-only fan stages, a counter-rotatingfan unit and a stator-rotor-stator stage.Comparisons of local...... and integrated propertiesshow that the computed results agree well with the measurements.Integrating a rotor-only version of the aerodynamic modelwith an algorithm for numerical designoptimization, enables the finding of an optimum fan rotor.The angular velocity of the rotor, the hub radius and the spanwise...

  12. Computational Aerodynamic Modeling of Small Quadcopter Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Ventura Diaz, Patricia; Boyd, D. Douglas; Chan, William M.; Theodore, Colin R.

    2017-01-01

    High-fidelity computational simulations have been performed which focus on rotor-fuselage and rotor-rotor aerodynamic interactions of small quad-rotor vehicle systems. The three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved on overset grids using high-order accurate schemes, dual-time stepping, low Mach number preconditioning, and hybrid turbulence modeling. Computational results for isolated rotors are shown to compare well with available experimental data. Computational results in hover reveal the differences between a conventional configuration where the rotors are mounted above the fuselage and an unconventional configuration where the rotors are mounted below the fuselage. Complex flow physics in forward flight is investigated. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that understanding of interactional aerodynamics can be an important factor in design decisions regarding rotor and fuselage placement for next-generation multi-rotor drones.

  13. Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong

    and applied to laminar flows. An aero-acoustic formulation for turbulent flows was in [15] developed for Large Eddy Simulation (LES), Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation (URANS) and Detached Eddy Simulation (DES). In [16] a collocated grid / finite volume method for aero-acoustic computations...... with Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA). With the spread of wind turbines near urban areas, there is an increasing need for accurate predictions of aerodynamically generated noise. Indeed, noise has become one of the most important issues for further development of wind power, and the ability of controlling...... and aero-acoustics of wind turbines. The papers are written in the period from 1997 to 2008 and numbered according to the list in page v. The work consists of two parts: an aerodynamic part based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and an aero-acoustic part based on Computational Aero Acoustics for wind...

  14. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Hybridized Differential Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses an evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution (DE) in conjunction with various hybridization strategies is described. DE is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Various hybridization strategies for DE are explored, including the use of neural networks as well as traditional local search methods. A Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the hybrid DE optimizer. The method is implemented on distributed parallel computers so that new designs can be obtained within reasonable turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. (The final paper will include at least one other aerodynamic design application). The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated.

  15. Compressor performance aerodynamics for the user

    CERN Document Server

    Gresh, Theodore

    2001-01-01

    Compressor Performance is a reference book and CD-ROM for compressor design engineers and compressor maintenance engineers, as well as engineering students. The book covers the full spectrum of information needed for an individual to select, operate, test and maintain axial or centrifugal compressors. It includes basic aerodynamic theory to provide the user with the ""how's"" and ""why's"" of compressor design. Maintenance engineers will especially appreciate the troubleshooting guidelines offered. Includes many example problems and reference data such as gas propert

  16. Uncertainty quantification and race car aerodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford, J; Montomoli, F; D'Ammaro, A

    2014-01-01

    28.04.15 KB. Ok to add accepted version to spiral, embargo expired Car aerodynamics are subjected to a number of random variables which introduce uncertainty into the downforce performance. These can include, but are not limited to, pitch variations and ride height variations. Studying the effect of the random variations in these parameters is important to predict accurately the car performance during the race. Despite their importance the assessment of these variations is difficult and it...

  17. Variation in aerodynamic coefficients with altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Shahid

    Full Text Available Precise aerodynamics performance prediction plays key role for a flying vehicle to get its mission completed within desired accuracy. Aerodynamic coefficients for same Mach number can be different at different altitude due to difference in Reynolds number. Prediction of these aerodynamics coefficients can be made through experiments, analytical solution or Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Advancements in computational power have generated the concept of using CFD as a virtual Wind Tunnel (WT, hence aerodynamic performance prediction in present study is based upon CFD (numerical test rig. Simulations at different altitudes for a range of Mach numbers with zero angle of attack are performed to predict axial force coefficient behavior with altitude (Reynolds number. Similar simulations for a fixed Mach number ‘3’ and a range of angle of attacks are also carried out to envisage the variation in normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude (Reynolds number. Results clearly depict that the axial force coefficient is a function of altitude (Reynolds number and increase as altitude increases, especially for subsonic region. Variation in axial force coefficient with altitude (Reynolds number slightly increases for larger values of angle of attacks. Normal force and pitching moment coefficients do not depend on altitude (Reynolds number at smaller values of angle of attacks but show slight decrease as altitude increases. Present study suggests that variation of normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude can be neglected but the variation of axial force coefficient with altitude should be considered for vehicle fly in dense atmosphere. It is recommended to continue this study to more complex configurations for various Mach numbers with side slip and real gas effects. Keywords: Mach number, Reynolds number, Blunt body, Altitude effect, Angle of attacks

  18. Variation in aerodynamic coefficients with altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Faiza; Hussain, Mukkarum; Baig, Mirza Mehmood; Haq, Ihtram ul

    Precise aerodynamics performance prediction plays key role for a flying vehicle to get its mission completed within desired accuracy. Aerodynamic coefficients for same Mach number can be different at different altitude due to difference in Reynolds number. Prediction of these aerodynamics coefficients can be made through experiments, analytical solution or Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Advancements in computational power have generated the concept of using CFD as a virtual Wind Tunnel (WT), hence aerodynamic performance prediction in present study is based upon CFD (numerical test rig). Simulations at different altitudes for a range of Mach numbers with zero angle of attack are performed to predict axial force coefficient behavior with altitude (Reynolds number). Similar simulations for a fixed Mach number '3' and a range of angle of attacks are also carried out to envisage the variation in normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude (Reynolds number). Results clearly depict that the axial force coefficient is a function of altitude (Reynolds number) and increase as altitude increases, especially for subsonic region. Variation in axial force coefficient with altitude (Reynolds number) slightly increases for larger values of angle of attacks. Normal force and pitching moment coefficients do not depend on altitude (Reynolds number) at smaller values of angle of attacks but show slight decrease as altitude increases. Present study suggests that variation of normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude can be neglected but the variation of axial force coefficient with altitude should be considered for vehicle fly in dense atmosphere. It is recommended to continue this study to more complex configurations for various Mach numbers with side slip and real gas effects.

  19. Active aerodynamic drag reduction on morphable cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttag, M.; Reis, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    We study a mechanism for active aerodynamic drag reduction on morphable grooved cylinders, whose topography can be modified pneumatically. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the Saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea), which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. Our analog experimental samples comprise a spoked rigid skeleton with axial cavities, covered by a stretched elastomeric film. Decreasing the inner pressure of the sample produces axial grooves, whose depth can be accurately varied, on demand. First, we characterize the relation between groove depth and pneumatic loading through a combination of precision mechanical experiments and finite element simulations. Second, wind tunnel tests are used to measure the aerodynamic drag coefficient (as a function of Reynolds number) of the grooved samples, with different levels of periodicity and groove depths. We focus specifically on the drag crisis and systematically measure the associated minimum drag coefficient and the critical Reynolds number at which it occurs. The results are in agreement with the classic literature of rough cylinders, albeit with an unprecedented level of precision and resolution in varying topography using a single sample. Finally, we leverage the morphable nature of our system to dynamically reduce drag for varying aerodynamic loading conditions. We demonstrate that actively controlling the groove depth yields a drag coefficient that decreases monotonically with Reynolds number and is significantly lower than the fixed sample counterparts. These findings open the possibility for the drag reduction of grooved cylinders to be operated over a wide range of flow conditions.

  20. Optimal Spacecraft Attitude Control Using Aerodynamic Torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    His design resembles a badminton shuttlecock and “uses passive aerodynamic drag torques to stabilize pitch and yaw” and active magnetic torque...Ravindran’s and Hughes’ ‘arrow-like’ design. Psiaki notes that “this arrow concept has been modified to become a badminton shuttlecock-type design...panels were placed to the rear of the center-of-mass, similar to a badminton shuttlecock, to provide passive stability about the pitch and yaw axes

  1. Aerodynamic sampling for landmine trace detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Gary S.; Kester, Douglas A.

    2001-10-01

    Electronic noses and similar sensors show promise for detecting buried landmines through the explosive trace signals they emit. A key step in this detection is the sampler or sniffer, which acquires the airborne trace signal and presents it to the detector. Practicality demands no physical contact with the ground. Further, both airborne particulates and molecular traces must be sampled. Given a complicated minefield terrain and microclimate, this becomes a daunting chore. Our prior research on canine olfactory aerodynamics revealed several ways that evolution has dealt with such problems: 1) proximity of the sniffer to the scent source is important, 2) avoid exhaling back into the scent source, 3) use an aerodynamic collar on the sniffer inlet, 4) use auxiliary airjets to stir up surface particles, and 5) manage the 'impedance mismatch' between sniffer and sensor airflows carefully. Unfortunately, even basic data on aerodynamic sniffer performance as a function of inlet-tube and scent-source diameters, standoff distance, etc., have not been previously obtained. A laboratory-prototype sniffer was thus developed to provide guidance for landmine trace detectors. Initial experiments with this device are the subject of this paper. For example, a spike in the trace signal is observed upon starting the sniffer airflow, apparently due to rapid depletion of the available signal-laden air. Further, shielding the sniffer from disruptive ambient airflows arises as a key issue in sampling efficiency.

  2. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    This paper shows an example of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. The aerodynamic optimised geometry from PVOPT is the `real` optimum (up to the latest decimal). The most important conclusion from this study is, that it is worthwhile to investigate the behaviour of the objective function (in the present case the energy yield) around the optimum: If the optimum is flat, there is a possibility to apply modifications to the optimum configuration with only a limited loss in energy yield. It is obvious that the modified configurations emits a different (and possibly lower) noise level. In the BLADOPT program (the successor of PVOPT) it will be possible to quantify the noise level and hence to assess the reduced noise emission more thoroughly. At present the most promising approaches for noise reduction are believed to be a reduction of the rotor speed (if at all possible), and a reduction of the tip angle by means of low lift profiles, or decreased twist at the outboard stations. These modifications were possible without a significant loss in energy yield. (LN)

  3. Calculated Low-Speed Steady and Time-Dependent Aerodynamic Derivatives for Some Airfoils Using a Discrete Vortex Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a collection of some results of four individual studies presenting calculated numerical values for airfoil aerodynamic stability derivatives in unseparated inviscid incompressible flow due separately to angle-of-attack, pitch rate, flap deflection, and airfoil camber using a discrete vortex method. Both steady conditions and oscillatory motion were considered. Variables include the number of vortices representing the airfoil, the pitch axis / moment center chordwise location, flap chord to airfoil chord ratio, and circular or parabolic arc camber. Comparisons with some experimental and other theoretical information are included. The calculated aerodynamic numerical results obtained using a limited number of vortices provided in each study compared favorably with thin airfoil theory predictions. Of particular interest are those aerodynamic results calculated herein (such as induced drag) that are not readily available elsewhere.

  4. Separation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    A disposal container is described for use in disposal of radioactive waste materials consisting of: top wall structure, bottom wall structure, and circumferential side wall structure interconnecting the top and bottom wall structures to define an enclosed container, separation structure in the container adjacent the inner surface of the side wall structure for allowing passage of liquid and retention of solids, inlet port structure in the top wall structure, discharge port structure at the periphery of the container in communication with the outer surface of the separation structure for receiving liquid that passes through the separation structure, first centrifugally actuated valve structure having a normal position closing the inlet port structure and a centrifugally actuated position opening the inlet port structure, second centrifugally actuated valve structure having a normal position closing the discharge port structure and a centrifugally actuated position opening the discharge port structure, and coupling structure integral with wall structure of the container for releasable engagement with centrifugal drive structure

  5. Separable algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Timothy J

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the theory of separable algebras over commutative rings. After a thorough introduction to the general theory, the fundamental roles played by separable algebras are explored. For example, Azumaya algebras, the henselization of local rings, and Galois theory are rigorously introduced and treated. Interwoven throughout these applications is the important notion of étale algebras. Essential connections are drawn between the theory of separable algebras and Morita theory, the theory of faithfully flat descent, cohomology, derivations, differentials, reflexive lattices, maximal orders, and class groups. The text is accessible to graduate students who have finished a first course in algebra, and it includes necessary foundational material, useful exercises, and many nontrivial examples.

  6. Aerodynamic Analysis of Trailing Edge Enlarged Wind Turbine Airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Haoran; Yang, Hua; Liu, Chao; Shen, Wenzhong; Zhu, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils generated from the DU- 91-W2-250, DU-97-W-300 and DU-96-W-350 airfoils by enlarging the thickness of trailing edge symmetrically from the location of maximum thickness to chord to the trailing edge were analyzed by using CFD and RFOIL methods at a chord Reynolds number of 3 × 10 6 . The goal of this study is to analyze the aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils with different thicknesses of trailing edge and maximum thicknesses to chord. The steady results calculated by the fully turbulent k-ω SST, transitional k-ω SST model and RFOIL all show that with the increase of thickness of trailing edge, the linear region of lift is extended and the maximum lift also increases, the increase rate and amount of lift become limited gradually at low angles of attack, while the drag increases dramatically. For thicker airfoils with larger maximum thickness to chord length, the increment of lift is larger than that of relatively thinner airfoils when the thickness of blunt trailing edge is increased from 5% to 10% chord length. But too large lift can cause abrupt stall which is profitless for power output. The transient characteristics of blunt trailing edge airfoils are caused by blunt body vortices at low angles of attack, and by the combined effect of separation and blunt body vortices at large angles of attack. With the increase of thickness of blunt trailing edge, the vibration amplitudes of lift and drag curves increase. The transient calculations over-predict the lift at large angles of attack and drag at all angles of attack than the steady calculations which is likely to be caused by the artificial restriction of the flow in two dimensions

  7. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, R.J.; Morrey, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated

  8. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Aerodynamic Penalties and Mechanisms in Heavy Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations that are conducted on a transport-type airfoil, NACA 64-210, at a Reynolds number of 2.6×106 and LWC of 25 g/m3 explore the aerodynamic penalties and mechanisms that affect airfoil performance in heavy rain conditions. Our simulation results agree well with the experimental data and show significant aerodynamic penalties for the airfoil in heavy rain. The maximum percentage decrease in CL is reached by 13.2% and the maximum percentage increase in CD by 47.6%. Performance degradation in heavy rain at low angles of attack is emulated by an originally creative boundary-layer-tripped technique near the leading edge. Numerical flow visualization technique is used to show premature boundary-layer separation at high angles of attack and the particulate trajectories at various angles of attack. A mathematic model is established to qualitatively study the water film effect on the airfoil geometric changes. All above efforts indicate that two primary mechanisms are accountable for the airfoil aerodynamic penalties. One is to cause premature boundary-layer transition at low AOA and separation at high AOA. The other occurs at times scales consistent with the water film layer, which is thought to alter the airfoil geometry and increase the mass effectively.

  9. A large-scale computer facility for computational aerodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, F.R.; Balhaus, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The combination of computer system technology and numerical modeling have advanced to the point that computational aerodynamics has emerged as an essential element in aerospace vehicle design methodology. To provide for further advances in modeling of aerodynamic flow fields, NASA has initiated at the Ames Research Center the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program. The objective of the Program is to develop a leading-edge, large-scale computer facility, and make it available to NASA, DoD, other Government agencies, industry and universities as a necessary element in ensuring continuing leadership in computational aerodynamics and related disciplines. The Program will establish an initial operational capability in 1986 and systematically enhance that capability by incorporating evolving improvements in state-of-the-art computer system technologies as required to maintain a leadership role. This paper briefly reviews the present and future requirements for computational aerodynamics and discusses the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program objectives, computational goals, and implementation plans

  10. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Technologies Testing of Heavy-Duty Vocational Vehicles and a Dry Van Trailer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragatz, Adam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thornton, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This study focused on two accepted methods for quantifying the benefit of aerodynamic improvement technologies on vocational vehicles: the coastdown technique, and on-road constant speed fuel economy measurements. Both techniques have their advantages. Coastdown tests are conducted over a wide range in speed and allow the rolling resistance and aerodynamic components of road load force to be separated. This in turn allows for the change in road load and fuel economy to be estimated at any speed, as well as over transient cycles. The on-road fuel economy measurements only supply one lumped result, applicable at the specific test speed, but are a direct measurement of fuel usage and are therefore used in this study as a check on the observed coastdown results. Resulting coefficients were then used to populate a vehicle model and simulate expected annual fuel savings over real-world vocational drive cycles.

  11. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijres, Florian T; Johansson, L Christoffer; Bowlin, Melissa S; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate longer distances

  12. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T Muijres

    Full Text Available Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate

  13. Influence of Unsteady Aerodynamics on Driving Dynamics of Passenger Cars

    OpenAIRE

    Huemer, J.; Stickel, T.; Sagan, E.; Schwarz, M.; Wall, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent approaches towards numerical investigations with CFD-Methods on unsteady aerodynamic loads of passenger cars identified major differences compared to steady state aerodynamic excitations. Furthermore innovative vehicle concepts like electric-vehicles or hybrid drives further challenge the basic layout of passenger cars. Therefore the relevance of unsteady aerodynamic loads on cross-wind stability of changing basic vehicle architectures should be analysed. In order to assure and improve...

  14. The Aerodynamic Performance of the 24 Inch Houck Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Winglets “ Winglets are aerodynamic components, placed at the tip of a wing to improve its efficiency during cruise” (6). The purpose of the winglet ... winglets have, by and large, been accepted as effective fuel-saving aerodynamic devices by both small and large aircraft manufacturers. 12 2.6... Winglet Airfoil for Low-Speed Aircraft.” AIAA 19th Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 11-14 June, 2001. AIAA Paper 2001-2406. 22. Mock, R. M. “The

  15. The Aerodynamic Performance of the Houck Configuration Flow Guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    efficiency factor (e = 1 for elliptical wing). 2.5 Winglets A winglet is best described by Jean Chattot’s quote: “ Winglets are aerodynamic components...spite of all the disadvantages, many aviation manufacturers have accepted winglets as a proven fuel- saving aerodynamic device (4). A study...conducted by Smith and Campbell in 1996 showed the effect of winglets on aerodynamic efficiency of a low-aspect-ratio model with respect to lift-to-drag

  16. Study of Swept Angle Effects on Grid Fins Aerodynamics Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faza, G. A.; Fadillah, H.; Silitonga, F. Y.; Agoes Moelyadi, Mochamad

    2018-04-01

    Grid fin is an aerodynamic control surface that usually used on missiles and rockets. In the recent several years many researches have conducted to develop a more efficient grid fins. There are many possibilities of geometric combination could be done to improve aerodynamics characteristic of a grid fin. This paper will only discuss about the aerodynamics characteristics of grid fins compared by another grid fins with different swept angle. The methodology that used to compare the aerodynamics is Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The result of this paper might be used for future studies to answer our former question or as a reference for related studies.

  17. A new specimen of the Early Cretaceous bird Hongshanornis longicresta: insights into the aerodynamics and diet of a basal ornithuromorph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Chiappe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of Hongshanornis longicresta, a small ornithuromorph bird with unusually long hindlimb proportions, was followed by the discovery of two closely related species, Longicrusavis houi and Parahongshanornis chaoyangensis. Together forming the Hongshanornithidae, these species reveal important information about the early diversity and morphological specialization of ornithuromorphs, the clade that contains all living birds. Here we report on a new specimen (DNHM D2945/6 referable to Hongshanornis longicresta that contributes significant information to better understand the morphology, trophic ecology, and aerodynamics of this species, as well as the taxonomy of the Hongshanornithidae. Most notable are the well-preserved wings and feathered tail of DNHM D2945/6, which afford an accurate reconstruction of aerodynamic parameters indicating that as early as 125 million years ago, basal ornithuromorphs had evolved aerodynamic surfaces comparable in size and design to those of many modern birds, and flight modes alike to those of some small living birds.

  18. Separation membrane development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.W. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A ceramic membrane has been developed to separate hydrogen from other gases. The method used is a sol-gel process. A thin layer of dense ceramic material is coated on a coarse ceramic filter substrate. The pore size distribution in the thin layer is controlled by a densification of the coating materials by heat treatment. The membrane has been tested by permeation measurement of the hydrogen and other gases. Selectivity of the membrane has been achieved to separate hydrogen from carbon monoxide. The permeation rate of hydrogen through the ceramic membrane was about 20 times larger than Pd-Ag membrane.

  19. Modeling of aerodynamics in vortex furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anufriev, I.; Krasinsky, D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Thermophysics; Salomatov, V.; Anikin, Y.; Sharypov, O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Thermophysics; Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Enkhjargal, Kh. [Mongol Univ. of Science and Technology, Ulan Bator (Mongolia)

    2013-07-01

    At present, the torch burning technology of pulverized-coal fuel in vortex flow is one of the most prospective and environmentally-friendly combustion technologies of low-grade coals. Appropriate organization of aerodynamics may influence stability of temperature and heat flux distributions, increase slag catching, and reduce toxic emissions. Therefore, from scientific point of view it is interesting to investigate aerodynamics in the devices aiming at justification of design and operating parameters for new steam generators with vortex furnace, and upgrade of existing boiler equipment. The present work is devoted to physical and mathematical modeling of interior aerodynamics of vortex furnace of steam generator of thermal power plants. Research was carried out on the air isothermal model which geometry was similar to one section of the experimental- industrial boiler TPE-427 of Novosibirsk TPS-3. Main elements of vortex furnace structure are combustion chamber, diffuser, and cooling chamber. The model is made from organic glass; on the front wall two rectangular nozzles (through which compressed air is injected) are placed symmetrically at 15 to the horizon. The Laser Doppler Velocimeter LAD-05 was used for non-contact measurement of vortex flow characteristics. Two velocity components in the XY-plane (in different cross- sections of the model) were measured in these experiments. Reynolds number was 3.10{sup 5}. Numerical simulation of 3-D turbulent isothermal flow was performed with the use of CFD package FLUENT. Detailed structure of the flow in vortex furnace model has been obtained in predictions. The distributions of main flow characteristics (pressure, velocity and vorticity fields, turbulent kinetic energy) are presented. The obtained results may be used at designing boilers with vortex furnace. Computations were performed using the supercomputer NKS-160.

  20. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Takeshi; Seo, Kazuya

    2013-12-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through a wind tunnel test and ball trajectory simulations, this study shows that the aerodynamic resistance of the new 32-panel soccer ball is larger in the high-speed region and lower in the middle-speed region than that of the previous 14- and 8-panel balls. The critical Reynolds number of the Roteiro, Teamgeist II, Jabulani, and Tango 12 was ~2.2 × 10(5) (drag coefficient, C d  ≈ 0.12), ~2.8 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), ~3.3 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), and ~2.4 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.15), respectively. The flight trajectory simulation suggested that the Tango 12, one of the newest soccer balls, has less air resistance in the medium-speed region than the Jabulani and can thus easily acquire large initial velocity in this region. It is considered that the critical Reynolds number of a soccer ball, as considered within the scope of this experiment, depends on the extended total distance of the panel bonds rather than the small designs on the panel surfaces.

  1. Wind Turbines: Unsteady Aerodynamics and Inflow Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Brian Riget

    in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics (Sears, W. R.: 1941, Some aspects of non-stationary airfoil theory and its practical application; Goldstein, M. E. and Atassi, H. M.: 1976, A complete second-order theory for the unsteady flow about an airfoil due to a periodic gust...... (Sears, W. R.: 1941; and Graham, J. M. R.: 1970). An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input (Amiet, R. K.: 1975, Acoustic radiation from an airfoil in a turbulent stream). The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models...

  2. Modelling of Aerodynamic Drag in Alpine Skiing

    OpenAIRE

    Elfmark, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Most of the breaking force in the speed disciplines in alpine skiing is caused by the aerodynamic drag, and a better knowledge of the drag force is therefore desirable to gain time in races. In this study a complete database of how the drag area (CDA) changes, with respect to the different body segments, was made and used to explain a complete body motion in alpine skiing. Three experiments were performed in the wind tunnel at NTNU, Trondheim. The database from a full body measurement on an a...

  3. Aerodynamic Benchmarking of the Deepwind Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedona, Gabriele; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic benchmarking for the DeepWind rotor is conducted comparing different rotor geometries and solutions and keeping the comparison as fair as possible. The objective for the benchmarking is to find the most suitable configuration in order to maximize the power production and minimize...... the blade solicitation and the cost of energy. Different parameters are considered for the benchmarking study. The DeepWind blade is characterized by a shape similar to the Troposkien geometry but asymmetric between the top and bottom parts: this shape is considered as a fixed parameter in the benchmarking...

  4. Aerodynamics/ACEE: Aircraft energy efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of a 10 year program managed by NASA which seeks to make possible the most efficient use of energy for aircraft propulsion and lift as well as provide a technology that can be used by U.S. manufacturers of air transports and engines. Supercritical wings, winglets, vortex drag reduction, high lift, active control, laminar flow control, and aerodynamics by computer are among the topics discussed. Wind tunnel models in flight verification of advanced technology, and the design, construction and testing of various aircraft structures are also described.

  5. Sensor Systems Collect Critical Aerodynamics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    With the support of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Dryden Flight Research Center, Tao of Systems Integration Inc. developed sensors and other components that will ultimately form a first-of-its-kind, closed-loop system for detecting, measuring, and controlling aerodynamic forces and moments in flight. The Hampton, Virginia-based company commercialized three of the four planned components, which provide sensing solutions for customers such as Boeing, General Electric, and BMW and are used for applications such as improving wind turbine operation and optimizing air flow from air conditioning systems. The completed system may one day enable flexible-wing aircraft with flight capabilities like those of birds.

  6. Fitting aerodynamics and propulsion into the puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Patrick J.; Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.; Chapman, Gary T.

    1987-01-01

    The development of an airbreathing single-stage-to-orbit vehicle, in particular the problems of aerodynamics and propulsion integration, is examined. The boundary layer transition on constant pressure surfaces at hypersonic velocities, and the effects of noise on the transition are investigated. The importance of viscosity, real-gas effects, and drag at hypersonic speeds is discussed. A propulsion system with sufficient propulsive lift to enhance the performance of the vehicle is being developed. The difficulties of engine-airframe integration are analyzed.

  7. Generic Wing-Body Aerodynamics Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Terry L.; Olsen, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The wing-body aerodynamics data base consists of a series of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations about a generic wing body configuration consisting of a ogive-circular-cylinder fuselage and a simple symmetric wing mid-mounted on the fuselage. Solutions have been obtained for Nonlinear Potential (P), Euler (E) and Navier-Stokes (N) solvers over a range of subsonic and transonic Mach numbers and angles of attack. In addition, each solution has been computed on a series of grids, coarse, medium and fine to permit an assessment of grid refinement errors.

  8. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic support struts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-03-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The support struts may include an aerodynamic contoured shape so as to distribute evenly a flow of air to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  9. Gas separating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  10. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosevear, A.; Sims, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    sup(195m)Au for medical usage is separated from sup(195m)Hg in a solution containing ions of sup(195m)Hg by contacting the solution with an adsorbing agent to adsorb 195 Hgsup(H) thereon, followed by selective elution of sup(195m)Au generated by radioactive decay of the sup(195m)Hg. The adsorbing agent comprises a composite material in the form of an inert porous inorganic substrate (e.g. Kieselguhr),the pores of which are occupied by a hydrogel of a polysaccharide (e.g. agarose) carrying terminal thiol groups for binding Hgsup(H) ions. (author)

  11. On the size of sports fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Texier, Baptiste Darbois; Cohen, Caroline; Clanet, Christophe; Dupeux, Guillaume; Quéré, David

    2014-01-01

    The size of sports fields considerably varies from a few meters for table tennis to hundreds of meters for golf. We first show that this size is mainly fixed by the range of the projectile, that is, by the aerodynamic properties of the ball (mass, surface, drag coefficient) and its maximal velocity in the game. This allows us to propose general classifications for sports played with a ball. (paper)

  12. Aerodynamics of a translating comb-like plate inspired by a fairyfly wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Daegyoum

    2017-08-01

    Unlike the smooth wings of common insects or birds, micro-scale insects such as the fairyfly have a distinctive wing geometry, comprising a frame with several bristles. Motivated by this peculiar wing geometry, we experimentally investigated the flow structure of a translating comb-like wing for a wide range of gap size, angle of attack, and Reynolds number, Re = O(10) - O(103), and the correlation of these parameters with aerodynamic performance. The flow structures of a smooth plate without a gap and a comb-like plate are significantly different at high Reynolds number, while little difference was observed at the low Reynolds number of O(10). At low Reynolds number, shear layers that were generated at the edges of the tooth of the comb-like plate strongly diffuse and eventually block a gap. This gap blockage increases the effective surface area of the plate and alters the formation of leading-edge and trailing-edge vortices. As a result, the comb-like plate generates larger aerodynamic force per unit area than the smooth plate. In addition to a quasi-steady phase after the comb-like plate travels several chords, we also studied a starting phase of the shear layer development when the comb-like plate begins to translate from rest. While a plate with small gap size can generate aerodynamic force at the starting phase as effectively as at the quasi-steady phase, the aerodynamic force drops noticeably for a plate with a large gap because the diffusion of the developing shear layers is not enough to block the gap.

  13. Aerodynamic models for a Darrieus wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraunie, P.; Beguier, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.

    1982-11-01

    Various models proposed for the aerodynamics of Darrieus wind turbines are reviewed. The magnitude of the L/D ratio for a Darrieus rotor blade is dependent on the profile, the Re, boundary layer characteristics, and the three-dimensional flow effects. The aerodynamic efficiency is theoretically the Betz limit, and the interference of one blade with another is constrained by the drag force integrated over all points on the actuator disk. A single streamtube model can predict the power available in a Darrieus, but the model lacks definition of the flow structure and the cyclic stresses. Techniques for calculating the velocity profiles and the consequent induced velocity at the blades are presented. The multiple streamtube theory has been devised to account for the repartition of the velocity in the rotor interior. The model has been expanded as the double multiple streamtube theory at Sandia Laboratories. Futher work is necessary, however, to include the effects of dynamic decoupling at high rotation speeds and to accurately describe blade behavior.

  14. Aerodynamic analysis of formula student car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmawan, Mohammad Arief; Ubaidillah, Nugraha, Arga Ahmadi; Wijayanta, Agung Tri; Naufal, Brian Aqif

    2018-02-01

    Formula Society of Automotive Engineering (FSAE) is a contest between ungraduated students to create a high-performance formula student car that completes the regulation. Body and the other aerodynamic devices are significant because it affects the drag coefficient and the down force of the car. The drag coefficient is a measurement of the resistance of an object in a fluid environment, a lower the drag coefficient means it will have a less drag force. Down force is a force that pushes an object to the ground, in the car more down force means more grip. The objective of the research was to study the aerodynamic comparison between the race vehicle when attached to the wings and without it. These studies were done in three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation method using the Autodesk Flow Design software. These simulations were done by conducted in 5 different velocities. The results of those simulations are by attaching wings on race vehicle has drag coefficient 0.728 and without wings has drag coefficient 0.56. Wings attachment will decrease the drag coefficient about 23 % and also the contour pressure and velocity were known at these simulations.

  15. Electro-aerodynamic field aided needleless electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guilong; Niu, Haitao; Zhou, Hua; Wang, Hongxia; Shao, Hao; Zhao, Xueting; Lin, Tong

    2018-06-08

    Auxiliary fields have been used to enhance the performance of needle electrospinning. However, much less has been reported on how auxiliary fields affect needleless electrospinning. Herein, we report a novel needleless electrospinning technique that consists of an aerodynamic field and a second electric field. The second electric field is generated by setting two grounded inductive electrodes near the spinneret. The two auxiliary fields have to be applied simultaneously to ensure working of the electrospinning process. A synergistic effect was observed between inductive electrode and airflow. The aerodynamic-electric auxiliary field was found to significantly increase fiber production rate (4.5 g h -1 ), by 350% in comparison to the setup without auxiliary field (1.0 g h -1 ), whereas it had little effect on fiber diameter. The auxiliary fields allow running needleless electrospinning at an applied voltage equivalent to that in needle electrospinning (e.g. 10-30 kV). The finite element analyses of electric field and airflow field verify that the inductive electrodes increase electric field strength near the spinneret, and the airflow assists in fiber deposition. This novel needleless electrospinning may be useful for development of high-efficiency, low energy-consumption nanofiber production systems.

  16. Electro-aerodynamic field aided needleless electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guilong; Niu, Haitao; Zhou, Hua; Wang, Hongxia; Shao, Hao; Zhao, Xueting; Lin, Tong

    2018-06-01

    Auxiliary fields have been used to enhance the performance of needle electrospinning. However, much less has been reported on how auxiliary fields affect needleless electrospinning. Herein, we report a novel needleless electrospinning technique that consists of an aerodynamic field and a second electric field. The second electric field is generated by setting two grounded inductive electrodes near the spinneret. The two auxiliary fields have to be applied simultaneously to ensure working of the electrospinning process. A synergistic effect was observed between inductive electrode and airflow. The aerodynamic-electric auxiliary field was found to significantly increase fiber production rate (4.5 g h‑1), by 350% in comparison to the setup without auxiliary field (1.0 g h‑1), whereas it had little effect on fiber diameter. The auxiliary fields allow running needleless electrospinning at an applied voltage equivalent to that in needle electrospinning (e.g. 10–30 kV). The finite element analyses of electric field and airflow field verify that the inductive electrodes increase electric field strength near the spinneret, and the airflow assists in fiber deposition. This novel needleless electrospinning may be useful for development of high-efficiency, low energy-consumption nanofiber production systems.

  17. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MEXICO Rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herraez, I; Medjroubi, W; Peinke, J; Stoevesandt, B

    2014-01-01

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations are a very promising method for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines in an inexpensive and accurate way. One of the major drawbacks of this method is the lack of validated models. As a consequence, the reliability of numerical results is often difficult to assess. The MEXICO project aimed at solving this problem by providing the project partners with high quality measurements of a 4.5 meters rotor diameter wind turbine operating under controlled conditions. The large measurement data-set allows the validation of all kind of aerodynamic models. This work summarizes our efforts for validating a CFD model based on the open source software OpenFoam. Both steady- state and time-accurate simulations have been performed with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for several operating conditions. In this paper we will concentrate on axisymmetric inflow for 3 different wind speeds. The numerical results are compared with pressure distributions from several blade sections and PIV-flow data from the near wake region. In general, a reasonable agreement between measurements the and our simulations exists. Some discrepancies, which require further research, are also discussed

  18. State of the art in wind turbine aerodynamics and aeroelasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Voutsinas, S

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive review of wind turbine aeroelasticity is given. The aerodynamic part starts with the simple aerodynamic Blade Element Momentum Method and ends with giving a review of the work done applying CFD on wind turbine rotors. In between is explained some methods of intermediate complexity...

  19. Reliability and Applicability of Aerodynamic Measures in Dysphonia Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Edwin M.-L.; Yuen, Yuet-Ming; Whitehill, Tara; Winkworth, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Aerodynamic measures are frequently used to analyse and document pathological voices. Some normative data are available for speakers from the English-speaking population. However, no data are available yet for Chinese speakers despite the fact that they are one of the largest populations in the world. The high variability of aerodynamic measures…

  20. Some Features of Aerodynamics of Cyclonic Chamber with Free Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Orekhov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper cites results of an experimental research in aerodynamics of a cyclonic chamber with a free exit that has a large relative length. Distributions of aerodynamic stream characteristics depending on geometry of working volume of the cyclonic chamber are given in the paper. Calculative dependences are proposed in the paper.

  1. Aerodynamic tailoring of the Learjet Model 60 wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Reuben M.; Hawke, Veronica M.; Hinson, Michael L.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Madson, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The wing of the Learjet Model 60 was tailored for improved aerodynamic characteristics using the TRANAIR transonic full-potential computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A root leading edge glove and wing tip fairing were shaped to reduce shock strength, improve cruise drag and extend the buffet limit. The aerodynamic design was validated by wind tunnel test and flight test data.

  2. Biomimetic Approach for Accurate, Real-Time Aerodynamic Coefficients, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodynamic and structural reliability and efficiency depends critically on the ability to accurately assess the aerodynamic loads and moments for each lifting...

  3. Numerical and experimental investigations on unsteady aerodynamics of flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meilin

    the flow fields around a series of plunging NACA symmetric airfoils with thickness ratio ranging from 4.0% to 20.0% of the airfoil chord length. The contribution of viscous force to flapping propulsion is accessed and it is found that viscous force becomes thrust producing, instead of drag producing, and plays a non-negligible role in thrust generation for thin airfoils. This is closely related to the variations of the dynamics of the unsteady vortex structures around the plunging airfoils. As nature flyers use complex wing kinematics in flapping flight, kinematics effects on the aerodynamic performance with different airfoil thicknesses are numerically studied by using a series of NACA symmetric airfoils. It is found that the combined plunging and pitching motion can outperform the pure plunging or pitching motion by sophisticatedly adjusting the airfoil gestures during the oscillation stroke. The thin airfoil better manipulates leading edge vortices (LEVs) than the thick airfoil (NACA0030) does in studied cases, and there exists an optimal thickness for large thrust generation with reasonable propulsive efficiency. With the present kinematics and dynamic parameters, relatively low reduced frequency is conducive for thrust production and propulsive efficiency for all tested airfoil thicknesses. In order to obtain the optimal kinematics parameters of flapping flight, a kinematics optimization is then performed. A gradient-based optimization algorithm is coupled with a second-order SD Navier-Stokes solver to search for the optimal kinematics of a certain airfoil undergoing a combined plunging and pitching motion. Then a high-order SD scheme is used to verify the optimization results and reveal the detailed vortex structures associated with the optimal kinematics of the flapping flight. It is found that for the case with maximum propulsive efficiency, there exists no leading edge separation during most of the oscillation cycle. In order to provide constructive

  4. Aerodynamic Analysis and Three-Dimensional Redesign of a Multi-Stage Axial Flow Compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Ning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the introduction of three-dimension (3-D blade designs into a 5-stage axial compressor with multi-stage computational fluid dynamic (CFD methods. Prior to a redesign, a validation study is conducted for the overall performance and flow details based on full-scale test data, proving that the multi-stage CFD applied is a relatively reliable tool for the analysis of the follow-up redesign. Furthermore, at the near stall point, the aerodynamic analysis demonstrates that significant separation exists in the last stator, leading to the aerodynamic redesign, which is the focus of the last stator. Multi-stage CFD methods are applied throughout the three-dimensional redesign process for the last stator to explore their aerodynamic improvement potential. An unconventional asymmetric bow configuration incorporated with leading edge re-camber and re-solidity is employed to reduce the high loss region dominated by the mainstream. The final redesigned version produces a 13% increase in the stall margin while maintaining the efficiency at the design point.

  5. Unsteady aerodynamics and vortex-sheet formation of a two-dimensional airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, X.; Mohseni, K.

    2017-11-01

    Unsteady inviscid flow models of wings and airfoils have been developed to study the aerodynamics of natural and man-made flyers. Vortex methods have been extensively applied to reduce the dimensionality of these aerodynamic models, based on the proper estimation of the strength and distribution of the vortices in the wake. In such modeling approaches, one of the most fundamental questions is how the vortex sheets are generated and released from sharp edges. To determine the formation of the trailing-edge vortex sheet, the classical Kutta condition can be extended to unsteady situations by realizing that a flow cannot turn abruptly around a sharp edge. This condition can be readily applied to a flat plate or an airfoil with cusped trailing edge since the direction of the forming vortex sheet is known to be tangential to the trailing edge. However, for a finite-angle trailing edge, or in the case of flow separation away from a sharp corner, the direction of the forming vortex sheet is ambiguous. To remove any ad-hoc implementation, the unsteady Kutta condition, the conservation of circulation, as well as the conservation laws of mass and momentum are coupled to analytically solve for the angle, strength, and relative velocity of the trailing-edge vortex sheet. The two-dimensional aerodynamic model together with the proposed vortex-sheet formation condition is verified by comparing flow structures and force calculations with experimental results for airfoils in steady and unsteady background flows.

  6. Evaluation of aerodynamic derivatives from a magnetic balance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, B. S.; Parker, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic testing of a model in the University of Virginia cold magnetic balance wind-tunnel facility is expected to consist of measurements of the balance forces and moments, and the observation of the essentially six degree of freedom motion of the model. The aerodynamic derivatives of the model are to be evaluated from these observations. The basic feasibility of extracting aerodynamic information from the observation of a model which is executing transient, complex, multi-degree of freedom motion is demonstrated. It is considered significant that, though the problem treated here involves only linear aerodynamics, the methods used are capable of handling a very large class of aerodynamic nonlinearities. The basic considerations include the effect of noise in the data on the accuracy of the extracted information. Relationships between noise level and the accuracy of the evaluated aerodynamic derivatives are presented.

  7. A simple method to recover Norovirus from fresh produce with large sample size by using histo-blood group antigen-conjugated to magnetic beads in a recirculating affinity magnetic separation system (RCAMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Yang, David; Mandrell, Robert

    2011-06-30

    Human norovirus (NoV) outbreaks are major food safety concerns. The virus has to be concentrated from food samples in order to be detected. PEG precipitation is the most common method to recover the virus. Recently, histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been recognized as receptors for human NoV, and have been utilized as an alternative method to concentrate human NoV for samples up to 40 mL in volume. However, to wash off the virus from contaminated fresh food samples, at least 250 mL of wash volume is required. Recirculating affinity magnetic separation system (RCAMS) has been tried by others to concentrate human NoV from large-volume samples and failed to yield consistent results with the standard procedure of 30 min of recirculation at the default flow rate. Our work here demonstrates that proper recirculation time and flow rate are key factors for success in using the RCAMS. The bead recovery rate was increased from 28% to 47%, 67% and 90% when recirculation times were extended from 30 min to 60 min, 120 min and 180 min, respectively. The kinetics study suggests that at least 120 min recirculation is required to obtain a good recovery of NoV. In addition, different binding and elution conditions were compared for releasing NoV from inoculated lettuce. Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and water results in similar efficacy for virus release, but the released virus does not bind to RCAMS effectively unless pH was adjusted to acidic. Either citrate-buffered saline (CBS) wash, or water wash followed by CBS adjustment, resulted in an enhanced recovery of virus. We also demonstrated that the standard curve generated from viral RNA extracted from serially-diluted virus samples is more accurate for quantitative analysis than standard curves generated from serially-diluted plasmid DNA or transcribed-RNA templates, both of which tend to overestimate the concentration power. The efficacy of recovery of NoV from produce using RCAMS was directly compared with that of the

  8. Aerodynamic Interaction between Delta Wing and Hemisphere-Cylinder in Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Atsuhiro; Ishikawa, Takahumi; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    As future space vehicles, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) needs to be developed, where there are two kinds of RLV: Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) and Two Stage To Orbit (TSTO). In the latter case, the shock/shock interaction and shock/boundary layer interaction play a key role. In the present study, we focus on the supersonic flow field with aerodynamic interaction between a delta wing and a hemisphere-cylinder, which imitate a TSTO, where the clearance, h, between the delta wing and hemisphere-cylinder is a key parameter. As a result, complicated flow patterns were made clear, including separation bubbles.

  9. Active aerodynamic stabilisation of long suspension bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Henrik Ditlev; Sørensen, Paul Haase; Jannerup, Ole Erik

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the addition of actively controlled appendages (flaps) attached along the length of the bridge deck to dampen wind-induced oscillations in long suppension bridges. A novel approach using control systems methods for the analysis of dynamic stability is presented. In order to make...... use of control analysis and design techniques, a linear model of the structural and aerodynamic motion around equilibriun is developed. The model is validated through comparison with finite element calculations and wind tunnel experimental data on the Great Belt East Bridge in Denmark. The developed...... active control scheme is local in that the flap control signal at a given longitudinal position along the bridge only depends on local motion measurements. The analysis makes use of the Nyquist stability criteria and an anlysis of the sensitivity function for stability analysis. The analysis shows...

  10. Improving the efficiency of aerodynamic shape optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay; Eleshaky, Mohamed E.

    1994-01-01

    The computational efficiency of an aerodynamic shape optimization procedure that is based on discrete sensitivity analysis is increased through the implementation of two improvements. The first improvement involves replacing a grid-point-based approach for surface representation with a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of the surface. Explicit analytical expressions for the grid sensitivity terms are developed for both approaches. The second improvement proposes the use of Newton's method in lieu of an alternating direction implicit methodology to calculate the highly converged flow solutions that are required to compute the sensitivity coefficients. The modified design procedure is demonstrated by optimizing the shape of an internal-external nozzle configuration. Practically identical optimization results are obtained that are independent of the method used to represent the surface. A substantial factor of 8 decrease in computational time for the optimization process is achieved by implementing both of the design procedure improvements.

  11. Aerodynamic features of flames in premixed gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    A variety of experimentally established flame phenomena in premixed gases are interpreted by relating them to basic aerodynamic properties of the flow field. On this basis the essential mechanism of some well known characteristic features of flames stabilized in the wake of a bluff-body or propagating in ducts are revealed. Elementary components of the flame propagation process are shown to be: rotary motion, self-advancement, and expansion. Their consequences are analyzed under a most strict set of idealizations that permit the flow field to be treated as potential in character, while the flame is modelled as a Stefan-like interface capable of exerting a feed-back effect upon the flow field. The results provide an insight into the fundamental fluid-mechanical reasons for the experimentally observed distortions of the flame front, rationalizing in particular its ability to sustain relatively high flow velocities at amazingly low normal burning speeds.

  12. Dynamic stability of an aerodynamically efficient motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amrit; Limebeer, David J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Motorcycles exhibit two potentially dangerous oscillatory modes known as 'wobble' and 'weave'. The former is reminiscent of supermarket castor shimmy, while the latter is a low frequency 'fish-tailing' motion that involves a combination of rolling, yawing, steering and side-slipping motions. These unwanted dynamic features, which can occur when two-wheeled vehicles are operated at speed, have been studied extensively. The aim of this paper is to use mathematical analysis to identify important stability trends in the on-going design of a novel aerodynamically efficient motorcycle known as the ECOSSE Spirit ES1. A mathematical model of the ES1 is developed using a multi-body dynamics software package called VehicleSim [Anon, VehicleSim Lisp Reference Manual Version 1.0, Mechanical Simulation Corporation, 2008. Available at http://www.carsim.com]. This high-fidelity motorcycle model includes realistic tyre-road contact geometry, a comprehensive tyre model, tyre relaxation and a flexible frame. A parameter set representative of a modern high-performance machine and rider is used. Local stability is investigated via the eigenvalues of the linearised models that are associated with equilibrium points of interest. A comprehensive study of the effects of frame flexibilities, acceleration, aerodynamics and tyre variations is presented, and an optimal passive steering compensator is derived. It is shown that the traditional steering damper cannot be used to stabilise the ES1 over its entire operating speed range. A simple passive compensator, involving an inerter is proposed. Flexibility can be introduced deliberately into various chassis components to change the stability characteristics of the vehicle; the implications of this idea are studied.

  13. Aerodynamic properties of turbulent combustion fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, C. C.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    Flow fields involving turbulent flames in premixed gases under a variety of conditions are modeled by the use of a numerical technique based on the random vortex method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations and a flame propagation algorithm to trace the motion of the front and implement the Huygens principle, both due to Chorin. A successive over-relaxation hybrid method is applied to solve the Euler equation for flows in an arbitrarily shaped domain. The method of images, conformal transformation, and the integral-equation technique are also used to treat flows in special cases, according to their particular requirements. Salient features of turbulent flame propagation in premixed gases are interpreted by relating them to the aerodynamic properties of the flow field. Included among them is the well-known cellular structure of flames stabilized by bluff bodies, as well as the formation of the characteristic tulip shape of flames propagating in ducts. In its rudimentary form, the mechanism of propagation of a turbulent flame is shown to consist of: (1) rotary motion of eddies at the flame front, (2) self-advancement of the front at an appropriate normal burning speed, and (3) dynamic effects of expansion due to exothermicity of the combustion reaction. An idealized model is used to illustrate these fundamental mechanisms and to investigate basic aerodynamic features of flames in premixed gases. The case of a confined flame stabilized behind a rearward-facing step is given particular care and attention. Solutions are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental results, especially with respect to global properties such as the average velocity profiles and reattachment length.

  14. Urban Aerodynamic Roughness Length Mapping Using Multitemporal SAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengli Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic roughness is very important to urban meteorological and climate studies. Radar remote sensing is considered to be an effective means for aerodynamic roughness retrieval because radar backscattering is sensitive to the surface roughness and geometric structure of a given target. In this paper, a methodology for aerodynamic roughness length estimation using SAR data in urban areas is introduced. The scale and orientation characteristics of backscattering of various targets in urban areas were firstly extracted and analyzed, which showed great potential of SAR data for urban roughness elements characterization. Then the ground truth aerodynamic roughness was calculated from wind gradient data acquired by the meteorological tower using fitting and iterative method. And then the optimal dimension of the upwind sector for the aerodynamic roughness calculation was determined through a correlation analysis between backscattering extracted from SAR data at various upwind sector areas and the aerodynamic roughness calculated from the meteorological tower data. Finally a quantitative relationship was set up to retrieve the aerodynamic roughness length from SAR data. Experiments based on ALOS PALSAR and COSMO-SkyMed data from 2006 to 2011 prove that the proposed methodology can provide accurate roughness length estimations for the spatial and temporal analysis of urban surface.

  15. Elemental mass size distribution of the Debrecen urban aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, Zs.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Dobos, E.; Borbely-Kiss, I.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Size distribution is one of the basic properties of atmospheric aerosol. It is closely related to the origin, chemical composition and age of the aerosol particles, and it influences the optical properties, environmental effects and health impact of aerosol. As part of the ongoing aerosol research in the Group of Ion Beam Applications of the Atomki, elemental mass size distribution of urban aerosol were determined using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analytical technique. Aerosol sampling campaigns were carried out with 9-stage PIXE International cascade impactors, which separates the aerosol into 10 size fractions in the 0.05-30 ?m range. Five 48-hours long samplings were done in the garden of the Atomki, in April and in October, 2007. Both campaigns included weekend and working day samplings. Basically two different kinds of particles could be identified according to the size distribution. In the size distribution of Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ba, Ti, Mn and Co one dominant peak can be found around the 3 m aerodynamic diameter size range, as it is shown on Figure 1. These are the elements of predominantly natural origin. Elements like S, Cl, K, Zn, Pb and Br appears with high frequency in the 0.25-0.5 mm size range as presented in Figure 2. These elements are originated mainly from anthropogenic sources. However sometimes in the size distribution of these elements a 2 nd , smaller peak appears at the 2-4 μm size ranges, indicating different sources. Differences were found between the size distribution of the spring and autumn samples. In the case of elements of soil origin the size distribution was shifted towards smaller diameters during October, and a 2 nd peak appeared around 0.5 μm. A possible explanation to this phenomenon can be the different meteorological conditions. No differences were found between the weekend and working days in the size distribution, however the concentration values were smaller during the weekend

  16. Predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of 2D airfoil and the performance of 3D wind turbine using a CFD code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bum Suk; Kim, Mann Eung [Korean Register of Shipping, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ho [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    Despite of the laminar-turbulent transition region co-exist with fully turbulence region around the leading edge of an airfoil, still lots of researchers apply to fully turbulence models to predict aerodynamic characteristics. It is well known that fully turbulent model such as standard k-model couldn't predict the complex stall and the separation behavior on an airfoil accurately, it usually leads to over prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics such as lift and drag forces. So, we apply correlation based transition model to predict aerodynamic performance of the NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Phase IV wind turbine. And also, compare the computed results from transition model with experimental measurement and fully turbulence results. Results are presented for a range of wind speed, for a NREL Phase IV wind turbine rotor. Low speed shaft torque, power, root bending moment, aerodynamic coefficients of 2D airfoil and several flow field figures results included in this study. As a result, the low speed shaft torque predicted by transitional turbulence model is very good agree with the experimental measurement in whole operating conditions but fully turbulent model(K- {epsilon}) over predict the shaft torque after 7m/s. Root bending moment is also good agreement between the prediction and experiments for most of the operating conditions, especially with the transition model.

  17. Predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of 2D airfoil and the performance of 3D wind turbine using a CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bum Suk; Kim, Mann Eung; Lee, Young Ho

    2008-01-01

    Despite of the laminar-turbulent transition region co-exist with fully turbulence region around the leading edge of an airfoil, still lots of researchers apply to fully turbulence models to predict aerodynamic characteristics. It is well known that fully turbulent model such as standard k-model couldn't predict the complex stall and the separation behavior on an airfoil accurately, it usually leads to over prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics such as lift and drag forces. So, we apply correlation based transition model to predict aerodynamic performance of the NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Phase IV wind turbine. And also, compare the computed results from transition model with experimental measurement and fully turbulence results. Results are presented for a range of wind speed, for a NREL Phase IV wind turbine rotor. Low speed shaft torque, power, root bending moment, aerodynamic coefficients of 2D airfoil and several flow field figures results included in this study. As a result, the low speed shaft torque predicted by transitional turbulence model is very good agree with the experimental measurement in whole operating conditions but fully turbulent model(K- ε) over predict the shaft torque after 7m/s. Root bending moment is also good agreement between the prediction and experiments for most of the operating conditions, especially with the transition model

  18. Mass spectrometric analysis and aerodynamic properties of various types of combustion-related aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Helas, G.; Gwaze, P.; Schmid, O.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchner, U.

    2006-12-01

    Various types of combustion-related particles in the size range between 100 and 850 nm were analyzed with an aerosol mass spectrometer and a differential mobility analyzer. The measurements were performed with particles originating from biomass burning, diesel engine exhaust, laboratory combustion of diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as from spark soot generation. Physical and morphological parameters like fractal dimension, effective density, bulk density and dynamic shape factor were derived or at least approximated from the measurements of electrical mobility diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter. The relative intensities of the mass peaks in the mass spectra obtained from particles generated by a commercial diesel passenger car, by diesel combustion in a laboratory burner, and by evaporating and re-condensing lubrication oil were found to be very similar. The mass spectra from biomass burning particles show signatures identified as organic compounds like levoglucosan but also others which are yet unidentified. The aerodynamic behavior yielded a fractal dimension (Df) of 2.09 +/- 0.06 for biomass burning particles from the combustion of dry beech sticks, but showed values around three, and hence more compact particle morphologies, for particles from combustion of more natural oak. Scanning electron microscope images confirmed the finding that the beech combustion particles were fractal-like aggregates, while the oak combustion particles displayed a much more compact shape. For particles from laboratory combusted diesel fuel, a Df value of 2.35 was found, for spark soot particles, Df [approximate] 2.10. The aerodynamic properties of fractal-like particles from dry beech wood combustion indicate an aerodynamic shape factor [chi] that increases with electrical mobility diameter, and a bulk density of 1.92 g cm-3. An upper limit of [chi] [approximate] 1.2 was inferred for the shape factor of the more compact particles from oak combustion.

  19. Aerodynamic levitator furnace for measuring thermophysical properties of refractory liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langstaff, D; Gunn, M; Greaves, G N; Marsing, A; Kargl, F

    2013-12-01

    The development of novel contactless aerodynamic laser heated levitation techniques is reported that enable thermophysical properties of refractory liquids to be measured in situ in the solid, liquid, and supercooled liquid state and demonstrated here for alumina. Starting with polished crystalline ruby spheres, we show how, by accurately measuring the changing radius, the known density in the solid state can be reproduced from room temperature to the melting point at 2323 K. Once molten, by coupling the floating liquid drop to acoustic oscillations via the levitating gas, the mechanical resonance and damping of the liquid can be measured precisely with high-speed high-resolution shadow cast imaging. The resonance frequency relates to the surface tension, the decay constant to the viscosity, and the ellipsoidal size and shape of the levitating drop to the density. This unique instrumentation enables these related thermophysical properties to be recorded in situ over the entire liquid and supercooled range of alumina, from the boiling point at 3240 K, until spontaneous crystallization occurs around 1860 K, almost 500 below the melting point. We believe that the utility that this unique instrumentation provides will be applicable to studying these important properties in many other high temperature liquids.

  20. Separation of contaminated concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakiewicz, J.L.; Reymer, A.P.S.

    1990-01-01

    Separating the contaminated parts from the non-contaminated parts from decommissioned nuclear facilities may strongly reduce the amount of contaminated concrete. The reduction in volume of the radioactive contaminated concrete is dependent on how much cementstone is in the concrete. This research program shows that the radioactive contamination is mostly in the cementstone. However the choice that the cementstone parts, (or better said the radioactive parts) are smaller than 1 mm may not always be true. Normally the cementstone takes about 30% of the total concrete volume. A separation procedure composed by a combination of milling and thermal shock has been assessed. Both the cold and hot thermal shock in combination with milling are not able to separate the cementstone from the larger aggregates completely. However, the cementstone from the concrete with a low nominal grain size seems to be almost completely removed by the combination cold thermal shock/milling, while the cementstone from the concrete with a high nominal grain size seems to be almost completely removed by the combination hot thermal shock/milling. After both methods a layer of cementstone was still visible on the aggregates. Washing followed by a nitric acid treatment removed each 2 wt% of cementstone

  1. Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Instability of Iced Bridge Cable Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Lund, Mia Schou Møller

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice on structural bridge cables changes the aerodynamic conditions of the surface and influences hence the acting wind load process. Full-scale monitoring indicates that light precipitation at moderate low temperatures between zero and -5°C may lead to large amplitude vibrations...... of bridge cables under wind action. This paper describes the experimental simulation of ice accretion on a real bridge cable sheet HDPE tube segment (diameter 160mm) and its effect on the aerodynamic load. Furthermore, aerodynamic instability will be estimated with quasi-steady theory using the determined...

  2. Fourier analysis of the aerodynamic behavior of cup anemometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Imanol; Aguado, Maite

    2013-01-01

    The calibration results (the transfer function) of an anemometer equipped with several cup rotors were analyzed and correlated with the aerodynamic forces measured on the isolated cups in a wind tunnel. The correlation was based on a Fourier analysis of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. Three different cup shapes were studied: typical conical cups, elliptical cups and porous cups (conical-truncated shape). Results indicated a good correlation between the anemometer factor, K, and the ratio between the first two coefficients in the Fourier series decomposition of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. (paper)

  3. Numerical study of aerodynamic effects on road vehicles lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernat, Mihail Victor; Cernat Bobonea, Andreea

    2017-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance analysis of road vehicles depends on the study of engine intake and cooling flow, internal ventilation, tire cooling, and overall external flow as the motion of air around a moving vehicle affects all of its components in one form or another. Due to the complex geometry of these, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flow and lifting surface shapes. The present study, however focuses on the effects of external aerodynamics only, and in particular on the flow over the lifting surfaces of a common compact car, designed especially for this study.

  4. An Aerodynamic Investigation of a Forward Swept Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    attached flow at higher angles of attack. 59 -. - . -- ~II The use of winglets should-also be considered to determine their effect on the aerodynamic ...INVSTGAIO OF A" ’/7AI/A/A7D1 ¾~nnt ¾ý’i ~~~)a al -A ApprovedYA~I forSIATO OFli Aees;dsrbuinulmtd AFIT/GAE/AA/77D -4 .1 AN AERODYNAMIC INVESTIGATION OF A...this study was to experimentally and analytically determine certain aerodynamic characteristics of a recently proposed high subsonic, forward swept wing

  5. Correlation-based Transition Modeling for External Aerodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medida, Shivaji

    Conventional turbulence models calibrated for fully turbulent boundary layers often over-predict drag and heat transfer on aerodynamic surfaces with partially laminar boundary layers. A robust correlation-based model is developed for use in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations to predict laminar-to-turbulent transition onset of boundary layers on external aerodynamic surfaces. The new model is derived from an existing transition model for the two-equation k-omega Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model, and is coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. The transition model solves two transport equations for intermittency and transition momentum thickness Reynolds number. Experimental correlations and local mean flow quantities are used in the model to account for effects of freestream turbulence level and pressure gradients on transition onset location. Transition onset is triggered by activating intermittency production using a vorticity Reynolds number criterion. In the new model, production and destruction terms of the intermittency equation are modified to improve consistency in the fully turbulent boundary layer post-transition onset, as well as ensure insensitivity to freestream eddy viscosity value specified in the SA model. In the original model, intermittency was used to control production and destruction of turbulent kinetic energy. Whereas, in the new model, only the production of eddy viscosity in SA model is controlled, and the destruction term is not altered. Unlike the original model, the new model does not use an additional correction to intermittency for separation-induced transition. Accuracy of drag predictions are improved significantly with the use of the transition model for several two-dimensional single- and multi-element airfoil cases over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The new model is able to predict the formation of stable and long laminar separation bubbles on low-Reynolds number airfoils that

  6. Method of isotope separation by chemi-ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wexler, S.; Young, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    A method is disclosed for separating isotopes in an isotopic mixture by aerodynamically accelerating a gaseous compound to form a jet of molecules, and passing the jet through a stream of electron donor atoms whereby an electron transfer takes place, thus forming negative ions of the molecules. The molecular ions are then passed through a radiofrequency quadrupole mass filter to separate the specific isotopes. cThis method may be used for any compounds having a sufficiently high electron affinity to permit negative ion formation, and is especially useful for the separation of plutonium and uranium isotopes. 10 claims, 1 figure

  7. In-flight icing on unmanned aerial vehicle and its aerodynamic penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilder, K.; Yuan, W.

    2017-06-01

    A numerical prediction of ice accretion on HQ309, SD7032, and SD7037 airfoils and its aerodynamic penalties is described. Ice accretion prediction on a three-dimensional (3D) swept wing is also presented. In addition to airflow and drop trajectory solvers, NRC's (National Research Council) original, 3D, morphogenetic icing modeling approach has been used. The analysis was performed for a wide range of icing conditions identi¦ed in the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) Appendix C icing envelope. They cover a range of drop sizes, air temperatures, and liquid water contents. For selected icing conditions, the resulting decrease in lift and increase in drag have been calculated.

  8. Particle size analyses in and around mineral sands operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameters (AMADs) of airborne dust in and around West Australian heavy mineral sands operations have been investigated. Monitoring of dry separation plant workers, positional monitoring of the plant environment and positional monitoring outdoors were conducted. The number of AMAD detections was 49, 21 and 37, respectively. Mean AMAD values of 15.7μm (GSD 2.9) for personal monitoring, 4.6μm (GSD 3.5) for positional monitoring indoors and 2.7 μm (GSD 4.8) for hi-vol positional monitoring outdoors were obtained. The size distribution of airborne radioactivity was observed to be log-normal. Applying the ICRP 30 inhalation model (ICRP 1979) and both, ICRP 26 (ICRP 1977) and ICRP 60 (ICRP 1990) recommendations, intake-to-dose conversion factors for internal alpha exposure from the Th series radionuclides (in secular equilibrium, solubility Class Y) associated with airborne dust were subsequently assessed. It has been concluded that no single AMAD value would characterise heavy mineral sands operations. In the areas of the greatest radiological impact (dry separation plants indoors) emphasis should be focused upon personal monitoring strategies. In the areas of a lower impact (outdoors), a positional cascade impactor data may be used for personal AMAD assessment. Application of the reference 1μm AMAD value may lead to an over 5-fold overestimation of internal doses for the dry separation plant workers and to about 2-fold dose overestimation for the other workers. Hence, the need and importance of conducting site-specific particle size analyses for individual mineral sands operations. 13 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  9. Aerodynamic and sound intensity measurements in tracheoesophageal voice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grolman, Wilko; Eerenstein, Simone E. J.; Tan, Frédérique M. L.; Tange, Rinze A.; Schouwenburg, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In laryngectomized patients, tracheoesophageal voice generally provides a better voice quality than esophageal voice. Understanding the aerodynamics of voice production in patients with a voice prosthesis is important for optimizing prosthetic designs and successful voice rehabilitation.

  10. Future requirements and roles of computers in aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    While faster computers will be needed to make solution of the Navier-Stokes equations practical and useful, most all of the other aerodynamic solution techniques can benefit from faster computers. There is a wide variety of computational and measurement techniques, the prospect of more powerful computers permits extension and an enhancement across all aerodynamic methods, including wind-tunnel measurement. It is expected that, as in the past, a blend of methods will be used to predict aircraft aerodynamics in the future. These will include methods based on solution of the Navier-Stokes equations and the potential flow equations as well as those based on empirical and measured results. The primary flows of interest in aircraft aerodynamics are identified, the predictive methods currently in use and/or under development are reviewed and two of these methods are analyzed in terms of the computational resources needed to improve their usefulness and practicality.

  11. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design with Transition Prediction, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enhance aerodynamic design capabilities, Desktop Aeronautics proposes to significantly improve upon the integration (performed in Phase 1) of a new sweep/taper...

  12. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design with Transition Prediction, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enhance aerodynamic design capabilities, Desktop Aeronautics proposes to combine a new sweep/taper integrated-boundary-layer (IBL) code that includes transition...

  13. Aerodynamic Efficiency Enhancements for Air Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for aerodynamics-based efficiency enhancements for air vehicles is presented. Concepts are presented for morphing aircraft, to enable the aircraft to...

  14. Aerodynamic Efficiency Enhancements for Air Vehicles, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for aerodynamics-based efficiency enhancements for air vehicles is presented. The results of the Phase I investigation of concepts for morphing aircraft are...

  15. Influence of hinge point on flexible flap aerodynamic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, H Y; Ye, Z; Wu, P; Li, C

    2013-01-01

    Large scale wind turbines lead to increasing blade lengths and weights, which presents new challenges for blade design. This paper selects NREL S809 airfoil, uses the parameterized technology to realize the flexible trailing edge deformation, researches the static aerodynamic characteristics of wind turbine blade airfoil with flexible deformation, and the dynamic aerodynamic characteristics in the process of continuous deformation, analyses the influence of hinge point position on flexible flap aerodynamic performance, in order to further realize the flexible wind turbine blade design and provides some references for the active control scheme. The results show that compared with the original airfoil, proper trailing edge deformation can improve the lift coefficient, reduce the drag coefficient, and thereby more efficiently realize flow field active control. With hinge point moving forward, total aerodynamic performance of flexible flap improves. Positive swing angle can push the transition point backward, thus postpones the occurrence of the transition phenomenon

  16. Innovative Aerodynamic Modeling for Aeroservoelastic Analysis and Design, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of a modern panel code for calculation of steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads needed for dynamic servoelastic (DSE) analysis of flight...

  17. The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III : Trucks, Buses and Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Orellano, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International conference “The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III: Trucks, Buses and Trains” held in Potsdam, Germany, September 12-17, 2010 by Engineering Conferences International (ECI). Leading scientists and engineers from industry, universities and research laboratories, including truck and high-speed train manufacturers and operators were brought together to discuss computer simulation and experimental techniques to be applied for the design of more efficient trucks, buses and high-speed trains in the future.   This conference was the third in the series after Monterey-Pacific Groove in 2002 and Lake Tahoe in 2007.  The presentations address different aspects of train aerodynamics (cross wind effects, underbody flow, tunnel aerodynamics and aeroacoustics, experimental techniques), truck aerodynamics (drag reduction, flow control, experimental and computational techniques) as well as computational fluid dynamics and bluff body, wake and jet flows.

  18. Theoretical and applied aerodynamics and related numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Chattot, J J

    2015-01-01

    This book covers classical and modern aerodynamics, theories and related numerical methods, for senior and first-year graduate engineering students, including: -The classical potential (incompressible) flow theories for low speed aerodynamics of thin airfoils and high and low aspect ratio wings. - The linearized theories for compressible subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics. - The nonlinear transonic small disturbance potential flow theory, including supercritical wing sections, the extended transonic area rule with lift effect, transonic lifting line and swept or oblique wings to minimize wave drag. Unsteady flow is also briefly discussed. Numerical simulations based on relaxation mixed-finite difference methods are presented and explained. - Boundary layer theory for all Mach number regimes and viscous/inviscid interaction procedures used in practical aerodynamics calculations. There are also four chapters covering special topics, including wind turbines and propellers, airplane design, flow analogies and h...

  19. Center for Computational Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and operate a wind farm optimally it is necessary to know in detail how the wind behaves and interacts with the turbines in a farm. This not only requires knowledge about meteorology, turbulence and aerodynamics, but it also requires access to powerful computers and efficient s...... software. Center for Computational Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Atmospheric Turbulence was established in 2010 in order to create a world-leading cross-disciplinary flow center that covers all relevant disciplines within wind farm meteorology and aerodynamics.......In order to design and operate a wind farm optimally it is necessary to know in detail how the wind behaves and interacts with the turbines in a farm. This not only requires knowledge about meteorology, turbulence and aerodynamics, but it also requires access to powerful computers and efficient...

  20. Forewings match the formation of leading-edge vortices and dominate aerodynamic force production in revolving insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2017-10-20

    In many flying insects, forewings and hindwings are coupled mechanically to achieve flapping flight synchronously while being driven by action of the forewings. How the forewings and hindwings as well as their morphologies contribute to aerodynamic force production and flight control remains unclear yet. Here we demonstrate that the forewings can produce most of the aerodynamic forces even with the hindwings removed through a computational fluid dynamic study of three revolving insect wing models, which are identical to the wing morphologies and Reynolds numbers of hawkmoth (Manduca sexta), bumblebee (Bombus ignitus) and fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster). We find that the forewing morphologies match the formation of leading-edge vortices (LEV) and are responsible for generating sufficient lift forces at the mean angles of attack and the Reynolds numbers where the three representative insects fly. The LEV formation and pressure loading keep almost unchanged with the hindwing removed, and even lead to some improvement in power factor and aerodynamic efficiency. Moreover, our results indicate that the size and strength of the LEVs can be well quantified with introduction of a conical LEV angle, which varies remarkably with angles of attack and Reynolds numbers but within the forewing region while showing less sensitivity to the wing morphologies. This implies that the forewing morphology very likely plays a dominant role in achieving low-Reynolds number aerodynamic performance in natural flyers as well as in revolving and/or flapping micro air vehicles. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Aerodynamics and Optimal Design of Biplane Wind Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Phillip

    In order to improve energy capture and reduce the cost of wind energy, in the past few decades wind turbines have grown significantly larger. As their blades get longer, the design of the inboard region (near the blade root) becomes a trade-off between competing structural and aerodynamic requirements. State-of-the-art blades require thick airfoils near the root to efficiently support large loads inboard, but those thick airfoils have inherently poor aerodynamic performance. New designs are required to circumvent this design compromise. One such design is the "biplane blade", in which the thick airfoils in the inboard region are replaced with thinner airfoils in a biplane configuration. This design was shown previously to have significantly increased structural performance over conventional blades. In addition, the biplane airfoils can provide increased lift and aerodynamic efficiency compared to thick monoplane inboard airfoils, indicating a potential for increased power extraction. This work investigates the fundamental aerodynamic aspects, aerodynamic design and performance, and optimal structural design of the biplane blade. First, the two-dimensional aerodynamics of biplanes with relatively thick airfoils are investigated, showing unique phenomena which arise as a result of airfoil thickness. Next, the aerodynamic design of the full biplane blade is considered. Two biplane blades are designed for optimal aerodynamic loading, and their aerodynamic performance quantified. Considering blades with practical chord distributions and including the drag of the mid-blade joint, it is shown that biplane blades have comparable power output to conventional monoplane designs. The results of this analysis also show that the biplane blades can be designed with significantly less chord than conventional designs, a characteristic which enables larger blade designs. The aerodynamic loads on the biplane blades are shown to be increased in gust conditions and decreased under

  2. On applications of chimera grid schemes to store separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cougherty, F. C.; Benek, J. A.; Steger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A finite difference scheme which uses multiple overset meshes to simulate the aerodynamics of aircraft/store interaction and store separation is described. In this chimera, or multiple mesh, scheme, a complex configuration is mapped using a major grid about the main component of the configuration, and minor overset meshes are used to map each additional component such as a store. As a first step in modeling the aerodynamics of store separation, two dimensional inviscid flow calculations were carried out in which one of the minor meshes is allowed to move with respect to the major grid. Solutions of calibrated two dimensional problems indicate that allowing one mesh to move with respect to another does not adversely affect the time accuracy of an unsteady solution. Steady, inviscid three dimensional computations demonstrate the capability to simulate complex configurations, including closely packed multiple bodies.

  3. Development of an on-line size exclusion chromatographic - reversed-phase liquid chromatographic two-dimensional system for the quantitative determination of peptides with concentration prior to reversed-phase liquid chromatographic separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroink, T.; Wiese, G.; Lingeman, H.; Bult, A.; Underberg, W.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Complex samples, containing endogenous peptides require analytical methods with high sensitivity and selectivity to enable reliable analysis of these compounds in biological samples. In a number of cases, the selectivity of mono-dimensional separation systems is not sufficient. In order to improve

  4. Computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Eric [San Francisco, CA; Riot, Vincent [Oakland, CA; Coffee, Keith [Diablo Grande, CA; Woods, Bruce [Livermore, CA; Tobias, Herbert [Kensington, CA; Birch, Jim [Albany, CA; Weisgraber, Todd [Brentwood, CA

    2011-11-22

    A computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack, using input from a designer related to, for example, particle size range to be considered, characteristics of the gas to be flowed through the system, the upstream temperature and pressure at the top of a first focusing lens, the flow rate through the aerodynamic focusing lens stack equivalent at atmosphere pressure; and a Stokes number range. Based on the design parameters, the method and system determines the total number of focusing lenses and their respective orifice diameters required to focus the particle size range to be considered, by first calculating for the orifice diameter of the first focusing lens in the Stokes formula, and then using that value to determine, in iterative fashion, intermediate flow values which are themselves used to determine the orifice diameters of each succeeding focusing lens in the stack design, with the results being output to a designer. In addition, the Reynolds numbers associated with each focusing lens as well as exit nozzle size may also be determined to enhance the stack design.

  5. Estimation of aircraft aerodynamic derivatives using Extended Kalman Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Curvo, M.

    2000-01-01

    Design of flight control laws, verification of performance predictions, and the implementation of flight simulations are tasks that require a mathematical model of the aircraft dynamics. The dynamical models are characterized by coefficients (aerodynamic derivatives) whose values must be determined from flight tests. This work outlines the use of the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) in obtaining the aerodynamic derivatives of an aircraft. The EKF shows several advantages over the more traditional...

  6. Self-starting aerodynamics analysis of vertical axis wind turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Jianyang Zhu; Hailin Huang; Hao Shen

    2015-01-01

    Vertical axis wind turbine is a special type of wind-force electric generator which is capable of working in the complicated wind environment. The self-starting aerodynamics is one of the most important considerations for this kind of turbine. This article aims at providing a systematic synthesis on the self-starting aerodynamic characteristics of vertical axis wind turbine based on the numerical analysis approach. First, the physical model of vertical axis wind turbine and its parameter defi...

  7. An explicit multi-time-stepping algorithm for aerodynamic flows

    OpenAIRE

    Niemann-Tuitman, B.E.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    1997-01-01

    An explicit multi-time-stepping algorithm with applications to aerodynamic flows is presented. In the algorithm, in different parts of the computational domain different time steps are taken, and the flow is synchronized at the so-called synchronization levels. The algorithm is validated for aerodynamic turbulent flows. For two-dimensional flows speedups in the order of five with respect to single time stepping are obtained.

  8. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  9. Aerodynamic models for high-amplitude, low reynolds flapping airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Morales Tirado, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis a new aerodynamic model of insect-like flapping flight for micro air vehicles has been developed. The New Predicted Aerodynamic Model (NPAM) was based on the model described by Weis-Fogh model in Energetics of Hovering Flight in Hummingbirds and Drosophila. In order to achieved the NPAM some variations were introduced regarding the geometry of the problem under study and also some improvements was done to the theory developed by Weis-Fogh. To have the required ...

  10. Application of CFD technique for HYFLEX aerodynamic design

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Yukimitsu; Watanabe, Shigeya; Ishiguro, Mitsuo; Ogasawara, Ko; 山本 行光; 渡辺 重哉; 石黒 満津夫; 小笠原 宏

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique for the HYFLEX (Hypersonic Flight Experiment) aerodynamic design by using the numerical simulation codes in the supersonic and hypersonic speed ranges is presented. Roles of CFD required to make up for the short term of development and small amount of the wind tunnel test cases, application in the HYFLEX aerodynamic design and their application methods are described. The procedure of CFD code validation by the expe...

  11. Progress in vehicle aerodynamics and thermal management. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Jochen (ed.) [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Kraftfahrwesen und Verbrennungsmotoren (IVK); Forschungsinstitut fuer Kraftfahrwesen und Fahrzeugmotoren (FKFS), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Vehicle aerodynamics and thermal management are subjects of increasing importance for automotive development especially regarding the necessity to reduce the energy consumption of the vehicle as well as the need to improve ist comfort. This book is intended for engineers, physicists, and mathematicians who work on vehicle aerodynamics. It is also addressed to people in research organizations, at universities and agencies. It may be of interest to technical journalists and to students. (orig.)

  12. The aerodynamic design of an advanced rotor airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, J. A., Jr.; Hinson, B. L.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced rotor airfoil, designed utilizing supercritical airfoil technology and advanced design and analysis methodology is described. The airfoil was designed subject to stringent aerodynamic design criteria for improving the performance over the entire rotor operating regime. The design criteria are discussed. The design was accomplished using a physical plane, viscous, transonic inverse design procedure, and a constrained function minimization technique for optimizing the airfoil leading edge shape. The aerodynamic performance objectives of the airfoil are discussed.

  13. The impact of aerodynamics on fuel consumption in railway applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan TARUS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The main consequence of on air flow surrounding a moving train resides in the aerodynamic drag and a certain pressure distribution on the frontal and lateral surfaces of the vehicle. The actual value of the aerodynamic drag (if pre-determined may lead to a more accurate design of the whole locomotive power transmission. The aerodynamic drag may be estimated by using two specific experiments: the traction method and the free launch method. While the first one uses highly complex equipment, the second is easier to use due to the relative low number of devices required. The present work’s main goal is to illustrate the importance of aerodynamic design of the railway vehicles, as their performances are influenced by the aerodynamic drag. In order to illustrate the influence of the aerodynamic shape of o locomotive body, we have chosen the latest diesel model available on the local market, the Class 621 EGM locomotives, currently in service at the national passenger railway operator, CFR Călători SA.

  14. Method and apparatus for controlled condensation isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, J.A.; Lee, J.T. Jr.; Kim, K.C.

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a method for producing controlled homogeneous condensation of a molecular feed gas containing several isotopes. The feed gas flows at supersonic rates through an expansion nozzle under conditions at which the gas would normally condense. The gas is irradiated with laser radiation of a wavelength that selectively excites those molecules in the feed gas that contain a particular isotope, thus preventing their condensation. Condensate particles may be aerodynamically separated from the flowing gas stream

  15. Computational aerodynamics and aeroacoustics for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, W.Z.

    2009-10-15

    The present thesis consists of 19 selected papers dealing with the development and use of CFD methods for studying the aerodynamics and aero-acoustics of wind turbines. The papers are written in the period from 1997 to 2008 and numbered according to the list in page v. The work consists of two parts: an aerodynamic part based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and an aero-acoustic part based on Computational Aero Acoustics for wind turbines. The main objective of the research was to develop new computational tools and techniques for analysing flows about wind turbines. A few papers deal with applications of Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory to wind turbines. In most cases the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables (velocity-pressure formulation) are employed as the basic governing equations. However, since fluid mechanical problems essentially are governed by vortex dynamics, it is sometimes advantageous to use the concept of vorticity (defined as the curl of velocity). In vorticity form the Navier-Stokes equations may be formulated in different ways, using a vorticity-stream function formulation, a vorticity-velocity formulation or a vorticity-potential-stream function formulation. In [1] - [3] two different vorticity formulations were developed for 2D and 3D wind turbine flows. In [4] and [5] numerical techniques for avoiding pressure oscillations were developed when solving the velocity-pressure coupling system in the in-house EllipSys2D/3D code. In [6] - [8] different actuator disc techniques combined with CFD are presented. This includes actuator disc, actuator line and actuator surface techniques, which were developed to simulate flows past one or more wind turbines. In [9] and [10] a tip loss correction method that improves the conventional models was developed for use in combination with BEM or actuator/Navier-Stokes computations. A simple and efficient technique for determining the angle of attack for flow past a wind turbine rotor

  16. Unsteady aerodynamic modelling of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coton, F.N.; Galbraith, R.A. [Univ. og Glasgow, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The following current and future work is discussed: Collaborative wind tunnel based PIV project to study wind turbine wake structures in head-on and yawed flow. Prescribed wake model has been embedded in a source panel representation of the wind tunnel walls to allow comparison with experiment; Modelling of tower shadow using high resolution but efficient vortex model in tower shadow domain; Extension of model to yawing flow; Upgrading and tuning of unsteady aerodynamic model for low speed, thick airfoil flows. Glasgow has a considerable collection of low speed dynamic stall data. Currently, the Leishman - Beddoes model is not ideally suited to such flows. For example: Range of stall onset criteria used for dynamic stall prediction including Beddoes. Wide variation of stall onset prediction. Beddoes representation was developed primarily with reference to compressible flows. Analyses of low speed data from Glasgow indicate deficiencies in the current model; Predicted versus measured response during ramp down motion. Modification of the Beddoes representation is required to obtain a fit with the measured data. (EG)

  17. IEA joint action. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-08-01

    The advances to be made in aerodynamic prediction requires a deeper understanding of the physical processes occurring at the blades, and in the wake, of a wind turbine. This can only come from a continuing process of experimental observation and theoretical analysis. The present symposium presents the opportunity to do this by exchange of data from experiments and simulations, and by discussion of new or modified wake theories. The symposium will consists of a number of presentations by invited speakers and conclude with a summary of the talks and a round-the-table technical discussion. The talks offer the change to present behaviour from full-scale and laboratory experiments that are not explained by existing prediction codes. In addition, presentations are welcome on new modelling techniques or formulations that could make existing codes more accurate, less computationally intensive and easier to use. This symposium is intended to provide a starting point for the formulation of advanced rotor performance methods, which will improve the accuracy of load and performance prediction codes useful to the wind turbine industry. (au)

  18. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  19. Aerodynamical noise from wind turbine generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Andersen, B.

    1993-06-01

    Two extensive measurement series of noise from wind turbines have been made during different modifications of their rotors. One series focused on the influence from the tip shape on the noise, while the other series dealt with the influence from the trailing edge. The experimental layout for the two investigations was identical. The total A-weighted noise from the wind turbine was measured in 1/3 octave bands from 50 Hz to 10 kHz in 1-minute periods simultaneously with wind speed measurements. The microphone was mounted on a hard board on the ground about 40 m directly downwind of the wind turbine, and the wind speed meter was placed at the same distance upwind of the wind turbine 10 m above ground. Regression analysis was made between noise and wind speed in each 1/3 octave band to determine the spectrum at 8 m/s. During the measurements care was taken to avoid influence from background noise, and the influence from machinery noise was minimized and corrected for. Thus the results display the aerodynamic rotor noise from the wind turbines. By use of this measurement technique, the uncertainty has been reduced to 1.5 - 2 dB per 1/3 octave band in the relevant frequency range and to about 1 dB on the total A-weighted levels. (au) (10 refs.)

  20. The aerodynamic signature of running spiders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Casas

    Full Text Available Many predators display two foraging modes, an ambush strategy and a cruising mode. These foraging strategies have been classically studied in energetic, biomechanical and ecological terms, without considering the role of signals produced by predators and perceived by prey. Wolf spiders are a typical example; they hunt in leaf litter either using an ambush strategy or by moving at high speed, taking over unwary prey. Air flow upstream of running spiders is a source of information for escaping prey, such as crickets and cockroaches. However, air displacement by running arthropods has not been previously examined. Here we show, using digital particle image velocimetry, that running spiders are highly conspicuous aerodynamically, due to substantial air displacement detectable up to several centimetres in front of them. This study explains the bimodal distribution of spider's foraging modes in terms of sensory ecology and is consistent with the escape distances and speeds of cricket prey. These findings may be relevant to the large and diverse array of arthropod prey-predator interactions in leaf litter.

  1. CFD aerodynamic analysis of non-conventional airfoil sections for very large rotor blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadakis, G; Voutsinas, S; Sieros, G; Chaviaropoulos, T

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of flat-back and elliptically shaped airfoils is analyzed on the basis of CFD simulations. Incompressible and low-Mach preconditioned compressible unsteady simulations have been carried out using the k-w SST and the Spalart Allmaras turbulence models. Time averaged lift and drag coefficients are compared to wind tunnel data for the FB 3500-1750 flat back airfoil while amplitudes and frequencies are also recorded. Prior to separation averaged lift is well predicted while drag is overestimated keeping however the trend in the tests. The CFD models considered, predict separation with a 5° delay which is reflected on the load results. Similar results are provided for a modified NACA0035 with a rounded (elliptically shaped) trailing edge. Finally as regards the dynamic characteristics in the load signals, there is fair agreement in terms of Str number but significant differences in terms of lift and drag amplitudes

  2. Unsteady Thick Airfoil Aerodynamics: Experiments, Computation, and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangfeld, C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Mueller-Vahl, H.; Greenblatt, D.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental, computational and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamic loads acting on a relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil when subjected to pitching and surging, individually and synchronously. Both pre-stall and post-stall angles of attack were considered. Experiments were carried out in a dedicated unsteady wind tunnel, with large surge amplitudes, and airfoil loads were estimated by means of unsteady surface mounted pressure measurements. Theoretical predictions were based on Theodorsen's and Isaacs' results as well as on the relatively recent generalizations of van der Wall. Both two- and three-dimensional computations were performed on structured grids employing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS). For pure surging at pre-stall angles of attack, the correspondence between experiments and theory was satisfactory; this served as a validation of Isaacs theory. Discrepancies were traced to dynamic trailing-edge separation, even at low angles of attack. Excellent correspondence was found between experiments and theory for airfoil pitching as well as combined pitching and surging; the latter appears to be the first clear validation of van der Wall's theoretical results. Although qualitatively similar to experiment at low angles of attack, two-dimensional URANS computations yielded notable errors in the unsteady load effects of pitching, surging and their synchronous combination. The main reason is believed to be that the URANS equations do not resolve wake vorticity (explicitly modeled in the theory) or the resulting rolled-up un- steady flow structures because high values of eddy viscosity tend to \\smear" the wake. At post-stall angles, three-dimensional computations illustrated the importance of modeling the tunnel side walls.

  3. Rarefaction Effects in Low Reynolds Number Subsonic and Transonic Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekardan, Cem

    The quantification of rarefaction effects for low Reynolds number (Reefficient. It was also shown that when the Reynolds number of the flow decreased from 10,000 to 1,000, slip effects become dominant. The flow becomes fully rarefied at Re=10. Furthermore, rarefaction effects were quantified for the NACA 0007 and the NACA 2407 at 0 and 10 degrees of angle of attack to investigate the effects of thickness, camber, and the angle of attack. It was observed that flow separation due to increase in thickness resulted in higher rarefaction effects. It was concluded that thin airfoils with very smooth shape changes minimize continuum breakdown / rarefaction effects. Rarefied gas phenomena that only appear in low pressures (such as thermal effects) can be exploited for performance enhancement of applications in slightly rarefied aerodynamics. In this study, feasibility and advantages of using thermal control to reduce drag and mitigate vortex shedding for airfoils are studied. NACA 0012 airfoil with a temperature difference applied between the upper and the lower surface is simulated in the continuum regime with a Navier-Stokes solver and compared to experimental data for verification of parameters and turbulence modelling. At lower pressures, an elevated temperature on the bottom surface of the airfoil is investigated to create lift and understand the rarefaction effects. Continuum NS results were compared to the rarefied ES-BGK solver for the rarefaction effects. It was shown that an elevated temperature enhances the lift by 25 % and reduces the drag at high angles of attack. In the second part, a temperature gradient on the upper surface is applied and it was seen that drag is reduced by 4 % and vortex shedding frequency is reduced due to gradients introduced in the flow by thermal transpiration.

  4. Methods for separation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, C.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of actinoids separation are reviewed, including precipitation, sublimation, paper chromatography and electrophoresis. Compounds typically used for co-precipitation of actinoid ions are listed. Ion-exchange methods considered include cation and ion exchange. Factors are described, which affect the efficiency of separation of transuranium elements in the same degrees of oxidation: complex-forming agents, temperature, ion-exchange resin, rate of elution, the size of the column, the influence of salts. Extraction of actinoid ions upon formation of solvate complexes, inner complex compounds and metal salts is discussed. Combining the advantages of ion exchange and extraction, the method of extraction chromatography can be widely used for separation of actinoids

  5. Fluid Dynamic Mechanisms and Interactions within Separated Flows and Their Effects on Missile Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    or blow-by, flow which, in turn, caused the pressure in the annular region (at PS4 and at pS5)41 to rise slightly then decrease. The slight pressure...pulse was much less than that measured during the Rip-Zap program. Thus, the splash- hack mass flow-rate apparently was relatively small for the Arrow

  6. Sample size requirements for separating out the effects of combination treatments: Randomised controlled trials of combination therapy vs. standard treatment compared to factorial designs for patients with tuberculous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrar Jeremy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In certain diseases clinical experts may judge that the intervention with the best prospects is the addition of two treatments to the standard of care. This can either be tested with a simple randomized trial of combination versus standard treatment or with a 2 × 2 factorial design. Methods We compared the two approaches using the design of a new trial in tuberculous meningitis as an example. In that trial the combination of 2 drugs added to standard treatment is assumed to reduce the hazard of death by 30% and the sample size of the combination trial to achieve 80% power is 750 patients. We calculated the power of corresponding factorial designs with one- to sixteen-fold the sample size of the combination trial depending on the contribution of each individual drug to the combination treatment effect and the strength of an interaction between the two. Results In the absence of an interaction, an eight-fold increase in sample size for the factorial design as compared to the combination trial is required to get 80% power to jointly detect effects of both drugs if the contribution of the less potent treatment to the total effect is at least 35%. An eight-fold sample size increase also provides a power of 76% to detect a qualitative interaction at the one-sided 10% significance level if the individual effects of both drugs are equal. Factorial designs with a lower sample size have a high chance to be underpowered, to show significance of only one drug even if both are equally effective, and to miss important interactions. Conclusions Pragmatic combination trials of multiple interventions versus standard therapy are valuable in diseases with a limited patient pool if all interventions test the same treatment concept, it is considered likely that either both or none of the individual interventions are effective, and only moderate drug interactions are suspected. An adequately powered 2 × 2 factorial design to detect effects of

  7. Sample size requirements for separating out the effects of combination treatments: randomised controlled trials of combination therapy vs. standard treatment compared to factorial designs for patients with tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, Marcel; Heemskerk, Dorothee; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Caws, Maxine; Farrar, Jeremy; Day, Jeremy

    2011-02-02

    In certain diseases clinical experts may judge that the intervention with the best prospects is the addition of two treatments to the standard of care. This can either be tested with a simple randomized trial of combination versus standard treatment or with a 2 x 2 factorial design. We compared the two approaches using the design of a new trial in tuberculous meningitis as an example. In that trial the combination of 2 drugs added to standard treatment is assumed to reduce the hazard of death by 30% and the sample size of the combination trial to achieve 80% power is 750 patients. We calculated the power of corresponding factorial designs with one- to sixteen-fold the sample size of the combination trial depending on the contribution of each individual drug to the combination treatment effect and the strength of an interaction between the two. In the absence of an interaction, an eight-fold increase in sample size for the factorial design as compared to the combination trial is required to get 80% power to jointly detect effects of both drugs if the contribution of the less potent treatment to the total effect is at least 35%. An eight-fold sample size increase also provides a power of 76% to detect a qualitative interaction at the one-sided 10% significance level if the individual effects of both drugs are equal. Factorial designs with a lower sample size have a high chance to be underpowered, to show significance of only one drug even if both are equally effective, and to miss important interactions. Pragmatic combination trials of multiple interventions versus standard therapy are valuable in diseases with a limited patient pool if all interventions test the same treatment concept, it is considered likely that either both or none of the individual interventions are effective, and only moderate drug interactions are suspected. An adequately powered 2 x 2 factorial design to detect effects of individual drugs would require at least 8-fold the sample size of the

  8. Aerodynamic modelling and optimization of axial fans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noertoft Soerensen, Dan

    1998-01-01

    A numerically efficient mathematical model for the aerodynamics of low speed axial fans of the arbitrary vortex flow type has been developed. The model is based on a blade-element principle, whereby the rotor is divided into a number of annular stream tubes. For each of these stream tubes relations for velocity, pressure and radial position are derived from the conservation laws for mass, tangential momentum and energy. The equations are solved using the Newton-Raphson methods, and solutions converged to machine accuracy are found at small computing costs. The model has been validated against published measurements on various fan configurations, comprising two rotor-only fan stages, a counter-rotating fan unit and a stator-rotor stator stage. Comparisons of local and integrated properties show that the computed results agree well with the measurements. Optimizations have been performed to maximize the mean value of fan efficiency in a design interval of flow rates, thus designing a fan which operates well over a range of different flow conditions. The optimization scheme was used to investigate the dependence of maximum efficiency on 1: the number of blades, 2: the width of the design interval and 3: the hub radius. The degree of freedom in the choice of design variable and constraints, combined with the design interval concept, provides a valuable design-tool for axial fans. To further investigate the use of design optimization, a model for the vortex shedding noise from the trailing edge of the blades has been incorporated into the optimization scheme. The noise emission from the blades was minimized in a flow rate design point. Optimizations were performed to investigate the dependence of the noise on 1: the number of blades, 2: a constraint imposed on efficiency and 3: the hub radius. The investigations showed, that a significant reduction of noise could be achieved, at the expense of a small reduction in fan efficiency. (EG) 66 refs.

  9. Aerodynamics support of research instrument development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. Scott

    1990-09-01

    A new velocimetry system is currently being developed at NASA LaRC. The device, known as a Doppler global velocimeter (DGV), can record three velocity components within a plane simultaneously and in near real time. To make measurements the DGV, like many other velocimetry systems, relies on the scattering of light from numerous small particles in a flow field. The particles or seeds are illuminated by a sheet of laser light and viewed by two CCD cameras. The scattered light from the particles will have a frequency which is a function of the source laser light frequency, the viewing angle, and most importantly the seed velocities. By determining the scattered light intensity the velocity can be measured at all points within the light sheet simultaneously. Upon completion of DGV component construction and initial check out a series of tests in the Basic Aerodynamic Research (wind) Tunnel (BART) are scheduled to verify instrument operation and accuracy. If the results are satisfactory, application of the DGV to flight measurements on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) are planned. The DGV verification test in the BART facility will utilize a 75 degree swept delta wing model. A major task undertaken this summer included evaluation of previous results for this model. A specific series of tests matching exactly the previous tests and exploring new DGV capabilities were developed and suggested. Another task undertaken was to study DGV system installation possibilities in the F-18 HARV aircraft. In addition, a simple seeding system modification was developed and utilized to make Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the BART facility.

  10. Aerodynamics, sensing and control of insect-scale flapping-wing flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, Wei; Kang, Chang-kwon; Chirarattananon, Pakpong; Ravi, Sridhar; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    There are nearly a million known species of flying insects and 13 000 species of flying warm-blooded vertebrates, including mammals, birds and bats. While in flight, their wings not only move forward relative to the air, they also flap up and down, plunge and sweep, so that both lift and thrust can be generated and balanced, accommodate uncertain surrounding environment, with superior flight stability and dynamics with highly varied speeds and missions. As the size of a flyer is reduced, the wing-to-body mass ratio tends to decrease as well. Furthermore, these flyers use integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic forces, muscles to move the wings, and sensing and control systems to guide and manoeuvre. In this article, recent advances in insect-scale flapping-wing aerodynamics, flexible wing structures, unsteady flight environment, sensing, stability and control are reviewed with perspective offered. In particular, the special features of the low Reynolds number flyers associated with small sizes, thin and light structures, slow flight with comparable wind gust speeds, bioinspired fabrication of wing structures, neuron-based sensing and adaptive control are highlighted. PMID:27118897

  11. Numerical investigation on aerodynamic performance of a novel vertical axis wind turbine with adaptive blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ying; Sun, Xiaojing; Dong, Xiaohua; Zhu, Bing; Huang, Diangui; Zheng, Zhongquan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel vertical axis wind turbine with deformed blades is designed. • The universal tendency of power characteristics for simulated turbine is found. • The whole flow field of different turbines from the aspect of vortex is analyzed. • The tracking analysis of vortex at different positions for a blade is conducted. • The aerodynamic performance of turbine with three deformed blades is analyzed. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine was designed whose blade can be deformed automatically into a desired geometry and thus achieve a better aerodynamic performance. A series of numerical simulations were conducted by utilizing the United Computational Fluid Dynamics code. Firstly, analysis and comparison of the performance of undeformed and deformed blades for the rotors having different blades were conducted. Then, the power characteristics of each simulated turbine were summarized and a universal tendency was found. Secondly, investigation on the effect of blade number and solidity on the power performance of Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine with deformable and undeformable blades was carried out. The results indicated that compared to conventional turbines with same solidity, the maximum percentage increase in power coefficient that the low solidity turbine with three deformable blades can achieve is about 14.56%. When solidity is high and also turbine operates at low tip speed ratio of less than the optimum value, the maximum power coefficient increase for the turbines with two and four deformable blades are 7.51% and 8.07%, respectively. However, beyond the optimal tip speed ratio, the power improvement of the turbine using the deformable blades seems not significant and even slightly worse than the conventional turbines. The last section studied the transient behavior of vortex and turbulent flow structures around the deformable rotor blade to explore the physical mechanism of improving aerodynamic

  12. Numerical Investigations on the Aerodynamic Performance of Wind Turbine:Downwind Versus Upwind Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhou; Decheng Wan

    2015-01-01

    Although the upwind configuration is more popular in the field of wind energy, the downwind one is a promising type for the offshore wind energy due to its special advantages. Different configurations have different aerodynamic performance and it is important to predict the performance of both downwind and upwind configurations accurately for designing and developing more reliable wind turbines. In this paper, a numerical investigation on the aerodynamic performance of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI wind turbine in downwind and upwind configurations is presented. The open source toolbox OpenFOAM coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method is applied to tackle rotating problems of wind turbines. Two 3D numerical models of NREL phase VI wind turbine with downwind and upwind configurations under four typical working conditions of incoming wind velocities are set up for the study of different unsteady characteristics of the downwind and upwind configurations, respectively. Numerical results of wake vortex structure, time histories of thrust, pressure distribution on the blade and limiting streamlines which can be used to identify points of separation in a 3D flow are presented. It can be concluded that thrust reduction due to blade-tower interaction is small for upwind wind turbines but relatively large for downwind wind turbines and attention should be paid to the vibration at a certain frequency induced by the cyclic reduction for both configurations. The results and conclusions are helpful to analyze the different aerodynamic performance of wind turbines between downwind and upwind configurations, providing useful references for practical design of wind turbine.

  13. Particle size distribution of UO sub 2 aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunath, B. (Radiation Safety Systems Div., BARC, Bombay (India)); Ramachandran, R.; Majumdar, S. (Radiometallurgy Div., BARC, Bombay (India))

    1991-12-01

    The Anderson cascade impactor has been used to determine the activity mean aerodynamic diameter and the particle size distribution of UO{sub 2} powders dispersed in the form of stable aerosols in an air medium. The UO{sub 2} powders obtained by the calcination of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) and ammonium diuranate (ADU) precipitates have been used. (orig./MM).

  14. Application Program Interface for the Orion Aerodynamics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip E.; Thompson, James

    2013-01-01

    The Application Programming Interface (API) for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Aerodynamic Database has been developed to provide the developers of software an easily implemented, fully self-contained method of accessing the CEV Aerodynamic Database for use in their analysis and simulation tools. The API is programmed in C and provides a series of functions to interact with the database, such as initialization, selecting various options, and calculating the aerodynamic data. No special functions (file read/write, table lookup) are required on the host system other than those included with a standard ANSI C installation. It reads one or more files of aero data tables. Previous releases of aerodynamic databases for space vehicles have only included data tables and a document of the algorithm and equations to combine them for the total aerodynamic forces and moments. This process required each software tool to have a unique implementation of the database code. Errors or omissions in the documentation, or errors in the implementation, led to a lengthy and burdensome process of having to debug each instance of the code. Additionally, input file formats differ for each space vehicle simulation tool, requiring the aero database tables to be reformatted to meet the tool s input file structure requirements. Finally, the capabilities for built-in table lookup routines vary for each simulation tool. Implementation of a new database may require an update to and verification of the table lookup routines. This may be required if the number of dimensions of a data table exceeds the capability of the simulation tools built-in lookup routines. A single software solution was created to provide an aerodynamics software model that could be integrated into other simulation and analysis tools. The highly complex Orion aerodynamics model can then be quickly included in a wide variety of tools. The API code is written in ANSI C for ease of portability to a wide variety of systems. The

  15. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Flapping Wing of a Bird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Agoes Moelyadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady flow behavior and time-dependent aerodynamic characteristics of the flapping motion of a bird’s wing were investigated using a computational method. During flapping, aerodynamic interactions between bird wing surfaces and surrounding flow may occur, generating local time-dependent flow changes in the flow field and aerodynamic load of birds. To study the effect of flapping speed on unsteady aerodynamic load, two kinds of computational simulations were carried out, namely a quasi-steady and an unsteady simulation. To mimic the movement of the down-stroke and the upstroke of a bird, the flapping path accorded to a sinus function, with the wing attitude changing in dihedral angle and time. The computations of time-dependent viscous flow were based on the solution of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations by applying the k-e turbulence model. In addition, the discretization for the computational domain around the model used multi-block structured grid to provide more accuracy in capturing viscous flow, especially in the vicinity of the wing and body surfaces, to obtain a proper wing-body geometry model. For this research, the seagull bird was chosen, which has high aspect ratio wings with pointed wing-tips and a high camber wing section. The results include mesh movement, velocity contours as well as aerodynamic coefficients of the flapping motion of the bird at various flapping frequencies.

  16. [Role of aerodynamic parameters in voice function assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong-qing; Lin, Sheng-zhi; Xu, Xin-lin; Zhou, Li; Zhuang, Pei-yun; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the application and significance of aerodynamic parameters in voice function assessment. The phonatory aerodynamic system (PAS) was used to collect aerodynamic parameters from subjects with normal voice, vocal fold polyp, vocal fold cyst, and vocal fold immobility. Multivariate statistical analysis was used to compare measurements across groups. Phonation threshold flow (PTF), mean flow rate (MFR), maximum phonation time (MPT), and glottal resistance (GR) in one hundred normal subjects were significantly affected by sex (P efficiency (VE) were not (P > 0.05). PTP, PTF, MFR, SGP, and MPT were significantly different between normal voice and voice disorders (P 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis found that PTP, PTF, SGP, MFR, MPT, and VE in one hundred thirteen voice dis orders had similar diagnostic utility (P aerodynamic parameters of the three degrees of voice dysfunction due to vocal cord polyps were compared and found to have no significant differences (P > 0.05). PTP, PTF, MFR, SGP and MPT in forty one patients with vocal polyps were significantly different after surgical resection of vocal cord polyps (P aerodynamic parameters can objectively and effectively evaluate the variations of vocal function, and have good auxiliary diagnostic value.

  17. Aerodynamic profiles of women with muscle tension dysphonia/aphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Amanda I; Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie; Rubinstein, Elaine N; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the authors aimed to (a) determine whether phonatory airflows and estimated subglottal pressures (est-Psub) for women with primary muscle tension dysphonia/aphonia (MTD/A) differ from those for healthy speakers; (b) identify different aerodynamic profile patterns within the MTD/A subject group; and (c) determine whether results suggest new understanding of pathogenesis in MTD/A. Retrospective review of aerodynamic data collected from 90 women at the time of primary MTD/A diagnosis. Aerodynamic profiles were significantly different for women with MTD/A as compared with healthy speakers. Five distinct profiles were identified: (a) normal flow, normal est-Psub; (b) high flow, high est-Psub; (c) low flow, normal est-Psub; (d) normal flow, high est-Psub; and (e) high flow, normal est-Psub. This study is the first to identify distinct subgroups of aerodynamic profiles in women with MTD/A and to quantitatively identify a clinical phenomenon sometimes described in association with it-"breath holding"-that is shown by low airflow with normal est-Psub. Results were consistent with clinical claims that diverse respiratory and laryngeal functions may underlie phonatory patterns associated with MTD/A. One potential mechanism, based in psychobiological theory, is introduced to explain some of the variability in aerodynamic profiles of women with MTD/A.

  18. Influence of unsteady aerodynamics on driving dynamics of passenger cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huemer, Jakob; Stickel, Thomas; Sagan, Erich; Schwarz, Martin; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2014-11-01

    Recent approaches towards numerical investigations with computational fluid dynamics methods on unsteady aerodynamic loads of passenger cars identified major differences compared with steady-state aerodynamic excitations. Furthermore, innovative vehicle concepts such as electric-vehicles or hybrid drives further challenge the basic layout of passenger cars. Therefore, the relevance of unsteady aerodynamic loads on cross-wind stability of changing basic vehicle architectures should be analysed. In order to assure and improve handling and ride characteristics at high velocity of the actual range of vehicle layouts, the influence of unsteady excitations on the vehicle response was investigated. For this purpose, a simulation of the vehicle dynamics through multi-body simulation was used. The impact of certain unsteady aerodynamic load characteristics on the vehicle response was quantified and key factors were identified. Through a series of driving simulator tests, the identified differences in the vehicle response were evaluated regarding their significance on the subjective driver perception of cross-wind stability. Relevant criteria for the subjective driver assessment of the vehicle response were identified. As a consequence, a design method for the basic layout of passenger cars and chassis towards unsteady aerodynamic excitations was defined.

  19. Prediction of aerodynamic performance for MEXICO rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Zedong; Yang, Hua; Xu, Haoran

    2013-01-01

    results by Shen is adopted in this paper. In order to accurately simulate the separation point and the separation area which is caused by the adverse pressure gradient, the CFD method using SST turbulence model is used to solve the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged equations. The first order upwind...... is used for the advection schemes, and the discrete equations are solved with simple algorithms. In addition, uniform velocity and static temperature are given as inlet boundary conditions, and static pressure is given as the circumferential outer boundary condition and the outlet boundary condition...

  20. Size distribution of airbone particulates in monazite dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, K.M.A.D. da; Carvalho, S.M.M.; Leite, C.V.B.; Baptista, G.B.; Paschoa, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    A six-stage cascade impactor was used to collect airborne dust particulates in the grinding area of a Monazite sepation plant. The samples were analysis using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to determine the elemental concentrations, with special attention to thorium and uranium concentrations. The particle size distribution of the samples containing thorium and uranium were determined. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) obtained was 1.15 μm for both elements. The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was estimated based on the MMAD. The results are compared with ICRP recommendations for derived air concentrations (DAC) for thorium and uranium in restricted areas [pt

  1. Computational Investigations of Inboard Flow Separation and Mitigation Techniques on Multi-Megawatt Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Raymond

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the NREL 5-MW rotor have been examined using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method, OVERFLOW2. A comprehensive off-body grid independence study has been performed. A strong dependence on the size of the near-body wake grid has been found. Rapid diffusion of the wake appears to generate an overprediction of power and thrust. A large, continuous near-wake grid at minimum of two rotor diameters downstream of the rotor appears to be necessary for accurate predictions of near-body forces. The NREL 5-MW rotor demonstrates significant inboard flow separation up to 30% of span. This separation appears to be highly three-dimensional, with a significant amount of radial flow increasing the size of the separated region outboard. Both integrated aerodynamic coefficients and detailed wake structures for the baseline NREL 5-MW rotor are in excellent agreement with results by Riso at Uinfinity = 8 and 11 m/s. A simple, continuous full-chord fence was applied at the maximum chord location of the blade, within the region of separation. This non-optimized device reduced the boundary-layer cross-flow and resulting separation, and increased rotor power capture by 0.9% and 0.6% at U infinity = 8 and 11 m/s, respectively. Suction side only fences perform similarly in terms of power capture but reduce the increase in rotor thrust. Fence heights from 0.5% to 17.5% of the maximum chord all demonstrate some level of effectiveness, with fences (1-2.5%cmax) showing similar performance gains to taller fences with smaller penalties in thrust. Performance in terms of power capture is not very sensitive to spanwise location when placed within the separation region. Blunt trailing edge modifications to the inboard region of the blade showed a relatively significant effect on rotor power. Over a large range of trailing edge thicknesses from hTE = 10 to 25%c, power was found to increase by 1.4%. Thrust increased proportionally with the thicknesses examined

  2. Primary and Aggregate Size Distributions of PM in Tail Pipe Emissions form Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masataka; Amagai, Kenji; Nakaji, Takayuki; Hayashi, Shinji

    Particulate matter (PM) emission exhausted from diesel engine should be reduced to keep the clean air environment. PM emission was considered that it consisted of coarse and aggregate particles, and nuclei-mode particles of which diameter was less than 50nm. However the detail characteristics about these particles of the PM were still unknown and they were needed for more physically accurate measurement and more effective reduction of exhaust PM emission. In this study, the size distributions of solid particles in PM emission were reported. PMs in the tail-pipe emission were sampled from three type diesel engines. Sampled PM was chemically treated to separate the solid carbon fraction from other fractions such as soluble organic fraction (SOF). The electron microscopic and optical-manual size measurement procedures were used to determine the size distribution of primary particles those were formed through coagulation process from nuclei-mode particles and consisted in aggregate particles. The centrifugal sedimentation method was applied to measure the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Aerodynamic diameters of nano and aggregate particles were measured with scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The peak aggregate diameters detected by SMPS were fallen in the same size regime as the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Both of primary and Stokes diameters of dry-soot decreased with increases of engine speed and excess air ratio. Also, the effects of fuel properties and engine types on primary and aggregate particle diameters were discussed.

  3. Steam-water separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modrak, T.M.; Curtis, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The steam-water separator connected downstream of a steam generator consists of a vertical centrifugal separator with swirl blades between two concentric pipes and a cyclone separator located above. The water separated in the cyclone separator is collected in the inner tube of the centrifugal separator which is closed at the bottom. This design allows the overall height of the separator to be reduced. (DG) [de

  4. Aerodynamic analysis of the Darrieus rotor including secondary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.; Fraunie, P.; Beguier, C.

    1983-10-01

    An aerodynamic analysis is made of two variants of the two-actuator-disk theory for modeling the Darrieus wind turbine. The double-multiple-streamtube model with constant and variable interference factors, including secondary effects, is examined for a Darrieus rotor. The influence of the secondary effects, namely, the blade geometry and profile type, the rotating tower, and the presence of struts and aerodynamic spoilers, is relatively significant, especially at high tip-speed ratios. Variation of the induced velocity as a function of the azimuthal angle allows a more accurate calculation of the aerodynamic loads on the downwind zone of the rotor with respect to the assumed constant interference factors. The theoretical results were compared with available experimental data for the Magdalen Islands wind turbine and Sandia-type machines (straight-line/circular-arc shape).

  5. THERMAL AND AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCES OF THE SUPERSONIC MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan P Ninković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, Mach number of 4 can be taken as a boundary value for transition from conditions for supersonic, into the area of hypersonic flow, distinguishing two areas: area of supersonic in which the effects of the aerodynamic heating can be neglected and the area of hypersonic, in which the thermal effects become dominant. This paper presents the effects in static and dynamic areas, as well as presentation of G.R.O.M. software for determination of the values of aerodynamic derivatives, which was developed on the basis of linearized theory of supersonic flow. Validation of developed software was carried out through different types of testing, proving its usefulness for engineering practice in the area of supersonic wing aerodynamic loading calculations, even at high Mach numbers, with dominant thermal effects.

  6. Aerodynamic Jump: A Short Range View for Long Rod Projectiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bundy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that aerodynamic jump for a nonspinning kinetic energy penetrator is not – as conventional definitions may infer – a discontinuous change in the direction of motion at the origin of free flight, nor is it the converse, a cumulative redirection over a domain of infinite extent. Rather, with the aid of an alternative kinematical definition, it is shown that aerodynamic jump for such a projectile is a localized redirection of the center-of-gravity motion, caused by the force of lift due to yaw over the relatively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. A rigorous proof of this statement is provided, but the primary objective of this paper is to provide answers to the questions: what is aerodynamic jump, what does it mean, and what aspects of the flight trajectory does it refer to, or account for.

  7. Aerodynamic design of electric and hybrid vehicles: A guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A typical present-day subcompact electric hybrid vehicle (EHV), operating on an SAE J227a D driving cycle, consumes up to 35% of its road energy requirement overcoming aerodynamic resistance. The application of an integrated system design approach, where drag reduction is an important design parameter, can increase the cycle range by more than 15%. This guidebook highlights a logic strategy for including aerodynamic drag reduction in the design of electric and hybrid vehicles to the degree appropriate to the mission requirements. Backup information and procedures are included in order to implement the strategy. Elements of the procedure are based on extensive wind tunnel tests involving generic subscale models and full-scale prototype EHVs. The user need not have any previous aerodynamic background. By necessity, the procedure utilizes many generic approximations and assumptions resulting in various levels of uncertainty. Dealing with these uncertainties, however, is a key feature of the strategy.

  8. Atmospheric testing of wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.S. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States); Migliore, P.G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Quandt, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    An experimental investigation was conducted using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable span trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. A primary goal was to directly compare study results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were utilized to define effective changes in the aerodynamic coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans and configurations. Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (<70%) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with characteristic vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  9. Fuel Savings and Aerodynamic Drag Reduction from Rail Car Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Bruce; Salari, Kambiz; Babb, Alex

    2008-01-01

    The potential for energy savings by reducing the aerodynamic drag of rail cars is significant. A previous study of aerodynamic drag of coal cars suggests that a 25% reduction in drag of empty cars would correspond to a 5% fuel savings for a round trip [1]. Rail statistics for the United States [2] report that approximately 5.7 billion liters of diesel fuel were consumed for coal transportation in 2002, so a 5% fuel savings would total 284 million liters. This corresponds to 2% of Class I railroad fuel consumption nationwide. As part of a DOE-sponsored study, the aerodynamic drag of scale rail cars was measured in a wind tunnel. The goal of the study was to measure the drag reduction of various rail-car cover designs. The cover designs tested yielded an average drag reduction of 43% relative to empty cars corresponding to an estimated round-trip fuel savings of 9%.

  10. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2006-01-01

    Aerodynamic effects in ionized gases, often neglected phenomena, have been subject of a renewed interest in recent years. After a brief historical account, we discuss a selected number of effects and unresolved problems that appear to be relevant in both aeronautic and propulsion applications in subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow. Interaction between acoustic shock waves and weakly ionized gas is manifested either as plasma-induced shock wave dispersion and acceleration or as shock-wave induced double electric layer in the plasma, followed by the localized increase of the average electron energy and density, as well as enhancement of optical emission. We describe the phenomenology of these effects and discuss several experiments that still do not have an adequate interpretation. Critical for application of aerodynamic effects is the energy deposition into the flow. We classify and discuss some proposed wall-free generation schemes with respect to the efficiency of energy deposition and overall generation of the aerodynamic body force

  11. [Acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of the oesophageal voice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez de la Iglesia, F; Fernández González, S

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the physiology and pathophisiology of esophageal voice according to objective aerodynamic and acoustic parameters (quantitative and qualitative parameters). Our subjects were comprised of 33 laryngectomized patients (all male) that underwent aerodynamic, acoustic and perceptual protocol. There is a statistical association between acoustic and aerodynamic qualitative parameters (phonation flow chart type, sound spectrum, perceptual analysis) among quantitative parameters (neoglotic pressure, phonation flow, phonation time, fundamental frequency, maximum intensity sound level, speech rate). Nevertheles, not always such observations bring practical resources to clinical practice. We consider that the facts studied may enable us to add, pragmatically, new resources to the more effective vocal rehabilitation to these patients. The physiology of esophageal voice is well understood by the method we have applied, also seeking for rehabilitation, improving oral communication skills in the laryngectomee population.

  12. Aerodynamic loads on buses due to crosswind gusts: extended analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugge, Lars; Juhlin, Magnus

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this work is to use inverse simulations on measured vehicle data in order to estimate the aerodynamic loads on a bus when exposed to crosswind situations. Tyre forces, driver input, wind velocity and vehicle response were measured on a typical coach when subjected to natural crosswind gusts. Based on these measurements and a detailed MBS vehicle model, the aerodynamic loads were estimated through inverse simulations. In order to estimate the lift force, roll and pitch moments in addition to the lateral force and yaw moment, the simulation model was extended by also incorporating the estimation of the vertical road disturbances. The proposed method enables the estimation of aerodynamic loads due to crosswind gusts without using a full scale wind tunnel adapted for crosswind excitation.

  13. Numerical study on aerodynamics of banked wing in ground effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Jia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Unlike conventional airplane, a WIG craft experiences righting moment and adverse yaw moment in banked turning in ground effect. Numerical simulations are carried out to study the aerodynamics of banked wing in ground effect. Configurations of rectangular wing and delta wing are considered, and performance of endplates and ailerons during banking are also studied. The study shows that righting moment increase nonlinearly with heeling angle, and endplates enhance the righting. The asymmetric aerodynamic distribution along span of wing with heeling angle introduces adverse yaw moment. Heeling in ground effect with small ground clearance increases the vertical aerodynamic force and makes WIG craft climb. Deflections of ailerons introduce lift decrease and a light pitching motion. Delta wing shows advantage in banked turning for smaller righting moment and adverse yaw moment during banking.

  14. Analysis of Ground Effects on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Aerofoils Using Boundary Layer Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuji; Kikuchi, Masanori; Hirano, Kimitaka

    A study of a new high-speed zero-emission transportation “Aerotrain” is being carried out in Tohoku University and the University of Miyazaki. Because the aerotrain utilizes the ground effect, research on the aerofoil section, which can harness the ground effect effectively, is important. The aerotrain moves along a U-shaped guideway, which has a ground and sidewalls, so it has many viscous interference elements. In an analysis of the ground effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of aerofoils, the boundary layers on the aerofoil surface must be considered. At first, velocity distributions on the surfaces of aerofoils in potential flows are computed using the vortex method, then the momentum integration equations of the boundary layer are solved with experimental formulas. This procedure has the following advantages: modifications of the aerofoil section are easy because it is not necessary to make complicated computational grids, boundary layer transition and separation can be predicted using empirical procedures. The aerodynamic characteristics of four types of aerofoil sections are investigated to clarify the relationship between aerofoil sections and ground effects. Computational results are compared with experimental results obtained using a towing wind tunnel to verify computational precisions. In addition, aerofoil characteristics at an actual cruise speed are analyzed.

  15. Experimental Investigation on Aerodynamic Control of a Wing with Distributed Plasma Actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Menghu; Li Jun; Liang Hua; Zhao Guangyin; Niu Zhongguo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental investigation of active flow control on the aerodynamic performance of a flying wing is conducted. Subsonic wind tunnel tests are performed using a model of a 35° swept flying wing with an nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (NS-DBD) plasma actuator, which is installed symmetrically on the wing leading edge. The lift and drag coefficient, lift-to-drag ratio and pitching moment coefficient are tested by a six-component force balance for a range of angles of attack. The results indicate that a 44.5% increase in the lift coefficient, a 34.2% decrease in the drag coefficient and a 22.4% increase in the maximum lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved as compared with the baseline case. The effects of several actuation parameters are also investigated, and the results show that control efficiency demonstrates a strong dependence on actuation location and frequency. Furthermore, we highlight the use of distributed plasma actuators at the leading edge to enhance the aerodynamic performance, giving insight into the different mechanism of separation control and vortex control, which shows tremendous potential in practical flow control for a broad range of angles of attack. (paper)

  16. Aerodynamic Modeling of Transonic Aircraft Using Vortex Lattice Coupled with Transonic Small Disturbance for Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Daniel; Fujiwara, Gustavo E. C.; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    The need to rapidly scan large design spaces during conceptual design calls for computationally inexpensive tools such as the vortex lattice method (VLM). Although some VLM tools, such as Vorview have been extended to model fully-supersonic flow, VLM solutions are typically limited to inviscid, subcritical flow regimes. Many transport aircraft operate at transonic speeds, which limits the applicability of VLM for such applications. This paper presents a novel approach to correct three-dimensional VLM through coupling of two-dimensional transonic small disturbance (TSD) solutions along the span of an aircraft wing in order to accurately predict transonic aerodynamic loading and wave drag for transport aircraft. The approach is extended to predict flow separation and capture the attenuation of aerodynamic forces due to boundary layer viscosity by coupling the TSD solver with an integral boundary layer (IBL) model. The modeling framework is applied to the NASA General Transport Model (GTM) integrated with a novel control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF).

  17. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Gholamhosein Pouryoussefi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Experiments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 × 106 over angles of attack from −8° to 20°, and then results are compared. Generally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10° and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50% which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4° and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2° and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  18. Application of Reduced Order Transonic Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient Matrix for Design Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Li, Wesley W.

    2009-01-01

    Supporting the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate guidelines, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] Dryden Flight Research Center is developing a multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization [MDAO] tool. This tool will leverage existing tools and practices, and allow the easy integration and adoption of new state-of-the-art software. Today s modern aircraft designs in transonic speed are a challenging task due to the computation time required for the unsteady aeroelastic analysis using a Computational Fluid Dynamics [CFD] code. Design approaches in this speed regime are mainly based on the manual trial and error. Because of the time required for unsteady CFD computations in time-domain, this will considerably slow down the whole design process. These analyses are usually performed repeatedly to optimize the final design. As a result, there is considerable motivation to be able to perform aeroelastic calculations more quickly and inexpensively. This paper will describe the development of unsteady transonic aeroelastic design methodology for design optimization using reduced modeling method and unsteady aerodynamic approximation. The method requires the unsteady transonic aerodynamics be represented in the frequency or Laplace domain. Dynamically linear assumption is used for creating Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient [AIC] matrices in transonic speed regime. Unsteady CFD computations are needed for the important columns of an AIC matrix which corresponded to the primary modes for the flutter. Order reduction techniques, such as Guyan reduction and improved reduction system, are used to reduce the size of problem transonic flutter can be found by the classic methods, such as Rational function approximation, p-k, p, root-locus etc. Such a methodology could be incorporated into MDAO tool for design optimization at a reasonable computational cost. The proposed technique is verified using the Aerostructures Test Wing 2 actually designed

  19. Block copolymer battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  20. Research on Aerodynamic Noise Reduction for High-Speed Trains

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yadong; Zhang, Jiye; Li, Tian; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    A broadband noise source model based on Lighthill’s acoustic theory was used to perform numerical simulations of the aerodynamic noise sources for a high-speed train. The near-field unsteady flow around a high-speed train was analysed based on a delayed detached-eddy simulation (DDES) using the finite volume method with high-order difference schemes. The far-field aerodynamic noise from a high-speed train was predicted using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD)/Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H)...

  1. Transient response of two lobe aerodynamic journal bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kumar Yadav

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of a rotor-dynamic system is greatly affected by the performance of aerodynamic bearing and the performance of bearing is characterized by the stiffness and damping coefficients. In the present work, stiffness and damping coefficients of bearing are computed and the performance of the bearing is greatly changed with the change in bearing air film profile. The effect of lobe offset factors on the transient performance of aerodynamic bearing is presented. Bifurcation and Poincare diagrams of two lobe journal bearing have been presented for different offset factors. A bearing designer can judge the bearing performance based on bifurcation diagrams.

  2. Aerodynamic-structural model of offwind yacht sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairs, Christopher M.

    An aerodynamic-structural model of offwind yacht sails was created that is useful in predicting sail forces. Two sails were examined experimentally and computationally at several wind angles to explore a variety of flow regimes. The accuracy of the numerical solutions was measured by comparing to experimental results. The two sails examined were a Code 0 and a reaching asymmetric spinnaker. During experiment, balance, wake, and sail shape data were recorded for both sails in various configurations. Two computational steps were used to evaluate the computational model. First, an aerodynamic flow model that includes viscosity effects was used to examine the experimental flying shapes that were recorded. Second, the aerodynamic model was combined with a nonlinear, structural, finite element analysis (FEA) model. The aerodynamic and structural models were used iteratively to predict final flying shapes of offwind sails, starting with the design shapes. The Code 0 has relatively low camber and is used at small angles of attack. It was examined experimentally and computationally at a single angle of attack in two trim configurations, a baseline and overtrimmed setting. Experimentally, the Code 0 was stable and maintained large flow attachment regions. The digitized flying shapes from experiment were examined in the aerodynamic model. Force area predictions matched experimental results well. When the aerodynamic-structural tool was employed, the predictive capability was slightly worse. The reaching asymmetric spinnaker has higher camber and operates at higher angles of attack than the Code 0. Experimentally and computationally, it was examined at two angles of attack. Like the Code 0, at each wind angle, baseline and overtrimmed settings were examined. Experimentally, sail oscillations and large flow detachment regions were encountered. The computational analysis began by examining the experimental flying shapes in the aerodynamic model. In the baseline setting, the

  3. Use of water towing tanks for aerodynamics and hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelhak, Mohamed

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnels and flumes have become standard laboratory tools for modeling a variety of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic flow problems. Less available, although by no means less useful, are facilities in which a model can be towed (or propelled) through air or water. This article emphasizes the use of the water towing tank as an experimental tool for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic studies. Its advantages and disadvantages over other flow rigs are discussed, and its usefullness is illustrated through many examples of research results obtained over the past few years in a typical towing tank facility.

  4. Aerodynamic Noise An Introduction for Physicists and Engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Tarit

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic Noise extensively covers the theoretical basis and mathematical modeling of sound, especially the undesirable sounds produced by aircraft. This noise could come from an aircraft’s engine—propellers, fans, combustion chamber, jets—or the vehicle itself—external surfaces—or from sonic booms. The majority of the sound produced is due to the motion of air and its interaction with solid boundaries, and this is the main discussion of the book. With problem sets at the end of each chapter, Aerodynamic Noise is ideal for graduate students of mechanical and aerospace engineering. It may also be useful for designers of cars, trains, and wind turbines.

  5. Design and aerodynamic analysis of a new Formula Ashenkoff car

    OpenAIRE

    Mateo Muñoz, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This project has the objective to learn to use CFD free software OpenFOAM focusing on turbulent problems resolution, with the objective of analyzing the aerodynamics of a formula racing car. We had the opportunity to contact with the company Ashenkoff S.L., whose managers were interested in creating a new prototype, the Ashenkoff K100, and they will borrow us resources to make it. The project will consists on the aerodynamic analysis of this new model using CFD software OpenFOAM. Previo...

  6. Aerodynamic Support of a Big Industrial Turboblower Rotor

    OpenAIRE

    Šimek, Jiří; Kozánek, Jan; Šafr, Milan

    2007-01-01

    Aerodynamic bearing support for the rotor of a 100 kW input industrial turboblower with operational speed of 18 000 rpm was designed and manufactured. Rotor with mass of about 50 kg is supported in two tilting-pad journal bearings 120 mm in diameter, axial forces are taken up by aerodynamic spiral groove thrust bearing 250 mm in diameter. Some specific features of the bearing design are described in the paper and the results of rotor support tests are presented. The paper is an extended versi...

  7. Improved blade element momentum theory for wind turbine aerodynamic computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhenye; Chen, Jin; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Blade element momentum (BEM) theory is widely used in aerodynamic performance predictions and design applications for wind turbines. However, the classic BEM method is not quite accurate which often tends to under-predict the aerodynamic forces near root and over-predict its performance near tip....... for the MEXICO rotor. Results show that the improved BEM theory gives a better prediction than the classic BEM method, especially in the blade tip region, when comparing to the MEXICO measurements. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  8. Hybrid Vortex Method for the Aerodynamic Analysis of Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid vortex method, in which vortex panel method is combined with the viscous-vortex particle method (HPVP, was established to model the wind turbine aerodynamic and relevant numerical procedure program was developed to solve flow equations. The panel method was used to calculate the blade surface vortex sheets and the vortex particle method was employed to simulate the blade wake vortices. As a result of numerical calculations on the flow over a wind turbine, the HPVP method shows significant advantages in accuracy and less computation resource consuming. The validation of the aerodynamic parameters against Phase VI wind turbine experimental data is performed, which shows reasonable agreement.

  9. Analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise from VS45

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundabin, P. [Renewable Energy Systems Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the analysis of acoustic data taken from the VS45 at Kaiser-Wilhelm-Koog. The aim was to investigate the dependence of aerodynamic noise on tip speed and angle of attack. In particular, the dependence of noise in individual third octave bands on these variable is examined. The analysis is divided into 3 sections: data selection, data checks and analysis of broadband nacelle noise; analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise and its sensitivity to tip speed and angle of attack. (LN)

  10. Aerodynamic Simulation Analysis of Unmanned Airborne Electronic Bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiaoying; Guo, Yachao

    2017-10-01

    For microelectronic bombs for UAVs, on the basis of the use of rotors to lift the insurance on the basis of ammunition, increased tail to increase stability. The aerodynamic simulation of the outer structure of the ammunition was carried out by FLUENT software. The resistance coefficient, the lift coefficient and the pitch moment coefficient under different angle of attack and Mach number were obtained, and the aerodynamic characteristics of the electronic bomb were studied. The pressure line diagram and the velocity line diagram of the flow around the bomb are further analyzed, and the rationality of the external structure is verified, which provides a reference for the subsequent design of the electronic bomb.

  11. Fictional Separation Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Buhrkal; Birkedal, Lars

    2012-01-01

    , separation means physical separation. In this paper, we introduce \\emph{fictional separation logic}, which includes more general forms of fictional separating conjunctions P * Q, where "*" does not require physical separation, but may also be used in situations where the memory resources described by P and Q...

  12. Aerodynamic research of a racing car based on wind tunnel test and computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jianfeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind tunnel test and computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation are two main methods for the study of automotive aerodynamics. CFD simulation software solves the results in calculation by using the basic theory of aerodynamic. Calculation will inevitably lead to bias, and the wind tunnel test can effectively simulate the real driving condition, which is the most effective aerodynamics research method. This paper researches the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing of a racing car. Aerodynamic model of a racing car is established. Wind tunnel test is carried out and compared with the simulation results of computational fluid dynamics. The deviation of the two methods is small, and the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics simulation is verified. By means of CFD software simulation, the coefficients of six aerodynamic forces are fitted and the aerodynamic equations are obtained. Finally, the aerodynamic forces and torques of the racing car travel in bend are calculated.

  13. Aeolian Sand Transport in the Planetary Context: Respective Roles of Aerodynamic and Bed-Dilatancy Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Bratton, C.

    1999-09-01

    . High-speed photography showed them to grow in both diameter and depth after the impactor had ricochetted from the crater site. The delayed response of the bed was "explosive" in nature, and created a miniature ejecta curtain spreading upward and outward for many centimeters for impact of 100-300 micron-diameter grains into similar material. Elastic energy deposited in the bed by the impacting grain creates a subsurface stress regime or "quasi-Boussinesq" compression field. Elastic recovery of the bed occurs by dilatancy; shear stresses suddenly convert the grains from closed to open packing, and grains are consequently able to eject themselves forcefully from the impact site. Random jostling of the grains causes radial homogenization of stress vectors and a resulting circular crater. There is a great temptation to draw parallels with cratering produced by meteorite impacts, but a rigorous search for common modelling ground between the two phenomena has not been conducted at this time. For every impact of an aerodynamically energized grain, there are several hundred grains ejected into the wind for the high-energy transport that might occur on Mars. Many of these grains will themselves become subject to the boundary layer's aerodynamic lift forces (their motion will not immediately die and add to the creep population), and these grains will become indistinguishable from those lifted entirely by aerodynamic forces. As each grain impacts the bed, it will eject even more grains into the flow. A cascading effect will take place, but because it must be finite in its growth, damping will occur as the number of grains set in motion causes mid-air collisions that prevent much of the impact energy from reaching the surface of the bed -thus creating a dynamic equilibrium in a high-density saltation cloud. It is apparent that for a given impact energy, the stress field permits a smaller volume of grains to convert to open packing as the size of the bed grains increases, or as the

  14. Study of elemental mass size distributions at Skukuza, South Africa, during the SAFARI 2000 dry season campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenhaut, Willy; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Cafmeyer, Jan; Annegarn, Harold J.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the final dry season campaign of SAFARI 2000, a 12-stage small deposit area low pressure impactor (SDI) was operated at Skukuza, in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, from 17 August until 19 September 2000. Separate day and night samples were collected (64 in total), starting at about 7:00 and at about 18:00 local time, respectively. The samples were analysed for 28 elements by PIXE. The total concentrations (summed over all 12 stages) varied quite substantially during the campaign (up to a factor of 50), but no systematic day/night difference pattern was observed. Also the size distributions were rather similar during day and night. S, K, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb and Pb had most of their mass in the submicrometre size range, with maximum typically at about 0.3 μm equivalent aerodynamic diameter. Several of those elements are good indicators for biomass burning. Mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMADs) were calculated for the various elements and compared with those obtained during SAFARI-92. During this earlier campaign, which also took place in the dry season, 41 daily samples were taken at Skukuza with a PIXE International cascade impactor (PCI). For the crustal and sea-salt elements, fairly similar MMADs were obtained in the two campaigns. For the fine-mode elements, however, the MMADs were substantially lower during SAFARI 2000 than during SAFARI-92. During this earlier campaign, the MMADs were most likely overestimated. Compared to the SDI, the PCI is much less appropriate for studying the size distribution in the submicrometre size range

  15. Dynamic size spectrometry of airborne microorganisms: Laboratory evaluation and calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yinge; Willeke, Klaus; Ulevicius, Vidmantas; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Donnelly, Jean

    Bioaerosol samplers need to be calibrated for the microorganisms of interest. The Aerosizer, a relatively new aerodynamic size spectrometer, is shown to be a suitable dynamic instrument for the evaluation and calibration of such samplers in the laboratory, prior to their use in the field. It provides the necessary reference count against which the microbiological response of the sampler can be compared. It measures the health-significant aerodynamic diameters of microorganisms down to 0.5 μm, thus including most of the bacteria, fungi and pollen found in outdoor and indoor air environments. Comparison tests with a laser size spectrometer indicate that the suspension of microorganisms needs to be washed several times before aerosolization to avoid coating of the airborne microorganisms with nutrients and microbial slime from the suspension, and to reduce the residue particles to sizes below the lowest size of the aerosolized microorganisms.

  16. Particle separations by electrophoretic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, N.E.; Petersen, S.L.; Ducatte, G.R.; Remcho, V.T.

    1996-03-01

    A new method for particle separations based on capillary electrophoresis has been developed and characterized. It uniquely separates particles according to their chemical nature. Separations have been demonstrated with chemically modified latex particles and with inorganic oxide and silicate particles. Separations have been shown both experimentally and theoretically to be essentially independent of particle size in the range of about 0.2 μm to 10 μm. The method has been applied to separations of U0 2 particles from environmental particulate material. For this, an integrated method was developed for capillary electrophoretic separation, collection of separated fractions, and determinations of U0 2 and environmental particles in each fraction. Experimental runs with the integrated method on mixtures of UO 2 particles and environmental particulate material demonstrated enrichment factors of 20 for UO 2 particles in respect to environmental particles in the U0 2 containing fractions. This enrichment factor reduces the costs and time for processing particulate samples by the lexan process by a factor of about 20

  17. Axial compressor blade design for desensitization of aerodynamic performance and stability to tip clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Engin

    Tip clearance flow is the flow through the clearance between the rotor blade tip and the shroud of a turbomachine, such as compressors and turbines. This flow is driven by the pressure difference across the blade (aerodynamic loading) in the tip region and is a major source of loss in performance and aerodynamic stability in axial compressors of modern aircraft engines. An increase in tip clearance, either temporary due to differential radial expansion between the blade and the shroud during transient operation or permanent due to engine wear or manufacturing tolerances on small blades, increases tip clearance flow and results in higher fuel consumption and higher risk of engine surge. A compressor design that can reduce the sensitivity of its performance and aerodynamic stability to tip clearance increase would have a major impact on short and long-term engine performance and operating envelope. While much research has been carried out on improving nominal compressor performance, little had been done on desensitization to tip clearance increase beyond isolated observations that certain blade designs such as forward chordwise sweep, seem to be less sensitive to tip clearance size increase. The current project aims to identify through a computational study the flow features and associated mechanisms that reduces sensitivity of axial compressor rotors to tip clearance size and propose blade design strategies that can exploit these results. The methodology starts with the design of a reference conventional axial compressor rotor followed by a parametric study with variations of this reference design through modification of the camber line and of the stacking line of blade profiles along the span. It is noted that a simple desensitization method would be to reduce the aerodynamic loading of the blade tip which would reduce the tip clearance flow and its proportional contribution to performance loss. However, with the larger part of the work on the flow done in this

  18. Aerodynamic Optimization of an Over-the-Wing-Nacelle-Mount Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    An over-the-wing-nacelle-mount airplane configuration is known to prevent the noise propagation from jet engines toward ground. However, the configuration is assumed to have low aerodynamic efficiency due to the aerodynamic interference effect between a wing and a nacelle. In this paper, aerodynamic design optimization is conducted to improve aerodynamic efficiency to be equivalent to conventional under-the-wing-nacelle-mount configuration. The nacelle and wing geometry are modified to achiev...

  19. Aerodynamic efficiency of a bio-inspired flapping wing rotor at low Reynolds number

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hao; Guo, Shijun

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the aerodynamic efficiency of a bioinspired flapping wing rotor kinematics which combines an active vertical flapping motion and a passive horizontal rotation induced by aerodynamic thrust. The aerodynamic efficiencies for producing both vertical lift and horizontal thrust of the wing are obtained using a quasi-steady aerodynamic model and two-dimensional (2D) CFD analysis at Reynolds number of 2500. The calculated efficiency data show that both efficiencies (propulsiv...

  20. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Separation Anxiety KidsHealth / For Parents / Separation Anxiety What's in this ... both of you get through it. About Separation Anxiety Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. Parents ...

  1. Method determination of aerodynamic performances of profile in the plane airfoil cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л. Г. Волянська

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Method determination of aerodynamic forces by direct measurement using three-component aerodynamic balance are given in the article. There are the schematic model of the facility for determination airfoil cascade aerodynamic performances in the article. Drawing and description of slewing pack of blades are shown in the article

  2. High Temperature, Controlled-Atmosphere Aerodynamic Levitation Experiments with Applications in Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macris, C. A.; Badro, J.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The aerodynamic levitation laser apparatus is an instrument in which spherical samples are freely floated on top of a stream of gas while being heated with a CO2laser to temperatures up to about 3500 °C. Laser heated samples, ranging in size from 0.5 to 3.5 mm diameter, can be levitated in a variety of chemically active or inert atmospheres in a gas-mixing chamber (e.g., Hennet et al. 2006; Pack et al. 2010). This allows for containerless, controlled-atmosphere, high temperature experiments with potential for applications in earth and planetary science. A relatively new technique, aerodynamic levitation has been used mostly for studies of the physical properties of liquids at high temperatures (Kohara et al. 2011), crystallization behavior of silicates and oxides (Arai et al. 2004), and to prepare glasses from compositions known to crystallize upon quenching (Tangeman et al. 2001). More recently, however, aerodynamic levitation with laser heating has been used as an experimental technique to simulate planetary processes. Pack et al. (2010) used levitation and melting experiments to simulate chondrule formation by using Ar-H2 as the flow gas, thus imposing a reducing atmosphere, resulting in reduction of FeO, Fe2O3, and NiO to metal alloys. Macris et al. (2015) used laser heating with aerodynamic levitation to reproduce the textures and diffusion profiles of major and minor elements observed in impact ejecta from the Australasian strewn field, by melting a powdered natural tektite mixed with 60-100 μm quartz grains on a flow of pure Ar gas. These experiments resulted in quantitative modeling of Si and Al diffusion, which allowed for interpretations regarding the thermal histories of natural tektites and their interactions with the surrounding impact vapor plume. Future experiments will employ gas mixing (CO, CO2, H2, O, Ar) in a controlled atmosphere levitation chamber to explore the range of fO2applicable to melt-forming impacts on other rocky planetary bodies

  3. Aerodynamic response of an airfoil section undergoing pitch motion and trailing edge flap deflection: a comparison of simulation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Riziotis, Vasilis A.; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    The study presents and compares aerodynamic simulations for an airfoil section with an adaptive trailing edge flap, which deflects following a smooth deformation shape. The simulations are carried out with three substantially different methods: a Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes solver, a viscous–inviscid...... to separated conditions and accounting for the effects of flap deflection; the steady results from the Navier–Stokes solver and the viscous–inviscid interaction method are used as input data for the simpler dynamic stall model. The paper characterizes then the dynamics of the unsteady forces and moments...

  4. Experimental analysis of aerodynamic stability of stress-ribbon footbridges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pirner, Miroš; Fischer, Ondřej

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (1999), s. 95-104 ISSN 1226-6116 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : footbridges * aerodynamic stability * bending-torsional vibrations * wind-excited vibrations * wind-tunnel in civil engineering Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://koreascience.or.kr/article/ArticleFullRecord.jsp?cn=KJKHCF_1999_v2n2_95&ordernum=5

  5. Self-starting aerodynamics analysis of vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyang Zhu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vertical axis wind turbine is a special type of wind-force electric generator which is capable of working in the complicated wind environment. The self-starting aerodynamics is one of the most important considerations for this kind of turbine. This article aims at providing a systematic synthesis on the self-starting aerodynamic characteristics of vertical axis wind turbine based on the numerical analysis approach. First, the physical model of vertical axis wind turbine and its parameter definitions are presented. Secondary, the interaction model between the vertical axis wind turbine and fluid is developed by using the weak coupling approach; the numerical data of this model are then compared with the wind tunnel experimental data to show its feasibility. Third, the effects of solidity and fixed pitch angle on the self-starting aerodynamic characteristics of the vertical axis wind turbine are analyzed systematically. Finally, the quantification effects of the solidity and fixed pitch angle on the self-starting performance of the turbine can be obtained. The analysis in this study will provide straightforward physical insight into the self-starting aerodynamic characteristics of vertical axis wind turbine.

  6. An explicit multi-time-stepping algorithm for aerodynamic flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemann-Tuitman, B.E.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    1997-01-01

    An explicit multi-time-stepping algorithm with applications to aerodynamic flows is presented. In the algorithm, in different parts of the computational domain different time steps are taken, and the flow is synchronized at the so-called synchronization levels. The algorithm is validated for

  7. Aerodynamic force coefficients of plain bridge cables in wet conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoni, Giulia; Georgakis, Christos T.

    In this paper, the aerodynamic forces and force coefficients from preliminary static wind tunnel tests on a plain cable in wet conditions are presented. The presented results are for several different relative cable wind-angles. A comparison is made with tests in dry conditions. In dry conditions...

  8. PRINCIPLE "EARLY MATCHING" AERODYNAMIC DESIGN AIRCRAFT WITH LANDING GEAR HOVERCRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Morozov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle of "early matching" aircraft aerohydrodynamic layouts with air cushion landing gear is suggested. Application of this principle is considered as an example of adaptation to the ball screw base circuit of light transport aircraft. The principle, other than weight, aerodynamic, technological and operational requirements includes additional project activities related to the installation of ball screws.

  9. Aerodynamic sound from a sawtooth plate with different thickness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acoustic performance of an airfoil can be improved with the serrated leading or trailing edge. A sawtooth plate is one of the serration shapes. In this study, the effect of sawtooth plate thickness on the aerodynamically generated noise in wake-sawtooth plate interaction at a Reynolds number of 150 is numerically investigated ...

  10. Aerodynamic effects of trees on pollutant concentration in street canyons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buccolieri, R.; Gromke, C.B.; Sabatino, Di S.; Ruck, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with aerodynamic effects of avenue-like tree planting on flow and traffic-originated pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons by means of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. Several parameters affecting pedestrian level concentration are investigated, namely plant

  11. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amir; Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-08-15

    During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Aerodynamic benefit for a cyclist by a following motorcycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blocken, B.J.E; Toparlar, Y.; Andrianne, Th.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many accidents have occurred between cyclists and in-race motorcycles, even yielding fatal injuries. The accidents and the potential aerodynamics issues have impelled the present authors to perform dedicated wind-tunnel measurements and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations

  13. Aerodynamic Profiles of Women with Muscle Tension Dysphonia/Aphonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Amanda I.; Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie; Rubinstein, Elaine N.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to (a) determine whether phonatory airflows and estimated subglottal pressures (est-P[subscript sub]) for women with primary muscle tension dysphonia/aphonia (MTD/A) differ from those for healthy speakers; (b) identify different aerodynamic profile patterns within the MTD/A subject group; and (c) determine…

  14. The efficiency of aerodynamic force production in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, F O

    2001-12-01

    Total efficiency of aerodynamic force production in insect flight depends on both the efficiency with which flight muscles turn metabolic energy into muscle mechanical power and the efficiency with which this power is converted into aerodynamic flight force by the flapping wings. Total efficiency has been estimated in tethered flying fruit flies Drosophila by modulating their power expenditures in a virtual reality flight simulator while simultaneously measuring stroke kinematics, locomotor performance and metabolic costs. During flight, muscle efficiency increases with increasing flight force production, whereas aerodynamic efficiency of lift production decreases with increasing forces. As a consequence of these opposite trends, total flight efficiency in Drosophila remains approximately constant within the kinematic working range of the flight motor. Total efficiency is broadly independent of different profile power estimates and typically amounts to 2-3%. The animal achieves maximum total efficiency near hovering flight conditions, when the beating wings produce flight forces that are equal to the body weight of the insect. It remains uncertain whether this small advantage in total efficiency during hovering flight was shaped by evolutionary factors or results from functional constraints on both the production of mechanical power by the indirect flight muscles and the unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms in flapping flight.

  15. Evolutive and nonlinear vibrations of rotor on aerodynamic bearings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Kozánek, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 2007, č. 50 (2007), s. 829-840 ISSN 0924-090X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/06/1787 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : rotordynamics * aerodynamic bearings * vibrations Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.045, year: 2007

  16. Aerodynamic investigation of winglets on wind turbine blades using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2006-01-01

    The present report describes the numerical investigation of the aerodynamics around a wind turbine blade with a winglet using Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD. Five winglets were investigated with different twist distribution and camber. Four of them were pointing towards the pressure side...

  17. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Patel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities.

  18. Topological estimation of aerodynamic controlled airplane system functionality of quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С.В. Павлова

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available  It is suggested to use topological methods for stage estimation of aerodynamic airplane control in widespread range of its conditions The estimation is based on normalized stage virtual non-isotropy of configurational airplane systems calculation.

  19. Research on the Aerodynamic Resistance of Trickle Biofilter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvydas Zagorskis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A four – section trickle biofilter was constructed for experimental research. The filter was filled with the packing material of artificial origin. The material consists of plastic balls having a large surface area. The dependence of biofilter aerodynamic resistance on supply air flow rate and the number of filter sections was determined. The aerodynamic resistance of the biofilter was measured in two cases. In the first case, the packing material of the filter was dry, whereas in the second case it was wet. The experimental research determined that an increase in the air flow rate from 0.043 m/s to 0.076 m/s causes an increase in biofilter aerodynamic resistance from 30.5 to 62.5 Pa after measuring four layers of dry packing material. In case of wet packing material, biofilter aerodynamic resistance after measuring four layers of plastic balls increases from 42.1 to 90.4 Pa.Article in Lithuanian

  20. Experimental Investigation on Airfoil Shock Control by Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Quan; Cheng Bangqin; Li Yinghong; Cui Wei; Jin Di; Li Jun

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation on airfoil (NACA64—215) shock control is performed by plasma aerodynamic actuation in a supersonic tunnel (Ma = 2). The results of schlieren and pressure measurement show that when plasma aerodynamic actuation is applied, the position moves forward and the intensity of shock at the head of the airfoil weakens. With the increase in actuating voltage, the total pressure measured at the head of the airfoil increases, which means that the shock intensity decreases and the control effect increases. The best actuation effect is caused by upwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, and then downwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, while the control effect of aerodynamic actuation without a magnetic field is the most inconspicuous. The mean intensity of the normal shock at the head of the airfoil is relatively decreased by 16.33%, and the normal shock intensity is relatively reduced by 27.5% when 1000 V actuating voltage and upwind-direction actuation are applied with a magnetic field. This paper theoretically analyzes the Joule heating effect generated by DC discharge and the Lorentz force effect caused by the magnetic field. The discharge characteristics are compared for all kinds of actuation conditions to reveal the mechanism of shock control by plasma aerodynamic actuation