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Sample records for aerodynamic size separator

  1. Indigenous development and performance evaluation of BARC aerodynamic size separator (BASS)

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, S; Khan, A; Mayya, Y S; Narayanan, K P; Purwar, R C; Sapra, B K; Sunny, F

    2002-01-01

    Commercially available cascade impactors, commonly used for aerodynamic size separation of aerosol particles, are based on the principle of inertial impaction. As of now, these instruments are imported at a cost of several lakhs of rupees; hence an effort has been made to develop an aerodynamic particle sizer indigenously in BARC. This unit, referred to as BARC Aerodynamic Size Separator (BASS), separates aerosols into seven size classes ranging from 0.53 mu m to 10 mu m and operates at a flow rate of 45 Ipm. Intercomparison studies between the standard Andersen Mark-II (Grasbey Andersen Inc.) impactor and BASS using nebulizer generated aerosols have consistently shown excellent performance by BASS in all respects. In particular, BASS yielded the parameters of polydisperse aerosols quite accurately. Experiments to evaluate the individual stage cut-off diameters show that these are within 8% of their designed value for all stages except the higher two stages which indicate about 30% lower values than the desig...

  2. Aerodynamic Size Classification of Glass Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laosmaa, Pekka J. J.

    The objective of this research was to examine a technique by which fibers may be aerodynamically classified by diameter and/or length. In this study a system for fiber preparation and generation as well as an in situ fiber classifier were constructed and evaluated. A recently developed technique, the size classification of particles by opposing jets, was modified. The research set-up consisted of (1) a vibrating bed fiber generator, which also functioned as a preselector, (2) an opposing-jet classifier equipped with electrodes and high voltage power supplies to create fiber-aligning electric fields inside the classifier and (3) an optoelectric fiber sensor to measure the concentration and length of fibers. The classified fibers were also collected on filters for the counting and dimensional analysis of the fibers. Some flow instability problems were found during the initial tests of the classifier. They were attributed to random flow fluctuations in the nozzles caused by very small perturbations upstream of the nozzles. Within a critical range of flow Reynolds numbers the flow becomes "intermittent", i.e. it alternates in time between being laminar and turbulent in a random sequence. Small disturbances upstream of the point of consideration can "trigger" the changes from laminar to turbulent flow and the initial disturbance may be "amplified", sending a turbulent flash through the flow system. The classifier performed well with test aerosols after the nozzle flowrate had been decreased to correspond to a lower and less critical Reynolds number and after some modifications had been made to smooth the flow inside the classifier inlet chambers. The cut-off of test aerosols was sharp, but the loss of particles greater than 2.5 (mu)m in aerodynamic diameter was unsatisfactorily high. The classifier was able to classify fibers by aerodynamic diameter, but not as predicted through calculations. The results were difficult to interpret because of the high loss of fibers

  3. Prediction of Hyper-X Stage Separation Aerodynamics Using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Dilley, Arthur D.; Pao, Jenn L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA X-43 "Hyper-X" hypersonic research vehicle will be boosted to a Mach 7 flight test condition mounted on the nose of an Orbital Sciences Pegasus launch vehicle. The separation of the research vehicle from the Pegasus presents some unique aerodynamic problems, for which computational fluid dynamics has played a role in the analysis. This paper describes the use of several CFD methods for investigating the aerodynamics of the research and launch vehicles in close proximity. Specifically addressed are unsteady effects, aerodynamic database extrapolation, and differences between wind tunnel and flight environments.

  4. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H [Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Aono, H [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI48109 (United States)], E-mail: hliu@faculty.chiba-u.jp, E-mail: aonoh@umich.edu

    2009-03-01

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(10{sup 4}) to O(10{sup 1}) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design.

  5. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Kolomenskiy

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering.

  6. The interference aerodynamics caused by the wing elasticity during store separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yang; Zheng-yin, Ye

    2016-04-01

    Air-launch-to-orbit is the technology that has stores carried aloft and launched the store from the plane to the orbit. The separation between the aircraft and store is one of the most important and difficult phases in air-launch-to-orbit technology. There exists strong aerodynamic interference between the aircraft and the store in store separation. When the aspect ratio of the aircraft is large, the elastic deformations of the wing must be considered. The main purpose of this article is to study the influence of the interference aerodynamics caused by the elastic deformations of the wing to the unsteady aerodynamics of the store. By solving the coupled functions of unsteady Navier-Stokes equations, six degrees of freedom dynamic equations and structural dynamic equations simultaneously, the store separation with the elastic deformation of the aircraft considered is simulated numerically. And the interactive aerodynamic forces are analyzed. The study shows that the interference aerodynamics is obvious at earlier time during the separation, and the dominant frequency of the elastic wing determines the aerodynamic forces frequencies of the store. Because of the effect of the interference aerodynamics, the roll angle response and pitch angle response increase. When the store is mounted under the wingtip, the additional aerodynamics caused by the wingtip vortex is obvious, which accelerate the divergence of the lateral force and the lateral-directional attitude angle of the store. This study supports some beneficial conclusions to the engineering application of the air-launch-to-orbit.

  7. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  8. Aerodynamic Limits on Large Civil Tiltrotor Sizing and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, C W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Large Civil Tiltrotor (2nd generation, or LCTR2) has been the reference design for avariety of NASA studies of design optimization, engine and gearbox technology, handling qualities, andother areas, with contributions from NASA Ames, Glenn and Langley Centers, plus academic and industrystudies. Ongoing work includes airfoil design, 3D blade optimization, engine technology studies, andwingrotor aerodynamic interference. The proposed paper will bring the design up to date with the latestresults of such studies, then explore the limits of what aerodynamic improvements might hope toaccomplish. The purpose is two-fold: 1) determine where future technology studies might have the greatestpayoff, and 2) establish a stronger basis of comparison for studies of other vehicle configurations andmissions.

  9. Aerodynamic ground effect in fruitfly sized insect takeoff

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling, considering the voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore the possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. The numerical method is based on a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver and a simple flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia, and the leg thrust. Forces, power and displacements are compared for takeoffs with and without ground effect. Natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly, modified takeoffs and hovering are analyzed. The results show that the ground effect during the natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, the ground effect does not produce any significant increase of the vertical force neither. Moreover, the vertical force even drops in most of the cases considered. There is a consistent increase of the horizontal force, and a decrease of the aerodynamic power, if the rate of climb is suff...

  10. Separating Hazardous Aerosols from Ambient Aerosols: Role of Fluorescence-Spectral Determination, Aerodynamic Deflector and Pulse Aerodynamic Localizer (PAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Cobler, Patrick J.; Rhodes, Scott A.; Halverson, Justin; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-08-22

    An aerosol deflection technique based on the single-shot UV-laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from a flowing particle is presented as a possible front-end bio-aerosol/hazardous-aerosol sensor/identifier. Cued by the fluorescence spectra, individual flowing bio-aerosol particles (1-10 {micro}m in diameter) have been successfully deflected from a stream of ambient aerosols. The electronics needed to compare the fluorescence spectrum of a particular particle with that of a pre-determined fluorescence spectrum are presented in some detail. The deflected particles, with and without going through a funnel for pulse aerodynamic localization (PAL), were collected onto a substrate for further analyses. To demonstrate how hazardous materials can be deflected, TbCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O (a simulant material for some chemical forms of Uranium Oxide) aerosol particles (2 {micro}m in diameter) mixed with Arizona road dust was separated and deflected with our system.

  11. Aerodynamic Testing of the Orion Launch Abort Tower Separation with Jettison Motor Jet Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, Matthew N.; Chan, David T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The aerodynamic database for the Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) was developed largely from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The LAS contains three solid rocket motors used in various phases of an abort to provide propulsion, steering, and Launch Abort Tower (LAT) jettison from the Crew Module (CM). This paper describes a pair of wind tunnel experiments performed at transonic and supersonic speeds to determine the aerodynamic effects due to proximity and jet interactions during LAT jettison from the CM at the end of an abort. The tests were run using two different scale models at angles of attack from 150deg to 200deg , sideslip angles from -10deg to +10deg , and a range of powered thrust levels from the jettison motors to match various jet simulation parameters with flight values. Separation movements between the CM and LAT included axial and vertical translations as well as relative pitch angle between the two bodies. The paper details aspects of the model design, nozzle scaling methodology, instrumentation, testing procedures, and data reduction. Sample data are shown to highlight trends seen in the results.

  12. Space Launch System Booster Separation Aerodynamic Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Chan, David T.; Crosby, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a 0.009 scale model of the Space Launch System (SLS) was conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel to characterize the aerodynamics of the core and solid rocket boosters (SRBs) during booster separation. High-pressure air was used to simulate plumes from the booster separation motors (BSMs) located on the nose and aft skirt of the SRBs. Force and moment data were acquired on the core and SRBs. These data were used to corroborate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations that were used in developing a booster separation database. The SRBs could be remotely positioned in the x-, y-, and z-direction relative to the core. Data were acquired continuously while the SRBs were moved in the axial direction. The primary parameters varied during the test were: core pitch angle; SRB pitch and yaw angles; SRB nose x-, y-, and z-position relative to the core; and BSM plenum pressure. The test was conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 4.25 and a unit Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot.

  13. Investigate the relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and aerosol size distributions using aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hu; Hua, Dengxin; Mao, Jiandong; Zhou, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The real aerosol size distributions were obtained by aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer (APS) in China YinChuan. The lidar ratios at wavelengths of 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm were calculated using Mie theory. The effective radius of aerosol particles reff and volume C/F ratio (coarse/fine) Vc/f were retrieved from the real aerosol size distributions. The relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and particle reff and Vc/f were investigated. The results indicate that the lidar ratio is positive correlated to the particle reff and Vc/f. The lidar ratio is more sensitive to the coarse particles. The short wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle Vc/f and the long wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle reff. The wavelength dependency indicated that the lidar ratios decrease with increasing the wavelength. The lidar ratios are almost irrelevant to the shape and total particles of aerosol size distributions.

  14. Particle size- and concentration-dependent separation of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Kerstin; Müller, Knut; Grüttner, Cordula; Westphal, Fritz; Johansson, Christer

    2017-04-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are of great interest for several biomedical applications. When the size of the particles decreases, the magnetic moment of the particles decreases. This leads to a significant increase in the separation time by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, in the present study the separation processes of bionized nanoferrites (BNF) with different sizes and concentrations were investigated with the commercial Sepmag Q system. It was found that an increasing initial particle concentration leads to a reduction of the separation time for large nanoparticles due to the higher probability of building chains. Small nanoparticles showed exactly the opposite behavior with rising particle concentration up to 0.1 mg(Fe)/ml. For higher iron concentrations the separation time remains constant and the measured Z-average decreases in the supernatant at same time intervals. At half separation time a high yield with decreasing hydrodynamic diameter of particles can be obtained using higher initial particle concentrations.

  15. A method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Kupperman, David S.

    1997-12-01

    A slashing process for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations includes the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns.

  16. Appropriate Separator Sizing: A Modified Stewart and Arnold Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Boukadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil and gas separators were one of the first pieces of production equipment to be used in the petroleum industry. The different stages of separation are completed using the following three principles: gravity, centrifugal force, and impingement. The sizes of the oil droplets, in the production water, are based mainly on the choke valve pressure drop. The choke valve pressure drop creates a shearing effect; this reduces the ability of the droplets to combine. One of the goals of oil separation is to reduce the shearing effect of the choke. Separators are conventionally designed based on initial flow rates; as a result, the separator is no longer able to accommodate totality of produced fluids. Changing fluid flow rates as well as emulsion viscosity effect separator design. The reduction in vessel performance results in recorded measurements that do not match actual production levels inducing doubt into any history matching process and distorting reservoir management programs. In this paper, the new model takes into account flow rates and emulsion viscosity. The generated vessel length, vessel diameter, and slenderness ratio monographs are used to select appropriate separator size based on required retention time. Model results are compared to API 12J standards.

  17. Plasma Influence on Characteristics of Aerodynamic Friction and Separation Flow Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Mirror- galvanometer oscillograph NO43.1 (6); • · Shadow Schlieren device IAB-451 (7-10). After a modernization the oscilloscope “Tektronix TDS...amplifier is transmitted to the mirror- galvanometer oscillograph (6), which in turn records the pressure variation diagram on a Plasma Aerodynamics...balance (4) is used, the signal from which is also transmitted to the 8-ANCh amplifier and then to the mirror- galvanometer oscillograph and is

  18. ULTRASONIC SEPARATION OF MICRO-SIZED INCLUSIONSIN MOLTEN METAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.Q. Bai; J.C. He

    2001-01-01

    The coagulation time and position of micro-sized non-metallic inclusions in molten metal during ultrasonic separation process were investigated, and the motion course of micro-sized non-metallic inclusions in an ultrasonic standing wave field was numerically simulated. The results of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that the movement of inclusions depends on the balance between the acoustic radiation force, effective buoyancy force and viscous drag force. It is presented that micro-sized inclusions, agglomerated at antinode-planes may be removed further with horizon tal ultrasound.``

  19. Size separation of DNA molecules by pulsed electric field dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedelcu, S [National Institute for R and D in Microtechnologies, Str. Erou Iancu Nicolae 32B, PO Box 38-160, 023573 Bucharest (Romania); Watson, J H P [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, SO17 1BJ, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-07

    In this paper we propose an electrode design and a switching pattern of the applied DC electrode potentials for a microfluidic device to be used in size separation of DNA molecules. Estimates on the separation resolution, which are based on numerical solutions of a Newton-type equation on time-averaged quantities, are presented for an input batch sample of DNA fragments with sizes up to 220 base pairs (bp). The active area of the device (which can be microfabricated by standard photolitographic techniques) is a channel 6 {mu}m wide, 8 {mu}m deep and 150 {mu}m in length, flanked by 23 plane parallel integrated electrodes, individually addressed with low DC voltages, up to {+-} 25 V. In the active area a time-dependent non-uniform electric field, or a travelling dielectrophoretic wave (TDW) is being produced. In order to enhance the separation resolution, the polarization DC potentials are switched with a relatively high frequency ({approx} 10{sup -7} s), which is chosen accordingly with the buffer conductivity and dielectric constants of the fluid and particles. Since the external field is of DC type, we put forward an explanatory model of the dielectric response of the DNA to the time-dependent applied field. We then numerically investigate the size-dependent response of the DNA in a low conductivity buffer ({approx}0.01 {omega}{sup -1} m{sup -1}) under the influence of the electric field, which is calculated by means of the method of moments. The results of the computer modelling indicate the existence of a threshold value for the size of the successfully transported molecules, which can be adjusted by varying the velocity of the dielectrophoretic wave produced by the system. The estimated error in selecting a chosen group of molecules with sizes above a specified value is about 5 bp, while the processing times are of the order of hundred of seconds.

  20. Integrated microfluidic system capable of size-specific droplet generation with size-dependent droplet separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmin; Hong, Seok Jun; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Ahn, Jae Hyun; Cho, Dong-il Dan

    2013-06-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics is receiving much attention in biomedical research area due to its advantage in uniform size droplet generation. Our previous results have reported that droplet size plays an important role in drug delivery actuated by flagellated bacteria. Recently, many research groups have been reported the size-dependent separation of emulsion droplets by a microfluidic system. In this paper, an integrated microfluidic system is proposed to produce and sort specificsized droplets sequentially. Operation of the system relies on two microfluidic transport processes: initial generation of droplets by hydrodynamic focusing and subsequent separation of droplets by a T-junction channel. The microfluidic system is fabricated by the SU-8 rapid prototyping method and poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) replica molding. A biodegradable polymer, poly-capro-lactone (PCL), is used for the droplet material. Using the proposed integrated microfluidic system, specific-sized droplets which can be delivered by flagellated bacteria are successfully generated and obtained.

  1. Effect of tail size reductions on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a three surface F-15 model with nonaxisymmetric nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinelli, Mark C.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of horizontal and vertical tail size reductions on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a modified F-15 model with canards and 2-D convergent-divergent nozzles. Quantifying the drag decrease at low angles of attack produced by tail size reductions was the primary focus. The model was tested at Mach numbers of 0.40, 0.90, and 1.20 over an angle of attack of -2 degree to 10 degree. The nozzle exhaust flow was simulated using high pressure air at nozzle pressure ratios varying from 1.0 (jet off) to 7.5. Data were obtained on the baseline configuration with and without tails as well as with reduced horizontal and/or vertical tail sizes that were 75, 50, and 25 percent of the baseline tail areas.

  2. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cooney

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Cooney1, Anthony J Hickey21Department of Biomedical Engineering; 2School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process.Keywords: diesel exhaust particles, aerosol, inhalation toxicology

  3. Numerical Investigation of Flow Separation Control on a Highly Loaded Compressor Cascade by Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiaohu; LI Yinghong; WU Yun; ZHU Tao; LI Yiwen

    2012-01-01

    To discover the characteristic of separated flows and mechanism of plasma flow control on a highly loaded compressor cascade,numerical investigation is conducted.The simulation method is validated by oil flow visualization and pressure distribution.The loss coefficients,streamline patterns,and topology structure as well as vortex structure are analyzed.Results show thai the numbers of singular points increase and three pairs of additional singular points of topology structure on solid surface generate with the increase of angle of attack,and the total pressure loss increases greatly.There are several principal vortices inside the cascade passage.The pressure side leg of horse-shoe vortex coexists within a specific region together with passage vortex,but finally merges into the latter.Comer vortex exists independently and does not evolve from the suction side leg of horse-shoe vortex.One pair of radial coupling-vortex exists near blade trailing edge and becomes the main part of backflow on the suction surface.Passage vortex interacts with the concentrated shedding vortex and they evolve into a large-scale vortex rotating in the direction opposite to passage vortex.The singular points and separation lines represent the basic separation feature of cascade passage.Plasma actuation has better effect at low freestream velocity,and the relative reductions of pitch-averaged total pressure loss coefficient with different actuation layouts of five and two pairs of electrodes are up to 30.8% and 26.7% while the angle of attack is 2°.Plasma actuation changes the local topology structure,but does not change the number relation of singular points.One pair of additional singular point of topology structure generates with plasma actuation and one more reattachment line appears,both of which break the separation line on the suction surface.

  4. Gamma-effects on 2-dimensional transonic aerodynamics. [specific heat ratio due to shock induced separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzla, K.; Russell, D. A.; Wai, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlifting 10% biconvex airfoils are mounted in a 30 x 40 cm Ludwieg-tube-driven transonic test-section and the flow field recorded with a holographic interferometer. Nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide are used as the principal test gases. Experiments are conducted with Reynolds number based on chord of (0.5-3.5) x 10 to the 6th with Mach numbers of 0.70, 0.75, and 0.80. Supporting calculations use inviscid transonic small-disturbance and full-potential computer codes coupled with simple integral boundary-layer modeling. Systematic studies show that significant gamma-effects can occur due to shock-induced separation.

  5. RESUSPENSION METHOD FOR ROAD SURFACE DUST COLLECTION AND AERODYNAMIC SIZE DISTRIBUTION CHARACTERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Chen; Hongfeng Zheng; Wei Wang; Hongjie Liu; Ling Lu; Linfa Bao; Lihong Ren

    2006-01-01

    Traffic-generated fugitive dust is a source of urban atmospheric particulate pollution in Beijing. This paper introduces the resuspension method, recommended by the US EPA in AP-42 documents, for collecting Beijing road-surface dust. Analysis shows a single-peak distribution in the number size distribution and a double-peak mode for mass size distribution of the road surface dust. The median diameter of the mass concentration distribution of the road dust on a high-grade road was higher than that on a low-grade road. The ratio of PM2.5 to PM10 was consistent with that obtained in a similar study for Hong Kong. For the two selected road samples, the average relative deviation of the size distribution was 10.9% and 11.9%. All results indicate that the method introduced in this paper can effectively determine the size distribution of fugitive dust from traffic.

  6. Electrostatic separation for multi-size granule of crushed printed circuit board waste using two-roll separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

    2008-11-30

    The electrostatic separation is an effective method for recycle of crushed waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). However, the robustness of the classical roll-type separator is vulnerable because of its sensitivity to variation of granule size. A new "two-roll type corona-electrostatic separator" was built to overcome the limitation of the classical one considering the actual situation of the industrial application which always contains granule with different size. Multi-size granule of crushed printed circuit board (PCB) wastes was used for investigation and the results showed that the efficiency of the separation process was improved by using the new separator. Compared with the process (lower voltage) performed on the old separator, the metal products increased 34% while the middling products reduced 73%, respectively. Compared with the process (higher voltage) performed on the old separator, the metal products increased 22% while the middling products reduced 59%, respectively. In addition, the metal component of the middling products using new machine notably decreased, 33% (new machine) compared with 58% (lower voltage) and 66% (higher voltage). The efficiency of the separation process is enhanced compared with the classical one.

  7. Size-selective separation of submicron particles in suspensions with ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Susumu; Oka, Naoyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Aqueous suspensions containing silica or polystyrene latex were ultrasonically atomized for separating particles of a specific size. With the help of a fog involving fine liquid droplets with a narrow size distribution, submicron particles in a limited size-range were successfully separated from suspensions. Performance of the separation was characterized by analyzing the size and the concentration of collected particles with a high resolution method. Irradiation of 2.4MHz ultrasound to sample suspensions allowed the separation of particles of specific size from 90 to 320nm without regarding the type of material. Addition of a small amount of nonionic surfactant, PONPE20 to SiO2 suspensions enhanced the collection of finer particles, and achieved a remarkable increase in the number of collected particles. Degassing of the sample suspension resulted in eliminating the separation performance. Dissolved air in suspensions plays an important role in this separation.

  8. Spatial separation of state- and size-selected neutral clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Trippel, Sebastian; Stern, Stephan; Mullins, Terry; Holmegaard, Lotte; Küpper, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the spatial separation of the prototypical indole(H2O) clusters from the various species present in the supersonic expansion of mixtures of indole and water. The major molecular constituents of the resulting molecular beam are H2O, indole, indole(H2O), and indole(H2O)2. It is a priori not clear whether such floppy systems are amenable to strong manipulation using electric fields. Here, we have exploited the cold supersonic molecular beam and the electrostatic deflector to separate indole(H2O) from the other molecular species as well as the helium seed gas. The experimental results are quantitatively explained by trajectory simulations, which also demonstrate that the quantum-state selectivity of the process leads to samples of indole(H2O) in low-lying rotational states. The prepared clean samples of indole(H2O) are ideally suited for investigations of the stereodynamics of this complex system, including time-resolved half-collision and diffraction experiments of fixed-in-space clusters. Our fin...

  9. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. Huffman; Treutlein, B.; U. Pöschl

    2009-01-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) to measure ...

  10. Design of an instrument for real-time detection of bioaerosols using simultaneous measurement of particle aerodynamic size and intrinsic fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairston, P P; Ho, J; Quant, F R

    1997-04-01

    A prototype instrument has been constructed to measure individual airborne particles based on their aerodynamic size and their intrinsic fluorescence at selected excitation and emission wavelength bands. The instrument combines features of an aerodynamic particle sizing device with capabilities similar to those of a liquid flow cytometer. The goal of the instrument is to provide real-time data indicative of particle characteristics, and it is especially targeted to respond to bioaerosols from 0.5 to 10 micrometers (aerodynamic diameter) with intrinsic fluorescence exited at a wavelength of 325 nm and emitting from 420 to 580 nm. This size range covers individual airborne bacteria and bacteria clusters, and the fluorescence sensitivity is selected for biological molecules commonly found in cellular systems, for example, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] and riboflavin. Initial tests with nebulised Bacillus subtilis var. niger (BG, ATCC 9372) spores have shown that, for both individual spores and spore clumps, a low level of fluorescence is detected from 17% of the particles. This detection percentage is on the same order as previous experiments that have measured viability of about 12% for mechanically dispersed BG spores (Ho and Fisher (1993) Defense Research Establishment Suffield Memorandum 1421) and suggests a need for further investigation into the possible relationship between the detected fluorescence and viability of bacterial spores.

  11. A sensitivity analysis of the modified chi-square ratio statistic for equivalence testing of aerodynamic particle size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Benjamin; Lee, Sau L; Lionberger, Robert; Li, Bing V; Tsong, Yi; Hochhaus, Guenther

    2013-04-01

    Demonstration of equivalence in aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) is one key component for establishing bioequivalence of orally inhaled drug products. We previously proposed a modified version of the Chi-square ratio statistic (mCSRS) for APSD equivalence testing and demonstrated that the median of the distribution of the mCSRS (MmCSRS) is a robust metric when test (T) and reference (R) cascade impactor (CI) profiles are identical. Here, we systematically evaluate the behavior of the MmCSRS when T and R CI profiles differ from each other in their mean deposition and variability on a single and multiple sites. All CI profiles were generated by Monte-Carlo simulations based upon modified actual CI data. Twenty thousand sets of 30 T and 30 R CI profiles were simulated for each scenario, and the behavior of the MmCSRS was correlated to metrics that characterize the difference between T and R product in mean deposition and variability. The two key findings were, first, that the MmCSRS is more sensitive to difference between T and R CI profiles on high deposition sites, and second, that a cut-off value for APSD equivalence testing based on the MmCSRS needs to be scaled on the variability of the R product. The former is considered as beneficial for equivalence testing of CI profiles as it decreases the likelihood of failing identical CI profiles by chance, in part, due to increasing analytical variability associated with lower deposition sites. The latter is expected to be important for consistently being able to discriminate equivalent from inequivalent CI profiles.

  12. Phase Separation of Binary Charged Particle Systems with Small Size Disparities using a Dusty Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killer, Carsten; Bockwoldt, Tim; Schütt, Stefan; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André; Piel, Alexander

    2016-03-18

    The phase separation in binary mixtures of charged particles has been investigated in a dusty plasma under microgravity on parabolic flights. A method based on the use of fluorescent dust particles was developed that allows us to distinguish between particles of slightly different size. A clear trend towards phase separation even for smallest size (charge) disparities is observed. The diffusion flux is directly measured from the experiment and uphill diffusion coefficients have been determined.

  13. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1998-05-19

    A slashing process is disclosed for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns. 2 figs.

  14. Continuous size-based separation of microparticles in a microchannel with symmetric sharp corner structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liang-Liang; He, Xu-Kun; Han, Yu; Du, Li; Zhao, Liang; Zhe, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    A new microchannel with a series of symmetric sharp corner structures is reported for passive size-dependent particle separation. Micro particles of different sizes can be completely separated based on the combination of the inertial lift force and the centrifugal force induced by the sharp corner structures in the microchannel. At appropriate flow rate and Reynolds number, the centrifugal force effect on large particles, induced by the sharp corner structures, is stronger than that on small particles; hence after passing a series of symmetric sharp corner structures, large particles are focused to the center of the microchannel, while small particles are focused at two particle streams near the two side walls of the microchannel. Particles of different sizes can then be completely separated. Particle separation with this device was demonstrated using 7.32 μm and 15.5 μm micro particles. Experiments show that in comparison with the prior multi-orifice flow fractionation microchannel and multistage-multiorifice flow fractionation microchannel, this device can completely separate two-size particles with narrower particle stream band and larger separation distance between particle streams. In addition, it requires no sheath flow and complex multi-stage separation structures, avoiding the dilution of analyte sample and complex operations. The device has potentials to be used for continuous, complete particle separation in a variety of lab-on-a-chip and biomedical applications.

  15. On the Application of Inertial Microfluidics for the Size-Based Separation of Polydisperse Cementitious Particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aditya; Lewis, Peter; Balonis, Magdalena; Di Carlo, Dino; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-06-01

    The early-age performance of concrete is determined by the properties of the cementitious binder and the evolution of its chemical reactions. The chemical reactivity, and to some extent, the composition of cementitious particles can depend on particle size. Therefore, it is valuable to physically separate cementing minerals into well-defined size classes so that the influences of both particle size and composition on reaction progress can be studied without the confounding effects of a broad particle size distribution. However, conventional particle separation methods (e.g., density fractionation, wet sieving, field-flow extraction, ultrasonification-sedimentation) are time-consuming and cumbersome and result in poor particle yields and size-selectivity, thus, making them unsuitable for processing larger volumes of cementitious powders (on the order of grams). This study applies a novel inertial microfluidics (IMF) based procedure to separate cementitious powders on the basis of their size. Special attention is paid to optimizing operating variables to ensure that particles in a fluid streamline achieve unique equilibrium positions within the device. From such positions, particles can be retrieved as per their size using symmetrical outlet configurations with tuned fluidic resistances. The approach is critically assessed in terms of: (1) its ability to separate cementitious powders into narrow size bins, and therefore its feasibility as a fractionation procedure, and (2) quantitatively relating the operating parameters to the particle yield and size selectivity. The study establishes metrics for assessing the ability of IMF methods to classify minerals and other polydisperse particles on the basis of their size.

  16. Chemical composition and bioactivity properties of size-fractions separated from a vermicompost humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canellas, Luciano P; Piccolo, Alessandro; Dobbss, Leonardo B; Spaccini, Riccardo; Olivares, Fábio L; Zandonadi, Daniel B; Façanha, Arnoldo R

    2010-01-01

    Preparative high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was applied to humic acids (HA) extracted from vermicompost in order to separate humic matter of different molecular dimension and evaluate the relationship between chemical properties of size-fractions (SF) and their effects on plant root growth. Molecular dimensions of components in humic SF was further achieved by diffusion-ordered nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR) based on diffusion coefficients (D), while carbon distribution was evaluated by solid state (CP/MAS) (13)C NMR. Seedlings of maize and Arabidopsis were treated with different concentrations of SF to evaluate root growth. Six different SF were obtained and their carbohydrate-like content and alkyl chain length decreased with decreasing molecular size. Progressive reduction of aromatic carbon was also observed with decreasing molecular size of separated fractions. Diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra showed that SF were composed of complex mixtures of aliphatic, aromatic and carbohydrates constituents that could be separated on the basis of their diffusion. All SF promoted root growth in Arabidopsis and maize seedlings but the effects differed according to molecular size and plant species. In Arabidopsis seedlings, the bulk HA and its SF revealed a classical large auxin-like exogenous response, i.e.: shortened the principal root axis and induced lateral roots, while the effects in maize corresponded to low auxin-like levels, as suggested by enhanced principal axis length and induction of lateral roots. The reduction of humic heterogeneity obtained in HPSEC separated size-fractions suggested that their physiological influence on root growth and architecture was less an effect of their size than their content of specific bioactive molecules. However, these molecules may be dynamically released from humic superstructures and exert their bioactivity when weaker is the humic conformational stability as that obtained

  17. Linear Kernels for Separating a Graph into Components of Bounded Size

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Mingyu

    2016-01-01

    Graph separation and partitioning are fundamental problems that have been extensively studied both in theory and practice. The \\textsc{$p$-Size Separator} problem, closely related to the \\textsc{Balanced Separator} problem, is to check whether we can delete at most $k$ vertices in a given graph $G$ such that each connected component of the remaining graph has at most $p$ vertices. This problem is NP-hard for each fixed integer $p\\geq 1$ and it becomes the famous \\textsc{Vertex Cover} problem ...

  18. Sensitive and predictable separation of microfluidic droplets by size using in-line passive filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ruihua; Ung, W Lloyd; Heyman, John A; Weitz, David A

    2017-01-01

    Active manipulation of droplets is crucial in droplet microfluidics. However, droplet polydispersity decreases the accuracy of active manipulation. We develop a microfluidic "droplet filter" that accurately separates droplets by size. The droplet filter has a sharp size cutoff and is capable of distinguishing droplets differing in volume by 20%. A simple model explains the behavior of the droplets as they pass through the filter. We show application of the filter in improving dielectric sorting efficiency.

  19. Influence of shape and size of the particles on jigging separation of plastics mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Fernando; Castilho, Ana

    2016-02-01

    Plastics are popular for numerous applications due to their high versatility and favourable properties such as endurance, lightness and cheapness. Therefore the generation of plastic waste is constantly increasing, becoming one of the larger categories in municipal solid waste. Almost all plastic materials are recyclable, but for the recycling to be possible it is necessary to separate the different types of plastics. The aim of this research was to evaluate the performance of the jig separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. For this study six granulated plastics had been used: Polystyrene (PS), Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET-S, PET-D) and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC-M, PVC-D). Plastics mixtures were subjected to jigging in a laboratorial Denver mineral jig. The results showed that the quality of the jigging separation varies with the mixture, the density differences and with the size and shape of the particles. In the case of particles with more regular shapes the quality of separation of bi-component plastic mixtures improved with the increase of the particle size. For lamellar particles the influence of particle size was minimal. In general, the beneficiation of plastics with similar densities was not effective, since the separation efficiency was lower than 25%. However, in bi-component plastic mixtures that join a low density plastic (PS) with a high density one (PMMA, PET-S, PET-D, PVC-M and PVC-D), the quality of the jigging separation was greatly improved. The PS grade in the sunk was less than 1% for all the plastic mixtures. Jigging proved to be an effective method for the separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. Jigging separation will be enhanced if the less dense plastic, that overflows, has a lamellar shape and if the denser plastic, that sinks, has a regular one.

  20. Efficiency of size-dependent particle separation by pinched flow fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastav, Aparna; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-01-01

    Pinched flow fractionation is shown to be an efficient and selective way to quickly separate particles by size in a very polydisperse semi-concentrated suspension. In an effort to optimize the method, we discuss the quantitative influence of the pinching intensity in the balance between the requirements of selectivity and minimal dilution.

  1. A Theoretical Study of the Separation Principle in Size Exclusion Chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yanwei; Teraoka, Iwao; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2010-01-01

    The principle of polymer separation in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) is studied based on a classical equilibrium partitioning theory. The task is to examine the correlation between the mean span dimension of polymer chains and their equilibrium partition coefficients with confining pores...

  2. Size Depending Separation of HAP:Eu Nanoparticles in Dispersed Sol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The particle size has a strong impact on the interactions between nanoparticles and cells. However, the synthesis process of nanoparticles limits the range of achievable average particle sizes. When biocompatible hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAP) are doped with the luminescent rare earth element Europium (Eu), the particle size becomes larger compared to pure HAP. Hence, a particle size reduction is necessary to achieve similar experimental conditions when substituting pure HAP with luminescent HAP: Eu nanoparticles to investigate particlecell-interactions in cell culture experiments. While the sedimentation process of particles in liquids and gels has been well described in literature, the separation of particles in dispersed colloids has not been studied, yet. In this study, the size depending separation and particle size reduction of a homogeneous dispersed nanoparticle sol by gravity and centrifugation were investigated. As the results showed, shorter time of centrifugation at higher speed can reduce the average particle size compared to the decline of the particle concentration in the upper sol layer most efficiently. This centrifugation method has some similarity to the overspeeding technique which is commonly used to lower the transient time to reach the equilibrium of sedimentation.

  3. Acoustophoretic separation of airborne millimeter-size particles by a Fresnel lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Ahmet; Korozlu, Nurettin; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    We numerically demonstrate acoustophoretic separation of spherical solid particles in air by means of an acoustic Fresnel lens. Beside gravitational and drag forces, freely-falling millimeter-size particles experience large acoustic radiation forces around the focus of the lens, where interplay of forces lead to differentiation of particle trajectories with respect to either size or material properties. Due to the strong acoustic field at the focus, radiation force can divert particles with source intensities significantly smaller than those required for acoustic levitation in a standing field. When the lens is designed to have a focal length of 100 mm at 25 kHz, finite-element method simulations reveal a sharp focus with a full-width at half-maximum of 0.5 wavelenghts and a field enhancement of 18 dB. Through numerical calculation of forces and simulation of particle trajectories, we demonstrate size-based separation of acrylic particles at a source sound pressure level of 153 dB such that particles with diameters larger than 0.5 mm are admitted into the central hole, whereas smaller particles are rejected. Besides, efficient separation of particles with similar acoustic properties such as polyethylene, polystyrene and acrylic particles of the same size is also demonstrated. PMID:28252033

  4. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J. A.; Treutlein, B.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-04-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) to measure Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAPs), which provide an estimate of viable bioaerosol particles and can be regarded as an approximate lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (particles (1-20 μm). Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August-December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10-2 cm-3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1μg m-3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10-2 cm-3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle (24-h) with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in aerosol

  5. Separation of large DNA molecules by size exclusion chromatography-based microchip with on-chip concentration structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Naoki; Itoh, Shintaro; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Zhang, Hedong

    2016-06-01

    The separation of DNA molecules according to their size represents a fundamental bioanalytical procedure. Here, we report the development of a chip-sized device, consisting of micrometer-sized fence structures fabricated in a microchannel, for the separation of large DNA molecules (over 10 kbp) based on the principle of size exclusion chromatography (SEC). In order to achieve separation, two approaches were utilized: first, the DNA samples were concentrated immediately prior to separation using nanoslit structures, with the aim of improving the resolution. Second, a theoretical model of SEC-based separation was established and applied in order to predict the optimal voltage range for separation. In this study, we achieved separation of λ DNA (48.5 kbp) and T4 DNA (166 kbp) using the present SEC-based microchip.

  6. Toxicity to chicken embryos of organic extracts from airborne particulates separated into five sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, H.

    1988-07-01

    The chicken embryo assay has been used for research on the toxicity of complex extracts derived from different environmental sources, as well as of individual compounds. However, only a few studies have been made on the toxicological effects of extracts derived from airborne particulate matter in chicken embryo. These studies showed that the toxic effect was due to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the particles, although their structure and quantity were the factors determining the extent of the toxicity. Airborne particulate matter is composed of particles of different sizes, which can be separated into five classes according to their size by an Andersen high-volume sampler. Each class contained many kinds of compounds such as PAHs. In this study, airborne particulate matter was extracted according to particle size, the extracts analyzed for PAHs, and tested for embryotoxicity.

  7. Microcystin distribution in physical size class separations of natural plankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J.L.; Jones, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    Phytoplankton communities in 30 northern Missouri and Iowa lakes were physically separated into 5 size classes (>100 ??m, 53-100 ??m, 35-53 ??m, 10-35 ??m, 1-10 ??m) during 15-21 August 2004 to determine the distribution of microcystin (MC) in size fractionated lake samples and assess how net collections influence estimates of MC concentration. MC was detected in whole water (total) from 83% of takes sampled, and total MC values ranged from 0.1-7.0 ??g/L (mean = 0.8 ??g/L). On average, MC in the > 100 ??m size class comprised ???40% of total MC, while other individual size classes contributed 9-20% to total MC. MC values decreased with size class and were significantly greater in the >100 ??m size class (mean = 0.5 ??g /L) than the 35-53 ??m (mean = 0.1 ??g/L), 10-35 ??m (mean = 0.0 ??g/L), and 1-10 ??m (mean = 0.0 ??g/L) size classes (p < 0.01). MC values in nets with 100-??m, 53-??m, 35-??m, and 10-??m mesh were cumulatively summed to simulate the potential bias of measuring MC with various size plankton nets. On average, a 100-??m net underestimated total MC by 51%, compared to 37% for a 53-??m net, 28% for a 35-??m net, and 17% for a 10-??m net. While plankton nets consistently underestimated total MC, concentration of algae with net sieves allowed detection of MC at low levels (???0.01 ??/L); 93% of lakes had detectable levels of MC in concentrated samples. Thus, small mesh plankton nets are an option for documenting MC occurrence, but whole water samples should be collected to characterize total MC concentrations. ?? Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2007.

  8. Fractionation of Exosomes and DNA using Size-Based Separation at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Benjamin; Smith, Joshua; Wang, Chao; Gifford, Stacey; Brink, Markus; Bruce, Robert; Solovitzky, Gustavo; Austin, Robert; Astier, Yann

    Exosomes, a key target of ``liquid biopsies'', are nano-vesicles found in nearly all biological fluids. Exosomes are secreted by eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells alike, and contain information about their originating cells, including surface proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, and nucleic acids. One challenge in studying exosome morphology is the difficulty of sorting exosomes by size and surface markers. Common separation techniques for exosomes include ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration, for preparation of large volume samples, but these techniques often show contamination and significant heterogeneity between preparations. To date, deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) pillar arrays in silicon have proven an efficient technology to sort, separate, and enrich micron-scale particles including human parasites, eukaryotic cells, blood cells, and circulating tumor cells in blood; however, the DLD technology has never been translated to the true nanoscale, where it could function on bio-colloids such as exosomes. We have fabricated nanoscale DLD (nanoDLD) arrays capable of rapidly sorting colloids down to 20 nm in continuous flow, and demonstrated size sorting of individual exosome vesicles and dsDNA polymers, opening the potential for on-chip biomolecule separation and diagnosti

  9. Microchannel anechoic corner for size-selective separation and medium exchange via traveling surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Ha, Byung Hang; Park, Jinsoo; Jung, Jin Ho; Alazzam, Anas; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-05-05

    We demonstrate a miniaturized acoustofluidic device composed of a pair of slanted interdigitated transducers (SIDTs) and a polydimethylsiloxane microchannel for achieving size-selective separation and exchange of medium around polystyrene particles in a continuous, label-free, and contactless fashion. The SIDTs, deposited parallel to each other, produce tunable traveling surface acoustic waves (TSAWs) at desired locations, which, in turn, yield an anechoic corner inside the microchannel that is used to selectively deflect particles of choice from their streamlines. The TSAWs with frequency fR originating from the right SIDT and propagating left toward the microchannel normal to the fluid flow direction, laterally deflect larger particles with diameter d1 from the hydrodynamically focused sample fluid that carries other particles as well with diameters d2 and d3, such that d1 > d2 > d3. The deflected particles (d1) are pushed into the top-left corner of the microchannel. Downstream, the TSAWs with frequency fL, such that fL > fR, disseminating from the left SIDT, deflect the medium-sized particles (d2) rightward, leaving behind the larger particles (d1) unaffected in the top-left anechoic corner and the smaller particles (d3) in the middle of the microchannel, thereby achieving particle separation. A particle not present in the anechoic corner could be deflected rightward to realize twice the medium exchange. In this work, the three-way separation of polystyrene particles with diameters of 3, 4.2, and 5 μm and 3, 5, and 7 μm is achieved using two separate devices. Moreover, these devices are used to demonstrate multimedium exchange around polystyrene particles ∼5 μm and 7 μm in diameter.

  10. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wang; Kai-Feng He; Wei-Qi Qian; Tian-Jiao Zhang; Yan-Qing Cheng; Kai-Yuan Wu

    2012-01-01

    In view of engineering application,it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components:the static aerodynamics,the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations,and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow.The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms,while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration,the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch,yaw,roll,and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations.The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics,respectively.The results show that:(1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points,but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence,stability,and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously.Furthermore,the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected.It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft.Finally,the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  11. A recyclable supramolecular membrane for size-selective separation of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Elisha; Weissman, Haim; Shirman, Elijah; Shimoni, Eyal; Rybtchinski, Boris

    2011-03-01

    Most practical materials are held together by covalent bonds, which are irreversible. Materials based on noncovalent interactions can undergo reversible self-assembly, which offers advantages in terms of fabrication, processing and recyclability, but the majority of noncovalent systems are too fragile to be competitive with covalent materials for practical applications, despite significant attempts to develop robust noncovalent arrays. Here, we report nanostructured supramolecular membranes prepared from fibrous assemblies in water. The membranes are robust due to strong hydrophobic interactions, allowing their application in the size-selective separation of both metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. A thin (12 µm) membrane is used for filtration (~5 nm cutoff), and a thicker (45 µm) membrane allows for size-selective chromatography in the sub-5 nm domain. Unlike conventional membranes, our supramolecular membranes can be disassembled using organic solvent, cleaned, reassembled and reused multiple times.

  12. Reconciliation of size-density bivariate distributions over a separating node

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bidarahalli Venkoba Rao; Vivek Ganvir; Sirigeri Jois Gopalakrishna

    2008-01-01

    Data reconciliation considers the restoration of mass balance among the noise prone measured data by way of component adjustments for the various particle size or particle density classes or assays over the separating node. In this paper, the method of Lagrange multipliers has been extended to balance bivariate feed and product size-density distributions of coal particles split from a settling column. The settling suspension in the column was split into two product fractions at 40% height from the bottom after a minute settling of homogenized suspension at start. Reconciliation of data assists to estimate solid flow split of particles to the settled stream as well as helps to calculate the profiles of partition curves of the marginal particle size or particle density distributions. In general, Lagrange multiplier method with uniform weighting of its components may not guarantee a smooth partition surface and thus the reconciled data needs further refinement to establish the nature of the surface. In order to overcome this difficulty, a simple alternative method of reconciling bivariate size-density data using partition surface concept is explored in this paper.

  13. An investigation of paper based microfluidic devices for size based separation and extraction applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Z W; Wu, R G; Wang, Z P; Tan, H L

    2015-09-01

    Conventional microfluidic devices are typically complex and expensive. The devices require the use of pneumatic control systems or highly precise pumps to control the flow in the devices. This work investigates an alternative method using paper based microfluidic devices to replace conventional microfluidic devices. Size based separation and extraction experiments conducted were able to separate free dye from a mixed protein and dye solution. Experimental results showed that pure fluorescein isothiocyanate could be separated from a solution of mixed fluorescein isothiocyanate and fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled bovine serum albumin. The analysis readings obtained from a spectrophotometer clearly show that the extracted tartrazine sample did not contain any amount of Blue-BSA, because its absorbance value was 0.000 measured at a wavelength of 590nm, which correlated to Blue-BSA. These demonstrate that paper based microfluidic devices, which are inexpensive and easy to implement, can potentially replace their conventional counterparts by the use of simple geometry designs and the capillary action. These findings will potentially help in future developments of paper based microfluidic devices.

  14. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs, including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS to measure Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAPs, which provide an estimate of viable bioaerosol particles and can be regarded as an approximate lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm, but not for coarse particles (1–20 μm.

    Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August–December 2006, the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10−2 cm−3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1μg m−3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10−2 cm−3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle (24-h with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively.

    The observed number

  15. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs, including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs, which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm, but not for coarse particles (1–20 μm.

    Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August–December 2006, the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10−2 cm−3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1 μg m−3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10−2 cm−3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively.

    The observed number concentrations and

  16. NASP aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the critical aerodynamic technologies needed to support the development of a class of aircraft represented by the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The air-breathing, single-stage-to-orbit mission presents a severe challenge to all of the aeronautical disciplines and demands an extension of the state-of-the-art in each technology area. While the largest risk areas are probably advanced materials and the development of the scramjet engine, there remains a host of design issues and technology problems in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and propulsion integration. The paper presents an overview of the most significant propulsion integration problems, and defines the most critical fluid flow phenomena that must be evaluated, defined, and predicted for the class of aircraft represented by the Aero-Space Plane.

  17. Missile Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-01

    Me 2 L~e coefficient de frottement CI est gnralement n~glig6. L’approximation est justifige par le fait que, qf , nul au recollement, est partout...be costly in terms of time and money. One should aim for a situation where an error of, say, 10% in estimating an aerodynamic coefficient or...constructing tables of forces and moments, or their coefficients , as functions of variables such as inci- dence angle, roll angle, speed and altitude, and

  18. Narrowing SWNT diameter distribution using size-separated ferritin-based Fe catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrer, Lukas; Greenwald, Jason; Helbling, Thomas; Muoth, Matthias; Riek, Roland; Hierold, Christofer

    2009-09-02

    Sensors and devices made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are most often electrically probed through metal leads contacting the semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs). Contact barriers in general and Schottky barriers (SBs) in particular are usually obtained at a metal-semiconductor interface. The unique one-dimensional structure (1D) of SWNTs allows tailoring of the SB heights through the contact metal type and the size of the s-SWNT bandgap. A large workfunction reduces the SB height (e.g. using Pd as the metal contact material). The bandgap of an SWNT is inversely proportional to its diameter. Ohmic contacts--the preferable choice--are achieved for s-SWNTs with diameters greater than 2 nm on Pd metal leads. SWNT device reproducibility, on the other hand, requires a narrow distribution of the SWNT diameters. Here, we present a method to fabricate SWNTs with a large and adjustable mean diameter (1.9-2.4 nm) and very narrow diameter distribution (+/- 0.27 nm at mean diameter 1.9 nm). The results are achieved through a size separation of the ferritin catalyst particles by sedimentation velocity centrifugation prior to their use in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) formation of SWNTs.

  19. Narrowing SWNT diameter distribution using size-separated ferritin-based Fe catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrer, Lukas; Helbling, Thomas; Muoth, Matthias; Hierold, Christofer [Micro and Nanosystems, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zuerich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Greenwald, Jason; Riek, Roland, E-mail: lukas.durrer@micro.mavt.ethz.c [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-09-02

    Sensors and devices made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are most often electrically probed through metal leads contacting the semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs). Contact barriers in general and Schottky barriers (SBs) in particular are usually obtained at a metal-semiconductor interface. The unique one-dimensional structure (1D) of SWNTs allows tailoring of the SB heights through the contact metal type and the size of the s-SWNT bandgap. A large workfunction reduces the SB height (e.g. using Pd as the metal contact material). The bandgap of an SWNT is inversely proportional to its diameter. Ohmic contacts-the preferable choice-are achieved for s-SWNTs with diameters greater than 2 nm on Pd metal leads. SWNT device reproducibility, on the other hand, requires a narrow distribution of the SWNT diameters. Here, we present a method to fabricate SWNTs with a large and adjustable mean diameter (1.9-2.4 nm) and very narrow diameter distribution ({+-} 0.27 nm at mean diameter 1.9 nm). The results are achieved through a size separation of the ferritin catalyst particles by sedimentation velocity centrifugation prior to their use in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) formation of SWNTs.

  20. Effects of cation size disorder and lattice distortion on metamagnetism in phase-separated manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavani, K. R.; Paulose, P. L.

    2005-07-01

    The effects of A-site cation size disorder in ABO 3 type charge-ordered and antiferromagnetic Pr 0.5Ca 0.5MnO 3 system have been studied by substituting La 3+, Sr 2+ or Ba 2+, while keeping the valency of Mn ions and the tolerance factor ( t=0.921) constant in the substituted compounds. We find that the substitutions by these larger cations induce successive sharp step-like metamagnetic transitions at 2.5 K. The critical field for metamagnetism is the lowest for 3% Ba substituted compound, which has the largest A-site cation size disorder and the least distorted MnO 6 octahedra, among the compounds reported here. These cation substitutions give rise to ferromagnetic clusters within antiferromagnetic matrix, indicating phase-separation at low temperatures. The growth of the clusters is found to vary with the substitution amount. The local lattice distortion of MnO 6 octahedra enhances the charge ordering temperature and reduces the magnetization at high fields (>1 T) in these manganites.

  1. Charge- and Size-Selective Molecular Separation using Ultrathin Cellulose Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Puspasari, Tiara

    2016-08-30

    To date, it is still a challenge to prepare high-flux and highselectivity microporous membranes thinner than 20 nm without introducing defects. In this work, we report for the first time the application of cellulose membranes for selective separation of small molecules. A freestanding cellulose membrane as thin as 10 nm has been prepared through regeneration of trimethylsilyl cellulose (TMSC). The freestanding membrane can be transferred to any desired substrate and shows a normalized flux as high as 700 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 when supported by a porous alumina disc. According to filtration experiments, the membrane exhibits precise size-sieving performances with an estimated pore size between 1.5–3.5 nm depending on the regeneration period and initial TMSC concentration. A perfect discrimination of anionic molecules over neutral species is demonstrated. Moreover, the membrane demonstrates high reproducibility, high scale-up potential, and excellent stability over two months.

  2. A stability analysis of a modified version of the chi-square ratio statistic: implications for equivalence testing of aerodynamic particle size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Benjamin; Hochhaus, Guenther; Adams, Wallace; Lionberger, Robert; Li, Bing; Tsong, Yi; Lee, Sau L

    2013-01-01

    Demonstration of equivalence in aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD; e.g., by comparing cascade impactor (CI) profiles) constitutes one of key in vitro tests for supporting bioequivalence between test (T) and reference (R) orally inhaled drug products (OIDPs). A chi-square ratio statistic (CSRS) was previously proposed for equivalence testing of CI profiles. However, it was reported that the CSRS could not consistently discriminate between equivalent and inequivalent CI profiles. The objective of the overall project was to develop a robust and sensitive methodology for assessing equivalence of APSD profiles of T and R OIDPs. We propose here a modified version of the CSRS (mCSRS) and evaluated systematically its behavior when T and R CI profiles were identical. Different scenarios comprising CI profiles with different number of deposition sites and shapes were generated by Monte-Carlo simulation. For each scenario, the mCSRS was applied to 20,000 independent sets of 30 T and 30 R CI profiles that were identical. Different metrics (including mean and median) of the distribution of 900 mCSRSs (30 T × 30 R) were then evaluated for their suitability as a test statistic (i.e., independent of the number of sites and shape of the CI profile) for APSD equivalence testing. The median of the distribution of 900 mCSRSs (MmCSRS) was one regardless of the number of sites and shape of the CI profile. Hence, the MmCSRS is a robust metric for CI profile equivalence testing when T and R CI profiles are identical and potentially useful for APSD equivalence testing.

  3. Charge-specific size-dependent separation of water-soluble organic molecules by fluorinated nanoporous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jeehye; Patel, Hasmukh A.; Thirion, Damien; Yavuz, Cafer T.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular architecture in nanoscale spaces can lead to selective chemical interactions and separation of species with similar sizes and functionality. Substrate specific sorbent chemistry is well known through highly crystalline ordered structures such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks and widely available nanoporous carbons. Size and charge-dependent separation of aqueous molecular contaminants, on the contrary, have not been adequately developed. Here we report a charge-specific size-dependent separation of water-soluble molecules through an ultra-microporous polymeric network that features fluorines as the predominant surface functional groups. Treatment of similarly sized organic molecules with and without charges shows that fluorine interacts with charges favourably. Control experiments using similarly constructed frameworks with or without fluorines verify the fluorine-cation interactions. Lack of a σ-hole for fluorine atoms is suggested to be responsible for this distinct property, and future applications of this discovery, such as desalination and mixed matrix membranes, may be expected to follow.

  4. Natural aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Scorer, R S

    1958-01-01

    Natural Aerodynamics focuses on the mathematics of any problem in air motion.This book discusses the general form of the law of fluid motion, relationship between pressure and wind, production of vortex filaments, and conduction of vorticity by viscosity. The flow at moderate Reynolds numbers, turbulence in a stably stratified fluid, natural exploitation of atmospheric thermals, and plumes in turbulent crosswinds are also elaborated. This text likewise considers the waves produced by thermals, transformation of thin layer clouds, method of small perturbations, and dangers of extra-polation.Thi

  5. Simultaneous control of nanocrystal size and nanocrystal{nanocrystal separation in CdS nanocrystal assembly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sameer Sapra; D D Sarma

    2005-10-01

    We report an easy, one pot synthesis to prepare ordered CdS nanocrystals with varying inter-particle separation and characterize the particle separation using x-ray diffraction at low and wide angles.

  6. Continuous separation of multiple size microparticles using alternating current dielectrophoresis in microfluidic device with acupuncture needle electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Ren, Yukun; Yan, Hui; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-03-01

    The need to continuously separate multiple microparticles is required for the recent development of lab-on-chip technology. Dielectrophoresis(DEP)-based separation device is extensively used in kinds of microfluidic applications. However, such conventional DEP-based device is relatively complicated and difficult for fabrication. A concise microfluidic device is presented for effective continuous separation of multiple size particle mixtures. A pair of acupuncture needle electrodes are creatively employed and embedded in a PDMS(poly-dimethylsiloxane) hurdle for generating non-uniform electric field thereby achieving a continuous DEP separation. The separation mechanism is that the incoming particle samples with different sizes experience different negative DEP(nDEP) forces and then they can be transported into different downstream outlets. The DEP characterizations of particles are calculated, and their trajectories are numerically predicted by considering the combined action of the incoming laminar flow and the nDEP force field for guiding the separation experiments. The device performance is verified by successfully separating a three-sized particle mixture, including polystyrene microspheres with diameters of 3 μm, 10 μm and 25 μm. The separation purity is below 70% when the flow rate ratio is less than 3.5 or more than 5.1, while the separation purity can be up to more than 90% when the flow rate ratio is between 3.5 and 5.1 and meanwhile ensure the voltage output falls in between 120 V and 150 V. Such simple DEP-based separation device has extensive applications in future microfluidic systems.

  7. Aerodynamic Characteristics Simulation Study of Air-launched Launch Vehicle in the Process of Rocket Separating from Plane%空射火箭箭机分离过程气动特性仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈亮; 张登成; 张艳华; 胡孟权; 李达

    2013-01-01

    为研究内装式空中发射运载火箭在箭机分离过程中的气动特性尤其是大迎角情况下的气动变化规律,应用计算流体力学(CFD)软件中的k-w模型对火箭气动特性进行了仿真研究,得到火箭气动特性随马赫数和迎角的变化规律,同时对改进后的火箭模型进行气动特性分析.仿真结果表明:发现火箭尾部改进成收敛-扩张型喷管可使火箭下落初期有一个抬头力矩,有利于运载火箭初期快速调整姿态;当快到达预期点火姿态时,由于气动力作用点后移产生的与角速度方向相反的力矩,可迫使运载火箭稳定,从而更容易地捕捉到点火角度,并保证点火时的姿态稳定.%For studying the aerodynamic characteristics of rocket in the process of the rocket separating from the plane internally carried air-launched launch vehicle,especially when the rocket is at high angle of attack,CFD is applied to the simulation of rocket aerodynamic characteristics.Based on the improvement of rocket shape,the rocket aerodynamic characteristics with Mach number and angle of attack can be obtained.The analysis of the aerodynamic characteristics of the improved rocket model shows that the rocket tail improved into a convergent nozzle is of great benefit to the attitude adjustment.These analyses provide a theoretical foundation for the further research on rocket attitude stabilization and track design.

  8. Deconvolution of overlapping spectral polymer signals in size exclusion separation-diode array detection separations by implementing a multivariate curve resolution method optimized by alternating least square.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoeylandt, Tim; Chen, Kai; Du Prez, Filip; Lynen, Frédéric

    2014-05-16

    Peaks eluting from a size exclusion separation (SEC) are often not completely baseline-separated due to the inherent dispersity of the polymer. Lowering the flow rate is sometimes a solution to obtain a better physical separation, but results in a longer retention time, which is often not desirable. The chemometrical deconvolution method discussed in this work provides the possibility of calculating the contribution of each peak separately in the total chromatogram of overlapping peaks. An in-house-developed MATLAB script differentiates between compounds based on their difference in UV-spectrum and retention time, using the entire 3D retention time UV-spectrum. Consequently, the output of the script offers the calculated chromatograms of the separate compounds as well as their respective UV-spectrum, of which the latter can be used for peak identification. This approach is of interest to quantitate contributions of different polymer types with overlapping UV-spectra and retention times, as is often the case in, for example, copolymer or polymer blend analysis. The applicability has been proven on mixtures of different polymer types: polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(ethoxyethyl acrylate). This paper demonstrates that both qualitative and quantitative analyses are possible after deconvolution and that alternating concentrations of adjacent peaks do not significantly influence the obtained accuracy.

  9. Aerodynamics of Small Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas J.

    In this review we describe the aerodynamic problems that must be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of a number of experimental boundary-layer studies, including the influence of laminar separation bubbles, are discussed. Several examples of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in this regime are described. Also, a brief survey of analytical models for oscillating and flapping-wing propulsion is presented. These range from the earliest examples where quasi-steady, attached flow is assumed, to those that account for the unsteady shed vortex wake as well as flow separation and aeroelastic behavior of a flapping wing. Experiments that complemented the analysis and led to the design of a successful ornithopter are also described.

  10. Branched polymers characterized by comprehensive two-dimensional separations with fully orthogonal mechanisms: Molecular-topology fractionation x size-exclusion chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Edam; E.P.C. Mes; D.M. Meunier; F.A. van Damme; P.J. Schoenmakers

    2014-01-01

    Polymer separations under non-conventional conditions have been explored to obtain a separation of long-chain branched polymers from linear polymers with identical hydrodynamic size. In separation media with flow-through channels of the same order as the size of the analyte molecules in solution, th

  11. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the charge-separation energies of hydrated zinc(II): redefinition of the critical size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Theresa E; Armentrout, P B

    2009-12-10

    In the preceding article, the hydration energies of Zn(2+)(H(2)O)(n) complexes, where n = 6-10, were measured using threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer (GIBMS) coupled with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The present investigation explores the charge-separation processes observed, Zn(2+)(H(2)O)(n) --> ZnOH(+)(H(2)O)(m) + H(+)(H(2)O)(n-m-1), and the competition between this process and the loss of water. Our results demonstrate that charge-separation processes occur at variable complex sizes of n = 6, 7, and 8, prompting a redefinition of the critical size for charge separation. Experimental kinetic energy-dependent cross sections are analyzed to yield 0 K threshold energies for the charge-separation products and the effects of competition with this channel on the energies for losing one and two water ligands after accounting for multiple collisions, kinetic shifts, and energy distributions. A complete reaction coordinate is calculated for the n = 7 complex dissociating into ZnOH(+)(H(2)O)(3) + H(+)(H(2)O)(3). Calculated rate-limiting transition states for n = 6-8 are also compared to experimental threshold measurements for the charge-separation processes.

  12. Weaning and separation stress: maternal motivation decreases with litter age and litter size in farmed mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Sørensen, Dennis Dam; Larsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    .01), indicative of dam hunger/metabolic burden in the preceding period. We found no signs of nipple/inflammation problems, evaluated visually and by Infrared Thermography (IRT) measuring surface temperatures of active teats.Dams separated at litter age 7 weeks had higher concentrations of cortisol metabolites...

  13. New composite separator pellet to increase power density and reduce size of thermal batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondy, Lisa Ann; Roberts, Christine Cardinal; Grillet, Anne; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; Barringer, David Alan; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Chavez, Thomas P.; Ingersoll, David T.; Hughes, Lindsey Gloe; Evans, Lindsey R.; Fitchett, Stephanie

    2013-11-01

    We show that it is possible to manufacture strong macroporous ceramic films that can be backfilled with electrolyte to form rigid separator pellets suitable for use in thermal batteries. Several new ceramic manufacturing processes are developed to produce sintered magnesium oxide foams with connected porosities of over 80% by volume and with sufficient strength to withstand the battery manufacturing steps. The effects of processing parameters are quantified, and methods to imbibe electrolyte into the ceramic scaffold demonstrated. Preliminary single cell battery testing show that some of our first generation pellets exhibit longer voltage life with comparable resistance at the critical early times to that exhibited by a traditional pressed pellets. Although more development work is needed to optimize the processes to create these rigid separator pellets, the results indicate the potential of such ceramic separator pellets to be equal, if not superior to, current pressed pellets. Furthermore, they could be a replacement for critical material that is no longer available, as well as improving battery separator strength, decreasing production costs, and leading to shorter battery stacks for long-life batteries.

  14. Accomplishing simple, solubility-based separations of rare earth elements with complexes bearing size-sensitive molecular apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Justin A; Cole, Bren E; Boreen, Michael A; Lippincott, Connor A; Manor, Brian C; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2016-12-27

    Rare earth (RE) metals are critical components of electronic materials and permanent magnets. Recycling of consumer materials is a promising new source of rare REs. To incentivize recycling, there is a clear need for the development of simple methods for targeted separations of mixtures of RE metal salts. Metal complexes of a tripodal hydroxylaminato ligand, TriNOx(3-), featured a size-sensitive aperture formed of its three η(2)-(N,O) ligand arms. Exposure of cations in the aperture induced a self-associative equilibrium comprising RE(TriNOx)THF and [RE(TriNOx)]2 species. Differences in the equilibrium constants Kdimer for early and late metals enabled simple separations through leaching. Separations were performed on RE1/RE2 mixtures, where RE1 = La-Sm and RE2 = Gd-Lu, with emphasis on Eu/Y separations for potential applications in the recycling of phosphor waste from compact fluorescent light bulbs. Using the leaching method, separations factors approaching 2,000 were obtained for early-late RE combinations. Following solvent optimization, >95% pure samples of Eu were obtained with a 67% recovery for the technologically relevant Eu/Y separation.

  15. Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    "Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics" is a comprehensive electronic guide to aerodynamics,computational fluid dynamics, aeronautics, aerospace propulsion systems, design and relatedtechnology. We report data, tables, graphics, sketches,examples, results, photos, technical andscientific literature...

  16. There's plenty of gloom at the bottom: the many challenges of accurate quantitation in size-based oligomeric separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, André M

    2013-11-01

    There is a variety of small-molecule species (e.g., tackifiers, plasticizers, oligosaccharides) the size-based characterization of which is of considerable scientific and industrial importance. Likewise, quantitation of the amount of oligomers in a polymer sample is crucial for the import and export of substances into the USA and European Union (EU). While the characterization of ultra-high molar mass macromolecules by size-based separation techniques is generally considered a challenge, it is this author's contention that a greater challenge is encountered when trying to perform, for quantitation purposes, separations in and of the oligomeric region. The latter thesis is expounded herein, by detailing the various obstacles encountered en route to accurate, quantitative oligomeric separations by entropically dominated techniques such as size-exclusion chromatography, hydrodynamic chromatography, and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation, as well as by methods which are, principally, enthalpically driven such as liquid adsorption and temperature gradient interaction chromatography. These obstacles include, among others, the diminished sensitivity of static light scattering (SLS) detection at low molar masses, the non-constancy of the response of SLS and of commonly employed concentration-sensitive detectors across the oligomeric region, and the loss of oligomers through the accumulation wall membrane in asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation. The battle is not lost, however, because, with some care and given a sufficient supply of sample, the quantitation of both individual oligomeric species and of the total oligomeric region is often possible.

  17. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  18. One-dimensional linear array of cylindrical posts for size-based deterministic separation of binary suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Devendra, Raghavendra

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the motion of suspended particles past a single line of equally spaced cylindrical posts that is slanted with respect to the driving force. We show that such a one-dimensional array of posts can fractionate particles according to their size, with small particles permeating through the line of posts but larger particles being deflected by the steric barrier created by the posts, even though the gaps between posts are larger than the particles. We perform characterization experiments driving monodisperse suspensions of particles of different size past the line of posts over the entire range of forcing orientations and present both the permeation probability through the individual gaps between the posts as well as the fraction of permeating particles through the one-dimensional array. In both cases, we observe a sharp transition from deflection to permeation mode that is a function of particle size, thus enabling separation. We then drive binary mixtures at selected orientations of the line of pos...

  19. Application and Method on Separation of Open Rotor Aerodynamic Noise%开式叶轮气动噪声信号离析方法和运用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万剑峰; 杨爱玲; 戴韧

    2013-01-01

    比较了同工况下开式叶轮气动噪声声压信号的测量结果,发现不论是在时域还是在频域上都存在较大的浮动。若采用旋转机械常用的时域同步平均法处理噪声信号,不仅需要另外安装锁相装置,还会过滤了宽频噪声信号以及使得其它非谐频信号的幅值失真。为了离析出稳定且正确的开式叶轮气动噪声信号,本文提出了一种无须安装锁相装置同时又能解决上述问题的信号处理方法,并从理论和实际运用中验证此方法的可行性。进一步分析了开式叶轮气动噪声尖峰间距特征和叶片固有频率对噪声幅值的影响。为了避免物理设备的误差,本文提出用尖峰区域下的占空比来区分旋转噪声和宽频噪声,在此基础上,计算了旋转噪声的能量在气动噪声中所占的比例和在频域下旋转噪声的能量分布。%In comparison with measurement results of open rotor sound pressure sign ,whether in frequency domain or in time domain,there is much fluctuation in those results .If by the method of time synchronous averaging ,not only locking phase equip-ment will be fixed addinally ,but also broadband noise sign can be filtered and the sign of harmonic frequency except times rotating frequency will be of distortion .In order to extract steady and true sign from rotor aerodynamic noise ,this paper introduces a simple and practical method without locking phase equipment , which can solve above mentioned problems .Then the method is proved to be true in theory and application analyses .What’s more, the following problems are analyzed in this paper:a distance between peeks of noise keeping a some value and how to effect noise amplitude by blade natural frequency .To avoid physical equipment error, rotating noise is able to be distinguished from broadband by computing duty ratio .On the basis, those are computed:a en-ergy ratio of rotating noise to broadband noise and energy

  20. Unsteady aerodynamics and flow control for flapping wing flyers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steven; Nassef, Hany; Pornsinsirirak, Nick; Tai, Yu-Chong; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2003-11-01

    The creation of micro air vehicles (MAVs) of the same general sizes and weight as natural fliers has spawned renewed interest in flapping wing flight. With a wingspan of approximately 15 cm and a flight speed of a few meters per second, MAVs experience the same low Reynolds number (10 4-10 5) flight conditions as their biological counterparts. In this flow regime, rigid fixed wings drop dramatically in aerodynamic performance while flexible flapping wings gain efficacy and are the preferred propulsion method for small natural fliers. Researchers have long realized that steady-state aerodynamics does not properly capture the physical phenomena or forces present in flapping flight at this scale. Hence, unsteady flow mechanisms must dominate this regime. Furthermore, due to the low flight speeds, any disturbance such as gusts or wind will dramatically change the aerodynamic conditions around the MAV. In response, a suitable feedback control system and actuation technology must be developed so that the wing can maintain its aerodynamic efficiency in this extremely dynamic situation; one where the unsteady separated flow field and wing structure are tightly coupled and interact nonlinearly. For instance, birds and bats control their flexible wings with muscle tissue to successfully deal with rapid changes in the flow environment. Drawing from their example, perhaps MAVs can use lightweight actuators in conjunction with adaptive feedback control to shape the wing and achieve active flow control. This article first reviews the scaling laws and unsteady flow regime constraining both biological and man-made fliers. Then a summary of vortex dominated unsteady aerodynamics follows. Next, aeroelastic coupling and its effect on lift and thrust are discussed. Afterwards, flow control strategies found in nature and devised by man to deal with separated flows are examined. Recent work is also presented in using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuators and angular speed

  1. Zirconium-titanium-phosphate nanoparticles. Triton X-100 based size modification, characterization and application in radiochemical separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Sen, B.; Chattopadhyay, P. [Burdwan Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-07-01

    Zirconium-titanium-phosphate nanoparticles (ZTP) of different sizes were synthesized using tritron X-100 (polyethylene glycol-p-isooctylphenyl ether) surfactant. The materials were characterized by FTIR and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structural and morphological details of the material were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SEM study was followed by energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis (EDS) for elemental analysis of the sample. The important peaks of the XRD spectra were analyzed to determine the probable composition of the material. The particle sizes were determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) method. Ion exchange capacity was measured for different metal ions with sizes of the ZTP nanoparticles and size-dependent ion exchange property of the material was investigated thoroughly. The nanomaterial of the smallest size of around 5 nm was employed to separate carrier-free {sup 137m}Ba from {sup 137}Cs in column chromatographic technique using 1.0 M HNO{sub 3} as eluting agent at pH = 5. (orig.)

  2. Hyperbranched polyglycerol-grafted titanium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, derivatization, characterization, size separation, and toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hongmei; Maruyama, Kyouhei; Amano, Tsukuru; Murakami, Takashi; Komatsu, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    We have been developing surface functionalization of various nanoparticles including nanodiamond and iron oxide nanoparticles in view of biomedical applications. In this context, TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NP) are functionalized with polyglycerol (PG) to provide water-dispersible TiO2-PG, which is further derivatized through multi-step organic transformations. The resulting TiO2-PG and its derivatives are fully characterized by various analyses including solution-phase 1H and 13C NMR. TiO2-PG was size-tuned with centrifugation by changing the acceleration and duration. At last, no cytotoxicity of TiO2 NP, TiO2-PG, and TiO2-PG functionalized with RGD peptide was observed under dark conditions.

  3. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  4. Excitation Gaps of Finite-Sized Systems from Optimally Tuned Range-Separated Hybrid Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronik, Leeor; Stein, Tamar; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Baer, Roi

    2012-05-08

    Excitation gaps are of considerable significance in electronic structure theory. Two different gaps are of particular interest. The fundamental gap is defined by charged excitations, as the difference between the first ionization potential and the first electron affinity. The optical gap is defined by a neutral excitation, as the difference between the energies of the lowest dipole-allowed excited state and the ground state. Within many-body perturbation theory, the fundamental gap is the difference between the corresponding lowest quasi-hole and quasi-electron excitation energies, and the optical gap is addressed by including the interaction between a quasi-electron and a quasi-hole. A long-standing challenge has been the attainment of a similar description within density functional theory (DFT), with much debate on whether this is an achievable goal even in principle. Recently, we have constructed and applied a new approach to this problem. Anchored in the rigorous theoretical framework of the generalized Kohn-Sham equation, our method is based on a range-split hybrid functional that uses exact long-range exchange. Its main novel feature is that the range-splitting parameter is not a universal constant but rather is determined from first principles, per system, based on satisfaction of the ionization potential theorem. For finite-sized objects, this DFT approach mimics successfully, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the quasi-particle picture of many-body theory. Specifically, it allows for the extraction of both the fundamental and the optical gap from one underlying functional, based on the HOMO-LUMO gap of a ground-state DFT calculation and the lowest excitation energy of a linear-response time-dependent DFT calculation, respectively. In particular, it produces the correct optical gap for the difficult case of charge-transfer and charge-transfer-like scenarios, where conventional functionals are known to fail. In this perspective, we overview

  5. Modification of pore size in activated carbon by benzene deposition and its effects on CH4/N2 separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-hua; CHE Yong-fang; LI Lan-ting; BAO Peng-cheng

    2011-01-01

    Anthracite coal was used as raw material to prepare activated carbons as the carbon support in the carbonization-activation process.Modification of the pore size of the activated carbon by chemical vapor deposition of carbon from benzene was examined.These samples were characterized by adsorption of N2 at 77 K and CH4 and N2 at 303 K.The microporosity of these samples was evaluated by the Dubinin-Astakhov Equation.The pore size distribution was obtained by the DFT method applied to the N2 adsorption data at 77 K.The separation selectivity was obtained by the Langmuir Equation.The surface morphology was characterized by an environmental scanning electron microscope.It was observed that all samples of carbon molecular sieves studied were microporous carbonaceous materials.CMS-2 prepared in the present study has a better N2/CH4 separation performance; it can satisfy the requirements of the pressure swing adsorption for concentrating CH4 from the N2/CH4 mixture gas.

  6. Cascading and Parallelising Curvilinear Inertial Focusing Systems for High Volume, Wide Size Distribution, Separation and Concentration of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B.; Jimenez, M.; Bridle, H.

    2016-11-01

    Inertial focusing is a microfluidic based separation and concentration technology that has expanded rapidly in the last few years. Throughput is high compared to other microfluidic approaches although sample volumes have typically remained in the millilitre range. Here we present a strategy for achieving rapid high volume processing with stacked and cascaded inertial focusing systems, allowing for separation and concentration of particles with a large size range, demonstrated here from 30 μm-300 μm. The system is based on curved channels, in a novel toroidal configuration and a stack of 20 devices has been shown to operate at 1 L/min. Recirculation allows for efficient removal of large particles whereas a cascading strategy enables sequential removal of particles down to a final stage where the target particle size can be concentrated. The demonstration of curved stacked channels operating in a cascaded manner allows for high throughput applications, potentially replacing filtration in applications such as environmental monitoring, industrial cleaning processes, biomedical and bioprocessing and many more.

  7. Determination of pore size distributions in capillary-channeled polymer fiber stationary phases by inverse size-exclusion chromatography and implications for fast protein separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengxin; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2014-07-18

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers have been utilized as liquid chromatography stationary phases, primarily for biomacromolecule separations on the analytical and preparative scales. The collinear packing of the eight-channeled C-CP fibers provides for very efficient flow, allowing operation at high linear velocity (u>100mm s(-1)) and low backpressure (transport properties, there must not be mass transfer limitations as would be imposed by having an appreciably porous phase, wherein solute diffusion limits the overall mass transport rates. To better understand the physical nano-/micro- structure of C-CP fibers, inverse size exclusion chromatography (iSEC) has been employed to determine the pore size distribution (PSD) within C-CP fibers. A diversity of test species (from metal ions to large proteins) was used as probes under non-retaining conditions to obtain a response curve reflecting the apparent partition coefficient (Kd) versus hydrodynamic radii (rm). A mean pore radius (rp) of 4.2nm with standard deviation (sp) of ±1.1nm was calculated by fitting the Kd versus rm data to model equations with a Gaussian pore size distribution, and a pore radius of 4.0±0.1nm was calculated based on a log-normal distribution. The derived mean pore radius is much smaller than traditional support materials, with the standard deviation showing a relatively uniform pore distribution. van Deemter plots were analyzed to provide practical confirmation of the structural implications. Large molecules (e.g., proteins) that are fully excluded from pores have no significant C-terms in the van Deemter plots whereas small molecules that can access the pore volumes display appreciable C-terms, as expected. Fitting of retention data to the Knox equation suggests that the columns operate with a characteristic particle diameter (dp) of ∼53μm.

  8. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    nearly remain unchanged. In dynamic stall, leading edge defect imposes a greater influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil than steady conditions. By increasing in defect length, it is found that the separated area becomes more intense and moves forward along the suction surface. Conclusions Leading edge defect has significant influence on the aerodynamic and flow characteristics of the airfoil, which will reach a stable status with enough large defect size. The leading edge separation bubble, circulation in the defect cavity and intense tailing edge vortex are the main features of flow around defective airfoils. PMID:27658310

  9. Aerodynamic characteristics of lotus seed mixtures and test on pneumatic separating device for lotus seed kernel and contaminants%莲子物料空气动力学特性与壳仁分离装置试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马秋成; 卢安舸; 高连兴; 王正根; 谭泽华; 李献奇

    2015-01-01

    Lotus seed hulling is the first process in rough processing, which is removing the tough shell that covers lotus seed kernel. Generally, it can utilize the mechanical processing method. After processing, the mixtures of lotus seed kernel, lotus seed shell, kernel debris and a small amount of imperfectly shelled lotus seed can be yielded. Because the lotus seed shell, kernel debris and other contaminants are easy to block the entrance of next working position (kernel coring process), a separating process for shell and kernel after the hulling process would be necessary and crucial. Pneumatic separating method is commonly used in separating equipment in agriculture products. However, there is limited academic research on pneumatic separating technology for lotus seed mixtures. In this paper, a negative pressure, pneumatic separating method was proposed to separate lotus seed kernel and shell. Firstly, the density parameter, the moisture content and the shape parameter of lotus seed mixture constituent were measured. The test results showed that the density parameters of lotus seed kernel, lotus seed, shell and kernel debris were 1 080, 1 042, 1 210 and 1 163 kg/m3 respectively, the moisture content of lotus seed kernel, unhulled lotus seed (with imperfectly shelled lotus seed), shell and kernel debris were 7.35%, 3.91%, 12.36%and 12.45%respectively. The shape of lotus seed kernel, lotus seed and the imperfectly shelled lotus seed could be abstracted as the spherical, and the grain diameter could be represented by maximum cross section. Secondly, the theoretical analysis and aerodynamics characteristics test of lotus seed mixtures were carried out. The results showed that the drag coefficient of lotus seed mixtures was within the Newton area, and the drag coefficient was 0.44. The ranges of theoretical suspension velocity of lotus seed kernel, lotus seed and imperfectly shelled lotus seed calculated were 14.134-16.115, 14.745-17.327 and 15.763-17.623 m/s respectively

  10. The aerodynamic and structural study of flapping wing vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on the aerodynamic and structural study carried out on flapping wings and flapping vehicles. Theoretical and experimental investigation of aerodynamic forces acting on flapping wings in simple harmonic oscillations is undertaken in order to help conduct and optimize the aerodynamic and structural design of flapping wing vehicles. The research is focused on the large scale ornithopter design of similar size and configuration to a hang glider. By means of Theodorsen’s th...

  11. Functional hydrophilic polystyrene beads with uniformly size and high cross-linking degree facilitated rapid separation of exenatide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Zhao, Lan; Zhang, Rongyue; Huang, Yongdong; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Kun; Wu, Xuexing; Zhang, Zhigang; Gong, Fangling; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    A high cross-linking polystyrene(PSt)-based anion-exchange material with uniformly size, high ion exchange capacity, and high hydrophilicity was synthesized by a novel surface functionalization approach in this study. Uniformly sized PSt microspheres were prepared by the membrane emulsion polymerization strategy, and then modified by (1) conversing resid ual surface vinyl groups to epoxy groups followed by quaternization, and (2) decorating aromatic ring matrix including nitration, reduction and attachment of glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. The 3-D morphology and porous features of microspheres were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface of the modified PSt became roughness but the particle size remained same. Meanwhile, FT-IR spectra and laser scanning confocal microscope (LCSM) indicated that the modification groups had been successfully covalently coated onto the PSt microspheres. Modified PSt microspheres showed greatly improved hydrophilicity and biocompatibility with 0.387mmol/mL ion exchange capacity (IEC). In the application evaluation procedure, exenatide can be purified from 42.9% (peptide crudes) to 88.6% by modified PSt column with 97.1% recovery yield. This modified PSt microspheres had a large potential in application for efficient separation of peptides.

  12. INTEGRATED AERODYNAMIC MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUTTE, HK

    1992-01-01

    The myoelastic-aerodynamic model of phonation implies that aerodynamic factors are crucial to the evaluation of voice function, Subglottal pressure and mean flow rate represent the vocal power source. If they can be related to the magnitude of the radiated sound power, they may provide an index of v

  13. Reinforced aerodynamic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to the prevention of deformations in an aerodynamic profile caused by lack of resistance to the bending moment forces that are created when such a profile is loaded in operation. More specifically, the invention relates to a reinforcing element inside an aerodynamic...

  14. Processing and size range separation of pristine and magnetic poly(l-lactic acid) based microspheres for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, D M; Sencadas, V; Ribeiro, C; Martins, P M; Martins, P; Gama, F M; Botelho, G; Lanceros-Méndez, S

    2016-08-15

    Biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and PLLA/CoFe2O4 magnetic microspheres with average sizes ranging between 0.16-3.9μm and 0.8-2.2μm, respectively, were obtained by an oil-in-water emulsion method using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) solution as the emulsifier agent. The separation of the microspheres in different size ranges was then performed by centrifugation and the colloidal stability assessed at different pH values. Neat PLLA spheres are more stable in alkaline environments when compared to magnetic microspheres, both types being stable for pHs higher than 4, resulting in a colloidal suspension. On the other hand, in acidic environments the microspheres tend to form aggregates. The neat PLLA microspheres show a degree of crystallinity of 40% whereas the composite ones are nearly amorphous (17%). Finally, the biocompatibility was assessed by cell viability studies with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells.

  15. Analysis of flow separation over aerodynamic airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Sánchez, Sergio Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Energy industries are nowadays struggling with the most effcient source of energy generation. The list of energy resources is huge starting with traditional coal and going through the different technologies until reaching the controversial nuclear reactors. One of the most interesting areas in energy generation is the renewable energy technologies. Among the different renewable energy sources, this project will be focused on eolic energy generation via horizontal axis wind turbine...

  16. Prediction of aerodynamic performance for MEXICO rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Zedong; Yang, Hua; Xu, Haoran

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of the MEXICO (Model EXperiments In Controlled cOnditions) rotor at five tunnel wind speeds is predicted by making use of BEM and CFD methods, respectively, using commercial MATLAB and CFD software. Due to the pressure differences on both sides of the blade, the tip...... the reliability of the MEXICO data. Second, the SST turbulence model can better capture the flow separation on the blade and has high aerodynamic performance prediction accuracy for a horizontal axis wind turbine in axial inflow conditions. Finally, the comparisons of the axial and tangential forces as well...

  17. Numerical investigation of the effect of number and shape of inlet of cyclone and particle size on particle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee, Iman

    2016-12-01

    Cyclones are one of the most common devices for removing particles from the gas stream and act as a filter. The mode of action of separating these particles, from mass gas flow, in this case, is that the inertia force exerted on the solid particles in the cyclone, several times greater than the force of inertia into the gas phase and so the particles are guided from the sides of the cyclone body to the bottom body but less power will be affected by the gas phase and from upper parts, solid particles, goes to the bottom chamber. Most of the attention has been focused on finding new methods to improve performance parameters. Recently, some studies were conducted to improve equipment performance by evaluating geometric effects on projects. In this work, the effect of cyclone geometry was studied through the creation of a symmetrical double and quad inlet and also studied cutting inlet geometry and their influence on separation efficiency. To assess the accuracy of modeling, selected model compared with the model Kim and Lee and the results were close to acceptable. The collection efficiency of the double inlet cyclone was found to be 20-25% greater than that of the single inlet cyclone and the collection efficiency of the quad inlet cyclone was found to be 40-45% greater than with the same inlet size. Also the collection efficiency of the rectangle inlet was found to be 4-6% greater than ellipse inlet and the collection efficiency of the ellipse inlet was found to be 30-35% greater than circle inlet.

  18. A novel microfluidic platform for size and deformability based separation and the subsequent molecular characterization of viable circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvichia, G E; Parveen, Z; Wagner, C; Janning, M; Quidde, J; Stein, A; Müller, V; Loges, S; Neves, R P L; Stoecklein, N H; Wikman, H; Riethdorf, S; Pantel, K; Gorges, T M

    2016-06-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were introduced as biomarkers more than 10 years ago, but capture of viable CTCs at high purity from peripheral blood of cancer patients is still a major technical challenge. Here, we report a novel microfluidic platform designed for marker independent capture of CTCs. The Parsortix™ cell separation system provides size and deformability-based enrichment with automated staining for cell identification, and subsequent recovery (harvesting) of cells from the device. Using the Parsortix™ system, average cell capture inside the device ranged between 42% and 70%. Subsequent harvest of cells from the device ranged between 54% and 69% of cells captured. Most importantly, 99% of the isolated tumor cells were viable after processing in spiking experiments as well as after harvesting from patient samples and still functional for downstream molecular analysis as demonstrated by mRNA characterization and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Analyzing clinical blood samples from metastatic (n = 20) and nonmetastatic (n = 6) cancer patients in parallel with CellSearch(®) system, we found that there was no statistically significant difference between the quantitative behavior of the two systems in this set of twenty six paired separations. In conclusion, the epitope independent Parsortix™ system enables the isolation of viable CTCs at a very high purity. Using this system, viable tumor cells are easily accessible and ready for molecular and functional analysis. The system's ability for enumeration and molecular characterization of EpCAM-negative CTCs will help to broaden research into the mechanisms of cancer as well as facilitating the use of CTCs as "liquid biopsies."

  19. Branched polymers characterized by comprehensive two-dimensional separations with fully orthogonal mechanisms: molecular-topology fractionation×size-exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edam, Rob; Mes, Edwin P C; Meunier, David M; Van Damme, Freddy A; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2014-10-31

    Polymer separations under non-conventional conditions have been explored to obtain a separation of long-chain branched polymers from linear polymers with identical hydrodynamic size. In separation media with flow-through channels of the same order as the size of the analyte molecules in solution, the separation and the elution order of polymers are strongly affected by the flow rate. At low flow rates, the largest polymers are eluted last. At high flow rates, they are eluted first. By tuning the channel size and flow rate, conditions can be found where separation becomes independent of molar mass or size of linear polymers. Long-chain branched polymers did experience lower migration rates under these conditions and can be separated from linear polymers. This type of separation is referred to as molecular-topology fractionation (MTF) at critical conditions. Separation by comprehensive two-dimensional molecular-topology fractionation and size-exclusion chromatography (MTF×SEC) was used to study the retention characteristics of MTF. Branching selectivity was demonstrated for three- and four-arm "star" polystyrenes of 3-5×10(6)g/mol molar mass. Baseline separation could be obtained between linear polymer, Y-shaped molecules, and X-shaped molecules in a single experiment at constant flow rate. For randomly branched polymers, the branching selectivity inevitably results in an envelope of peaks, because it is not possible to fully resolve the huge numbers of different branched and linear polymers of varying molar mass. It was concluded that MTF involves partial deformation of polymer coils in solution. The increased coil density and resistance to deformation can explain the different retention behavior of branched molecules.

  20. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  1. Perching aerodynamics and trajectory optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenheiser, Adam; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2007-04-01

    Advances in smart materials, actuators, and control architecture have enabled new flight capabilities for aircraft. Perching is one such capability, described as a vertical landing maneuver using in-flight shape reconfiguration in lieu of high thrust generation. A morphing, perching aircraft design is presented that is capable of post stall flight and very slow landing on a vertical platform. A comprehensive model of the aircraft's aerodynamics, with special regard to nonlinear affects such as flow separation and dynamic stall, is discussed. Trajectory optimization using nonlinear programming techniques is employed to show the effects that morphing and nonlinear aerodynamics have on the maneuver. These effects are shown to decrease the initial height and distance required to initiate the maneuver, reduce the bounds on the trajectory, and decrease the required thrust for the maneuver. Perching trajectories comparing morphing versus fixed-configuration and stalled versus un-stalled aircraft are presented. It is demonstrated that a vertical landing is possible in the absence of high thrust if post-stall flight capabilities and vehicle reconfiguration are utilized.

  2. Hydrodynamic features of centrifugal contactor separators; experimental studies on liquid hold-up, residence time distribution, phase behavior and drop size distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, B.; Kraai, G.N.; Winkelman, J.G.N.; Heeres, H.

    2012-01-01

    The liquid hold-up, residence time distributions (RTD), drop size distributions and continuous/dispersed phase for a typical centrifugal contactor separator (CCS) of the type CINC V02 were determined experimentally for various L-L systems. The hold-up ratio of the different solvents was mainly a fun

  3. Hydrodynamic features of centrifugal contactor separators : Experimental studies on liquid hold-up, residence time distribution, phase behavior and drop size distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, Boelo; Kraai, Gerard N.; Winkelman, Jozef G. M.; Heeres, Hero J.

    2012-01-01

    The liquid hold-up, residence time distributions (RTD), drop size distributions and continuous/dispersed phase for a typical centrifugal contactor separator (CCS) of the type CINC V02 were determined experimentally for various L-L systems. The hold-up ratio of the different solvents was mainly a fun

  4. The Mechanism of Aerodynamic Hysteresis for Sinusoidally Oscillating Delta Wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄国创; 王玉明; 曹桂兴

    1994-01-01

    An unsteady model of vortex system is developed to simulate the phenomena of aerodynamic hysteresis of sinusoidally oscillating delta wings.The dynamic behavior of leading-edge separation vortices simulated by the present method is in qualitative agreement with that of flow visualization by Gad-el-Hak and Ho.The calculated lift hysteresis loops are in quantitative agreement with the force measurements in the tunnel.The aerodynamic mechanism of the hysteresis phenomena is further investigated by the present method.

  5. Mimicking the humpback whale: An aerodynamic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, S. M. A.; Razak, N. A.; Mohd Rafie, A. S.; Ahmad, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    This comprehensive review aims to provide a critical overview of the work on tubercles in the past decade. The humpback whale is of interest to aerodynamic/hydrodynamic researchers, as it performs manoeuvres that baffle the imagination. Researchers have attributed these capabilities to the presence of lumps, known as tubercles, on the leading edge of the flipper. Tubercles generate a unique flow control mechanism, offering the humpback exceptional manoeuverability. Experimental and numerical studies have shown that the flow pattern over the tubercle wing is quite different from conventional wings. Research on the Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE) concept has helped to clarify aerodynamic issues such as flow separation, tonal noise and dynamic stall. TLE shows increased lift by delaying and restricting spanwise separation. A summary of studies on different airfoils and reported improvement in performance is outlined. The major contributions and limitations of previous work are also reported.

  6. Leading Edge Device Aerodynamic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Gabriel COJOCARU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leading edge devices are conventionally used as aerodynamic devices that enhance performances during landing and in some cases during takeoff. The need to increase the efficiency of the aircrafts has brought the idea of maintaining as much as possible a laminar flow over the wings. This is possible only when the leading edge of the wings is free from contamination, therefore using the leading edge devices with the additional role of shielding during takeoff. Such a device based on the Krueger flap design is aerodynamically analyzed and optimized. The optimization comprises three steps: first, the positioning of the flap such that the shielding criterion is kept, second, the analysis of the flap size and third, the optimization of the flap shape. The first step is subject of a gradient based optimization process of the position described by two parameters, the position along the line and the deflection angle. For the third step the Adjoint method is used to gain insight on the shape of the Krueger flap that will extend the most the stall limit. All these steps have been numerically performed using Ansys Fluent and the results are presented for the optimized shape in comparison with the baseline configuration.

  7. The use of nylon and glass fiber filter separators with different pore sizes in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Separators are needed in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to reduce electrode spacing and preventing electrode short circuiting. The use of nylon and glass fiber filter separators in single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs was examined for their effect on performance. Larger pore nylon mesh were used that had regular mesh weaves with pores ranging from 10 to 160 μm, while smaller pore-size nylon filters (0.2-0.45 μm) and glass fiber filters (0.7-2.0 μm) had a more random structure. The pore size of both types of nylon filters had a direct and predictable effect on power production, with power increasing from 443 ± 27 to 650 ± 7 mW m-2 for pore sizes of 0.2 and 0.45 μm, and from 769 ± 65 to 941 ± 47 mW m-2 for 10 to 160 μm. In contrast, changes in pore sizes of the glass fiber filters resulted in a relatively narrow change in power (732 ± 48 to 779 ± 43 mW m-2) for pore sizes of 0.7 to 2 μm. An ideal separator should increase both power density and Coulombic efficiency (CE). However, CEs measured for the different separators were inversely correlated with power production, demonstrating that materials which reduced the oxygen diffusion into the reactor also hindered proton transport to the cathode, reducing power production through increased internal resistance. Our results highlight the need to develop separators that control oxygen transfer and facilitate proton transfer to the cathode. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Conformable M3 Microsystems for Aerodynamic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    we have fabricated sensors, actuators, and electronics all on the same chip. Control: • A CMOS control circuit has been designed and sent to MOSIS ...macro aerodynamic devices. (3) After the chip from MOSIS is fabricated, it will be tested to confirm that it works as designed. (4) The process and...identify the separation point from the outputs of shear stress sensors and drive the corresponding actuators. The layout has been sent to MOSIS for

  9. Vortices and Vortical Structures in Internal Aerodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RudolfDvorak

    1997-01-01

    The paper aims at summarizing the author's recent phenomenological study of the origin,development and identification of vortical structures in internal aerodynamics.A connection between evolution of these structures and flow separation in closed curved channels is also discussed.It has been shown that in real fluids the individual vortex cores very sonn lose their identity and merge into a new dissipative structure,the properties of which still have to be defined.

  10. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  11. Cable Aerodynamic Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, Kenneth

    to a categorization of the different control technics together with an identification of two key mechanisms for reduction of the design drag force. During this project extensive experimental work examining the aerodynamics of the currently used cable surface modifications together with new innovative proposals have...

  12. Aerodynamically shaped vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Velte, Clara Marika; Øye, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamically shaped vortex generator has been proposed, manufactured and tested in a wind tunnel. The effect on the overall performance when applied on a thick airfoil is an increased lift to drag ratio compared with standard vortex generators. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  13. The Effects of Family Size, Birth Order, Sibling Separation and Crowding on the Academic Achievement of Boys and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Ena Vazquez; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Family constellation variables such as family size, birth order, spacing of children, and crowding were significantly associated with academic achievement when IQ was controlled. The effects of family constellation variables were found to be sex specific. (RC)

  14. Size fractionation of waste-to-energy boiler ash enables separation of a coarse fraction with low dioxin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, E; Allegrini, E; Fruergaard Astrup, T; Hulgaard, T; Riber, C; Jansson, S

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) formed in modern Waste-to-Energy plants are primarily found in the generated ashes and air pollution control residues, which are usually disposed of as hazardous waste. The objective of this study was to explore the occurrence of PCDD/F in different grain size fractions in the boiler ash, i.e. ash originating from the convection pass of the boiler. If a correlation between particle size and dioxin concentrations could be found, size fractionation of the ashes could reduce the total amount of hazardous waste. Boiler ash samples from ten sections of a boiler's convective part were collected over three sampling days, sieved into three different size fractions - 0.355 mm - and analysed for PCDD/F. The coarse fraction (>0.355 mm) in the first sections of the horizontal convection pass appeared to be of low toxicity with respect to dioxin content. While the total mass of the coarse fraction in this boiler was relatively small, sieving could reduce the amount of ash containing toxic PCDD/F by around 0.5 kg per tonne input waste or around 15% of the collected boiler ash from the convection pass. The mid-size fraction in this study covered a wide size range (0.09-0.355 mm) and possibly a low toxicity fraction could be identified by splitting this fraction into more narrow size ranges. The ashes exhibited uniform PCDD/F homologue patterns which suggests a stable and continuous generation of PCDD/F.

  15. Receptor-ligand interactions measured by an improved spun column chromatography technique. A high efficiency and high throughput size separation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Stryhn, A; Kirkby, N;

    1995-01-01

    on the method development essential to obtain efficient separation in particular when used for analytical purposes. In this paper we describe a systematic approach to select the optimal parameters for spun column separation including a simple modification of the technique whereby the spun columns are eluted...... the gradient centrifugation helps to achieve equilibrium across the gel matrix during the elution. The new method has been used successfully for several different receptor-ligand interactions, and this paper describes a general approach on how to develop new applications of the technique.......Size exclusion chromatography may under the right circumstances be an easy and powerful way to measure in solution the interaction between a receptor an dits ligand. Spun column chromatography is a fast size exclusion technique of increasing popularity, however, little information exists...

  16. Receptor-ligand interactions measured by an improved spun column chromatography technique. A high efficiency and high throughput size separation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Stryhn, A; Kirkby, N

    1995-01-01

    Size exclusion chromatography may under the right circumstances be an easy and powerful way to measure in solution the interaction between a receptor an dits ligand. Spun column chromatography is a fast size exclusion technique of increasing popularity, however, little information exists...... on the method development essential to obtain efficient separation in particular when used for analytical purposes. In this paper we describe a systematic approach to select the optimal parameters for spun column separation including a simple modification of the technique whereby the spun columns are eluted...... the gradient centrifugation helps to achieve equilibrium across the gel matrix during the elution. The new method has been used successfully for several different receptor-ligand interactions, and this paper describes a general approach on how to develop new applications of the technique....

  17. Size fractionation of waste-to-energy boiler ash enables separation of a coarse fraction with low dioxin concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidemann, E.; Allegrini, Elisa; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard;

    2016-01-01

    /F in different grain size fractions in the boiler ash, i.e. ash originating from the convection pass of the boiler. If a correlation between particle size and dioxin concentrations could be found, size fractionation of the ashes could reduce the total amount of hazardous waste. Boiler ash samples from ten...... sections of a boiler's convective part were collected over three sampling days, sieved into three different size fractions - 0.355. mm - and analysed for PCDD/F. The coarse fraction (>0.355. mm) in the first sections of the horizontal convection pass appeared to be of low toxicity with respect to dioxin...... content. While the total mass of the coarse fraction in this boiler was relatively small, sieving could reduce the amount of ash containing toxic PCDD/F by around 0.5. kg per tonne input waste or around 15% of the collected boiler ash from the convection pass. The mid-size fraction in this study covered...

  18. A high gradient and strength bioseparator with nano-sized immunomagnetic particles for specific separation and efficient concentration of E. coli O157:H7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jianhan, E-mail: jianhan@cau.edu.cn [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Agricultural Information Acquisition Technology (Beijing), 17 East Tsinghua Road, China Agricultural University, Mailbox 125, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Min [College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li, Yanbin [College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Chen, Qi [Modern Precision Agriculture System Integration Research Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Sample pretreatment is a key to rapid screening of pathogens for prevention and control of foodborne diseases. Magnetic immunoseparation is a specific method based on antibody–antigen reaction to capture the target bacteria and concentrate them in a smaller-volume buffer. The use of nano-sized magnetic particles could improve the separation efficiency of bacteria but require much higher gradient and strength magnetic field. In this study, a strong magnetic bioseparator with a mean field strength of 1.35 T and a mean gradient of 90 T/m was developed with the use of the 30 nm and 180 nm magnetic particles to specifically separate and efficiently concentrate foodborne bacterial pathogens using Escherichia coli O157:H7 as a model bacterium. The polyclonal antibodies against E. coli were evaluated using Dot ELISA analysis for their good affinity with the target bacteria and then used to modify the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles by 1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC·HCl) method and streptavidin-biotin binding. The magnetic particle concentrations were optimized to be 40 µg/ml and 100 µg/ml for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively, the immunoreaction time was optimized to be 45 min for both sizes of particles, and the separation times were optimized to be 60 min and 2 min for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively. The total magnetic separation time was 2 h and 1 h for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that the bioseparator with the use of either 30 nm or 180 nm immunomagnetic particles could achieve a separation efficiency of >90% for E. coli O157:H7 at the concentrations ranging from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 5} cfu/ml. No obvious interferences from non-target foodborne pathogens, such as SalmonellaTyphimurium and Listeria innocua, were found. For overall consideration of the consuming time, the cost, and the separation efficiency, the 180 nm magnetic particles are

  19. Aerodynamic Leidenfrost effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Bird, James C.; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2016-12-01

    When deposited on a plate moving quickly enough, any liquid can levitate as it does when it is volatile on a very hot solid (Leidenfrost effect). In the aerodynamic Leidenfrost situation, air gets inserted between the liquid and the moving solid, a situation that we analyze. We observe two types of entrainment. (i) The thickness of the air gap is found to increase with the plate speed, which is interpreted in the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin frame: Air is dynamically dragged along the surface and its thickness results from a balance between capillary and viscous effects. (ii) Air set in motion by the plate exerts a force on the levitating liquid. We discuss the magnitude of this aerodynamic force and show that it can be exploited to control the liquid and even to drive it against gravity.

  20. Computational electromagnetic-aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Joseph J S

    2016-01-01

    Presents numerical algorithms, procedures, and techniques required to solve engineering problems relating to the interactions between electromagnetic fields, fluid flow, and interdisciplinary technology for aerodynamics, electromagnetics, chemical-physics kinetics, and plasmadynamics This book addresses modeling and simulation science and technology for studying ionized gas phenomena in engineering applications. Computational Electromagnetic-Aerodynamics is organized into ten chapters. Chapter one to three introduce the fundamental concepts of plasmadynamics, chemical-physics of ionization, classical magnetohydrodynamics, and their extensions to plasma-based flow control actuators, high-speed flows of interplanetary re-entry, and ion thrusters in space exploration. Chapter four to six explain numerical algorithms and procedures for solving Maxwell’s equation in the time domain for computational electromagnetics, plasma wave propagation, and the time-dependent c mpressible Navier-Stokes equation for aerodyn...

  1. Going beyond 20 μm-sized channels for studying red blood cell phase separation in microfluidic bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sophie; Merlo, Adlan; Duru, Paul; Risso, Frédéric; Lorthois, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    Despite the development of microfluidics, experimental challenges are considerable for achieving a quantitative study of phase separation, i.e., the non-proportional distribution of Red Blood Cells (RBCs) and suspending fluid, in microfluidic bifurcations with channels smaller than 20 μm. Yet, a basic understanding of phase separation in such small vessels is needed for understanding the coupling between microvascular network architecture and dynamics at larger scale. Here, we present the experimental methodologies and measurement techniques developed for that purpose for RBC concentrations (tube hematocrits) ranging between 2% and 20%. The maximal RBC velocity profile is directly measured by a temporal cross-correlation technique which enables to capture the RBC slip velocity at walls with high resolution, highlighting two different regimes (flat and more blunted ones) as a function of RBC confinement. The tube hematocrit is independently measured by a photometric technique. The RBC and suspending fluid flow rates are then deduced assuming the velocity profile of a Newtonian fluid with no slip at walls for the latter. The accuracy of this combination of techniques is demonstrated by comparison with reference measurements and verification of RBC and suspending fluid mass conservation at individual bifurcations. The present methodologies are much more accurate, with less than 15% relative errors, than the ones used in previous in vivo experiments. Their potential for studying steady state phase separation is demonstrated, highlighting an unexpected decrease of phase separation with increasing hematocrit in symmetrical, but not asymmetrical, bifurcations and providing new reference data in regimes where in vitro results were previously lacking.

  2. Hypervelocity Aerodynamics and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-06

    Report: Hypervelocity Aerodynamics and Control 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) T. C. Adamson, Jr. and R. IA. Howe 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...6] pulse applied. If the Mxyz system as shown is Fig. 3 r 3. , is used, then we have R21= k costo -t4 ksin yot 1 6r= ro 1 (4) -- (6k 2 - 5 -30k 2 sin

  3. CFD research, parallel computation and aerodynamic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    Over five years of research in Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications are covered in this report. Using CFD as an established tool, aerodynamic optimization on parallel architectures is explored. The objective of this work is to provide better tools to vehicle designers. Submarine design requires accurate force and moment calculations in flow with thick boundary layers and large separated vortices. Low noise production is critical, so flow into the propulsor region must be predicted accurately. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has been the subject of recent work. This vehicle is to be a passenger vehicle with the capability of cutting overseas flight times by more than half. A successful design must surpass the performance of comparable planes. Fuel economy, other operational costs, environmental impact, and range must all be improved substantially. For all these reasons, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer and other disciplines.

  4. Aerodynamic data of space vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Weiland, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The capacity and quality of the atmospheric flight performance of space flight vehicles is characterized by their aerodynamic data bases. A complete aerodynamic data base would encompass the coefficients of the static longitudinal and lateral motions and the related dynamic coefficients. In this book the aerodynamics of 27 vehicles are considered. Only a few of them did really fly. Therefore the aerodynamic data bases are often not complete, in particular when the projects or programs were more or less abruptly stopped, often due to political decisions. Configurational design studies or the development of demonstrators usually happen with reduced or incomplete aerodynamic data sets. Therefore some data sets base just on the application of one of the following tools: semi-empirical design methods, wind tunnel tests, numerical simulations. In so far a high percentage of the data presented is incomplete and would have to be verified. Flight mechanics needs the aerodynamic coefficients as function of a lot of var...

  5. Giant Peltier Effect in a Submicron-Sized Cu-Ni/Au Junction with Nanometer-Scale Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Atsushi; Kodzuka, Masaya; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ando, Koji; Takanashi, Koki; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Hono, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Akio

    2010-06-01

    We observed a giant Peltier effect in a submicron Cu-Ni/Au junction. The Peltier coefficient was evaluated to be 480 mV at room temperature from the balance between Joule heating and the Peltier cooling effect in the junction, which is 40 times that expected from the Seebeck coefficients of bulk Au and Cu-Ni alloy. This giant cooling effect lowered the inner temperature of the junction by 160 K. Microstructure analysis with a three-dimensional atom probe suggested that the giant Peltier effect possibly originated from nanometer-scale phase separation in the Cu-Ni layer.

  6. Targeting high value metals in lithium-ion battery recycling via shredding and size-based separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Gaustad, Gabrielle; Babbitt, Callie W

    2016-05-01

    Development of lithium-ion battery recycling systems is a current focus of much research; however, significant research remains to optimize the process. One key area not studied is the utilization of mechanical pre-recycling steps to improve overall yield. This work proposes a pre-recycling process, including mechanical shredding and size-based sorting steps, with the goal of potential future scale-up to the industrial level. This pre-recycling process aims to achieve material segregation with a focus on the metallic portion and provide clear targets for subsequent recycling processes. The results show that contained metallic materials can be segregated into different size fractions at different levels. For example, for lithium cobalt oxide batteries, cobalt content has been improved from 35% by weight in the metallic portion before this pre-recycling process to 82% in the ultrafine (6mm). However, size fractions across multiple battery chemistries showed significant variability in material concentration. This finding indicates that sorting by cathode before pre-treatment could reduce the uncertainty of input materials and therefore improve the purity of output streams. Thus, battery labeling systems may be an important step towards implementation of any pre-recycling process.

  7. Mixed matrix membrane incorporated with large pore size halloysite nanotubes (HNT) as filler for gas separation: experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemifard, S A; Ismail, A F; Matsuura, T

    2011-07-15

    This study investigated the gas separation and transport properties of asymmetric mixed matrix membranes (MMM) fabricated from polyetherimide (PEI); Ultem 1000 incorporated with raw and modified halloysite nanotubes (HNT) as filler. The modified HNTs; S-HNTs were prepared by treating HNTs with N-β-(aminoethyl)-γ-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane (AEAPTMS). FESEM, XRD, FTIR, TGA, DSC and pure gas permeation testing were used to characterise the S-HNTs and the fabricated MMMs. In the first part of the experiments, the effect of dope preparation factors such as: ultrasonic sonication period, filler wetting period and priming period were investigated. In the second part, the influence of silane concentration on the fabricated MMMs was studied. Results showed that, increasing the silane concentration, led to higher tendency in HNT agglomeration which resulted in poor separation properties but permeability enhancement. In the last part, the effect of S-HNTs loading was experienced. Our observations showed that the dispersion of nanoparticles decreased with an increase in the S-HNTs loading. Accordingly, 0.5% loading of silylated-HNT yielded the optimum MMMs in terms of permeability (27% increase) and selectivity (8% increase).

  8. Tunable Rare Earth fcu-MOF Platform: Access to Adsorption Kinetics Driven Gas/Vapor Separations via Pore Size Contraction

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Dong-Xu

    2015-03-31

    Reticular chemistry approach was successfully employed to deliberately construct new rare-earth (RE, i.e. Eu3+, Tb3+ and Y3+) fcu metal‒organic frameworks (MOFs) with restricted window apertures. Controlled and selective access to the resultant contracted fcu-MOF pores permits the achievement of the requisite sorbate cut-off ideal for selective adsorption kinetics separation and/or molecular sieving of gases and vapors. Predetermined reaction conditions that permitted the formation in-situ of the 12-connected RE hexanuclear molecular building block (MBB) and the establishment of the RE-fcu-MOF plat-form, especially in the presence of 2-fluorobenzoic acid (2-FBA) as a modulator and a structure directing agent, were used to synthesize isostructural RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOFs based on a relatively bulkier 2-connected bridging ligand, namely 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate (1,4-NDC). The subsequent RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOF structural features, contracted windows/pores and high concentration of open metal sites combined with exceptional hydrothermal and chemical stabilities, yielded nota-ble gas/solvent separation properties, driven mostly by adsorption kinetics as exemplified in this work for n-butane/methane, butanol/methanol and butanol/water pair systems.

  9. Aerodynamic design of the National Rotor Testbed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Christopher Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A new wind turbine blade has been designed for the National Rotor Testbed (NRT) project and for future experiments at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility with a specific focus on scaled wakes. This report shows the aerodynamic design of new blades that can produce a wake that has similitude to utility scale blades despite the difference in size and location in the atmospheric boundary layer. Dimensionless quantities circulation, induction, thrust coefficient, and tip-speed-ratio were kept equal between rotor scales in region 2 of operation. The new NRT design matched the aerodynamic quantities of the most common wind turbine in the United States, the GE 1.5sle turbine with 37c model blades. The NRT blade design is presented along with its performance subject to the winds at SWiFT. The design requirements determined by the SWiFT experimental test campaign are shown to be met.

  10. The separation efficiency of ceramic barrier filters determined at high temperatures by optical particle size and concentration measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmer, G.; Umhauer, H.; Kasper, G. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Mechanische Verfahrenstechnik und Mechanik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Berbner, S. [Freudenberg Nonwovens, Filtration Div., Hopkinsville, KY (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Based on the experiences of earlier investigations a special optical particle counter was developed capable of recording size and quantity (concentration) of the particles directly within a given gas particle stream under the prevailing conditions (true in-situ measurements at high temperatures). In addition to earlier investigations [1], a second type of ceramic filter media with much smaller porosity and a membrane layer on the filtration side was tested. The candles with a length of 1.5 m which are used in industrial applications were mounted in the same hot gas filtration unit already used before. Measurements on the clean gas side at temperatures of up to 1000 C have been conducted using a fraction of quartz particles as test dust. The particle size ranged between 0.3 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m. Filtration velocity (1.5 cm/s) and final pressure drop of dust cake {delta}p (1000 Pa) were kept constant. As a main result the fractional efficiency as function of temperature is discussed and compared with that obtained before for a filter media of type I: The fractional efficiency values of filter type II are at least 100 times higher than that of filter type I. (orig.)

  11. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Martin O L

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design a classical pitch and torque regulator to control rotational speed and power, while the section on structural dynamics has been extended with a simplified mechanical system explaining the phenomena of forward and backward whirling modes. Readers will also benefit from a new chapter on Vertical Axis W

  12. Size-separated sampling and analysis of isocyanates in workplace aerosols. Part I. Denuder--cascade impactor sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Jakob; Spanne, Mårten; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2008-07-01

    Isocyanates in the workplace atmosphere are typically present both in gas and particle phase. The health effects of exposure to isocyanates in gas phase and different particle size fractions are likely to be different due to their ability to reach different parts in the respiratory system. To reveal more details regarding the exposure to isocyanate aerosols, a denuder-impactor (DI) sampler for airborne isocyanates was designed. The sampler consists of a channel-plate denuder for collection of gaseous isocyanates, in series with three-cascade impactor stages with cut-off diameters (d(50)) of 2.5, 1.0 and 0.5 mum. An end filter was connected in series after the impactor for collection of particles smaller than 0.5 mum. The denuder, impactor plates and the end filter were impregnated with a mixture of di-n-butylamine (DBA) and acetic acid for derivatization of the isocyanates. During sampling, the reagent on the impactor plates and the end filter is continuously refreshed, due to the DBA release from the impregnated denuder plates. This secures efficient derivatization of all isocyanate particles. The airflow through the sampler was 5 l min(-1). After sampling, the samples containing the different size fractions were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. The DBA impregnation was stable in the sampler for at least 1 week. After sampling, the DBA derivatives were stable for at least 3 weeks. Air sampling was performed in a test chamber (300 l). Isocyanate aerosols studied were thermal degradation products of different polyurethane polymers, spraying of isocyanate coating compounds and pure gas-phase isocyanates. Sampling with impinger flasks, containing DBA in toluene, with a glass fiber filter in series was used as a reference method. The DI sampler showed good compliance with the reference method, regarding total air levels. For the different aerosols studied, vast differences were revealed in the distribution of isocyanate in gas and

  13. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  14. A high gradient and strength bioseparator with nano-sized immunomagnetic particles for specific separation and efficient concentration of E. coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianhan; Li, Min; Li, Yanbin; Chen, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Sample pretreatment is a key to rapid screening of pathogens for prevention and control of foodborne diseases. Magnetic immunoseparation is a specific method based on antibody-antigen reaction to capture the target bacteria and concentrate them in a smaller-volume buffer. The use of nano-sized magnetic particles could improve the separation efficiency of bacteria but require much higher gradient and strength magnetic field. In this study, a strong magnetic bioseparator with a mean field strength of 1.35 T and a mean gradient of 90 T/m was developed with the use of the 30 nm and 180 nm magnetic particles to specifically separate and efficiently concentrate foodborne bacterial pathogens using Escherichia coli O157:H7 as a model bacterium. The polyclonal antibodies against E. coli were evaluated using Dot ELISA analysis for their good affinity with the target bacteria and then used to modify the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles by 1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC·HCl) method and streptavidin-biotin binding. The magnetic particle concentrations were optimized to be 40 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively, the immunoreaction time was optimized to be 45 min for both sizes of particles, and the separation times were optimized to be 60 min and 2 min for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively. The total magnetic separation time was 2 h and 1 h for the 30 nm and 180 nm particles, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that the bioseparator with the use of either 30 nm or 180 nm immunomagnetic particles could achieve a separation efficiency of >90% for E. coli O157:H7 at the concentrations ranging from 102 to 105 cfu/ml. No obvious interferences from non-target foodborne pathogens, such as SalmonellaTyphimurium and Listeria innocua, were found. For overall consideration of the consuming time, the cost, and the separation efficiency, the 180 nm magnetic particles are practical for rapid

  15. 兆瓦级风电机组叶片气动外形技术研究%Aerodynamic Shape Study of a MW- sized Wind Turbine Blade with Horizontal Axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文芝; 齐向东; 周洁; 巩勇智; 张富海

    2011-01-01

    针对大型风电机组叶片最佳设计攻角、升力系数呈非线性变化问题,基于叶素-动量理论,通过改进Wilson优化算法,从结构及加工角度修正翼型,设计了1.2 MW风电机组叶片的气动外形.通过片条理论进行气动性能的计算,求出不同风速下改变的变化桨距角,得到其功率曲线,证明了用改进的Wilson算法的合理性和以之设计大型风电机组叶片气动外形的可行性.%The optimum design angle of attack for large - scale wind turbine blade and the lift coefficient assumes the nonlinearities change. For such problem, 1.2 MW wind turbine blade's profile is designed based on BEM theory through improving on the Wilson algorithm and correcting the airfoil from the structure and processing angle. By strip theory and the calculation for the aerodynamic performance, the changeable pitch angle varied with different wind speed is solved and the power curve is gotten, which proves the rationality of improving on the Wilson algorithm and the feasibility of designing Aerodynamic shape of large - scale wind turbine blade with horizontal axis.

  16. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  17. Influence of ribs on train aerodynamic performances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Xiu-juan; GAO Guang-jun

    2015-01-01

    The influence of ribs on the train aerodynamic performance was computed using detached eddy simulation (DES), and the transient iteration was solved by the dual-time step lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) method. The results show that the ribs installed on the roof have a great effect on the train aerodynamic performance. Compared with trains without ribs, the lift force coefficient of the train with convex ribs changes from negative to positive, while the side force coefficient increases by 110% and 88%, respectively. Due to the combined effect of the lift force and side force, the overturning moment of the train with convex ribs and cutting ribs increases by 140% and 106%, respectively. There is larger negative pressure on the roof of the train without ribs than that with ribs. The ribs on the train would disturb the flow structure and contribute to the air separation, so the separation starts from the roof, while there is no air separation on the roof of the train without ribs. The ribs can also slow down the flow speed above the roof and make the air easily sucked back to the train surface. The vortices at the leeward side of the train without ribs are small and messy compared with those of the train with convex or cutting ribs.

  18. Improved Aerodynamic Analysis for Hybrid Wing Body Conceptual Design Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of ongoing efforts to develop, evaluate, and validate different tools for improved aerodynamic modeling and systems analysis of Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft configurations. Results are being presented for the evaluation of different aerodynamic tools including panel methods, enhanced panel methods with viscous drag prediction, and computational fluid dynamics. Emphasis is placed on proper prediction of aerodynamic loads for structural sizing as well as viscous drag prediction to develop drag polars for HWB conceptual design optimization. Data from transonic wind tunnel tests at the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel was used as a reference data set in order to evaluate the accuracy of the aerodynamic tools. Triangularized surface data and Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) models of an X-48B 2% scale wind tunnel model were used to generate input and model files for the different analysis tools. In support of ongoing HWB scaling studies within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program, an improved finite element based structural analysis and weight estimation tool for HWB center bodies is currently under development. Aerodynamic results from these analyses are used to provide additional aerodynamic validation data.

  19. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their

  20. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan;

    , and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the current version...... of DVMFLOW in a strip wise fashion. Neglecting the aerodynamic admittance, i.e. the correlation of the instantaneous lift force to the turbulent fluctuations in the vertical velocities, leads to higher response to high frequency atmospheric turbulence than would be obtained from wind tunnel tests....

  1. Study on particle-size separation pretreatment of Bayer red mud%拜耳法赤泥粒径分级预处理的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘万超; 张校申; 江文琛; 朱新锋; 杨家宽

    2011-01-01

    赤泥是从铝土矿中提取氧化铝的过程中产生的工业废渣.分析了拜耳法赤泥的粒径分布,以及主要化学组成和矿物组成在不同粒径赤泥中的变化规律.在此基础上,提出先将赤泥粒径分级预处理,然后根据粗细粒径赤泥的差异分别进行回收利用的思路.研究结果表明,赤泥中粒径大于0.075 mm的粗颗粒以铁、硅、钙为主,实践证明可以通过磁选或重选工艺直接从中回收铁矿;赤泥中粒径小于0.075 mm的细颗粒占赤泥总质量的74.31%,其铝硅比(A/S)由原来的0.81提高到1.08,初步实验证明可以利用还原焙烧-溶出-磁选工艺联合回收铁铝元素.分析认为,该预处理过程具有较好的环境效益.%Red mud is the solid waste generated in alumina extracting process from bauxite. The different chemical compositions and mineral phases in Bayer red mud with different size range were investigated. A size separation pretreatment process followed by recovery of value elements from red mud with different size range was proposed. The results show that iron, silicon and calcium are the three dominating compositions in the large particles ( ≥0. 075 mm) from raw red mud. Iron ore can be directly enriched from the bulk particles by magnetic separation or gravitational separation. The content of small particles ( < 0. 075 mm) in raw red mud is 74.31% by weight. The massive ratio of Al2O3 to SiO2 (A/S) in small particle is improved to 1.08 from 0.81 of raw red mud. Primary experiments show that it is possible to recover Fe and Al from fine red mud by reducing roast-dissolution-magnetic separation technique. And it is believed that the pretreatment process is positive to environment protection.

  2. The influence of the elastic vibration of the carrier to the aerodynamics of the external store in air-launch-to-orbit process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Ye, Zheng-Yin; Wu, Jie

    2016-11-01

    The separation between the carrier and store is one of the most important and difficult phases in Air-launch-to-orbit technology. Based on the previous researches, the interference aerodynamic forces of the store caused by the carrier are obvious in the earlier time during the separation. And the interference aerodynamics will be more complex when considering the elastic deformation of the carrier. Focusing on the conditions that in the earlier time during the separation, the steady and unsteady interference aerodynamic forces of the store are calculated at different angle of attacks and relative distances between the carrier and store. During the calculation, the elastic vibrations of the carrier are considered. According to the cause of formations of the interference aerodynamics, the interference aerodynamic forces of the store are divided into several components. The relative magnitude, change rule, sphere of influence and mechanism of interference aerodynamic forces components of the store are analyzed quantitatively. When the relative distance between the carrier and store is small, the interference aerodynamic forces caused by the elastic vibration of the carrier is about half of the total aerodynamic forces of the store. And as the relative distance increases, the value of interference aerodynamic forces decrease. When the relative distance is larger than twice the mean aerodynamic chord of the carrier, the values of interference aerodynamic forces of the store can be ignored. Besides, under the influence of the steady interference aerodynamic forces, the lift characteristics of the store are worse and the static stability margin is poorer.

  3. Aerodynamic interaction between road deck and rail deck of separate-type highway-railway bridges and its effect on train running performance%分离式公铁双层桥面相互气动干扰及对列车走行性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永乐; 姜孝伟; 苏洋; 李龙安; 廖海黎

    2016-01-01

    There exists aerodynamic interaction between road deck and rail deck of highway-railway bridges under cross wind.In order to investigate the effect of different height intervals between two decks on train running performance, a separate-type highway-railway concrete box girder bridge was taken as an engineering example.The numerical simulation with CFD and the coupled vibration analysis of a wind-vehicle-bridge system were performed to determine train aerodynamic characteristics and to obtain its dynamic response.The results showed that the height interval between two decks has a major influence on train aerodynamic characteristics and its dynamic response;reducing the height interval leads to increase in the train lift coefficient and its vertical acceleration,and the wheel load reduction ratio increases as well;the effect of height intervals between two decks should receive more attention when selecting the optimal height interval in the design of highway-railway bridges.%横向风作用下公铁两用双层桥的上、下桥面间存在相互的气动干扰,为研究公铁两用组合桥间隔高度对列车走行性的影响,针对某分离式公铁两用混凝土箱梁桥,采用计算流体动力学(CFD)数值模拟和风-车-桥耦合振动研究的方法,分析了上、下桥面间隔高度对列车气动特性和车辆动力响应的影响。分析结果表明,公铁两用组合桥间隔高度对列车的气动特性和动力响应影响显著,间隔高度减小,列车升力系数和竖向加速度显著增大,轮重减载率也随之增大。公铁两用组合桥的设计应考虑间隔高度对列车的影响,以选择合理的间隔高度。

  4. Introduction to transonic aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Written to teach students the nature of transonic flow and its mathematical foundation, this book offers a much-needed introduction to transonic aerodynamics. The authors present a quantitative and qualitative assessment of subsonic, supersonic, and transonic flow around bodies in two and three dimensions. The book reviews the governing equations and explores their applications and limitations as employed in modeling and computational fluid dynamics.  Some concepts, such as shock and expansion theory, are examined from a numerical perspective. Others, including shock-boundary-layer interaction, are discussed from a qualitative point of view. The book includes 60 examples and more than 200 practice problems. The authors also offer analytical methods such as Method of Characteristics (MOC) that allow readers to practice with the subject matter.  The result is a wealth of insight into transonic flow phenomena and their impact on aircraft design, including compressibility effects, shock and expansion waves, sho...

  5. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design...... Turbines (VAWT). Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element Momentum method...... is also covered, as are eigenmodes and the dynamic behaviour of a turbine. The book describes the effects of the dynamics and how this can be modelled in an aeroelastic code, which is widely used in the design and verification of modern wind turbines. Furthermore, it examines how to calculate...

  6. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  7. Size separations of starch of different botanical origin studied by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlund, Karl-Gustav; Leeman, Mats; Santacruz, Stalin

    2011-02-01

    Asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation combined with multiangle light scattering and refractive index detection has been revealed to be a powerful tool for starch characterization. It is based on size separation according to the hydrodynamic diameter of the starch components. Starch from a wide range of different botanical sources were studied, including normal starch and high-amylose and high-amylopectin starch. The starch was dissolved by heat treatment at elevated pressure in a laboratory autoclave. This gave clear solutions with no granular residues. Amylose retrogradation was prevented by using freshly dissolved samples. Programmed cross flow starting at 1.0 mL min(-1) and decreasing exponentially with a half-life of 4 min was utilised. The starches showed two size populations representing mainly amylose and mainly amylopectin with an overlapping region where amylose and amylopectin were possibly co-eluted. Most of the first population had molar masses below 10(6) g mol(-1), and most of the second size population had molar masses above 10(7) g mol(-1). Large differences were found in the relative amounts of the two populations, the molar mass, and hydrodynamic diameters, depending on the plant source and its varieties.

  8. System Identification and POD Method Applied to Unsteady Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Deman; Kholodar, Denis; Juang, Jer-Nan; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The representation of unsteady aerodynamic flow fields in terms of global aerodynamic modes has proven to be a useful method for reducing the size of the aerodynamic model over those representations that use local variables at discrete grid points in the flow field. Eigenmodes and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) modes have been used for this purpose with good effect. This suggests that system identification models may also be used to represent the aerodynamic flow field. Implicit in the use of a systems identification technique is the notion that a relative small state space model can be useful in describing a dynamical system. The POD model is first used to show that indeed a reduced order model can be obtained from a much larger numerical aerodynamical model (the vortex lattice method is used for illustrative purposes) and the results from the POD and the system identification methods are then compared. For the example considered, the two methods are shown to give comparable results in terms of accuracy and reduced model size. The advantages and limitations of each approach are briefly discussed. Both appear promising and complementary in their characteristics.

  9. Naval Aerodynamics Test Facility (NATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NATF specializes in Aerodynamics testing of scaled and fullsized Naval models, research into flow physics found on US Navy planes and ships, aerosol testing and...

  10. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  11. Introduction to wind turbine aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffarczyk, Alois Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wind-Turbine Aerodynamics is a self-contained textbook which shows how to come from the basics of fluid mechanics to modern wind turbine blade design. It presents a fundamentals of fluid dynamics and inflow conditions, and gives a extensive introduction into theories describing the aerodynamics of wind turbines. After introducing experiments the book applies the knowledge to explore the impact on blade design.The book is an introduction for professionals and students of very varying levels.

  12. The space shuttle ascent vehicle aerodynamic challenges configuration design and data base development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, C. C.; Young, J. C.; Roberts, B. B.; Craig, M. K.; Hamilton, J. T.; Boyle, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    The phase B Space Shuttle systems definition studies resulted in a generic configuration consisting of a delta wing orbiter, and two solid rocket boosters (SRB) attached to an external fuel tank (ET). The initial challenge facing the aerodynamic community was aerodynamically optimizing, within limits, this configuration. As the Shuttle program developed and the sensitivities of the vehicle to aerodynamics were better understood the requirements of the aerodynamic data base grew. Adequately characterizing the vehicle to support the various design studies exploded the size of the data base to proportions that created a data modeling/management challenge for the aerodynamicist. The ascent aerodynamic data base originated primarily from wind tunnel test results. The complexity of the configuration rendered conventional analytic methods of little use. Initial wind tunnel tests provided results which included undesirable effects from model support tructure, inadequate element proximity, and inadequate plume simulation. The challenge to improve the quality of test results by determining the extent of these undesirable effects and subsequently develop testing techniques to eliminate them was imposed on the aerodynamic community. The challenges to the ascent aerodynamics community documented are unique due to the aerodynamic complexity of the Shuttle launch. Never before was such a complex vehicle aerodynamically characterized. The challenges were met with innovative engineering analyses/methodology development and wind tunnel testing techniques.

  13. Aerodynamic performances of cruise missile flying above local terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A.; Saad, M. R.; Che Idris, A.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Sujipto, S.

    2016-10-01

    Cruise missile can be classified as a smart bomb and also Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) due to its ability to move and manoeuvre by itself without a pilot. Cruise missile flies in constant velocity in cruising stage. Malaysia is one of the consumers of cruise missiles that are imported from other nations, which can have distinct geographic factors including their local terrains compared to Malaysia. Some of the aerodynamic performances of missile such as drag and lift coefficients can be affected by the local geographic conditions in Malaysia, which is different from the origin nation. Therefore, a detailed study must be done to get aerodynamic performance of cruise missiles that operate in Malaysia. The effect of aerodynamic angles such as angle of attack and side slip can be used to investigate the aerodynamic performances of cruise missile. Hence, subsonic wind tunnel testings were conducted to obtain the aerodynamic performances of the missile at various angle of attack and sideslip angles. Smoke visualization was also performed to visualize the behaviour of flow separation. The optimum angle of attack found was at α=21° and side slip, β=10° for optimum pitching and yawing motion of cruise missile.

  14. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  15. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  16. Comparison of quartz and Teflon filters for simultaneous collection of size-separated ultrafine aerosol particles and gas-phase zero samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Ruiz-Jimenez, Jose; Petäjä, Tuukka; Hartonen, Kari; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2011-07-01

    In this research, the two most common filter media, quartz and Teflon, were tested to obtain information about the possible adsorption of gas-phase compounds onto filters during long sample collection of atmospheric aerosols. Particles of nanometer-size for off-line chemical characterization were collected using a recently introduced differential mobility analyzer for size separation. Samples were collected at an urban site (Helsinki, SMEARIII station) during spring 2010. Sampling time was 4 to 10 days for particles 50, 40, or 30 nm in diameter. Sample air flow was 4 L/min. The sampling setup was arranged so that two samples were obtained for each sampling period almost simultaneously: one containing particles and adsorbed gas-phase compounds and one containing adsorbed gas-phase compounds only. Filters were extracted and analyzed for the presence of selected carboxylic acids, polyols, nitrogen-containing compounds, and aldehydes. The results showed that, in quartz filter samples, gas-phase adsorption may be responsible for as much as 100% of some compound masses. Whether quartz or Teflon, simultaneous collection of gas-phase zero samples is essential during the whole sampling period. The dependence of the adsorption of gas-phase compounds on vapor pressure and the effect of adsorption on the deposited aerosol layer are discussed.

  17. Aerodynamic Characteristic of the Active Compliant Trailing Edge Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Rui; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli; Li, Dawei

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel Morphing Wing structure known as the Active Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE). ACTE structures are designed using the concept of “distributed compliance” and wing skins of ACTE are fabricated from high-strength fiberglass composites laminates. Through the relative sliding between upper and lower wing skins which are connected by a linear guide pairs, the wing is able to achieve a large continuous deformation. In order to present an investigation about aerodynamics and noise characteristics of ACTE, a series of 2D airfoil analyses are established. The aerodynamic characteristics between ACTE and conventional deflection airfoil are analyzed and compared, and the impacts of different ACTE structure design parameters on aerodynamic characteristics are discussed. The airfoils mentioned above include two types (NACA0012 and NACA64A005.92). The computing results demonstrate that: compared with the conventional plane flap airfoil, the morphing wing using ACTE structures has the capability to improve aerodynamic characteristic and flow separation characteristic. In order to study the noise level of ACTE, flow field analysis using LES model is done to provide noise source data, and then the FW-H method is used to get the far field noise levels. The simulation results show that: compared with the conventional flap/aileron airfoil, the ACTE configuration is better to suppress the flow separation and lower the overall sound pressure level.

  18. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan

    , and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the current version...... of DVMFLOW in a strip wise fashion. Neglecting the aerodynamic admittance, i.e. the correlation of the instantaneous lift force to the turbulent fluctuations in the vertical velocities, leads to higher response to high frequency atmospheric turbulence than would be obtained from wind tunnel tests....... In the present work we have extended the laminar oncoming flow in DVMFLOW to a turbulent one, modelled by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles synthesized from prescribed atmospheric turbulence velocity spectra [3] . The discrete spectrum is sampled from the continuous spectrum subject to a lower cutoff...

  19. Aerodynamic Design of a Locomotive Fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Chad; Maynes, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Rising fuel cost has motivated increased fuel efficiency of freight trains. At cruising speed, the largest contributing factor to the fuel consumption is the aerodynamic drag. As a result of air stagnation at the front of the train and substantial flow separation behind, the leading locomotive and trailing railcar experience greater drag than intermediate cars. This work introduces the design of streamlined nose fairings to be attached to freight locomotives as a means of reducing the leading locomotive drag. The aerodynamic performance of each fairing design is modeled using a commercial CFD software package. The K-epsilon turbulence model is used, and fluid properties are equivalent to atmospheric air at standard conditions. A selection of isolated screening studies are performed, and a multidimensional regression is used to predict optimal-performing fairing designs. Between screening studies, careful examination of the flow field is performed to inspire subsequent fairing designs. Results are presented for 250 different nose fairings. The best performing fairing geometry predicts a nominal drag reduction of 17% on the lead locomotive in a train set. This drag reduction is expected to result in nearly 1% fuel savings for the entire train.

  20. Fundamentals of modern unsteady aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gülçat, Ülgen

    2016-01-01

    In this book, the author introduces the concept of unsteady aerodynamics and its underlying principles. He provides the readers with a comprehensive review of the fundamental physics of free and forced unsteadiness, the terminology and basic equations of aerodynamics ranging from incompressible flow to hypersonics. The book also covers modern topics related to the developments made in recent years, especially in relation to wing flapping for propulsion. The book is written for graduate and senior year undergraduate students in aerodynamics and also serves as a reference for experienced researchers. Each chapter includes ample examples, questions, problems and relevant references.   The treatment of these modern topics has been completely revised end expanded for the new edition. It now includes new numerical examples, a section on the ground effect, and state-space representation.

  1. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics: Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second subj

  2. Rotor/body aerodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzina, M. D.; Smith, C. A.; Shinoda, P.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in which independent, steady state aerodynamic forces and moments were measured on a 2.24 m diam. two bladed helicopter rotor and on several different bodies. The mutual interaction effects for variations in velocity, thrust, tip-path-plane angle of attack, body angle of attack, rotor/body position, and body geometry were determined. The results show that the body longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of a rotor and hub, and that the hub interference may be a major part of such interaction. The effects of the body on the rotor performance are presented.

  3. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  4. The aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels

    2013-01-01

    In the paper we present state-of-the-art of research in wind turbine aerodynamics. We start be giving a brief historical review and a survey over aerodynamic research in wind energy. Next, we focus on some recent research results obtained by our wind energy group at Department of Mechanical...... Engineering at DTU. In particular, we show some new results on the classical problem of the ideal rotor and present a series of new results from an on-going research project dealing with the modelling and simulation of turbulent flow structures in the wake behind wind turbines....

  5. Aerodynamics and flight performance of flapping wing micro air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silin, Dmytro

    Research efforts in this dissertation address aerodynamics and flight performance of flapping wing aircraft (ornithopters). Flapping wing aerodynamics was studied for various wing sizes, flapping frequencies, airspeeds, and angles of attack. Tested wings possessed both camber and dihedral. Experimental results were analyzed in the framework of momentum theory. Aerodynamic coefficients and Reynolds number are defined using a reference velocity as a vector sum of a freestream velocity and a strokeaveraged wingtip velocity. No abrupt stall was observed in flapping wings for the angle of attack up to vertical. If was found that in the presence of a freestream lift of a flapping wing in vertical position is higher than the propulsive thrust. Camber and dihedral increased both lift and thrust. Lift-curve slope, and maximum lift coefficient increased with Reynolds number. Performance model of an ornithopter was developed. Parametric studies of steady level flight of ornithopters with, and without a tail were performed. A model was proposed to account for wing-sizing effects during hover. Three micro ornithopter designs were presented. Ornithopter flight testing and data-logging was performed using a telemetry acquisition system, as well as motion capture technology. The ability of ornithopter for a sustained flight and a presence of passive aerodynamic stability were shown. Flight data were compared with performance simulations. Close agreement in terms of airspeed and flapping frequency was observed.

  6. Diving-flight aerodynamics of a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ponitz

    Full Text Available This study investigates the aerodynamics of the falcon Falco peregrinus while diving. During a dive peregrines can reach velocities of more than 320 km h⁻¹. Unfortunately, in freely roaming falcons, these high velocities prohibit a precise determination of flight parameters such as velocity and acceleration as well as body shape and wing contour. Therefore, individual F. peregrinus were trained to dive in front of a vertical dam with a height of 60 m. The presence of a well-defined background allowed us to reconstruct the flight path and the body shape of the falcon during certain flight phases. Flight trajectories were obtained with a stereo high-speed camera system. In addition, body images of the falcon were taken from two perspectives with a high-resolution digital camera. The dam allowed us to match the high-resolution images obtained from the digital camera with the corresponding images taken with the high-speed cameras. Using these data we built a life-size model of F. peregrinus and used it to measure the drag and lift forces in a wind-tunnel. We compared these forces acting on the model with the data obtained from the 3-D flight path trajectory of the diving F. peregrinus. Visualizations of the flow in the wind-tunnel uncovered details of the flow structure around the falcon's body, which suggests local regions with separation of flow. High-resolution pictures of the diving peregrine indicate that feathers pop-up in the equivalent regions, where flow separation in the model falcon occurred.

  7. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  8. Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D.A. [R. Lynette & amp; Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

  9. Application of neural networks to unsteady aerodynamic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, William E.; Schreck, Scott J.; Luttges, Marvin W.

    1994-01-01

    The problem under consideration in this viewgraph presentation is to understand, predict, and control the fluid mechanics of dynamic maneuvers, unsteady boundary layers, and vortex dominated flows. One solution is the application of neural networks demonstrating closed-loop control. Neural networks offer unique opportunities: simplify modeling of three dimensional, vortex dominated, unsteady separated flow fields; are effective means for controlling unsteady aerodynamics; and address integration of sensors, controllers, and time lags into adaptive control systems.

  10. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  11. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  12. EBF noise suppression and aerodynamic penalties. [Externally Blown Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinzie, L. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic tests were conducted at model scale to determine the noise produced in the flyover and sideline planes at reduced separation distances between the nozzle exhaust plane and the flaps of an under-the-wing (UTW) externally blown flap (EBF) configuration in its approach attitude. Tests were also made to determine the noise suppression effectiveness of two types of passive devices which were located on the jet impingement surfaces of the configuration. In addition, static aerodynamic performance data were obtained to evaluate the penalties produced by these suppression devices. Broadband low frequency noise reductions were achieved by reducing the separation distance between the nozzle and flaps. However, mid and high frequency noise was produced which exceeded that of the reference configuration. Two passive noise suppression devices located on the flaps produced moderate to large noise reductions at reduced separation distances. Consideration of the static aerodynamic performance data obtained for the configurations tested suggests that specific broadband noise suppression characteristics may be obtained through a trade-off with aerodynamic performance penalties by the careful selection of suppression devices.

  13. Mechanism of unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of an elliptic airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of elliptic airfoil are quite different from the case of conventional airfoil for Reynolds number varying from about 104 to 106. In order to reveal the fundamental mechanism, the unsteady flow around a stationary two-dimensional elliptic airfoil with 16% relative thickness has been simulated using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations and the γ-Reθt‾ transition turbulence model at different angles of attack for flow Reynolds number of 5 × 105. The aerodynamic coefficients and the pressure distribution obtained by computation are in good agreement with experimental data, which indicates that the numerical method works well. Through this study, the mechanism of the unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil is analyzed and discussed based on the computational predictions coupled with the wind tunnel results. It is considered that the boundary layer transition at the leading edge and the unsteady flow separation vortices at the trailing edge are the causes of the case. Furthermore, a valuable insight into the physics of how the flow behavior affects the elliptic airfoil’s aerodynamics is provided.

  14. 碳点的制备与柱层析尺寸分离%The synthesis and size separation by gel column of carbon dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨梅; 王佩瑶; 王珊; 李艳杰; 王珍妮; 侯雨

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) are a new class of quantum dot‐similar fluorescent nanomaterials ,which have unique luminescent properties ,such as excitation‐dependent emission and upconversion photolu‐minescence .In this work ,we synthesized two kinds of CDs with different quantum yields by a hy‐drothermal method and found that CDs with a lower quantum yield had excitation‐dependent emission behavior .The CDs were further separated with column chromatography and we explored the lumi‐nescent properties of the components .It was observed the excitation and emission spectra of CDs ex‐perienced blue shifting along with size decrease of CDs .These results indicated that excitation‐de‐pendent emission and upconversion photoluminescence of CDs were related to their size distribution . Their advantages such as size‐dependent photoluminescence properties ,multi‐colored marking ,high luminescence intensity and photochemical stability make CDs potential applications in biological fields .%碳点(CDs)是一种新的类似量子点的荧光纳米材料,具有激发波长依赖性和上转换发光性等性质。碳点的这种发光特性可能与它的尺寸分布有关。本文采用水热法合成了2种不同量子产率的碳点,发现低量子产率的碳点具有波长调制性质,通过柱层析技术对该碳点进一步尺寸分离,并考察各组分的发光性质。结果表明:分离前后所得的碳点具有不同的激发波长、发射波长和量子产率,且随尺寸的减小波长蓝移、量子产率降低,说明柱层析技术能基本实现碳点中不同尺寸组分的分离,并且证明碳点的发光性质与其尺寸有关。碳点这种尺寸依赖的光学特性使其可能成为一种新型的荧光标记物,可进行多色标记,并且发光强度高,光稳定性好,在生物科学领域具有潜在的应用价值。

  15. Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

    1977-12-01

    This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

  16. A New Aerodynamic Data Dispersion Method for Launch Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for implementing aerodynamic data dispersion analysis is herein introduced. A general mathematical approach combined with physical modeling tailored to the aerodynamic quantity of interest enables the generation of more realistically relevant dispersed data and, in turn, more reasonable flight simulation results. The method simultaneously allows for the aerodynamic quantities and their derivatives to be dispersed given a set of non-arbitrary constraints, which stresses the controls model in more ways than with the traditional bias up or down of the nominal data within the uncertainty bounds. The adoption and implementation of this new method within the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Project has resulted in significant increases in predicted roll control authority, and lowered the induced risks for flight test operations. One direct impact on launch vehicles is a reduced size for auxiliary control systems, and the possibility of an increased payload. This technique has the potential of being applied to problems in multiple areas where nominal data together with uncertainties are used to produce simulations using Monte Carlo type random sampling methods. It is recommended that a tailored physics-based dispersion model be delivered with any aerodynamic product that includes nominal data and uncertainties, in order to make flight simulations more realistic and allow for leaner spacecraft designs.

  17. The effects of corrugation and wing planform on the aerodynamic force production of sweeping model insect wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoyu Luo; Mao Sun

    2005-01-01

    The effects of corrugation and wing planform (shape and aspect ratio) on the aerodynamic force production of model insect wings in sweeping (rotating after an initial start) motion at Reynolds number 200 and 3500 at angle of attack 40° are investigated, using the method of computational fluid dynamics. A representative wing corrugation is considered. Wing-shape and aspect ratio (AR) of ten representative insect wings are considered; they are the wings of fruit fly, cranefly, dronefly, hoverfly, ladybird, bumblebee, honeybee, lacewing (forewing), hawkmoth and dragonfly (forewing), respectively (AR of these wings varies greatly,from 2.84 to 5.45). The following facts are shown.(1) The corrugated and flat-plate wings produce approximately the same aerodynamic forces. This is because for a sweeping wing at large angle of attack, the length scale of the corrugation is much smaller than the size of the separated flow region or the size of the leading edge vortex (LEV). (2) The variation in wing shape can have considerable effects on the aerodynamic force; but it has only minor effects on the force coefficients when the velocity at r2 (the radius of the second moment of wing area) is used as the reference velocity; i.e.the force coefficients are almost unaffected by the variation in wing shape. (3) The effects of AR are remarkably small:when AR increases from 2.8 to 5.5, the force coefficients vary only slightly; flowfield results show that when AR is relatively large, the part of the LEV on the outer part of the wings sheds during the sweeping motion. As AR is increased, on one hand,the force coefficients will be increased due to the reduction of 3-dimensional flow effects; on the other hand, they will be decreased due to the shedding of pan of the LEV; these two effects approximately cancel each other, resulting in only minor change of the force coefficients.

  18. Studies on aerodynamic interferences between the components of transport airplane using unstructured Navier-Stokes simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.; Ye, Z. [Northwestern Polytechnical Univ., National Key Lab. of Aerodynamic Design and Research, Xi' an (China)]. E-mail: wanggang@nwpu.edu.cn; yezy@nwpu.edu.cn

    2005-07-01

    It is well known that the aerodynamic interference flows widely exist between the components of conventional transport airplane, for example, the wing-fuselage juncture flow, wing-pylon-nacelle flow and tail-fuselage juncture flow. The main characteristic of these aerodynamic interferences is flow separation, which will increase the drag, reduce the lift and cause adverse influence on the stability and controllability of the airplane. Therefore, the modern civil transport designers should do their best to eliminate negative effects of aerodynamic interferences, which demands that the aerodynamic interferences between the aircraft components should be predicted and analyzed accurately. Today's CFD techniques provide us powerful and efficient analysis tools to achieve this objective. In this paper, computational investigations of the interferences between transport aircraft components have been carried out by using a viscous flow solver based on mixed element type unstructured meshes. (author)

  19. Wind Tunnel Tests on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Advanced Solid Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Keiichiro; Nonaka, Satoshi; Irikado, Tomoko; Fukuzoe, Moriyasu; Shima, Eiji

    The Advanced Solid Rocket is being developed by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Since its configuration has been changed very recently, its aerodynamic characteristics are of great interest of the JAXA Advanced Solid Rocket Team. In this study, we carried out wind tunnel tests on the aerodynamic characteristics of the present configuration for Mach 1.5. Six test cases were conducted with different body configurations, attack angles, and roll angles. A six component balance, oilflow visualization, Schlieren images were used throughout the experiments. It was found that, at zero angle-of-attack, the flow around the body were perturbed and its drag (axial force) characteristics were significantly influenced by protruding body components such as flanges, cable ducts, and attitude control units of SMSJ (Solid Motor Side Jet), while the nozzle had a minor role. With angle-of-attack of five degree, normal force of CNα = 3.50±0.03 was measured along with complex flow features observed in the full-component model; whereas no crossflow separations were induced around the no-protuberance model with CNα = 2.58±0.10. These values were almost constant with respect to the angle-of-attack in both of the cases. Furthermore, presence of roll angle made the flow more complicated, involving interactions of separation vortices. These data provide us with fundamental and important aerodynamic insights of the Advanced Solid Rocket, and they will be utilized as reference data for the corresponding numerical analysis.

  20. Simulating Magneto-Aerodynamic Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-20

    2005. 19. Boeuf, J.P., Lagmich, Y., Callegari, Th., and Pitchford , L.C., Electro- hydrodynamic Force and Acceleration in Surface Discharge, AIAA 2006...Plasmadynamics and Laser Award, 2004 AFRL Point of Contact Dr. Donald B. Paul , AFRL/VA WPAFB, OH 937-255-7329, met weekly. Dr. Alan Garscadden, AFRL/PR...validating database for numerical simulation of magneto-aerodynamic actuator for hypersonic flow control. Points of contact at the AFRL/VA are Dr. D. Paul

  1. Experimental Research of Influence of a Relative Particles Positioning in a Gas Stream on Characteristics of their Aerodynamic Traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkov Roman S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cycle of experimental studies on determination of length of aerodynamic traces of the particles which are flowed round by an air stream is executed. When carrying out researches, panoramic optical methods for diagnostics of multiphase flows of PIV and PTV were used. Velocities of an air flow were varied in the range of 1-3 m/s. The sizes of particles changed from 1mm to 5 mm. The defining influence of the sizes of particles and velocities of an air stream on length of aerodynamic traces is established. Influence of a relative positioning of particles on features of formation of an aerodynamic trace is shown.

  2. Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities, Equipment, and Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The following facilities, equipment, and capabilities are available in the Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities and Equipment (1) Subsonic, open-jet wind tunnel with...

  3. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project will focus on the development and demonstration of hypersonic inflatable aeroshell technologies...

  4. Review paper on wind turbine aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the development and description of the aerodynamic models used to estimate the aerodynamic loads on wind turbine constructions. This includes a status of the capabilities of computation fluid dynamics and the need for reliable airfoil data for the simpler engineering models....... Also a discussion of the use of passive and active aerodynamic devices is included such as, e.g., Vortex Generators and distributed active flaps. Finally the problem of wakes in wind farms is addressed and a section of the likely future development of aerodynamic models for wind turbines is included...

  5. Aerodynamic Aspects of Wind Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the most important aerodynamic research topics in the field of wind energy. Wind turbine aerodynamics concerns the modeling and prediction of aerodynamic forces, such as performance predictions of wind farms, and the design of specific parts of wind turbines, such as rotor......-blade geometry. The basics of the blade-element momentum theory are presented along with guidelines for the construction of airfoil data. Various theories for aerodynamically optimum rotors are discussed, and recent results on classical models are presented. State-of-the-art advanced numerical simulation tools...

  6. Mechanics and aerodynamics of insect flight control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G K

    2001-11-01

    Insects have evolved sophisticated fight control mechanisms permitting a remarkable range of manoeuvres. Here, I present a qualitative analysis of insect flight control from the perspective of flight mechanics, drawing upon both the neurophysiology and biomechanics literatures. The current literature does not permit a formal, quantitative analysis of flight control, because the aerodynamic force systems that biologists have measured have rarely been complete and the position of the centre of gravity has only been recorded in a few studies. Treating the two best-known insect orders (Diptera and Orthoptera) separately from other insects, I discuss the control mechanisms of different insects in detail. Recent experimental studies suggest that the helicopter model of flight control proposed for Drosophila spp. may be better thought of as a facultative strategy for flight control, rather than the fixed (albeit selected) constraint that it is usually interpreted to be. On the other hand, the so-called 'constant-lift reaction' of locusts appears not to be a reflex for maintaining constant lift at varying angles of attack, as is usually assumed, but rather a mechanism to restore the insect to pitch equilibrium following a disturbance. Differences in the kinematic control mechanisms used by the various insect orders are related to differences in the arrangement of the wings, the construction of the flight motor and the unsteady mechanisms of lift production that are used. Since the evolution of insect flight control is likely to have paralleled the evolutionary refinement of these unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms, taxonomic differences in the kinematics of control could provide an assay of the relative importance of different unsteady mechanisms. Although the control kinematics vary widely between orders, the number of degrees of freedom that different insects can control will always be limited by the number of independent control inputs that they use. Control of the moments

  7. Experimental Research on Flow Separation Control using Synthetic Jet Actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, E.; Hoeijmakers, H.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Airplane wings can suffer from flow separation, which greatly decreases their aerodynamic per-formance. The flow separates due to the bound-ary layer possessing insufficient momentum to engage the adverse pressure gradient along the airfoil surface. Flow separation control actively influences the fl

  8. Experimental research on flow separation control using synthetic jet actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, E.; Hoeijmakers, H.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Airplane wings can suffer from flow separation, which greatly decreases their aerodynamic per-formance. The flow separates due to the bound-ary layer possessing insufficient momentum to engage the adverse pressure gradient along the airfoil surface. Flow separation control actively influences the fl

  9. Bayesian inference of nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics from aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, Rimple [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Poirel, Dominique [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Pettit, Chris [Department of Aerospace Engineering, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Khalil, Mohammad [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Sarkar, Abhijit, E-mail: abhijit.sarkar@carleton.ca [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    A Bayesian model selection and parameter estimation algorithm is applied to investigate the influence of nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamic loads on the limit cycle oscillation (LCO) of a pitching airfoil in the transitional Reynolds number regime. At small angles of attack, laminar boundary layer trailing edge separation causes negative aerodynamic damping leading to the LCO. The fluid–structure interaction of the rigid, but elastically mounted, airfoil and nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics is represented by two coupled nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations containing uncertain parameters and model approximation errors. Several plausible aerodynamic models with increasing complexity are proposed to describe the aeroelastic system leading to LCO. The likelihood in the posterior parameter probability density function (pdf) is available semi-analytically using the extended Kalman filter for the state estimation of the coupled nonlinear structural and unsteady aerodynamic model. The posterior parameter pdf is sampled using a parallel and adaptive Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The posterior probability of each model is estimated using the Chib–Jeliazkov method that directly uses the posterior MCMC samples for evidence (marginal likelihood) computation. The Bayesian algorithm is validated through a numerical study and then applied to model the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic loads using wind-tunnel test data at various Reynolds numbers.

  10. Bayesian inference of nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics from aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Rimple; Poirel, Dominique; Pettit, Chris; Khalil, Mohammad; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    A Bayesian model selection and parameter estimation algorithm is applied to investigate the influence of nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamic loads on the limit cycle oscillation (LCO) of a pitching airfoil in the transitional Reynolds number regime. At small angles of attack, laminar boundary layer trailing edge separation causes negative aerodynamic damping leading to the LCO. The fluid-structure interaction of the rigid, but elastically mounted, airfoil and nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics is represented by two coupled nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations containing uncertain parameters and model approximation errors. Several plausible aerodynamic models with increasing complexity are proposed to describe the aeroelastic system leading to LCO. The likelihood in the posterior parameter probability density function (pdf) is available semi-analytically using the extended Kalman filter for the state estimation of the coupled nonlinear structural and unsteady aerodynamic model. The posterior parameter pdf is sampled using a parallel and adaptive Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The posterior probability of each model is estimated using the Chib-Jeliazkov method that directly uses the posterior MCMC samples for evidence (marginal likelihood) computation. The Bayesian algorithm is validated through a numerical study and then applied to model the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic loads using wind-tunnel test data at various Reynolds numbers.

  11. Biomimetic Approach for Accurate, Real-Time Aerodynamic Coefficients Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodynamic and structural reliability and efficiency depends critically on the ability to accurately assess the aerodynamic loads and moments for each lifting...

  12. High angle of attack aerodynamics subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Rom, Josef

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamics of aircraft at high angles of attack is a subject which is being pursued diligently, because the modern agile fighter aircraft and many of the current generation of missiles must perform well at very high incidence, near and beyond stall. However, a comprehensive presentation of the methods and results applicable to the studies of the complex aerodynamics at high angle of attack has not been covered in monographs or textbooks. This book is not the usual textbook in that it goes beyond just presenting the basic theoretical and experimental know-how, since it contains reference material to practical calculation methods and technical and experimental results which can be useful to the practicing aerospace engineers and scientists. It can certainly be used as a text and reference book for graduate courses on subjects related to high angles of attack aerodynamics and for topics related to three-dimensional separation in viscous flow courses. In addition, the book is addressed to the aerodynamicist...

  13. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  14. Migration on Wings Aerodynamics and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kantha, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    This book is an effort to explore the technical aspects associated with bird flight and migration on wings. After a short introduction on the birds migration, the book reviews the aerodynamics and Energetics of Flight and presents the calculation of the Migration Range. In addition, the authors explains aerodynamics of the formation flight and finally introduces great flight diagrams.

  15. Aerodynamic seal assemblies for turbo-machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Wolfe, Christopher; Fang, Biao

    2015-09-29

    The present application provides an aerodynamic seal assembly for use with a turbo-machine. The aerodynamic seal assembly may include a number of springs, a shoe connected to the springs, and a secondary seal positioned about the springs and the shoe.

  16. Aerodynamics of wind turbines emerging topics

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines with topics ranging from Fundamental to Application of horizontal axis wind turbines, this book presents advanced topics including: Basic Theory for Wind turbine Blade Aerodynamics, Computational Methods, and Special Structural Reinforcement Technique for Wind Turbine Blades.

  17. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag

  18. Building Integrated Active Flow Control: Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Tall Buildings Using Fluid-Based Aerodynamic Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicovich, David

    material and energy consumption profiles of tall building. To date, the increasing use of light-weight and high-strength materials in tall buildings, with greater flexibility and reduced damping, has increased susceptibility to dynamic wind load effects that limit the gains afforded by incorporating these new materials. Wind, particularly fluctuating wind and its interaction with buildings induces two main responses; alongwind - in the direction of the flow and crosswind - perpendicular to the flow. The main risk associated with this vulnerability is resonant oscillations induced by von-Karman-like vortex shedding at or near the natural frequency of the structure caused by flow separation. Dynamic wind loading effects often increase with a power of wind speed greater than 3, thus increasingly, tall buildings pay a significant price in material to increase the natural frequency and/or the damping to overcome this response. In particular, crosswind response often governs serviceability (human habitability) design criteria of slender buildings. Currently, reducing crosswind response relies on a Solid-based Aerodynamic Modification (SAM), either by changing structural or geometric characteristics such as the tower shape or through the addition of damping systems. While this approach has merit it has two major drawbacks: firstly, the loss of valuable rentable areas and high construction costs due to increased structural requirements for mass and stiffness, further contributing towards the high consumption of non-renewable resources by the commercial building sector. For example, in order to insure human comfort within an acceptable range of crosswind response induced accelerations at the top of a building, an aerodynamically efficient plan shape comes at the expense of floor area. To compensate for the loss of valuable area compensatory stories are required, resulting in an increase in wind loads and construction costs. Secondly, a limited, if at all, ability to adaptively

  19. Measured Aerodynamic Interaction of Two Tiltrotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Wadcock, Alan J.; Derby, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic interaction of two model tilrotors in helicopter-mode formation flight is investigated. Three cenarios representing tandem level flight, tandem operations near the ground, and a single tiltrotor operating above thc ground for varying winds are examined. The effect of aircraft separation distance on the thrust and rolling moment of the trailing aircraft with and without the presence of a ground plane are quantified. Without a ground plane, the downwind aircraft experiences a peak rolling moment when the right (left) roto- of the upwind aircraft is laterally aligned with the left (right) rotor of the downwind aircraft. The presence of the ground plane causes the peak rolling moment on the downwind aircraft to occur when the upwind aircraft is further outboard of the downwind aircraft. Ground plane surface flow visualization images obtained using rufts and oil are used to understand mutual interaction between the two aircraft. These data provide guidance in determining tiltrotor flight formations which minimize disturbance to the trailing aircraft.

  20. Nonlinear prediction of the aerodynamic loads on lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, O. A.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    A numerical procedure is used to predict the nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics of lifting surfaces of low aspect ratio at high angles of attack for low subsonic Mach numbers. The procedure utilizes a vortex-lattice method and accounts for separation at sharp tips and leading edges. The shapes of the wakes emanating from the edges are predicted, and hence the nonlinear characteristics are calculated. Parallelogram and delta wings are presented as numerical examples. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S N Maitra

    2000-10-01

    The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating ratesto the wetted area and to the nose of the missile are also investigated. Finally four numerical examples are cited to estimate the errors, in heat transfers and heating ratesto both wetted area and nose region of the missile, arising out of neglecting the gravitational forces.

  2. Effect of Moving Surface on NACA 63218 Aerodynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahiaoui Tayeb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 63218 airfoil by using moving surface. Different numerical cases are considered: the first one is the numerical simulation of non-modified airfoil NACA 63218 according at different angle of attack and the second one a set of moving cylinder is placed on leading edge of the airfoil. The rotational velocity of the cylinder is varied to establish the effect of momentum injection on modified airfoil aerodynamic performances. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model.

  3. A Survey of Theoretical and Experimental Coaxial Rotor Aerodynamic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Colin P.

    1997-01-01

    The recent appearance of the Kamov Ka-50 helicopter and the application of coaxial rotors to unmanned aerial vehicles have renewed international interest in the coaxial rotor configuration. This report addresses the aerodynamic issues peculiar to coaxial rotors by surveying American, Russian, Japanese, British, and German research. (Herein, 'coaxial rotors' refers to helicopter, not propeller, rotors. The intermeshing rotor system was not investigated.) Issues addressed are separation distance, load sharing between rotors, wake structure, solidity effects, swirl recovery, and the effects of having no tail rotor. A general summary of the coaxial rotor configuration explores the configuration's advantages and applications.

  4. Atomic fluorescence study of high temperature aerodynamic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.; Sethi, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet laser induced atomic fluorescence has been used to characterize supersonic jet aerodynamic levitation experiments. The levitated specimen was a 0.4 cm sapphire sphere that was separately heated at temperatures up to 2327 K by an infrared laser. The supersonic jet expansion and thermal gradients in the specimen wake were studied by measuring spatial variations in the concentration of atomic Hg added to the levitating argon gas stream. Further applications of atomic fluorescence in containerless experiments, such as ideal gas fluorescence thermometry and containerless process control are discussed.

  5. Aerodynamic Flow Control by Thermoacoustic Excitation from the Constituent Nanomaterials on the Platform Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    control, turbulence, fluid mechanics, nonlinear coupling, planar jet experiment, Director’s Research Initiative (DRI) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...Successful development of active aerodynamic flow control technologies that delay or prevent separation could lead to substantial performance...improvements, including increased speed, maneuverability, payload capacity, and/or range. However, instances in which active flow control technologies have

  6. Testing Orions Fairing Separation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Henry; Cloutier, Chris; Lemmon, Heber; Rakes, Daniel; Oldham, Joe; Schlagel, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Traditional fairing systems are designed to fully encapsulate and protect their payload from the harsh ascent environment including acoustic vibrations, aerodynamic forces and heating. The Orion fairing separation system performs this function and more by also sharing approximately half of the vehicle structural load during ascent. This load-share condition through launch and during jettison allows for a substantial increase in mass to orbit. A series of component-level development tests were completed to evaluate and characterize each component within Orion's unique fairing separation system. Two full-scale separation tests were performed to verify system-level functionality and provide verification data. This paper summarizes the fairing spring, Pyramidal Separation Mechanism and forward seal system component-level development tests, system-level separation tests, and lessons learned.

  7. Aerodynamic results of a separation test (CA20) conducted at the Boeing transonic wind tunnel using 0.030-scale models of the configuration 140A/B (modified) SSV orbiter (model no. 45-0) and the Boeing 747 carrier (model no. AX 1319 I-1), volume 1. [wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubala, T.; Esparza, V.; Gillins, R. L.; Petrozzi, M.

    1975-01-01

    A Rockwell built 0.030-scale 45-0 modified Space Shuttle Orbiter Configuration 14?A/B model and a Boeing built 0.030-scale 747 carrier model were tested to provide six component force and moment data for each vehicle in proximity to the other at a matrix of relative positions, attitudes and test conditions (angles of attack and sideslip were varied). Orbiter model support system tare effects were determined for corrections to obtain support-free aerodynamics. In addition to the balance force data, pressures were measured. Pressure orifices were located at the base of the Orbiter, on either side of the vertical blade strut, and at the mid-root chord on either side of the vertical tail. Strain gages were installed on the Boeing 747 vertical tail to indicate buffet onset. Photographs of aerodynamic configurations tested are shown.

  8. Training Data Requirement for a Neural Network to Predict Aerodynamic Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor); Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angle of attack, speed brake deflection angle, Mach number, and side slip angle. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. We previously demonstrated that a neural network is a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients. We encountered few under fitted and/or over fitted results during prediction. The training data for the neural network are derived from wind tunnel test measurements and numerical simulations. The basic questions that arise are: how many training data points are required to produce an efficient neural network prediction, and which type of transfer functions should be used between the input-hidden layer and hidden-output layer. In this paper, a comparative study of the efficiency of neural network prediction based on different transfer functions and training dataset sizes is presented. The results of the neural network prediction reflect the sensitivity of the architecture, transfer functions, and training dataset size.

  9. On cup anemometer rotor aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup.

  10. Aerodynamic research on tipvane windturbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbussel, G. J. W.; Vanholten, T.; Vankuik, G. A. M.

    1982-09-01

    Tipvanes are small auxiliary wings mounted at the tips of windturbine blades in such a way that a diffuser effect is generated, resulting in a mass flow augmentation through the turbine disc. For predicting aerodynamic loads on the tipvane wind turbine, the acceleration potential is used and an expansion method is applied. In its simplest form, this method can essentially be classified as a lifting line approach, however, with a proper choice of the basis load distributions of the lifting line, the numerical integration of the pressurefield becomes one dimensional. the integration of the other variable can be performed analytically. The complete analytical expression for the pressure field consists of two series of basic pressure fields. One series is related to the basic load distributions over the turbineblade, and the other series to the basic load distribution over the tipvane.

  11. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  12. Aerodynamic seals for rotary machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Cirri, Massimiliano; Thatte, Azam Mihir; Williams, John Robert

    2016-02-09

    An aerodynamic seal assembly for a rotary machine includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having multiple labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device segment also includes multiple flexures connected to the shoe plate and to a top interface element, wherein the multiple flexures are configured to allow the high pressure fluid to occupy a forward cavity and the low pressure fluid to occupy an aft cavity. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal attached to the top interface element at one first end and positioned about the flexures and the shoe plate at one second end.

  13. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pindado

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups’ front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer’s performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal, tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups’ center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor’s cup.

  14. Constant size, variable density aerosol particles by ultrasonic spray freeze drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addio, Suzanne M; Chan, John Gar Yan; Kwok, Philip Chi Lip; Prud'homme, Robert K; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2012-05-10

    This work provides a new understanding of critical process parameters involved in the production of inhalation aerosol particles by ultrasonic spray freeze drying to enable precise control over particle size and aerodynamic properties. A series of highly porous mannitol, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) particles were produced, varying only the solute concentration in the liquid feed, c(s), from 1 to 5 wt%. The particle sizes of mannitol, BSA, and lysozyme powders were independent of solute concentration, and depend only on the drop size produced by atomization. Both mannitol and lysozyme formulations showed a linear relationship between the computed Fine Particle Fraction (FPF) and the square root of c(s), which is proportional to the particle density, ρ, given a constant particle size d(g). The FPF decreased with increasing c(s) from 57.0% to 16.6% for mannitol and 44.5% to 17.2% for lysozyme. Due to cohesion, the BSA powder FPF measured by cascade impaction was less than 10% and independent of c(s). Ultrasonic spray freeze drying enables separate control over particle size, d(g), and aerodynamic size, d(a) which has allowed us to make the first experimental demonstration of the widely accepted rule d(a)=d(g)(ρ/ρ(o))(1/2) with particles of constant d(g), but variable density, ρ (ρ(o) is unit density).

  15. AEROSTATIC AND AERODYNAMIC MODULES OF A HYBRID BUOYANT AIRCRAFT: AN ANALYTICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ul Haque

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An analytical approach is essential for the estimation of the requirements of aerodynamic and aerostatic lift for a hybrid buoyant aircraft. Such aircrafts have two different modules to balance the weight of aircraft; aerostatic module and aerodynamic module. Both these modules are to be treated separately for estimation of the mass budget of propulsion systems and required power. In the present work, existing relationships of aircraft and airship are reviewed for its further application for these modules. Limitations of such relationships are also disussed and it is precieved that it will provide a strating point for better understanding of design anatomy of such aircraft.

  16. AVATAR: AdVanced Aerodynamic Tools for lArge Rotors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schepers, J.C.; Ceyhan, O.; Savenije, F.J.;

    2015-01-01

    for the AVATAR project lies in the fact that future 10 to 20 MW turbine design model analysis will importantly violate known validity limits of today’s aerodynamic and aero-elastic models in aspects like compressibility and Reynolds number effects, laminar/turbulent transition and separation effects, all...... in combination with a much more complex fluid-structure interaction. Further complications enter by the possible use of active or passive flow devices. AVATAR's main aim is then to develop enhancements for aerodynamic and aero-elastic models suitable for large (10MW+) wind turbines analysis. The turbine...

  17. Characterization of the Flow Separation of a Variable Camber Airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wen-Chao; WANG Hui; YANG Jian-Ting; YANG Ji-Ming

    2012-01-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out to study the How separation behaviors of a variable camber airfoil. The aerodynamic load measurements and related flow visualization show that there are two types of stalls caused by the deformation on the camber: the leading-edge stall and the trailing-edge stall. Static measurements of aerodynamic force show a drastic leading-edge stall, while the serial measurements on an airfoil with camber deformation illustrate a trailing-edge stall and gradual bending-over on the aerodynamic coefficient curve. Under flow separation circumstances, the Bow structure is related not only to current boundary conditions, but also the previous flow characteristics, so the quasi-steady aerodynamic characteristics are significantly distinct from those of the static measurements.%An experimental investigation is carried out to study the flow separation behaviors of a variable camber airfoil.The aerodynamic load measurements and related flow visualization show that there are two types of stalls caused by the deformation on the camber:the leading-edge stall and the trailing-edge stall.Static measurements of aerodynamic force show a drastic leading-edge stall,while the serial measurements on an airfoil with camber deformation illustrate a trailing-edge stall and gradual bending-over on the aerodynamic coefficient curve.Under flow separation circumstances,the flow structure is related not only to current boundary conditions,but also the previous flow characteristics,so the quasi-steady aerodynamic characteristics are significantly distinct from those of the static measurements.

  18. Aerodynamic Efficiency Enhancements for Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for aerodynamics-based efficiency enhancements for air vehicles is presented. Concepts are presented for morphing aircraft, to enable the aircraft to...

  19. Prediction of Unsteady Transonic Aerodynamics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An accurate prediction of aero-elastic effects depends on an accurate prediction of the unsteady aerodynamic forces. Perhaps the most difficult speed regime is...

  20. Aerodynamic Efficiency Enhancements for Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for aerodynamics-based efficiency enhancements for air vehicles is presented. The results of the Phase I investigation of concepts for morphing aircraft are...

  1. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls

    OpenAIRE

    Asai, Takeshi; SEO, KAZUYA

    2013-01-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through...

  2. The Aerodynamics of High Speed Aerial Weapons

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, Simon A.

    1999-01-01

    The focus of this work is the investigation of the complex compressible flow phenomena associated with high speed aerial weapons. A three dimen- sional multiblock finite volume flow solver was developed with the aim of studying the aerodynamics of missile configurations and their component structures. The first component of the study involved the aerodynamic investigation of the isolated components used in the design of conventional missile config- urations. The computati...

  3. Nasal aerodynamics protects brain and lung from inhaled dust in subterranean diggers, Ellobius talpinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Moshkin; D.V. Petrovski; A.E. Akulov; A.V. Romashchenko; L.A. Gerlinskaya; V.L. Ganimedov; M.I. Muchnaya; A.S. Sadovsky; I.V. Koptyug; A.A. Savelov; S. Yu Troitsky; Y.M. Moshkn; V.I. Bukhtiyarov; N.A. Kolchanov; R.Z. Sagdeev; V.M. Fomin

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInhalation of air-dispersed sub-micrometre and nano-sized particles presents a risk factor for animal and human health. Here, we show that nasal aerodynamics plays a pivotal role in the protection of the subterranean mole vole Ellobius talpinus from an increased exposure to nano-aerosols

  4. ATEFlap aerodynamic model, a dynamic stall model including the effects of trailing edge flap deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergami, L.; Gaunaa, M.

    2012-02-15

    The report presents the ATEFlap aerodynamic model, which computes the unsteady lift, drag and moment on a 2D airfoil section equipped with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap. The model captures the unsteady response related to the effects of the vorticity shed into the wake, and the dynamics of flow separation a thin-airfoil potential flow model is merged with a dynamic stall model of the Beddoes-Leishmann type. The inputs required by the model are steady data for lift, drag, and moment coefficients as function of angle of attack and flap deflection. Further steady data used by the Beddoes- Leishmann dynamic stall model are computed in an external preprocessor application, which gives the user the possibility to verify, and eventually correct, the steady data passed to the aerodynamic model. The ATEFlap aerodynamic model is integrated in the aeroelastic simulation tool HAWC2, thus al- lowing to simulate the response of a wind turbine with trailing edge flaps on the rotor. The algorithms used by the preprocessor, and by aerodynamic model are presented, and modifications to previous implementations of the aerodynamic model are briefly discussed. The performance and the validity of the model are verified by comparing the dynamic response computed by the ATEFlap with solutions from CFD simulations. (Author)

  5. Spacecraft aerodynamics and trajectory simulation during aerobraking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-pu ZHANG; Bo HAN; Cheng-yi ZHANG

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses a direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC)approach to simulate rarefied aerodynamic characteristics during the aerobraking process of the NASA Mars Global Surveyor(MGS)spacecraft.The research focuses on the flowfield and aerodynamic characteristics distribution under various free stream densities.The variation regularity of aerodynamic coefficients is analyzed.The paper also develops an aerodynamics-aeroheating-trajectory integrative simulation model to preliminarily calculate the aerobraking orbit transfer by combining the DSMC technique and the classical kinematics theory.The results show that the effect of the planetary atmospheric density,the spacecraft yaw,and the pitch attitudes on the spacecraft aerodynamics is significant.The numerical results are in good agreement with the existing results reported in the literature.The aerodynamics-aeroheating-trajectory integrative simulation model can simulate the orbit tran,sfer in the complete aerobraking mission.The current results of the spacecraft trajectory show that the aerobraking maneuvers have good performance of attitude control.

  6. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction for a Generic Truck Using Geometrically Optimized Rear Cabin Bumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Ait Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous surge in gas prices has raised major concerns about vehicle fuel efficiency, and drag reduction devices offer a promising strategy. In this paper, we investigate the mechanisms by which geometrically optimized bumps, placed on the rear end of the cabin roof of a generic truck, reduce aerodynamic drag. The incorporation of these devices requires proper choices of the size, location, and overall geometry. In the following analysis we identify these factors using a novel methodology. The numerical technique combines automatic modeling of the add-ons, computational fluid dynamics and optimization using orthogonal arrays, and probabilistic restarts. Numerical results showed reduction in aerodynamic drag between 6% and 10%.

  7. Aerodynamic Analysis of Morphing Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Caleb; Macphee, David; Carlisle, Madeline

    2016-11-01

    Interest in morphing blades has grown with applications for wind turbines and other aerodynamic blades. This passive control method has advantages over active control methods such as lower manufacturing and upkeep costs. This study has investigated the lift and drag forces on individual blades with experimental and computational analysis. The goal has been to show that these blades delay stall and provide larger lift-to-drag ratios at various angles of attack. Rigid and flexible airfoils were cast from polyurethane and silicone respectively, then lift and drag forces were collected from a load cell during 2-D testing in a wind tunnel. Experimental data was used to validate computational models in OpenFOAM. A finite volume fluid-structure-interaction solver was used to model the flexible blade in fluid flow. Preliminary results indicate delay in stall and larger lift-to-drag ratios by maintaining more optimal angles of attack when flexing. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  8. Discrete vortex method simulations of the aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan;

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel method for the simulation of the aerodynamic admittance in bluff body aerodynamics. The method introduces a model for describing oncoming turbulence in two-dimensional discrete vortex method simulations by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles. The turbulence...

  9. Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

    1977-12-01

    The successful development of reliable, cost competitive horizontal axis, propeller-type wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is strongly dependent on the availability of advanced technology for each of the system components. This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

  10. An aerodynamic performance analysis of a perforated wind turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didane, D. H.; Mohd, S.; Subari, Z.; Rosly, N.; Ghafir, M. F. Abdul; Mohd Masrom, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    Wind power is one of the important renewable energy sources. Currently, many researches are focusing on improving the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine blades through simulations and wind tunnel testing. In the present study, the aerodynamic performance of the perforated Eqwin blade (shell type blade) is investigated by using numerical simulation. Three types of slots namely circular, horizontal rectangular and vertical rectangular were evaluated. It was found that the optimum angle of attack for a perforated shell type blade was 12° with maximum Cl/Cd value of 6.420. In general, for all the perforated blade cases, Cl/Cd tended to decrease as the slot size increased except for the circular slot with 5 mm diameter. This was due to the disturbance of the airflow in lower side region which passed through the bigger slot size. Among the modified slots; the circular slot with diameter of 5 mm would be the best slot configuration that can be considered for blade fabrication. The Cl/Cd obtained was 6.46 which is about 5% more than the value of the reference blade. Moreover, the introduced slot would also reduce the overall weight of the blade by 1.3%.

  11. New insights into the wind-dust relationship in sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment from wind tunnel experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad

    2016-01-22

    Numerous parameterizations have been developed for predicting wind erosion, yet the physical mechanism of dust emission is not fully understood. Sandblasting is thought to be the primary mechanism, but recent studies suggest that dust emission by direct aerodynamic entrainment can be significant under certain conditions. In this work, using wind tunnel experiments, we investigated some of the lesser understood aspects of dust emission in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment for three soil types, namely clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam. First, we explored the role of erodible surface roughness on dust emitted by aerodynamic entrainment. Second, we compared the emitted dust concentration in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment under a range of wind friction velocities. Finally, we explored the sensitivity of emitted dust particle size distribution (PSD) to soil type and wind friction velocity in these two processes. The dust concentration in aerodynamic entrainment showed strong positive correlation, no significant correlation, and weak negative correlation, for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively, with the erodible soil surface roughness. The dust in aerodynamic entrainment was significant constituting up to 28.3, 41.4, and 146.4% compared to sandblasting for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively. PSD of emitted dust was sensitive to soil type in both sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment. PSD was sensitive to the friction velocity in aerodynamic entrainment but not in sandblasting. Our results highlight the need to consider the details of sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment processes in parameterizing dust emission in global/regional climate models.

  12. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform

    CERN Document Server

    Lentink, David; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on tethered experiments with robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for nonintrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is ...

  13. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sixing; Ma, Fen; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E.; Zeng, Xiangqun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device.

  14. Aerodynamic stability of cable-stayed bridges under erection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-jun; SUN Bing-nan; XIANG Hai-fan

    2005-01-01

    In this work, nonlinear multimode aerodynamic analysis of the Jingsha Bridge under erection over the Yangtze River is conducted, and the evolutions of structural dynamic characteristics and the aerodynamic stability with erection are numerically generated. Instead of the simplified method, nonlinear multimode aerodynamic analysis is suggested to predict the aerodynamic stability of cable-stayed bridges under erection. The analysis showed that the aerodynamic stability maximizes at the relatively early stages, and decreases as the erection proceeds. The removal of the temporary piers in side spans and linking of the main girder to the anchor piers have important influence on the dynamic characteristics and aerodynamic stability of cable-stayed bridges under erection.

  15. Spiral microfluidic nanoparticle separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Kuntaegowdanahalli, Sathyakumar S.; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Papautsky, Ian

    2008-02-01

    Nanoparticles have potential applications in many areas such as consumer products, health care, electronics, energy and other industries. As the use of nanoparticles in manufacturing increases, we anticipate a growing need to detect and measure particles of nanometer scale dimensions in fluids to control emissions of possible toxic nanoparticles. At present most particle separation techniques are based on membrane assisted filtering schemes. Unfortunately their efficiency is limited by the membrane pore size, making them inefficient for separating a wide range of sizes. In this paper, we propose a passive spiral microfluidic geometry for momentum-based particle separations. The proposed design is versatile and is capable of separating particulate mixtures over a wide dynamic range and we expect it will enable a variety of environmental, medical, or manufacturing applications that involve rapid separation of nanoparticles in real-world samples with a wide range of particle components.

  16. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace.

  17. Unsteady aerodynamics of membrane wings with adaptive compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Jillian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Membrane wings are known to provide superior aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds numbers (Re =104 -105), primarily due to passive shape adaptation to flow conditions. In addition to this passive deformation, active control of the fluid-structure interaction and resultant aerodynamic properties can be achieved through the use of dielectric elastomer actuators as the wing membrane material. When actuated, membrane pretension is decreased and wing camber increases. Additionally, actuation at resonance frequencies allows additional control over wing camber. We present results using synchronized (i) time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) to resolve the flow field, (ii) 3D direct linear transformation (DLT) to recover membrane shape, (iii) lift/drag/torque measurements and (iv) near-wake hot wire anemometry measurements to characterize the fluid-structure interactions. Particular attention is paid to cases in which the vortex shedding frequency, the membrane resonance, and the actuation frequency coincide. In quantitatively examining both flow field and membrane shape at a range of actuation frequencies and vortex shedding frequencies, this work seeks to find actuation parameters that allow for active control of boundary layer separation over a range of flow conditions. Also at Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport.

  18. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  19. Influence of Icing on Bridge Cable Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Frej Henningsen, Jesper; Olsen, Idar

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the relevance of ice accretion for wind-induced vibration of structural bridge cables has been recognised and became a subject of research in bridge engineering. Full-scale monitoring and observation indicate that light precipitation at moderate low temperatures between zero and -5......°C may lead to large amplitude vibrations of bridge cables under wind action. For the prediction of aerodynamic instability quasi-steady models have been developed estimating the cable response magnitude based on structural properties and aerodynamic force coefficients for drag, lift and torsion....... The determination of these force coefficients require a proper simulation of the ice layer occurring under the specific climatic conditions, favouring real ice accretion over simplified artificial reproduction. The work presented in this paper was performed to study the influence of ice accretion on the aerodynamic...

  20. Aerodynamic Jump for Long Rod Penetrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Bundy

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic jump for a non-spinning kinetic energy penetrator is neither a discontinuous change in the ,direction of motion at the origin of free night, nor is it the converse, i.e. a cumulativer~direc4on over a domain of infinite extent. Rather aerodynamic jump, for such a projectile, is a localised redirection of the centre of gravity motion, caused ~ the force of lift due to yaw over ther4latively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. The primary objective of this paper is to provide answtfrs to the questions like what is aerodynamic jump, what liauses it, !lnd wh~t aspects df the flight trajectory does it refer to, or account for .

  1. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  2. On the properties and mechanisms of microjet arrays in crossflow for the control of flow separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Erik J.

    By utilizing passive and active methods of flow control, the aerodynamic performance of external and internal components can be greatly improved. Recently however, the benefits of applying active flow control methods to turbomachinery components for improved fuel efficiency, reduced engine size, and greater operational envelope has sparked a renewed interest in some of these flow control techniques. The more attractive of these, is active control in the form of jets in cross flow. With their ability to be turned on and off, as well as their negligible effect on drag when not being actuated, they are well suited for applications such as compressor and turbine blades, engine inlet diffusers, internal engine passages, and general external aerodynamics. This study consists of two parts. The first is the application of active control on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) cascade to determine the effectiveness of microjet actuators on flow separation at relatively low speeds. The second study, motivated by the first, involves a parametric study on a more canonical model to examine the effects of various microjet parameters on the efficacy of separation control and to provide a better understanding of the relevant flow physics governing this control approach. With data obtained from velocity measurements across the wide parametric range, correlations for the growth of the counter-rotating vortex pairs generated by these actuators are deduced. From the information and models obtained throughout the study, basic suggestions for microjet actuator design are presented.

  3. Differences in estimates of size distribution of beryllium powder materials using phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and liquid suspension counter techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Hoover, Mark D; Dickerson, Robert M; Day, Gregory A; Breysse, Patrick N; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2007-02-28

    Accurate characterization of the physicochemical properties of aerosols generated for inhalation toxicology studies is essential for obtaining meaningful results. Great emphasis must also be placed on characterizing particle properties of materials as administered in inhalation studies. Thus, research is needed to identify a suite of techniques capable of characterizing the multiple particle properties (i.e., size, mass, surface area, number) of a material that may influence toxicity. The purpose of this study was to characterize the morphology and investigate the size distribution of a model toxicant, beryllium. Beryllium metal, oxides, and alloy particles were aerodynamically size-separated using an aerosol cyclone, imaged dry using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), then characterized using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), a liquid suspension particle counter (LPC), and computer-controlled SEM (CCSEM). Beryllium metal powder was compact with smaller sub-micrometer size particles attached to the surface of larger particles, whereas the beryllium oxides and alloy particles were clusters of primary particles. As expected, the geometric mean (GM) diameter of metal powder determined using PCM decreased with aerodynamic size, but when suspended in liquid for LPC or CCSEM analysis, the GM diameter decreased by a factor of two (p particles attached to the surface of larger particles and/or particle agglomerates detach in liquid, thereby shifting the particle size distribution downward. The GM diameters of the oxide materials were similar regardless of sizing technique, but observed differences were generally significant (p aerodynamic cluster size will dictate deposition in the lung, but primary particle size may influence biological activity. The GM diameter of alloy particles determined using PCM became smaller with decreasing aerodynamic size fraction; however, when suspended in liquid for CCSEM and LPC analyses, GM particle size decreased by a factor of two (p

  4. Aerodynamic Jump for Long Rod Penetrators

    OpenAIRE

    Mark L. Bundy

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamic jump for a non-spinning kinetic energy penetrator is neither a discontinuous change in the ,direction of motion at the origin of free night, nor is it the converse, i.e. a cumulativer~direc4on over a domain of infinite extent. Rather aerodynamic jump, for such a projectile, is a localised redirection of the centre of gravity motion, caused ~ the force of lift due to yaw over ther4latively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. The primary...

  5. Aerodynamic performance and particle image velocimetery of piezo actuated biomimetic manduca sexta engineered wings towards the design and application of a flapping wing flight vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Anthony M.

    Considerable research and investigation has been conducted on the aerodynamic performance, and the predominate flow physics of the Manduca Sexta size of biomimetically designed and fabricated wings as part of the AFIT FWMAV design project. Despite a burgeoning interest and research into the diverse field of flapping wing flight and biomimicry, the aerodynamics of flapping wing flight remains a nebulous field of science with considerable variance into the theoretical abstractions surrounding aerodynamic mechanisms responsible for aerial performance. Traditional FWMAV flight models assume a form of a quasi-steady approximation of wing aerodynamics based on an infinite wing blade element model (BEM). An accurate estimation of the lift, drag, and side force coefficients is a critical component of autonomous stability and control models. This research focused on two separate experimental avenues into the aerodynamics of AFIT's engineered hawkmoth wings|forces and flow visualization. 1. Six degree of freedom force balance testing, and high speed video analysis was conducted on 30°, 45°, and 60° angle stop wings. A novel, non-intrusive optical tracking algorithm was developed utilizing a combination of a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and ComputerVision (OpenCV) tools to track the wing in motion from multiple cameras. A complete mapping of the wing's kinematic angles as a function of driving amplitude was performed. The stroke angle, elevation angle, and angle of attack were tabulated for all three wings at driving amplitudes ranging from A=0.3 to A=0.6. The wing kinematics together with the force balance data was used to develop several aerodynamic force coefficient models. A combined translational and rotational aerodynamic model predicted lift forces within 10%, and vertical forces within 6%. The total power consumption was calculated for each of the three wings, and a Figure of Merit was calculated for each wing as a general expression of the overall efficiency of

  6. Aerodynamics and thermal physics of helicopter ice accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yiqiang

    Ice accretion on aircraft introduces significant loss in airfoil performance. Reduced lift-to- drag ratio reduces the vehicle capability to maintain altitude and also limits its maneuverability. Current ice accretion performance degradation modeling approaches are calibrated only to a limited envelope of liquid water content, impact velocity, temperature, and water droplet size; consequently inaccurate aerodynamic performance degradations are estimated. The reduced ice accretion prediction capabilities in the glaze ice regime are primarily due to a lack of knowledge of surface roughness induced by ice accretion. A comprehensive understanding of the ice roughness effects on airfoil heat transfer, ice accretion shapes, and ultimately aerodynamics performance is critical for the design of ice protection systems. Surface roughness effects on both heat transfer and aerodynamic performance degradation on airfoils have been experimentally evaluated. Novel techniques, such as ice molding and casting methods and transient heat transfer measurement using non-intrusive thermal imaging methods, were developed at the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility at Penn State. A novel heat transfer scaling method specifically for turbulent flow regime was also conceived. A heat transfer scaling parameter, labeled as Coefficient of Stanton and Reynolds Number (CSR = Stx/Rex --0.2), has been validated against reference data found in the literature for rough flat plates with Reynolds number (Re) up to 1x107, for rough cylinders with Re ranging from 3x104 to 4x106, and for turbine blades with Re from 7.5x105 to 7x106. This is the first time that the effect of Reynolds number is shown to be successfully eliminated on heat transfer magnitudes measured on rough surfaces. Analytical models for ice roughness distribution, heat transfer prediction, and aerodynamics performance degradation due to ice accretion have also been developed. The ice roughness prediction model was

  7. Team Software Development for Aerothermodynamic and Aerodynamic Analysis and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, N.; Atkins, H. L.; Bibb, K. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Carpenter, M. H.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Hammond, D. P.; Jones, W. T.; Kleb, W. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative approach to software development is described. The approach employs the agile development techniques: project retrospectives, Scrum status meetings, and elements of Extreme Programming to efficiently develop a cohesive and extensible software suite. The software product under development is a fluid dynamics simulator for performing aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis and design. The functionality of the software product is achieved both through the merging, with substantial rewrite, of separate legacy codes and the authorship of new routines. Examples of rapid implementation of new functionality demonstrate the benefits obtained with this agile software development process. The appendix contains a discussion of coding issues encountered while porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95, software design principles, and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  8. Effect of compressibility on the nonlinear prediction of the aerodynamic loads on lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, O. A.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The vortex-lattice technique for incompressible flow which accounts for separation at sharp edges is modified to account for compressibility. This is accomplished by extending the Prandtl-Glauert transformation to moderate angles of attack. Thus, the aerodynamic characteristics for the compressible case are obtained from the solution of an equivalent incompressible problem. Numerical results are presented for parallelogram and delta wings to assess the effects of compressibility. The results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  9. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnels use scale models to characterize aerodynamic coefficients, Wind tunnel testing can be slow and costly due to high personnel overhead and intensive power utilization. Although manual curve fitting can be done, it is highly efficient to use a neural network to define the complex relationship between variables. Numerical simulation of complex vehicles on the wide range of conditions required for flight simulation requires static and dynamic data. Static data at low Mach numbers and angles of attack may be obtained with simpler Euler codes. Static data of stalled vehicles where zones of flow separation are usually present at higher angles of attack require Navier-Stokes simulations which are costly due to the large processing time required to attain convergence. Preliminary dynamic data may be obtained with simpler methods based on correlations and vortex methods; however, accurate prediction of the dynamic coefficients requires complex and costly numerical simulations. A reliable and fast method of predicting complex aerodynamic coefficients for flight simulation I'S presented using a neural network. The training data for the neural network are derived from numerical simulations and wind-tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of the flow characteristics and the control surfaces of the vehicle. The basic coefficients of lift, drag and pitching moment are expressed as functions of angles of attack and Mach number. The modeled and training aerodynamic coefficients show good agreement. This method shows excellent potential for rapid development of aerodynamic models for flight simulation. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used to optimize a previously built Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that reliably predicts aerodynamic coefficients. Results indicate that the GA provided an efficient method of optimizing the ANN model to predict aerodynamic coefficients. The reliability of the ANN using the GA includes prediction of aerodynamic

  10. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewicz, P.; Kulak, M.; Karczewski, M.

    2014-08-01

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  11. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.

  12. IEA joint action. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-12-31

    In the period 1992-1997 the IEA Annex XIV `Field Rotor Aerodynamics` was carried out. Within its framework 5 institutes from 4 different countries participated in performing detailed aerodynamic measurements on full-scale wind turbines. The Annex was successfully completed and resulted in a unique database of aerodynamic measurements. The database is stored on an ECN disc (available through ftp) and on a CD-ROM. It is expected that this base will be used extensively in the development and validation of new aerodynamic models. Nevertheless at the end of IEA Annex XIV, it was recommended to perform a new IEA Annex due to the following reasons: In Annex XIV several data exchange rounds appeared to be necessary before a satisfactory result was achieved. This is due to the huge amount of data which had to be supplied, by which a thorough inspection of all data is very difficult and very time consuming; Most experimental facilities are still operational and new, very useful, measurements are expected in the near future; The definition of angle of attack and dynamic pressure in the rotating environment is less straightforward than in the wind tunnel. The conclusion from Annex XIV was that the uncertainty which results from these different definitions is still too large and more investigation in this field is required. (EG)

  13. Continuous Aerodynamic Modelling of Entry Shapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, D.; Mooij, E.

    2011-01-01

    During the conceptual design phase of a re-entry vehicle, the vehicle shape can be varied and its impact on performance evaluated. To this end, the continuous modeling of the aerodynamic characteristics as a function of the shape is useful in exploring the full design space. Local inclination method

  14. Separation techniques: Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Coskun, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Chromatography is an important biophysical technique that enables the separation, identification, and purification of the components of a mixture for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Proteins can be purified based on characteristics such as size and shape, total charge, hydrophobic groups present on the surface, and binding capacity with the stationary phase. Four separation techniques based on molecular characteristics and interaction type use mechanisms of ion exchange, surface adsorp...

  15. Aerodynamic Interactions Between Wing and Body of a Model Insect in Forward Flight and Maneuvers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liang; Mao Sun

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic interactions between the body and the wings of a model insect in forward flight and maneuvers are studied using the method of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations over moving overset grids.Three cases are considered,including a complete insect,wing pair only and body only.By comparing the results of these cases,the interaction effect between the body and the wing pair can be identified.The changes in the force and moment coefficients of the wing pair due to the presence of the body are less than 4.5% of the mean vertical force coefficient of the model insect; the changes in the aerodynamic force coefficients of the body due to the presence of the wings are less than 5.0% of the mean vertical force coefficient of the model insect.The results of this paper indicate that in studying the aerodynamics and flight dynamics of a flapping insect in forward flight or maneuver,separately computing (or measuring) the aerodynamic forces and moments on the wing pair and on the body could be a good approximation.

  16. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-06

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing.

  17. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  18. Wind turbines. Unsteady aerodynamics and inflow noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riget Broe, B.

    2009-12-15

    Aerodynamical noise from wind turbines due to atmospheric turbulence has the highest emphasis in semi-empirical models. However it is an open question whether inflow noise has a high emphasis. This illustrates the need to investigate and improve the semi-empirical model for noise due to atmospheric turbulence. Three different aerodynamical models are investigated in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics. Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil. An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input. The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models for lift distribution is for completely anisotropic turbulence and the other for perfectly isotropic turbulence, and so is also the corresponding models for the lift fluctuations derived from the models for lift distribution. The models for lift distribution and lift are compared with pressure data which are obtained by microphones placed flush with the surface of an aerofoil. The pressure data are from two experiments in a wind tunnel, one experiment with a NACA0015 profile and a second with a NACA63415 profile. The turbulence is measured by a triple wired hotwire instrument in the experiment with a NACA0015 profile. Comparison of the aerodynamical models with data shows that the models capture the general characteristics of the measurements, but the data are hampered by background noise from the fan propellers in the wind tunnel. The measurements are in between the completely anisotropic turbulent model and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model by the measurements

  19. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MARINTEK Braceless Semisubmersible Wave Tank Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gordon; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Model scale experiments of floating offshore wind turbines are important for both platform design for the industry as well as numerical model validation for the research community. An important consideration in the wave tank testing of offshore wind turbines are scaling effects, especially the tension between accurate scaling of both hydrodynamic and aerodynamic forces. The recent MARINTEK braceless semisubmersible wave tank experiment utilizes a novel aerodynamic force actuator to decouple the scaling of the aerodynamic forces. This actuator consists of an array of motors that pull on cables to provide aerodynamic forces that are calculated by a blade-element momentum code in real time as the experiment is conducted. This type of system has the advantage of supplying realistically scaled aerodynamic forces that include dynamic forces from platform motion, but does not provide the insights into the accuracy of the aerodynamic models that an actual model-scale rotor could provide. The modeling of this system presents an interesting challenge, as there are two ways to simulate the aerodynamics; either by using the turbulent wind fields as inputs to the aerodynamic model of the design code, or by surpassing the aerodynamic model and using the forces applied to the experimental turbine as direct inputs to the simulation. This paper investigates the best practices of modeling this type of novel aerodynamic actuator using a modified wind turbine simulation tool, and demonstrates that bypassing the dynamic aerodynamics solver of design codes can lead to erroneous results.

  20. Separation Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, John C.

    2002-01-01

    expressions) for accessing and modifying shared structures, and for explicit allocation and deallocation of storage. Assertions are extended by introducing a "separating conjunction" that asserts that its sub-formulas hold for disjoint parts of the heap, and a closely related "separating implication". Coupled......, dynamically allocated arrays, and recursive procedures. We will also discuss promising future directions....

  1. Computational Hypersonic Aerodynamics with Emphasis on Earth Reentry Capsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Leonida NICULESCU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The temperature in the front region of a hypersonic vehicle nose can be extremely high, for example, reaching approximately 11 000 K at a Mach number of 36 (Apollo reentry due to the bow shock wave. In this case, accurate prediction of temperature behind the shock wave is necessary in order to precisely estimate the wall heat flux. A better prediction of wall heat flux leads to smaller safety coefficient for thermal shield of space reentry vehicle; therefore, the size of thermal shield decreases and the payload could increase. However, the accurate prediction of temperature behind the bow shock wave implies the use of a precise chemical model whose partial differential equations are added to Navier-Stokes equations. This second order partial differential system is very difficult to be numerically integrated. For this reason, the present paper deals with the computational hypersonic aerodynamics with chemical reactions with the aim of supporting Earth reentry capsule design.

  2. Aerosol printing of colloidal nanocrystals by aerodynamic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lejun

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, have shown promise as the active material in electronic and optoelectronic applications, because of their high quantum yield, narrow spectral emission band, size-tunable bandgap, chemical stability, and easy processibility. Meanwhile, it is still challenging to print patterns of nanocrystal films with desired linewidth and thickness, which is a critical step in fabrication of nanocrystal-based devices. In this thesis, a direct-write method of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals has been developed. Like other direct-write techniques, this aerosol based method simplifies printing process and reduces the manufacturing cost, as it avoids mask screening, lithography, and pre-patterning of the substrate. Moreover, the aerosol printing with aerodynamic lenses needs neither microscale nozzles nor sheath gases, and is able to incorporate into the vacuum systems currently used in microelectronic fabrication. This thesis research presents systematic efforts to develop an aerosol-based method to directly write patterns of semiconductor nanocrystals from colloidal dispersions by aerodynamic focusing. First, the synthesized colloidal nanocrystals in hexane were nebulized into compact and spherical agglomerates suspending in the carrier gas. The details about the impact dynamics of individual aerosolized nanocrystal agglomerates were investigated. As building blocks of printed nanocrystal films, the agglomerate exhibited cohesive and granular behaviors during impact deformation on the substrate. The strength of cohesion between nanocrystals in the agglomerates could be adjusted by tuning the number concentration of colloidal nanocrystal dispersion. Second, ultrathin films of nanocrystals were obtained by printing monodisperse nanocrystal agglomerates. As the result of the granular property of nanocrystal agglomerates, it was found that the thickness of deposited agglomerates strongly depended on the size of agglomerates. A

  3. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  4. Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with Fowler flaps including flap loads, downwash, and calculated effect on take-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Robert C

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of a wing in combination with each of three sizes of Fowler flap. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap chord and position, the air loads on the flaps, and the effect of flaps on the downwash.

  5. Aerodynamics of Rotor Blades for Quadrotors

    CERN Document Server

    Bangura, Moses; Naldi, Roberto; Mahony, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present the theory on aerodynamics of quadrotors using the well established momentum and blade element theories. From a robotics perspective, the theoretical development of the models for thrust and horizontal forces and torque (therefore power) are carried out in the body fixed frame of the quadrotor. Using momentum theory, we propose and model the existence of a horizontal force along with its associated power. Given the limitations associated with momentum theory and the inadequacy of the theory to account for the different powers represented in a proposed bond graph lead to the use of blade element theory. Using this theory, models are then developed for the different quadrotor rotor geometries and aerodynamic properties including the optimum hovering rotor used on the majority of quadrotors. Though this rotor is proven to be the most optimum rotor, we show that geometric variations are necessary for manufacturing of the blades. The geometric variations are also dictated by a desired th...

  6. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR CALCULATING FAN AERODYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dostal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results obtained between 2010 and 2014 in the field of fan aerodynamics at the Department of Composite Technology at the VZLÚ aerospace research and experimental institute in Prague – Letnany. The need for rapid and accurate methods for the preliminary design of blade machinery led to the creation of a mathematical model based on the basic laws of turbomachine aerodynamics. The mathematical model, the derivation of which is briefly described below, has been encoded in a computer programme, which enables the theoretical characteristics of a fan of the designed geometry to be determined rapidly. The validity of the mathematical model is assessed continuously by measuring model fans in the measuring unit, which was developed and manufactured specifically for this purpose. The paper also presents a comparison between measured characteristics and characteristics determined by the mathematical model as the basis for a discussion on possible causes of measured deviations and calculation deviations.

  7. Aerodynamic Design of a Tailless Aeroplan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Friedl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an aerodynamic analysis of a one-seat ultralight (UL tailless aeroplane named L2k, with a very complicated layout. In the first part, an autostable airfoil with a low moment coefficient was chosen as a base for this problem. This airfoil was refined and modified to satisfy the design requirements. The computed aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils for different Reynolds numbers (Re were compared with available experimental data. XFOIL code was used to perform the computations. In the second part, a computation of wing characteristics was carried out. All calculated cases were chosen as points on the manoeuvring and gust envelope. The vortex lattice method was used with consideration of fuselage and winglets for very complicated wing geometry. The PMW computer program developed at IAE was used to perform the computations. The computed results were subsequently used for structural and strength analysis and design.

  8. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  9. Vortical sources of aerodynamic force and moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the aerodynamic force and moment can be expressed in terms of vorticity distribution (and entropy variation for compressible flow) on near wake plane, or in terms of boundary vorticity flux on the body surface. Thus the vortical sources of lift and drag are clearly identified, which is the real physical basis of optimal aerodynamic design. Moreover, these sources are highly compact, hence allowing one to concentrate on key local regions of the configuration, which have dominating effect to the lift and drag. A detail knowledge of the vortical low requires measuring or calculating the vorticity and dilatation field, which is however still a challenging task. Nevertheless, this type of formulation has some unique advantages; and how to set up a well-posed problem, in particular how to establish vorticity-dilatation boundary conditions, is addressed.

  10. Particle Methods in Bluff Body Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj

    Fluid-structure interaction is studied numerically in academics and the industry. Shear computational power alone is insufficient to accurately resolve the complex dynamics of high Reynolds number fluid flow. Therefore the development of more efficient and applicable computational algorithms...... is important. This dissertation focuses on the use of vortex particle methods and computational efficiency. The work is divided into three parts. A novel method for the simulation of the aerodynamic admittance in bluff body aerodynamics is presented. The method involves a model for describing oncoming...... turbulence in two-dimensional discrete vortex method simulations by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles. The turbulence is generated prior to the simulations and is based on analytic spectral densities of the atmospheric turbulence and a coherence function defining the spatial correlation...

  11. Integrated structural-aerodynamic design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P. J.; Grossman, B.; Polen, D.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration, with emphasis on the major difficulty associated with multidisciplinary design optimization processes, their enormous computational costs. Methods are presented for reducing this computational burden through the development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculations and the implementation of approximate optimization procedures. Utilizing a modular sensitivity analysis approach, it is shown that the sensitivities can be computed without the expensive calculation of the derivatives of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix, and the derivatives of the structural flexibility matrix. The same process is used to efficiently evaluate the sensitivities of the wing divergence constraint, which should be particularly useful, not only in problems of complete integrated aircraft design, but also in aeroelastic tailoring applications.

  12. Nash equilibrium and multi criterion aerodynamic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhili; Zhang, Lianhe

    2016-06-01

    Game theory and its particular Nash Equilibrium (NE) are gaining importance in solving Multi Criterion Optimization (MCO) in engineering problems over the past decade. The solution of a MCO problem can be viewed as a NE under the concept of competitive games. This paper surveyed/proposed four efficient algorithms for calculating a NE of a MCO problem. Existence and equivalence of the solution are analyzed and proved in the paper based on fixed point theorem. Specific virtual symmetric Nash game is also presented to set up an optimization strategy for single objective optimization problems. Two numerical examples are presented to verify proposed algorithms. One is mathematical functions' optimization to illustrate detailed numerical procedures of algorithms, the other is aerodynamic drag reduction of civil transport wing fuselage configuration by using virtual game. The successful application validates efficiency of algorithms in solving complex aerodynamic optimization problem.

  13. Error Estimates of the Ares I Computed Turbulent Ascent Longitudinal Aerodynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Ghaffari, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics for the Ares I class of vehicles, along with the associated error estimate derived from an iterative convergence grid refinement, are presented. Computational results are based on an unstructured grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes analysis. The validity of the approach to compute the associated error estimates, derived from a base grid to an extrapolated infinite-size grid, was first demonstrated on a sub-scaled wind tunnel model at representative ascent flow conditions for which the experimental data existed. Such analysis at the transonic flow conditions revealed a maximum deviation of about 23% between the computed longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients with the base grid and the measured data across the entire roll angles. This maximum deviation from the wind tunnel data was associated with the computed normal force coefficient at the transonic flow condition and was reduced to approximately 16% based on the infinite-size grid. However, all the computed aerodynamic coefficients with the base grid at the supersonic flow conditions showed a maximum deviation of only about 8% with that level being improved to approximately 5% for the infinite-size grid. The results and the error estimates based on the established procedure are also presented for the flight flow conditions.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Aerodynamic Penalties and Mechanisms in Heavy Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations that are conducted on a transport-type airfoil, NACA 64-210, at a Reynolds number of 2.6×106 and LWC of 25 g/m3 explore the aerodynamic penalties and mechanisms that affect airfoil performance in heavy rain conditions. Our simulation results agree well with the experimental data and show significant aerodynamic penalties for the airfoil in heavy rain. The maximum percentage decrease in CL is reached by 13.2% and the maximum percentage increase in CD by 47.6%. Performance degradation in heavy rain at low angles of attack is emulated by an originally creative boundary-layer-tripped technique near the leading edge. Numerical flow visualization technique is used to show premature boundary-layer separation at high angles of attack and the particulate trajectories at various angles of attack. A mathematic model is established to qualitatively study the water film effect on the airfoil geometric changes. All above efforts indicate that two primary mechanisms are accountable for the airfoil aerodynamic penalties. One is to cause premature boundary-layer transition at low AOA and separation at high AOA. The other occurs at times scales consistent with the water film layer, which is thought to alter the airfoil geometry and increase the mass effectively.

  15. Unsteady Aerodynamic Flow Control of Moving Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-29

    This error will arguably be diminished further with the future tuning of the PID controller that implements the motor commands. III.3.3 Aerodynamic...model is still aligned with the flow or ‘fine tune ’ the SMA power if it needs a minor realignment. III.1.2 Centered Static Model Prior to examining...8217 fluidic control. In addition, a PID controller is developed to effect ’closed loop’ fluidic control with optimally timed synthetic jet operation

  16. Special Course on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    Munich, 1973. £913 PINES, S. Aerodynamic flutter derivatives for an oscillating finite DUGUNDJI , J. thin wing in supersonic flow. JAS 23, p. 693, 1955... topology asso- ciated with forebody blowing about a slender cone model. 6-3 A.2 BACKGROUND A. 2.1 Forebody Flowfields at High Angles of Attack It is...spin. since the driving side force is produced by the vortex in the closest proximity to the surface.) The topology of the asymmetric vortex

  17. Compressor performance aerodynamics for the user

    CERN Document Server

    Gresh, Theodore

    2001-01-01

    Compressor Performance is a reference book and CD-ROM for compressor design engineers and compressor maintenance engineers, as well as engineering students. The book covers the full spectrum of information needed for an individual to select, operate, test and maintain axial or centrifugal compressors. It includes basic aerodynamic theory to provide the user with the ""how's"" and ""why's"" of compressor design. Maintenance engineers will especially appreciate the troubleshooting guidelines offered. Includes many example problems and reference data such as gas propert

  18. Aerodynamic sound of flow in corrugated tubes

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Aerodynamic sound emitted by flow through a finite length duct with corrugated inner surface is experimentally investigated. As the mechanism of sound generating oscillation, so far popular 'cavity-tone' mechanism was definitely denied. The principal reason is: With corrugation of helical geometry, no characteristic sound came on, while a pair of a nozzle edge and a leading edge both of which are helical, with constant distance, made essentially as loud sound as a pair of normal edges. Other ...

  19. Aerodynamic Benchmarking of the Deepwind Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedona, Gabriele; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge;

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic benchmarking for the DeepWind rotor is conducted comparing different rotor geometries and solutions and keeping the comparison as fair as possible. The objective for the benchmarking is to find the most suitable configuration in order to maximize the power production and minimize...... NACA airfoil family. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license...

  20. Aerodynamics of a rigid curved kite wing

    CERN Document Server

    Maneia, Gianmauro; Tordella, Daniela; Iovieno, Michele

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary numerical study on the aerodynamics of a kite wing for high altitude wind power generators is proposed. Tethered kites are a key element of an innovative wind energy technology, which aims to capture energy from the wind at higher altitudes than conventional wind towers. We present the results obtained from three-dimensional finite volume numerical simulations of the steady air flow past a three-dimensional curved rectangular kite wing (aspect ratio equal to 3.2, Reynolds number equal to 3x10^6). Two angles of incidence -- a standard incidence for the flight of a tethered airfoil (6{\\deg}) and an incidence close to the stall (18{\\deg}) -- were considered. The simulations were performed by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes flow model using the industrial STAR-CCM+ code. The overall aerodynamic characteristics of the kite wing were determined and compared to the aerodynamic characteristics of the flat rectangular non twisted wing with an identical aspect ratio and section (Clark Y profil...

  1. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight.

  2. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    This paper shows an example of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. The aerodynamic optimised geometry from PVOPT is the `real` optimum (up to the latest decimal). The most important conclusion from this study is, that it is worthwhile to investigate the behaviour of the objective function (in the present case the energy yield) around the optimum: If the optimum is flat, there is a possibility to apply modifications to the optimum configuration with only a limited loss in energy yield. It is obvious that the modified configurations emits a different (and possibly lower) noise level. In the BLADOPT program (the successor of PVOPT) it will be possible to quantify the noise level and hence to assess the reduced noise emission more thoroughly. At present the most promising approaches for noise reduction are believed to be a reduction of the rotor speed (if at all possible), and a reduction of the tip angle by means of low lift profiles, or decreased twist at the outboard stations. These modifications were possible without a significant loss in energy yield. (LN)

  3. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Technologies Testing of Heavy-Duty Vocational Vehicles and a Dry Van Trailer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragatz, Adam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thornton, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This study focused on two accepted methods for quantifying the benefit of aerodynamic improvement technologies on vocational vehicles: the coastdown technique, and on-road constant speed fuel economy measurements. Both techniques have their advantages. Coastdown tests are conducted over a wide range in speed and allow the rolling resistance and aerodynamic components of road load force to be separated. This in turn allows for the change in road load and fuel economy to be estimated at any speed, as well as over transient cycles. The on-road fuel economy measurements only supply one lumped result, applicable at the specific test speed, but are a direct measurement of fuel usage and are therefore used in this study as a check on the observed coastdown results. Resulting coefficients were then used to populate a vehicle model and simulate expected annual fuel savings over real-world vocational drive cycles.

  4. Assessment of 3D aerodynamic effects on the behaviour of floating wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolas, D.; Riziotis, V.; Voutsinas, S.

    2014-12-01

    Current state-of-art models for floating wind turbines are built by merging separate modules addressing the four basic aspects leading to a compound hydro-servo-aero-elastic time domain solver. While current state-of-the-art models differ in many aspects, they all use the blade element momentum (BEM) aerodynamic modelling. Due to its low cost, BEM is the standard choice for design purposes. However the use of BEM entails several semi-empirical corrections and add-ons that need reconsideration and recalibration when new features appear. For floating wind turbines, the effect of the floater motions is such a new feature. In the present paper, this aspect is investigated by comparing BEM based results against 3D free-wake simulations. Deterministic as well as stochastic simulations are presented in pure aerodynamic and full aeroelastic context. It is confirmed that asymmetric inflow originating from yaw misalignment and shear give significant differences reflected on mean values and amplitudes.

  5. Numerical Study of Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Symmetric NACA Section with Simulated Ice Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, N.; Cervantes, M. J.; Trivedi, C.; Aidanpää, Jan-Olof

    2016-09-01

    To develop a numerical model of icing on wind turbine blades, a CFD simulation was conducted to investigate the effect of critical ice accretions on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.610 m chord NACA 0011 airfoil section. Aerodynamic performance coefficients and pressure profile were calculated and compared with the available measurements for a chord Reynolds number of 1.83x106. Ice shapes were simulated with flat plates (spoiler-ice) extending along the span of the wing. Lift, drag, and pressure coefficients were calculated in zero angle of attack through the steady state and transient simulations. Different approaches of numerical studies have been applied to investigate the icing conditions on the blades. The simulated separated flow over the sharp spoilers is challenging and can be seen as a worst test case for validation. It allows determining a reliable strategy to simulate real ice shapes [1] for which the detailed validation cannot easily be provided.

  6. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijres, Florian T; Johansson, L Christoffer; Bowlin, Melissa S; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate longer distances

  7. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T Muijres

    Full Text Available Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate

  8. AERODYNAMIC BEHAVIOR AIRCRAFT CAUSED BY RESIDUAL STRAIN WINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiy Ishchenko

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The influence of residual strain on the airframe aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft wasconsidered. The possibility of estimation of changes in deformation of airframe using data of leveling wasshown. The method of estimating the change of aerodynamic characteristics caused by the influence ofresidual strain airframe was proposed. Technique can be used in the operation and overhaul of aircraft withlarge operating time.Keywords: aerodynamic characteristics, residual strain construction asymmetric moments, thedistribution of circulation, the scheme of leveling, trigonometric series.

  9. AERODYNAMIC BEHAVIOR AIRCRAFT CAUSED BY RESIDUAL STRAIN WINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Ishchenko, Sergiy; Tofil, Arkadiush

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. The influence of residual strain on the airframe aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft wasconsidered. The possibility of estimation of changes in deformation of airframe using data of leveling wasshown. The method of estimating the change of aerodynamic characteristics caused by the influence ofresidual strain airframe was proposed. Technique can be used in the operation and overhaul of aircraft withlarge operating time.Keywords: aerodynamic characteristics, residual strain constr...

  10. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  11. A new specimen of the Early Cretaceous bird Hongshanornis longicresta: insights into the aerodynamics and diet of a basal ornithuromorph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Chiappe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of Hongshanornis longicresta, a small ornithuromorph bird with unusually long hindlimb proportions, was followed by the discovery of two closely related species, Longicrusavis houi and Parahongshanornis chaoyangensis. Together forming the Hongshanornithidae, these species reveal important information about the early diversity and morphological specialization of ornithuromorphs, the clade that contains all living birds. Here we report on a new specimen (DNHM D2945/6 referable to Hongshanornis longicresta that contributes significant information to better understand the morphology, trophic ecology, and aerodynamics of this species, as well as the taxonomy of the Hongshanornithidae. Most notable are the well-preserved wings and feathered tail of DNHM D2945/6, which afford an accurate reconstruction of aerodynamic parameters indicating that as early as 125 million years ago, basal ornithuromorphs had evolved aerodynamic surfaces comparable in size and design to those of many modern birds, and flight modes alike to those of some small living birds.

  12. Differences in estimates of size distribution of beryllium powder materials using phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and liquid suspension counter techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Gregory A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accurate characterization of the physicochemical properties of aerosols generated for inhalation toxicology studies is essential for obtaining meaningful results. Great emphasis must also be placed on characterizing particle properties of materials as administered in inhalation studies. Thus, research is needed to identify a suite of techniques capable of characterizing the multiple particle properties (i.e., size, mass, surface area, number of a material that may influence toxicity. The purpose of this study was to characterize the morphology and investigate the size distribution of a model toxicant, beryllium. Beryllium metal, oxides, and alloy particles were aerodynamically size-separated using an aerosol cyclone, imaged dry using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, then characterized using phase contrast microscopy (PCM, a liquid suspension particle counter (LPC, and computer-controlled SEM (CCSEM. Beryllium metal powder was compact with smaller sub-micrometer size particles attached to the surface of larger particles, whereas the beryllium oxides and alloy particles were clusters of primary particles. As expected, the geometric mean (GM diameter of metal powder determined using PCM decreased with aerodynamic size, but when suspended in liquid for LPC or CCSEM analysis, the GM diameter decreased by a factor of two (p

  13. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic contrails are defined in this paper as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data, first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation, and how frequently (probability aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Finally we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally we give an argument for our believe that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  14. Aerodynamic stability of cable-stayed-suspension hybrid bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-jun; SUN Bing-nan

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional nonlinear aerodynamic stability analysis was applied to study the aerodynamic stability of a cable-stayed-suspension (CSS) hybrid bridge with main span of 1400 meters, and the effects of some design parameters (such as the cable sag, length of suspension portion, cable plane arrangement, subsidiary piers in side spans, the deck form, etc.) on the aerodynamic stability of the bridge are analytically investigated. The key design parameters, which significantly influence the aerodynamic stability of CSS hybrid bridges, are pointed out, and based on the wind stability the favorable structural system of CSS hybrid bridges is discussed.

  15. Aerodynamic instability of a cylinder with thin ice accretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstrup, Henrik; Georgakis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    prototyping. Next, a series of static wind tunnel tests were undertaken to determine the aerodynamic force coefficients of the rapidly prototyped hanger sectional model. Finally the aerodynamic force coefficients (drag, lift and moment), found from the static wind tunnel tests, were used to determine...... the potential for aerodynamic instability of the hanger through application of the quasi-steady theory developed by Gjelstrup et al. [9-10]. The application of the theoretical model yield regions of expected aerodynamic instability in which the observed vibrations of the Great Belt East Bridge hangers lie....

  16. Aerodynamic Modeling with Heterogeneous Data Assimilation and Uncertainty Quantification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear Science Corp. proposes to develop an aerodynamic modeling tool that assimilates data from different sources and facilitates uncertainty quantification. The...

  17. Some thoughts on separation control strategies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P R Viswanath

    2007-02-01

    Separation control has received considerable emphasis in literature both owing to fundamental flow physics and technological applications. Flow separation generally leads to increased energy losses, instability and so on, and its control is essential to improve aerodynamic performance. Here a brief review is presented of three broad strategies for separation control: these include methods that involve energization of the boundary layer upstream of separation, those that involve altering the bubble flow or dead air zone, and those that may influence the shear layer reattachment directly. Examples from recent research in our laboratories are reviewed and it is suggested that direct manipulation of the reattachment process could lead to effective control/management.

  18. Separation membrane development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.W. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A ceramic membrane has been developed to separate hydrogen from other gases. The method used is a sol-gel process. A thin layer of dense ceramic material is coated on a coarse ceramic filter substrate. The pore size distribution in the thin layer is controlled by a densification of the coating materials by heat treatment. The membrane has been tested by permeation measurement of the hydrogen and other gases. Selectivity of the membrane has been achieved to separate hydrogen from carbon monoxide. The permeation rate of hydrogen through the ceramic membrane was about 20 times larger than Pd-Ag membrane.

  19. Aerodynamic study on wing and tail small UAV without runways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetanto, Maria F.; R., Randy; Alfan M., R.; Dzaldi

    2016-06-01

    This paper consists of the design and analysis of the aerodynamics of the profiles of wing and tail of a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). UAV is a remote-controlled aircraft that can carry cameras, sensors and even weapons on an area that needed aerial photography or aerial video [1]. The aim of this small UAV is for used in situations where manned flight is considered too risky or difficult, such as fire fighting or surveillance, while the term 'small means the design of this UAV has to be relatively small and portable so that peoples are able to carry it during their operations [CASR Part 101.240: it is a UAV which is has a launch mass greater than 100 grams but less than 100 kilograms] [2]. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) method was used to analyze the fluid flow characteristics around the aerofoil's profiles, such as the lift generation for each angle of attack and longitudinal stability caused by vortex generation on trailing edge. Based on the analysis and calculation process, Clark-Y MOD with aspect ratio, AR = 4.28 and taper ratio, λ = 0.65 was chosen as the wing aerofoil and SD 8020 with AR = 4.8 and λ = 0.5 was chosen as the horizontal tail, while SD 8020 with AR = 1.58 and λ = 0.5 was chosen as the vertical tail. The lift and drag forces generated for wing and tail surfaces can be determined from the Fluent 6.3 simulation. Results showed that until angle of attack of 6 degrees, the formation of flow separation is still going on behind the trailing edge, and the stall condition occurs at 14 degrees angle of attack which is characterized by the occurrence of flow separation at leading edge, with a maximum lift coefficient (Cl) obtained = 1.56. The results of flight tests show that this small UAV has successfully maneuvered to fly, such as take off, some acrobatics when cruising and landing smoothly, which means that the calculation and analysis of aerodynamic aerofoil's profile used on the wing and tail of the Small UAV were able to be validated.

  20. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction for A Generic Sport Utility Vehicle Using Rear Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Ait Moussa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The high demand for new and improved aerodynamic drag reduction devices has led to the invention of flow control mechanisms and continuous suction is a promising strategy that does not have major impact on vehicle geometry. The implementation of this technique on sport utility vehicles (SUV requires adequate choice of the size and location of the opening as well as the magnitude of the boundary suction velocity. In this paper we introduce a new methodology to identifying these parameters for maximum reduction in aerodynamic drag. The technique combines automatic modeling of the suction slit, computational fluid dynamics (CFD and a global search method using orthogonal arrays. It is shown that a properly designed suction mechanism can reduce drag by up to 9%..

  1. The Characteristics and Parameterization of Aerodynamic Roughness Length over Heterogeneous Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Li; LIU Shaomin; XU Ziwei; YANG Kun; CAI Xuhui; JIA Li; WANG Jiemin

    2009-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (zOm) is a key factor in surface flux estimations with remote sensing algorithms and/or land surface models. This paper calculates zOm over several land surfaces, with 3 years of experimental data from Xiaotangshan. The results show that zOm is direction-dependent, mainly due to the heterogeneity of the size and spatial distribution of the roughness elements inside the source area along different wind directions. Furthermore, a heuristic parameterization of the aerodynamic roughness length for heterogeneous surfaces is proposed. Individual zOm over each surface component (patch) is calculated firstly with the characteristic parameters of the roughness elements (vegetation height, leaf area index, etc.), then zOm over the whole experimental field is aggregated, using the footprint weighting method.

  2. Experimental Aerodynamic Facilities of the Aerodynamics Research and Concepts Assistance Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    liquid droplets and other aerodynamic bodies which are sensitive to support interference and motion cross coupling effects. Rapid and accurate...AESD Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 HQ AFSC/SDZ ATTN: CPT D. Rledlger Andrews AFB, MD 20334 HQ, AFSC/SDNE Andrews AFB, MD 20334 HQ, AFSC/ SGB

  3. HRS Separator

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 90 and 60 degree ISOLDE HRS separator magnets in the HRS separator zone. In the two vacuum sectors HRS20 and HRS30 equipment such as the HRS slits SL240, the HRS faraday cup FC300 and wiregrid WG210 can be spotted. Vacuum valves, turbo pumps, beamlines, quadrupoles, water and compressed air connections, DC and signal cabling can be seen throughout the video. The HRS main and user beamgate in the beamline between MAG90 and MAG60 and its switchboxes as well as all vacuum bellows and flanges are shown. Instrumentation such as the HRS scanner unit 482 / 483, the HRS WG470 wiregrid and slits piston can be seen. The different quadrupoles and supports are shown as well as the RILIS guidance tubes and installation at the magnets and the different radiation monitors.

  4. GPS Separator

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 70 degree ISOLDE GPS separator magnet MAG70 as well as the switchyard for the Central Mass and GLM (GPS Low Mass) and GHM (GPS High Mass) beamlines in the GPS separator zone. In the GPS20 vacuum sector equipment such as the long GPS scanner 482 / 483 unit, faraday cup FC 490, vacuum valves and wiregrid piston WG210 and WG475 and radiation monitors can also be seen. Also the RILIS laser guidance and trajectory can be seen, the GPS main beamgate switch box and the actual GLM, GHM and Central Beamline beamgates in the beamlines as well as the first electrostatic quadrupoles for the GPS lines. Close up of the GHM deflector plates motor and connections and the inspection glass at the GHM side of the switchyard.

  5. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft at cruise levels can cause two kinds of contrails, the well known exhaust contrails and the less well-known aerodynamic contrails. While the possible climate impact of exhaust contrails has been studied for many years, research on aerodynamic contrails began only a few years ago and nothing is known about a possible contribution of these ice clouds to climate impact. In order to make progress in this respect, we first need a climatology of their formation conditions and this is given in the present paper. Aerodynamic contrails are defined here as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data: first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation, and how frequently (probability aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Furthermore, we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally, we argue that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  6. Aerodynamics of High-Speed Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetz, Joseph A.

    This review highlights the differences between the aerodynamics of high-speed trains and other types of transportation vehicles. The emphasis is on modern, high-speed trains, including magnetic levitation (Maglev) trains. Some of the key differences are derived from the fact that trains operate near the ground or a track, have much greater length-to-diameter ratios than other vehicles, pass close to each other and to trackside structures, are more subject to crosswinds, and operate in tunnels with entry and exit events. The coverage includes experimental techniques and results and analytical and numerical methods, concentrating on the most recent information available.

  7. Aerodynamic Modelling and Optimization of Axial Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft

    A numerically efficient mathematical model for the aerodynamics oflow speed axial fans of the arbitrary vortex flow type has been developed.The model is based on a blade-element principle, whereby therotor is divided into a number of annular streamtubes.For each of these streamtubes relations...... for velocity, pressure andradial position are derived from the conservationlaws for mass, tangential momentum and energy.The resulting system of equations is non-linear and, dueto mass conservation and pressure equilibrium far downstream of the rotor,strongly coupled.The equations are solved using the Newton...

  8. Aerodynamic Optimization of a Winglet Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahiaoui T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an experimental study is presented for a flow around an isolated wing equipped by a winglet and profiled with Naca 0012. Several cases of winglets were tested according to the angle ß: 0°, 55°, 65°and 75°. For all these cases at a velocity of 20, 30 and 40 meters per second, wind tunnel tests are performed and compared for different angles of incidence. It is observed that the aerodynamic performance of the winglet with β= 55° differ favorably for positive angle of incidence compared for other cases.

  9. Fluidization technologies: Aerodynamic principles and process engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Rahul; Puthli, Shivanand

    2009-11-01

    The concept of fluidization has been adapted to different unit processes of pharmaceutical product development. Till date a lot of improvements have been made in the engineering design to achieve superior process performance. This review is focused on the fundamental principles of aerodynamics and hydrodynamics associated with the fluidization technologies. Fluid-bed coating, fluidized bed granulation, rotor processing, hot melt granulation, electrostatic coating, supercritical fluid based fluidized bed technology are highlighted. Developments in the design of processing equipments have been explicitly elucidated. This article also discusses processing problems from the operator's perspective along with latest developments in the application of these principles.

  10. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic support struts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-03-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The support struts may include an aerodynamic contoured shape so as to distribute evenly a flow of air to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  11. Aerodynamically forced vibration analysis of turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchuri, V.; Pamidi, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of theoretical considerations for the determination of turbomachine response under aerodynamic excitation, as in the cases of advanced turboprop rotors with highly swept blades and axial flow compressors. Dynamic response is characterized in terms of the normal modal coordinates of tuned rotating cyclic structures for both rigid and flexible hubs/disks. Implementation of the scheme is in NASTRAN; coriolis and centripetal accelerations are included, together with differential stiffness effects. Analytically predicted vibratory stresses for the blades of two different advanced turboprops are compared to those determined by wind tunnel tests conducted by NASA-Lewis.

  12. Aerodynamic noise emission from turbulent shear layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The Phillips (1960) convected wave equation is employed in this paper to study aerodynamic noise emission processes in subsonic and supersonic shear layers. The wave equation in three spatial dimensions is first reduced to an ordinary differential equation by Fourier transformation and then solved via the WKBJ method. Three typical solutions are required for discussions in this paper. The current results are different from the classical conclusions. The effects of refraction, convection, Mach-number dependence and temperature dependence of turbulent noise emission are analyzed in the light of solutions to the Phillips equation.

  13. SIMULATION STUDY OF AERODYNAMIC FORCE FOR HIGH-SPEED MAGNETICALLY-LEVITATED TRAINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Renxian; LIU Yingqing; ZHAI Wanming

    2006-01-01

    Based on Reynolds average Navier-Storkes equations of viscous incompressible fluid and k-ε two equations turbulent model, the aerodynamic forces of high-speed magnetically-levitated(maglev) trains in transverse and longitudinal wind are investigated by finite volume method. Near 80 calculation cases for 2D transverse wind fields and 20 cases for 3D longitudinal wind fields are and lyzed. The aerodynamic side force, yawing, drag, lift and pitching moment for different types of maglev trains and a wheel/rail train are compared under the different wind speeds. The types of maglev train models for 2D transverse wind analysis included electromagnetic suspension (EMS) type train,electrodynamic suspension (EDS) type train, EMS type train with shelter wind wall in one side or two sides of guideway and the walls, which are in different height or/and different distances from train body. The situation of maglev train running on viaduct is also analyzed. For 3D longitudinal wind field analysis, the model with different sizes of air clearances beneath maglev train is examined for the different speeds. Calculation result shows that: ① Different transverse effects are shown in different types of maglev trains. ② The shelter wind wall can fairly decrease the transverse effect on the maglev train. ③ When the shelter wall height is 2 m, there is minimum side force on the train.When the shelter wall height is 2.5 m, there is minimum yawing moment on the train. ④ When the distance between inside surfaces of the walls and center of guideway is 4.0 m, there is minimum transverse influence on the train. ⑤ The size of air clearance beneath train body has a small influence on aerodynamic drag of the train, but has a fairly large effect on aerodynamic lift and pitching moment of the train. ⑥ The calculating lift and pitching moment for maglev train models are minus values.

  14. Aerodynamic characteristics and respiratory deposition of fungal fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Sung-Chul; Schmechel, Detlef; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of fungal fragments and to estimate their respiratory deposition. Fragments and spores of three different fungal species ( Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Stachybotrys chartarum) were aerosolized by the fungal spore source strength tester (FSSST). An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) measured the size distribution in real-time and collected the aerosolized fungal particles simultaneously onto 12 impactor stages in the size range of 0.3-10 μm utilizing water-soluble ZEF-X10 coating of the impaction stages to prevent spore bounce. For S. chartarum, the average concentration of released fungal fragments was 380 particles cm -3, which was about 514 times higher than that of spores. A. versicolor was found to release comparable amount of spores and fragments. Microscopic analysis confirmed that S. chartarum and A. versicolor did not show any significant spore bounce, whereas the size distribution of P. melinii fragments was masked by spore bounce. Respiratory deposition was calculated using a computer-based model, LUDEP 2.07, for an adult male and a 3-month-old infant utilizing the database on the concentration and size distribution of S. chartarum and A. versicolor aerosols measured by the ELPI. Total deposition fractions for fragments and spores were 27-46% and 84-95%, respectively, showing slightly higher values in an infant than in an adult. For S. chartarum, fragments demonstrated 230-250 fold higher respiratory deposition than spores, while the number of deposited fragments and spores of A. versicolor were comparable. It was revealed that the deposition ratio (the number of deposited fragments divided by that of deposited spores) in the lower airways for an infant was 4-5 times higher than that for an adult. As fungal fragments have been shown to contain mycotoxins and antigens, further exposure assessment should include the measurement of fungal fragments for

  15. Unsteady aerodynamics of reverse flow dynamic stall on an oscillating blade section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Andrew H.; Jones, Anya R.

    2016-07-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed on a sinusoidally oscillating NACA 0012 blade section in reverse flow. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry and unsteady surface pressure measurements were used to characterize the evolution of reverse flow dynamic stall and its sensitivity to pitch and flow parameters. The effects of a sharp aerodynamic leading edge on the fundamental flow physics of reverse flow dynamic stall are explored in depth. Reynolds number was varied up to Re = 5 × 105, reduced frequency was varied up to k = 0.511, mean pitch angle was varied up to 15∘, and two pitch amplitudes of 5∘ and 10∘ were studied. It was found that reverse flow dynamic stall of the NACA 0012 airfoil is weakly sensitive to the Reynolds numbers tested due to flow separation at the sharp aerodynamic leading edge. Reduced frequency strongly affects the onset and persistence of dynamic stall vortices. The type of dynamic stall observed (i.e., number of vortex structures) increases with a decrease in reduced frequency and increase in maximum pitch angle. The characterization and parameter sensitivity of reverse flow dynamic stall given in the present work will enable the development of a physics-based analytical model of this unsteady aerodynamic phenomenon.

  16. Design of Packaging for Microballoon Actuators and Feasibility of their Integration within Aerodynamic Flight Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Linga Murthy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The microballoon actuators are used for the active flow control in turbulent boundary layer for aerodynamic control of flight vehicles. The packaging, interfacing, and integration of the microballoon actuators within the flight vehicle play a key role for functioning of the microballoon actuators during the flight conditions. This paper addresses the design and analysis of packaging and integration aspects and associated issues. The use of microballoon actuators on the control surfaces and nose cone of flight vehicles has the positive influence of delaying the flow separation from the aerodynamic surface. This results in enhancing aerodynamic effectiveness and lift as well as reduction of drag. A typical control surface is configured with eight microballoon actuators symmetric wrt the hinge line of the control surface and embedded within the control surface. Provision of the Pneumatic feed line system for inflation and deflation of the microballoons within the control surface has been made. The nose cone has been designed to have 32 such actuators at the circular periphery. The design is found to be completely feasible for the incorporation of microballoon actuators, both in the nose cone and in the control surface.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(5, pp.485-493, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1549

  17. Wake analysis of aerodynamic components for the glide envelope of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    KleinHeerenbrink, Marco; Warfvinge, Kajsa; Hedenström, Anders

    2016-05-15

    Gliding flight is a relatively inexpensive mode of flight used by many larger bird species, where potential energy is used to cover the cost of aerodynamic drag. Birds have great flexibility in their flight configuration, allowing them to control their flight speed and glide angle. However, relatively little is known about how this flexibility affects aerodynamic drag. We measured the wake of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula) gliding in a wind tunnel, and computed the components of aerodynamic drag from the wake. We found that induced drag was mainly affected by wingspan, but also that the use of the tail has a negative influence on span efficiency. Contrary to previous work, we found no support for the separated primaries being used in controlling the induced drag. Profile drag was of similar magnitude to that reported in other studies, and our results suggest that profile drag is affected by variation in wing shape. For a folded tail, the body drag coefficient had a value of 0.2, rising to above 0.4 with the tail fully spread, which we conclude is due to tail profile drag.

  18. Aerodynamic mechanism of forces generated by twisting model-wing in bat flapping flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管子武; 余永亮

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic mechanism of the bat wing membrane along the lateral border of its body is studied. The twist-morphing that alters the angle of attack (AOA) along the span-wise direction is observed widely during bat flapping flight. An assumption is made that the linearly distributed AOA is along the span-wise direction. The plate with the aspect ratio of 3 is used to model a bat wing. A three-dimensional (3D) unsteady panel method is used to predict the aerodynamic forces generated by the flapping plate with leading edge separation. It is found that, relative to the rigid wing flapping, twisting motion can increase the averaged lift by as much as 25% and produce thrust instead of drag. Furthermore, the aerodynamic forces (lift/drag) generated by a twisting plate-wing are similar to those of a pitching rigid-wing, meaning that the twisting in bat flight has the same function as the supination/pronation motion in insect flight.

  19. Influence of anisotropic piezoelectric actuators on wing aerodynamic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Changing the shape of an airfoil to enhance overall aircraft performance has always been a goal of aircraft designers. Using smart material to reshape the wing can improve aerodynamic performance. The influence of anisotropic effects of piezoelectric actuators on the aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified HALE wing model was investigated. Test verification was conducted.

  20. Influence of anisotropic piezoelectric actuators on wing aerodynamic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN De; LI Min; LI Wei; WANG MingChun

    2008-01-01

    Changing the shape of an airfoil to enhance overall aircraft performance has always been s goal of aircraft designers.Using smart material to reshape the wing can improve aerodynamic performance.The influence of anisotropic effects of piezo-electric actuators on the aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified HALE wing model was investigated.Test verification was conducted.

  1. Exploring the Aerodynamic Drag of a Moving Cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilmann, Florian; Reinhard, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although the physics of cycling itself is a complex mixture of aerodynamics, physiology, mechanics, and heuristics, using cycling as a context for teaching physics has a tradition of certainly more than 30 years. Here, a possible feature is the discussion of the noticeable resistant forces such as aerodynamic drag and the associated power…

  2. Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Instability of Iced Bridge Cable Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Lund, Mia Schou Møller

    2013-01-01

    of bridge cables under wind action. This paper describes the experimental simulation of ice accretion on a real bridge cable sheet HDPE tube segment (diameter 160mm) and its effect on the aerodynamic load. Furthermore, aerodynamic instability will be estimated with quasi-steady theory using the determined...

  3. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic characteristics in flight dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobak, M.; Chapman, G. T.; Schiff, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    Basic concepts involved in the mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic response of an aircraft to arbitrary maneuvers are reviewed. The original formulation of an aerodynamic response in terms of nonlinear functionals is shown to be compatible with a derivation based on the use of nonlinear functional expansions. Extensions of the analysis through its natural connection with ideas from bifurcation theory are indicated.

  4. State of the art in wind turbine aerodynamics and aeroelasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Voutsinas, S

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive review of wind turbine aeroelasticity is given. The aerodynamic part starts with the simple aerodynamic Blade Element Momentum Method and ends with giving a review of the work done applying CFD on wind turbine rotors. In between is explained some methods of intermediate complexity...

  5. Inlet Particle-Sorting Cyclone for the Enhancement of PM2.5 Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peng-Bo; Wang, Fei; Yang, Xue-Jing; Ma, Liang; Cui, Xin; Wang, Hua-Lin

    2017-02-07

    Many cities are suffering from severe air pollution from fine particulate matter. Cyclone is an effective separator for particulate pollutant but has low efficiency for those with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM2.5). In this research, four novel inlet particle-sorting cyclones were first developed to enhance the separation of PM2.5. The energy consumption, overall separation efficiency, particle grade efficiency,outlet particle concentration and size distribution were compared with common cyclone (CM-C). It was found that the vertical reverse rotation cyclone (VRR-C), which made the smaller particles enter cyclone from radially outer side and axially lower side at the rectangular inlet, had the best separation performance, especially for PM2.5 separation. The mean diameter of inlet particles was 15.7 μm and the particle concentration was 2000 mg/m(3), the overall separation efficiency of the VRR-C reached 98.3%, which was 6.4% higher than that of CM-C. PM2.5 grade efficiency of the VRR-C exceeded 80%, which was 15∼20% higher than that of CM-C. The PM2.5 content at the VRR-C outlet was 30.8 mg/m(3), while that of CM-C was still 118.4 mg/m(3). The novel inlet particle-sorting cyclone is an effective separation enhancement for PM2.5 source control in the process of industrial production and environment protection.

  6. Aeroassist flight experiment aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    The problem is to determine the transitional flow aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, including the base flow characteristics, of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The justification for the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) Application stems from MSFC's system integration responsibility for the AFE. To insure that the AFE objectives are met, MSFC must understand the limitations and uncertainties of the design data. Perhaps the only method capable of handling the complex physics of the rarefied high energy AFE trajectory is Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The 3-D code used in this analysis is applicable only to the AFE geometry. It uses the Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) collision model and five specie chemistry model available from Langley Research Center. The code is benchmarked against the AFE flight data and used as an Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design tool. The code is being used to understand the AFE flow field and verify or modify existing design data. Continued application to lower altitudes is testing the capability of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) to handle 3-D DSMC and its practicality as an ASTV/AFE design tool.

  7. Cricket Ball Aerodynamics: Myth Versus Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Koga, Demmis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in the flight of a cricket ball released by a bowler. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can follow a curved flight path that is not always under the control of the bowler. ne basic aerodynamic principles responsible for the nonlinear flight or "swing" of a cricket ball were identified several years ago and many papers have been published on the subject. In the last 20 years or so, several experimental investigations have been conducted on cricket ball swing, which revealed the amount of attainable swing, and the parameters that affect it. A general overview of these findings is presented with emphasis on the concept of late swing and the effects of meteorological conditions on swing. In addition, the relatively new concept of "reverse" swing, how it can be achieved in practice and the role in it of ball "tampering", are discussed in detail. A discussion of the "white" cricket ball used in last year's World Cup, which supposedly possesses different swing properties compared to a conventional red ball, is also presented.

  8. THERMAL STRESS IN METEOROIDS BY AERODYNAMIC HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-YuKing

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stress in meteoroids by aerodynamic heating is calculated for the ideal case of an isotropic,homogeneous,elastic sphere being heated at the surface with a constant heattransfer coefficient. Given enough time,the tensile stress in the interior of the meteoroid can be as high as 10 kb. This stress value is greater than estimated tensile strengths of meteoroids and the aerodynamic compression they encounter. Significant thermal stress(1 kb) can develop quickly (within a few tens of seconds) in a small(radius<10 cm) stony meteoroid and a somewhat large(radius<l m)metallic meteoroid,and thus may cause tensile fracture to initiate in the meteotoid's interior. Fracture by thermal stress may have contributed to such observations as the existence of dust particles in upper atmosphere,the breakup of meteoroids at relatively low altitudes, the angular shape of meteorites and their wide scattering in a strewn field,and the explosive features of impact craters. In large meteoroids that require longer heating for thermal stress to fully develop, its effect is probably insignificant. The calculated stress values may be upper limits for real meteoroids which suffer melting and ablation at the surface.

  9. THERMAL STRESS IN METEOROIDS BY AERODYNAMIC HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Yu King

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stress in meteoroids by aerodynamic heating is calculated for the ideal case of an isotropic,homogeneous,elastic sphere being heated at the surface with a constant heattransfer coefficient. Given enough time, the tensile stress in the interior of the meteoroid can be as high as 10 kb. This stress value is greater than estimated tensile strengths of meteoroids and the aerodynamic compression they encounter. Significant thermal stress(1 kb) can develop quickly within a few tens of seconds) in a small(radius<10 cm) stony meteoroid and a somewhat large radius<l m)metallic meteoroid,and thus may cause tensile fracture to initiate in the meteotoid's interior. Fracture by thermal stress may have contributed to such observations as the existence of dust particles in upper atmosphere,the breakup of meteoroids at relatively low altitudes, the angular shape of meteorites and their wide scattering in a strewn field,and the explosive features of impact craters. In large meteoroids that require longer heating for thermal stress to fully develop,its effect is probably insignificant. The calculated stress values may be upper limits for real meteoroids which suffer melting and ablation at the surface.

  10. WECS Incompressible Complex Configuration Aerodynamics (WICCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preuss, R.; Morino, L.

    1976-05-01

    A finite-element method for determining the aerodynamic loading on rotors is presented. The report describes the development of the formulation for the steady state and numerical results for horizontal axis windmills. It is based on a general theory for uncompressible potential aerodynamics for complex configurations in a rotating frame of reference. If a rotor is rotating at constant angular velocity and is directed along a uniform wind distribution, the problem may be solved in the steady state for a frame of reference rotating with the rotor. A computer program (WICCA) has been designed to incorporate the method, and results compare favorably with an existing lifting surface formation. The program has been modified to include the hub for analysis. Further modifications are planned to study the effect of the coning angle, chord length distribution, blade pitch angle distribution, and airfoil section. The method may also be applied to unsteady flow problems such as non-uniform wind distributions (windmills in shear winds). The appendices contain graphs, the verification of expressions for the indefinite doublet and source integrals, proof of far wake, and hub geometry.

  11. STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF VAN-BODY TRUCKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the van-body truck were studied by means of theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiments. The concept of critical length was presented for the van-body truck in wind tunnel experiments, the proper critical Reynolds number was found and the effects of ground parameters in ground effect simulation on the aerodynamic measurements were examined. It shows that two structure parameters, van height and the gap between the cab and the van, can obviously influence the aerodynamic characteristics, and the additional aerodynamic devices, the wind deflector and the vortex regulator in the rear, can considerably reduce the aerodynamic drag of the van-body truck. Numerical simulations provided rich information of the flow fields around the van-body trucks.

  12. Results of an aerodynamic investigation of a space shuttle orbiter/747 carrier vehicle configuration to establish a free-stream data base for ALT separation investigations, utilizing a 0.0125-scale model (48-0/AX1318I-1) in the ARC 14-foot wind tunnel (CA23A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Force and moment data are presented which were obtained for each vehicle separately at a Mach number of 0.6, and for the mated orbiter/747 configuration at Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7. Orbiter angles of attack from 0 degrees to +12 degrees and 747/Carrier angles of attack from -3 degrees to +7 degrees were investigated at angles of sideslip of 0 degrees and -5 degrees. Model variables include orbiter elevon and rudder deflections, orbiter tail cone-on and off, various orbiter/747 attach structure configurations, 747 stabilizer and rudder deflections, and 747 CAM modification components-on and off. Photographs of test configurations are included.

  13. Plume aerodynamic effects of cushion engine in lunar landing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Bijiao; He Xiaoying; Zhang Mingxing; Cai Guobiao

    2013-01-01

    During the second period of China “Tanyue” Project,the explorer will softland on the moon.The cushion engines are used to decelerate the explorer and reduce the impact on the lunar ground.It is necessary to study its plume effects on the explorer component.The self-developed PWS (Plume WorkStation) software based on direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to simulate the plume effects of two 150 N engines.Due to the complex structure of the explorer,PWS uses a decoupling method to treat the boundary mesh,which mainly interacts with simulation particles,and has no relation with the computational grids.After the analytical expressions of plane surfaces and curved surfaces of each boundary block are given,the particle position within or without the boundary blocks can be easily determined.Finally the 3D plume field of two 150 N engines is simulated.The pressure,temperature and velocity distributions of plume field are clearly presented by three characteristic slices.The aerodynamic effects on the explorer bottom,the landfall legs and antenna are separately shown.The compression influence on the plume flow of four landfall legs can be observed.

  14. Large eddy simulation for aerodynamics: status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaut, Pierre; Deck, Sébastien

    2009-07-28

    The present paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of large eddy simulation (LES) and sequels for engineering applications related to aerodynamics. Most recent landmark achievements are presented. Two categories of problem may be distinguished whether the location of separation is triggered by the geometry or not. In the first case, LES can be considered as a mature technique and recent hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-LES methods do not allow for a significant increase in terms of geometrical complexity and/or Reynolds number with respect to classical LES. When attached boundary layers have a significant impact on the global flow dynamics, the use of hybrid RANS-LES remains the principal strategy to reduce computational cost compared to LES. Another striking observation is that the level of validation is most of the time restricted to time-averaged global quantities, a detailed analysis of the flow unsteadiness being missing. Therefore, a clear need for detailed validation in the near future is identified. To this end, new issues, such as uncertainty and error quantification and modelling, will be of major importance. First results dealing with uncertainty modelling in unsteady turbulent flow simulation are presented.

  15. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  16. Bird Flight as a Model for a Course in Unsteady Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jamey; Mitchell, Jonathan; Puopolo, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Traditional unsteady aerodynamics courses at the graduate level focus on theoretical formulations of oscillating airfoil behavior. Aerodynamics students with a vision for understanding bird-flight and small unmanned aircraft dynamics desire to move beyond traditional flow models towards new and creative ways of appreciating the motion of agile flight systems. High-speed videos are used to record kinematics of bird flight, particularly barred owls and red-shouldered hawks during perching maneuvers, and compared with model aircraft performing similar maneuvers. Development of a perching glider and associated control laws to model the dynamics are used as a class project. Observations are used to determine what different species and sizes of birds share in their methods to approach a perch under similar conditions. Using fundamental flight dynamics, simplified models capable of predicting position, attitude, and velocity of the flier are developed and compared with the observations. By comparing the measured data from the videos and predicted and measured motions from the glider models, it is hoped that the students gain a better understanding of the complexity of unsteady aerodynamics and aeronautics and an appreciation for the beauty of avian flight.

  17. Development and evaluation of an air-curtain fume cabinet with considerations of its aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R F; Wu, Y D; Chen, H D; Chen, C-C; Chen, C-W; Chang, C-P; Shih, T-S

    2007-03-01

    In order to avoid the inherent aerodynamic difficulties of the conventional fume hood, an innovative design--the 'air curtain-isolated fume hood' is developed. The new hood applies a specially designed air curtain (which is generated by a narrow planar jet and a suction slot flow at low velocities) across the sash plane. The hood constructed for the study is full size and transparent for flow visualization. The aerodynamic characteristics are diagnosed by using the laser-light-sheet-assisted smoke flow visualization method. Four characteristic air-curtain flow modes are identified in the domain of jet and suction velocities when the sash remains static. Some of these characteristic flow modes have much improved flow patterns when compared with those of the conventional fume hoods. From the viewpoint of the aerodynamics and mass transport, the results indicate that the air curtain properly setup across the sash opening allows almost no sensible exchange of momentum and mass between the flowfields of the cabinet and the outside environment. Two standard sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas concentration measurement methods following the ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 standard and the prEN14175 protocol for static test are employed to examine the contaminant leakage levels. Results of the rigorous examinations of leakage show unusually satisfactory hood performance. The leakage of the tracer gas can approach almost null (<0.001 p.p.m.) if the jet and suction velocities are properly adjusted.

  18. Component-based model to predict aerodynamic noise from high-speed train pantographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre Iglesias, E.; Thompson, D. J.; Smith, M. G.

    2017-04-01

    At typical speeds of modern high-speed trains the aerodynamic noise produced by the airflow over the pantograph is a significant source of noise. Although numerical models can be used to predict this they are still very computationally intensive. A semi-empirical component-based prediction model is proposed to predict the aerodynamic noise from train pantographs. The pantograph is approximated as an assembly of cylinders and bars with particular cross-sections. An empirical database is used to obtain the coefficients of the model to account for various factors: incident flow speed, diameter, cross-sectional shape, yaw angle, rounded edges, length-to-width ratio, incoming turbulence and directivity. The overall noise from the pantograph is obtained as the incoherent sum of the predicted noise from the different pantograph struts. The model is validated using available wind tunnel noise measurements of two full-size pantographs. The results show the potential of the semi-empirical model to be used as a rapid tool to predict aerodynamic noise from train pantographs.

  19. Computational Study on the Aerodynamic Performance of Wind Turbine Airfoil Fitted with Coandă Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Djojodihardjo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various methods of flow control for enhanced aerodynamic performance have been developed and applied to enhance and control the behavior of aerodynamic components. The use of Coandă effect for the enhancement of circulation and lift has gained renewed interest, in particular with the progress of CFD. The present work addresses the influence, effectiveness, and configuration of Coandă-jet fitted aerodynamic surface for improving lift and L/D, specifically for S809 airfoil, with a view on its incorporation in the wind turbine. A simple two-dimensional CFD modeling using k-ɛ turbulence model is utilized to reveal the key elements that could exhibit the desired performance for a series of S809 airfoil configurations. Parametric study performed indicates that the use of Coandă-jet S809 airfoil can only be effective in certain range of trailing edge rounding-off radius, Coandă-jet thickness, and momentum jet size. The location of the Coandă-jet was found to be effective when it is placed close to the trailing edge. The results are compared with experimental data for benchmarking. Three-dimensional configurations are synthesized using certain acceptable assumptions. A trade-off study on the S809 Coandă configured airfoil is needed to judge the optimum configuration of Coandă-jet fitted Wind-Turbine design.

  20. Aerodynamics of a Gulfstream G550 Nose Landing Gear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss detailed steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a Gulfstream G550 nose landing gear model. The quarter-scale, high-fidelity model includes part of the lower fuselage and the gear cavity. The full model configuration allowed for removal of various gear components (e.g. light cluster, steering mechanism, hydraulic lines, etc.) in order to document their effects on the local flow field. The measurements were conducted at a Reynolds number of 7.3 x 10(exp 4) based on the shock strut (piston) diameter and a freestream Mach number of 0.166. Additional data were also collected at lower Mach numbers of 0.12 and 0.145 and correspondingly lower Reynolds numbers. The boundary layer on the piston was tripped to enable turbulent flow separation, so as to better mimic the conditions encountered during flight. Steady surface pressures were gathered from an extensive number of static ports on the wheels, door, fuselage, and within the gear cavity. To better understand the resultant flow interactions between gear components, surface pressure fluctuations were collected via sixteen dynamic pressure sensors strategically placed on various subcomponents of the gear. Fifteen of the transducers were flush mounted on the gear surface at fixed locations, while the remaining one was a mobile transducer that could be placed at numerous varying locations. The measured surface pressure spectra are mainly broadband in nature, lacking any local peaks associated with coherent vortex shedding. This finding is in agreement with off-surface flow measurements using PIV that revealed the flow field to be a collection of separated shear layers without any dominant vortex shedding processes.

  1. A generalized solution of elasto-aerodynamic lubrication for aerodynamic compliant foil bearings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Lie; QI; Shemiao; GENG; Haipeng

    2005-01-01

    Although aerodynamic compliant foil bearings are successfully applied in a number of turbo-machineries, theoretical researches on the modeling, performance prediction of compliant foil bearings and the dynamic analysis of the related rotor system seem still far behind the experimental investigation because of structural complexity of the foil bearings. A generalized solution of the elasto-aerodynamic lubrication is presented in this paper by introducing both static and dynamic deformations of foils and solving gas-lubricated Reynolds equations with deformation equations simultaneously. The solution can be used for the calculation of dynamic stiffness and damping, as well as the prediction of static performances of foil bearings. Systematical theories and methods are also presented for the purpose of the prediction of dynamic behavior of a rotor system equipped with foil bearings.

  2. Mass spectrometric analysis and aerodynamic properties of various types of combustion-related aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Helas, G.; Gwaze, P.; Schmid, O.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchner, U.

    2006-12-01

    Various types of combustion-related particles in the size range between 100 and 850 nm were analyzed with an aerosol mass spectrometer and a differential mobility analyzer. The measurements were performed with particles originating from biomass burning, diesel engine exhaust, laboratory combustion of diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as from spark soot generation. Physical and morphological parameters like fractal dimension, effective density, bulk density and dynamic shape factor were derived or at least approximated from the measurements of electrical mobility diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter. The relative intensities of the mass peaks in the mass spectra obtained from particles generated by a commercial diesel passenger car, by diesel combustion in a laboratory burner, and by evaporating and re-condensing lubrication oil were found to be very similar. The mass spectra from biomass burning particles show signatures identified as organic compounds like levoglucosan but also others which are yet unidentified. The aerodynamic behavior yielded a fractal dimension (Df) of 2.09 +/- 0.06 for biomass burning particles from the combustion of dry beech sticks, but showed values around three, and hence more compact particle morphologies, for particles from combustion of more natural oak. Scanning electron microscope images confirmed the finding that the beech combustion particles were fractal-like aggregates, while the oak combustion particles displayed a much more compact shape. For particles from laboratory combusted diesel fuel, a Df value of 2.35 was found, for spark soot particles, Df [approximate] 2.10. The aerodynamic properties of fractal-like particles from dry beech wood combustion indicate an aerodynamic shape factor [chi] that increases with electrical mobility diameter, and a bulk density of 1.92 g cm-3. An upper limit of [chi] [approximate] 1.2 was inferred for the shape factor of the more compact particles from oak combustion.

  3. Ares I Aerodynamic Testing at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Tomek, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout three full design analysis cycles, the Ares I project within the Constellation program has consistently relied on the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel (PSWT) for aerodynamic testing of the subsonic, transonic and supersonic portions of the atmospheric flight envelope (Mach=0.5 to 4.5). Each design cycle required the development of aerodynamic databases for the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) forces and moments, as well as distributed line-loads databases covering the full range of Mach number, total angle-of-attack, and aerodynamic roll angle. The high fidelity data collected in this facility has been consistent with the data collected in NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the overlapping condition ofMach=1.6. Much insight into the aerodynamic behavior of the launch vehicle during all phases of flight was gained through wind tunnel testing. Important knowledge pertaining to slender launch vehicle aerodynamics in particular was accumulated. In conducting these wind tunnel tests and developing experimental aerodynamic databases, some challenges were encountered and are reported as lessons learned in this paper for the benefit of future crew launch vehicle aerodynamic developments.

  4. Multiprocessing on supercomputers for computational aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1991-01-01

    Little use is made of multiple processors available on current supercomputers (computers with a theoretical peak performance capability equal to 100 MFLOPS or more) to improve turnaround time in computational aerodynamics. The productivity of a computer user is directly related to this turnaround time. In a time-sharing environment, such improvement in this speed is achieved when multiple processors are used efficiently to execute an algorithm. The concept of multiple instructions and multiple data (MIMD) is applied through multitasking via a strategy that requires relatively minor modifications to an existing code for a single processor. This approach maps the available memory to multiple processors, exploiting the C-Fortran-Unix interface. The existing code is mapped without the need for developing a new algorithm. The procedure for building a code utilizing this approach is automated with the Unix stream editor.

  5. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  6. WECS incompressible Lifting Surface Aerodynamics (WILSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suciu, E.; Morino, L.

    1976-05-01

    A method is described for computing the distribution for a zero-thickness horizontal axis windmill, as well as for obtaining the power coefficient. The problem is formulated in terms of velocity potential, and the study deals with a nonlinear finite-element lifting-surface analysis of horizontal-axis windmills in a steady incompressible, inviscid, irrotational flow, with a prescribed helicoidal wake. A zero-order-finite-element analysis is used with a straight-vortex line wake. The correct wake geometry is obtained and the pressure coefficient calculated using both linearized and nonlinear forms of the Bernoulli Theorem. The numerical results compare well with those obtained with Windmill Incompressible Complex Configuration Aerodynamics (WICCA), a computer program for solving the same problem which uses a completely different integral equation. A number of suggestions are offered to improve the model presented.

  7. Wind Turbines: Unsteady Aerodynamics and Inflow Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Brian Riget

    ; and Graham, J. M. R.: 1970, Lifting surface theory for the problem of an arbitrarily yawed sinusoidal gust incident on a thin aerofoil in incompressible flow). Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil...... (Sears, W. R.: 1941; and Graham, J. M. R.: 1970). An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input (Amiet, R. K.: 1975, Acoustic radiation from an airfoil in a turbulent stream). The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models...... and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model...

  8. Aerodynamic levitation : an approach to microgravity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glorieux, B.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Millot, F.; Enderby, J.; Rifflet, J.-C.

    2000-12-05

    Measurements of the thermophysical and structural properties of liquid materials at high temperature have undergone considerable development in the past few years. Following improvements in electromagnetic levitation, aerodynamic levitation associated with laser heating has shown promise for assessing properties of different molten materials (metals, oxides, and semiconductors), preserving sample purity over a wide range of temperatures and under different gas environments. The density, surface tension and viscosity are measured with a high-speed video camera and an image analysis system. Results on nickel and alumina show that small droplets can be considered in the first approximation to be under microgravity conditions. Using a non-invasive contactless technique recently developed to measure electrical conductivity, results have been extended to variety of materials ranging from liquid metals and liquid semiconductors to ionically conducting materials. The advantage of this technique is the feasibility of monitoring changes in transport occurring during phase transitions and in deeply undercooled states.

  9. Aerodynamic Optimization of Micro Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ping Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD study was done on the propeller design of a micro aerial vehicle (quadrotor-typed to optimize its aerodynamic performance via Shear Stress Transport K-Omega (SST k-ω turbulence model. The quadrotor model used was WL-V303 Seeker. The design process started with airfoils selection and followed by the evaluation of drone model in hovering and cruising conditions. To sustain a 400g payload, by Momentum Theory an ideal thrust of 5.4 N should be generated by each rotor of the quadrotor and this resulted in an induced velocity of 7.4 m/s on the propeller during hovering phase, equivalent to Reynolds number of 10403 at 75% of the propeller blade radius. There were 6 propellers investigated at this Reynolds number. Sokolov airfoil which produced the largest lift-to-drag ratio was selected for full drone installation to be compared with the original model (benchmark. The CFD results showed that the Sokolov propeller generated 0.76 N of thrust more than the benchmark propeller at 7750 rpm. Despite generating higher thrust, higher drag was also experienced by the drone installed with Sokolov propellers. This resulted in lower lift-to-drag ratio than the benchmark propellers. It was also discovered that the aerodynamic performance of the drone could be further improved by changing the rotating direction of each rotor. Without making changes on the structural design, the drone performance increased by 39.58% in terms of lift-to-drag ratio by using this method.

  10. Landing Gear Aerodynamic Noise Prediction Using Building-Cube Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Sasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Landing gear noise prediction method is developed using Building-Cube Method (BCM. The BCM is a multiblock-structured Cartesian mesh flow solver, which aims to enable practical large-scale computation. The computational domain is composed of assemblage of various sizes of building blocks where small blocks are used to capture flow features in detail. Because of Cartesian-based mesh, easy and fast mesh generation for complicated geometries is achieved. The airframe noise is predicted through the coupling of incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver and the aeroacoustic analogy-based Curle’s equation. In this paper, Curle’s equation in noncompact form is introduced to predict the acoustic sound from an object in flow. This approach is applied to JAXA Landing gear Evaluation Geometry model to investigate the influence of the detail components to flows and aerodynamic noises. The position of torque link and the wheel cap geometry are changed to discuss the influence. The present method showed good agreement with the preceding experimental result and proved that difference of the complicated components to far field noise was estimated. The result also shows that the torque link position highly affects the flow acceleration at the axle region between two wheels, which causes the change in SPL at observation point.

  11. Microgravity Passive Phase Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragano, Matthew; Indoe, William; Darmetko, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A new invention disclosure discusses a structure and process for separating gas from liquids in microgravity. The Microgravity Passive Phase Separator consists of two concentric, pleated, woven stainless- steel screens (25-micrometer nominal pore) with an axial inlet, and an annular outlet between both screens (see figure). Water enters at one end of the center screen at high velocity, eventually passing through the inner screen and out through the annular exit. As gas is introduced into the flow stream, the drag force exerted on the bubble pushes it downstream until flow stagnation or until it reaches an equilibrium point between the surface tension holding bubble to the screen and the drag force. Gas bubbles of a given size will form a front that is moved further down the length of the inner screen with increasing velocity. As more bubbles are added, the front location will remain fixed, but additional bubbles will move to the end of the unit, eventually coming to rest in the large cavity between the unit housing and the outer screen (storage area). Owing to the small size of the pores and the hydrophilic nature of the screen material, gas does not pass through the screen and is retained within the unit for emptying during ground processing. If debris is picked up on the screen, the area closest to the inlet will become clogged, so high-velocity flow will persist farther down the length of the center screen, pushing the bubble front further from the inlet of the inner screen. It is desired to keep the velocity high enough so that, for any bubble size, an area of clean screen exists between the bubbles and the debris. The primary benefits of this innovation are the lack of any need for additional power, strip gas, or location for venting the separated gas. As the unit contains no membrane, the transport fluid will not be lost due to evaporation in the process of gas separation. Separation is performed with relatively low pressure drop based on the large surface

  12. Center for Computational Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and operate a wind farm optimally it is necessary to know in detail how the wind behaves and interacts with the turbines in a farm. This not only requires knowledge about meteorology, turbulence and aerodynamics, but it also requires access to powerful computers and efficient...... software. Center for Computational Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Atmospheric Turbulence was established in 2010 in order to create a world-leading cross-disciplinary flow center that covers all relevant disciplines within wind farm meteorology and aerodynamics....

  13. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

  14. Fourier analysis of the aerodynamic behavior of cup anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Imanol; Aguado, Maite

    2013-06-01

    The calibration results (the transfer function) of an anemometer equipped with several cup rotors were analyzed and correlated with the aerodynamic forces measured on the isolated cups in a wind tunnel. The correlation was based on a Fourier analysis of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. Three different cup shapes were studied: typical conical cups, elliptical cups and porous cups (conical-truncated shape). Results indicated a good correlation between the anemometer factor, K, and the ratio between the first two coefficients in the Fourier series decomposition of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force.

  15. 基于轨迹图像的气液旋风分离器液滴粒度、浓度、速度的在线测量%In-line measurement of size, concentration and velocity of drops from gas-liquid cyclone separator based on trajectory image processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海龙; 陈孝震; 蔡小舒; 余方

    2012-01-01

    For measuring size, concentration and velocity of droplets from the cyclone separator inlet and outlet, a measurement system based on trajectory image processing was developed. Principles of measurement were introduced. Droplets from cyclone separator were always spherical under the surface tension of water. It was reasonable to approximate the width of trajectory particle image as the diameter of droplets. The distance over which droplets moved in exposure time was obtained from trajectory image by processing, and the velocity of droplets could be easily calculated. Telecentric lens was used as an important part of measurement system. Common lens exhibited varying magnification for objects at different distances from the lens, but telecentric lens provided the same magnification at all distances, so droplets at different distances were the same size in the image. Firstly, images of particles were taken by capture system, and images were processed with a computer program. Then the particle size, concentration and velocity could be calculated. The system was installed in an experimental set-up that was used to study the performance of the cyclone separator. The experiment results showed that the system avoided the inversing process and had high size resolution as compared with traditional measurement system with the light scattering method. And it could make a measurement in line, and was better than other systems.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport configuration with a over-the-wing nacelle-pylon arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, W. P.; Abeyounis, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport configuration of installing an over-the-wing nacelle-pylon arrangement. The tests are conducted at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.82 and at angles of attack from -2 deg to 4 deg. The configurational variables under study include symmetrical and contoured nacelles and pylons, pylon size, and wing leading-edge extensions. The symmetrical nacelles and pylons reduce the lift coefficient, increase the drag coefficient, and cause a nose-up pitching-moment coefficient. The contoured nacelles significantly reduce the interference drag, though it is still excessive. Increasing the pylon size reduces the drag, whereas adding wing leading-edge extension does not affect the aerodynamic characteristics significantly.

  17. Aerodynamic Optimization of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine with Trailing Edge Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ertem, Sercan; Ferreira, Carlos Simao; Gaunaa, Mac;

    2016-01-01

    Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) are competitive concepts for very large scale (10-20 MW)floating ofshore applications. Rotor circulation control (loading control) opens a wide design space to enhance the aerodynamic and operational features of VAWT. The modied linear derivation of the Actuator...... gains for various solidity, tip-speed ratio, maximum ap defection and ap size are quantifed in inviscidow. This extensive work presents new insights on the performance of a VAWT with innite number of blades as well as it provides a solid foundation forap usage on a real VAWT rotor to enhance its...

  18. Integrated Design Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment - Aerodynamics, Aerothermodynamics, and Thermal Protection System Integration Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hilmi N.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the work performed during from March 2010 October 2011. The Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) environment is a collaborative environment based on an object-oriented, multidisciplinary, distributed environment using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as the underlying framework. This report will focus on describing the work done in the area of extending the aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics module using S/HABP, CBAERO, PREMIN and LANMIN. It will also detail the work done integrating EXITS as the TPS sizing tool.

  19. What is the critical height of leading edge roughness for aerodynamics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christian; Gaunaa, Mac; Olsen, Anders Smærup;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the critical leading edge roughness height is analyzed in two cases: 1) leading edge roughness influencing the lift-drag ratio and 2) leading edge roughness influencing the maximum lift. The analysis was based on wind tunnel measurements on the airfoils NACA0015, Risoe-B1-18 and Ris...... with panel code predictions of the boundary layer momentum thickness created the basis for determining the impact of roughness on the aerodynamic performance. The critical heights were related to the Reynolds numbers and thereby the size of the wind turbines....

  20. Cylinder wake influence on the tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Nakano, T.; Nashimoto, A.

    2006-11-01

    The influence of cylinder wake on discrete tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil is studied experimentally in a uniform flow at a moderate Reynolds number. The experiments are carried out by measuring sound pressure levels and spectrum, separation and the reattachment points, pressure distribution, fluid forces, mean-flow and turbulence characteristics around the airfoil with and without the cylinder wake. Present results indicate that the tonal noise from the airfoil is suppressed by the influence of the cylinder wake and the aerodynamic characteristics are improved in comparison with the case without the cylinder wake. These are mainly due to the separation control of boundary layers over the airfoil caused by the wake-induced transition, which is observed by surface flow visualization with liquid- crystal coating. The PIV measurements of the flow field around the airfoil confirm that highly turbulent velocity fluctuation of the cylinder wake induces the transition of the boundary layers and produces an attached boundary layer over the airfoil. Then, the vortex shedding phenomenon near the trailing edge of pressure surface is removed by the influence of the wake and results in the suppression of tonal noise.

  1. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design with Transition Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enhance aerodynamic design capabilities, Desktop Aeronautics proposes to combine a new sweep/taper integrated-boundary-layer (IBL) code that includes transition...

  2. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design with Transition Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enhance aerodynamic design capabilities, Desktop Aeronautics proposes to significantly improve upon the integration (performed in Phase 1) of a new sweep/taper...

  3. The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III : Trucks, Buses and Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Orellano, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International conference “The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III: Trucks, Buses and Trains” held in Potsdam, Germany, September 12-17, 2010 by Engineering Conferences International (ECI). Leading scientists and engineers from industry, universities and research laboratories, including truck and high-speed train manufacturers and operators were brought together to discuss computer simulation and experimental techniques to be applied for the design of more efficient trucks, buses and high-speed trains in the future.   This conference was the third in the series after Monterey-Pacific Groove in 2002 and Lake Tahoe in 2007.  The presentations address different aspects of train aerodynamics (cross wind effects, underbody flow, tunnel aerodynamics and aeroacoustics, experimental techniques), truck aerodynamics (drag reduction, flow control, experimental and computational techniques) as well as computational fluid dynamics and bluff body, wake and jet flows.

  4. Theoretical and applied aerodynamics and related numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Chattot, J J

    2015-01-01

    This book covers classical and modern aerodynamics, theories and related numerical methods, for senior and first-year graduate engineering students, including: -The classical potential (incompressible) flow theories for low speed aerodynamics of thin airfoils and high and low aspect ratio wings. - The linearized theories for compressible subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics. - The nonlinear transonic small disturbance potential flow theory, including supercritical wing sections, the extended transonic area rule with lift effect, transonic lifting line and swept or oblique wings to minimize wave drag. Unsteady flow is also briefly discussed. Numerical simulations based on relaxation mixed-finite difference methods are presented and explained. - Boundary layer theory for all Mach number regimes and viscous/inviscid interaction procedures used in practical aerodynamics calculations. There are also four chapters covering special topics, including wind turbines and propellers, airplane design, flow analogies and h...

  5. Unified Aeroacoustics Analysis for High Speed Turboprop Aerodynamics and Noise. Volume 1; Development of Theory for Blade Loading, Wakes, and Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    A unified theory for the aerodynamics and noise of advanced turboprops are presented. Aerodynamic topics include calculation of performance, blade load distribution, and non-uniform wake flow fields. Blade loading can be steady or unsteady due to fixed distortion, counter-rotating wakes, or blade vibration. The aerodynamic theory is based on the pressure potential method and is therefore basically linear. However, nonlinear effects associated with finite axial induction and blade vortex flow are included via approximate methods. Acoustic topics include radiation of noise caused by blade thickness, steady loading (including vortex lift), and unsteady loading. Shielding of the fuselage by its boundary layer and the wing are treated in separate analyses that are compatible but not integrated with the aeroacoustic theory for rotating blades.

  6. Unsteady Low Reynolds Number Aerodynamics for Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    horizontal model. The first has advantages of placing t he force balance above the water line and thus solving the balance waterproofing i ssues , an d h...ABSTRACT This work introduces the Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) problem from the viewpoint of aerodynamics. Water tunnels are assessed as tools for MAV...aerodynamics. The design, construction and instrumentation of RB’s “Horizontal Free-surface Water Tunnel” is documented. Experiments in steady

  7. Progress in vehicle aerodynamics and thermal management. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Jochen (ed.) [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Kraftfahrwesen und Verbrennungsmotoren (IVK); Forschungsinstitut fuer Kraftfahrwesen und Fahrzeugmotoren (FKFS), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Vehicle aerodynamics and thermal management are subjects of increasing importance for automotive development especially regarding the necessity to reduce the energy consumption of the vehicle as well as the need to improve ist comfort. This book is intended for engineers, physicists, and mathematicians who work on vehicle aerodynamics. It is also addressed to people in research organizations, at universities and agencies. It may be of interest to technical journalists and to students. (orig.)

  8. Aerodynamic optimisation of an industrial axial fan blade

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Numerical optimisation methods have successfully been used for a variety of aerodynamic design problems over quite a few years. However the application of these methods to the aerodynamic blade shape optimisation of industrial axial fans has received much less attention in the literature probably given the fact that the majority of resources available to develop these automated design approaches is to be found in the aerospace field. This work presents the develo...

  9. Aerodynamics of indirect thrust measurement by the impulse method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Kang Wu; Hai-Xing Wang; Xian Meng; Xi Chen; Wen-Xia Pan

    2011-01-01

    The aerodynamic aspects of indirect thrust measurement by the impulse method have been studied both experimentally and numerically.The underlying basic aerodynamic principle is outlined, the phenomena in subsonic,supersonic and arc-heated jets are explored, and factors affecting the accuracy of the method are studied and discussed.Results show that the impulse method is reliable for indirect thrust measurement if certain basic requirements are met,and a simple guideline for its proper application is given.

  10. Fourier analysis of the aerodynamic behavior of cup anemometers

    OpenAIRE

    Pindado Carrion, Santiago; Pérez Sarasola, Imanol; Aguado Roca, Maite

    2013-01-01

    The calibration results (the transfer function) of an anemometer equipped with several cup rotors were analyzed and correlated with the aerodynamic forces measured on the isolated cups in a wind tunnel. The correlation was based on a Fourier analysis of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. Three different cup shapes were studied: typical conical cups, elliptical cups and porous cups (conical-truncated shape). Results indicated a good correlation between the anemometer factor, K, and the r...

  11. Separation enhancement in pinched flow fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vig, Asger Laurberg; Kristensen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    polystyrene bead sizes ranging from 0.25 to 2.5 mu m in radius were separated in a PFF and in an enhanced PFF device. The separation in the two types of devices were compared and an amplification in the separation of up to 70% was achieved. Numerical calculations, which include an edge effect, are used...

  12. Unsteady Thick Airfoil Aerodynamics: Experiments, Computation, and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangfeld, C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Mueller-Vahl, H.; Greenblatt, D.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental, computational and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamic loads acting on a relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil when subjected to pitching and surging, individually and synchronously. Both pre-stall and post-stall angles of attack were considered. Experiments were carried out in a dedicated unsteady wind tunnel, with large surge amplitudes, and airfoil loads were estimated by means of unsteady surface mounted pressure measurements. Theoretical predictions were based on Theodorsen's and Isaacs' results as well as on the relatively recent generalizations of van der Wall. Both two- and three-dimensional computations were performed on structured grids employing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS). For pure surging at pre-stall angles of attack, the correspondence between experiments and theory was satisfactory; this served as a validation of Isaacs theory. Discrepancies were traced to dynamic trailing-edge separation, even at low angles of attack. Excellent correspondence was found between experiments and theory for airfoil pitching as well as combined pitching and surging; the latter appears to be the first clear validation of van der Wall's theoretical results. Although qualitatively similar to experiment at low angles of attack, two-dimensional URANS computations yielded notable errors in the unsteady load effects of pitching, surging and their synchronous combination. The main reason is believed to be that the URANS equations do not resolve wake vorticity (explicitly modeled in the theory) or the resulting rolled-up un- steady flow structures because high values of eddy viscosity tend to \\smear" the wake. At post-stall angles, three-dimensional computations illustrated the importance of modeling the tunnel side walls.

  13. Aerodynamically generated noise by lightning arrester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Váchová J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the general solution of aerodynamically generated noise by lightning arrester. Governing equations are presented in form of Lighthill acoustic analogy, as embodied in the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H equation. This equation is based on conservation laws of fluid mechanics rather than on the wave equation. Thus, the FW-H equation is valid even if the integration surface is in nonlinear region. That’s why the FWH method is superior in aeroacoustics. The FW-H method is implemented in program Fluent and the numerical solution is acquired by Fluent code.The general solution of acoustic signal generated by lightning arrester is shown and the results in form of acoustic pressure and frequency spectrum are presented. The verification of accuracy was made by evaluation of Strouhal number. A comparison of Strouhal number for circumfluence of a cylinder and the lightning arrester was done, because the experimental data for cylinder case are known and these solids are supposed to be respectively in shape relation.

  14. IEA joint action. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-08-01

    The advances to be made in aerodynamic prediction requires a deeper understanding of the physical processes occurring at the blades, and in the wake, of a wind turbine. This can only come from a continuing process of experimental observation and theoretical analysis. The present symposium presents the opportunity to do this by exchange of data from experiments and simulations, and by discussion of new or modified wake theories. The symposium will consists of a number of presentations by invited speakers and conclude with a summary of the talks and a round-the-table technical discussion. The talks offer the change to present behaviour from full-scale and laboratory experiments that are not explained by existing prediction codes. In addition, presentations are welcome on new modelling techniques or formulations that could make existing codes more accurate, less computationally intensive and easier to use. This symposium is intended to provide a starting point for the formulation of advanced rotor performance methods, which will improve the accuracy of load and performance prediction codes useful to the wind turbine industry. (au)

  15. Unsteady aerodynamic modelling of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coton, F.N.; Galbraith, R.A. [Univ. og Glasgow, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The following current and future work is discussed: Collaborative wind tunnel based PIV project to study wind turbine wake structures in head-on and yawed flow. Prescribed wake model has been embedded in a source panel representation of the wind tunnel walls to allow comparison with experiment; Modelling of tower shadow using high resolution but efficient vortex model in tower shadow domain; Extension of model to yawing flow; Upgrading and tuning of unsteady aerodynamic model for low speed, thick airfoil flows. Glasgow has a considerable collection of low speed dynamic stall data. Currently, the Leishman - Beddoes model is not ideally suited to such flows. For example: Range of stall onset criteria used for dynamic stall prediction including Beddoes. Wide variation of stall onset prediction. Beddoes representation was developed primarily with reference to compressible flows. Analyses of low speed data from Glasgow indicate deficiencies in the current model; Predicted versus measured response during ramp down motion. Modification of the Beddoes representation is required to obtain a fit with the measured data. (EG)

  16. Computational aerodynamics and aeroacoustics for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, W.Z.

    2009-10-15

    The present thesis consists of 19 selected papers dealing with the development and use of CFD methods for studying the aerodynamics and aero-acoustics of wind turbines. The papers are written in the period from 1997 to 2008 and numbered according to the list in page v. The work consists of two parts: an aerodynamic part based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and an aero-acoustic part based on Computational Aero Acoustics for wind turbines. The main objective of the research was to develop new computational tools and techniques for analysing flows about wind turbines. A few papers deal with applications of Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory to wind turbines. In most cases the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables (velocity-pressure formulation) are employed as the basic governing equations. However, since fluid mechanical problems essentially are governed by vortex dynamics, it is sometimes advantageous to use the concept of vorticity (defined as the curl of velocity). In vorticity form the Navier-Stokes equations may be formulated in different ways, using a vorticity-stream function formulation, a vorticity-velocity formulation or a vorticity-potential-stream function formulation. In [1] - [3] two different vorticity formulations were developed for 2D and 3D wind turbine flows. In [4] and [5] numerical techniques for avoiding pressure oscillations were developed when solving the velocity-pressure coupling system in the in-house EllipSys2D/3D code. In [6] - [8] different actuator disc techniques combined with CFD are presented. This includes actuator disc, actuator line and actuator surface techniques, which were developed to simulate flows past one or more wind turbines. In [9] and [10] a tip loss correction method that improves the conventional models was developed for use in combination with BEM or actuator/Navier-Stokes computations. A simple and efficient technique for determining the angle of attack for flow past a wind turbine rotor

  17. The aerodynamic signature of running spiders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Casas

    Full Text Available Many predators display two foraging modes, an ambush strategy and a cruising mode. These foraging strategies have been classically studied in energetic, biomechanical and ecological terms, without considering the role of signals produced by predators and perceived by prey. Wolf spiders are a typical example; they hunt in leaf litter either using an ambush strategy or by moving at high speed, taking over unwary prey. Air flow upstream of running spiders is a source of information for escaping prey, such as crickets and cockroaches. However, air displacement by running arthropods has not been previously examined. Here we show, using digital particle image velocimetry, that running spiders are highly conspicuous aerodynamically, due to substantial air displacement detectable up to several centimetres in front of them. This study explains the bimodal distribution of spider's foraging modes in terms of sensory ecology and is consistent with the escape distances and speeds of cricket prey. These findings may be relevant to the large and diverse array of arthropod prey-predator interactions in leaf litter.

  18. Kinematics and Aerodynamics of Backward Flying Dragonflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Zeyghami, Samane; Dong, Haibo

    2015-11-01

    Highly maneuverable insects such as dragonflies have a wide range of flight capabilities; precise hovering, fast body reorientations, sideways flight and backward takeoff are only a few to mention. In this research, we closely examined the kinematics as well as aerodynamics of backward takeoff in dragonflies and compared them to those of forward takeoff. High speed videography and accurate 3D surface reconstruction techniques were employed to extract details of the wing and body motions as well as deformations during both flight modes. While the velocities of both forward and backward flights were similar, the body orientation as well as the wing kinematics showed large differences. Our results indicate that by tilting the stroke plane angle of the wings as well as changing the orientation of the body relative to the flight path, dragonflies control the direction of the flight like a helicopter. In addition, our detailed analysis of the flow in these flights shows important differences in the wake capture phenomena among these flight modes. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  19. Rudolf Hermann, wind tunnels and aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Charles A.; Coleman, Anne M.

    2008-04-01

    Rudolf Hermann was born on December 15, 1904 in Leipzig, Germany. He studied at the University of Leipzig and at the Aachen Institute of Technology. His involvement with wind tunnels began in 1934 when Professor Carl Wieselsberger engaged him to work at Aachen on the development of a supersonic wind tunnel. On January 6, 1936, Dr. Wernher von Braun visited Dr. Hermann to arrange for use of the Aachen supersonic wind tunnel for Army problems. On April 1, 1937, Dr. Hermann became Director of the Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the Army installation at Peenemunde. Results from the Aachen and Peenemunde wind tunnels were crucial in achieving aerodynamic stability for the A-4 rocket, later designated as the V-2. Plans to build a Mach 10 'hypersonic' wind tunnel facility at Kochel were accelerated after the Allied air raid on Peenemunde on August 17, 1943. Dr. Hermann was director of the new facility. Ignoring destruction orders from Hitler as WWII approached an end in Europe, Dr. Hermann and his associates hid documents and preserved wind tunnel components that were acquired by the advancing American forces. Dr. Hermann became a consultant to the Air Force at its Wright Field in November 1945. In 1951, he was named professor of Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. In 1962, Dr. Hermann became the first Director of the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a position he held until he retired in 1970.

  20. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  1. Primary and Aggregate Size Distributions of PM in Tail Pipe Emissions form Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masataka; Amagai, Kenji; Nakaji, Takayuki; Hayashi, Shinji

    Particulate matter (PM) emission exhausted from diesel engine should be reduced to keep the clean air environment. PM emission was considered that it consisted of coarse and aggregate particles, and nuclei-mode particles of which diameter was less than 50nm. However the detail characteristics about these particles of the PM were still unknown and they were needed for more physically accurate measurement and more effective reduction of exhaust PM emission. In this study, the size distributions of solid particles in PM emission were reported. PMs in the tail-pipe emission were sampled from three type diesel engines. Sampled PM was chemically treated to separate the solid carbon fraction from other fractions such as soluble organic fraction (SOF). The electron microscopic and optical-manual size measurement procedures were used to determine the size distribution of primary particles those were formed through coagulation process from nuclei-mode particles and consisted in aggregate particles. The centrifugal sedimentation method was applied to measure the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Aerodynamic diameters of nano and aggregate particles were measured with scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The peak aggregate diameters detected by SMPS were fallen in the same size regime as the Stokes diameter of dry-soot. Both of primary and Stokes diameters of dry-soot decreased with increases of engine speed and excess air ratio. Also, the effects of fuel properties and engine types on primary and aggregate particle diameters were discussed.

  2. Virus separation using membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, Tanja A; Michalsky, Ronald; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Industrial manufacturing of cell culture-derived viruses or virus-like particles for gene therapy or vaccine production are complex multistep processes. In addition to the bioreactor, such processes require a multitude of downstream unit operations for product separation, concentration, or purification. Similarly, before a biopharmaceutical product can enter the market, removal or inactivation of potential viral contamination has to be demonstrated. Given the complexity of biological solutions and the high standards on composition and purity of biopharmaceuticals, downstream processing is the bottleneck in many biotechnological production trains. Membrane-based filtration can be an economically attractive and efficient technology for virus separation. Viral clearance, for instance, of up to seven orders of magnitude has been reported for state of the art polymeric membranes under best conditions.This chapter summarizes the fundamentals of virus ultrafiltration, diafiltration, or purification with adsorptive membranes. In lieu of an impractical universally applicable protocol for virus filtration, application of these principles is demonstrated with two examples. The chapter provides detailed methods for production, concentration, purification, and removal of a rod-shaped baculovirus (Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, about 40 × 300 nm in size, a potential vector for gene therapy, and an industrially important protein expression system) or a spherical parvovirus (minute virus of mice, 22-26 nm in size, a model virus for virus clearance validation studies).

  3. Results of the AVATAR project for the validation of 2D aerodynamic models with experimental data of the DU95W180 airfoil with unsteady flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Baldacchino, D.;

    2016-01-01

    The FP7 AdVanced Aerodynamic Tools for lArge Rotors - Avatar project aims to develop and validate advanced aerodynamic models, to be used in integral design codes for the next generation of large scale wind turbines (10-20MW). One of the approaches towards reaching rotors for 10-20MW size...... is the application of flow control devices, such as flaps. In Task 3.2: Development of aerodynamic codes for modelling of flow devices on aerofoils and, rotors of the Avatar project, aerodynamic codes are benchmarked and validated against the experimental data of a DU95W180 airfoil in steady and unsteady flow......, for different angle of attack and flap settings, including unsteady oscillatory trailing-edge-flap motion, carried out within the framework of WP3: Models for Flow Devices and Flow Control, Task 3.1: CFD and Experimental Database. The aerodynamics codes are: AdaptFoil2D, Foil2W, FLOWer, MaPFlow, OpenFOAM, Q3UIC...

  4. Results of the AVATAR project for the validation of 2D aerodynamic models with experimental data of the DU95W180 airfoil with unsteady flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Baldacchino, D.; Aparicio, M.; Gómez, S.; Munduate, X.; Garcia, N. R.; Sørensen, J. N.; Jost, E.; Knecht, S.; Lutz, T.; Chassapogiannis, P.; Diakakis, K.; Papadakis, G.; Voutsinas, S.; Prospathopoulos, J.; Gillebaart, T.; van Zuijlen, A.

    2016-09-01

    The FP7 AdVanced Aerodynamic Tools for lArge Rotors - Avatar project aims to develop and validate advanced aerodynamic models, to be used in integral design codes for the next generation of large scale wind turbines (10-20MW). One of the approaches towards reaching rotors for 10-20MW size is the application of flow control devices, such as flaps. In Task 3.2: Development of aerodynamic codes for modelling of flow devices on aerofoils and, rotors of the Avatar project, aerodynamic codes are benchmarked and validated against the experimental data of a DU95W180 airfoil in steady and unsteady flow, for different angle of attack and flap settings, including unsteady oscillatory trailing-edge-flap motion, carried out within the framework of WP3: Models for Flow Devices and Flow Control, Task 3.1: CFD and Experimental Database. The aerodynamics codes are: AdaptFoil2D, Foil2W, FLOWer, MaPFlow, OpenFOAM, Q3UIC, ATEFlap. The codes include unsteady Eulerian CFD simulations with grid deformation, panel models and indicial engineering models. The validation cases correspond to 18 steady flow cases, and 42 unsteady flow cases, for varying angle of attack, flap deflection and reduced frequency, with free and forced transition. The validation of the models show varying degrees of agreement, varying between models and flow cases.

  5. Numerical Investigations on the Aerodynamic Performance of Wind Turbine:Downwind Versus Upwind Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhou; Decheng Wan

    2015-01-01

    Although the upwind configuration is more popular in the field of wind energy, the downwind one is a promising type for the offshore wind energy due to its special advantages. Different configurations have different aerodynamic performance and it is important to predict the performance of both downwind and upwind configurations accurately for designing and developing more reliable wind turbines. In this paper, a numerical investigation on the aerodynamic performance of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI wind turbine in downwind and upwind configurations is presented. The open source toolbox OpenFOAM coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method is applied to tackle rotating problems of wind turbines. Two 3D numerical models of NREL phase VI wind turbine with downwind and upwind configurations under four typical working conditions of incoming wind velocities are set up for the study of different unsteady characteristics of the downwind and upwind configurations, respectively. Numerical results of wake vortex structure, time histories of thrust, pressure distribution on the blade and limiting streamlines which can be used to identify points of separation in a 3D flow are presented. It can be concluded that thrust reduction due to blade-tower interaction is small for upwind wind turbines but relatively large for downwind wind turbines and attention should be paid to the vibration at a certain frequency induced by the cyclic reduction for both configurations. The results and conclusions are helpful to analyze the different aerodynamic performance of wind turbines between downwind and upwind configurations, providing useful references for practical design of wind turbine.

  6. Numerical investigations on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine: Downwind versus upwind configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hu; Wan, Decheng

    2015-03-01

    Although the upwind configuration is more popular in the field of wind energy, the downwind one is a promising type for the offshore wind energy due to its special advantages. Different configurations have different aerodynamic performance and it is important to predict the performance of both downwind and upwind configurations accurately for designing and developing more reliable wind turbines. In this paper, a numerical investigation on the aerodynamic performance of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI wind turbine in downwind and upwind configurations is presented. The open source toolbox OpenFOAM coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method is applied to tackle rotating problems of wind turbines. Two 3D numerical models of NREL phase VI wind turbine with downwind and upwind configurations under four typical working conditions of incoming wind velocities are set up for the study of different unsteady characteristics of the downwind and upwind configurations, respectively. Numerical results of wake vortex structure, time histories of thrust, pressure distribution on the blade and limiting streamlines which can be used to identify points of separation in a 3D flow are presented. It can be concluded that thrust reduction due to blade-tower interaction is small for upwind wind turbines but relatively large for downwind wind turbines and attention should be paid to the vibration at a certain frequency induced by the cyclic reduction for both configurations. The results and conclusions are helpful to analyze the different aerodynamic performance of wind turbines between downwind and upwind configurations, providing useful references for practical design of wind turbine.

  7. Fluid Dynamic Mechanisms and Interactions within Separated Flows and Their Effects on Missile Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    theoretical solution the flow which im- pinges on the wall is turned approximately 30-35’ by a weak, oblique hock wave. The fact that the experimentally... Amanda L. Homer Word Processing Operator III June W. Kempka Chief Clerk Suzanne F. Palmer Illustrator I I II APPENDIX 0 1 WALL STATIC PRESSURE DATA FOR

  8. Comparison of aerodynamic characteristics of pentagonal and hexagonal shaped bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Md. Naimul; Katsuchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Hitoshi; Nishio, Mayuko

    2016-07-01

    Aerodynamics of the long-span bridge deck should be well understood for an efficient design of the bridge system. For practical bridges various deck shapes are being recommended and adopted, yet not all of their aerodynamic behaviors are well interpreted. In the present study, a numerical investigation was carried out to explore the aerodynamic characteristics of pentagonal and hexagonal shaped bridge decks. A relative comparison of steady state aerodynamic responses was made and the flow field was critically analyzed for better understanding the aerodynamic responses. It was found that the hexagonal shaped bridge deck has better aerodynamic characteristics as compared to the pentagonal shaped bridge deck.

  9. Aerodynamics support of research instrument development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. Scott

    1990-01-01

    A new velocimetry system is currently being developed at NASA LaRC. The device, known as a Doppler global velocimeter (DGV), can record three velocity components within a plane simultaneously and in near real time. To make measurements the DGV, like many other velocimetry systems, relies on the scattering of light from numerous small particles in a flow field. The particles or seeds are illuminated by a sheet of laser light and viewed by two CCD cameras. The scattered light from the particles will have a frequency which is a function of the source laser light frequency, the viewing angle, and most importantly the seed velocities. By determining the scattered light intensity the velocity can be measured at all points within the light sheet simultaneously. Upon completion of DGV component construction and initial check out a series of tests in the Basic Aerodynamic Research (wind) Tunnel (BART) are scheduled to verify instrument operation and accuracy. If the results are satisfactory, application of the DGV to flight measurements on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) are planned. The DGV verification test in the BART facility will utilize a 75 degree swept delta wing model. A major task undertaken this summer included evaluation of previous results for this model. A specific series of tests matching exactly the previous tests and exploring new DGV capabilities were developed and suggested. Another task undertaken was to study DGV system installation possibilities in the F-18 HARV aircraft. In addition, a simple seeding system modification was developed and utilized to make Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the BART facility.

  10. Aerodynamic modelling and optimization of axial fans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noertoft Soerensen, Dan

    1998-01-01

    A numerically efficient mathematical model for the aerodynamics of low speed axial fans of the arbitrary vortex flow type has been developed. The model is based on a blade-element principle, whereby the rotor is divided into a number of annular stream tubes. For each of these stream tubes relations for velocity, pressure and radial position are derived from the conservation laws for mass, tangential momentum and energy. The equations are solved using the Newton-Raphson methods, and solutions converged to machine accuracy are found at small computing costs. The model has been validated against published measurements on various fan configurations, comprising two rotor-only fan stages, a counter-rotating fan unit and a stator-rotor stator stage. Comparisons of local and integrated properties show that the computed results agree well with the measurements. Optimizations have been performed to maximize the mean value of fan efficiency in a design interval of flow rates, thus designing a fan which operates well over a range of different flow conditions. The optimization scheme was used to investigate the dependence of maximum efficiency on 1: the number of blades, 2: the width of the design interval and 3: the hub radius. The degree of freedom in the choice of design variable and constraints, combined with the design interval concept, provides a valuable design-tool for axial fans. To further investigate the use of design optimization, a model for the vortex shedding noise from the trailing edge of the blades has been incorporated into the optimization scheme. The noise emission from the blades was minimized in a flow rate design point. Optimizations were performed to investigate the dependence of the noise on 1: the number of blades, 2: a constraint imposed on efficiency and 3: the hub radius. The investigations showed, that a significant reduction of noise could be achieved, at the expense of a small reduction in fan efficiency. (EG) 66 refs.

  11. Application Program Interface for the Orion Aerodynamics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip E.; Thompson, James

    2013-01-01

    The Application Programming Interface (API) for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Aerodynamic Database has been developed to provide the developers of software an easily implemented, fully self-contained method of accessing the CEV Aerodynamic Database for use in their analysis and simulation tools. The API is programmed in C and provides a series of functions to interact with the database, such as initialization, selecting various options, and calculating the aerodynamic data. No special functions (file read/write, table lookup) are required on the host system other than those included with a standard ANSI C installation. It reads one or more files of aero data tables. Previous releases of aerodynamic databases for space vehicles have only included data tables and a document of the algorithm and equations to combine them for the total aerodynamic forces and moments. This process required each software tool to have a unique implementation of the database code. Errors or omissions in the documentation, or errors in the implementation, led to a lengthy and burdensome process of having to debug each instance of the code. Additionally, input file formats differ for each space vehicle simulation tool, requiring the aero database tables to be reformatted to meet the tool s input file structure requirements. Finally, the capabilities for built-in table lookup routines vary for each simulation tool. Implementation of a new database may require an update to and verification of the table lookup routines. This may be required if the number of dimensions of a data table exceeds the capability of the simulation tools built-in lookup routines. A single software solution was created to provide an aerodynamics software model that could be integrated into other simulation and analysis tools. The highly complex Orion aerodynamics model can then be quickly included in a wide variety of tools. The API code is written in ANSI C for ease of portability to a wide variety of systems. The

  12. The mineral processing technology characteristics of middle and small size concentrators for Iron ore separation in Handan-Xintai area, south Hebei province%冀南邯-邢地区中小规模铁选厂选矿技术特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨炳飞; 王立辉; 柳晓蒙

    2012-01-01

    冀南邯-邢地区中小规模铁选厂破碎阶段多采用两段破碎工艺,破碎设备主要为颚式破碎机.最终破碎产品粒度较大,最大粒度不小于50mm.破碎阶段普遍配置磁滑轮干式预选.采用开路磨矿或闭路磨矿,磨矿段数为一段或两段,磨矿设备多采用中小规格湿式球磨机.广泛采用高频细筛进行分级,部分选厂采用螺旋分级机.采用两段或三段磁选,磁选设备为永磁筒式磁选机,型号多样.选别流程有直接磁选和阶段磨矿阶段磁选等方式.精矿脱水采用真空过滤机或沉降池,尾矿处理采用直接排放、水力旋流器浓缩排放或浓缩过筛后固态堆存.该地区铁选厂选矿技术还有有很大的发展空间.%Two-stage crushing and jaw crusher are used in the technological process in middle and small size concentrators in Handan-Xintai area, south Hebei province. The maximum partical size of crushed product is not less than 50mm. Dry magnetic separation is used in the crushing stage. Open or closed circuit grinding,one-stage or two-stage grinding, as well as middle and small type ball mills are used in grinding stage. High frequency fine screen and mechanical classifier are the most commom used classifier. Two-stage or three-stage magnetic separation with permanent drum magnetic separators is used in the technological process. Separation directly and stage grinding & separation are the separation process. Vaccum filter or subside pool is widely adopted in concentrate dewatering progress. Tailing dosposal methods are as follows: discharge directly, discharge after concentrate with hydrocyclone and storage after concentrate and screening. There is a broad developing space on mineral processing technology of middle and small size concentrator in Handan-Xintai area,South Hebei province.

  13. Research on the Aerodynamic Lift of Vehicle Windshield Wiper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Zhengqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, research on the aerodynamic lift of vehicle windshield wipers is confined to the steady results, and there are very few test results. In the face of this truth, a wind tunnel test is conducted by using the Multipoint Film Force Test System (MFF. In this test, the aerodynamic lift of four kinds of wiper is measured at different wind speeds and different rotation angles. And then, relevant steady-state numerical simulations are accomplished and the mechanism of the aerodynamic lift is analyzed. Furthermore, combined with dynamic meshing and user-defined functions (UDF, transient aerodynamic characteristics of wipers are obtained through numerical simulations. It is found that the aerodynamic lift takes great effect on the stability of wipers, and there is maximum value of the lift near a certain wind speed and rotation angle. The lift force when wipers are rotating with the free stream is less than steady, and the force when rotating against the free stream is greater than steady.

  14. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Flapping Wing of a Bird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Agoes Moelyadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady flow behavior and time-dependent aerodynamic characteristics of the flapping motion of a bird’s wing were investigated using a computational method. During flapping, aerodynamic interactions between bird wing surfaces and surrounding flow may occur, generating local time-dependent flow changes in the flow field and aerodynamic load of birds. To study the effect of flapping speed on unsteady aerodynamic load, two kinds of computational simulations were carried out, namely a quasi-steady and an unsteady simulation. To mimic the movement of the down-stroke and the upstroke of a bird, the flapping path accorded to a sinus function, with the wing attitude changing in dihedral angle and time. The computations of time-dependent viscous flow were based on the solution of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations by applying the k-e turbulence model. In addition, the discretization for the computational domain around the model used multi-block structured grid to provide more accuracy in capturing viscous flow, especially in the vicinity of the wing and body surfaces, to obtain a proper wing-body geometry model. For this research, the seagull bird was chosen, which has high aspect ratio wings with pointed wing-tips and a high camber wing section. The results include mesh movement, velocity contours as well as aerodynamic coefficients of the flapping motion of the bird at various flapping frequencies.

  15. Aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis of space mission vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Viviani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Presenting an up-to-date view on the most important space vehicle configurations, this book contains detailed analyses for several different type of space mission profiles while considering important factors such as aerodynamic loads, aerodynamic heating, vehicle stability and landing characteristics. With that in mind, the authors provide a detailed overview on different state-of-the-art themes of hypersonic aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, and consider different space vehicle shapes useful for different space mission objectives. These include: ·        Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) ·        Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) ·        Sample Return Vehicle (SRV) ·        Flying Test Bed (FTB). Throughout Aerodynamic and Aerothermodynamic Analysis of Space Mission Vehicles many examples are given, with detailed computations and results for the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of all such configurations. Moreover, a final chapter on future launchers is provided and an Appendix on...

  16. Computational Design and Analysis of a Micro-Tab Based Aerodynamic Loads Control System for Lifting Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dam, C P; Nakafuji, D Y; Bauer, C; Chao, D; Standish, K

    2002-11-01

    A computational design and analysis of a microtab based aerodynamic loads control system is presented. The microtab consists of a small tab that emerges from a wing approximately perpendicular to its surface in the vicinity of its trailing edge. Tab deployment on the upper side of the wing causes a decrease in the lift generation whereas deployment on the pressure side causes an increase. The computational methods applied in the development of this concept solve the governing Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on structured, overset grids. The application of these methods to simulate the flows over lifting surface including the tabs has been paramount in the development of these devices. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the microtab and that it is possible to carry out a sensitivity analysis on the positioning and sizing of the tabs before they are implemented in successfully controlling the aerodynamic loads.

  17. Experimental Study of Effects of Tail Wings on Submunition Aerodynamic Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海福; 李向荣

    2004-01-01

    Aimed at the needs of deceleration of submunitions dispensed from the ballistic missile, wind tunnel tests were performed on the submunitions with different tail wing sizes at the Mach number range from 0.7 to 3.0 and the angle of attack range from 0° to 14°. Experimental data about the variance of aerodynamic coefficients with the Mach number and angle of attack were obtained systemically. The effects of the tail wing sizes on the drag coefficients and the center of pressure coefficients were discussed. Analyzed results show the arc tail wings designed are beneficial to both the deceleration effect and static stability. These results are significant to the tail wing design and its applications to the submunitions deceleration.

  18. An Aerodynamic Analysis of a Robustly Redesigned Modern Aero-Engine Fan

    CERN Document Server

    Seshadri, Pranay; Shahpar, Shahrokh

    2016-01-01

    This paper documents results from a recent computational study aimed at de-sensitizing fan stage aerodynamics---in a modern, high bypass ratio aero-engine---to the effects of rear-seal leakage flows. These flows are the result of seal erosion between a rotor and stator disk in an engine, and deterioration over the life of an engine. The density-matching technique for optimization under uncertainty was applied to this problem. This involved RANS and adjoint flow solves of a full fan stage carried out at two different leakage conditions. Here a detailed analysis of the fan stage aerodynamics is carried out to determine why exactly the new design is more insensitive to the effects of leakage flows. Specifically, it is shown that this insensitivity is attributed to three main factors: a slight rearward shift in loading, and thus a reduction in incidence; a reduction in the cross-passage pressure gradient; and a re-acceleration of the flow towards the trailing edge, which prevented any corner separation.

  19. Numerical Analysis of Wind Turbine Airfoil Aerodynamic Performance with Leading Edge Bump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Asli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic performance improvement of wind turbine blade is the key process to improve wind turbine performance in electricity generated and energy conversion in renewable energy sources concept. The flow behavior on wind turbine blades profile and the relevant phenomena like stall can be improved by some modifications. In the present paper, Humpback Whales flippers leading edge protuberances model as a novel passive stall control method was investigated on S809 as a thick airfoil. The airfoil was numerically analyzed by CFD method in Reynolds number of 106 and aerodynamic coefficients in static angle of attacks were validated with the experimental data reported by Somers in NREL. Therefore, computational results for modified airfoil with sinusoidal wavy leading edge were presented. The results revealed that, at low angles of attacks before the stall region, lift coefficient decreases slightly rather than baseline model. However, the modified airfoil has a smooth stall trend while baseline airfoil lift coefficient decreases sharply due to the separation which occurred on suction side. According to the flow physics over the airfoils, leading edge bumps act as vortex generator so vortices containing high level of momentum make the flow remain attached to the surface of the airfoil at high angle of attack and prevent it from having a deep stall.

  20. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masoud Mirzaei; Mohammad-Mahdi Nazemi; Mojtaba Fouladi; Alireza Doostmahmoudi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Exper-iments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 ? 106 over angles of attack from ? 8? to 20?, and then results are compared. Gener-ally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10? and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50%which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4? and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2? and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  1. PIV-based study of the gliding osprey aerodynamics in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Roi; Liberzon, Alex; Kopp, Gregory; Kirchhefer, Adam; Weihs, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    The hunting flight of an osprey consists of periods where the bird glides while foraging for prey. High quality measurements of aerodynamics in this flight mode are needed in order to estimate the daily energy expenditure of the bird accurately. An experimental study of an osprey model in a wind tunnel (BLWTL, UWO) was performed in order to characterize the aerodynamic forces using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The model was a stuffed osprey with mechanical joints allowing control of the the wing (angle of attack, tilt) and tail orientation. Two-dimensional velocity realizations in the streamwise-normal plane were obtained simultaneously in the two fields of view: above the wing and in the wake of the wing. Mean and turbulent flow characteristics are presented as function of angle of attack based on measurements taken at 4 different angles of attack at three different locations over the wingspan. The main outcome is the accurate estimate of the drag from the measurements of momentum thickness in the turbulent boundary layer of the osprey wing. Moreover, the gradient of the momentum thickness method was applied to identify the separation point in the boundary layer. This estimate has been compared to the total drag calculated from measurements in the wake of the wing and with a theoretical prediction.

  2. Unsteady Aerodynamics and Vortex-sheet Formation of A Two-dimensional Airfoil

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady inviscid flow models of wings and airfoils have been developed to study the aerodynamics of natural and man-made flyers. Vortex methods have been extensively applied to reduce the dimensionality of these aerodynamic models, based on the proper estimation of the strength and distribution of the vortices in the wake. In such modeling approaches, one of the most fundamental questions is how the vortex sheets are generated and released from sharp edges. To determine the formation of the trailing-edge vortex sheet, the classical Kutta condition can be extended to unsteady situations by realizing that a flow cannot turn abruptly around a sharp edge. This condition can be readily applied to a flat plate or an airfoil with cusped trailing edge since the direction of the forming vortex sheet is known to be tangential to the trailing edge. However, for a finite-angle trailing edge, or in the case of flow separation away from a sharp corner, the direction of the forming vortex sheet is ambiguous. To remove any ...

  3. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Gholamhosein Pouryoussefi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Experiments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 × 106 over angles of attack from −8° to 20°, and then results are compared. Generally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10° and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50% which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4° and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2° and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  4. Aerodynamic Modeling of Transonic Aircraft Using Vortex Lattice Coupled with Transonic Small Disturbance for Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Daniel; Fujiwara, Gustavo E. C.; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    The need to rapidly scan large design spaces during conceptual design calls for computationally inexpensive tools such as the vortex lattice method (VLM). Although some VLM tools, such as Vorview have been extended to model fully-supersonic flow, VLM solutions are typically limited to inviscid, subcritical flow regimes. Many transport aircraft operate at transonic speeds, which limits the applicability of VLM for such applications. This paper presents a novel approach to correct three-dimensional VLM through coupling of two-dimensional transonic small disturbance (TSD) solutions along the span of an aircraft wing in order to accurately predict transonic aerodynamic loading and wave drag for transport aircraft. The approach is extended to predict flow separation and capture the attenuation of aerodynamic forces due to boundary layer viscosity by coupling the TSD solver with an integral boundary layer (IBL) model. The modeling framework is applied to the NASA General Transport Model (GTM) integrated with a novel control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF).

  5. Investigates on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Projectile with Triangular Cross Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Wen-jun; WANG Zhong-yuan; LI Yan; QIAN Ji-sheng

    2009-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of projectiles with triangular and circular cross sections are investigated respectively by use of free-flight experiment. Processed the experiment data, curves of flight velocity variation and nutation of both projectiles are obtained, based on the curves, their aerodynamic force and moment coefficients are found out by data fitting, and their aerodynamic performances are compared and analyzed. Results show that the projectile with triangular cross section has smaller resistance, higher lift-drag ratio, better static stability, higher stability capability and more excellent maneuverability than those of the projectile with circular cross section, therefore it can be used in the guided projectiles; under lower rotation speed, the triangular section projectile has greater Magnus moment leading to bigger projectile distribution.

  6. Does an active adjustment of aerodynamic drag make sense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The article concerns evaluation of the possible impact of the gap between the tractor and semitrailer on the aerodynamic drag coefficient. The aim here is not to adjust this distance depending on the geometrical shape of the tractor and trailer, but depending solely on the speed of articulated vehicle. All the tests have form of numerical simulations. The method of simulation is briefly explained in the article. It considers various issues such as the range and objects of tests as well as the test conditions. The initial (pre-adaptive) and final (after adaptation process) computational meshes have been presented as illustrations. Some of the results have been presented in the form of run chart showing the change of value of aerodynamic drag coefficients in time, for different geometric configurations defined by a clearance gap between the tractor and semitrailer. The basis for a detailed analysis and conclusions were the averaged (in time) aerodynamic drag coefficients as a function of the clearance gap.

  7. Improved blade element momentum theory for wind turbine aerodynamic computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhenye; Chen, Jin; Shen, Wen Zhong;

    2016-01-01

    Blade element momentum (BEM) theory is widely used in aerodynamic performance predictions and design applications for wind turbines. However, the classic BEM method is not quite accurate which often tends to under-predict the aerodynamic forces near root and over-predict its performance near tip....... The reliability of the aerodynamic calculations and design optimizations is greatly reduced due to this problem. To improve the momentum theory, in this paper the influence of pressure drop due to wake rotation and the effect of radial velocity at the rotor disc in the momentum theory are considered. Thus...... the axial induction factor in far downstream is not simply twice of the induction factor at disc. To calculate the performance of wind turbine rotors, the improved momentum theory is considered together with both Glauert's tip correction and Shen's tip correction. Numerical tests have been performed...

  8. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  9. Aerodynamic Jump: A Short Range View for Long Rod Projectiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bundy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that aerodynamic jump for a nonspinning kinetic energy penetrator is not – as conventional definitions may infer – a discontinuous change in the direction of motion at the origin of free flight, nor is it the converse, a cumulative redirection over a domain of infinite extent. Rather, with the aid of an alternative kinematical definition, it is shown that aerodynamic jump for such a projectile is a localized redirection of the center-of-gravity motion, caused by the force of lift due to yaw over the relatively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. A rigorous proof of this statement is provided, but the primary objective of this paper is to provide answers to the questions: what is aerodynamic jump, what does it mean, and what aspects of the flight trajectory does it refer to, or account for.

  10. Effects of ice accretion on the aerodynamics of bridge cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demartino, C.; Koss, Holger; Georgakis, Christos T.;

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable wind induced vibrations of bridge cables can occur when atmospheric conditions are such to generate ice accretion. This paper contains the results of an extensive investigation of the effects of ice accretion due to in-cloud icing, on the aerodynamic characteristics of bridge hangers...... and stay cables. The aim of this paper is twofold; first, it was investigated the ice accretion process and the final shape of the ice accreted; then the aerodynamics of the ice accreted bridge cables was characterized, and related to the ice shape. Different climatic conditions, i.e. combinations...... of the ice accretions is given in the paper. Only for the bridge hanger case, a short description of the evolution of the ice accretions is given. The aerodynamic force coefficients were then measured with varying yaw angle, angle of attack and wind speed, and are presented and discussed in the paper...

  11. THERMAL AND AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCES OF THE SUPERSONIC MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan P Ninković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, Mach number of 4 can be taken as a boundary value for transition from conditions for supersonic, into the area of hypersonic flow, distinguishing two areas: area of supersonic in which the effects of the aerodynamic heating can be neglected and the area of hypersonic, in which the thermal effects become dominant. This paper presents the effects in static and dynamic areas, as well as presentation of G.R.O.M. software for determination of the values of aerodynamic derivatives, which was developed on the basis of linearized theory of supersonic flow. Validation of developed software was carried out through different types of testing, proving its usefulness for engineering practice in the area of supersonic wing aerodynamic loading calculations, even at high Mach numbers, with dominant thermal effects.

  12. Atmospheric testing of wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.S. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States); Migliore, P.G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Quandt, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    An experimental investigation was conducted using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable span trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. A primary goal was to directly compare study results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were utilized to define effective changes in the aerodynamic coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans and configurations. Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (<70%) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with characteristic vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  13. Analysis of two troubles of air pre-cooling system of small-sized air separation plant%两起小型空分设备空气预冷系统故障分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小兴; 梁莺娥

    2012-01-01

    在3200 m3/h空分设备运行过程中,发生了常温水流量偏大导致常温水泵和低温水泵同时跳车、冷冻水温度调节旋钮脱落导致冷冻水温度太低的两起故障。介绍故障发生时的现象、故障原因以及故障发生时的应急操作。%During operation of 3200 m3/h air separation plant,slightly high flowrate of normal temperature water results in simultaneous trip of both the normal temperature water pump and the low-temperature water pump,and the dropping of the chilled water temperature adjustment knob results in too low chilled water temperature.The phenomena at occurring of the two troubles are described,and their causes and emergency operation are described.

  14. Two cases of aerodynamic adjustment of sastrugi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Amory

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In polar regions, sastrugi are a direct manifestation of wind driven snow and form the main surface roughness elements. In turn, sastrugi influence the local wind field and associated aeolian snow mass fluxes. Little attention has been paid to these feedback processes, mainly because of experimental difficulties, and, as a result most polar atmospheric models currently ignore sastrugi. More accurate quantification of the influence of sastrugi remains a major challenge. In the present study, wind profiles and aeolian snow mass fluxes were analyzed jointly on a sastrugi covered snowfield in Antarctica. Neutral stability 10 m air-snow drag coefficients CDN10 were computed from six level wind speed profiles collected in Adélie Land during austral winter 2013. The aeolian snow mass flux in the first meter above the surface of the snow was also measured using a windborne snow acoustic sensor. This paper focuses on two cases during which sastrugi responses to shifts in wind direction were evidenced by variations in snow mass flux and drag coefficients. Using this dataset, it was shown that (i the timescale of sastrugi aerodynamic adjustment can be as short as 3 h for friction velocities of 1 m s−1 or above and during strong windborne snow conditions, (ii CDN10 values were in the range of 1.3–1.5 × 103 when the wind was well aligned with the sastrugi and increased to 3 × 103 or higher when the wind only shifted 20–30°, (iii CDN10 can increase (to 120 % and the aeolian snow mass flux can decrease (to 80 % in response to a shift in wind direction, and (iv knowing CDN10 is not sufficient to estimate the erosion flux that results from drag partitioning at the surface because CDN10 includes the contribution of the sastrugi form drag. These results not only support the existence of feedback mechanisms linking sastrugi, aeolian particle transport and surface drag properties over snow surface but also provide orders of magnitude, although further

  15. Aerodynamics and combustion of axial swirlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongqiang

    A multipoint lean direct injection (LDI) concept was introduced recently in non-premixed combustion to obtain both low NOx emissions and good combustion stability. In this concept, a key feature is the injection of finely atomized fuel into the high-swirling airflow at the combustor dome that provides a homogenous, lean fuel-air mixture. In order to achieve the fine atomization and mixing of the fuel and air quickly and uniformly, a good swirler design should be studied. The focus of this dissertation is to investigate the aerodynamics and combustion of the swirling flow field in a multipoint Lean Direct Injector combustor. A helical axial-vaned swirler with a short internal convergent-divergent venturi was used. Swirlers with various vane angles and fuel nozzle insertion lengths have been designed. Three non-dimensional parameter effects on non-reacting, swirling flow field were studied: swirler number, confinement ratio and Reynolds number. Spray and combustion characteristics on the single swirler were studied to understand the mechanism of fuel-air mixing in this special configuration. Multi-swirler interactions were studied by measuring the confined flow field of a multipoint swirler array with different configurations. Two different swirler arrangements were investigated experimentally, which include a co-swirling array and a counter-swirling array. In order to increase the range of stability of multipoint LDI combustors, an improved design were also conducted. The results show that the degree of swirl and the level of confinement have a clear impact on the mean and turbulent flow fields. The swirling flow fields may also change significantly with the addition of a variety of simulated fuel nozzle insertion lengths. The swirler with short insertion has the stronger swirling flow as compared with the long insertion swirler. Reynolds numbers, with range of current study, will not alter mean and turbulent properties of generated flows. The reaction of the spray

  16. Aerodynamic Interactions Between Contralateral Wings and Between Wings and Body of a Model Insect at Hovering and Small Speed Motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Bin; SUN Mao

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we study the aerodynamic interactions between the contralateral wings and between the body and wings of a model insect,when the insect is hovering and has various translational and rotational motions,using the method numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations over moving overset grids.The aerodynamic interactional effects are identified by comparing the results of a complete model insect,the corresponding wing pair,single wing and body without the wings.Horizontal,vertical and lateral translations and roll,pitch and yaw rotations at small speeds are considered.The results indicate that for the motions considered,both the interaction between the contralateral wings and the interaction between the body and wings are weak.The changes in the forces and moments of a wing due to the contralateral wing interaction,of the wings due to the presence of the body,and of the body due to the presence of the wings are generally less than 4.5%.Results show that aerodynamic forces of wings and body can be measured or computed separately in the analysis of flight stability and control of hovering insects.

  17. Block copolymer battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  18. Hybrid Vortex Method for the Aerodynamic Analysis of Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid vortex method, in which vortex panel method is combined with the viscous-vortex particle method (HPVP, was established to model the wind turbine aerodynamic and relevant numerical procedure program was developed to solve flow equations. The panel method was used to calculate the blade surface vortex sheets and the vortex particle method was employed to simulate the blade wake vortices. As a result of numerical calculations on the flow over a wind turbine, the HPVP method shows significant advantages in accuracy and less computation resource consuming. The validation of the aerodynamic parameters against Phase VI wind turbine experimental data is performed, which shows reasonable agreement.

  19. Research on Aerodynamic Noise Reduction for High-Speed Trains

    OpenAIRE

    Yadong Zhang; Jiye Zhang; Tian Li; Liang Zhang; Weihua Zhang

    2016-01-01

    A broadband noise source model based on Lighthill’s acoustic theory was used to perform numerical simulations of the aerodynamic noise sources for a high-speed train. The near-field unsteady flow around a high-speed train was analysed based on a delayed detached-eddy simulation (DDES) using the finite volume method with high-order difference schemes. The far-field aerodynamic noise from a high-speed train was predicted using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD)/Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H)...

  20. Efficient optimization of integrated aerodynamic-structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Eppard, W. M.; Kao, P. J.; Polen, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for reducing the computational complexity of multidisciplinary design optimization (DO) of aerodynamic structures are described and demonstrated. The basic principles of aerodynamic and structural DO are reviewed; the formulation of the combined DO problem is outlined; and particular attention is given to (1) the application of perturbation methods to cross-sensitivity computations and (2) numerical approximation procedures. Trial DOs of a simple sailplane design are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. The IBM 3090 CPU time for the entire integrated DO was reduced from an estimated 10 h to about 6 min.

  1. Aerodynamic Noise An Introduction for Physicists and Engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Tarit

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic Noise extensively covers the theoretical basis and mathematical modeling of sound, especially the undesirable sounds produced by aircraft. This noise could come from an aircraft’s engine—propellers, fans, combustion chamber, jets—or the vehicle itself—external surfaces—or from sonic booms. The majority of the sound produced is due to the motion of air and its interaction with solid boundaries, and this is the main discussion of the book. With problem sets at the end of each chapter, Aerodynamic Noise is ideal for graduate students of mechanical and aerospace engineering. It may also be useful for designers of cars, trains, and wind turbines.

  2. Aerodynamic Jump: A Short Range View for Long Rod Projectiles

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Bundy

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that aerodynamic jump for a nonspinning kinetic energy penetrator is not – as conventional definitions may infer – a discontinuous change in the direction of motion at the origin of free flight, nor is it the converse, a cumulative redirection over a domain of infinite extent. Rather, with the aid of an alternative kinematical definition, it is shown that aerodynamic jump for such a projectile is a localized redirection of the center-of-gravity motion, caused by the force of lift ...

  3. Analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise from VS45

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundabin, P. [Renewable Energy Systems Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the analysis of acoustic data taken from the VS45 at Kaiser-Wilhelm-Koog. The aim was to investigate the dependence of aerodynamic noise on tip speed and angle of attack. In particular, the dependence of noise in individual third octave bands on these variable is examined. The analysis is divided into 3 sections: data selection, data checks and analysis of broadband nacelle noise; analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise and its sensitivity to tip speed and angle of attack. (LN)

  4. An aerodynamic noise propagation model for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2005-01-01

    A model based on 2-D sound ray theory for aerodynamic noise propagation from wind turbine rotating blades is introduced. The model includes attenuation factors from geometric spreading, sound directivity of source, air absorption, ground deflection and reflection, as well as effects from temperat......A model based on 2-D sound ray theory for aerodynamic noise propagation from wind turbine rotating blades is introduced. The model includes attenuation factors from geometric spreading, sound directivity of source, air absorption, ground deflection and reflection, as well as effects from...

  5. Particle separations by electrophoretic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballou, N.E.; Petersen, S.L.; Ducatte, G.R.; Remcho, V.T.

    1996-03-01

    A new method for particle separations based on capillary electrophoresis has been developed and characterized. It uniquely separates particles according to their chemical nature. Separations have been demonstrated with chemically modified latex particles and with inorganic oxide and silicate particles. Separations have been shown both experimentally and theoretically to be essentially independent of particle size in the range of about 0.2 {mu}m to 10 {mu}m. The method has been applied to separations of U0{sub 2} particles from environmental particulate material. For this, an integrated method was developed for capillary electrophoretic separation, collection of separated fractions, and determinations of U0{sub 2} and environmental particles in each fraction. Experimental runs with the integrated method on mixtures of UO{sub 2} particles and environmental particulate material demonstrated enrichment factors of 20 for UO{sub 2} particles in respect to environmental particles in the U0{sub 2}containing fractions. This enrichment factor reduces the costs and time for processing particulate samples by the lexan process by a factor of about 20.

  6. Aerodynamic Optimization of an Over-the-Wing-Nacelle-Mount Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Daisuke Sasaki; Kazuhiro Nakahashi

    2011-01-01

    An over-the-wing-nacelle-mount airplane configuration is known to prevent the noise propagation from jet engines toward ground. However, the configuration is assumed to have low aerodynamic efficiency due to the aerodynamic interference effect between a wing and a nacelle. In this paper, aerodynamic design optimization is conducted to improve aerodynamic efficiency to be equivalent to conventional under-the-wing-nacelle-mount configuration. The nacelle and wing geometry are modified to achiev...

  7. Fictional Separation Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Buhrkal; Birkedal, Lars

    2012-01-01

    , separation means physical separation. In this paper, we introduce \\emph{fictional separation logic}, which includes more general forms of fictional separating conjunctions P * Q, where "*" does not require physical separation, but may also be used in situations where the memory resources described by P and Q...

  8. Mesh Optimization for Ground Vehicle Aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Gaylard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    size: small; font-family: Times New Roman;">Mesh optimization strategy for estimating accurate drag of a ground vehicle is proposed based on examining the effect of different mesh parameters.  The optimized mesh parameters were selected using design of experiment (DOE method to be able to work in a limited memory environment and in a reasonable amount of time but without compromising the accuracy of results. The study was further extended to take into account the car model size effect. Three car model sizes have been investigated and compared with MIRA scale wind tunnel results. Parameters that lead to drag value closer to experiment with less memory and computational time have been identified. Scaling the optimized mesh size with the length of car model was successfully used to predict the drag of the other car sizes with reasonable accuracy. This investigation was carried out using STARCCM+ commercial software package, however the findings can be applied to any other CFD package.

  9. Portion size

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Romaine lettuce) One medium baked potato is a computer mouse To control your portion sizes when you ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  10. Assessment of spanwise domain size effect on the transitional flow past an airfoil

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-19

    In most large-eddy and direct numerical simulations of flow past an isolated airfoil, the flow is assumed periodic in the spanwise direction. The size of the spanwise domain is an important geometrical parameter determining whether the turbulent flow is fully developed, and whether the separation and transition patterns are accurately modeled. In the present study, we investigate the incompressible flow past an isolated NACA0012 airfoil at the angle of attack of 5 degrees and Reynolds number 5 × 104. The spanwise domain size Lz, represented by the aspect ratio AR=Lz/C where C is the airfoil chord length, is varied in the range 0.1−0.80.1−0.8. The effect of varying the normalized spanwise domain size AR is examined via direct numerical simulation (DNS) on several aspects of the turbulent flow quantities including the time-averaged and time-dependent behavior as well as the spanwise variation of the selected statistical quantities. DNS results reveal that different aspect ratios result in close predictions of the time-averaged aerodynamic quantities, and the velocity field except for a slight difference in the separation bubble. Smaller aspect ratios tend to underpredict the turbulent fluctuations near the separation point but overpredict them inside the separation bubble. Large differences are observed for multiple statistical quantities near the reattachment point, especially the turbulent kinetic energy budget terms. The leading edge separation is notably three-dimensional for simulation at AR=0.8, while remaining quasi-2D for smaller aspect ratios. The spanwise two-point correlation coefficient shows significant dependence on the position of the probe and the velocity component analyzed: small aspect ratios do not produce uncorrelated results for all the velocity components. The simulation results demonstrate that examining only a few statistical quantities may result in a misleading conclusion regarding the sufficiency of the spanwise domain size. Reliable

  11. Aerodynamic and engineering design of a 1.5 s high quality microgravity drop tower facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Valentin; Breuninger, Jakob; Reilly, Matthew; Laufer, René; Dropmann, Michael; Herdrich, Georg; Hyde, Truell; Röser, Hans-Peter; Fasoulas, Stefanos

    2016-12-01

    Microgravity experiments are essential for research in space science, biology, fluid mechanics, combustion, and material sciences. One way to conduct microgravity experiments on Earth is by using drop tower facilities. These facilities combine a high quality of microgravity, adequate payload masses and have the advantage of virtually unlimited repeatability under same experimental conditions, at a low cost. In a collaboration between the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart and Baylor University (BU) in Waco, Texas, a new drop tower is currently under development at the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER). The design parameters of the drop tower ask for at least 1.5 s in free fall duration while providing a quality of at least 10-5 g. Previously, this quality has only been achieved in vacuum drop tower facilities where the capsule experiences virtually zero aerodynamic drag during its free fall. Since this design comes at high costs, a different drop tower design concept, which does not require an evacuated drop shaft, was chosen. It features a dual-capsule system in which the experiment capsule is shielded from aerodynamic forces by surrounding it with a drag shield during the drop. As no other dual-capsule drop tower has been able to achieve a quality as good as or better than 10-5 g previous work optimized the design with an aerodynamic perspective by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to determine the ideal shape and size of the outer capsule and to specify the aerodynamically crucial dimensions for the overall system. Experiments later demonstrated that the required quality of microgravity can be met with the proposed design. The main focus of this paper is the mechanical realization of the capsule as well as the development and layout of the surrounding components, such as the release mechanism, the deceleration device and the drop shaft. Because the drop tower facility is a

  12. Aerodynamics Investigation of Faceted Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolillo, Zachary G.

    The desire and demand to fly farther and faster has progressively integrated the concept of optimization with airfoil design, resulting in increasingly complex numerical tools pursuing efficiency often at diminishing returns; while the costs and difficulty associated with fabrication increases with design complexity. Such efficiencies may often be necessary due to the power density limitations of certain aircraft such as small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs). This research, however, focuses on reducing the complexity of airfoils for applications where aerodynamic performance is less important than the efficiency of manufacturing; in this case a Hybrid Projectile. By employing faceted sections to approximate traditional contoured wing sections it may be possible to expedite manufacturing and reduce costs. We applied this method to the development of a low Reynolds number, disposable Hybrid Projectile requiring a 4.5:1 glide ratio, resulting in a series of airfoils which are geometric approximations to highly contoured cross-sections called ShopFoils. This series of airfoils both numerically and experimentally perform within a 10% margin of the SD6060 airfoil at low Re. Additionally, flow visualization has been conducted to qualitatively determine what mechanisms, if any, are responsible for the similarity in performance between the faceted ShopFoil sections and the SD6060. The data obtained by these experiments did not conclusively reveal how the faceted surfaces may influence low Re flow but did indicate that the ShopFoil s did not maintain flow attachment at higher angles of attack than the SD6060. Two reasons are provided for the unexpected performance of the ShopFoil: one is related to downwash effects, which are suspected of placing the outer portion of the span at an effective angle of attack where the ShopFoils outperform the SD6060; the other is the influence of the tip vortex on separation near the wing tips, which possibly

  13. Aerodynamic Improvements of an Empty Timber Truck can Have the Potential of Significantly Reducing Fuel Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Marashi, Seyedeh Sepideh; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, aerodynamic drag (AD) has been estimated for an empty and a fully loaded conceptual timber truck (TT) using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The increasing fuel prices have challenged heavy duty vehicle (HDV) manufactures to strive for better fuel economy, by e.g. utilizing drag reducing external devices. Despite this knowledge, the TT fleets seem to be left in the dark. Like HDV aerodynamics, similarities can be observed as a large low pressure wake is formed behind the tractor (unloaded) and downstream of the trailer (full load) thus generating AD. As TTs travel half the time without any cargo, focus on drag reduction is important. The full scaled TTs where simulated using the realizable k-epsilon model with grid adaption techniques for mesh independence. Our results indicate that a loaded TT reduces the AD significantly as both wake size and turbulence kinetic energy are lowered. In contrast to HDV the unloaded TTs have a much larger design space available for possible drag reducing devices, e.g. plastic wrapping and/or flaps. This conceptual CFD study has given an indication of the large AD difference between the unloaded and fully loaded TT, showing the potential for significant AD improvements.

  14. Effect of Side Wind on the Directional Stability and Aerodynamics of a Hybrid Buoyant Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Anwar U

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional stability characteristics explain the capabilities of a hybrid buoyant aircraft’s performance against the side wind, which induces flow separation that is chaotic in nature and may lead to oscillations of the aerodynamic surfaces. A numerical study is carried out to estimate the effect of side wind. The boundary conditions for the computational domain are set to velocity inlet and pressure outlet. Due to the incompressible flow at the cruise velocity, the density is taken to be constant. For these steady state simulations, the time is discretized in first order implicit and the SIMPLE scheme is employed for pressure velocity coupling alongwith k-ω SST model. Based on the results obtained so far, it is concluded that voluminous hybrid lifting fuselage is the major cause of directional.

  15. Aerodynamically-driven condensate layer thickness distributions on isothermal cylindrical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Gunes, D.; Nazih-Anous, N.

    A simple yet rather general mathematical model is presented for predicting the distribution of condensate layer thickness when aerodynamic shear is the dominant mechanism of liquid flow along the surface. The Newtonian condensate film is treated using well-known thin-layer (lubrication theory) approximations, and condensate supply is taken to be the result of either convective diffusion or inertial impaction. Illustrative calculations for a circular cylinder in a crossflow at Re = 100,000 reveal the consequences of alternate condensate arrival mechanisms and the existence of thicker reverse-flow films behind the position of gas boundary-layer separation. The present formulation is readily generalized to include transient liquid layer flows on noncircular objects of variable surface temperature, as encountered in turbine-blade materials testing or operation.

  16. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  17. Topological analysis of plasma flow control on corner separation in a highly loaded compressor cascade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hu Zhao; Yun Wu; Ying-Hong Li; Xue-De Wang; Qin Zhao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,flow behavior and topology structure in a highly loaded compressor cascade with and without plasma aerodynamic actuation (PAA) are investigated.Streamline pattern,total pressure loss coefficient,outlet flow angle and topological analysis are considered to study the effect and mechanism of the plasma flow control on corner separation.Results presented include the boundary layer flow behavior,effects of three types of PAA on separated flows and performance parameters,topology structures and sequences of singular points with and without PAA.Two separation lines,reversed flow and backflow exist on the suction surface.The cross flow on the endwall is an important element for the corner separation.PAA can reduce the undertuming and overturning as well as the total pressure loss,leading to an overall increase of flow turning and enhancement of aerodynamic performance.PAA can change the topology structure,sequences of singular points and their corresponding separation lines.Types Ⅱ and Ⅲ PAA are much more efficient in controlling corner separation and enhancing aerodynamic performances than type Ⅰ.

  18. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Separation Anxiety KidsHealth > For Parents > Separation Anxiety A A A ... both of you get through it. About Separation Anxiety Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. Parents ...

  19. ERCOFTAC Symposium on Unsteady Separation in Fluid-Structure Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Bottaro, Alessandro; Thompson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This book addresses flow separation within the context of fluid-structure interaction phenomena. Here, new findings from two research communities focusing on fluids and structures are brought together, emphasizing the importance of a unified multidisciplinary approach. The book covers the theory, experimental findings, numerical simulations, and modeling in fluid dynamics and structural mechanics for both incompressible and compressible separated unsteady flows. There is a focus on the morphing of lifting structures in order to increase their aerodynamic and/or hydrodynamic performances, to control separation and to reduce noise, as well as to inspire the design of novel structures. The different chapters are based on contributions presented at the ERCOFTAC Symposium on Unsteady Separation in Fluid-Structure Interaction held in Mykonos, Greece, 17-21 June, 2013 and include extended discussions and new highlights. The book is intended for students, researchers and practitioners in the broad field of computatio...

  20. Improvement of aerodynamic characteristics of a thick airfoil with a vortex cell in sub- and transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, Sergey; Baranov, Paul; Popov, Igor; Sudakov, Alexander; Usachov, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    The modified SST model (2005) is verified using Rodi- Leschziner-Isaev's approach and the multiblock computational technologies are validated in the VP2/3 code on different-structure overlapping grids by comparing the numerical predictions with the experimental data on transonic flow around an NACA0012 airfoil at an angle of attack of 4o for M=0.7 and Re=4×106. It is proved that the aerodynamic characteristics of a thick (20% of the chord) MQ airfoil mounted at an angle of attack of 2o for Re=107 and over the Mach number range 0.3-0.55 are significantly improved because an almost circular small-size (0.12) vortex cell with a defined volumetric flow rate coefficient of 0.007 during slot suction has been located on the upper airfoil section and an intense trapped vortex has been formed in it. A detailed analysis of buffeting within the self-oscillatory regime of flow around the MQ airfoil with a vortex cell has demonstrated the periodic changes in local and integral characteristics; the lift and the aerodynamic efficiency remain quite high, but inferior to the similar characteristics at M=0.55. It is found that the vortex cell at M=0.7 is inactive, and the aerodynamic characteristics of the MQ airfoil with a vortex cell are close to those of a smooth airfoil without a cell.

  1. Reduced order modeling of steady flows subject to aerodynamic constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Vendl, Alexander; Goertz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    A novel reduced-order modeling method based on proper orthogonal decomposition for predicting steady, turbulent flows subject to aerodynamic constraints is introduced. Model-order reduction is achieved by replacing the governing equations of computational fluid dynamics with a nonlinear weighted ...

  2. Laryngeal Aerodynamics Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham-Rowan, Mary; Fowler, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in laryngeal aerodynamic measures during connected speech associated with oral contraceptive (OC) use. Eight women taking an OC, and eight others not taking an OC, participated in the study. Three trials of syllable /p[subscript alpha] /repetitions were obtained using a…

  3. The effect of aerodynamic parameters on power output of windmills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, W.

    1973-01-01

    Aerodynamic results for a study on windpower generation are reported. Windmill power output is presented in terms that are commonly used in rotary wing analysis, namely, power output as a function of drag developed by the windmill. Effect of tip speed ratio, solidity, twist, wind angle, blade setting and airfoil characteristics are given.

  4. Aerodynamic stability of cable-supported bridges using CFRP cables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-jun; YING Lei-dong

    2007-01-01

    To gain understanding of the applicability of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) cable in cable-supported bridges, based on the Runyang Bridge and Jinsha Bridge, a suspension bridge using CFRP cables and a cable-stayed bridge using CFRP stay cables are designed, in which the cable's cross-sectional area is determined by the principle of equivalent axial stiffness.Numerical investigations on the aerodynamic stability of the two bridges are conducted by 3D nonlinear aerodynamic stability analysis. The results showed that as CFRP cables are used in cable-supported bridges, for suspension bridge, its aerodynamic stability is superior to that of the case using steel cables due to the great increase of the torsional frequency; for cable-stayed bridge,its aerodynamic stability is basically the same as that of the case using steel stay cables. Therefore as far as the wind stability is considered, the use of CFRP cables in cable-supported bridges is feasible, and the cable's cross-sectional area should be determined by the principle of equivalent axial stiffness.

  5. Aerodynamic Experiments on DelFly II: Unsteady Lift Enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Clercq, K.M.E.; De Kat, R.; Remes, B.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Bijl, H.

    2009-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry measurements and simultaneous force measurements have been performed on the DelFly II flapping-wing MAV, to investigate the flow-field behavior and the aerodynamic forces generated. For flapping wing motion it is expected that both the clap and peel mechanism and the occur

  6. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities. PMID:27412267

  7. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Patel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities.

  8. Studying surface glow discharge for application in plasma aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshonok, D. V.

    2014-02-01

    Surface glow discharge in nitrogen between two infinite planar electrodes occurring on the same plane has been studied in the framework of a diffusion-drift model. Based on the results of numerical simulations, the plasma structure of this discharge is analyzed and the possibility of using it in plasma aerodynamics is considered.

  9. Innovation in Aerodynamic Design Features of Soviet Missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2006-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations of some tactical and strategic missile systems developed by the former Soviet Union have been included in the basic missile research programs of the NACA/NASA. Studies of the Soviet missiles sometimes revealed innovative design features that resulted in unusual or unexpected aerodynamic characteristics. In some cases these characteristics have been such that the measured performance of the missile exceeds what might have been predicted. In other cases some unusual design features have been found that would alleviate what might otherwise have been a serious aerodynamic problem. In some designs, what has appeared to be a lack of refinement has proven to be a matter of expediency. It is a purpose of this paper to describe some examples of unusual design features of some Soviet missiles and to illustrate the effectiveness of the design features on the aerodynamic behavior of the missile. The paper draws on the experience of the author who for over 60 years was involved in the aerodynamic wind tunnel testing of aircraft and missiles with the NACA/NASA.

  10. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting... engine mount and its supporting structure must meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section and.... (c) For airplanes certificated in the commuter category, each engine mount and its...

  11. Passive flow control by membrane wings for aerodynamic benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpe, Amory; Zhang, Zheng; Hubner, James; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    The coupling of passive structural response of flexible membranes with the flow over them can significantly alter the aerodynamic characteristic of simple flat-plate wings. The use of flexible wings is common throughout biological flying systems inspiring many engineers to incorporate them into small engineering flying systems. In many of these systems, the motion of the membrane serves to passively alter the flow over the wing potentially resulting in an aerodynamic benefit. In this study, the aerodynamic loads and the flow field for a rigid flat-plate wing are compared to free trailing-edge membrane wings with two different pre-tensions at a chord-based Reynolds number of approximately 50,000. The membrane was silicon rubber with a scalloped free trailing edge. The analysis presented includes load measurements from a sting balance along with velocity fields and membrane deflections from synchronized, time-resolved particle image velocimetry and digital image correlation. The load measurements demonstrate increased aerodynamic efficiency and lift, while the synchronized flow and membrane measurements show how the membrane motion serves to force the flow. This passive flow control introduced by the membranes motion alters the flows development over the wing and into the wake region demonstrating how, at least for lower angles of attack, the membranes motion drives the flow as opposed to the flow driving the membrane motion.

  12. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  13. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amir; Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-08-15

    During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities.

  14. Recycling of WEEE by magnetic density separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, B.; Giacometti, L.; Di Maio, F.; Rem, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The paper introduces a new recycling method of WEEE: Magnetic Density Separation. By using this technology, both grade and recovery rate of recycled products are over 90%. Good separations are not only observed in relatively big WEEE samples, but also in samples with smaller sizes or electrical wire

  15. Radioactivity of size fractionated fly-ash emissions from a peat- and oil-fired power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, R; Jantunen, M

    1985-12-01

    Concentrations of gamma-emitting natural radionuclides and 137Cs were analyzed in the size fractionated fly-ash emissions from a 100-MWt peat- and oil-fired power plant. The emitted fly ash was separated into five size fractions with a high-volume impactor with cut sizes of 1.3 micron, 2.1 micron, 4.2 micron and 10 micron. The greatest activity emissions were associated with the smallest size fraction, below 1.3 micron. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of the fly-ash particles after the electrostatic precipitator was 1.9 micron with a geometric standard deviation of 3.0 and the median of the 32 fly-ash emission samples was 8.73 mg MJ-1 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.3. Lead-210 gave the greatest particulate activity emission per input fuel energy, 18.7 mBq MJ-1, and showed a strong enrichment onto small fly-ash particles.

  16. Exploring Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among…

  17. Size matter!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe; Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined how a reduction in plate size would affect the amount of food waste from leftovers in a field experiment at a standing lunch for 220 CEOs. Methods A standing lunch for 220 CEOs in the Danish Opera House was arranged to feature two identical buffets with plates of two differ...

  18. Aerodynamic Noise Prediction Using stochastic Turbulence Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Ahmadzadegan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amongst many approaches to determine the sound propagated from turbulent flows, hybrid methods, in which the turbulent noise source field is computed or modeled separately from the far field calculation, are frequently used. For basic estimation of sound propagation, less computationally intensive methods can be developed using stochastic models of the turbulent fluctuations (turbulent noise source field. A simple and easy to use stochastic model for generating turbulent velocity fluctuations called continuous filter white noise (CFWN model was used. This method based on the use of classical Langevian-equation to model the details of fluctuating field superimposed on averaged computed quantities. The resulting sound field due to the generated unsteady flow field was evaluated using Lighthill's acoustic analogy. Volume integral method used for evaluating the acoustic analogy. This formulation presents an advantage, as it confers the possibility to determine separately the contribution of the different integral terms and also integration regions to the radiated acoustic pressure. Our results validated by comparing the directivity and the overall sound pressure level (OSPL magnitudes with the available experimental results. Numerical results showed reasonable agreement with the experiments, both in maximum directivity and magnitude of the OSPL. This method presents a very suitable tool for the noise calculation of different engineering problems in early stages of the design process where rough estimates using cheaper methods are needed for different geometries.

  19. Controlling Separation in Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Simon; Himmel, Christoph; Power, Bronwyn; Wakelam, Christian; Xu, Liping; Hynes, Tom; Hodson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Four examples of flow control: 1) Passive control of LP turbine blades (Laminar separation control). 2) Aspiration of a conventional axial compressor blade (Turbulent separation control). 3) Compressor blade designed for aspiration (Turbulent separation control). 4.Control of intakes in crosswinds (Turbulent separation control).

  20. Aerodynamic Analysis of Multistage Turbomachinery Flows in Support of Aerodynamic Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the state of 3D CFD based models of the time average flow field within axial flow multistage turbomachines. Emphasis is placed on models which are compatible with the industrial design environment and those models which offer the potential of providing credible results at both design and off-design operating conditions. The need to develop models which are free of aerodynamic input from semi-empirical design systems is stressed. The accuracy of such models is shown to be dependent upon their ability to account for the unsteady flow environment in multistage turbomachinery. The relevant flow physics associated with some of the unsteady flow processes present in axial flow multistage machinery are presented along with procedures which can be used to account for them in 3D CFD simulations. Sample results are presented for both axial flow compressors and axial flow turbines which help to illustrate the enhanced predictive capabilities afforded by including these procedures in 3D CFD simulations. Finally, suggestions are given for future work on the development of time average flow models.

  1. Towards an Experimental Investigation of Wind Turbine Aerodynamics at Full Dynamic Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark A.; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    As horizontal axis wind turbines continue to increase in size (with the largest approaching 200 meters in diameter) it becomes progressively more difficult to test new designs without high computational power or extensive experimental effort using conventional tools. Therefore, compromises are often made between the important non-dimensional parameters (Reynolds number and Strouhal number, or tip speed ratio) so that reasonable engineering insight can be gained. Using the unique facilities available at Princeton University, we aim to match both non-dimensional parameters and thus achieve full dynamic similarity at realistic conditions. This is accomplished by using the High Reynolds number Test Facility (or HRTF), which is a high pressure (200 atmospheres) wind tunnel. We present the design, manufacture, and testing of an apparatus suited to the unique environment of a high-pressure facility as well as future plans for investigating the underlying aerodynamics of large-scale wind turbines.

  2. Latest results from the EU project AVATAR: Aerodynamic modelling of 10 MW wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schepers O. Ceyhan, J. G.; Boorsma, K.; Gonzalez, A.;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the most recent results from the EU project AVATAR in which aerodynamic models are improved and validated for wind turbines on a scale of 10 MW and more. Measurements on a DU 00-W-212 airfoil are presented which have been taken in the pressurized DNW-HDG wind tunnel up to a Re...... results from 3D rotor models where a comparison is made between results from vortex wake methods and BEM methods at yawed conditions....... showed an unexpected large scatter which eventually was reduced by paying even more attention to grid independency and domain size in relation to grid topology. Moreover calculations are presented on flow devices (leading and trailing edge flaps and vortex generators). Finally results are shown between...

  3. Glottal configuration, acoustic, and aerodynamic changes induced by variation in suture direction in arytenoid adduction procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagi, Katsuhide; Connor, Nadine P; Suzuki, Tatsutoshi; Ford, Charles N; Bless, Diane M; Nakajima, Masami

    2002-10-01

    Arytenoid adduction is a phonosurgical procedure in which the arytenoid cartilages are approximated to reduce posterior glottal gap size and improve voice. Voice outcomes following arytenoid adduction are not always optimal. The goal of this study was to systematically vary suture direction and force of pull on the arytenoid cartilages in a human excised laryngeal model to determine the optimal combination of factors for reducing glottal gap and improving voice. Several factors demonstrated significant effects. Changes in suture direction and force of pull affected glottal configuration in both the horizontal and vertical planes. Increased force of pull on the muscular process resulted in increased adduction of the vocal process for all suture directions. Changes in suture direction and force of pull also affected acoustic and aerodynamic measures of induced voice. Therefore, voice outcomes can be optimized with arytenoid adduction if the vocal fold plane is accurately adjusted.

  4. Aerodynamical Probation Of Semi-Industrial Production Plant For Centrifugal Dust Collectors’ Efficiency Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buligin, Y. I.; Zharkova, M. G.; Alexeenko, L. N.

    2017-01-01

    In previous studies, experiments were carried out on the small-size models of cyclonic units, but now there completed the semi-industrial pilot plant ≪Cyclone≫, which would allow comparative testing of real samples of different shaped centrifugal dust-collectors and compare their efficiency. This original research plant is patented by authors. The aim of the study is to improve efficiency of exhaust gases collecting process, by creating improved designs of centrifugal dust collectors, providing for the possibility of regulation constructive parameters depending on the properties and characteristics of air-fuel field. The objectives of the study include identifying and studying the cyclonic apparatus association constructive parameters with their aerodynamic characteristics and dust-collecting efficiency. The article is very relevant, especially for future practical application of its results in dust removal technology.

  5. Mesh Optimization for Ground Vehicle Aerodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Gaylard; Essam F Abo-Serie; Nor Elyana Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    size: small; font-family: Times New Roman;">Mesh optimization strategy for estimating accurate drag of a ground vehicle is proposed based on examining the effect of different mesh parameters.  The optimized mesh parameters were selected using design of experiment (DOE) method to be able to work in a...

  6. Size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forst, Michael

    2012-11-01

    The shakeout in the solar cell and module industry is in full swing. While the number of companies and production locations shutting down in the Western world is increasing, the capacity expansion in the Far East seems to be unbroken. Size in combination with a good sales network has become the key to success for surviving in the current storm. The trade war with China already looming on the horizon is adding to the uncertainties. (orig.)

  7. Fine structure of mass size distributions in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Imre; Ocskay, Rita; Raes, Nico; Maenhaut, Willy

    As part of an urban aerosol research project, aerosol samples were collected by a small deposit area low-pressure impactor and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor in downtown Budapest in spring 2002. A total number of 23 samples were obtained with each device for separate daytime periods and nights. The samples were analysed by particle-induced X-ray emission spectrometry for 29 elements, or by gravimetry for particulate mass. The raw size distribution data were processed by the inversion program MICRON utilising the calibrated collection efficiency curve for each impactor stage in order to study the mass size distributions in the size range of about 50 nm to 10 μm in detail. Concentration, geometric mean aerodynamic diameter, and geometric standard deviation for each contributing mode were determined and further evaluated. For the crustal elements, two modes were identified in the mass size distributions: a major coarse mode and a (so-called) intermediate mode, which contained about 4% of the elemental mass. The coarse mode was associated with suspension, resuspension, and abrasion processes, whereby the major contribution likely came from road dust, while the particles of the intermediate mode may have originated from the same but also from the other sources. The typical anthropogenic elements exhibited usually trimodal size distributions including a coarse mode and two submicrometer modes instead of a single accumulation mode. The mode diameter of the upper submicrometer mode was somewhat lower for the particulate mass (PM) and S than for the anthropogenic metals, suggesting different sources and/or source processes. The different relative intensities of the two submicrometer modes for the anthropogenic elements and the PM indicate that the elements and PM have multiple sources. An Aitken mode was unambiguously observed for S, Zn, and K, but in a few cases only. The relatively large coarse mode of Cu and Zn, and the small night-to-daytime period

  8. Predicting Involuntary Separation of Enlisted Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    involuntary separation 20 ABSTRACT tConinue on rev -.. side It rect.ssaty and id.. nif hy block rnmhirl ,This report contains lh’ results of a study to compare...Subsample Size - 1000 Predicted 1 593 204 590 217 Base Rate - 65% Predicted 0 57 146 ( A1 133 Classification Accuracy (7’) 73.9 72.3 Subsample Size

  9. Characterization of an aerodynamic lens for transmitting particles > 1 micrometer in diameter into the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Williams

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We have designed and characterized a new inlet and aerodynamic lens for the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS that transmits particles between 80 nm and more than 3 μm in diameter. The design of the inlet and lens was optimized with computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling of particle trajectories. Major changes include a redesigned critical orifice holder and valve assembly, addition of a relaxation chamber behind the critical orifice, and a higher lens operating pressure. The transmission efficiency of the new inlet and lens was characterized experimentally with size-selected particles. Experimental measurements are in good agreement with the calculated transmission efficiency.

  10. Minnowbrook VI: 2009 Workshop on Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGraff, John E.; Povinelli, Louis A.; Gostelow, J. Paul; Glauser, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Topics covered include: Flow Physics and control for Internal and External Aerodynamics (not in TOC...starts on pg13); Breaking CFD Bottlenecks in Gas-Turbine Flow-Path Design; Streamwise Vortices on the Convex Surfaces of Circular Cylinders and Turbomachinery Blading; DNS and Embedded DNS as Tools for Investigating Unsteady Heat Transfer Phenomena in Turbines; Cavitation, Flow Structure and Turbulence in the Tip Region of a Rotor Blade; Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows; Active Flow Control of Lifting Surface With Flap-Current Activities and Future Directions; Closed-Loop Control of Vortex Formation in Separated Flows; Global Instability on Laminar Separation Bubbles-Revisited; Very Large-Scale Motions in Smooth and Rough Wall Boundary Layers; Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer With Localized Roughness; Active Control of Open Cavities; Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control; U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Need for Flow Physics and Control With Applications Involving Aero-Optics and Weapon Bay Cavities; Some Issues Related to Integrating Active Flow Control With Flight Control; Active Flow Control Strategies Using Surface Pressure Measurements; Reduction of Unsteady Forcing in a Vaned, Contra-Rotating Transonic Turbine Configuration; Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface; Controlling Separation in Turbomachines; Flow Control on Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoils Using Vortex Generator Jets; Reduced Order Modeling Incompressible Flows; Study and Control of Flow Past Disk, and Circular and Rectangular Cylinders Aligned in the Flow; Periodic Forcing of a Turbulent Axisymmetric Wake; Control of Vortex Breakdown in Critical Swirl Regime Using Azimuthal Forcing; External and Turbomachinery Flow Control Working Group; Boundary Layers, Transitions and Separation; Efficiency Considerations in Low Pressure Turbines; Summary of Conference; and Final Plenary Session

  11. PULP FIBER SIZE CHARACTERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shijie Liu

    2004-01-01

    Pulp fiber length distribution characterization has been examined in this study. Because of the fiber morphology: slender in shape, fiber size distribution characterization is a very difficult task. Traditional technique involves separation of the particles by size,such as Bauer-McNett fiber classifier, and measuring the weight fractions. The particle fractions obtained may or may not reflect the desired size classification.On the other hand, the more recent technique through optical measurement of fiber length is limited by its inability to measure the mass of the particle fractions.Therefore, not only the two techniques fail to generate identical results, either one was accepted to be of better value. Pure hardwood kraft, softwood kraft, and their mixture samples have been measured for their fiber length distributions using an optical fiber quality analyzer: FQA. The data obtained from FQA are extensively studied to investigate more reliable way of representing the fiber length data and thus examining the viable route for measuring the fiber size distributions. It has been found that the fiber length averaged length 11 is a viable indicator of the average pulp fiber length. The fiber size fraction and/or distribution can be represented by the fiber "length" fractions.

  12. PULP FIBER SIZE CHARACTERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShijieLiu

    2004-01-01

    Pulp fiber length distribution characterization hasbeen examined in this study. Because of the fibermorphology: slender in shape, fiber size distributioncharacterization is a very difficult task. Traditionaltechnique involves separation of the particles by size,such as Bauer-McNett fiber classifier, and measuringthe weight fractions. Themay or may not reflect theparticle fractions obtaineddesired size classification.On the other hand, the more recent technique throughoptical measurement of fiber length is limited by itsinability to measure the mass of the particle fractions.Therefore, not only the two techniques fail togenerate identical results, either one was accepted tobe of better value. Pure hardwood kraft, softwoodkraft, and their mixture samples have been measuredfor their fiber length distributions using an opticalfiber quality analyzer: FQA. The data obtained fromFQA are extensively studied to investigate morereliable way of representing the fiber length data andthus examining the viable route for measuring thefiber size distributions. It has been found that thefiber length averaged length 1~ is a viable indicator ofthe average pulp fiber length. The fiber size fractionand/or distribution can be represented by the fiber"length" fractions.

  13. Aerodynamic characteristic of canard rotor/wing aircraft in conversion%鸭式旋翼/机翼飞行器转换末段气动特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李毅波; 马东立; 牛凌宇

    2011-01-01

    采用数值模拟方法研究鸭武旋翼/机翼(CRW,Canard Rotor/Wing)飞行器在转换过程末段,旋翼转速极低时全机气动特性变化规律及其产生原因.给出了旋翼旋转一周时,全机气动力、气动力矩、焦点位置变化规律,对此布局形式,转换过程末段全机升力、阻力变化幅度可达10.7%,3.7%,焦点可移动0.6 m.研究显示:旋翼处于前后不对称流场及旋翼处于不同方位角时对机体的不对称干扰是气动力与气动力矩变化原因,旋翼与平尾升力线斜率变化、旋翼自身焦点位置变化导致了全机焦点移动.%The aerodynamic characteristics and mechanism of canard rotor/wing(CRW) aircraft during conversion from rotary to fixed-wing flight was numerically investigated. The variation of forces, moments and aerodynamic center with respect to rotor position are presented, the amplitude of lift, drag and aerodynamic center for this configuration in conversion can reach 10.7% , 3.7% and 0.6 m separately. The investigation shows that the cause of forces and moments variation is the asymmetry flow field in rotary plane and asymmetry interference between rotor and fuselage, the motion of aerodynamic center can be explained by the motion of rotor aerodynamic center and the variation of lift curve slope of rotor and horizontal tail.

  14. Centrifugal separators and related devices and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikrantz, David H.; Law, Jack D.; Garn, Troy G.; Macaluso, Lawrence L.; Todd, Terry A.

    2012-03-06

    Centrifugal separators and related methods and devices are described. More particularly, centrifugal separators comprising a first fluid supply fitting configured to deliver fluid into a longitudinal fluid passage of a rotor shaft and a second fluid supply fitting sized and configured to sealingly couple with the first fluid supply fitting are described. Also, centrifugal separator systems comprising a manifold having a drain fitting and a cleaning fluid supply fitting are described, wherein the manifold is coupled to a movable member of a support assembly. Additionally, methods of cleaning centrifugal separators are described.

  15. Abort System Using Supersonic Aerodynamic Interaction for Capsule-Type Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    小澤, 啓伺; 北村, 圭一; 花井, 勝祥; 三好, 理也; 森, 浩一; 中村, 佳朗

    The space transportation system using capsule/rocket configurations such as Apollo and Soyuz are simple compared with Space Shuttle, and have several merits from the viewpoint of reliability. The capsule/rocket system will take over the Space Shuttle, after it retires in 2010. As the Space Shuttle accidents had been caused by several factors, e.g., aerodynamic interaction of shock waves ahead of its wing, advanced abort systems such as LAS (Launch Abort System) are required for the capsule/rocket system. In the present study, as a baseline configuration, a combination of a cone and a cylinder is employed as a CEV (Crew Exploration Vehicle), which consists of a capsule (LAV: Launch Abort Vehicle) and a rocket (SM: Service Module). By changing the relative position of the two components as well as the profile area of the rocket, their effects on the capsule/rocket aerodynamic interaction and characteristics (drag and pitching moment) are experimentally and numerically investigated at a supersonic speed (M∞ = 3.0). It is found from the results that the clearance have little effects on the flow field for the case of the baseline configuration. The capsule always showed a positive drag (CD = 0.34), which means that thrust is required to overcome the drag. Otherwise the capsule will recontact the rocket. However in the case where the rocket contact area is 2.2 times as large as the capsule profile, more favorable effects were obtained. Especially in the case of a certain clearance (h/D = 0.40), the drag coefficient of the capsule is CD = -0.35, which means that the capsule suffers a thrust force from the aerodynamic interaction. Under this condition, if capsule has a pitch angle with 5 degrees instantaneously, then pitching moment coefficient becomes CMp = -0.41 therefore capsule stabilize. However, in the case of a very small clearance (h/D ∝ 0.00), the flow becomes unsteady involving pulsating shock wave, leading to a potentially risky separation of the capsule.

  16. Particle size separation via soil washing to obtain volume reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R; Rasor, E; Van Ryn, F

    1999-04-23

    A pilot-plant study was performed using a soil washing pilot plant originally designed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to demonstrate scale-up and potential full-scale remediation. This pilot plant named VORCE (Volume Reduction/Chemical Extraction) was modified to meet the specific requirements for treatment of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and a Department of Energy site soils. After a series of tests on clean soils to develop operating parameters and system performance, the machine was used to treat soils, one contaminated with Thorium-232 and the other with Cesium-137. All indicate that soil washing is very promising for volume reduction treatment. In addition, cost data was generated and is given herein.

  17. Experimental and Analytical Analysis of Perforated Plate Aerodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jürgen Zierep; Rainer Bohning; Piotr Doerffer

    2003-01-01

    Perforated walls and transpiration flow play an important role in aerodynamics due to an increasing interest in application of flow control by means of blowing and/or suction. An experimental study was carried out which has led to the determination of a transpiration flow characteristics in the form of a simple formula that is very useful in modelling such flows. In connection to this relation a method of "aerodynamic porosity" determination has been proposed which is much more reliable than geometric description of the porosity. A theoretical analysis of the flow through a perforation hole was also carried out. The flow was considered as compressible and viscous. The gasdynamic analysis led us to a very similar result to the relation obtained from the experiment. The adequacy of the theoretical result is discussed in respect to the experiment.

  18. Aerodynamic challenges in span length of suspension bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Haifan; GE Yaojun

    2007-01-01

    The potential requirement of extreme bridge spans is firstly discussed according to horizontal clearances for navigation and economical construction of deep-water foundation. To ensure the technological feasibility of suspen- sion bridges with longer spans, the Static estimation of feasi- ble span length is then made based on current material strength and weight of cables and deck. After the performances of the countermeasures for raising the aerodynamic stability are reviewed, a trial design of a 5 000 m suspension bridge, which is estimated as a reasonable limitation of span length, is finally conducted to respond to the tomorrow's challenge in span length of suspension bridges with the particular aspects, including dynamic stiffness, aerodynamic flutter and aerostatic stability.

  19. Aerodynamics of ski jumping: experiments and CFD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meile, W.; Reisenberger, E.; Brenn, G. [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, Graz (Austria); Mayer, M. [VRVis GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Schmoelzer, B.; Mueller, W. [Medical University of Graz, Department for Biophysics, Graz (Austria)

    2006-12-15

    The aerodynamic behaviour of a model ski jumper is investigated experimentally at full-scale Reynolds numbers and computationally applying a standard RANS code. In particular we focus on the influence of different postures on aerodynamic forces in a wide range of angles of attack. The experimental results proved to be in good agreement with full-scale measurements with athletes in much larger wind tunnels, and form a reliable basis for further predictions of the effects of position changes on the performance. The comparison of CFD results with the experiments shows poor agreement, but enables a clear outline of simulation potentials and limits when accurate predictions of effects from small variations are required. (orig.)

  20. Study on Aerodynamic Design Optimization of Turbomachinery Blades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naixing CHEN; Hongwu ZHANG; Weiguang HUANG; Yanji XU

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the study on aerodynamics design optimization of turbomachinery blading developed by the authors at the Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, during the recent few years. The present paper describes the aspects mainly on how to use a rapid approach of profiling a 3D blading and of grid generation for computation, a fast and accurate viscous computation method and an appropriate optimization methodology_ including a blade parameterization algorithm to optimize turbomachinery blading aerodynamically. Any blade configuration can be expressed by three curves, they are the camber lines, the thickness distributions and the radial stacking line, and then the blade geometry can be easily parameterized by a number of parameters with three polynomials. A gradient-based parameterization analytical method and a response surface method were applied herein for blade optimization. It was found that the optimization process provides reliable design for turbomachinery with reasonable computing time.

  1. Aircraft Noise Prediction Program theoretical manual: Propeller aerodynamics and noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorumski, W. E. (Editor); Weir, D. S. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The prediction sequence used in the aircraft noise prediction program (ANOPP) is described. The elements of the sequence are called program modules. The first group of modules analyzes the propeller geometry, the aerodynamics, including both potential and boundary-layer flow, the propeller performance, and the surface loading distribution. This group of modules is based entirely on aerodynamic strip theory. The next group of modules deals with the first group. Predictions of periodic thickness and loading noise are determined with time-domain methods. Broadband noise is predicted by a semiempirical method. Near-field predictions of fuselage surface pressrues include the effects of boundary layer refraction and scattering. Far-field predictions include atmospheric and ground effects.

  2. Influence of a humidor on the aerodynamics of baseballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Bohn, John L.

    2008-11-01

    We investigate whether storing baseballs in a controlled humidity environment significantly affects their aerodynamic properties. We measure the change in diameter and weight of baseballs as a function of relative humidity in which the balls are stored. The trajectories of pitched and batted baseballs are modeled to assess the difference between those stored at 30% relative humidity versus 50% relative humidity. We find that a drier baseball will curve slightly more than a humidified one for a given pitch velocity and rotation rate. We also find that aerodynamics alone would add 2ft to the distance a wetter baseball ball is hit. This increased distance is compensated by a 6ft reduction in the batted distance due to the change in the coefficient of restitution of the ball. We discuss consequences of these results for baseball played at Coors Field in Denver, where baseballs have been stored in a humidor at 50% relative humidity since 2002.

  3. Satellite Aerodynamics and Density Determination from Satellite Dynamic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag and lift properties of a satellite are first expressed as a function of two parameters associated with gas-surface interaction at the satellite surface. The dynamic response of the satellite as it passes through the atmosphere is then expressed as a function of the two gas-surface interaction parameters, the atmospheric density, the satellite velocity, and the satellite orientation to the high speed flow. By proper correlation of the observed dynamic response with the changing angle of attack of the satellite, it is found that the two unknown gas-surface interaction parameters can be determined. Once the gas-surface interaction parameters are known, the aerodynamic properties of the satellite at all angles of attack are also determined.

  4. Parameterization adaption for 3D shape optimization in aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr Abou El Majd

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available When solving a PDE problem numerically, a certain mesh-refinement process is always implicit, and very classically, mesh adaptivity is a very effective means to accelerate grid convergence. Similarly, when optimizing a shape by means of an explicit geometrical representation, it is natural to seek for an analogous concept of parameterization adaptivity. We propose here an adaptive parameterization for three-dimensional optimum design in aerodynamics by using the so-called “Free-Form Deformation” approach based on 3D tensorial Bézier parameterization. The proposed procedure leads to efficient numerical simulations with highly reduced computational costs.[How to cite this article:  Majd, B.A.. 2014. Parameterization adaption for 3D shape optimization in aerodynamics. International Journal of Science and Engineering, 6(1:61-69. Doi: 10.12777/ijse.6.1.61-69

  5. Aerodynamic Heating in Hypersonic Boundary Layers:\\ Role of Dilatational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yiding; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multi-mode instabilities in a hypersonic boundary layer and their effects on aerodynamic heating are investigated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering flow visualization, fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint (TSP), and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Calculations are also performed based on both parabolized stability equations (PSE) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). It is found that second-mode dilatational waves, accompanied by high-frequency alternating fluid compression and expansion, produce intense aerodynamic heating in a small region that rapidly heats the fluid passing through it. As a result, the surface temperature rapidly increases and results in an overshoot over the nominal transitional value. When the dilatation waves decay downstream, the surface temperature decreases gradually until transition is completed. A theoretical analysis is provided to interpret the temperature distribution affected by ...

  6. AERODYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION DESIGN OF LOW ASPECT RATIO TRANSONIC TURBINE STAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Liming; LI Jun; FENG Zhenping

    2006-01-01

    The advanced optimization method named as adaptive range differential evolution (ARDE)is developed. The optimization performance of ARDE is demonstrated using a typical mathematical test and compared with the standard genetic algorithm and differential evolution. Combined with parallel ARDE, surface modeling method and Navier-Stokes solution, a new automatic aerodynamic optimization method is presented. A low aspect ratio transonic turbine stage is optimized for the maximization of the isentropic efficiency with forty-one design variables in total. The coarse-grained parallel strategy is applied to accelerate the design process using 15 CPUs. The isentropic efficiency of the optimum design is 1.6% higher than that of the reference design. The aerodynamic performance of the optimal design is much better than that of the reference design.

  7. Experimental Investigation on Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Paraglider Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashud, Mohammad; Umemura, Akira

    The fundamental aerodynamic characteristics of a paraglider’s canopy are investigated in wind tunnel experiments using an inflatable cell model designed to represent the dynamic behaviors of each cell comprising the canopy. At attack angles greater than a few degrees, the cell model inflates fully. To characterize its aerodynamic characteristics, we focus our attention on the flow around the inflated cell model at the plane of symmetry of the model. The cross-sectional profile of the inflated cell model, streamline pattern, internal air pressure and external surface pressure distribution are measured at various attack angles in order to identify the function of air intake and to obtain the lift and drag coefficients of the airfoil with an open air intake. The results reveal the mechanism of how the cell inflates into a stable wing shape and bears the buckling force caused by the cables suspending a pay load.

  8. Wing Warping, Roll Control and Aerodynamic Optimization of Inflatable Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andrew

    2005-11-01

    The research presents work on aerodynamic control by warping inflatable wings. Inflatable wings are deformable by their nature. Mechanical manipulation of the wing's shape has been demonstrated to alter the performance and control the vehicle in flight by deforming the trailing edge of the wing near the wing tip. Predicting and correlating the forces required in deforming the wings to a particular shape and the deformation generated for a given internal pressure were conducted through the use of photogrammetry. This research focuses on optimizing the roll moments and aerodynamic performance of the vehicle, given the current level of wing warping ability. Predictions from lifting line theory applied to wing shape changes are presented. Comparisons from the experimental results are made with lifting line analysis for wings with arbitrary twist and the solutions are used to determine rolling moment and optimum L/D. Results from flight tests will also be presented.

  9. Improvement in Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Paraglider Wing Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashud, Mohammad; Umemura, Akira

    To determine the parameters which can improve the overall performance of a paraglider wing canopy, we have been investigating the fundamental aerodynamic characteristics of an inflatable cell model which is designed to represent the dynamic behaviors of each cell comprising the wing canopy. This paper describes the results of a series of wind tunnel experiments. It is shown that significant drag reduction can be achieved by adopting an appropriately designed shape for the soft cloth comprising the upper surface. A trade-off relationship between the aerodynamic quality (characterized by the lift-to-drag ratio) and structural strength (characterized by the internal air pressure coefficient) of the canopy is also examined in detail.

  10. BTT autopilot design for agile missiles with aerodynamic uncer tainty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueyue Ma; Jie Guo; Shengjing Tang

    2015-01-01

    The approach to the synthesis of autopilot with aerody-namic uncertainty is investigated in order to achieve large maneu-verability of agile missiles. The dynamics of the agile missile with reaction-jet control system (RCS) are presented. Subsequently, the cascade control scheme based on the bank-to-turn (BTT) steering technique is described. To address the aerodynamic un-certainties encountered by the control system, the active distur-bance rejection control (ADRC) method is introduced in the autopi-lot design. Furthermore, a compound control er, using extended state observer (ESO) to online estimate system uncertainties and calculate derivative of command signals, is designed based on dynamic surface control (DSC). Nonlinear simulation results show the feasibility of the proposed approach and validate the robust-ness of the control er with severe unmodeled dynamics.

  11. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, T; Fujita, K; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1.

  12. Aerodynamic characteristics research on wide-speed range waverider configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Waverider generated from a given flow field has a high lift-to-drag ratio because of attached bow shock on leading edge. However, leading edge blunt and off-design condition can make bow shock off leading edge and have unfavorable influence on aerodynamic characteristics. So these two problems have always been concerned as important engineering science issues by aeronautical engineering scientists. In this paper, through respectively using low speed and high speed waverider design principles, a wide-speed rang vehicle is designed, which can level takeoff and accelerate to hypersonic speed for cruise. In addition, sharp leading edge is blunted to alleviated aeroheating. Theoretical study and wind tunnel test show that this vehicle has good aerodynamic performance in wide-speed range of subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic speeds.

  13. Picosecond laser surface micro-texturing for the modification of aerodynamic and dust distribution characteristics in a multi-cyclone system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omonigho B. Otanocha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic flow control in a cyclone is critical to its performance. Dust accumulation in a multi-cyclone is undesirable. This research investigated, the effects of laser-patterned Ethylene-Propylene-Diene Monomer (EPDM roof in a commercial multi-cyclone system on its aerodynamic and dust accumulation characteristics. Our experimental data show that strategically designed concentric micro-dimples on the cyclone roof can improve both the aerodynamic performance and dust separation capability in the multi-cyclone system. With specific laser-patterned cyclone roof, up to 78% reduction in dust adhesion was demonstrated in one of the cones (cone 9. With the 315-μm diameter micro-dimples on EPDM roof, it was observed that dimples located close to the vortex finder caused an increase in the reverse airflows in the cyclone, thereby effecting entrainment of dust. The overall dust separation efficiency of the multi-cyclone system was at an average of 99.9% with the laser-textured roof, hence no adverse effect on the original cyclone system, in spite of the reported improvements in dust adhesion reduction.

  14. Nonlinear, unsteady aerodynamic loads on rectangular and delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, E. H.; Kandil, O. A.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic loads on rectangular and delta wings in an incompressible flow are calculated by using an unsteady vortex-lattice model. Examples include flows past fixed wings in unsteady uniform streams and flows past wings undergoing unsteady motions. The unsteadiness may be due to gusty winds or pitching oscillations. The present technique establishes a reliable approach which can be utilized in the analysis of problems associated with the dynamics and aeroelasticity of wings within a wide range of angles of attack.

  15. Aerodynamic Classification of Swept-Wing Ice Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, Jeff M.; Broeren, Andy P.; Bragg, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    The continued design, certification and safe operation of swept-wing airplanes in icing conditions rely on the advancement of computational and experimental simulation methods for higher fidelity results over an increasing range of aircraft configurations and performance, and icing conditions. The current stateof- the-art in icing aerodynamics is mainly built upon a comprehensive understanding of two-dimensional geometries that does not currently exist for fundamentally three-dimensional geometries such as swept wings. The purpose of this report is to describe what is known of iced-swept-wing aerodynamics and to identify the type of research that is required to improve the current understanding. Following the method used in a previous review of iced-airfoil aerodynamics, this report proposes a classification of swept-wing ice accretion into four groups based upon unique flowfield attributes. These four groups are: ice roughness, horn ice, streamwise ice and spanwise-ridge ice. In the case of horn ice it is shown that a further subclassification of "nominally 3D" or "highly 3D" horn ice may be necessary. For all of the proposed ice-shape classifications, relatively little is known about the three-dimensional flowfield and even less about the effect of Reynolds number and Mach number on these flowfields. The classifications and supporting data presented in this report can serve as a starting point as new research explores swept-wing aerodynamics with ice shapes. As further results are available, it is expected that these classifications will need to be updated and revised.

  16. Applications of color graphics to complex aerodynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of uses for color graphics in the display of large sets of complex aerodynamic data in two and three dimensions are summarized. These methods improve the ability of a scientific researcher to interactively review three-dimensional displays of aircraft panel geometries for the purposes of eliminating errors, and allow him to rapidly display an assortment of smooth-shaded, color-coded illustrations for his experimental and computational results.

  17. Aerodynamic investigation of winglets on wind turbine blades using CFD

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2006-01-01

    The present report describes the numerical investigation of the aerodynamics around a wind turbine blade with a winglet using Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD. Five winglets were investigated with different twist distribution and camber. Four of themwere pointing towards the pressure side (upstream) and one was pointing towards the suction side (downstream). Additionally, a rectangular modification of the original blade tip was designed with the same planform area as the blades with winglets...

  18. Influence of satellite aerodynamics on atmospheric density determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R.; Smith, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of aerodynamic factors which influence the interpretation of satellite dynamic response. These factors include: (1) the influence of satellite orientation and shape on the drag coefficient; (2) the effect of changes in the gas flow properties with altitude; and (3) the influence of upper atmospheric winds on the interpretation of data. These factors represent the greatest source of error in current data reduction. For this reason, an estimate is made of a possible correction to present density models.

  19. Determining Aerodynamic Loads Based on Optical Deformation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshu; Barrows, D. A.; Burner, A. W.; Rhew, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a videogrammetric technique for determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements. The data reduction methods are developed to extract the normal force and pitching moment from beam deformation data. The axial force is obtained by measuring the axial translational motion of a movable shaft in a spring/bearing device. Proof-of-concept calibration experiments are conducted to assess the accuracy of this optical technique.

  20. Aerodynamic Effects Of Deicing And Anti-Icing Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents results of wind-tunnel tests of aerodynamic effects of deicing and anti-icing fluids on airplane wings. Tests conducted on three-dimensional half-model airplane and two-dimensional airfoil model at temperatures ranging from -29 to +10 degrees C. Fluids used included three commercial fluids available for use during 1987-1988 winter season, one discontinued commercial fluid, and eight newer fluids experimental at time of test.