WorldWideScience

Sample records for aerodynamic size range

  1. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cooney

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Cooney1, Anthony J Hickey21Department of Biomedical Engineering; 2School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process.Keywords: diesel exhaust particles, aerosol, inhalation toxicology

  2. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H [Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Aono, H [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI48109 (United States)], E-mail: hliu@faculty.chiba-u.jp, E-mail: aonoh@umich.edu

    2009-03-01

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(10{sup 4}) to O(10{sup 1}) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design.

  3. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(104) to O(101) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design

  4. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321: uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pfeifer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network, 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA were compared with a focus on flow rates accuracy, particle sizing, and unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent, while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10–20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 μm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 μm in aerodynamic diameter should be only used with caution. For particles larger than 3 μm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. This uncertainty of the particle number size distribution has especially to be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size

  5. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Sascha; Müller, Thomas; Weinhold, Kay; Zikova, Nadezda; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Marinoni, Angela; Bischof, Oliver F.; Kykal, Carsten; Ries, Ludwig; Meinhardt, Frank; Aalto, Pasi; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates, particle sizing, and the unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10 % to 20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 µm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 µm in aerodynamic diameter should only be used with caution. For particles larger than 3 µm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. Particularly this uncertainty of the particle number size distribution must be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3 µm

  6. Aerodynamic levitator for large-sized glassy material production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Shinichi; Cho, Won-Seung; Imai, Ryoji

    2015-09-01

    Containerless aerodynamic levitation processing is a unique technology for the fabrication of bulk non-crystalline materials. Using conventional aerodynamic levitation, a high reflective index (RI) material (BaTi2O5 and LaO3/2-TiO2-ZrO2 system) was developed with a RI greater than approximately 2.2, which is similar to that of diamond. However, the glass size was small, approximately 3 mm in diameter. Therefore, it is essential to produce large sized materials for future optical materials applications, such as camera lenses. In this study, a new aerodynamic levitator was designed to produce non-crystalline materials with diameters larger than 6 mm. The concept of this new levitator was to set up a reduced pressure at the top of the molten samples without generating turbulent flow. A numerical simulation was also performed to verify the concept. PMID:26429456

  7. Aerodynamic characteristics research on wide-speed range waverider configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Waverider generated from a given flow field has a high lift-to-drag ratio because of attached bow shock on leading edge. However, leading edge blunt and off-design condition can make bow shock off leading edge and have unfavorable influence on aerodynamic characteristics. So these two problems have always been concerned as important engineering science issues by aeronautical engineering scientists. In this paper, through respectively using low speed and high speed waverider design principles, a wide-speed rang vehicle is designed, which can level takeoff and accelerate to hypersonic speed for cruise. In addition, sharp leading edge is blunted to alleviated aeroheating. Theoretical study and wind tunnel test show that this vehicle has good aerodynamic performance in wide-speed range of subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic speeds.

  8. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Maeda, Masateru; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering. PMID:27019208

  9. Aerodynamic Jump: A Short Range View for Long Rod Projectiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bundy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that aerodynamic jump for a nonspinning kinetic energy penetrator is not – as conventional definitions may infer – a discontinuous change in the direction of motion at the origin of free flight, nor is it the converse, a cumulative redirection over a domain of infinite extent. Rather, with the aid of an alternative kinematical definition, it is shown that aerodynamic jump for such a projectile is a localized redirection of the center-of-gravity motion, caused by the force of lift due to yaw over the relatively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. A rigorous proof of this statement is provided, but the primary objective of this paper is to provide answers to the questions: what is aerodynamic jump, what does it mean, and what aspects of the flight trajectory does it refer to, or account for.

  10. Indigenous development and performance evaluation of BARC aerodynamic size separator (BASS)

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, S; Khan, A; Mayya, Y S; Narayanan, K P; Purwar, R C; Sapra, B K; Sunny, F

    2002-01-01

    Commercially available cascade impactors, commonly used for aerodynamic size separation of aerosol particles, are based on the principle of inertial impaction. As of now, these instruments are imported at a cost of several lakhs of rupees; hence an effort has been made to develop an aerodynamic particle sizer indigenously in BARC. This unit, referred to as BARC Aerodynamic Size Separator (BASS), separates aerosols into seven size classes ranging from 0.53 mu m to 10 mu m and operates at a flow rate of 45 Ipm. Intercomparison studies between the standard Andersen Mark-II (Grasbey Andersen Inc.) impactor and BASS using nebulizer generated aerosols have consistently shown excellent performance by BASS in all respects. In particular, BASS yielded the parameters of polydisperse aerosols quite accurately. Experiments to evaluate the individual stage cut-off diameters show that these are within 8% of their designed value for all stages except the higher two stages which indicate about 30% lower values than the desig...

  11. Intercomparison of 15 Aerodynamic Particle Size Spectrometers (APS 3321): Uncertainties in Particle Sizing and Number Size Distribution.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Weinhold, K.; Zíková, Naděžda; dos Santos, S.M.; Marinoni, A.; Bischof, O.F.; Kykal, C.; Ries, L.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 1545-1551. ISSN 1867-1381 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 262254 - ACTRIS Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : counting efficiency * aerodynamic particle size spectrometers * laboratory study Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.929, year: 2014

  12. On the heritability of geographic range sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, T. J.; Gaston, K J

    2003-01-01

    Within taxonomic groups, most species are restricted in their geographic range sizes, with only a few being widespread. The possibility that species-level selection on range sizes contributes to the characteristic form of such speciesrange size distributions has previously been raised. This would require that closely related species have similar range sizes, an indication of "heritability" of range sizes at the species level. Support for this view came from a positive correlation between the ...

  13. Indigenous development and performance evaluation of BARC aerodynamic size separator (BASS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercially available cascade impactors, commonly used for aerodynamic size separation of aerosol particles, are based on the principle of inertial impaction. As of now, these instruments are imported at a cost of several lakhs of rupees; hence an effort has been made to develop an aerodynamic particle sizer indigenously in BARC. This unit, referred to as BARC Aerodynamic Size Separator (BASS), separates aerosols into seven size classes ranging from 0.53 μm to 10 μm and operates at a flow rate of 45 Ipm. Intercomparison studies between the standard Andersen Mark-II (Grasbey Andersen Inc.) impactor and BASS using nebulizer generated aerosols have consistently shown excellent performance by BASS in all respects. In particular, BASS yielded the parameters of polydisperse aerosols quite accurately. Experiments to evaluate the individual stage cut-off diameters show that these are within 8% of their designed value for all stages except the higher two stages which indicate about 30% lower values than the designed ones. The replotting of all the mass distribution data using the experimental cut-off diameters showed perfect lognormal fits, thereby indicating that these diameters are closer to the true stage cut-off diameters for BASS. The studies show that BASS will be suitable for determining the particle size distributions in the context of the radiological safety programmes of DAE. Being indigenous in design, it may be fabricated on a commercial scale at a cost far less than that of the imported units. Such a venture will greatly help several national programmes on atmospheric pollution being carried out by many laboratories and institutions across the country. (author)

  14. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by 222Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It's major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented

  15. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olawoyin, L.

    1995-09-01

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by {sup 222}Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It`s major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented.

  16. Aerodynamic Limits on Large Civil Tiltrotor Sizing and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, C W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Large Civil Tiltrotor (2nd generation, or LCTR2) has been the reference design for avariety of NASA studies of design optimization, engine and gearbox technology, handling qualities, andother areas, with contributions from NASA Ames, Glenn and Langley Centers, plus academic and industrystudies. Ongoing work includes airfoil design, 3D blade optimization, engine technology studies, andwingrotor aerodynamic interference. The proposed paper will bring the design up to date with the latestresults of such studies, then explore the limits of what aerodynamic improvements might hope toaccomplish. The purpose is two-fold: 1) determine where future technology studies might have the greatestpayoff, and 2) establish a stronger basis of comparison for studies of other vehicle configurations andmissions.

  17. Aerodynamic ground effect in fruitfly sized insect takeoff

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling, considering the voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore the possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. The numerical method is based on a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver and a simple flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia, and the leg thrust. Forces, power and displacements are compared for takeoffs with and without ground effect. Natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly, modified takeoffs and hovering are analyzed. The results show that the ground effect during the natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, the ground effect does not produce any significant increase of the vertical force neither. Moreover, the vertical force even drops in most of the cases considered. There is a consistent increase of the horizontal force, and a decrease of the aerodynamic power, if the rate of climb is suff...

  18. AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS IN THE SUBMICRON SIZE RANGE, STUDIES WITH AN AEROSOL CENTRIFUGE, A NEW DIFFUSION BATTERY, A LOW PRESSURE IMPACTOR AND AN ADVANCED CONDENSATION NUCLEI COUNTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes the investigations of four aerosol classifiers which cover finite, but overlapping ranges of the aerosol particle size spectrum. The first part is concerned with a cylindrical aerosol centrifuge, which measures aerodynamic equivalent diameters precisely. Thi...

  19. Research of the coal dust size range influence on low-temperature vortex combustion based on numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shcherbakova Ksenia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature vortex combustion numerical simulation was performed using FIRE-3D software. Low-temperature vortex combustion aerodynamic and heat-and-mass transfer versus coal dust size range characteristic were analysed. The results are presented in graphical form. P-49 Nazarovo station steam generator model was created. The results of the numerical modelling are suitable for coal dust size range effect on low-temperature vortex combustion analysis.

  20. Morphological characterization of carbon nanofiber aerosol using tandem mobility and aerodynamic size measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deye, Gregory J.; Kulkarni, Pramod, E-mail: pskulkarni@cdc.gov; Ku, Bon Ki [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Characterizing microstructural and transport properties of non-spherical particles, such as carbon nanofibers (CNF), is important for understanding their transport and deposition in human respiratory system and engineered devices such as particle filters. We describe an approach to obtain morphological information of non-spherical particles using a tandem system of differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI). Effective density, dynamic shape factors (DSF), particle mass, and fractal dimension-like mass-scaling exponent of nanofibers were derived using the measured mobility and aerodynamic diameters, along with the known material density of CNF. Multiple charging of particles during DMA classification, which tends to bias the measured shape factors and particle mass toward higher values, was accounted for using a correction procedure. Particle mass derived from DMA-ELPI measurements agreed well with the direct mass measurements using an aerosol particle mass analyzer. Effective densities, based on mobility diameters, ranged from 0.32 to 0.67 g cm{sup -3}. The DSF of the CNF ranged from 1.8 to 2.3, indicating highly non-spherical particle morphologies.

  1. Climate and topography explain range sizes of terrestrial vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiming; Li, Xianping; Sandel, Brody; Blank, David; Liu, Zetian; Liu, Xuan; Yan, Shaofei

    2016-05-01

    Identifying the factors that influence range sizes of species provides important insight into the distribution of biodiversity, and is crucial for predicting shifts in species ranges in response to climate change. Current climate (for example, climate variability and climate extremes), long-term climate change, evolutionary age, topographic heterogeneity, land area and species traits such as physiological thermal limits, dispersal ability, annual fecundity and body size have been shown to influence range size. Yet, few studies have examined the generality of each of these factors among different taxa, or have simultaneously evaluated the strength of relationships between range size and these factors at a global scale. We quantify contributions of these factors to range sizes of terrestrial vertebrates (mammals, birds and reptiles) at a global scale. We found that large-ranged species experience greater monthly extremes of maximum or minimum temperature within their ranges, or occur in areas with higher long-term climate velocity and lower topographic heterogeneity or lower precipitation seasonality. Flight ability, body mass and continent width are important only for particular taxa. Our results highlight the importance of climate and topographic context in driving range size variation. The results suggest that small-range species may be vulnerable to climate change and should be the focus of conservation efforts.

  2. Effects of sample size on KERNEL home range estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, D.E.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Kernohan, Brian J.; Brundige, Gary C.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Gitzen, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Kernel methods for estimating home range are being used increasingly in wildlife research, but the effect of sample size on their accuracy is not known. We used computer simulations of 10-200 points/home range and compared accuracy of home range estimates produced by fixed and adaptive kernels with the reference (REF) and least-squares cross-validation (LSCV) methods for determining the amount of smoothing. Simulated home ranges varied from simple to complex shapes created by mixing bivariate normal distributions. We used the size of the 95% home range area and the relative mean squared error of the surface fit to assess the accuracy of the kernel home range estimates. For both measures, the bias and variance approached an asymptote at about 50 observations/home range. The fixed kernel with smoothing selected by LSCV provided the least-biased estimates of the 95% home range area. All kernel methods produced similar surface fit for most simulations, but the fixed kernel with LSCV had the lowest frequency and magnitude of very poor estimates. We reviewed 101 papers published in The Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM) between 1980 and 1997 that estimated animal home ranges. A minority of these papers used nonparametric utilization distribution (UD) estimators, and most did not adequately report sample sizes. We recommend that home range studies using kernel estimates use LSCV to determine the amount of smoothing, obtain a minimum of 30 observations per animal (but preferably a?Y50), and report sample sizes in published results.

  3. Global patterns of geographic range size in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C David L Orme

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale patterns of spatial variation in species geographic range size are central to many fundamental questions in macroecology and conservation biology. However, the global nature of these patterns has remained contentious, since previous studies have been geographically restricted and/or based on small taxonomic groups. Here, using a database on the breeding distributions of birds, we report the first (to our knowledge global maps of variation in species range sizes for an entire taxonomic class. We show that range area does not follow a simple latitudinal pattern. Instead, the smallest range areas are attained on islands, in mountainous areas, and largely in the southern hemisphere. In contrast, bird species richness peaks around the equator, and towards higher latitudes. Despite these profoundly different latitudinal patterns, spatially explicit models reveal a weak tendency for areas with high species richness to house species with significantly smaller median range area. Taken together, these results show that for birds many spatial patterns in range size described in geographically restricted analyses do not reflect global rules. It remains to be discovered whether global patterns in geographic range size are best interpreted in terms of geographical variation in species assemblage packing, or in the rates of speciation, extinction, and dispersal that ultimately underlie biodiversity.

  4. Theoretical studies on particle shape classification based on simultaneous small forward angle light scattering and aerodynamic sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin-Bi, Zhang; Lei, Ding; Ying-Ping, Wang; Li, Zhang; Jin-Lei, Wu; Hai-Yang, Zheng; Li, Fang

    2016-03-01

    Particle shape contributes to understanding the physical and chemical processes of the atmosphere and better ascertaining the origins and chemical compositions of the particles. The particle shape can be classified by the aspect ratio, which can be estimated through the asymmetry factor measured with angularly resolved light scattering. An experimental method of obtaining the asymmetry factor based on simultaneous small forward angle light scattering and aerodynamic size measurements is described briefly. The near forward scattering intensity signals of three detectors in the azimuthal angles at 120° offset are calculated using the methods of T-matrix and discrete dipole approximation. Prolate spheroid particles with different aspect ratios are used as the shape models with the assumption that the symmetry axis is parallel to the flow axis and perpendicular to the incident light. The relations between the asymmetry factor and the optical size and aerodynamic size at various equivalent sizes, refractive indices, and mass densities are discussed in this paper. The numerically calculated results indicate that an elongated particle may be classified at diameter larger than 1.0 μm, and may not be distinguished from a sphere at diameter less than 0.5 μm. It is estimated that the lowest detected aspect ratio is around 1.5:1 in consideration of the experimental errors. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41275132).

  5. Landscape Heterogeneity-Biodiversity Relationship: Effect of Range Size

    OpenAIRE

    Katayama, Naoki; Amano, Tatsuya; Naoe, Shoji; YAMAKITA Takehisa; Komatsu, Isamu; Takagawa, Shin-ichi; Sato, Naoto; Ueta, Mutsuyuki; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization) and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, wherea...

  6. A method of approximating range size of small mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.

    1965-01-01

    In summary, trap success trends appear to provide a useful approximation to range size of easily trapped small mammals such as Peromyscus. The scale of measurement can be adjusted as desired. Further explorations of the usefulness of the plan should be made and modifications possibly developed before adoption.

  7. Abundance-range size relationships in stream vegetation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2002-01-01

    thecultivated lowlands of Denmark, we examined the overall relationship betweenlocal abundance and geographical range size of the vascular flora. We found asignificant positive relationship for all species at all stream localities andan even stronger relationship for ecologically similar species...... streamhabitattypes of the same width and lengthwise locations in different stream systemsdidnot show a stronger positive relationship than the overall relationship. Thefewobligatory submerged species having a high local abundance and low range sizecould not be regarded as specialist species on narrowly distributed...... resources.Their occurrence is probably a temporal phenomenon due to the profound habitatdestruction during the last 100 years, restricting to a few localities thespecies that were previously widely distributed. Many species presently survivein a marginal position of low range size and low local abundance...

  8. Geographic range size and extinction risk assessment in nomadic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Claire A; Tulloch, Ayesha; Hammill, Edd; Possingham, Hugh P; Fuller, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Geographic range size is often conceptualized as a fixed attribute of a species and treated as such for the purposes of quantification of extinction risk; species occupying smaller geographic ranges are assumed to have a higher risk of extinction, all else being equal. However many species are mobile, and their movements range from relatively predictable to-and-fro migrations to complex irregular movements shown by nomadic species. These movements can lead to substantial temporary expansion and contraction of geographic ranges, potentially to levels which may pose an extinction risk. By linking occurrence data with environmental conditions at the time of observations of nomadic species, we modeled the dynamic distributions of 43 arid-zone nomadic bird species across the Australian continent for each month over 11 years and calculated minimum range size and extent of fluctuation in geographic range size from these models. There was enormous variability in predicted spatial distribution over time; 10 species varied in estimated geographic range size by more than an order of magnitude, and 2 species varied by >2 orders of magnitude. During times of poor environmental conditions, several species not currently classified as globally threatened contracted their ranges to very small areas, despite their normally large geographic range size. This finding raises questions about the adequacy of conventional assessments of extinction risk based on static geographic range size (e.g., IUCN Red Listing). Climate change is predicted to affect the pattern of resource fluctuations across much of the southern hemisphere, where nomadism is the dominant form of animal movement, so it is critical we begin to understand the consequences of this for accurate threat assessment of nomadic species. Our approach provides a tool for discovering spatial dynamics in highly mobile species and can be used to unlock valuable information for improved extinction risk assessment and conservation

  9. Methods for root effects, tip effects and extending the angle of attack range to {+-} 180 deg., with application to aerodynamics for blades on wind turbines and propellers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomerie, Bjoern

    2004-06-01

    For wind turbine and propeller performance calculations aerodynamic data, valid for several radial stations along the blade, are used. For wind turbines the data must be valid for the 360 degree angle of attack range. The reason is that all kinds of abnormal conditions must be analysed especially during the design of the turbine. Frequently aerodynamic data are available from wind tunnel tests where the angle of attack range is from say -5 to +20 degrees. This report describes a method to extend such data to be valid for {+-} 180 degrees. Previously the extension of data has been very approximate following the whim of the moment with the analyst. Furthermore, the Himmelskamp effect at the root and tip effects are treated in the complete method.

  10. Multivariate Data Analysis as a Semi-quantitative Tool for Interpretive Evaluation of Comparability or Equivalence of Aerodynamic Particle Size Distribution Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Shuai; Hickey, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the performance of multivariate data analysis, especially orthogonal partial least square (OPLS) analysis, as a semi-quantitative tool to evaluate the comparability or equivalence of aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) profiles of orally inhaled and nasal drug products (OINDP). Monte Carlo simulation was employed to reconstitute APSD profiles based on 55 realistic scenarios proposed by the Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) workin...

  11. Characteristics of Aerodynamic and Noise for Tubular Centrifugal Fan (2nd report) : Effects of Belt Case, Inclination of Blade, Size of Casing and Preventive Plate against Reverse Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Kodama, Yoshio; Futigami, Shinichirou; Hayashi, Hidechito; Mimura, Yujirou

    1999-01-01

    The effects of the belt case, the inclination of blade, the size of casing and the preventive plate of a tubular centrifugal fan on both fan noise and the aerodynamic characteristics are experimentally investigated by using three impellers. The results are summarized as follows : A considerable amount of a rise of pressure and fan efficiency can be expected by using the inclined blade and taking off belt case. Therefore, the specific noise level of the tubular centrifugal fan decrease conside...

  12. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolway, R. Iestyn; Jones, Ian D.; Maberly, Stephen C.; French, Jon R.; Livingstone, David M.; Monteith, Donald T.; Simpson, Gavin L.; Thackeray, Stephen J.; Andersen, Mikkel R.; Battarbee, Richard W.; DeGasperi, Curtis L.; Evans, Christopher D.; de Eyto, Elvira; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Hamilton, David P.; Kernan, Martin; Krokowski, Jan; Rimmer, Alon; Rose, Kevin C.; Rusak, James A.; Ryves, David B.; Scott, Daniel R.; Shilland, Ewan M.; Smyth, Robyn L.; Staehr, Peter A.; Thomas, Rhian; Waldron, Susan; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here we quantify the pattern and magnitude of diel temperature variability of surface waters using high-frequency data from 100 lakes. We show that the near-surface diel temperature range can be substantial in summer relative to long-term change and, for lakes smaller than 3 km2, increases sharply and predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored. PMID:27023200

  13. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woolway, R Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Maberly, Stephen C; French, Jon R; Livingstone, David M; Monteith, Donald T; Simpson, Gavin L; Thackeray, Stephen J; Andersen, Mikkel R; Battarbee, Richard W; DeGasperi, Curtis L; Evans, Christopher D; de Eyto, Elvira; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Hamilton, David P; Kernan, Martin; Krokowski, Jan; Rimmer, Alon; Rose, Kevin C; Rusak, James A; Ryves, David B; Scott, Daniel R; Shilland, Ewan M; Smyth, Robyn L; Staehr, Peter A; Thomas, Rhian; Waldron, Susan; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A

    2016-01-01

    Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here...... predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical...... cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored....

  14. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2009-08-01

    characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in aerosol filter samples. To our knowledge, however, this study reporting: continuous online measurements of bioaerosol particles over several months, a range of characteristic size distribution patterns, and a persistent bioaerosol peak at ~3 μm. The measurement results confirm that PBAPs account for a substantial proportion of coarse aerosol particle number and mass in continental boundary layer air. Moreover, they suggest that the number concentration of viable bioparticles is dominated by fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria with aerodynamic diameters around 3 μm rather than single bacterial cells with diameters around 1 μm.

  15. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2010-04-01

    concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in aerosol filter samples. To our knowledge, however, this is the first exploratory study reporting continuous online measurements of bioaerosol particles over several months and a range of characteristic size distribution patterns with a persistent bioaerosol peak at ~3 μm. The measurement results confirm that PBAPs account for a substantial proportion of coarse aerosol particle number and mass in continental boundary layer air. Moreover, they suggest that the number concentration of viable bioparticles is dominated by fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria with aerodynamic diameters around 3 μm rather than single bacterial cells with diameters around 1 μm.

  16. An accurate description of quantum size effects in InP nanocrystallites over a wide range of sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtain an effective parametrization of the bulk electronic structure of InP within the tight-binding scheme. Using these parameters, we calculate the electronic structure of InP clusters with the size ranging up to 7.5 nm. The calculated variations in the electronic structure as a function of the cluster size is found to be in excellent agreement with experimental results over the entire range of sizes, establishing the effectiveness and transferability of the obtained parameter strengths

  17. Are range-size distributions consistent with species-level heritability?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Gotelli, Nicholas; Rahbek, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    of three different models to the range-size distribution of the South American avifauna. Although there were differences among the models, a moderate-to-high degree of range-size heritability consistently leads to SRDs that were similar to empirical data. These results suggest that range...

  18. Habitat area and climate stability determine geographical variation in plant species range sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morueta-Holme, Naia; Enquist, Brian J.; McGill, Brian J.;

    2013-01-01

    ,000 plant species across the New World. We assess prominent hypothesised range-size controls, finding that plant range sizes are codetermined by habitat area and long- and short-term climate stability. Strong short- and long-term climate instability in large parts of North America, including past...... concerns over the potential effects of future climate change and habitat loss on biodiversity.......Despite being a fundamental aspect of biodiversity, little is known about what controls species range sizes. This is especially the case for hyperdiverse organisms such as plants. We use the largest botanical data set assembled to date to quantify geographical variation in range size for ~85...

  19. Are range-size distributions consistent with species-level heritability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borregaard, Michael K; Gotelli, Nicholas J; Rahbek, Carsten

    2012-07-01

    The concept of species-level heritability is widely contested. Because it is most likely to apply to emergent, species-level traits, one of the central discussions has focused on the potential heritability of geographic range size. However, a central argument against range-size heritability has been that it is not compatible with the observed shape of present-day species range-size distributions (SRDs), a claim that has never been tested. To assess this claim, we used forward simulation of range-size evolution in clades with varying degrees of range-size heritability, and compared the output of three different models to the range-size distribution of the South American avifauna. Although there were differences among the models, a moderate-to-high degree of range-size heritability consistently leads to SRDs that were similar to empirical data. These results suggest that range-size heritability can generate realistic SRDs, and may play an important role in shaping observed patterns of range sizes. PMID:22759297

  20. Home range sizes for burchell's zebra equus burchelli antiquorum from the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.L. Smuts

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available Annual home range sizes were determined for 49 marked zebra family groups in the Kruger National Park. Sizes varied from 49 to 566 sq. km, the mean for the Park being 164 square kilometre. Mean home range sizes for different zebra sub-populations and biotic areas were found to differ considerably. Present herbivore densities have not influenced intra- and inter-specific tolerance levels to the extent that home range sizes have increased. Local habitat conditions, and particularly seasonal vegetational changes, were found to have the most profound influence on the shape and mean size of home ranges. The large home range sizes obtained in the Kruger Park, when compared to an area such as the Ngorongoro Crater, can be ascribed to a lower carrying capacity with respect to zebra, large portions of the habitat being sub-optimal, either seasonally or annually.

  1. Free-ranging farm cats: home range size and predation on a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna E Kitts-Morgan

    Full Text Available This study's objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05 on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE or core home range size (50% KDE. Male cats tended (P = 0.08 to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha compared to female cats (0.64 ha. Reproductively intact cats (n = 2 had larger (P < 0.0001 diurnal and nocturnal home ranges as compared to altered cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife.

  2. Free-ranging farm cats: home range size and predation on a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts-Morgan, Susanna E; Caires, Kyle C; Bohannon, Lisa A; Parsons, Elizabeth I; Hilburn, Katharine A

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05) on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE) or core home range size (50% KDE). Male cats tended (P = 0.08) to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha) compared to female cats (0.64 ha). Reproductively intact cats (n = 2) had larger (P hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife. PMID:25894078

  3. A resource range invariance rule for optimal offspring size predicts patterns of variability in parental phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Downhower, Jerry F.; Charnov, Eric L.

    1998-01-01

    Previous analysis of the rules regarding how much more a female should invest in a litter of size C rather than producing a litter with one more offspring revealed an invariance relationship between litter size and the range of resources per offspring in any litter size. The rule is that the range of resources per offspring should be inversely proportional to litter size. Here we present a modification of this rule that relates litter size to the total resources devoted to reproduction at tha...

  4. Causes and consequences of range size variation: the influence of traits, speciation, and extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Vamosi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous variation in species richness observed among related clades across the tree of life has long caught the imagination of biologists. Recently, there has been growing attention paid to the possible contribution of range size variation, either alone or in combination with putative key innovations, to these patterns. Here, we review three related topics relevant to range size evolution, speciation, and extinction. First, we provide a brief overview of the debate surrounding patterns and mechanisms for phylogenetic signal in range size. Second, we discuss some recent findings regarding the joint influence of traits and range size on diversification. Finally, we present the preliminary results of a study investigating whether range size is negatively correlated with contemporary extinction risk in flowering plants.

  5. Unifying latitudinal gradients in range size and richness across marine and terrestrial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašových, Adam; Kennedy, Jonathan D; Betzner, Tristan J; Kuehnle, Nicole Bitler; Edie, Stewart; Kim, Sora; Supriya, K; White, Alexander E; Rahbek, Carsten; Huang, Shan; Price, Trevor D; Jablonski, David

    2016-05-11

    Many marine and terrestrial clades show similar latitudinal gradients in species richness, but opposite gradients in range size-on land, ranges are the smallest in the tropics, whereas in the sea, ranges are the largest in the tropics. Therefore, richness gradients in marine and terrestrial systems do not arise from a shared latitudinal arrangement of species range sizes. Comparing terrestrial birds and marine bivalves, we find that gradients in range size are concordant at the level of genera. Here, both groups show a nested pattern in which narrow-ranging genera are confined to the tropics and broad-ranging genera extend across much of the gradient. We find that (i) genus range size and its variation with latitude is closely associated with per-genus species richness and (ii) broad-ranging genera contain more species both within and outside of the tropics when compared with tropical- or temperate-only genera. Within-genus species diversification thus promotes genus expansion to novel latitudes. Despite underlying differences in the species range-size gradients, species-rich genera are more likely to produce a descendant that extends its range relative to the ancestor's range. These results unify species richness gradients with those of genera, implying that birds and bivalves share similar latitudinal dynamics in net species diversification. PMID:27147094

  6. Fractal geometry predicts varying body size scaling relationships for mammal and bird home ranges

    OpenAIRE

    Haskell, John P.; Ritchie, Mark E.; Olff, Han

    2002-01-01

    Scaling laws that describe complex interactions between organisms and their environment as a function of body size offer exciting potential for synthesis in biology. Home range size, or the area used by individual organisms, is a critical ecological variable that integrates behaviour, physiology and population density and strongly depends on organism size. Here we present a new model of home range–body size scaling based on fractal resource distributions, in which resource encounter rates are...

  7. Free-Ranging Farm Cats: Home Range Size and Predation on a Livestock Unit In Northwest Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Susanna E Kitts-Morgan; Caires, Kyle C.; Bohannon, Lisa A.; Parsons, Elizabeth I.; Katharine A Hilburn

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fe...

  8. Mean latitudinal range sizes of bird assemblages in six Neotropical forest chronosequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunn, Robert R.; Romdal, Tom Skovlund

    2005-01-01

    Aim The geographical range size frequency distributions of animal and plant assemblages are among the most important factors affecting large-scale patterns of diversity. Nonetheless, the relationship between habitat type and the range size distributions of species forming assemblages remains poorly...... towards more small ranged species occurs. Even relatively old secondary forests have bird species with larger average ranges than mature forests. As a consequence, conservation of secondary forests alone will miss many of the species most at risk of extinction and most unlikely to be conserved in other...

  9. Summer Home Range Size and Habitat Use by River Otters in Ohio

    OpenAIRE

    David A. Helon; Anderson, James T.; Chris P. Dwyer; Edwards, John W.

    2004-01-01

    Reintroduced river otters (Lontra canadensis) are an important component of Ohio’s biological diversity, and are a key indicator of wetland and watershed health and quality. However, few data are available on their home range sizes and habitat use. We monitored river otters using radio-telemetry in the Killbuck Watershed, in northeastern Ohio, during 2002 and 2003 to determine home range and habitat use. Overall, mean home range size was 802.4 ha (range = 84.5–3,376.3, SE = 448.2) for female ...

  10. Summer Home Range Size and Habitat Use by River Otters in Ohio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Helon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Reintroduced river otters (Lontra canadensis are an important component of Ohio’s biological diversity, and are a key indicator of wetland and watershed health and quality. However, few data are available on their home range sizes and habitat use. We monitored river otters using radio-telemetry in the Killbuck Watershed, in northeastern Ohio, during 2002 and 2003 to determine home range and habitat use. Overall, mean home range size was 802.4 ha (range = 84.5–3,376.3, SE = 448.2 for female river otters and 1,101.7 ha (range = 713.8–1,502.6, SE = 102.2 for male river otters. Home range size of female and male river otters did not differ in 2002 (P = 0.763, but males had larger home range size than females during 2003 (P = 0.001. Based on compositional analysis, habitat use differed in proportion to availability of the 5 habitat types available in the study area (marsh, wet meadow, riparian/floodplain, open water, and flooded upland (P < 0.0001. Overall, river otters used marsh habitat with a diverse association of floating aquatics and emergent vegetation in greater proportion than was available. Knowledge and understanding of river otter habitat use and home range size in Ohio will help managers identify habitats suitable for river otters in the Midwestern United States.

  11. Fractal geometry predicts varying body size scaling relationships for mammal and bird home ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haskell, J.P.; Ritchie, M.E.; Olff, H.

    2002-01-01

    Scaling laws that describe complex interactions between organisms and their environment as a function of body size offer exciting potential for synthesis in biology(1-4). Home range size, or the area used by individual organisms, is a critical ecological variable that integrates behaviour, physiolog

  12. Fractal geometry predicts varying body size scaling relationships for mammal and bird home ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haskell, John P.; Ritchie, Mark E.; Olff, Han

    2002-01-01

    Scaling laws that describe complex interactions between organisms and their environment as a function of body size offer exciting potential for synthesis in biology. Home range size, or the area used by individual organisms, is a critical ecological variable that integrates behaviour, physiology and

  13. Home range size variation in female arctic grizzly bears relative to reproductive status and resource availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Edwards

    Full Text Available The area traversed in pursuit of resources defines the size of an animal's home range. For females, the home range is presumed to be a function of forage availability. However, the presence of offspring may also influence home range size due to reduced mobility, increased nutritional need, and behavioral adaptations of mothers to increase offspring survival. Here, we examine the relationship between resource use and variation in home range size for female barren-ground grizzly bears (Ursus arctos of the Mackenzie Delta region in Arctic Canada. We develop methods to test hypotheses of home range size that address selection of cover where cover heterogeneity is low, using generalized linear mixed-effects models and an information-theoretic approach. We found that the reproductive status of female grizzlies affected home range size but individually-based spatial availability of highly selected cover in spring and early summer was a stronger correlate. If these preferred covers in spring and early summer, a period of low resource availability for grizzly bears following den-emergence, were patchy and highly dispersed, females travelled farther regardless of the presence or absence of offspring. Increased movement to preferred covers, however, may result in greater risk to the individual or family.

  14. Prevalence of intraspecific relationships between range size and abundance in Danish birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Rahbek, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigate patterns in the prevalence of dynamic range-abundance relationships of the Danish avifauna, using breeding bird atlases from 1971 to 1974 and from 1993 to 1996. We focus on differences between common and rare species by dividing the assemblage into range-size quartiles....... The trend in total population size was determined using an index. Range was determined as grid cell occupancy and standardized to facilitate comparisons between common and rare species. While narrow-ranging species showed strong and consistent range-abundance relationships, the relationships for widespread...... species were weak and exhibited considerable variation. This may be due to differences in patterns of resource use, since widespread species generally have wider niches, and so may be less affected by resource-based factors linking range and abundance. Since a tight and dynamic relationship is upheld...

  15. Simulation analyses of space use: Home range estimates, variability, and sample size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekoff, M.; Mech, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Simulations of space use by animals were run to determine the relationship among home range area estimates, variability, and sample size {number of locations}. As sample size increased, home range size increased asymptotically, whereas variability decreased among mean home range area estimates generated by multiple simulations for the same sample size. Our results suggest that field workers should ascertain between 100 and 200 locations in order to estimate reliably home range area. In some cases, this suggested guideline is higher than values found in the few published studies in which the relationship between home range area and number of locations is addressed. Sampling differences for small species occupying relatively small home ranges indicate that fewer locations may be sufficient to allow for a reliable estimate of home range. Intraspecffic variability in social status (group member, loner, resident, transient), age, sex, reproductive condition, and food resources also have to be considered, as do season, habitat, and differences in sampling and analytical methods. Comparative data still are needed.

  16. Mountain gorilla ranging patterns: influence of group size and group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillaud, Damien; Ndagijimana, Felix; Giarrusso, Anthony J; Vecellio, Veronica; Stoinski, Tara S

    2014-08-01

    Since the 1980s, the Virunga mountain gorilla population has almost doubled, now reaching 480 individuals living in a 430-km(2) protected area. Analysis of the gorillas' ranging patterns can provide critical information on the extent and possible effects of competition for food and space. We analyzed 12 years of daily ranging data and inter-group encounter data collected on 11 gorilla groups monitored by the Karisoke Research Center in Rwanda. During that period, the study population increased in size by almost 50% and the number of groups tripled. Groups had small yearly home ranges compared to other known gorilla populations, with an average 90% kernel density estimate of 8.07 km2 and large between-group variations (3.17-23.59 km2). Most groups had consistent home range location over the course of the study but for some, we observed gradual range shifts of up to 4 km. Neighboring groups displayed high home range overlap, which increased dramatically after the formation of new groups. On average, each group used only 28.6% of its 90% kernel home range exclusively, and in some areas up to six different groups had overlapping home ranges with little or no exclusive areas. We found a significant intra-group positive relationship between the number of weaned individuals in a group and the home range size, but the fitted models only explained 17.5% and 13.7% of the variance in 50% and 90% kernel home range size estimates, respectively. This suggests that despite the increase in size, the study population is not yet experiencing marked effects of feeding competition. However, the increase in home range overlap resulting from the formation of new groups led to a sixfold increase in the frequency of inter-group encounters, which exposes the population to elevated risks of fight-related injuries and infanticide. PMID:24573634

  17. Fluorescent dye labeled DNA size standards for molecular mass detection in visible/infrared range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreelakshmi Yellamaraju

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING is a high throughput reverse genetics tool which detects mismatches (single point mutations or small indels in large number of individuals of mutagenized populations. Currently, TILLING is intensively used for genomics assisted molecular breeding of several crop plants for desired traits. Most commonly used platform for mutation detection is Li-COR DNA Analyzer, where PCR amplified products treated with single strand mismatch specific nuclease are resolved on denaturing gels. The molecular size of any cut product can be easily estimated by comparing with IR dye labeled markers of known sizes. Similar fluorescent dye labeled size markers are also used for several genotyping experiments. Currently, commercially available size standards are expensive and are restricted up to only 700 bp which renders estimation of products of sizes greater than 700 bases inaccurate. Findings A simple protocol was developed for labeling 5' end of multiple DNA size markers with fluorescent dyes. This method involves cloning a pool of different size markers of DNA in a plasmid vector. PCR amplification of plasmid using IR dye labeled universal primers generates 5' fluorescent labeled products of various sizes. The size of products constituting the ladder can be customized as per the need. The generated size markers can be used without any further purification and were found to be stable up to one year at -20°C. Conclusions A simple method was developed for generating fluorescent dye labeled size standards. This method can be customized to generate different size standards as per experimental needs. The protocol described can also be adapted for developing labeled size standards for detection on platforms other than Li-COR i.e. other than infra red range of the spectrum.

  18. The size and range effect: lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager-Wick Ellingsen, Linda; Singh, Bhawna; Hammer Strømman, Anders

    2016-05-01

    The primary goal of this study is to investigate the effect of increasing battery size and driving range to the environmental impact of electric vehicles (EVs). To this end, we compile cradle-to-grave inventories for EVs in four size segments to determine their climate change potential. A second objective is to compare the lifecycle emissions of EVs to those of conventional vehicles. For this purpose, we collect lifecycle emissions for conventional vehicles reported by automobile manufacturers. The lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions are calculated per vehicle and over a total driving range of 180 000 km using the average European electricity mix. Process-based attributional LCA and the ReCiPe characterisation method are used to estimate the climate change potential from the hierarchical perspective. The differently sized EVs are compared to one another to find the effect of increasing the size and range of EVs. We also point out the sources of differences in lifecycle emissions between conventional- and electric vehicles. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis assesses the change in lifecycle emissions when electricity with various energy sources power the EVs. The sensitivity analysis also examines how the use phase electricity sources influences the size and range effect.

  19. Optimizing components size of an extended range electric vehicle according to the use specifications

    OpenAIRE

    DEROLLEPOT, Romain; Weiss, Christine; Kolli, Zehir; Franke, Thomas; TRIGUI, Rochdi; Chlond, Bastian; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy; STARK, Juliane; Roman KLEMENTSCHITZ; Baumann, Michael; PELISSIER, Serge

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to optimally design the drivetrain of an Extended Range Electric Vehicle (EREV) according to the use specifications from European mobility surveys. At first the analysis of car uses is carried out, and a process aiming to classify the car use profiles into different clusters is proposed. Clusters that could fit typical EREV use are selected and applied in a sizing methodology to design the battery and the Range Extender (RE). Using a validated simulation soft...

  20. A stochastic model of range profiles of raindrop size distributions: application to radar attenuation correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berne, A.D.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2005-01-01

    To analyze the influence of the spatial variability of the raindrop size distribution (DSD) on rainfall estimation using weather radar, a stochastic model is proposed in order to simulate range profiles of DSDs and consequently profiles of rainfall intensity, radar reflectivity and specific attenuat

  1. Impact of dose evaluation using various gamma tools depending on gird size and searching range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dosimeters for dose measurement have been grown 1D such as farmer ion chamber to 2D like radiochromic film and finally 3D such as polymerizing gels gradually and radiotherapy planning which is complicated and has steep dose gradient such as IMRT is under progress in these days. Therefore, dose evaluation for assuring accuracy about comparison between measured and calculated dose distributions becomes more and more important. It is very important dose distribution is assessed at complex field having sharp gradient such as IMRT, VMAT. The commonly used dose analysis tools are gamma tools that included dose concept and distance concept. Figure 1 shows results of prostate field are similar to that of the wedge field. Therefore, we found pass ratio fell sharply as grid size increased because of gradually bigger gamma value. This study estimated changes of images according to searching range and differences of gamma values in each searching range.As searching ranges became bigger, gamma value also was increased and visible noise of images got worse severely for two models. This study evaluated difference according to gamma models and changes of gamma values according to grid size and searching range. The pass ratio fell down as grid size increased at all gamma models and all fields, however gap between 0.5 mm and 1 mm is not significantly different. For searching range, artifacts of images and gamma values increased when it rose at all gamma models and all fields.

  2. Bryophyte diversity and range size distribution along two altitudinal gradients: Continent vs. island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah-Peng, Claudine; Wilding, Nicholas; Kluge, Juergen; Descamps-Julien, Blandine; Bardat, Jacques; Chuah-Petiot, Min; Strasberg, Dominique; Hedderson, Terry A. J.

    2012-07-01

    We compare patterns of bryophyte diversity and variation in species altitudinal ranges between a continental and an island altitudinal gradient. We use our ecological data set along the highest summit (Piton des Neiges, 3069 m) of Réunion Island (Mascarene archipelago) and compare it to available published data of another high volcanic massif in Colombia (Nevado del Ruiz, 5321 m). The distribution of narrow-ranged and large-ranged species was investigated. We tested the effect of geometric constraints on species distribution along the two gradients by comparing empirical to predicted data using the Mid-Domain Null Programme (McCain, 2004). Species richness was comparable between the island and continental gradient for epiphytic bryophytes, 265 and 295 species respectively. The comparison between the two tropical high mountains demonstrates important differences in the distribution of range sizes with altitude and a dominance of species with small range sizes on the Réunion gradient. For the island gradient, mean altitudinal range increases with altitude whilst concurrently species richness decreases revealing a Rapoport effect in altitudinal distribution of bryophyte communities. Geometric constraints did not explain much of the species richness pattern for the island. Conversely, for the continental gradient, dominated by large-ranged species, geometric constraints could not be ruled out as a primary structuring feature for the species richness pattern. This study also highlights that the island's cloud forest hosts not only high species richness but also high number of rare species, which is of prime interest for conservation planners.

  3. Comparative studies on plant range size: Linking reproductive and regenerative traits in two Ipomoea species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astegiano, Julia; Funes, Guillermo; Galetto, Leonardo

    2010-09-01

    Reproductive and regenerative traits associated with colonization and persistence ability may determine plant range size. However, few comparative studies on plant distribution have assessed these traits simultaneously. Pollinator richness and frequency of visits, autonomous self-pollination ability, reproductive output (i.e., reproductive traits), seed bank strategy and seedling density (i.e., regenerative traits) were compared between the narrowly distributed Ipomoea rubriflora O'Donnell (Convolvulaceae) and its widespread congener Ipomoea purpurea (L.) Roth. The narrowly distributed species showed higher ecological specialization to pollinators and lower autonomous self-pollination ability. Frequency of visits, natural seed/ovule ratio and fruit set, and total fruit production did not differ between species. However, the number of seeds produced per fruit was lower in the narrowly distributed species, translating into lower total seed production per plant. Indeed, I. rubriflora formed smaller transient and persistent seed banks and showed lower seedling density than the widespread I. purpurea. These reproductive and regenerative trait results suggest that the narrowly distributed species may have lower colonization and persistence ability than its widespread congener. They further suggest that the negative effects of lower fecundity in the narrowly distributed species might persist in time through the long-lasting effects of total seed production on seed bank size, reducing the species' ability to buffered environmental stochasticity. However, other regenerative traits, such as seed size, and processes such as pre- and post-dispersal seed predation, might modulate the effects of plant fecundity on plant colonization and persistence ability and thus range size.

  4. Atomic size effects on local coordination and medium range order in molten trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural correlations in molten trivalent metal chlorides are evaluated as functions of the metal ion size RM across the range from LaCl3 (RM approx. 1.4 A) to AlCl3 (RM approx. 0.8 A), using a charged soft-sphere model and the hypernetted chain approximation. Main attention is given to trends in the local liquid structure (partial radial distribution functions, coordination numbers and bond lengths) and in the intermediate range order (first sharp diffraction peak in the number-number and partial structure factors). The trend towards fourfold local coordination of the metal ions, the stabilization of their first-neighbour chlorine cage and the growth of medium range order are found to proceed in parallel as the size of the metal ion is allowed to decrease at constant number density and temperature. A tendency to molecular-type local structure and liquid-vapour phase separation is found within the hypernetted chain scheme at small metal ion sizes corresponding to AlCl3 and is emphasized by decreasing the number density of the fluid. The predicted molecular units are rather strongly distorted Al2Cl6 dimers, in agreement with observation. The calculated structural trends for other trichlorides are compared with diffraction and transport data. (author). 17 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  5. Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

    1977-12-01

    This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

  6. Short versus long range interactions and the size of two-body weakly bound objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very weakly bound systems may manifest intriguing 'universal' properties, independent of the specific interaction which keeps the system bound. An interesting example is given by relations between the size of the system and the separation energy, or scaling laws. So far, scaling laws have been investigated for short-range and long-range (repulsive) potentials. We report here on scaling laws for weakly bound two-body systems valid for a larger class of potentials, i.e. short-range potentials having a repulsive core and long-range attractive potentials. We emphasize analogies and differences between the short- and the long-range case. In particular, we show that the emergence of halos is a threshold phenomenon which can arise when the system is bound not only by short-range interactions but also by long-range ones, and this for any value of the orbital angular momentum l. These results enlarge the image of halo systems we are accustomed to. (authors)

  7. Short versus long range interactions and the size of two-body weakly bound objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very weakly bound systems may manifest intriguing ''universal'' properties, independent of the specific interaction which keeps the system bound. An interesting example is given by relations between the size of the system and the separation energy, or scaling laws. So far, scaling laws have been investigated for short-range and long-range (repulsive) potentials. We report here on scaling laws for weakly bound two-body systems valid for a larger class of potentials, i.e. short-range potentials having a repulsive core and long-range attractive potentials. We emphasize analogies and differences between the short- and the long-range case. In particular, we show that the emergence of halos is a threshold phenomenon which can arise when the system is bound not only by short-range interactions but also by long-range ones, and this for any value of the orbital angular momentum l. These results enlarge the image of halo systems we are accustomed to. (orig.)

  8. Performance of diethylene glycol based particle counters in the sub 3 nm size range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wimmer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available When studying new particle formation, the uncertainty in determining the "true" nucleation rate is considerably reduced when using Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs capable of measuring concentrations of aerosol particles at sizes close to or even at the critical cluster size (1–2 nm. Recently CPCs, able to reliably detect particles below 2 nm in size and even close to 1 nm became available. The corrections needed to calculate nucleation rates are substantially reduced compared to scaling the observed formation rate to the nucleation rate at the critical cluster size. However, this improved instrumentation requires a careful characterization of their cut-off size and the shape of the detection efficiency curve because relatively small shifts in the cut-off size can translate into larger relative errors when measuring particles close to the cut-off size.

    Here we describe the development of two continuous flow CPCs using diethylene glycol (DEG as the working fluid. The design is based on two TSI 3776 counters. Several sets of measurements to characterize their performance at different temperature settings were carried out. Furthermore two mixing-type Particle Size Magnifiers (PSM A09 from Airmodus were characterized in parallel. One PSM was operated at the highest mixing ratio (1 L min−1 saturator flow, and the other was operated in a scanning mode, where the mixing ratios are changed periodically, resulting in a range of cut-off sizes. Different test aerosols were generated using a nano-Differential Mobility Analyzer (nano-DMA or a high resolution DMA, to obtain detection efficiency curves for all four CPCs. One calibration setup included a high resolution mass spectrometer (APi-TOF for the determination of the chemical composition of the generated clusters. The lowest cut-off sizes were achieved with negatively charged ammonium sulphate clusters, resulting in cut-offs of 1.4 nm for the laminar flow CPCs and 1.2 and 1

  9. Experimental Research of Influence of a Relative Particles Positioning in a Gas Stream on Characteristics of their Aerodynamic Traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkov Roman S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cycle of experimental studies on determination of length of aerodynamic traces of the particles which are flowed round by an air stream is executed. When carrying out researches, panoramic optical methods for diagnostics of multiphase flows of PIV and PTV were used. Velocities of an air flow were varied in the range of 1-3 m/s. The sizes of particles changed from 1mm to 5 mm. The defining influence of the sizes of particles and velocities of an air stream on length of aerodynamic traces is established. Influence of a relative positioning of particles on features of formation of an aerodynamic trace is shown.

  10. Next generation cooled long range thermal sights with minimum size, weight, and power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, R.; Ihle, T.; Wendler, J.; Rühlich, I.; Ziegler, J.

    2013-06-01

    Situational awareness and precise targeting at day, night and severe weather conditions are key elements for mission success in asymmetric warfare. To support these capabilities for the dismounted soldier, AIM has developed a family of stand-alone thermal weapon sights based on high performance cooled IR-modules which are used e.g. in the infantryman of the future program of the German army (IdZ). The design driver for these sights is a long ID range NATO standard target to cover the operational range of a platoon with the engagement range of .50 cal rifles, 40mm AGLs or for reconnaissance tasks. The most recent sight WBZG has just entered into serial production for the IdZ enhanced system of the German army with additional capabilities like a wireless data link to the soldier backbone computer. Minimum size, weight and power (SWaP) are most critical requirements for the dismounted soldiers' equipment and sometimes push a decision towards uncooled equipment with marginal performance referring to the outstanding challenges in current asymmetric warfare, e.g. the capability to distinguish between combatants and non-combatants in adequate ranges. To provide the uncompromised e/o performance with SWaP parameters close to uncooled, AIM has developed a new thermal weapon sight based on high operating temperature (HOT) MCT MWIR FPAs together with a new low power single piston stirling cooler. In basic operation the sight is used as a clip-on in front of the rifle scope. An additional eyepiece for stand-alone targeting with e.g. AGLs or a biocular version for relaxed surveillance will be available. The paper will present details of the technologies applied for such long range cooled sights with size, weight and power close to uncooled.

  11. Density-dependent home-range size revealed by spatially explicit capture–recapture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efford, M.G.; Dawson, Deanna K.; Jhala, Y.V.; Qureshi, Q.

    2016-01-01

    The size of animal home ranges often varies inversely with population density among populations of a species. This fact has implications for population monitoring using spatially explicit capture–recapture (SECR) models, in which both the scale of home-range movements σ and population density D usually appear as parameters, and both may vary among populations. It will often be appropriate to model a structural relationship between population-specific values of these parameters, rather than to assume independence. We suggest re-parameterizing the SECR model using kp = σp √Dp, where kp relates to the degree of overlap between home ranges and the subscript p distinguishes populations. We observe that kp is often nearly constant for populations spanning a range of densities. This justifies fitting a model in which the separate kp are replaced by the single parameter k and σp is a density-dependent derived parameter. Continuous density-dependent spatial variation in σ may also be modelled, using a scaled non-Euclidean distance between detectors and the locations of animals. We illustrate these methods with data from automatic photography of tigers (Panthera tigris) across India, in which the variation is among populations, from mist-netting of ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla) in Maryland, USA, in which the variation is within a single population over time, and from live-trapping of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, modelling spatial variation within one population. Possible applications and limitations of the methods are discussed. A model in which kp is constant, while density varies, provides a parsimonious null model for SECR. The parameter k of the null model is a concise summary of the empirical relationship between home-range size and density that is useful in comparative studies. We expect deviations from this model, particularly the dependence of kp on covariates, to be biologically interesting.

  12. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  13. Natural aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Scorer, R S

    1958-01-01

    Natural Aerodynamics focuses on the mathematics of any problem in air motion.This book discusses the general form of the law of fluid motion, relationship between pressure and wind, production of vortex filaments, and conduction of vorticity by viscosity. The flow at moderate Reynolds numbers, turbulence in a stably stratified fluid, natural exploitation of atmospheric thermals, and plumes in turbulent crosswinds are also elaborated. This text likewise considers the waves produced by thermals, transformation of thin layer clouds, method of small perturbations, and dangers of extra-polation.Thi

  14. Negative range size-abundance relationships in Indo-Pacific bird communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart Reeve, Andrew; Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Fjeldså, Jon

    2016-01-01

    environmental stability create selection pressures that favor narrowly specialized species, which could drive these non-positive relationships. To test this idea, we measured the range size-abundance relationships of eleven bird communities in mature and degraded forest on four islands in the Indo...... ascribed to narrow specialization. Rather, cross-habitat community comparisons indicate that locally abundant endemic and near-endemic species adapted to a broad spectrum of local environmental conditions cause the observed negative relationships. We suspect that geographic isolation facilitates the...

  15. An Improved Method for Including Upper Size Range Plasmids in Metamobilomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Riber, Leise; Luo, Wenting; Li, Li Li; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Two recently developed isolation methods have shown promise when recovering pure community plasmid DNA (metamobilomes/plasmidomes), which is useful in conducting culture-independent investigations into plasmid ecology. However, both methods employ multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to ensure...... suitable quantities of plasmid DNA for high-throughput sequencing. This study demonstrates that MDA greatly favors smaller circular DNA elements (<10 Kbp), which, in turn, leads to stark underrepresentation of upper size range plasmids (>10 Kbp). Throughout the study, we used two model plasmids, a 4.4 Kbp...

  16. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Alster, E.; Safran, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range “macroscopic modes” in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development. PMID:27283037

  17. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasbiswas, K; Alster, E; Safran, S A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range "macroscopic modes" in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development. PMID:27283037

  18. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Alster, E.; Safran, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range “macroscopic modes” in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development.

  19. Relationship between lizard home range and body size: A reanalysis of the data. [Uta stansburiana, Conolophus pallidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, K.A.; Waldschmidt, S.

    1984-01-01

    The authors reanalyzed the relationship between range and lizard body size. Their analysis includes home ranges estimated with the convex polygon technique and a recently proposed method for eliminating sample size bias. When analyzed separately, neither insectivorous, carnivorous nor female herbivorous lizards had a significant regression of home range size against body mass; male herbivores had a marginally significant regression. Combining data for the different foraging types resulted in significant regressions for both males and females; the regression for the pooled data set (males plus females) was also significant. These regression equations differ significantly from previously published equations derived from home range estimates adjusted for sample size bias. Except for the intercepts of the female regressions, the equations do not differ significantly from earlier equations derived from unadjusted home range estimates. The analysis showed that home range size for the side-blotched lizard, Uta stansburiana, could be accurately determined, without sample size bias, with an average of 13 resightings per lizard.

  20. Aerodynamic Simulation of Runback Ice Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Whalen, Edward A.; Busch, Greg T.; Bragg, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of recent investigations into the aerodynamics of simulated runback ice accretion on airfoils. Aerodynamic tests were performed on a full-scale model using a high-fidelity, ice-casting simulation at near-flight Reynolds (Re) number. The ice-casting simulation was attached to the leading edge of a 72-in. (1828.8-mm ) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model. Aerodynamic performance tests were conducted at the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel over a Reynolds number range of 4.7?10(exp 6) to 16.0?10(exp 6) and a Mach (M) number ran ge of 0.10 to 0.28. For Re = 16.0?10(exp 6) and M = 0.20, the simulated runback ice accretion on the airfoil decreased the maximum lift coe fficient from 1.82 to 1.51 and decreased the stalling angle of attack from 18.1deg to 15.0deg. The pitching-moment slope was also increased and the drag coefficient was increased by more than a factor of two. In general, the performance effects were insensitive to Reynolds numb er and Mach number changes over the range tested. Follow-on, subscale aerodynamic tests were conducted on a quarter-scale NACA 23012 model (18-in. (457.2-mm) chord) at Re = 1.8?10(exp 6) and M = 0.18, using low-fidelity, geometrically scaled simulations of the full-scale castin g. It was found that simple, two-dimensional simulations of the upper- and lower-surface runback ridges provided the best representation of the full-scale, high Reynolds number iced-airfoil aerodynamics, whereas higher-fidelity simulations resulted in larger performance degrada tions. The experimental results were used to define a new subclassification of spanwise ridge ice that distinguishes between short and tall ridges. This subclassification is based upon the flow field and resulting aerodynamic characteristics, regardless of the physical size of the ridge and the ice-accretion mechanism.

  1. Expected proton signal sizes in the PRaVDA Range Telescope for proton Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton radiotherapy has demonstrated benefits in the treatment of certain cancers. Accurate measurements of the proton stopping powers in body tissues are required in order to fully optimise the delivery of such treaments. The PRaVDA Consortium is developing a novel, fully solid state device to measure these stopping powers. The PRaVDA Range Telescope (RT), uses a stack of 24 CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) to measure the residual proton energy after the patient. We present here the ability of the CMOS sensors to detect changes in the signal sizes as the proton traverses the RT, compare the results with theory, and discuss the implications of these results on the reconstruction of proton tracks

  2. Sizing Power Components of an Electrically Driven Tail Cone Thruster and a Range Extender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ralph H.; Bowman, Cheryl; Jankovsky, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The aeronautics industry has been challenged on many fronts to increase efficiency, reduce emissions, and decrease dependency on carbon-based fuels. This paper provides an overview of the turboelectric and hybrid electric technologies being developed under NASA's Advanced Air Transportation Technology (AATT) Project and discusses how these technologies can impact vehicle design. The discussion includes an overview of key hybrid electric studies and technology investments, the approach to making informed investment decisions based on key performance parameters and mission studies, and the power system architectures for two candidate aircraft. Finally, the power components for a single-aisle turboelectric aircraft with an electrically driven tail cone thruster and for a hybrid-electric nine-passenger aircraft with a range extender are parametrically sized, and the sensitivity of these components to key parameters is presented.

  3. Coarsening dynamics in condensing zero-range processes and size-biased birth death chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero-range processes with decreasing jump rates are well known to exhibit a condensation transition under certain conditions on the jump rates, and the dynamics of this transition continues to be a subject of current research interest. Starting from homogeneous initial conditions, the time evolution of the condensed phase exhibits an interesting coarsening phenomenon of mass transport between cluster sites characterized by a power law. We revisit the approach in Godrèche (2003 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 36 6313) to derive effective single site dynamics which form a nonlinear birth death chain describing the coarsening behavior. We extend these results to a larger class of parameter values, and introduce a size-biased version of the single site process, which provides an effective tool to analyze the dynamics of the condensed phase without finite size effects and is the main novelty of this paper. Our results are based on a few heuristic assumptions and exact computations, and are corroborated by detailed simulation data. (paper)

  4. Coarsening dynamics in condensing zero-range processes and size-biased birth death chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatuviriyapornchai, Watthanan; Grosskinsky, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Zero-range processes with decreasing jump rates are well known to exhibit a condensation transition under certain conditions on the jump rates, and the dynamics of this transition continues to be a subject of current research interest. Starting from homogeneous initial conditions, the time evolution of the condensed phase exhibits an interesting coarsening phenomenon of mass transport between cluster sites characterized by a power law. We revisit the approach in Godrèche (2003 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 36 6313) to derive effective single site dynamics which form a nonlinear birth death chain describing the coarsening behavior. We extend these results to a larger class of parameter values, and introduce a size-biased version of the single site process, which provides an effective tool to analyze the dynamics of the condensed phase without finite size effects and is the main novelty of this paper. Our results are based on a few heuristic assumptions and exact computations, and are corroborated by detailed simulation data.

  5. Switching or triggering by light organic materials in the 100 nm size range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Vina; Dayen, Jean Francois; Doudin, Bernard; Dmons Team

    2011-03-01

    We investigate optoelectronic fabrication and characterization of organic electronics devices in the 100 nm range. This intermediate size has advantages in simplicity of device fabrication and robustness of observed properties. For this aim high aspect ratio lateral electrodes separated by a sub 100nm gap were produced by means of simple optical lithography techniques. The electrical measurements set-up is integrated with an inverted optical microscope, allowing simultaneous optical and electrical measurements followed by temperature and magnetic field studies. We demonstrate that electrical contacts are suitable for a wide range of current measurements going from 10-13 to 10-2 A. This versatility makes the nanotrench design compatible for studying a broad variety of nanoparticles and molecular systems. Electrical transport properties of different devices are presented, e.g molecular switches, Iron based spin-transition nanoparticles, Conductive molecular chains and 2D nanoparticle networks. The promising reproducible results reveal novel intrinsic transport properties and confirm the high interest and reliability of this approach for further studies in the field of molecular electronics and spin dependent transport in molecular structures.

  6. Do Rapoport's rule, mid-domain effect or environmental factors predict latitudinal range size patterns of terrestrial mammals in China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Luo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explaining species range size pattern is a central issue in biogeography and macroecology. Although several hypotheses have been proposed, the causes and processes underlying range size patterns are still not clearly understood. In this study, we documented the latitudinal mean range size patterns of terrestrial mammals in China, and evaluated whether that pattern conformed to the predictions of the Rapoport's rule several analytical methods. We also assessed the influence of the mid-domain effect (MDE and environmental factors on the documented range size gradient. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Distributions of 515 terrestrial mammals and data on nine environmental variables were compiled. We calculated mean range size of the species in each 5° latitudinal band, and created a range size map on a 100 km×100 km quadrat system. We evaluated Rapoport's rule according to Steven's, mid-point, Pagel's and cross-species methods. The effect of the MDE was tested based on a Monte Carlo simulation and linear regression. We used stepwise generalized linear models and correlation analyses to detect the impacts of mean climate condition, climate variability, ambient energy and topography on range size. The results of the Steven's, Pagel's and cross-species methods supported Rapoport's rule, whereas the mid-point method resulted in a hump-shaped pattern. Our range size map showed that larger mean latitudinal extents emerged in the mid-latitudes. We found that the MDE explained 80.2% of the range size variation, whereas, environmental factors accounted for <30% of that variation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Latitudinal range size pattern of terrestrial mammals in China supported Rapoport's rule, though the extent of that support was strongly influenced by methodology. The critical factor underlying the observed gradient was the MDE, and the effects of climate, energy and topography were limited. The mean climate condition hypothesis, climate

  7. Predictable variation of range-sizes across an extreme environmental gradient in a lizard adaptive radiation: evolutionary and ecological inferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pincheira-Donoso

    Full Text Available Large-scale patterns of current species geographic range-size variation reflect historical dynamics of dispersal and provide insights into future consequences under changing environments. Evidence suggests that climate warming exerts major damage on high latitude and elevation organisms, where changes are more severe and available space to disperse tracking historical niches is more limited. Species with longer generations (slower adaptive responses, such as vertebrates, and with restricted distributions (lower genetic diversity, higher inbreeding in these environments are expected to be particularly threatened by warming crises. However, a well-known macroecological generalization (Rapoport's rule predicts that species range-sizes increase with increasing latitude-elevation, thus counterbalancing the impact of climate change. Here, I investigate geographic range-size variation across an extreme environmental gradient and as a function of body size, in the prominent Liolaemus lizard adaptive radiation. Conventional and phylogenetic analyses revealed that latitudinal (but not elevational ranges significantly decrease with increasing latitude-elevation, while body size was unrelated to range-size. Evolutionarily, these results are insightful as they suggest a link between spatial environmental gradients and range-size evolution. However, ecologically, these results suggest that Liolaemus might be increasingly threatened if, as predicted by theory, ranges retract and contract continuously under persisting climate warming, potentially increasing extinction risks at high latitudes and elevations.

  8. Movements, home-range size and habitat selection of mallards during autumn migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Daniel; Avril, Alexis; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Elmberg, Johan; Söderquist, Pär; Norevik, Gabriel; Tolf, Conny; Safi, Kamran; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Wikelski, Martin; Olsen, Björn; Waldenström, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is a focal species in game management, epidemiology and ornithology, but comparably little research has focused on the ecology of the migration seasons. We studied habitat use, time-budgets, home-range sizes, habitat selection, and movements based on spatial data collected with GPS devices attached to wild mallards trapped at an autumn stopover site in the Northwest European flyway. Sixteen individuals (13 males, 3 females) were followed for 15-38 days in October to December 2010. Forty-nine percent (SD = 8.4%) of the ducks' total time, and 85% of the day-time (SD = 28.3%), was spent at sheltered reefs and bays on the coast. Two ducks used ponds, rather than coast, as day-roosts instead. Mallards spent most of the night (76% of total time, SD = 15.8%) on wetlands, mainly on alvar steppe, or in various flooded areas (e.g. coastal meadows). Crop fields with maize were also selectively utilized. Movements between roosting and foraging areas mainly took place at dawn and dusk, and the home-ranges observed in our study are among the largest ever documented for mallards (mean  = 6,859 ha; SD = 5,872 ha). This study provides insights into relatively unknown aspects of mallard ecology. The fact that autumn-staging migratory mallards have a well-developed diel activity pattern tightly linked to the use of specific habitats has implications for wetland management, hunting and conservation, as well as for the epidemiology of diseases shared between wildlife and domestic animals. PMID:24971887

  9. Movements, home-range size and habitat selection of mallards during autumn migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bengtsson

    Full Text Available The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos is a focal species in game management, epidemiology and ornithology, but comparably little research has focused on the ecology of the migration seasons. We studied habitat use, time-budgets, home-range sizes, habitat selection, and movements based on spatial data collected with GPS devices attached to wild mallards trapped at an autumn stopover site in the Northwest European flyway. Sixteen individuals (13 males, 3 females were followed for 15-38 days in October to December 2010. Forty-nine percent (SD = 8.4% of the ducks' total time, and 85% of the day-time (SD = 28.3%, was spent at sheltered reefs and bays on the coast. Two ducks used ponds, rather than coast, as day-roosts instead. Mallards spent most of the night (76% of total time, SD = 15.8% on wetlands, mainly on alvar steppe, or in various flooded areas (e.g. coastal meadows. Crop fields with maize were also selectively utilized. Movements between roosting and foraging areas mainly took place at dawn and dusk, and the home-ranges observed in our study are among the largest ever documented for mallards (mean  = 6,859 ha; SD = 5,872 ha. This study provides insights into relatively unknown aspects of mallard ecology. The fact that autumn-staging migratory mallards have a well-developed diel activity pattern tightly linked to the use of specific habitats has implications for wetland management, hunting and conservation, as well as for the epidemiology of diseases shared between wildlife and domestic animals.

  10. Aerodynamics of wind turbines emerging topics

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines with topics ranging from Fundamental to Application of horizontal axis wind turbines, this book presents advanced topics including: Basic Theory for Wind turbine Blade Aerodynamics, Computational Methods, and Special Structural Reinforcement Technique for Wind Turbine Blades.

  11. Performance of diethylene glycol-based particle counters in the sub-3 nm size range

    CERN Document Server

    Wimmer, D; Franchin, A; Kangasluoma, J; Kreissl, F; Kürten, A; Kupc, A; Metzger, A; Mikkilä, J; Petäjä, J; Riccobono, F; Vanhanen, J; Kulmala, M; Curtius, J

    2013-01-01

    When studying new particle formation, the uncertainty in determining the "true" nucleation rate is considerably reduced when using condensation particle counters (CPCs) capable of measuring concentrations of aerosol particles at sizes close to or even at the critical cluster size (1–2 nm). Recently, CPCs able to reliably detect particles below 2 nm in size and even close to 1 nm became available. Using these instruments, the corrections needed for calculating nucleation rates are substantially reduced compared to scaling the observed formation rate to the nucleation rate at the critical cluster size. However, this improved instrumentation requires a careful characterization of their cut-off size and the shape of the detection efficiency curve because relatively small shifts in the cut-off size can translate into larger relative errors when measuring particles close to the cut-off size. Here we describe the development of two continuous-flow CPCs using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid. The desig...

  12. Whitebark pine, population density, and home-range size of grizzly bears in the greater yellowstone ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D Bjornlie

    Full Text Available Changes in life history traits of species can be an important indicator of potential factors influencing populations. For grizzly bears (Ursus arctos in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE, recent decline of whitebark pine (WBP; Pinus albicaulis, an important fall food resource, has been paired with a slowing of population growth following two decades of robust population increase. These observations have raised questions whether resource decline or density-dependent processes may be associated with changes in population growth. Distinguishing these effects based on changes in demographic rates can be difficult. However, unlike the parallel demographic responses expected from both decreasing food availability and increasing population density, we hypothesized opposing behavioral responses of grizzly bears with regard to changes in home-range size. We used the dynamic changes in food resources and population density of grizzly bears as a natural experiment to examine hypotheses regarding these potentially competing influences on grizzly bear home-range size. We found that home-range size did not increase during the period of whitebark pine decline and was not related to proportion of whitebark pine in home ranges. However, female home-range size was negatively associated with an index of population density. Our data indicate that home-range size of grizzly bears in the GYE is not associated with availability of WBP, and, for female grizzly bears, increasing population density may constrain home-range size.

  13. Whitebark pine, population density, and home-range size of grizzly bears in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel D, Bjornlie; van Manen, Frank T.; Michael R, Ebinger; Haroldson, Mark A.; Daniel J, Thompson; Cecily M, Costello

    2014-01-01

    Changes in life history traits of species can be an important indicator of potential factors influencing populations. For grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), recent decline of whitebark pine (WBP; Pinus albicaulis), an important fall food resource, has been paired with a slowing of population growth following two decades of robust population increase. These observations have raised questions whether resource decline or density-dependent processes may be associated with changes in population growth. Distinguishing these effects based on changes in demographic rates can be difficult. However, unlike the parallel demographic responses expected from both decreasing food availability and increasing population density, we hypothesized opposing behavioral responses of grizzly bears with regard to changes in home-range size. We used the dynamic changes in food resources and population density of grizzly bears as a natural experiment to examine hypotheses regarding these potentially competing influences on grizzly bear home-range size. We found that home-range size did not increase during the period of whitebark pine decline and was not related to proportion of whitebark pine in home ranges. However, female home-range size was negatively associated with an index of population density. Our data indicate that home-range size of grizzly bears in the GYE is not associated with availability of WBP, and, for female grizzly bears, increasing population density may constrain home-range size.

  14. Speciation and Extinction Drive the Appearance of Directional Range Size Evolution in Phylogenies and the Fossil Record

    OpenAIRE

    Pigot, Alex L.; Owens, Ian P. F.; Orme, C. David L

    2012-01-01

    While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular e...

  15. Female home range size is regulated by resource distribution and intraspecific competition: a long-term field study

    OpenAIRE

    Schradin, C; Schmohl, G; Rödel, H G; Schoepf, I; Treffler, S M; Brenner, J.; Bleeker, M; Schubert, M.; König, B; Pillay, N

    2010-01-01

    The size of an individual’s home range is an important feature, influencing reproduction and survival, but it can vary considerably among both populations and individuals. The factors accounting for such variation are still poorly understood, and comprehensive long-term field studies considering various environmental factors that influence home range size are rare. We investigated the effects of seasonality, availability of food, cover, number of direct neighbours and the relative individual ...

  16. Speciation in little: the role of range and body size in the diversification of Malagasy mantellid frogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vences Miguel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate and mode of lineage diversification might be shaped by clade-specific traits. In Madagascar, many groups of organisms are characterized by tiny distribution ranges and small body sizes, and this high degree of microendemism and miniaturization parallels a high species diversity in some of these groups. We here investigate the geographic patterns characterizing the radiation of the frog family Mantellidae that is virtually endemic to Madagascar. We integrate a newly reconstructed near-complete species-level timetree of the Mantellidae with georeferenced distribution records and maximum male body size data to infer the influence of these life-history traits on each other and on mantellid diversification. Results We reconstructed a molecular phylogeny based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA for 257 species and candidate species of the mantellid frog radiation. Based on this phylogeny we identified 53 well-supported pairs of sister species that we used for phylogenetic comparative analyses, along with whole tree-based phylogenetic comparative methods. Sister species within the Mantellidae diverged at 0.2-14.4 million years ago and more recently diverged sister species had geographical range centroids more proximate to each other, independently of their current sympatric or allopatric occurrence. The largest number of sister species pairs had non-overlapping ranges, but several examples of young microendemic sister species occurring in full sympatry suggest the possibility of non-allopatric speciation. Range sizes of species included in the sister species comparisons increased with evolutionary age, as did range size differences between sister species, which rejects peripatric speciation. For the majority of mantellid sister species and the whole mantellid radiation, range and body sizes were associated with each other and small body sizes were linked to higher mitochondrial nucleotide substitution rates and higher clade

  17. Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    "Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics" is a comprehensive electronic guide to aerodynamics,computational fluid dynamics, aeronautics, aerospace propulsion systems, design and relatedtechnology. We report data, tables, graphics, sketches,examples, results, photos, technical andscientific literature, for...

  18. Fundamentals of modern unsteady aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gülçat, Ülgen

    2016-01-01

    In this book, the author introduces the concept of unsteady aerodynamics and its underlying principles. He provides the readers with a comprehensive review of the fundamental physics of free and forced unsteadiness, the terminology and basic equations of aerodynamics ranging from incompressible flow to hypersonics. The book also covers modern topics related to the developments made in recent years, especially in relation to wing flapping for propulsion. The book is written for graduate and senior year undergraduate students in aerodynamics and also serves as a reference for experienced researchers. Each chapter includes ample examples, questions, problems and relevant references.   The treatment of these modern topics has been completely revised end expanded for the new edition. It now includes new numerical examples, a section on the ground effect, and state-space representation.

  19. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  20. Home-range size and overlap within an introduced population of the Cuban Knight Anole, Anolis equestris (Squamata: Iguanidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Richards

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have investigated the spatial relationships of terrestrial lizards, but arboreal species remain poorly studiedbecause they are difficult to observe. The conventional view of home-range size and overlap among territorial, polygynous species of lizards is that: (1 male home ranges are larger than those of females; (2 male home ranges usually encompass, or substantiallyoverlap, those of several females; and (3 male home-range overlap varies but often is minimal, but female home ranges frequently overlap extensively. However, the paucity of pertinent studies makes it difficult to generalize these patterns to arboreal lizards. Weinvestigated home-range size and overlap in the arboreal Knight Anole, Anolis equestris, and compared our findings to published home-range data for 15 other species of Anolis. Using radiotelemetry and mark-recapture/resight techniques, we analyzed the home rangesof individuals from an introduced population of Knight Anoles in Miami, Florida. The home ranges of both sexes substantially overlapped those of the same- and different-sex individuals. In addition, male and female home ranges did not differ significantly, an unusual observation among lizard species. If one compares both male and female home ranges to those of other Anolis species, Knight Anoles have significantly larger home ranges, except for two species for which statistical comparisons were not possible. Our results suggest that home ranges and sex-specific spatial arrangements of canopy lizards may differ from those of more terrestrial species.

  1. Golf Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A former Martin Marietta Manned Space Systems engineer, Robert T. Thurman went from analyzing airloads on the Space Shuttle External Tank to analyzing airloads on golf balls for Wilson Sporting Goods Company. Using his NASA know-how, Thurman designed the Ultra 500 golf ball, which has three different-sized dimples in 60 triangular faces (instead of the usual 20) formed by a series of intersecting "parting" lines. This balances the asymmetry caused by the molding line in all golf balls. According to Wilson, the ball sustains initial velocity longer and produces the most stable ball flight for "unmatched" accuracy and distance.

  2. Polydisperse particle size characterization by ultrasonic attenuation spectroscopy in the micrometer range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Andreas; Babick, Frank; Stintz, Michael

    2006-12-22

    The theoretical advantages of ultrasonic attenuation spectroscopy for particle size are currently not fully utilized. Especially in the region of larger particles, there is a lack of experimental confirmation of applicable models which may be used to infer particle sizes from measured attenuation spectra. With the present work, an attempt is made to supply experimental data, obtained with a commercially available ultrasonic attenuation spectrometer, and model calculations, which are based on the resonant scattering theory. It is shown that measured attenuation results for various combinations of disperse and continuous phase for both polydisperse emulsions and suspensions are reproducible by calculation. The approach is further examined for suspensions of porous particles. Here, the resonant scattering approach is combined with the Biot model for poroelasticity to obtain attenuation results with several fractions of titania aggregates, differing in particle size and pore diameter. The results indicate that the theory of resonant scattering is a valid approach if applied to particle size characterization in the large particle limit. PMID:16808945

  3. Differences in fecal particle size between free-ranging and captive individuals of two browser species

    OpenAIRE

    Hummel, J.; Fritz, J.; Kienzle, E.; Medici, E P; Lang, S.; Zimmermann, W.; Streich, W J; Clauss, M

    2008-01-01

    Data from captive animals indicated that browsing (BR) ruminants have larger fecal particles-indicative of lesser chewing efficiency-than grazers (GR). To answer whether this reflects fundamental differences between the animal groups, or different reactions of basically similar organisms to diets fed in captivity, we compared mean fecal particle size (MPS) in a GR and a BR ruminant (aurox Bos primigenius taurus, giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis) and a GR and a BR hindgut fermenter (Przewalski's...

  4. The range of local public services and population size: Is there a “zoo effect” in French jurisdictions?

    OpenAIRE

    Quentin Frère; Hakim Hammadou; Sonia Paty

    2011-01-01

    This article contributes to the small literature on the relationship between the range of local public services and population size. Using new data on French local jurisdictions, we test the hypothesis that larger jurisdictions provide a broader range of public goods (the so-called “zoo effect”, Oates (1988)). We take advantage of the fact that, in France, many municipalities recently joined together, forming groups of municipalities (or communities) in order to achieve economies of scale. Us...

  5. Monitoring aerosol elemental composition in particle size fractions of long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metternich, P.; Georgii, H.-W.; Groeneveld, K. O.

    1983-04-01

    Collection of atmospheric samples was performed at Malta, a semi-remote environment in the Mediterranean, in case of long-range transport studies of pollutants and natural substances. Using PIXE as a non-destructive trace-element analytical tool, the elemental composition of these samples was determined. Atmospheric concentrations obtained in this study were of one magnitude higher than those observed over the open North Alantic in purely marine air. For most of the anomalously enriched elements in the Mediterranean aerosol, the high concentrations can be explained by long-range transport.

  6. Coherence loss in stroboscopic radar ranging in the problem of asteroid size estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharchenko, V D; Rizhkov, V Yu

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of coherence loss in a stroboscopic high resolution radar ranging due to phase instability of the probing and reference radio signals. Requirements to the coherence of reference generators in stroboscopic signal processing system are formulated. The results of statistical modeling are presented.

  7. Changes in home range sizes and population densities of carnivore species along the natural to urban habitat gradient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šálek, Martin; Drahníková, L.; Tkadlec, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-14. ISSN 0305-1838 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Carnivores * home range size * natural–urban gradient * population density * review Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.256, year: 2014

  8. Ion generation and CPC detection efficiency studies in sub 3-nm size range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the chemical composition of commonly used condensation particle counter calibration ions with a mass spectrometer and found that in our calibration setup the negatively charged ammonium sulphate, sodium chloride and tungsten oxide are the least contaminated whereas silver on both positive and negative and the three mentioned earlier in positive mode are contaminated with organics. We report cut-off diameters for Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6 and 1.6-1.8 nm for negative sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate, tungsten oxide, silver and positive organics, respectively. To study the effect of sample relative humidity on detection efficiency of the PSM we used different humidities in the differential mobility analyzer sheath flow and found that with increasing relative humidity also the detection efficiency of the PSM increases.

  9. The mid-domain effect matters: simulation analyses of range-size distribution data from Mount Kinabalu, Borneo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grytnes, John-Arvid; Beaman, John H.; Romdal, Tom Skovlund;

    2008-01-01

    Aim In simulation exercises, mid-domain peaks in species richness arise as a result of the random placement of modelled species ranges within simulated geometric constraints. This has been called the mid-domain effect (MDE). Where close correspondence is found between such simulations and empirical...... data, it is not possible to reject the hypothesis that empirical species richness patterns result from the MDE rather than being the outcome (wholly or largely) of other factors. To separate the influence of the MDE from other factors we therefore need to evaluate variables other than species richness....... The distribution of range sizes gives different predictions between models including the MDE or not. Here, we produce predictions for species richness and distribution of range sizes from one model without the MDE and from two MDE models: a classical MDE model encompassing only species with their...

  10. Eigenvectors and scalar products for long range interacting spin chains II: the finite size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Serban, D

    2013-01-01

    In this note, we study the eigenvectors and the scalar products the integrable long-range deformation of a XXX spin chain which is solved exactly by algebraic Bethe ansatz, and it coincides in the bulk with the Inozemtsev spin chain. At the closing point it contains a defect which effectively removes the wrapping interactions. Here we concentrate on determining the defect term for the first non-trivial order in perturbation in the deformation parameter and how it affects the Bethe ansatz equations. Our study is motivated by the relation with the dilatation operator of the N = 4 gauge theory in the su(2) sector.

  11. Analytical Investigation of a Flicker-Type Roll Control for a Mach Number 6 Missile with Aerodynamic Controls Over An Altitude Range of 82,000 to 282,000 feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Reginald R.; Whitman, Ruth I.

    1959-01-01

    An analytical investigation has been carried out to determine the responses of a flicker-type roll control incorporated in a missile which traverses a range of Mach number of 6.3 at an altitude of 82,000 feet to 5.26 at an altitude of 282,000 feet. The missile has 80 deg delta wings in a cruciform arrangement with aerodynamic controls attached to the fuselage near the wing trailing edge and indexed 450 to the wings. Most of the investigation was carried out on an analog computer. Results showed that roll stabilization that may be adequate for many cases can be obtained over the altitude range considered, providing that the rate factor can be changed with altitude. The response would be improved if the control deflection were made larger at the higher altitudes. lag times less than 0.04 second improve the response appreciably. Asymmetries that produce steady rolling moments can be very detrimental to the response in some cases. The wing damping made a negligible contribution to the response.

  12. Optimization of electrode size for aluminum-nitride matrix ultrasonic transducers in the frequency range above 200 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yangjie; Herzog, Thomas; Heuer, Henning

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes an optimization method of the top electrode size for a thin film matrix ultrasonic transducer (M-UT) in the frequency range above 200 MHz. The goal of this work is to design an optimal top electrode size for an M-UT providing the maximal output peak-peak voltage (V(PP)) and the maximal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) without additional electrical impedance matching. In order to reduce the complexity of the M-UT with more than 1000 elements, an intrinsic matching by electrode size variation is necessary. However, the size of a single element top electrode for an M-UT is related to the number of elements within a targeted sensor area, V(PP) and SNR of the transducer. In this paper, varying the active area of the top electrode from 0.09 to 25 mm(2) shows that for an Al-AlN-Al on silicon wafer configuration connected with a JSR Ultrasonics pulser/receiver (50 ohms), the optimal electrode size is 1 mm(2). With the optimal size electrode, the maximum output V(PP) of 0.08 V and the SNR of 42.93 dB are achieved at the resonance frequency of 225 MHz, and the bandwidth is 16.21 MHz. PMID:23218910

  13. New insights into the wind-dust relationship in sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment from wind tunnel experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad

    2016-01-22

    Numerous parameterizations have been developed for predicting wind erosion, yet the physical mechanism of dust emission is not fully understood. Sandblasting is thought to be the primary mechanism, but recent studies suggest that dust emission by direct aerodynamic entrainment can be significant under certain conditions. In this work, using wind tunnel experiments, we investigated some of the lesser understood aspects of dust emission in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment for three soil types, namely clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam. First, we explored the role of erodible surface roughness on dust emitted by aerodynamic entrainment. Second, we compared the emitted dust concentration in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment under a range of wind friction velocities. Finally, we explored the sensitivity of emitted dust particle size distribution (PSD) to soil type and wind friction velocity in these two processes. The dust concentration in aerodynamic entrainment showed strong positive correlation, no significant correlation, and weak negative correlation, for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively, with the erodible soil surface roughness. The dust in aerodynamic entrainment was significant constituting up to 28.3, 41.4, and 146.4% compared to sandblasting for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively. PSD of emitted dust was sensitive to soil type in both sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment. PSD was sensitive to the friction velocity in aerodynamic entrainment but not in sandblasting. Our results highlight the need to consider the details of sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment processes in parameterizing dust emission in global/regional climate models.

  14. New insights into the wind-dust relationship in sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment from wind tunnel experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad; Zobeck, Ted M.; Kocurek, Gary; Yang, Zong-Liang; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2016-02-01

    Numerous parameterizations have been developed for predicting wind erosion, yet the physical mechanism of dust emission is not fully understood. Sandblasting is thought to be the primary mechanism, but recent studies suggest that dust emission by direct aerodynamic entrainment can be significant under certain conditions. In this work, using wind tunnel experiments, we investigated some of the lesser understood aspects of dust emission in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment for three soil types, namely, clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam. First, we explored the role of erodible surface roughness on dust emitted by aerodynamic entrainment. Second, we compared the emitted dust concentration in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment under a range of wind friction velocities. Finally, we explored the sensitivity of emitted dust particle size distribution (PSD) to soil type and wind friction velocity in these two processes. The dust concentration in aerodynamic entrainment showed strong positive correlation, no significant correlation, and weak negative correlation, for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively, with the erodible soil surface roughness. The dust in aerodynamic entrainment was significant constituting up to 28.3, 41.4, and 146.4% compared to sandblasting for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively. PSD of emitted dust was sensitive to soil type in both sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment. PSD was sensitive to the friction velocity in aerodynamic entrainment but not in sandblasting. Our results highlight the need to consider the details of sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment processes in parameterizing dust emission in global/regional climate models.

  15. The aerodynamic and structural study of flapping wing vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Liangchen

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on the aerodynamic and structural study carried out on flapping wings and flapping vehicles. Theoretical and experimental investigation of aerodynamic forces acting on flapping wings in simple harmonic oscillations is undertaken in order to help conduct and optimize the aerodynamic and structural design of flapping wing vehicles. The research is focused on the large scale ornithopter design of similar size and configuration to a hang glider. By means of Theodorsen’s th...

  16. Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

    1977-12-01

    The successful development of reliable, cost competitive horizontal axis, propeller-type wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is strongly dependent on the availability of advanced technology for each of the system components. This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

  17. Optimizing battery sizes of plug-in hybrid and extended range electric vehicles for different user types

    OpenAIRE

    Redelbach, Martin; Özdemir, Enver Doruk; Friedrich, Horst E.

    2014-01-01

    There are ambitious greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) targets for the manufacturers of light duty vehicles. To reduce the GHG emissions, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) and extended range electric vehicle (EREV) are promising powertrain technologies. However, the battery is still a very critical component due to the high production cost and heavy weight. This paper introduces a holistic approach for the optimization of the battery size of PHEVs and EREVs under German market conditions. Th...

  18. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows

  19. Computation of dragonfly aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Karl; Leben, Robert

    1991-04-01

    Dragonflies are seen to hover and dart, seemingly at will and in remarkably nimble fashion, with great bursts of speed and effectively discontinuous changes of direction. In their short lives, their gossamer flight provides us with glimpses of an aerodynamics of almost extraterrestrial quality. Here we present the first computer simulations of such aerodynamics.

  20. Effects of sample size and sampling frequency on studies of brown bear home ranges and habitat use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Steve M.; Schwartz, Charles C.

    1999-01-01

    We equipped 9 brown bears (Ursus arctos) on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, with collars containing both conventional very-high-frequency (VHF) transmitters and global positioning system (GPS) receivers programmed to determine an animal's position at 5.75-hr intervals. We calculated minimum convex polygon (MCP) and fixed and adaptive kernel home ranges for randomly-selected subsets of the GPS data to examine the effects of sample size on accuracy and precision of home range estimates. We also compared results obtained by weekly aerial radiotracking versus more frequent GPS locations to test for biases in conventional radiotracking data. Home ranges based on the MCP were 20-606 km2 (x = 201) for aerial radiotracking data (n = 12-16 locations/bear) and 116-1,505 km2 (x = 522) for the complete GPS data sets (n = 245-466 locations/bear). Fixed kernel home ranges were 34-955 km2 (x = 224) for radiotracking data and 16-130 km2 (x = 60) for the GPS data. Differences between means for radiotracking and GPS data were due primarily to the larger samples provided by the GPS data. Means did not differ between radiotracking data and equivalent-sized subsets of GPS data (P > 0.10). For the MCP, home range area increased and variability decreased asymptotically with number of locations. For the kernel models, both area and variability decreased with increasing sample size. Simulations suggested that the MCP and kernel models required >60 and >80 locations, respectively, for estimates to be both accurate (change in area sample size, these data failed to indicate some areas that likely were important to bears. Our results suggest that the usefulness of conventional radiotracking data may be limited by potential biases and variability due to small samples. Investigators that use home range estimates in statistical tests should consider the effects of variability of those estimates. Use of GPS-equipped collars can facilitate obtaining larger samples of unbiased data and improve accuracy

  1. How to Calculate Range and Population Size for the Otter? The Irish Approach as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dierdre Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available All EU Member States are obliged to submit reports to the EU Commission every 6 years, detailing the conservation status of species and habitats listed on the Habitats Directive. The otter (Lutra lutra is one such species. Despite a number of national surveys that showed that the otter was widespread across the country, in Ireland’s 2007 conservation status assessment the otter was considered to be in unfavourable condition. While the Range, Habitat and Future Prospects categories were all considered favourable, Population was deemed to be unfavourable.This paper examines the data behind the 2007 assessment by Ireland, which included three national otter surveys and a series of radio-tracking studies. Range was mapped and calculated based on the results of national distribution surveys together with records submitted from the public. Population size was estimated by calculating the extent of available habitats (rivers, lakes and coasts, dividing that by the typical home range size and then multiplying the result by the proportion of positive sites in the most recent national survey.While the Range of the otter in Ireland did not decrease between the 1980/81 and the 2004/05 surveys, Population trend was calculated as -23.7%. As a consequence, the most recent national Red Data List for Ireland lists the species as Near Threatened (Marnell et al., 2009.

  2. The influence of band sum area, domain extent, and range sizes on the latitudinal mid-domain effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romdal, Tom Skovlund; Colwell, Robert K.; Rahbek, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    Although the mid-domain effect (MDE) model for species richness in bounded geographical domains has proved controversial, several studies have revealed its explanatory potential for patterns of species richness. This paper investigates unexplored aspects of one-dimensional MDE, based on a data set......-corrected richness patterns differed substantially from raw band sums, although both confirmed a strong, mid-tropical peak in richness. An MDE model accounted for 47% of the adjusted pattern, whereas area alone explained 13% of variation. Area-adjusted band sum data proved preferable to coastal transect data from...... the same data set. MDE was relatively more important in smaller latitudinal domains and/or for taxa with relatively large ranges. On fundamental grounds, we concluded that MDE randomizations based on empirical ranges are more appropriate than those based on theoretical range size distributions. Models...

  3. 新型宽速域高超声速飞行器气动特性研究%Investigation on aerodynamic performance for a novel wide-ranged hypersonic vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世斌; 罗世彬; 黄伟; 柳军; 金亮

    2012-01-01

    为设计一种新型宽速域滑翔飞行器,基于无粘锥导乘波设计理论,设计了Ma =4和Ma =8状态下的乘波构型,并将其进行“串联”拼接,得到一类新型宽速域乘波飞行器.采用数值模拟方法对此类飞行器的气动特性进行了研究,得到其流场特征和气动特性.结果表明,采用新型“串联”高超声速乘波飞行器,其气动性能在宽速域范围内比单马赫数条件下的乘波飞行器气动性能更优.“串联”乘波体的升阻比随马赫数的增加而变大,当Ma >8时,其气动特性变化不明显,最大升阻比接近3.2,在设计马赫数范围内,升阻比不低于2.6.升阻比随攻角的增加先变大后减小,在3°攻角时升阻比最大.在Ma =6时,基准模型-1的最大升阻比为4.714,“串联”乘波体的升阻比达到3.48.%In order to design a novel hypersonic cruise vehicle for a wide-ranged Mach numhers, two different configurations in two situations ( Ma = 4 and Ma = 8) based on the theory of waverider were designed, and then combined to achieve a novel hypersonic vehicle for a wide-ranged velocity. In this study, the commercial software Fluent was employed to numerically investigate its aerodynamic performance and flow field characteristics. The obtained results show that the aerodynamic performance of the novel combined waverider vehicle is better than that of single Mach number waverider vehicle for the wide-ranged velocity. With the increasing of Mach numbers, the lift-to-drag ratio of the novel waverider increases continually, but the gradient decreases. Its maximum value is nearly 3.2, and the value is not lower than 2. 6 in the range of design Mach number. The lift-to-drag ratio first increases, and then decreases with the increasing of the angle of attack. When the angle of attack is 3? the lift-to-drag ratio is the largest. When the Mach number is 6, the maximum value of the benchmark-1 is 4. 714, and the value of the combined waverider reaches 3.48.

  4. Resonances and Aerodynamic Damping of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Ottermo, Fredric; Bernhoff, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of a straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine is investigated with respect to oscillations due to the elasticity of struts and shaft connecting to the hub. In particular, for the three-bladed turbine, a concept is proposed for dimensioning the turbine to maximize the size of the resonance free rpm range for operation. The effect of aerodynamic damping on the struts is also considered. The damping of these types of oscillations for a typical turbine is found to be good.

  5. Optimizing battery sizes of plug-in hybrid and extended range electric vehicles for different user types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are ambitious greenhouse gas emission (GHG) targets for the manufacturers of light duty vehicles. To reduce the GHG emissions, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) and extended range electric vehicle (EREV) are promising powertrain technologies. However, the battery is still a very critical component due to the high production cost and heavy weight. This paper introduces a holistic approach for the optimization of the battery size of PHEVs and EREVs under German market conditions. The assessment focuses on the heterogeneity across drivers, by analyzing the impact of different driving profiles on the optimal battery setup from total cost of ownership (TCO) perspective. The results show that the battery size has a significant effect on the TCO. For an average German driver (15,000 km/a), battery capacities of 4 kWh (PHEV) and 6 kWh (EREV) would be cost optimal by 2020. However, these values vary strongly with the driving profile of the user. Moreover, the optimal battery size is also affected by external factors, e.g. electricity and fuel prices or battery production cost. Therefore, car manufacturers should develop a modular design for their batteries, which allows adapting the storage capacity to meet the individual customer requirements instead of “one size fits all”. - Highlights: • Optimization of the battery size of PHEVs and EREVs under German market conditions. • Focus on heterogeneity across drivers (e.g. mileage, trip distribution, speed). • Optimal battery size strongly depends on the driving profile and energy prices. • OEMs require a modular design for their batteries to meet individual requirements

  6. In-place testing of HEPA filter using monodisperse DOP aerosols in the most penetrating particle size range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent filtration studies have revealed that the most penetrating particle size MPPS, through HEPA filter is smaller than 0.3 μm, which is the test aerosol size in the current filter testing. Furthermore, in the radiation protection field the filter performance is required to be linked to a DF (Decontamination Factor). To meet this evaluation criterion, a new in-place filter test system was developed. Our system consists of a newly designed aerosol generator and a computer-aided aerosol measuring system. The aerosol generator, which is a vaporization-condensation type, generates DOP (Dioctyl Phthalate) aerosols in the most penetrating particle size range from 0.1 to 0.2 μm with a geometric standard deviation (σg) less than 1.2. This high monodispersity makes possible to use a CNC (Condensation Nucleus Counter) for determination of aerosol penetration. Test aerosols are simultaneously measured by using a laser aerosol spectrometer in the upstream and the CNC in the downstream. It was shown that the collection efficiency of seven-nine percentage class for the MPPS range can be measured at air flow of 7800 m3/hr in in-place test. (4 figs., 2 tabs.)

  7. Feasibility Study of Interstellar Missions Using Laser Sail Probes Ranging in Size from the Nano to the Macro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malroy, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis examining the feasibility of interstellar travel using laser sail probes ranging in size from the nano to the macro. The relativistic differential equations of motion for a laser sail are set up and solved using the Pasic Method. The limitations of the analysis are presented and discussed. The requirements for the laser system are examined, including the thermal analysis of the laser sails. Black holes, plasma fields, atmospheric collisions and sun light are several methods discussed to enable the deceleration of the interstellar probe. A number of novel mission scenarios are presented including the embryonic transport of plant life as a precursor to the arrival of space colonies

  8. Why to measure a broad range of city sizes? Analysis of globally pooled data of urban GHG measurements for sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybski, Diego; Sterzel, Till; Reusser, Dominik E.; Fichter, Christina; Kropp, Jürgen P.

    2013-04-01

    We have assembled a database of urban GHG emissions from various published sources, including about 200 cities globally. Analyzing this CO2 emission inventory from multiple countries we find power-law relations between the emissions and city size, measured in population. The results suggest that in developing countries large cities emit more CO2 per capita compared to small cities, i.e. they tend to comprise super-linear correlations. For developed countries the results suggest the opposite, i.e. linear or sub-linear correlations, implying better efficiency of large cities. We derive how the total emissions of an entire country relate with the power-law correlations and find that the size of the most populated city is dominating in the case of linear and super-linear correlations, while a transition occurs to sub-linear correlations, where the size of the largest city has no influence. It is important to further substantiate an overview of city emission inventories across a broad range of city sizes and types to further clarify the complex relationships between cities and GHG emissions. On the one hand, we propose a minimum set of meta-information to be reported together with the emission inventories, e.g. for determining comparability among inventories. On the other hand, we propose to fill evident gaps with respect to regions (e.g. sub-Saharan African and South American cities) and types of cities (e.g. small medium and low-income country cities) to allow for a better global overview of city sizes, income, and emissions. We conclude that from the climate change mitigation point of view, urbanization is desirable in developed countries and should be avoided in developing countries, if effinciency increasing mechanisms can not be established. More data acquisition is needed to support our empirical findings.

  9. Bulk refractive-index sensitivities of the THz-range plasmon resonances on a micro-size graphene strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied numerically the potential use of a micro-size graphene strip as a surface plasmon (SP) resonance-based bulk refractive-index sensor in the THz frequency regime. Our accurate computational instrument was an in-house algorithm based on integral equations (IEs) and Nystrom discretization. The refractive-index sensitivities and figure-of-merit (FOM) values of the associated plasmon resonances were calculated. It was found that the primary plasmon mode P 1 is more sensitive to the refractive-index changes than plasmons of higher orders, although the latter demonstrated much larger FOM values explained by the higher Q-factors. The FOM values of the higher-order resonances on a graphene strip in the THz range are at a level similar to the FOM values of the localized SP resonances on a noble-metal strip in the optical range. (paper)

  10. Silage Collected from Dairy Farms Harbors an Abundance of Listeriaphages with Considerable Host Range and Genome Size Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Switt, Andrea Moreno; den Bakker, Henk C.; Fortes, Esther D.

    2012-01-01

    Since the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is common in dairy farm environments, it is likely that phages infecting this bacterium (“listeriaphages”) are abundant on dairy farms. To better understand the ecology and diversity of listeriaphages on dairy farms and to develop a diverse phage collection for further studies, silage samples collected on two dairy farms were screened for L. monocytogenes and listeriaphages. While only 4.5% of silage samples tested positive for L. monocytogenes, 47.8% of samples were positive for listeriaphages, containing up to >1.5 × 104 PFU/g. Host range characterization of the 114 phage isolates obtained, with a reference set of 13 L. monocytogenes strains representing the nine major serotypes and four lineages, revealed considerable host range diversity; phage isolates were classified into nine lysis groups. While one serotype 3c strain was not lysed by any phage isolates, serotype 4 strains were highly susceptible to phages and were lysed by 63.2 to 88.6% of phages tested. Overall, 12.3% of phage isolates showed a narrow host range (lysing 1 to 5 strains), while 28.9% of phages represented broad host range (lysing ≥11 strains). Genome sizes of the phage isolates were estimated to range from approximately 26 to 140 kb. The extensive host range and genomic diversity of phages observed here suggest an important role of phages in the ecology of L. monocytogenes on dairy farms. In addition, the phage collection developed here has the potential to facilitate further development of phage-based biocontrol strategies (e.g., in silage) and other phage-based tools. PMID:23042180

  11. Reinforced aerodynamic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to the prevention of deformations in an aerodynamic profile caused by lack of resistance to the bending moment forces that are created when such a profile is loaded in operation. More specifically, the invention relates to a reinforcing element inside an aerodynamic ...... profile and a method for the construction thereof. The profile is intended for, but not limited to, useas a wind turbine blade, an aerofoil device or as a wing profile used in the aeronautical industry....

  12. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  13. Processing and size range separation of pristine and magnetic poly(l-lactic acid) based microspheres for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, D M; Sencadas, V; Ribeiro, C; Martins, P M; Martins, P; Gama, F M; Botelho, G; Lanceros-Méndez, S

    2016-08-15

    Biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and PLLA/CoFe2O4 magnetic microspheres with average sizes ranging between 0.16-3.9μm and 0.8-2.2μm, respectively, were obtained by an oil-in-water emulsion method using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) solution as the emulsifier agent. The separation of the microspheres in different size ranges was then performed by centrifugation and the colloidal stability assessed at different pH values. Neat PLLA spheres are more stable in alkaline environments when compared to magnetic microspheres, both types being stable for pHs higher than 4, resulting in a colloidal suspension. On the other hand, in acidic environments the microspheres tend to form aggregates. The neat PLLA microspheres show a degree of crystallinity of 40% whereas the composite ones are nearly amorphous (17%). Finally, the biocompatibility was assessed by cell viability studies with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells. PMID:27209393

  14. Evaluation of Argos Telemetry Accuracy in the High-Arctic and Implications for the Estimation of Home-Range Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Christin

    Full Text Available Animal tracking through Argos satellite telemetry has enormous potential to test hypotheses in animal behavior, evolutionary ecology, or conservation biology. Yet the applicability of this technique cannot be fully assessed because no clear picture exists as to the conditions influencing the accuracy of Argos locations. Latitude, type of environment, and transmitter movement are among the main candidate factors affecting accuracy. A posteriori data filtering can remove "bad" locations, but again testing is still needed to refine filters. First, we evaluate experimentally the accuracy of Argos locations in a polar terrestrial environment (Nunavut, Canada, with both static and mobile transmitters transported by humans and coupled to GPS transmitters. We report static errors among the lowest published. However, the 68th error percentiles of mobile transmitters were 1.7 to 3.8 times greater than those of static transmitters. Second, we test how different filtering methods influence the quality of Argos location datasets. Accuracy of location datasets was best improved when filtering in locations of the best classes (LC3 and 2, while the Douglas Argos filter and a homemade speed filter yielded similar performance while retaining more locations. All filters effectively reduced the 68th error percentiles. Finally, we assess how location error impacted, at six spatial scales, two common estimators of home-range size (a proxy of animal space use behavior synthetizing movements, the minimum convex polygon and the fixed kernel estimator. Location error led to a sometimes dramatic overestimation of home-range size, especially at very local scales. We conclude that Argos telemetry is appropriate to study medium-size terrestrial animals in polar environments, but recommend that location errors are always measured and evaluated against research hypotheses, and that data are always filtered before analysis. How movement speed of transmitters affects location

  15. Evaluation of Argos Telemetry Accuracy in the High-Arctic and Implications for the Estimation of Home-Range Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, Sylvain; St-Laurent, Martin-Hugues; Berteaux, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Animal tracking through Argos satellite telemetry has enormous potential to test hypotheses in animal behavior, evolutionary ecology, or conservation biology. Yet the applicability of this technique cannot be fully assessed because no clear picture exists as to the conditions influencing the accuracy of Argos locations. Latitude, type of environment, and transmitter movement are among the main candidate factors affecting accuracy. A posteriori data filtering can remove "bad" locations, but again testing is still needed to refine filters. First, we evaluate experimentally the accuracy of Argos locations in a polar terrestrial environment (Nunavut, Canada), with both static and mobile transmitters transported by humans and coupled to GPS transmitters. We report static errors among the lowest published. However, the 68th error percentiles of mobile transmitters were 1.7 to 3.8 times greater than those of static transmitters. Second, we test how different filtering methods influence the quality of Argos location datasets. Accuracy of location datasets was best improved when filtering in locations of the best classes (LC3 and 2), while the Douglas Argos filter and a homemade speed filter yielded similar performance while retaining more locations. All filters effectively reduced the 68th error percentiles. Finally, we assess how location error impacted, at six spatial scales, two common estimators of home-range size (a proxy of animal space use behavior synthetizing movements), the minimum convex polygon and the fixed kernel estimator. Location error led to a sometimes dramatic overestimation of home-range size, especially at very local scales. We conclude that Argos telemetry is appropriate to study medium-size terrestrial animals in polar environments, but recommend that location errors are always measured and evaluated against research hypotheses, and that data are always filtered before analysis. How movement speed of transmitters affects location error needs

  16. On the size of sports fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size of sports fields considerably varies from a few meters for table tennis to hundreds of meters for golf. We first show that this size is mainly fixed by the range of the projectile, that is, by the aerodynamic properties of the ball (mass, surface, drag coefficient) and its maximal velocity in the game. This allows us to propose general classifications for sports played with a ball. (paper)

  17. Source apportionment of wide range particle size spectra and black carbon collected at the airport of Venice (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, Mauro; Vu, Tuan V.; Beddows, David C. S.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric particles are of high concern due to their toxic properties and effects on climate, and large airports are known as significant sources of particles. This study investigates the contribution of the Airport of Venice (Italy) to black carbon (BC), total particle number concentrations (PNC) and particle number size distributions (PNSD) over a large range (14 nm-20 μm). Continuous measurements were conducted between April and June 2014 at a site located 110 m from the main taxiway and 300 m from the runway. Results revealed no significantly elevated levels of BC and PNC, but exhibited characteristic diurnal profiles. PNSD were then analysed using both k-means cluster analysis and positive matrix factorization. Five clusters were extracted and identified as midday nucleation events, road traffic, aircraft, airport and nighttime pollution. Six factors were apportioned and identified as probable sources according to the size profiles, directional association, diurnal variation, road and airport traffic volumes and their relationships to micrometeorology and common air pollutants. Photochemical nucleation accounted for ∼44% of total number, followed by road + shipping traffic (26%). Airport-related emissions accounted for ∼20% of total PNC and showed a main mode at 80 nm and a second mode beyond the lower limit of the SMPS (international airport located in area affected by a complex emission scenario. The results may underpin measures for improving local and regional air quality, and health impact assessment studies.

  18. Search for critical point indications in long-range correlations by energy and system size scanning in string fusion approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, V. N.; Vechernin, V. V. [Saint Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-22

    The ultrarelativistic collisions of heavy and light ions in the center-of-mass energy range from a few up to a hundred GeV per nucleon have been considered in string fusion approach. A Monte Carlo model of proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions has been developed, which takes into account both the string fusion and the finite rapidity length of strings, implementing the hadronic scattering through the interaction of color dipoles. It well describes the proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the partonic level without using Glauber model of nuclear collisions. All parameters are fixed using experimental data on inelastic cross section and multiplicity. In the framework of the model, we performed a beam energy and system size scan and studied the behaviour of n-n, pt-n and pt-pt long-range correlation coefficients. The detailed modeling of the event by event charged particles production allowed to provide predictions in the conditions close to the experimental ones allowing a direct comparison to the data.

  19. Search for critical point indications in long-range correlations by energy and system size scanning in string fusion approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrarelativistic collisions of heavy and light ions in the center-of-mass energy range from a few up to a hundred GeV per nucleon have been considered in string fusion approach. A Monte Carlo model of proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions has been developed, which takes into account both the string fusion and the finite rapidity length of strings, implementing the hadronic scattering through the interaction of color dipoles. It well describes the proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the partonic level without using Glauber model of nuclear collisions. All parameters are fixed using experimental data on inelastic cross section and multiplicity. In the framework of the model, we performed a beam energy and system size scan and studied the behaviour of n-n, pt-n and pt-pt long-range correlation coefficients. The detailed modeling of the event by event charged particles production allowed to provide predictions in the conditions close to the experimental ones allowing a direct comparison to the data

  20. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic contrails are defined in this paper as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data, first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation, and how frequently (probability aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Finally we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally we give an argument for our believe that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  1. Chemical composition, mass size distribution and source analysis of long-range transported wildfire smokes in Helsinki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Special episodes of long-range transported particulate (PM) air pollution were investigated in a one-month field campaign at an urban background site in Helsinki, Finland. A total of nine size-segregated PM samplings of 3- or 4-day duration were made between August 23 and September 23, 2002. During this warm and unusually dry period there were two (labelled P2 and P5) sampling periods when the PM2.5 mass concentration increased remarkably. According to the hourly-measured PM data and backward air mass trajectories, P2 (Aug 23-26) represented a single, 64-h episode of long-range transported aerosol, whereas P5 (Sept 5-9) was a mixture of two 16- and 14-h episodes and usual seasonal air quality. The large chemical data set, based on analyses made by ion chromatography, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence analysis and smoke stain reflectometry, demonstrated that the PM2.5 mass concentrations of biomass signatures (i.e. levoglucosan, oxalate and potassium) and of some other compounds associated with biomass combustion (succinate and malonate) increased remarkably in P2. Crustal elements (Fe, Al, Ca and Si) and unidentified matter, presumably consisting to a large extent of organic material, were also increased in P2. The PM2.5 composition in P5 was different from that in P2, as the inorganic secondary aerosols (NO3-, SO42-, NH4+) and many metals reached their highest concentration in this period. The water-soluble fraction of potassium, lead and manganese increased in both P2 and P5. Mass size distributions (0.035-10 μm) showed that a large accumulation mode mainly caused the episodically increased PM2.5 concentrations. An interesting observation was that the episodes had no obvious impact on the Aitken mode. Finally, the strongly increased concentrations of biomass signatures in accumulation mode proved that the episode in P2 was due to long-range transported biomass combustion aerosol

  2. Evaluation of size segregation of elemental carbon emission in Europe: influence on atmospheric long-range transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y. F.; Nordmann, S.; Birmili, W.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Ma, N.; Wolke, R.; Wehner, B.; Sun, J.; Spindler, G.; Mu, Q.; Pöschl, U.; Su, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2015-11-01

    Elemental Carbon (EC) has significant impact on human health and climate change. In order to evaluate the size segregation of EC emission and investigation of its influence on atmospheric transport processes in Europe, we used the fully coupled online Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry model (WRF-Chem) at a resolution of 2 km focusing on a region in Germany, in conjunction with a high-resolution EC emission inventory. The ground meteorology conditions, vertical structure and wind pattern were well reproduced by the model. The simulations of particle number/mass size distributions were evaluated by observations taken at the central European background site Melpitz. The fine mode aerosol was reasonably well simulated, but the coarse mode was substantially overestimated by the model. We found that it was mainly due to the nearby point source plume emitting a high amount of EC in the coarse mode. The comparisons between simulated EC and Multi-angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) measurements at Melpitz, Leipzig-TROPOS and Bösel indicated that coarse mode EC (ECc) emission in the nearby point sources might be overestimated by a factor of 2-10. The emission fraction of EC in coarse mode was overestimated by about 10-30 % for Russian and 5-10 % for Eastern Europe (e.g.: Poland and Belarus), respectively. This overestimation in ECc emission fraction makes EC particles having less opportunity to accumulate in the atmosphere and participate to the long range transport, due to the shorter lifetime of coarse mode aerosol. The deposition concept model showed that the transported EC mass from Warsaw and Moskva to Melpitz may be reduced by 25-35 and 25-55 % respectively, due to the overestimation of ECc emission fraction. This may partly explain the underestimation of EC concentrations for Germany under eastern wind pattern in some other modelling research.

  3. Source apportionment of wide range particle size spectra and black carbon collected at the airport of Venice (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, Mauro; Vu, Tuan V.; Beddows, David C. S.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric particles are of high concern due to their toxic properties and effects on climate, and large airports are known as significant sources of particles. This study investigates the contribution of the Airport of Venice (Italy) to black carbon (BC), total particle number concentrations (PNC) and particle number size distributions (PNSD) over a large range (14 nm-20 μm). Continuous measurements were conducted between April and June 2014 at a site located 110 m from the main taxiway and 300 m from the runway. Results revealed no significantly elevated levels of BC and PNC, but exhibited characteristic diurnal profiles. PNSD were then analysed using both k-means cluster analysis and positive matrix factorization. Five clusters were extracted and identified as midday nucleation events, road traffic, aircraft, airport and nighttime pollution. Six factors were apportioned and identified as probable sources according to the size profiles, directional association, diurnal variation, road and airport traffic volumes and their relationships to micrometeorology and common air pollutants. Photochemical nucleation accounted for ∼44% of total number, followed by road + shipping traffic (26%). Airport-related emissions accounted for ∼20% of total PNC and showed a main mode at 80 nm and a second mode beyond the lower limit of the SMPS (factors accounted for less than 10% of number counts, but were relevant for total volume concentrations: nighttime nitrate, regional pollution and local resuspension. An analysis of BC levels over different wind sectors revealed no especially significant contributions from specific directions associated with the main local sources, but a potentially significant role of diurnal dynamics of the mixing layer on BC levels. The approaches adopted in this study have identified and apportioned the main sources of particles and BC at an international airport located in area affected by a complex emission scenario. The results may underpin

  4. Evaluation of size segregation of elemental carbon emission in Europe: influence on atmospheric long-range transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Elemental Carbon (EC has significant impact on human health and climate change. In order to evaluate the size segregation of EC emission and investigation of its influence on atmospheric transport processes in Europe, we used the fully coupled online Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry model (WRF-Chem at a resolution of 2 km focusing on a region in Germany, in conjunction with a high-resolution EC emission inventory. The ground meteorology conditions, vertical structure and wind pattern were well reproduced by the model. The simulations of particle number/mass size distributions were evaluated by observations taken at the central European background site Melpitz. The fine mode aerosol was reasonably well simulated, but the coarse mode was substantially overestimated by the model. We found that it was mainly due to the nearby point source plume emitting a high amount of EC in the coarse mode. The comparisons between simulated EC and Multi-angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP measurements at Melpitz, Leipzig-TROPOS and Bösel indicated that coarse mode EC (ECc emission in the nearby point sources might be overestimated by a factor of 2–10. The emission fraction of EC in coarse mode was overestimated by about 10–30 % for Russian and 5–10 % for Eastern Europe (e.g.: Poland and Belarus, respectively. This overestimation in ECc emission fraction makes EC particles having less opportunity to accumulate in the atmosphere and participate to the long range transport, due to the shorter lifetime of coarse mode aerosol. The deposition concept model showed that the transported EC mass from Warsaw and Moskva to Melpitz may be reduced by 25–35 and 25–55 % respectively, due to the overestimation of ECc emission fraction. This may partly explain the underestimation of EC concentrations for Germany under eastern wind pattern in some other modelling research.

  5. Leading Edge Device Aerodynamic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Gabriel COJOCARU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leading edge devices are conventionally used as aerodynamic devices that enhance performances during landing and in some cases during takeoff. The need to increase the efficiency of the aircrafts has brought the idea of maintaining as much as possible a laminar flow over the wings. This is possible only when the leading edge of the wings is free from contamination, therefore using the leading edge devices with the additional role of shielding during takeoff. Such a device based on the Krueger flap design is aerodynamically analyzed and optimized. The optimization comprises three steps: first, the positioning of the flap such that the shielding criterion is kept, second, the analysis of the flap size and third, the optimization of the flap shape. The first step is subject of a gradient based optimization process of the position described by two parameters, the position along the line and the deflection angle. For the third step the Adjoint method is used to gain insight on the shape of the Krueger flap that will extend the most the stall limit. All these steps have been numerically performed using Ansys Fluent and the results are presented for the optimized shape in comparison with the baseline configuration.

  6. Pretreatment of Soil Samples Rich in Short-Range-Order Minerals Before Particle-Size Analysis by the Pipette Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.ALARY; D.BABRE; L.CANER; F.FEDER; M.SZWARC; M.NAUDAN; G.BOURGEON

    2013-01-01

    The possibilities of combining the dissolution of short-range-order minerals (SROMs) like allophane and imogolite,by ammonium oxalate and a particle size distribution analysis performed by the pipette method were investigated by tests on a soil sample from Reunion,a volcanic island located in the Indian Ocean,having a large SROMs content.The need to work with moist soil samples was again emphasized because the microaggregates formed during air-drying are resistant to the reagent.The SROM content increased,but irregularly,with the number of dissolutions by ammonium oxalate:334 and 470 mg g-1 of SROMs were dissolved after one and three dissolutions respectively.Six successive dissolutions with ammonium oxalate on the same soil sample showed that 89% of the sum of oxides extracted by the 6 dissolutions were extracted by the first dissolution (mean 304 mg g-1).A compromise needs to be found between the total removal of SROMs by large quantities of ammonium oxalate and the preservation of clay minerals,which were unexpectedly dissolved by this reagent.These tests enabled a description of the clay assemblage of the soil (gibbsite,smectite,and traces of kaolinite) in an area where such information was lacking due to the difficulties encountered in recupcration of the clay fraction.

  7. Aerodynamically shaped vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Velte, Clara Marika; Øye, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamically shaped vortex generator has been proposed, manufactured and tested in a wind tunnel. The effect on the overall performance when applied on a thick airfoil is an increased lift to drag ratio compared with standard vortex generators. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  8. In vivo measurement of aerodynamic weight support in freely flying birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-11-01

    Birds dynamically change the shape of their wing during the stroke to support their body weight aerodynamically. The wing is partially folded during the upstroke, which suggests that the upstroke of birds might not actively contribute to aerodynamic force production. This hypothesis is supported by the significant mass difference between the large pectoralis muscle that powers the down-stroke and the much smaller supracoracoideus that drives the upstroke. Previous works used indirect or incomplete techniques to measure the total force generated by bird wings ranging from muscle force, airflow, wing surface pressure, to detailed kinematics measurements coupled with bird mass-distribution models to derive net force through second derivatives. We have validated a new method that measures aerodynamic force in vivo time-resolved directly in freely flying birds which can resolve this question. The validation of the method, using independent force measurements on a quadcopter with pulsating thrust, show the aerodynamic force and impulse are measured within 2% accuracy and time-resolved. We demonstrate results for quad-copters and birds of similar weight and size. The method is scalable and can be applied to both engineered and natural flyers across taxa. The first author invented the method, the second and third authors validated the method and present results for quadcopters and birds.

  9. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft at cruise levels can cause two kinds of contrails, the well known exhaust contrails and the less well-known aerodynamic contrails. While the possible climate impact of exhaust contrails has been studied for many years, research on aerodynamic contrails began only a few years ago and nothing is known about a possible contribution of these ice clouds to climate impact. In order to make progress in this respect, we first need a climatology of their formation conditions and this is given in the present paper. Aerodynamic contrails are defined here as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data: first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation, and how frequently (probability aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Furthermore, we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally, we argue that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  10. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierens, K.; Dilger, F.

    2013-11-01

    Aircraft at cruise levels can cause two kinds of contrails, the well known exhaust contrails and the less well-known aerodynamic contrails. While the possible climate impact of exhaust contrails has been studied for many years, research on aerodynamic contrails began only a few years ago and nothing is known about a possible contribution of these ice clouds to climate impact. In order to make progress in this respect, we first need a climatology of their formation conditions and this is given in the present paper. Aerodynamic contrails are defined here as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data: first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation), and how frequently (probability) aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Furthermore, we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally, we argue that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  11. In vitro inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of size-segregated particulate samples collected during long-range transport of wildfire smoke to Helsinki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of long-range transport (LRT) episodes of wildfire smoke on the inflammogenic and cytotoxic activity of urban air particles was investigated in the mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. The particles were sampled in four size ranges using a modified Harvard high-volume cascade impactor, and the samples were chemically characterized for identification of different emission sources. The particulate mass concentration in the accumulation size range (PM1-0.2) was highly increased during two LRT episodes, but the contents of total and genotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in collected particulate samples were only 10-25% of those in the seasonal average sample. The ability of coarse (PM10-2.5), intermodal size range (PM2.5-1), PM1-0.2 and ultrafine (PM0.2) particles to cause cytokine production (TNFα, IL-6, MIP-2) reduced along with smaller particle size, but the size range had a much smaller impact on induced nitric oxide (NO) production and cytotoxicity or apoptosis. The aerosol particles collected during LRT episodes had a substantially lower activity in cytokine production than the corresponding particles of the seasonal average period, which is suggested to be due to chemical transformation of the organic fraction during aging. However, the episode events were associated with enhanced inflammogenic and cytotoxic activities per inhaled cubic meter of air due to the greatly increased particulate mass concentration in the accumulation size range, which may have public health implications

  12. Body size and geographic range do not explain long term variation in fish populations: a Bayesian phylogenetic approach to testing assembly processes in stream fish assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Jacquemin

    Full Text Available We combine evolutionary biology and community ecology to test whether two species traits, body size and geographic range, explain long term variation in local scale freshwater stream fish assemblages. Body size and geographic range are expected to influence several aspects of fish ecology, via relationships with niche breadth, dispersal, and abundance. These traits are expected to scale inversely with niche breadth or current abundance, and to scale directly with dispersal potential. However, their utility to explain long term temporal patterns in local scale abundance is not known. Comparative methods employing an existing molecular phylogeny were used to incorporate evolutionary relatedness in a test for covariation of body size and geographic range with long term (1983 - 2010 local scale population variation of fishes in West Fork White River (Indiana, USA. The Bayesian model incorporating phylogenetic uncertainty and correlated predictors indicated that neither body size nor geographic range explained significant variation in population fluctuations over a 28 year period. Phylogenetic signal data indicated that body size and geographic range were less similar among taxa than expected if trait evolution followed a purely random walk. We interpret this as evidence that local scale population variation may be influenced less by species-level traits such as body size or geographic range, and instead may be influenced more strongly by a taxon's local scale habitat and biotic assemblages.

  13. Size-controlled synthesis of near-monodisperse gold nanoparticles in the 1-4 nm range using polymeric stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Graham, Susan; Wang, Zhenxin; Tan, Bien; Sherrington, David C; Rannard, Steven P; Cooper, Andrew I; Brust, Mathias

    2005-11-30

    We report here a simple one-step protocol for the preparation of near-monodisperse gold hydrosols in the small size regime (<5 nm). The particle size can be controlled by varying the concentration of the stabilizing polymer, which can be readily displaced by thiol ligands to yield monolayer protected clusters of the usual type. PMID:16305218

  14. Determining Sample Size with a Given Range of Mean Effects in One-Way Heteroscedastic Analysis of Variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen; Jan, Show-Li

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined 2 approaches for determining the required sample size of Welch's test for detecting equality of means when the greatest difference between any 2 group means is given. It is shown that the actual power obtained with the sample size of the suggested approach is consistently at least as great as the nominal power. However,…

  15. Fluorescent or not? Size-dependent fluorescence switching for polymer-stabilized gold clusters in the 1.1-1.7 nm size range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Nicolas; Tan, Bien; Dickinson, Calum; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Laromaine, Anna; McComb, David W; Stevens, Molly M; Wang, Yiqian; Petit, Laure; Barentin, Catherine; Spiller, David G; Cooper, Andrew I; Lévy, Raphaël

    2008-09-14

    The synthesis of fluorescent water-soluble gold nanoparticles by the reduction of a gold salt in the presence of a designed polymer ligand is described, the size and fluorescence of the particles being controlled by the polymer to gold ratio; the most fluorescent nanomaterial has a 3% quantum yield, a 1.1 nm gold core and a 6.9 nm hydrodynamic radius. PMID:18758601

  16. Computational electromagnetic-aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Joseph J S

    2016-01-01

    Presents numerical algorithms, procedures, and techniques required to solve engineering problems relating to the interactions between electromagnetic fields, fluid flow, and interdisciplinary technology for aerodynamics, electromagnetics, chemical-physics kinetics, and plasmadynamics This book addresses modeling and simulation science and technology for studying ionized gas phenomena in engineering applications. Computational Electromagnetic-Aerodynamics is organized into ten chapters. Chapter one to three introduce the fundamental concepts of plasmadynamics, chemical-physics of ionization, classical magnetohydrodynamics, and their extensions to plasma-based flow control actuators, high-speed flows of interplanetary re-entry, and ion thrusters in space exploration. Chapter four to six explain numerical algorithms and procedures for solving Maxwell’s equation in the time domain for computational electromagnetics, plasma wave propagation, and the time-dependent c mpressible Navier-Stokes equation for aerodyn...

  17. Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its second edition, it has been entirely updated and substantially extended to reflect advances in technology, research into rotor aerodynamics and the structural...... response of the wind turbine structure. Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element...... Momentum method is also covered, as are eigenmodes and the dynamic behavior of a turbine. The new material includes a description of the effects of the dynamics and how this can be modeled in an aeroelastic code, which is widely used in the design and verification of modern wind turbines. Further, the...

  18. Interregional comparison of the size-structure of populations of Melaleuca quinquenervia in its native and exotic range, with and without biocontrol agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    We compare size structure and rates of recruitment and mortality in populations of Melaleuca quinquenervia in its native and exotic ranges. In the exotic range study sites were chosen to include contrasts in presence and abundance of two biological control agents. We tagged and measured (DBH) all ...

  19. aerodynamics and heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Rajadas

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary optimization procedure, with the integration of aerodynamic and heat transfer criteria, has been developed for the design of gas turbine blades. Two different optimization formulations have been used. In the first formulation, the maximum temperature in the blade section is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint is imposed on the blade average temperature and a lower bound constraint is imposed on the blade tangential force coefficient. In the second formulation, the blade average and maximum temperatures are chosen as objective functions. In both formulations, bounds are imposed on the velocity gradients at several points along the surface of the airfoil to eliminate leading edge velocity spikes which deteriorate aerodynamic performance. Shape optimization is performed using the blade external and coolant path geometric parameters as design variables. Aerodynamic analysis is performed using a panel code. Heat transfer analysis is performed using the finite element method. A gradient based procedure in conjunction with an approximate analysis technique is used for optimization. The results obtained using both optimization techniques are compared with a reference geometry. Both techniques yield significant improvements with the multiobjective formulation resulting in slightly superior design.

  20. Aerodynamic data of space vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Weiland, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The capacity and quality of the atmospheric flight performance of space flight vehicles is characterized by their aerodynamic data bases. A complete aerodynamic data base would encompass the coefficients of the static longitudinal and lateral motions and the related dynamic coefficients. In this book the aerodynamics of 27 vehicles are considered. Only a few of them did really fly. Therefore the aerodynamic data bases are often not complete, in particular when the projects or programs were more or less abruptly stopped, often due to political decisions. Configurational design studies or the development of demonstrators usually happen with reduced or incomplete aerodynamic data sets. Therefore some data sets base just on the application of one of the following tools: semi-empirical design methods, wind tunnel tests, numerical simulations. In so far a high percentage of the data presented is incomplete and would have to be verified. Flight mechanics needs the aerodynamic coefficients as function of a lot of var...

  1. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.

  2. Influence of Grain Size Distribution on the Mechanical Behavior of Light Alloys in Wide Range of Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir A.; Skripnyak, Natalia V.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.

    2015-06-01

    Inelastic deformation and damage at the mesoscale level of ultrafine grained (UFG) Al 1560 aluminum and Ma2-1 magnesium alloys with distribution of grain size were investigated in wide loading conditions by experimental and computer simulation methods. The computational multiscale models of representative volume element (RVE) with the unimodal and bimodal grain size distributions were developed using the data of structure researches aluminum and magnesium UFG alloys. The critical fracture stress of UFG alloys on mesoscale level depends on relative volumes of coarse grains. Microcracks nucleation at quasi-static and dynamic loading is associated with strain localization in UFG partial volumes with bimodal grain size distribution. Microcracks arise in the vicinity of coarse and ultrafine grains boundaries. It is revealed that the occurrence of bimodal grain size distributions causes the increasing of UFG alloys ductility, but decreasing of the tensile strength. The increasing of fine precipitations concentration not only causes the hardening but increasing of ductility of UFG alloys with bimodal grain size distribution. This research carried out in 2014-2015 was supported by grant from ``The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program''.

  3. Closely related species of birds differ more in body size when their ranges overlap--in warm, but not cool, climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothwell, Emma; Montgomerie, Robert; Lougheed, Stephen C; Martin, Paul R

    2015-07-01

    Differences in body size are widely thought to allow closely related species to coexist in sympatry, but body size also varies as an adaptive response to climate. Here, we use a sister lineage approach to test the prediction that body size differences between closely related species of birds worldwide are greater for species whose ranges are sympatric rather than allopatric. We further test if body size differences among sympatric versus allopatric species vary with geography, evolutionary distance, and environmental temperatures. We find greater differences in size among sympatric compared with allopatric lineages, but only in closely related species that live where mean annual temperatures are above 25°C. These size differences in warm environments declined with the evolutionary distance between sister lineages. In species living in cooler regions, closely related allopatric and sympatric species did not differ significantly in size, suggesting either that colder temperatures constrain the evolutionary divergence of size in sympatry, or that the biotic selective pressures favoring size differences in sympatry are weaker in colder environments. Our results are consistent with suggestions by Wallace, Darwin, and Dobzhansky that climatic selective pressures are more important in cooler environments (e.g., high elevations and latitudes) whereas biotic selective pressures dominate in warm environments (e.g., lowland tropics). PMID:26085317

  4. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Martin O L

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design a classical pitch and torque regulator to control rotational speed and power, while the section on structural dynamics has been extended with a simplified mechanical system explaining the phenomena of forward and backward whirling modes. Readers will also benefit from a new chapter on Vertical Axis W

  5. The aerodynamics of the beautiful game

    OpenAIRE

    Bush, John W. M.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the aerodynamics of football, specifically, the interaction between a ball in flight and the ambient air. Doing so allows one to account for the characteristic range and trajectories of balls in flight, as well as their anomalous deflections as may be induced by striking the ball either with or without spin. The dynamics of viscous boundary layers is briefly reviewed, its critical importance on the ball trajectories highlighted. The Magnus effect responsible for the anomalous curv...

  6. How do low dispersal species establish large range sizes? The case of the water beetle Graphoderus bilineatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars Lønsmann; Rannap, Riinu; Thomsen, Philip Francis;

    2013-01-01

    Species’ dispersal abilities have been considered a major driving force in establishment and maintenance of large range sizes. However, recent studies question the general validity of this relationship because the relationship between dispersal ability and range size might in some cases be less....... bilineatus depended on landscape connectivity, distance to a possible source habitat, and stability of the site; however, specificity of habitat characteristics was not vital for the species. We reason that the large range of G. bilineatus is best explained by the historical combination of lakes, river...... measures for G. bilineatus and similar philopatric species. Instead, conservation actions should be focused at the landscape level to ensure a long-term viability of such species across their range....

  7. Climate change velocity since the Last Glacial Maximum and its importance for patterns of species richness and range size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven; Arge, Lars Allan; Svenning, J.-C.

    fully occupy suitable habitat, or when local diversification rates are depressed by local population extinctions and changing selective regimes. Locations with long-term climate instability should therefore show reduced species richness with small-ranged species particularly missing from the community...... predictions using global data on mammal and amphibian distributions. Consistent with our predictions, richness of small-ranged species of both groups was negatively associated with velocity. Velocity generally explained more variation in richness than did the simple climate anomaly. Climate velocity appears...

  8. Aerodynamics of a hybrid airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andan, Amelda Dianne; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of a numerical study of the aerodynamic parameters of a wingless and a winged-hull airship. The total forces and moment coefficients of the airships have been computed over a range of angles. The results obtained show that addition of a wing to a conventional airship increases the lift has three times the lifting force at positive angle of attack as compared to a wingless airship whereas the drag increases in the range of 19% to 58%. The longitudinal and directional stabilities were found to be statically stable, however, both the conventional airship and the hybrid or winged airships were found to have poor rolling stability. Wingless airship has slightly higher longitudinal stability than a winged airship. The winged airship has better directional stability than the wingless airship. The wingless airship only possesses static rolling stability in the range of yaw angles of -5° to 5°. On the contrary, the winged airship initially tested does not possess rolling stability at all. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations show that modifications to the wing placement and its dihedral have strong positive effect on the rolling stability. Raising the wings to the center of gravity and introducing a dihedral angle of 5° stabilizes the rolling motion of the winged airship.

  9. Seasonality, weather and climate affect home range size in roe deer across a wide latitudinal gradient within Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morellet, N.; Bonenfant, Ch.; Börger, L.; Ossi, F.; Cagnacci, F.; Heurich, M.; Kjellander, P.; Linnell, J. D. C.; Nicoloso, S.; Šustr, Pavel; Urbano, F.; Mysterud, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 6 (2013), s. 1326-1339. ISSN 0021-8790 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : animal movements * day length * large herbivore * ranging behaviour * spatiotemporal variation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.726, year: 2013

  10. Magnetic properties of synthetic analogues of pyrrhotite ore in the grain size range 1-24μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, W.; Hoffmann, V.; Chouker, A. C.; Soffel, H. C.; Menyeh, A.

    2000-09-01

    Iron and sulphur in proportions appropriate to Fe7S8 were reacted in evacuated quartz tubes for 24hr at 500°C. Quenching produces predominantly hexagonal pyrrhotite, whereas further prolonged annealing at 250°C produces monoclinic pyrrhotite. We mainly report the properties of material cooled from 500°C at 10°Cmin-1, which is predominantly monoclinic but probably contains hexagonal pyrrhotite together with pyrite, FeS2. This material, which we refer to as `non-ideal' pyrrhotite, may be a better analogue of pyrrhotite ore than ideal synthetic monoclinic pyrrhotite. The samples were characterized by X-ray, Mössbauer effect and thermomagnetic analyses. The slow-cooled non-ideal monoclinic pyrrhotite exhibits thermal stability intermediate between monoclinic and hexagonal pyrrhotites. One striking observation is that the deviation from ideal monoclinic pyrrhotite increases with decreasing particle size. Particles about 1μm in size have a low saturation magnetization value of about 6Am2kg-1, indicating a lower concentration of ferrimagnetic monoclinic pyrrhotite (saturation magnetization 18Am2kg-1) than particles of about 6μm and above (saturation magnetization 12Am2kg-1). On the other hand, magnetization process parameters-coercive force, ratio of saturation remanence to saturation magnetization, coercive force of remanence, median destructive and inductive fields, the magnetic susceptibility-follow well-behaved power law dependences on particle size, similar to monoclinic pyrrhotite. Magnetic domain patterns in the slow-cooled non-ideal pyrrhotite are similar in type and style to those observed in synthetic monoclinic pyrrhotite and in natural pyrrhotite particles in rocks. Dynamic observations of domain walls in changing external alternating and direct magnetic fields are consistent with macroscopic observations of magnetization change with field. The critical size for the monodomain/multidomain transition in synthetic monoclinic pyrrhotite, at about 1μm, is

  11. The effect of kauri (Agathis australis) on grain size distribution and clay mineralogy of andesitic soils in the Waitakere Ranges, New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongkind, A.G.; Buurman, P.

    2006-01-01

    Kauri (Agathis australis) is generally associated with intense podzolisation, but little research has been carried out to substantiate this. We studied soil profiles, grain size distribution patterns and clay mineralogy under kauri and broadleaf/tree fern vegetation in the Waitakere Ranges, North Is

  12. Introduction to transonic aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Written to teach students the nature of transonic flow and its mathematical foundation, this book offers a much-needed introduction to transonic aerodynamics. The authors present a quantitative and qualitative assessment of subsonic, supersonic, and transonic flow around bodies in two and three dimensions. The book reviews the governing equations and explores their applications and limitations as employed in modeling and computational fluid dynamics.  Some concepts, such as shock and expansion theory, are examined from a numerical perspective. Others, including shock-boundary-layer interaction, are discussed from a qualitative point of view. The book includes 60 examples and more than 200 practice problems. The authors also offer analytical methods such as Method of Characteristics (MOC) that allow readers to practice with the subject matter.  The result is a wealth of insight into transonic flow phenomena and their impact on aircraft design, including compressibility effects, shock and expansion waves, sho...

  13. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design...... Wind Turbines (VAWT). Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element Momentum...... method is also covered, as are eigenmodes and the dynamic behaviour of a turbine. The book describes the effects of the dynamics and how this can be modelled in an aeroelastic code, which is widely used in the design and verification of modern wind turbines. Furthermore, it examines how to calculate the...

  14. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  15. Wind turbine wake aerodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeer, L.J. [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands). Section Wind Energy; Sorensen, J.N. [Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Crespo, A. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dpto. de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica

    2003-10-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions. For the far wake, the survey focuses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines. The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines. (author)

  16. Cable Aerodynamic Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, Kenneth

    categorization of the different control technics together with an identification of two key mechanisms for reduction of the design drag force. During this project extensive experimental work examining the aerodynamics of the currently used cable surface modifications together with new innovative proposals have...... drag force due to the high intensity of streamwise vorticity, whereas the helical fillets resulted in a more gradual flow transition because of the spanwise variation. During yawed flow conditions, the asymmetrical appearance of the helical solution was found to induce a significant lift force with a...... were tested. While a proper discrete helical arrangement of Cylindrical Vortex Generators resulted in a superior drag performance, only systems applying "mini-strakes" were capable of complete rivulet suppression. When the strakes was positioned in a staggered helical arrangement, the innovative system...

  17. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide with a long-range order and tunable cell sizes by phosphoric acid anodization on pre-patterned substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawathanawises, Krissada; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has been explored for various applications due to its regular cell arrangement and relatively easy fabrication processes. However, conventional two-step anodization based on self-organization only allows the fabrication of a few discrete cell sizes and formation of small domains of hexagonally packed pores. Recent efforts to pre-pattern aluminum followed with anodization significantly improve the regularity and available pore geometries in AAO, while systematic study of the anodization condition, especially the impact of acid composition on pore formation guided by nanoindentation is still lacking. In this work, we pre-patterned aluminium thin films using ordered monolayers of silica beads and formed porous AAO in a single-step anodization in phosphoric acid. Controllable cell sizes ranging from 280 nm to 760 nm were obtained, matching the diameters of the silica nanobead molds used. This range of cell size is significantly greater than what has been reported for AAO formed in phosphoric acid in the literature. In addition, the relationships between the acid concentration, cell size, pore size, anodization voltage and film growth rate were studied quantitatively. The results are consistent with the theory of oxide formation through an electrochemical reaction. Not only does this study provide useful operational conditions of nanoindentation induced anodization in phosphoric acid, it also generates significant information for fundamental understanding of AAO formation. PMID:24535886

  18. The Clark Phase-able Sample Size Problem: Long-Range Phasing and Loss of Heterozygosity in GWAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldórsson, Bjarni V.; Aguiar, Derek; Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    A phase transition is taking place today. The amount of data generated by genome resequencing technologies is so large that in some cases it is now less expensive to repeat the experiment than to store the information generated by the experiment. In the next few years it is quite possible that millions of Americans will have been genotyped. The question then arises of how to make the best use of this information and jointly estimate the haplotypes of all these individuals. The premise of the paper is that long shared genomic regions (or tracts) are unlikely unless the haplotypes are identical by descent (IBD), in contrast to short shared tracts which may be identical by state (IBS). Here we estimate for populations, using the US as a model, what sample size of genotyped individuals would be necessary to have sufficiently long shared haplotype regions (tracts) that are identical by descent (IBD), at a statistically significant level. These tracts can then be used as input for a Clark-like phasing method to obtain a complete phasing solution of the sample. We estimate in this paper that for a population like the US and about 1% of the people genotyped (approximately 2 million), tracts of about 200 SNPs long are shared between pairs of individuals IBD with high probability which assures the Clark method phasing success. We show on simulated data that the algorithm will get an almost perfect solution if the number of individuals being SNP arrayed is large enough and the correctness of the algorithm grows with the number of individuals being genotyped.

  19. Use of bionic inspired surfaces for aerodynamic drag reduction on motor vehicle body panels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-wen SONG; Guo-geng ZHANG; Yun WANG; Shu-gen HU

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the successful applications of biological non-smoothness,we introduced bionic non-smooth surfaces as appendices into vehicle body design,aiming to further reduce aerodynamic drag.The size range of the non-smooth units with pits and grooves was determined according to our analysis with the mechanisms underlying non-smooth unit mediated aerodynamic drag reduction.The bionic non-smooth units reported here were designed to adapt the structure of a given vehicle body from the point of boundary layer control that reduces the burst and the loss of turbulent kinetic energy.The engine cover lid and vehicle body cap were individually treated with the non-smooth units,and the treated vehicles were subjected to aerodynamic drag coefficient simulation tests using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis method.The simulation results showed that,in comparison with smooth surfaces,properly designed non-smooth surfaces can have greater effects on drag reduction.The mechanism underlying drag reduction mediated by non-smooth surfaces was revealed by further analyses,in which the effects of non-smooth and smooth surfaces were directly compared.

  20. Aerodynamics profile not in stationary flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Загорулько

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available  Consider the question about influence of unsteady flight on the size of drag and lift coefficients of theaerodynamic profile. Distinctive features of this investigation are obtaining data about aerodynamic drag chancing in process unsteady on high angle at attack and oscillation profile in subsonic and transonic flight. Given analysis of oscillation profile show, that dynamic loops accompany change of lift and dray force. The researches show that it is necessary to clarity the mathematic model of the airplane flight dynamics by introducing numbers, with take into account unsteady effects.

  1. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Hefner, Jerry N.

    2000-01-01

    Investments in aeronautics research and technology have declined substantially over the last decade, in part due to the perception that technologies required in aircraft design are fairly mature and readily available. This perception is being driven by the fact that aircraft configurations, particularly the transport aircraft, have evolved only incrementally, over last several decades. If however, one considers that the growth in air travel is expected to triple in the next 20 years, it becomes quickly obvious that the evolutionary development of technologies is not going to meet the increased demands for safety, environmental compatibility, capacity, and economic viability. Instead, breakthrough technologies will he required both in traditional disciplines of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, materials, controls, and avionics as well as in the multidisciplinary integration of these technologies into the design of future aerospace vehicles concepts. The paper discusses challenges and opportunities in the field of aerodynamics over the next decade. Future technology advancements in aerodynamics will hinge on our ability, to understand, model, and control complex, three-dimensional, unsteady viscous flow across the speed range. This understanding is critical for developing innovative flow and noise control technologies and advanced design tools that will revolutionize future aerospace vehicle systems and concepts. Specifically, the paper focuses on advanced vehicle concepts, flow and noise control technologies, and advanced design and analysis tools.

  2. Naval Aerodynamics Test Facility (NATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NATF specializes in Aerodynamics testing of scaled and fullsized Naval models, research into flow physics found on US Navy planes and ships, aerosol testing and...

  3. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  4. Aerodynamic characteristics of popcorn ash particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkaduvasala, V.; Murphy, D.W.; Ban, H.; Harrison, K.E.; Monroe, L.S. [University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Popcorn ash particles are fragments of sintered coal fly ash masses that resemble popcorn in low apparent density. They can travel with the flow in the furnace and settle on key places such as catalyst surfaces. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are often used in the design process to prevent the carryover and settling of these particles on catalysts. Particle size, density, and drag coefficient are the most important aerodynamic parameters needed in CFD modeling of particle flow. The objective of this study was to experimentally determine particle size, shape, apparent density, and drag characteristics for popcorn ash particles from a coal-fired power plant. Particle size and shape were characterized by digital photography in three orthogonal directions and by computer image analysis. Particle apparent density was determined by volume and mass measurements. Particle terminal velocities in three directions were measured in water and each particle was also weighed in air and in water. The experimental data were analyzed and models were developed for equivalent sphere and equivalent ellipsoid with apparent density and drag coefficient distributions. The method developed in this study can be used to characterize the aerodynamic properties of popcorn-like particles.

  5. Introduction to wind turbine aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffarczyk, Alois Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wind-Turbine Aerodynamics is a self-contained textbook which shows how to come from the basics of fluid mechanics to modern wind turbine blade design. It presents a fundamentals of fluid dynamics and inflow conditions, and gives a extensive introduction into theories describing the aerodynamics of wind turbines. After introducing experiments the book applies the knowledge to explore the impact on blade design.The book is an introduction for professionals and students of very varying levels.

  6. Sharp Hypervelocity Aerodynamic Research Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Jeffrey; Kolodziej, Paul; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this flight demonstration is to deploy a slender-body hypervelocity aerodynamic research probe (SHARP) from an orbiting platform using a tether, deorbit and fly it along its aerothermal performance constraint, and recover it intact in mid-air. To accomplish this objective, two flight demonstrations are proposed. The first flight uses a blunt-body, tethered reentry experiment vehicle (TREV) to prove out tethered deployment technology for accurate entries, a complete SHARP electronics suite, and a new soft mid-air helicopter recovery technique. The second flight takes advantage of this launch and recovery capability to demonstrate revolutionary sharp body concepts for hypervelocity vehicles, enabled by new Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) recently developed by Ames Research Center. Successful demonstration of sharp body hypersonic vehicle technologies could have radical impact on space flight capabilities, including: enabling global reentry cross range capability from Station, eliminating reentry communications blackout, and allowing new highly efficient launch systems incorporating air breathing propulsion and zeroth staging.

  7. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  8. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird. Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust – two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc., and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  9. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird). Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust - two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc.), and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  10. Experimental Study of Effects of Tail Wings on Submunition Aerodynamic Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海福; 李向荣

    2004-01-01

    Aimed at the needs of deceleration of submunitions dispensed from the ballistic missile, wind tunnel tests were performed on the submunitions with different tail wing sizes at the Mach number range from 0.7 to 3.0 and the angle of attack range from 0° to 14°. Experimental data about the variance of aerodynamic coefficients with the Mach number and angle of attack were obtained systemically. The effects of the tail wing sizes on the drag coefficients and the center of pressure coefficients were discussed. Analyzed results show the arc tail wings designed are beneficial to both the deceleration effect and static stability. These results are significant to the tail wing design and its applications to the submunitions deceleration.

  11. The space shuttle ascent vehicle aerodynamic challenges configuration design and data base development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, C. C.; Young, J. C.; Roberts, B. B.; Craig, M. K.; Hamilton, J. T.; Boyle, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    The phase B Space Shuttle systems definition studies resulted in a generic configuration consisting of a delta wing orbiter, and two solid rocket boosters (SRB) attached to an external fuel tank (ET). The initial challenge facing the aerodynamic community was aerodynamically optimizing, within limits, this configuration. As the Shuttle program developed and the sensitivities of the vehicle to aerodynamics were better understood the requirements of the aerodynamic data base grew. Adequately characterizing the vehicle to support the various design studies exploded the size of the data base to proportions that created a data modeling/management challenge for the aerodynamicist. The ascent aerodynamic data base originated primarily from wind tunnel test results. The complexity of the configuration rendered conventional analytic methods of little use. Initial wind tunnel tests provided results which included undesirable effects from model support tructure, inadequate element proximity, and inadequate plume simulation. The challenge to improve the quality of test results by determining the extent of these undesirable effects and subsequently develop testing techniques to eliminate them was imposed on the aerodynamic community. The challenges to the ascent aerodynamics community documented are unique due to the aerodynamic complexity of the Shuttle launch. Never before was such a complex vehicle aerodynamically characterized. The challenges were met with innovative engineering analyses/methodology development and wind tunnel testing techniques.

  12. Computational methods for aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Five methods to increase the computational efficiency of aerodynamic design using numerical optimization, by reducing the computer time required to perform gradient calculations, are examined. The most promising method consists of drastically reducing the size of the computational domain on which aerodynamic calculations are made during gradient calculations. Since a gradient calculation requires the solution of the flow about an airfoil whose geometry was slightly perturbed from a base airfoil, the flow about the base airfoil is used to determine boundary conditions on the reduced computational domain. This method worked well in subcritical flow.

  13. Experimental determination of the steady-state charging probabilities and particle size conservation in non-radioactive and radioactive bipolar aerosol chargers in the size range of 5–40 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three bipolar aerosol chargers, an AC-corona (Electrical Ionizer 1090, MSP Corp.), a soft X-ray (Advanced Aerosol Neutralizer 3087, TSI Inc.), and an α-radiation-based 241Am charger (tapcon & analysesysteme), were investigated on their charging performance of airborne nanoparticles. The charging probabilities for negatively and positively charged particles and the particle size conservation were measured in the diameter range of 5–40 nm using sucrose nanoparticles. Chargers were operated under various flow conditions in the range of 0.6–5.0 liters per minute. For particular experimental conditions, some deviations from the chosen theoretical model were found for all chargers. For very small particle sizes, the AC-corona charger showed particle losses at low flow rates and did not reach steady-state charge equilibrium at high flow rates. However, for all chargers, operating conditions were identified where the bipolar charge equilibrium was achieved. Practically, excellent particle size conservation was found for all three chargers

  14. Size-dependent modulation of graphene oxide-aptamer interactions for an amplified fluorescence-based detection of aflatoxin B1 with a tunable dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, JingJing; Li, Zengmei; Zhao, Shancang; Lu, Yi

    2016-06-20

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a common toxin found in many foods. While AFB1 sensors have been reported, few studies have shown amplified detection with tunable dynamic ranges. We herein report a simple and highly sensitive amplified aptamer-based fluorescent sensor for AFB1, which relies on the ability of nano-graphene oxide (GO) to protect aptamers from nuclease cleavage for amplified detection and on the nanometer size effect of GO to tune the dynamic range and sensitivity. The assay was performed by simply mixing the carboxyl-X-rhodamine (ROX)-labeled AFB1 aptamer, the GO, the nuclease, and the AFB1 samples. Modulating the size of the GO nanosheet resulted in three dynamic ranges, i.e., 12.5 to 312.5 ng mL(-1), 1.0 to 100 ng mL(-1), and 5.0 to 50 ng mL(-1), with corresponding limits of detection of 10.0 ng mL(-1), 0.35 ng mL(-1) and 15.0 ng mL(-1), respectively. The sensor was highly selective against other aflatoxins and common molecules in foods, and its performance was verified in corn samples spiked with known concentration of AFB1. PMID:27137348

  15. Three-dimensional carbon foam supported tin oxide nanocrystallites with tunable size range: Sulfonate anchoring synthesis and high rate lithium storage properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yue; Asfaw, Habtom Desta; Edström, Kristina

    2015-10-01

    The development of a free-standing electrode with high rate capability requires the realization of facile electrolyte percolation, fast charge transfer at the electrode-electrolyte interface as well as the intimate electrical wiring to the current collector. Employing a sulfonated high internal phase emulsion polymer (polyHIPE) as the carbon precursor, we developed a free-standing composite of carbon foam encapsulated SnO2 nanocrystallites, which simultaneously satisfies the aforementioned requirements. When directly evaluated in the pouch cell without using the binder, carbon additive or metallic current collector, the best performing composite exhibits a good rate performance up to 8 A g-1 and very stable cyclability for 250 cycles. This cycling performance was attributed to the synergistic coupling of hierarchical macro/mesoporous carbon foam and SnO2 nanocrystals with optimized size range. Postmortem characterizations unveiled the significant influence of subtle size variation of oxides on the electrochemical performance.

  16. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan; Walther, Jens Honore

    The meshless and remeshed Discrete Vortex Method (DVM) has been widely used in academia and by the industry to model two-dimensional flow around bluff bodies. The implementation “DVMFLOW” [1] is used by the bridge design company COWI to determine and visualise the flow field around bridge sections......, and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the...... current version of DVMFLOW in a strip wise fashion. Neglecting the aerodynamic admittance, i.e. the correlation of the instantaneous lift force to the turbulent fluctuations in the vertical velocities, leads to higher response to high frequency atmospheric turbulence than would be obtained from wind tunnel...

  17. Investigation of Aerodynamic Capabilities of Flying Fish in Gliding Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Choi, H.

    In the present study, we experimentally investigate the aerodynamic capabilities of flying fish. We consider four different flying fish models, which are darkedged-wing flying fishes stuffed in actual gliding posture. Some morphological parameters of flying fish such as lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins, incidence angles of pectoral and pelvic fins are considered to examine their effect on the aerodynamic performance. We directly measure the aerodynamic properties (lift, drag, and pitching moment) for different morphological parameters of flying fish models. For the present flying fish models, the maximum lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio are similar to those of medium-sized birds such as the vulture, nighthawk and petrel. The pectoral fins are found to enhance the lift-to-drag ratio and the longitudinal static stability of gliding flight. On the other hand, the lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio decrease with increasing lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins.

  18. Aerodynamic study of a blended wing body, comparison with a conventional transport airplane.

    OpenAIRE

    Ayuso Moreno, Luis Manuel; Sant Palma, Rodolfo; Plagaro Pascual, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Blended-wing-body (BWB) aircraft are being studied with interest and effort to improve economic efficiency and to overcome operational and infrastructure related problems associated to the increasing size of conventional transport airplanes. The objective of the research reported here is to assess the aerodynamic feasibility and operational efficiency of a great size, blended wing body layout, a configuration which has many advantages. To this end, the conceptual aerodynamic design process of...

  19. Chemical composition and aerosol size distribution of the middle mountain range in the Nepal Himalayas during the 2009 pre-monsoon season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shrestha

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particle number size distribution and chemical composition were measured at two low altitude sites, one urban and one relatively pristine valley, in Central Nepal during the 2009 pre-monsoon season (May–June. This is the first time that aerosol size distribution and chemical composition were measured simultaneously at lower elevation in the Middle Himalayan region in Nepal. The aerosol size distribution was measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, 14~340 nm, and the chemical composition of the filter samples collected during the field campaign was analyzed in the laboratory. Teflon membrane filters were used for ion chromatography (IC and water-soluble organic carbon and nitrogen analysis. Quartz fiber filters were used for organic carbon and elemental carbon analysis. Multi-lognormal fits to the measured aerosol size distribution indicated a consistent larger mode around 100 nm which is usually the oldest, most processed background aerosol. The smaller mode was located around 20 nm, which is indicative of fresh but not necessarily local aerosol. The diurnal cycle of the aerosol number concentration showed the presence of two peaks (early morning and evening, during the transitional period of boundary layer growth and collapse. The increase in number concentration during the peak period was observed for the entire size distribution. Although the possible contribution of local emissions in size ranges similar to the larger mode cannot be completely ruled out, another plausible explanation is the mixing of aged elevated aerosol in the residual layer during the morning period as suggested by previous studies. Similarly, the evening time concentration peaks when the boundary layer becomes shallow concurrent with increase in local activity. A decrease in aerosol number concentration was observed during the nighttime with the development of cold (downslope mountain winds that force the low level warmer air in the valley to

  20. EV range sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostafew, C. [Azure Dynamics Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation included a sensitivity analysis of electric vehicle components on overall efficiency. The presentation provided an overview of drive cycles and discussed the major contributors to range in terms of rolling resistance; aerodynamic drag; motor efficiency; and vehicle mass. Drive cycles that were presented included: New York City Cycle (NYCC); urban dynamometer drive cycle; and US06. A summary of the findings were presented for each of the major contributors. Rolling resistance was found to have a balanced effect on each drive cycle and proportional to range. In terms of aerodynamic drive, there was a large effect on US06 range. A large effect was also found on NYCC range in terms of motor efficiency and vehicle mass. figs.

  1. Electro-hydrodynamic generation of monodisperse nanoparticles in the sub-10 nm size range from strongly electrolytic salt solutions: governing parameters of scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisser, Anne, E-mail: a.maisser@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Attoui, Michel B. [LISA, UMR CNRS University Paris Est Creteil, University Paris-Diderot (France); Ganan-Calvo, Alfonso M. [Universidad de Sevilla, ESI (Spain); Szymanski, Wladyslaw W. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics (Austria)

    2013-01-15

    A charge reduced electro-hydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) device has been used to generate airborne salt clusters in the sub 10 nm size range. The focus of this study on that specific sub-micron range of electrospray droplets with relatively high electrical conductivities and permittivities aims to address the still existing controversy on the scaling laws of electrosprayed droplet diameters. In this study different concentrations of sodium chloride and potassium chloride-both show strong electrolytic behavior-have been electrosprayed from solutions in pure water, or from aqueous ammonium acetate buffer liquids of varying concentrations. The dry residue salt cluster diameter generated by the EHDA process have been measured using a differential mobility analyzer. The initial droplet diameter has been determined indirectly from the measured particle size following the steps of Chen et al. (J Aerosol Sci 26:963-977, 1995). Results have been compared to existing scaling laws valid for direct droplet measurements. They can be interpreted concisely on the basis of a realistic hypothesis on possible electrochemical effects taking place and affecting the droplet and thus nanoparticle formation in EHDA. The hypothesis developed in this work and the comparison with the experimental results are shown and discussed in the manuscript.

  2. The aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    In the paper we present state-of-the-art of research in wind turbine aerodynamics. We start be giving a brief historical review and a survey over aerodynamic research in wind energy. Next, we focus on some recent research results obtained by our wind energy group at Department of Mechanical...... Engineering at DTU. In particular, we show some new results on the classical problem of the ideal rotor and present a series of new results from an on-going research project dealing with the modelling and simulation of turbulent flow structures in the wake behind wind turbines....

  3. Evaluation of the size segregation of elemental carbon (EC) emission in Europe: influence on the simulation of EC long-range transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Cheng, Ya-Fang; Nordmann, Stephan; Birmili, Wolfram; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Ma, Nan; Wolke, Ralf; Wehner, Birgit; Sun, Jia; Spindler, Gerald; Mu, Qing; Pöschl, Ulrich; Su, Hang; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-02-01

    Elemental Carbon (EC) has a significant impact on human health and climate change. In order to evaluate the size segregation of EC emission in the EUCAARI inventory and investigate its influence on the simulation of EC long-range transportation in Europe, we used the fully coupled online Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry model (WRF-Chem) at a resolution of 2 km focusing on a region in Germany, in conjunction with a high-resolution EC emission inventory. The ground meteorology conditions, vertical structure and wind pattern were well reproduced by the model. The simulations of particle number and/or mass size distributions were evaluated with observations at the central European background site Melpitz. The fine mode particle concentration was reasonably well simulated, but the coarse mode was substantially overestimated by the model mainly due to the plume with high EC concentration in coarse mode emitted by a nearby point source. The comparisons between simulated EC and Multi-angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) measurements at Melpitz, Leipzig-TROPOS and Bösel indicated that the coarse mode EC (ECc) emitted from the nearby point sources might be overestimated by a factor of 2-10. The fraction of ECc was overestimated in the emission inventory by about 10-30 % for Russia and 5-10 % for Eastern Europe (e.g., Poland and Belarus). This incorrect size-dependent EC emission results in a shorter atmospheric life time of EC particles and inhibits the long-range transport of EC. A case study showed that this effect caused an underestimation of 20-40 % in the EC mass concentration in Germany under eastern wind pattern.

  4. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics: Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second subj

  5. Design Oriented Aerodynamic Modelling of Wind Turbine Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a wind turbine aerodynamics model using a Boundary Integral Equation model (BIEM) is presented. The methodology is valid to study inviscid unsteady flows around three dimensional bodies of arbitrary shape and arbitrarily moving with respect to the incoming flow. The extension of this methodology to study viscosity effects in turbine blade flow at high angle of attack is addressed and an approach to determine aerodynamic loads over a wide range of turbine operating conditions is proposed. Numerical applications considering a selected test cases from the NREL experimental dataset are presented. Finally, the application of the proposed turbine aerodynamics model into a multi-disciplinary study including aeroelasticity of pylon-turbine assembly and aeroacoustics modelling of induced noise is briefly described

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics and respiratory deposition of fungal fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Sung-Chul; Schmechel, Detlef; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of fungal fragments and to estimate their respiratory deposition. Fragments and spores of three different fungal species ( Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Stachybotrys chartarum) were aerosolized by the fungal spore source strength tester (FSSST). An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) measured the size distribution in real-time and collected the aerosolized fungal particles simultaneously onto 12 impactor stages in the size range of 0.3-10 μm utilizing water-soluble ZEF-X10 coating of the impaction stages to prevent spore bounce. For S. chartarum, the average concentration of released fungal fragments was 380 particles cm -3, which was about 514 times higher than that of spores. A. versicolor was found to release comparable amount of spores and fragments. Microscopic analysis confirmed that S. chartarum and A. versicolor did not show any significant spore bounce, whereas the size distribution of P. melinii fragments was masked by spore bounce. Respiratory deposition was calculated using a computer-based model, LUDEP 2.07, for an adult male and a 3-month-old infant utilizing the database on the concentration and size distribution of S. chartarum and A. versicolor aerosols measured by the ELPI. Total deposition fractions for fragments and spores were 27-46% and 84-95%, respectively, showing slightly higher values in an infant than in an adult. For S. chartarum, fragments demonstrated 230-250 fold higher respiratory deposition than spores, while the number of deposited fragments and spores of A. versicolor were comparable. It was revealed that the deposition ratio (the number of deposited fragments divided by that of deposited spores) in the lower airways for an infant was 4-5 times higher than that for an adult. As fungal fragments have been shown to contain mycotoxins and antigens, further exposure assessment should include the measurement of fungal fragments for

  7. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; He, Kai-Feng; Qian, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Jiao; Cheng, Yan-Qing; Wu, Kai-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    In view of engineering application, it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components: the static aerodynamics, the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations, and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow. The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms, while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration, the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch, yaw, roll, and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations. The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics, respectively. The results show that: (1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points, but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence, stability, and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously. Furthermore, the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected. It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft. Finally, the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  8. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wang; Kai-Feng He; Wei-Qi Qian; Tian-Jiao Zhang; Yan-Qing Cheng; Kai-Yuan Wu

    2012-01-01

    In view of engineering application,it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components:the static aerodynamics,the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations,and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow.The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms,while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration,the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch,yaw,roll,and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations.The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics,respectively.The results show that:(1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points,but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence,stability,and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously.Furthermore,the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected.It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft.Finally,the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  9. [Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By accelerating a gas containing suspended particles or large molecules through a converging nozzle, the suspended species may be focused and therefore used to write fine lines on a surface. Our objective was to study the limits on how narrow this focal region could be as a function of particle size. We find that, for monodisperse particles with masses mp some 3.6 x 105 times larger than the molecular mass m of the carrier gas (diameters above some 100 angstrom), there is no fundamental obstacle to directly write submicron features. However, this conclusion has been verified experimentally only with particles larger than 0.1 μm. Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies on the defocusing role of Brownian motion for very small particles or heavy molecules have shown that high resolution (purely aerodynamic) focusing is impossible with volatile molecules whose masses are typically smaller than 1000 Dalton. For these, the minimal focal diameter after optimization appears to be 5√(m/mp) times the nozzle diameter dn. But combinations of focused lasers and aerodynamic focusing appear as promising for direct writing with molecular precursors. Theoretical and numerical schemes capable of predicting the evolution of the focusing beam, including Brownian motion effects, have been developed, although further numerical work would be desirable. 11 refs

  10. Wind, waves, and wing loading: morphological specialization may limit range expansion of endangered albatrosses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Suryan

    Full Text Available Among the varied adaptations for avian flight, the morphological traits allowing large-bodied albatrosses to capitalize on wind and wave energy for efficient long-distance flight are unparalleled. Consequently, the biogeographic distribution of most albatrosses is limited to the windiest oceanic regions on earth; however, exceptions exist. Species breeding in the North and Central Pacific Ocean (Phoebastria spp. inhabit regions of lower wind speed and wave height than southern hemisphere genera, and have large intrageneric variation in body size and aerodynamic performance. Here, we test the hypothesis that regional wind and wave regimes explain observed differences in Phoebastria albatross morphology and we compare their aerodynamic performance to representatives from the other three genera of this globally distributed avian family. In the North and Central Pacific, two species (short-tailed P. albatrus and waved P. irrorata are markedly larger, yet have the smallest breeding ranges near highly productive coastal upwelling systems. Short-tailed albatrosses, however, have 60% higher wing loading (weight per area of lift compared to waved albatrosses. Indeed, calculated aerodynamic performance of waved albatrosses, the only tropical albatross species, is more similar to those of their smaller congeners (black-footed P. nigripes and Laysan P. immutabilis, which have relatively low wing loading and much larger foraging ranges that include central oceanic gyres of relatively low productivity. Globally, the aerodynamic performance of short-tailed and waved albatrosses are most anomalous for their body sizes, yet consistent with wind regimes within their breeding season foraging ranges. Our results are the first to integrate global wind and wave patterns with albatross aerodynamics, thereby identifying morphological specialization that may explain limited breeding ranges of two endangered albatross species. These results are further relevant to

  11. Nostril Aerodynamics of Scenting Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, G. S.

    1997-11-01

    Dogs and other scenting animals detect airborne odors with extraordinary sensitivity. Aerodynamic sampling plays a key role, but the literature on olfaction contains little on the external aerodynamics thereof. To shed some light on this, the airflows generated by a scenting dog were visualized using the schlieren technique. It was seen that the dog stops panting in order to scent, since panting produces a turbulent jet which disturbs scent-bearing air currents. Inspiratory airflow enters the nostrils from straight ahead, while expiration is directed to the sides of the nose and downward, as was found elsewhere in the case of rats and rabbits. The musculature and geometry of the dog's nose thus modulates the airflow during scenting. The aerodynamics of a nostril which must act reversibly as both inlet and outlet is briefly discussed. The eventual practical goal of this preliminary work is to achieve a level of understanding of the aerodynamics of canine olfaction sufficient for the design of a mimicking device. (Research supported by the DARPA Unexploded Ordnance Detection and Neutralization Program.)

  12. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  13. Effects of diurnal temperature range on adult size and emergence times from diapausing pupae in Papilio glaucus and p.canadensis (Papilionidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Mark Scriber; Brittany Sonke

    2011-01-01

    With recent climate warming trends,both the increase in thermal variance (i.e.,diurnal temperature range; DTR) as well as increased mean temperature may impact many different organisms,especially poikilothermic invertebrates.Predictions of insect developmental rates using degree-days (thermal unit accumulations above the developmental base threshold of the insect) are based on daily mean temperatures,regardless of DTR.However,non-linearity and variance in the means and extremes are often ignored.The role of thermal variance (e.g.,daily temperature extremes and DTR) was evaluated experimentally for two swallowtail butterfly sister species using a common day/night photoperiod of 18:6 h photo:scoto-phase and corresponding daytime thermophase and nighttime cryophase periods of 22:22℃ (constant 22℃),24:16℃,and 26:10℃ (all three treatments had the same daily mean and the same degree-day accumulations).Although developmental rates ofpost-diapause pupae were largely unaffected for both species,our results show that sizes in P.canadensis females (but not males) were smaller in the treatments with more variance (26℃:10℃) compared to constant 22℃.Such potentially significant impacts of size reduction in P.canadensis females were not observed in P.glaucus males or females under the same series ofthermo-period treatments.

  14. Quasi steady-state aerodynamic model development for race vehicle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a procedure to develop a high fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for use in race car vehicle dynamic simulations. Developed to fit quasi steady-state wind tunnel data, the aerodynamic model is regressed against three independent variables: front ground clearance, rear ride height, and yaw angle. An initial dual range model is presented and then further refined to reduce the model complexity while maintaining a high level of predictive accuracy. The model complexity reduction decreases the required amount of wind tunnel data thereby reducing wind tunnel testing time and cost. The quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for the pitch moment degree of freedom is systematically developed in this paper. This same procedure can be extended to the other five aerodynamic degrees of freedom to develop a complete six degree of freedom quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for any vehicle.

  15. Aerodynamic levitator furnace for measuring thermophysical properties of refractory liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langstaff, D.; Gunn, M.; Greaves, G. N.; Marsing, A.; Kargl, F.

    2013-12-01

    The development of novel contactless aerodynamic laser heated levitation techniques is reported that enable thermophysical properties of refractory liquids to be measured in situ in the solid, liquid, and supercooled liquid state and demonstrated here for alumina. Starting with polished crystalline ruby spheres, we show how, by accurately measuring the changing radius, the known density in the solid state can be reproduced from room temperature to the melting point at 2323 K. Once molten, by coupling the floating liquid drop to acoustic oscillations via the levitating gas, the mechanical resonance and damping of the liquid can be measured precisely with high-speed high-resolution shadow cast imaging. The resonance frequency relates to the surface tension, the decay constant to the viscosity, and the ellipsoidal size and shape of the levitating drop to the density. This unique instrumentation enables these related thermophysical properties to be recorded in situ over the entire liquid and supercooled range of alumina, from the boiling point at 3240 K, until spontaneous crystallization occurs around 1860 K, almost 500 below the melting point. We believe that the utility that this unique instrumentation provides will be applicable to studying these important properties in many other high temperature liquids.

  16. Computational aerodynamic analysis on perimeter reinforced (PR)-compliant wing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Ismail; AH Zulkifli; MZ Abdullah; M Hisyam Basri; Norazharuddin Shah Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Implementing the morphing technique on a micro air vehicle (MAV) wing is a very chal-lenging task, due to the MAV’s wing size limitation and the complex morphing mechanism. As a result, understanding aerodynamic characteristics and flow configurations, subject to wing structure deformation of a morphing wing MAV has remained obstructed. Thus, this paper presents the investigation of structural deformation, aerodynamics performance and flow formation on a pro-posed twist morphing MAV wing design named perimeter reinforced (PR)-compliant wing. The numerical simulation of two-way fluid structure interaction (FSI) investigation consist of a quasi-static aeroelastic structural analysis coupled with 3D incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and shear-stress-transport (RANS-SST) solver utilized throughout this study. Verification of numerical method on a rigid rectangular wing achieves a good correlation with available exper-imental results. A comparative aeroelastic study between PR-compliant to PR and rigid wing per-formance is organized to elucidate the morphing wing performances. Structural deformation results show that PR-compliant wing is able to alter the wing’s geometric twist characteristic, which has directly influenced both the overall aerodynamic performance and flow structure behavior. Despite the superior lift performance result, PR-compliant wing also suffers from massive drag penalty, which has consequently affected the wing efficiency in general. Based on vortices investigation, the results reveal the connection between these aerodynamic performances with vortices formation on PR-compliant wing.

  17. Comparing Aerodynamic Efficiency in Birds and Bats Suggests Better Flight Performance in Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Muijres, Florian T.; L. Christoffer Johansson; Melissa S Bowlin; York Winter; Anders Hedenström

    2012-01-01

    Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed ...

  18. Control of helicopter rotorblade aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabunmi, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of a method for controlling the aerodynamics of helicopter rotorblades using stacks of piezoelectric ceramic plates are presented. A resonant mechanism is proposed for the amplification of the displacements produced by the stack. This motion is then converted into linear displacement for the actuation of the servoflap of the blades. A design which emulates the actuation of the servoflap on the Kaman SH-2F is used to demonstrate the fact that such a system can be designed to produce the necessary forces and velocities needed to control the aerodynamics of the rotorblades of such a helicopter. Estimates of the electrical power requirements are also presented. A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 Program is suggested, whereby a bench-top prototype of the device can be built and tested. A collaborative effort between AEDAR Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation is anticipated for future effort on this project.

  19. Dingoes at the Doorstep: Home Range Sizes and Activity Patterns of Dingoes and Other Wild Dogs around Urban Areas of North-Eastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Alice T.; Leung, Luke K. -P.; Goullet, Mark S.; Gentle, Matthew N.; Allen, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    Simple summary Conflicts with dingoes and other wild dogs are becoming increasingly common in and around urban areas of Australia. A lack of basic information about wild dog movement ecology hampers efficient planning and allocation of resources to mitigate human–wild dog conflicts. We captured, collared and released 37 wild dogs in urban areas of north-eastern Australia to investigate their movement ecology. In general, wild dogs occupied small fragments of bushland within an urban matrix, were active at all times of the day, and lived within a few hundred meters of houses and humans at all times. We conclude that wild dog management strategies in urban areas should focus on the mitigation of impacts at the individual or group level, and not population-level reductions in numbers. Abstract Top-predators around the world are becoming increasingly intertwined with humans, sometimes causing conflict and increasing safety risks in urban areas. In Australia, dingoes and dingo × domestic dog hybrids are common in many urban areas, and pose a variety of human health and safety risks. However, data on urban dingo ecology is scant. We GPS-collared 37 dingoes in north-eastern Australia and continuously monitored them each 30 min for 11–394 days. Most dingoes were nocturnal, with an overall mean home range size of 17.47 km2. Overall mean daily distance travelled was 6.86 km/day. At all times dingoes were within 1000 m of houses and buildings. Home ranges appeared to be constrained to patches of suitable vegetation fragments within and around human habitation. These data can be used to reallocate dingo management effort towards mitigating actual conflicts between humans and dingoes in urban areas. PMID:27537916

  20. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, Paxton K; Parsons, Michael S; Unz, Ronald J; Waggoner, Charles A

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m(3)/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome. PMID:22667655

  1. Aerodynamics of an Axisymmetric Missile Concept Having Cruciform Strakes and In-Line Tail Fins From Mach 0.60 to 4.63, Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jerry M.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed to develop a large force and moment aerodynamic data set on a slender axisymmetric missile configuration having cruciform strakes and in-line control tail fins. The data include six-component balance measurements of the configuration aerodynamics and three-component measurements on all four tail fins. The test variables include angle of attack, roll angle, Mach number, model buildup, strake length, nose size, and tail fin deflection angles to provide pitch, yaw, and roll control. Test Mach numbers ranged from 0.60 to 4.63. The entire data set is presented on a CD-ROM that is attached to this paper. The CD-ROM also includes extensive plots of both the six-component configuration data and the three-component tail fin data. Selected samples of these plots are presented in this paper to illustrate the features of the data and to investigate the effects of the test variables.

  2. WIND TURBINE MASS AND AERODYNAMIC IMBALANCES DETERMINATION

    OpenAIRE

    Nduwayezu Eric; Mehmet Bayrak

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of simulations to investigate wind turbine mass and aerodynamic imbalances. Faults caused by mass and aerodynamic imbalances constitute a significant portion of all faults in wind turbine. The aerodynamic imbalances effects such as deviations between the three blades pitch angle are often underrated and misunderstood. In practice, for many wind energy converters the blade adjustment is found to be sub-optimal. The dynamics of a model wind turbine was s...

  3. The effects of size and period of administration of gold nanoparticles on rheological parameters of blood plasma of rats over a wide range of shear rates: In vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhalim Mohamed Anwar K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood viscosity appears to be independent predictor of stroke, carotid intima-media thickening, atherosclerosis and most cardiovascular diseases. In an attempt to understand the toxicity and the potential threat of GNPs therapeutic and diagnostic use, an array of rheological parameters were performed to quantify the blood plasma response to different sizes and administration periods of GNPs over a wide range of shear rates. Methods Healthy, thirty male Wistar-Kyoto rats, 8-12 weeks old (approximately 250 g body weight were divided into control group (NG: n = 10, group 1 (G1A: intraperitoneal infusion of 10 nm GNPs for 3 days, n = 5 and G1B: intraperitoneal infusion of 10 nm GNPs for 7 days, n = 5, group 2 (G2A: intraperitoneal infusion of 50 nm GNPs for 3 days, n = 5 and G2B: intraperitoneal infusion of 50 nm GNPs for 7 days, n = 5. Dose of 100 μl of GNPs was administered to the animals via intraperitoneal injection. Blood samples of nearly 1 ml were obtained from each rat. Various rheological parameters such as torque, shear stress, shear rate, viscosity, plastic velocity, yield stress, consistency index (k and flow index (n were measured in the blood plasma of rats after the intraperitoneal administration of 10 and 50 nm GNP for 3 and 7 days using Brookfield LVDV-III Programmable rheometer. Results The relationship between shear stress and shear rate for control, G1A, G1B, G2A and G2B was linearly related. The plastic viscosity and the yield stress values for G1A, G1B, G2A and G2B significantly (p Conclusions At these particular shear rates, the estimated rheological parameters are not influenced by GNPs size and shape, number of NPs, surface area and administration period of GNPs. This study demonstrates that the highly decrease in blood plasma viscosity was accompanied with the smaller 10 nm GNPs compared with the 50 nm GNPs. The decrease in blood plasma viscosity induced with 10 and 50 nm GNPs may be attributed to

  4. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics: Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Schepers, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second subject considers the (wake) flow within a wind farm. For both areas calculational models have been developed which are implemented i rotor design and wind farm design codes respectively. Accurate roto...

  5. Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities, Equipment, and Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The following facilities, equipment, and capabilities are available in the Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities and Equipment (1) Subsonic, open-jet wind tunnel with...

  6. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project will focus on the development and demonstration of hypersonic inflatable aeroshell technologies...

  7. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan;

    The meshless and remeshed Discrete Vortex Method (DVM) has been widely used in academia and by the industry to model two-dimensional flow around bluff bodies. The implementation “DVMFLOW” [1] is used by the bridge design company COWI to determine and visualise the flow field around bridge sections, ...... solution for the admittance of a turbulent flow past a flat plate [4] and two types of bridge girder sections. A fair agreement is observed for sufficiently low turbulence intensities and sufficient spatial and temporal resolutions.......The meshless and remeshed Discrete Vortex Method (DVM) has been widely used in academia and by the industry to model two-dimensional flow around bluff bodies. The implementation “DVMFLOW” [1] is used by the bridge design company COWI to determine and visualise the flow field around bridge sections......, and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the...

  8. Selected advanced aerodynamics and active controls technology concepts development on a derivative B-747 aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Analytical design and wind tunnel test evaluations covering the feasibility of applying wing tip extensions, winglets, and active control wing had alleviation to the model B747 are described. Aerodynamic improvement offered by wing tip extension and winglet individually, and the combined aerodynamic and weight improvements when wing load alleviation is combined with the tip extension or the winglet are evaluated. Results are presented in the form of incremental effects on weight mission range, fuel usage, cost, and airline operating economics.

  9. The basic aerodynamics of floatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M.J.; Wood, D.H.

    1983-09-01

    The original derivation of the basic theory governing the aerodynamics of both hovercraft and modern floatation ovens, requires the validity of some extremely crude assumptions. However, the basic theory is surprisingly accurate. It is shown that this accuracy occurs because the final expression of the basic theory can be derived by approximating the full Navier-Stokes equations in a manner that clearly shows the limitations of the theory. These limitations are used in discussing the relatively small discrepancies between the theory and experiment, which may not be significant for practical purposes.

  10. Elemental study of aerodynamic profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In teaching fluid Mechanics, it would be convenient to provide the students with simple theoretical tools which allow them to deal with real and of technological interest situations. For instance, the apparently simple fluid motion around wing sections of arbitrary shape can not be overcome by using the mathematical methods available for students. In this article we present a simple theoretical procedure to analyze this problem. In the proposed method the role played by the analytical and numerical calculations are greatly reduced in order to emphasize the purely aerodynamic concepts. (Author) 3 refs. 001ES0100130

  11. Numerical and Experimental Investigations on the Aerodynamic Characteristic of Three Typical Passenger Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yiping wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiment were employed to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of three typical rear shapes: fastback, notchback and squareback. The object was to investigate the sensibility of aerodynamic characteristic to the rear shape, and provide more comprehensive experimental data as a reference to validate the numerical simulation. In the wind tunnel experiments, the aerodynamic six components of the three models with the yaw angles range from -15 and 15 were measured. The realizable k-ε model was employed to compute the aerodynamic drag, lift and surface pressure distribution at a zero yaw angle. In order to improve the calculation efficiency and accuracy, a hybrid Tetrahedron-Hexahedron-Pentahedral-Prism mesh strategy was used to discretize the computational domain. The computational results showed a good agreement with the experimental data and the results revealed that different rear shapes would induce very different aerodynamic characteristic, and it was difficult to determine the best shape. For example, the fastback would obtain very low aerodynamic drag, but it would induce positive lift which was not conducive to stability at high speed, and it also would induce bad crosswind stability. In order to reveal the internal connection between the aerodynamic drag and wake vortices, the turbulent kinetic, recirculation length, position of vortex core and velocity profile in the wake were investigated by numerical simulation and PIV experiment.

  12. Analytical Aerodynamic Simulation Tools for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wind power is a renewable energy source that is today the fastest growing solution to reduce CO2 emissions in the electric energy mix. Upwind horizontal axis wind turbine with three blades has been the preferred technical choice for more than two decades. This horizontal axis concept is today widely leading the market. The current PhD thesis will cover an alternative type of wind turbine with straight blades and rotating along the vertical axis. A brief overview of the main differences between the horizontal and vertical axis concept has been made. However the main focus of this thesis is the aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades. Making aerodynamically efficient turbines starts with efficient blades. Making efficient blades requires a good understanding of the physical phenomena and effective simulations tools to model them. The specific aerodynamics for straight bladed vertical axis turbine flow are reviewed together with the standard aerodynamic simulations tools that have been used in the past by blade and rotor designer. A reasonably fast (regarding computer power) and accurate (regarding comparison with experimental results) simulation method was still lacking in the field prior to the current work. This thesis aims at designing such a method. Analytical methods can be used to model complex flow if the geometry is simple. Therefore, a conformal mapping method is derived to transform any set of section into a set of standard circles. Then analytical procedures are generalized to simulate moving multibody sections in the complex vertical flows and forces experienced by the blades. Finally the fast semi analytical aerodynamic algorithm boosted by fast multipole methods to handle high number of vortices is coupled with a simple structural model of the rotor to investigate potential aeroelastic instabilities. Together with these advanced simulation tools, a standard double multiple streamtube model has been developed and used to design several straight bladed

  13. Swept-Wing Ice Accretion Characterization and Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Riley, James T.; Villedieu, Philippe; Moens, Frederic; Bragg, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    NASA, FAA, ONERA, the University of Illinois and Boeing have embarked on a significant, collaborative research effort to address the technical challenges associated with icing on large-scale, three-dimensional swept wings. The overall goal is to improve the fidelity of experimental and computational simulation methods for swept-wing ice accretion formation and resulting aerodynamic effect. A seven-phase research effort has been designed that incorporates ice-accretion and aerodynamic experiments and computational simulations. As the baseline, full-scale, swept-wing-reference geometry, this research will utilize the 65 percent scale Common Research Model configuration. Ice-accretion testing will be conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel for three hybrid swept-wing models representing the 20, 64 and 83 percent semispan stations of the baseline-reference wing. Threedimensional measurement techniques are being developed and validated to document the experimental ice-accretion geometries. Artificial ice shapes of varying geometric fidelity will be developed for aerodynamic testing over a large Reynolds number range in the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel and in a smaller-scale atmospheric wind tunnel. Concurrent research will be conducted to explore and further develop the use of computational simulation tools for ice accretion and aerodynamics on swept wings. The combined results of this research effort will result in an improved understanding of the ice formation and aerodynamic effects on swept wings. The purpose of this paper is to describe this research effort in more detail and report on the current results and status to date.

  14. Dynamic stability of an aerodynamically efficient motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amrit; Limebeer, David J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Motorcycles exhibit two potentially dangerous oscillatory modes known as 'wobble' and 'weave'. The former is reminiscent of supermarket castor shimmy, while the latter is a low frequency 'fish-tailing' motion that involves a combination of rolling, yawing, steering and side-slipping motions. These unwanted dynamic features, which can occur when two-wheeled vehicles are operated at speed, have been studied extensively. The aim of this paper is to use mathematical analysis to identify important stability trends in the on-going design of a novel aerodynamically efficient motorcycle known as the ECOSSE Spirit ES1. A mathematical model of the ES1 is developed using a multi-body dynamics software package called VehicleSim [Anon, VehicleSim Lisp Reference Manual Version 1.0, Mechanical Simulation Corporation, 2008. Available at http://www.carsim.com]. This high-fidelity motorcycle model includes realistic tyre-road contact geometry, a comprehensive tyre model, tyre relaxation and a flexible frame. A parameter set representative of a modern high-performance machine and rider is used. Local stability is investigated via the eigenvalues of the linearised models that are associated with equilibrium points of interest. A comprehensive study of the effects of frame flexibilities, acceleration, aerodynamics and tyre variations is presented, and an optimal passive steering compensator is derived. It is shown that the traditional steering damper cannot be used to stabilise the ES1 over its entire operating speed range. A simple passive compensator, involving an inerter is proposed. Flexibility can be introduced deliberately into various chassis components to change the stability characteristics of the vehicle; the implications of this idea are studied.

  15. Aerodynamics of a golf ball with grooves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jooha; Son, Kwangmin; Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    It is well known that the drag on a dimpled ball is much lower than that on smooth ball. Choi et al. (Phys. Fluids, 2006) showed that turbulence is generated through the instability of shear layer separating from the edge of dimples and delays flow separation. Based on this mechanism, we devise a new golf ball with grooves on the surface but without any dimples. To investigate the aerodynamic performance of this new golf ball, an experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at the Reynolds numbers of 0.5 x10^5 - 2.7 x10^5 and the spin ratios (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of α=0 - 0.5, which are within the ranges of real golf-ball velocity and spin rate. We measure the drag and lift forces on the grooved ball and compare them with those of smooth ball. At zero spin, the drag coefficient on the grooved ball shows a rapid fall-off at a critical Reynolds number and maintains a minimum value which is lower by 50% than that on smooth ball. At non-zero α, the drag coefficient on the grooved ball increases with increasing α, but is still lower by 40% than that on smooth ball. The lift coefficient on the grooved ball increases with increasing α, and is 100% larger than that on smooth ball. The aerodynamic characteristics of grooved ball is in general quite similar to that of dimpled ball. Some more details will be discussed in the presentation.

  16. First-principles theory of short-range order in size-mismatched metal alloys: Cu-Au, Cu-Ag, and Ni-Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a first-principles technique for calculating the short-range order (SRO) in disordered alloys, even in the presence of large anharmonic atomic relaxations. The technique is applied to several alloys possessing large size mismatch: Cu-Au, Cu-Ag, Ni-Au, and Cu-Pd. We find the following: (i) The calculated SRO in Cu-Au alloys peaks at (or near) the left-angle 100 right-angle point for all compositions studied, in agreement with diffuse scattering measurements. (ii) A fourfold splitting of the X-point SRO exists in both Cu0.75Au0.25 and Cu0.70Pd0.30, although qualitative differences in the calculated energetics for these two alloys demonstrate that the splitting in Cu0.70Pd0.30 may be accounted for by T=0 K energetics while T≠0 K configurational entropy is necessary to account for the splitting in Cu0.75Au0.25. Cu0.75Au0.25 shows a significant temperature dependence of the splitting, in agreement with recent in situ measurements, while the splitting in Cu0.70Pd0.30 is predicted to have a much smaller temperature dependence. (iii) Although no measurements exist, the SRO of Cu-Ag alloys is predicted to be of clustering type with peaks at the left-angle 000 right-angle point. Streaking of the SRO peaks in the left-angle 100 right-angle and left-angle 1 (1) /(2) 0 right-angle directions for Ag- and Cu-rich compositions, respectively, is correlated with the elastically soft directions for these compositions. (iv) Even though Ni-Au phase separates at low temperatures, the calculated SRO pattern in Ni0.4Au0.6, like the measured data, shows a peak along the left-angle ζ00 right-angle direction, away from the typical clustering-type left-angle 000 right-angle point. (v) The explicit effect of atomic relaxation on SRO is investigated and it is found that atomic relaxation can produce significant qualitative changes in the SRO pattern, changing the pattern from ordering to clustering type, as in the case of Cu-Ag. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  17. Aerodynamic seal assemblies for turbo-machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Wolfe, Christopher; Fang, Biao

    2015-09-29

    The present application provides an aerodynamic seal assembly for use with a turbo-machine. The aerodynamic seal assembly may include a number of springs, a shoe connected to the springs, and a secondary seal positioned about the springs and the shoe.

  18. Review paper on wind turbine aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the development and description of the aerodynamic models used to estimate the aerodynamic loads on wind turbine constructions. This includes a status of the capabilities of computation fluid dynamics and the need for reliable airfoil data for the simpler engineering models...

  19. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  20. Biomimetic Approach for Accurate, Real-Time Aerodynamic Coefficients Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodynamic and structural reliability and efficiency depends critically on the ability to accurately assess the aerodynamic loads and moments for each lifting...

  1. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag

  2. Scaled photographs of surf over the full range of breaker sizes on the north shore of Oahu and Jaws, Maui, Hawaiian Islands (NODC Accession 0001753)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digital surf photographs were scaled using surfers as height benchmarks to estimate the size of the breakers. Historical databases for surf height in Hawaii are...

  3. Aerodynamic Analysis of a Manned Space Vehicle for Missions to Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Pezzella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the aerodynamic analysis of a manned braking system entering the Mars atmosphere with the aim to support planetary entry system design studies. The exploration vehicle is an axisymmetric blunt body close to the Apollo capsule. Several fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analyses have been performed to address the capsule aerodynamic performance. To this end, a wide range of flow conditions including reacting and nonreacting flow, different angles of attack, and Mach numbers have been investigated and compared. Moreover, nonequilibrium effects on the flow field around the entry vehicle have also been investigated. Results show that real-gas effects, for all the angles of attack considered, increase both the aerodynamic drag and pitching moment whereas the lift is only slighted affected. Finally, results comparisons highlight that experimental and CFD aerodynamic findings available for the Apollo capsule in air adequately represent the static coefficients of the capsule in the Mars atmosphere.

  4. Aerodynamic Analysis of the Truss-Braced Wing Aircraft Using Vortex-Lattice Superposition Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric Bi-Wen; Reynolds, Kevin Wayne; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Totah, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The SUGAR Truss-BracedWing (TBW) aircraft concept is a Boeing-developed N+3 aircraft configuration funded by NASA ARMD FixedWing Project. This future generation transport aircraft concept is designed to be aerodynamically efficient by employing a high aspect ratio wing design. The aspect ratio of the TBW is on the order of 14 which is significantly greater than those of current generation transport aircraft. This paper presents a recent aerodynamic analysis of the TBW aircraft using a conceptual vortex-lattice aerodynamic tool VORLAX and an aerodynamic superposition approach. Based on the underlying linear potential flow theory, the principle of aerodynamic superposition is leveraged to deal with the complex aerodynamic configuration of the TBW. By decomposing the full configuration of the TBW into individual aerodynamic lifting components, the total aerodynamic characteristics of the full configuration can be estimated from the contributions of the individual components. The aerodynamic superposition approach shows excellent agreement with CFD results computed by FUN3D, USM3D, and STAR-CCM+. XXXXX Demand for green aviation is expected to increase with the need for reduced environmental impact. Most large transports today operate within the best cruise L/D range of 18-20 using the conventional tube-and-wing design. This configuration has led to marginal improvements in aerodynamic efficiency over this past century, as aerodynamic improvements tend to be incremental. A big opportunity has been shown in recent years to significantly reduce structural weight or trim drag, hence improved energy efficiency, with the use of lightweight materials such as composites. The Boeing 787 transport is an example of a modern airframe design that employs lightweight structures. High aspect ratio wing design can provide another opportunity for further improvements in energy efficiency. Historically, the study of high aspect ratio wings has been intimately tied to the study of

  5. Aerodynamic seals for rotary machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Cirri, Massimiliano; Thatte, Azam Mihir; Williams, John Robert

    2016-02-09

    An aerodynamic seal assembly for a rotary machine includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having multiple labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device segment also includes multiple flexures connected to the shoe plate and to a top interface element, wherein the multiple flexures are configured to allow the high pressure fluid to occupy a forward cavity and the low pressure fluid to occupy an aft cavity. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal attached to the top interface element at one first end and positioned about the flexures and the shoe plate at one second end.

  6. The basic aerodynamics of floatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, M. J.; Wood, D. H.

    1983-09-01

    It is pointed out that the basic aerodynamics of modern floatation ovens, in which the continuous, freshly painted metal strip is floated, dried, and cured, is the two-dimensional analog of that of hovercraft. The basic theory for the static lift considered in connection with the study of hovercraft has had spectacular success in describing the experimental results. This appears surprising in view of the crudity of the theory. The present investigation represents an attempt to explore the reasons for this success. An outline of the basic theory is presented and an approach is shown for deriving the resulting expressions for the lift from the full Navier-Stokes equations in a manner that clearly indicates the limitations on the validity of the expressions. Attention is given to the generally good agreement between the theory and the axisymmetric (about the centerline) results reported by Jaumotte and Kiedrzynski (1965).

  7. Female sexual behavior and sexual swelling size as potential cues for males to discern the female fertile phase in free-ranging Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauch, Katrin; Pfefferle, Dana; Hodges, Keith; Möhle, Ulrike; Fischer, Julia; Heistermann, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Although female catarrhine primates show cyclic changes in sexual behavior and sexual swellings, the value of these sexual signals in providing information to males about timing of the fertile phase is largely unclear. Recently, we have shown that in Barbary macaques, males receive information from females which enables them to discern the fertile phase and to focus their reproductive effort accordingly. Here, we investigate the nature of the cues being used by examining female sexual behavior and the size of sexual swelling as potential indicators of the fertile phase. We collected behavioral data and quantified swelling size using digital images of 11 females of the Gibraltar Barbary macaque population and related the data to the time of ovulation and the fertile phase as determined from fecal hormone analysis. We found that rates of female sexual behaviors were not correlated with female estrogen levels and did not significantly differ between the fertile and non-fertile phases of the cycle. In contrast, swelling size was significantly correlated with female estrogen levels and increased predictably towards ovulation with size being maximal during the fertile phase. Moreover, frequencies of male ejaculatory copulations showed a strong positive correlation with swelling size and highest rates were found during maximum swelling. Our data provide strong evidence that female Barbary macaques honestly signal the probability of fertility through sexual swelling and that males apparently use this information to time their mating activities. Honest advertising of the fertile phase might be part of a female strategy to manipulate male mating behavior for their own advantage, such as ensure fertilization with high quality sperm or influence paternity outcome. PMID:17644098

  8. Active Control of Aerodynamic Noise Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise sources become important when propulsion noise is relatively low, as during aircraft landing. Under these conditions, aerodynamic noise from high-lift systems can be significant. The research program and accomplishments described here are directed toward reduction of this aerodynamic noise. Progress toward this objective include correction of flow quality in the Low Turbulence Water Channel flow facility, development of a test model and traversing mechanism, and improvement of the data acquisition and flow visualization capabilities in the Aero. & Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. These developments are described in this report.

  9. Euromech Colloquium 509: Vehicle Aerodynamics. External Aerodynamics of Railway Vehicles, Trucks, Buses and Cars - Proceedings

    OpenAIRE

    Nayeri, Christian Navid; Löfdahl, Lennart; Schober, Martin

    2009-01-01

    During the 509th Colloquium of the Euromech society, held from March 24th & 25th at TU Berlin, fifty leading researchers from all over europe discussed various topics affecting both road vehicle as well as railway vehicle aerodynamics, especially drag reduction (with road vehicles), cross wind stability (with trains) and wake analysis (with both). With the increasing service speed of modern high-speed railway traffic, aerodynamic aspects are gaining importance. The aerodynamic research topics...

  10. Building Integrated Active Flow Control: Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Tall Buildings Using Fluid-Based Aerodynamic Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicovich, David

    material and energy consumption profiles of tall building. To date, the increasing use of light-weight and high-strength materials in tall buildings, with greater flexibility and reduced damping, has increased susceptibility to dynamic wind load effects that limit the gains afforded by incorporating these new materials. Wind, particularly fluctuating wind and its interaction with buildings induces two main responses; alongwind - in the direction of the flow and crosswind - perpendicular to the flow. The main risk associated with this vulnerability is resonant oscillations induced by von-Karman-like vortex shedding at or near the natural frequency of the structure caused by flow separation. Dynamic wind loading effects often increase with a power of wind speed greater than 3, thus increasingly, tall buildings pay a significant price in material to increase the natural frequency and/or the damping to overcome this response. In particular, crosswind response often governs serviceability (human habitability) design criteria of slender buildings. Currently, reducing crosswind response relies on a Solid-based Aerodynamic Modification (SAM), either by changing structural or geometric characteristics such as the tower shape or through the addition of damping systems. While this approach has merit it has two major drawbacks: firstly, the loss of valuable rentable areas and high construction costs due to increased structural requirements for mass and stiffness, further contributing towards the high consumption of non-renewable resources by the commercial building sector. For example, in order to insure human comfort within an acceptable range of crosswind response induced accelerations at the top of a building, an aerodynamically efficient plan shape comes at the expense of floor area. To compensate for the loss of valuable area compensatory stories are required, resulting in an increase in wind loads and construction costs. Secondly, a limited, if at all, ability to adaptively

  11. Evaluating parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer using field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomin Liu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat and water transfer have a significant impact on the accuracy of models of land – atmosphere interactions and of estimated surface fluxes using spectro-radiometric data collected from aircrafts and satellites. We have used measurements from an eddy correlation system to derive the aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer over a bare soil surface as well as over a maize canopy. Diurnal variations of aerodynamic resistance have been analyzed. The results showed that the diurnal variation of aerodynamic resistance during daytime (07:00 h–18:00 h was significant for both the bare soil surface and the maize canopy although the range of variation was limited. Based on the measurements made by the eddy correlation system, a comprehensive evaluation of eight popularly used parameterization schemes of aerodynamic resistance was carried out. The roughness length for heat transfer is a crucial parameter in the estimation of aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer and can neither be taken as a constant nor be neglected. Comparing with the measurements, the parameterizations by Choudhury et al. (1986, Viney (1991, Yang et al. (2001 and the modified forms of Verma et al. (1976 and Mahrt and Ek (1984 by inclusion of roughness length for heat transfer gave good agreements with the measurements, while the parameterizations by Hatfield et al. (1983 and Xie (1988 showed larger errors even though the roughness length for heat transfer has been taken into account.

  12. Lifting Wing in Constructing Tall Buildings —Aerodynamic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Skelton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper builds on previous research by the authors which determined the global state-of-the-art of constructing tall buildings by surveying the most active specialist tall building professionals around the globe. That research identified the effect of wind on tower cranes as a highly ranked, common critical issue in tall building construction. The research reported here presents a design for a “Lifting Wing,” a uniquely designed shroud which potentially allows the lifting of building materials by a tower crane in higher and more unstable wind conditions, thereby reducing delay on the programmed critical path of a tall building. Wind tunnel tests were undertaken to compare the aerodynamic performance of a scale model of a typical “brick-shaped” construction load (replicating a load profile most commonly lifted via a tower crane against the aerodynamic performance of the scale model of the Lifting Wing in a range of wind conditions. The data indicate that the Lifting Wing improves the aerodynamic performance by a factor of up to 50%.

  13. Unsteady interactional aerodynamics of helicopter configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present the aerodynamic simulation of a complex rotor/fuselage configuration performed with the Cfd solver Rosita (Rotorcraft Software Italy), developed at the Aerospace Department of the Politecnico di Milano.

  14. Aerodynamic Efficiency Enhancements for Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for aerodynamics-based efficiency enhancements for air vehicles is presented. The results of the Phase I investigation of concepts for morphing aircraft...

  15. Prediction of Unsteady Transonic Aerodynamics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An accurate prediction of aero-elastic effects depends on an accurate prediction of the unsteady aerodynamic forces. Perhaps the most difficult speed regime is...

  16. Aerodynamic Efficiency Enhancements for Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for aerodynamics-based efficiency enhancements for air vehicles is presented. Concepts are presented for morphing aircraft, to enable the aircraft to...

  17. Electrospray-assisted ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer for real-time characterization of bacterial particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hee; Lee, Jung Eun; Hwang, Gi Byoung; Lee, Byung Uk; Lee, Seung Bok; Jurng, Jong Soo; Bae, Gwi Nam

    2010-01-15

    The ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS) spectrometer is a novel, commercially available aerosol counter for real-time, continuous monitoring of viable bioaerosols based on the fluorescence induced from living microorganisms. For aerosolization of liquid-based microorganisms, general aerosolization methods such as atomization or nebulization may not be adequate for an accurate and quantitative characterization of the microorganisms because of the formation of agglomerated particles. In such cases, biological electrospray techniques have an advantage because they generate nonagglomerated particles, attributable to the repulsive electrical forces among particles with unipolar charges. Biological electrosprays are quickly gaining potential for the detection and control of living organisms in applications ranging from mass spectrometry to developmental microbiology. In this study, we investigated the size distribution, total concentration, and fluorescence percentage of bacterial particles in a real-time manner by electrospray-assisted UVAPS. A suspension containing Escherichia coli as a test microorganism was sprayed in a steady cone-jet mode using a specially designed electrospray system with a point-to-orifice-plate configuration based on charge-reduced electrospray size spectrometry. With the electrospray process, 98% of the total E. coli particle number concentration had a size of microorganisms, owing to the generation of nonagglomerated particles. PMID:20038090

  18. Aerodynamic Classification of Swept-Wing Ice Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, Jeff M.; Broeren, Andy P.; Bragg, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    The continued design, certification and safe operation of swept-wing airplanes in icing conditions rely on the advancement of computational and experimental simulation methods for higher fidelity results over an increasing range of aircraft configurations and performance, and icing conditions. The current stateof- the-art in icing aerodynamics is mainly built upon a comprehensive understanding of two-dimensional geometries that does not currently exist for fundamentally three-dimensional geometries such as swept wings. The purpose of this report is to describe what is known of iced-swept-wing aerodynamics and to identify the type of research that is required to improve the current understanding. Following the method used in a previous review of iced-airfoil aerodynamics, this report proposes a classification of swept-wing ice accretion into four groups based upon unique flowfield attributes. These four groups are: ice roughness, horn ice, streamwise ice and spanwise-ridge ice. In the case of horn ice it is shown that a further subclassification of "nominally 3D" or "highly 3D" horn ice may be necessary. For all of the proposed ice-shape classifications, relatively little is known about the three-dimensional flowfield and even less about the effect of Reynolds number and Mach number on these flowfields. The classifications and supporting data presented in this report can serve as a starting point as new research explores swept-wing aerodynamics with ice shapes. As further results are available, it is expected that these classifications will need to be updated and revised.

  19. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls

    OpenAIRE

    Asai, Takeshi; Seo, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through...

  20. Computer Aided Aerodynamic Design of Missile Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Panneerselvam, S; P. Theerthamalai; A.K. Sarkar

    1987-01-01

    Aerodynamic configurations of tactical missiles have to produce the required lateral force with minimum time lag to meet the required manoeuvability and response time. The present design which is mainly based on linearised potential flow involves (a) indentification of critical design points, (b) design of lifting components and their integration with mutual interference, (c) evaluation of aerodynamic characteristics, (d) checking its adequacy at otherpoints, (e) optimization of parameters an...

  1. Unsteady aerodynamic modelling of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coton, F.N.; Galbraith, R.A. [Univ. og Glasgow, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The following current and future work is discussed: Collaborative wind tunnel based PIV project to study wind turbine wake structures in head-on and yawed flow. Prescribed wake model has been embedded in a source panel representation of the wind tunnel walls to allow comparison with experiment; Modelling of tower shadow using high resolution but efficient vortex model in tower shadow domain; Extension of model to yawing flow; Upgrading and tuning of unsteady aerodynamic model for low speed, thick airfoil flows. Glasgow has a considerable collection of low speed dynamic stall data. Currently, the Leishman - Beddoes model is not ideally suited to such flows. For example: Range of stall onset criteria used for dynamic stall prediction including Beddoes. Wide variation of stall onset prediction. Beddoes representation was developed primarily with reference to compressible flows. Analyses of low speed data from Glasgow indicate deficiencies in the current model; Predicted versus measured response during ramp down motion. Modification of the Beddoes representation is required to obtain a fit with the measured data. (EG)

  2. Aerodynamical noise from wind turbine generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two extensive measurement series of noise from wind turbines have been made during different modifications of their rotors. One series focused on the influence from the tip shape on the noise, while the other series dealt with the influence from the trailing edge. The experimental layout for the two investigations was identical. The total A-weighted noise from the wind turbine was measured in 1/3 octave bands from 50 Hz to 10 kHz in 1-minute periods simultaneously with wind speed measurements. The microphone was mounted on a hard board on the ground about 40 m directly downwind of the wind turbine, and the wind speed meter was placed at the same distance upwind of the wind turbine 10 m above ground. Regression analysis was made between noise and wind speed in each 1/3 octave band to determine the spectrum at 8 m/s. During the measurements care was taken to avoid influence from background noise, and the influence from machinery noise was minimized and corrected for. Thus the results display the aerodynamic rotor noise from the wind turbines. By use of this measurement technique, the uncertainty has been reduced to 1.5 - 2 dB per 1/3 octave band in the relevant frequency range and to about 1 dB on the total A-weighted levels. (au) (10 refs.)

  3. Modeling Aerodynamically Generated Sound of Helicopter Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound of rotors over the past decade. Although the modeling effort has focused on helicopter main rotors, the theory is generally valid for a wide range of rotor configurations. The Ffowcs Williams Hawkings (FW-H) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. The monopole and dipole source terms of the FW-H equation account for the thickness and loading noise, respectively. Bladevortex-interaction noise and broadband noise are important types of loading noise, hence much research has been directed toward the accurate modeling of these noise mechanisms. Both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise formulations have been developed for the prediction of high-speed impulsive noise. In an effort to eliminate the need to compute the quadrupole contribution, the FW-H equation has also been utilized on permeable surfaces surrounding all physical noise sources. Comparisons of the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces with the FW-H equation have shown that the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces can give erroneous results for aeroacoustic problems. Finally, significant progress has been made incorporating the rotor noise models into full vehicle noise prediction tools.

  4. Kinematics and Aerodynamics of Backward Flying Dragonflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Zeyghami, Samane; Dong, Haibo

    2015-11-01

    Highly maneuverable insects such as dragonflies have a wide range of flight capabilities; precise hovering, fast body reorientations, sideways flight and backward takeoff are only a few to mention. In this research, we closely examined the kinematics as well as aerodynamics of backward takeoff in dragonflies and compared them to those of forward takeoff. High speed videography and accurate 3D surface reconstruction techniques were employed to extract details of the wing and body motions as well as deformations during both flight modes. While the velocities of both forward and backward flights were similar, the body orientation as well as the wing kinematics showed large differences. Our results indicate that by tilting the stroke plane angle of the wings as well as changing the orientation of the body relative to the flight path, dragonflies control the direction of the flight like a helicopter. In addition, our detailed analysis of the flow in these flights shows important differences in the wake capture phenomena among these flight modes. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  5. Sex differences in the regional deposition of inhaled particles in the 2.5-7.5 μm size range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a study to validate a chest phantom for the assessment of plutonium in lung, male volunteers inhaled 5 μm polystyrene particles labelled with sup(92m)Nb (half-life 10.2 days, 15.7-18 and 934 keV γ-rays). More recently it was decided to carry out similar studies in women, to ascertain the effects of smaller thoracic size and variable amounts of breast tissue on counting efficiency for 239Pu. It was observed that alveolar deposition of these particles was less than in men. In consequence, it was decided to make a more detailed study of the total and regional deposition in women and also determine a particle size at which alveolar deposition would be similar to that of 5μm particles in men. Preliminary results for particles up to 5μm have been reported recently by Pritchard et al. (in press). This paper describes an extension of the study to include particles of 7.5 μm nominal diameter. (author)

  6. Operating range, hold-up, droplet size and axial mixing of pulsed plate columns in highly disperse and low-continuity volume flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operating behavior, hold-up, droplet size and axial mixing are investigated in highly disperse and slightly continuous volume flows in a pulsed plate column. The geometry of the column of 4-m length and 10-cm inside diameter was held constant. The hole shape of the column bases was changed, wherby the cylindrical, sharp-edge drilled hole is compared with the punched, nozzle-shaped hole in their effects on the fluid-dynamic behavior. In this case we varied the volume flows, the ratio of volume flows, the pulse frequency and the operating temperature. The operation was held constant for the aqueous, the organic, the continuous and the disperse phases. The objective was to demonstrate the applicability of pulsed plate columns with very large differences between the organic disperse and the aqueous continuous volume flow, to obtain design data for such columns and to perform a scale-up to industrial reprocessing plant-size. 18 references, 11 figures, 3 tables

  7. Aerodynamics of Unsteady Sailing Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Colin; Schutt, Riley; Borshoff, Jennifer; Alley, Philip; de Zegher, Maximilien; Williamson, Chk

    2015-11-01

    In small sailboats, the bodyweight of the sailor is proportionately large enough to induce significant unsteady motion of the boat and sail. Sailors use a variety of kinetic techniques to create sail dynamics which can provide an increment in thrust, thereby increasing the boatspeed. In this study, we experimentally investigate the unsteady aerodynamics associated with two techniques, ``upwind leech flicking'' and ``downwind S-turns''. We explore the dynamics of an Olympic class Laser sailboat equipped with a GPS, IMU, wind sensor, and camera array, sailed expertly by a member of the US Olympic team. The velocity heading of a sailing boat is oriented at an apparent wind angle to the flow. In contrast to classic flapping propulsion, the heaving of the sail section is not perpendicular to the sail's motion through the air. This leads to heave with components parallel and perpendicular to the incident flow. The characteristic motion is recreated in a towing tank where the vortex structures generated by a representative 2-D sail section are observed using Particle Image Velocimetry and the measurement of thrust and lift forces. Amongst other results, we show that the increase in driving force, generated due to heave, is larger for greater apparent wind angles.

  8. The development of a Realistic LOCA evaluation model applicable to the full range of breaks sizes: Westinghouse full spectrum LOCA (FSLOCA™) methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently changes in the regulatory environment toward a risk informed approach combined with more efficient and demanding fuel power cycles, and utilization of margins put more emphasis in scenarios traditionally defined as Small and Intermediate Break LOCA. As a result, Westinghouse made several upgrades and added several new functionalities to its realistic Large Break LOCA methodology based on the use of the WCOBRA/TRAC code. The new code has been renamed to WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2, for the purpose of extending the Evaluation Model (EM) applicability to smaller break sizes. The new EM is called Westinghouse Full Spectrum LOCA (FSLOCA™) Methodology and is intended to be applicable to a full spectrum of LOCAs, from small to intermediate break as well as large break LOCAs. This paper describes the market and regulatory drivers, the functional requirements for the new evaluation model (EM). An overview of the EM and key conclusions on its applicability to LOCA safety analysis are here summarized. (author)

  9. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction for a Generic Truck Using Geometrically Optimized Rear Cabin Bumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Ait Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous surge in gas prices has raised major concerns about vehicle fuel efficiency, and drag reduction devices offer a promising strategy. In this paper, we investigate the mechanisms by which geometrically optimized bumps, placed on the rear end of the cabin roof of a generic truck, reduce aerodynamic drag. The incorporation of these devices requires proper choices of the size, location, and overall geometry. In the following analysis we identify these factors using a novel methodology. The numerical technique combines automatic modeling of the add-ons, computational fluid dynamics and optimization using orthogonal arrays, and probabilistic restarts. Numerical results showed reduction in aerodynamic drag between 6% and 10%.

  10. Aerodynamic Parameter Identification of a Venus Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Robert A.

    An analysis was conducted to identify the parameters of an aerodynamic model for a Venus lander based on experimental free-flight data. The experimental free-flight data were collected in the NASA Langley 20-ft Vertical Spin Tunnel with a 25-percent Froude-scaled model. The experimental data were classified based on the wind tunnel run type: runs where the lander model was unperturbed over the course of the run, and runs were the model was perturbed (principally in pitch, yaw, and roll) by the wind tunnel operator. The perturbations allow for data to be obtained at higher wind angles and rotation rates than those available from the unperturbed data. The model properties and equations of motion were used to determine experimental values for the aerodynamic coefficients. An aerodynamic model was selected using a priori knowledge of axisymmetric blunt entry vehicles. The least squares method was used to estimate the aerodynamic parameters. Three sets of results were obtained from the following data sets: perturbed, unperturbed, and the combination of both. The combined data set was selected for the final set of aerodynamic parameters based on the quality of the results. The identified aerodynamic parameters are consistent with that of the static wind tunnel data. Reconstructions, of experimental data not used in the parameter identification analyses, achieved similar residuals as those with data used to identify the parameters. Simulations of the experimental data, using the identified parameters, indicate that the aerodynamic model used is incapable of replicating the limit cycle oscillations with stochastic peak amplitudes observed during the test.

  11. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform

    CERN Document Server

    Lentink, David; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on tethered experiments with robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for nonintrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is ...

  12. Aerodynamic device for generating mono-disperse fuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G. J.; Walsh, D. E.; Takahashi, F.; Dryer, F. L.

    1989-04-01

    A device has been developed for generating well-defined, one-dimensional streams of small monosized droplets of a variety of fuels. The droplets produced are well separated, making this technique well suited to experimental combustion studies of unsupported, isolated droplets. This method has been used successfully to generate droplets of light and middistillate petroleum fuels, heavy oils, boron/JP-10 slurries, and coke/oil slurries, for a range of combustion studies. The principle of operation of the device is the aerodynamic stripping of incompletely formed droplets emerging from the tip of a capillary/fine wire which resides in the throat of a venturi or convergent nozzle.

  13. Aerodynamic force coefficients of plain bridge cables in wet conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoni, Giulia; Georgakis, Christos T.

    , tests were performed for wind velocities between 2 and 31 m/s, whilst in wet conditions tests were performed for the range of wind velocities where rain rivulet formation was found possible, i.e. between 8-18 m/s. For all of the tested relative cable-wind angles in wet conditions, a reduction in the...... drag coefficient with increasing Reynolds number, accompanied by a near-zero lift coefficient, was observed. A theoretical evaluation of the aerodynamic damping assuming quasi-steady conditions reveals that changes in drag and lift coefficient are nonetheless not sufficient to generate negative...

  14. Parallel computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients for aeroelastic analysis on a transputer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janetzke, D. C.; Murthy, D. V.

    1991-01-01

    Aeroelastic analysis is mult-disciplinary and computationally expensive. Hence, it can greatly benefit from parallel processing. As part of an effort to develop an aeroelastic analysis capability on a distributed-memory transputer network, a parallel algorithm for the computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients is implemented on a network of 32 transputers. The aerodynamic influence coefficients are calculated using a three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic model and a panel discretization. Efficiencies up to 85 percent are demonstrated using 32 processors. The effects of subtask ordering, problem size and network topology are presented. A comparison to results on a shared-memory computer indicates that higher speedup is achieved on the distributed-memory system.

  15. Aerodynamic Response of a Pitching Airfoil with Pulsed Circulation Control for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, Chad C.

    Cmu, based on effective ranges from prior flow control airfoil studies. Airfoil pitch was found to increase the baseline lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) by up to 50% due to dynamic stall effects. The influence of dynamic stall on steady CC airfoil performance was greater for Cmu=0.05, increasing L/D by 115% for positive angle-of-attack. Pulsed actuation was shown to match, or improve, steady jet lift performance while reducing required mass flow by up to 35%. From numerical flow visualization, pulsed actuation was shown to reduce the size and strength of wake vorticity during DS, resulting in lower profile drag relative to baseline and steady actuation cases. A database of pitching airfoil test data, including overshoot and hysteresis of aerodynamic coefficients (Cl, Cd), was compiled for improved analytical model inputs to update CCVAWT performance predictions, where the aforementioned L/D improvements will be directly reflected. Relative to a conventional VAWT with annual power output of 1 MW, previous work at WVU proved that the addition of steady jet CC could improve total output to 1.25 MW. However, the pumping cost to generate the continuous jet reduced yearly CCVAWT net gains to 1.15 MW. The current study has shown that pulsed CC jets can recover 4% of the pumping demands due to reduced mass flow requirements, increasing annual CCVAWT net power production to 1.19 MW, a 19% improvement relative to the conventional turbine.

  16. Aerodynamic Response of a Pitching Airfoil with Pulsed Circulation Control for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, Chad C.

    reduced jet frequencies (0.25≤St≤4) were analyzed with varying Cmu, based on effective ranges from prior flow control airfoil studies. Airfoil pitch was found to increase the baseline lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) by up to 50% due to dynamic stall effects. The influence of dynamic stall on steady CC airfoil performance was greater for Cmu=0.05, increasing L/D by 115% for positive angle-of-attack. Pulsed actuation was shown to match, or improve, steady jet lift performance while reducing required mass flow by up to 35%. From numerical flow visualization, pulsed actuation was shown to reduce the size and strength of wake vorticity during DS, resulting in lower profile drag relative to baseline and steady actuation cases. A database of pitching airfoil test data, including overshoot and hysteresis of aerodynamic coefficients (Cl, Cd), was compiled for improved analytical model inputs to update CCVAWT performance predictions, where the aforementioned L/D improvements will be directly reflected. Relative to a conventional VAWT with annual power output of 1 MW, previous work at WVU proved that the addition of steady jet CC could improve total output to 1.25 MW. However, the pumping cost to generate the continuous jet reduced yearly CCVAWT net gains to 1.15 MW. The current study has shown that pulsed CC jets can recover 4% of the pumping demands due to reduced mass flow requirements, increasing annual CCVAWT net power production to 1.19 MW, a 19% improvement relative to the conventional turbine.

  17. Modulation of leading edge vorticity and aerodynamic forces in flexible flapping wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Liang; Deng Xinyan [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Sane, Sanjay P, E-mail: xdeng@purdue.edu, E-mail: sane@ncbs.res.in [National Centre for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, GKVK Campus, Bellary Road, Bangalore 560 065 (India)

    2011-09-15

    In diverse biological flight systems, the leading edge vortex has been implicated as a flow feature of key importance in the generation of flight forces. Unlike fixed wings, flapping wings can translate at higher angles of attack without stalling because their leading edge vorticity is more stable than the corresponding fixed wing case. Hence, the leading edge vorticity has often been suggested as the primary determinant of the high forces generated by flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary to modulate the size and strength of the leading edge vorticity independently of the gross kinematics while simultaneously monitoring the forces generated by the wing. In a recent study, we observed that forces generated by wings with flexible trailing margins showed a direct dependence on the flexural stiffness of the wing. Based on that study, we hypothesized that trailing edge flexion directly influences leading edge vorticity, and thereby the magnitude of aerodynamic forces on the flexible flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, we visualized the flows on wings of varying flexural stiffness using a custom 2D digital particle image velocimetry system, while simultaneously monitoring the magnitude of the aerodynamic forces. Our data show that as flexion decreases, the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity increases and enhances aerodynamic forces, thus confirming that the leading edge vortex is indeed a key feature for aerodynamic force generation in flapping flight. The data shown here thus support the hypothesis that camber influences instantaneous aerodynamic forces through modulation of the leading edge vorticity.

  18. Modulation of leading edge vorticity and aerodynamic forces in flexible flapping wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In diverse biological flight systems, the leading edge vortex has been implicated as a flow feature of key importance in the generation of flight forces. Unlike fixed wings, flapping wings can translate at higher angles of attack without stalling because their leading edge vorticity is more stable than the corresponding fixed wing case. Hence, the leading edge vorticity has often been suggested as the primary determinant of the high forces generated by flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary to modulate the size and strength of the leading edge vorticity independently of the gross kinematics while simultaneously monitoring the forces generated by the wing. In a recent study, we observed that forces generated by wings with flexible trailing margins showed a direct dependence on the flexural stiffness of the wing. Based on that study, we hypothesized that trailing edge flexion directly influences leading edge vorticity, and thereby the magnitude of aerodynamic forces on the flexible flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, we visualized the flows on wings of varying flexural stiffness using a custom 2D digital particle image velocimetry system, while simultaneously monitoring the magnitude of the aerodynamic forces. Our data show that as flexion decreases, the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity increases and enhances aerodynamic forces, thus confirming that the leading edge vortex is indeed a key feature for aerodynamic force generation in flapping flight. The data shown here thus support the hypothesis that camber influences instantaneous aerodynamic forces through modulation of the leading edge vorticity.

  19. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  20. An aerodynamic roughness length map derived from extended martian rock abundance data

    OpenAIRE

    Hébrard, Eric; Listowski, Constantino; Coll, P; B. Marticorena; G. Bergametti; Määttänen, Anni; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, François

    2012-01-01

    Many boundary layer processes simulated within a Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM), including the description of the processes controlling dust rising from the Martian surface, are highly sensitive to the aerodynamic roughness length z0. On the basis of rock-size frequency distributions inferred from different Martian landing sites and Earth analog sites, we have first established that lognormal-modeled rock-size frequency distributions are able to reproduce correctly the observed Martian...

  1. Wing shape allometry and aerodynamics in calopterygid damselflies: a comparative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Outomuro, David; Adams, Dean C; Johansson, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background: Wing size and shape have important aerodynamic implications on flight performance. We explored how wing size was related to wing shape in territorial males of 37 taxa of the damselfly family Calopterygidae. Wing coloration was also included in the analyses because it is sexually and naturally selected and has been shown to be related to wing shape. We studied wing shape using both the non-dimensional radius of the second moment of wing area (RSM) and geometric morphometrics. Lower...

  2. High fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model effects on race vehicle performance predictions using multi-body simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-07-01

    We described in this paper the development of a high fidelity vehicle aerodynamic model to fit wind tunnel test data over a wide range of vehicle orientations. We also present a comparison between the effects of this proposed model and a conventional quasi steady-state aerodynamic model on race vehicle simulation results. This is done by implementing both of these models independently in multi-body quasi steady-state simulations to determine the effects of the high fidelity aerodynamic model on race vehicle performance metrics. The quasi steady state vehicle simulation is developed with a multi-body NASCAR Truck vehicle model, and simulations are conducted for three different types of NASCAR race tracks, a short track, a one and a half mile intermediate track, and a higher speed, two mile intermediate race track. For each track simulation, the effects of the aerodynamic model on handling, maximum corner speed, and drive force metrics are analysed. The accuracy of the high-fidelity model is shown to reduce the aerodynamic model error relative to the conventional aerodynamic model, and the increased accuracy of the high fidelity aerodynamic model is found to have realisable effects on the performance metric predictions on the intermediate tracks resulting from the quasi steady-state simulation.

  3. Structural dynamics and aerodynamics measurements of biologically inspired flexible flapping wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flapping wing flight as seen in hummingbirds and insects poses an interesting unsteady aerodynamic problem: coupling of wing kinematics, structural dynamics and aerodynamics. There have been numerous studies on the kinematics and aerodynamics in both experimental and computational cases with both natural and artificial wings. These studies tend to ignore wing flexibility; however, observation in nature affirms that passive wing deformation is predominant and may be crucial to the aerodynamic performance. This paper presents a multidisciplinary experimental endeavor in correlating a flapping micro air vehicle wing's aeroelasticity and thrust production, by quantifying and comparing overall thrust, structural deformation and airflow of six pairs of hummingbird-shaped membrane wings of different properties. The results show that for a specific spatial distribution of flexibility, there is an effective frequency range in thrust production. The wing deformation at the thrust-productive frequencies indicates the importance of flexibility: both bending and twisting motion can interact with aerodynamic loads to enhance wing performance under certain conditions, such as the deformation phase and amplitude. By measuring structural deformations under the same aerodynamic conditions, beneficial effects of passive wing deformation can be observed from the visualized airflow and averaged thrust. The measurements and their presentation enable observation and understanding of the required structural properties for a thrust effective flapping wing. The intended passive responses of the different wings follow a particular pattern in correlation to their aerodynamic performance. Consequently, both the experimental technique and data analysis method can lead to further studies to determine the design principles for micro air vehicle flapping wings.

  4. Structural dynamics and aerodynamics measurements of biologically inspired flexible flapping wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P; Stanford, B K; Ifju, P G [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, MAE-A 231, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Saellstroem, E; Ukeiley, L, E-mail: diccidwp@ufl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Shalimar, FL 32579 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Flapping wing flight as seen in hummingbirds and insects poses an interesting unsteady aerodynamic problem: coupling of wing kinematics, structural dynamics and aerodynamics. There have been numerous studies on the kinematics and aerodynamics in both experimental and computational cases with both natural and artificial wings. These studies tend to ignore wing flexibility; however, observation in nature affirms that passive wing deformation is predominant and may be crucial to the aerodynamic performance. This paper presents a multidisciplinary experimental endeavor in correlating a flapping micro air vehicle wing's aeroelasticity and thrust production, by quantifying and comparing overall thrust, structural deformation and airflow of six pairs of hummingbird-shaped membrane wings of different properties. The results show that for a specific spatial distribution of flexibility, there is an effective frequency range in thrust production. The wing deformation at the thrust-productive frequencies indicates the importance of flexibility: both bending and twisting motion can interact with aerodynamic loads to enhance wing performance under certain conditions, such as the deformation phase and amplitude. By measuring structural deformations under the same aerodynamic conditions, beneficial effects of passive wing deformation can be observed from the visualized airflow and averaged thrust. The measurements and their presentation enable observation and understanding of the required structural properties for a thrust effective flapping wing. The intended passive responses of the different wings follow a particular pattern in correlation to their aerodynamic performance. Consequently, both the experimental technique and data analysis method can lead to further studies to determine the design principles for micro air vehicle flapping wings.

  5. Summary analysis of the Gemini entry aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitnah, A. M.; Howes, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic data that were derived in 1967 from the analysis of flight-generated data for the Gemini entry module are presented. These data represent the aerodynamic characteristics exhibited by the vehicle during the entry portion of Gemini 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions. For the Gemini, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions, the flight-generated lift-to-drag ratios and corresponding angles of attack are compared with the wind tunnel data. These comparisons show that the flight generated lift-to-drag ratios are consistently lower than were anticipated from the tunnel data. Numerous data uncertainties are cited that provide an insight into the problems that are related to an analysis of flight data developed from instrumentation systems, the primary functions of which are other than the evaluation of flight aerodynamic performance.

  6. Physics of badminton shuttlecocks. Part 1 : aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Caroline; Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    We study experimentally shuttlecocks dynamics. In this part we show that shuttlecock trajectory is highly different from classical parabola. When one takes into account the aerodynamic drag, the flight of the shuttlecock quickly curves downwards and almost reaches a vertical asymptote. We solve the equation of motion with gravity and drag at high Reynolds number and find an analytical expression of the reach. At high velocity, this reach does not depend on velocity anymore. Even if you develop your muscles you will not manage to launch the shuttlecock very far because of the ``aerodynamic wall.'' As a consequence you can predict the length of the field. We then discuss the extend of the aerodynamic wall to other projectiles like sports balls and its importance.

  7. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  8. Wind turbine aerodynamics research needs assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, F. S.; Porter, B. K.

    1986-01-01

    A prioritized list is developed for wind turbine aerodynamic research needs and opportunities which could be used by the Department of Energy program management team in detailing the DOE Five-Year Wind Turbine Research Plan. The focus of the Assessment was the basic science of aerodynamics as applied to wind turbines, including all relevant phenomena, such as turbulence, dynamic stall, three-dimensional effects, viscosity, wake geometry, and others which influence aerodynamic understanding and design. The study was restricted to wind turbines that provide electrical energy compatible with the utility grid, and included both horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) and vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT). Also, no economic constraints were imposed on the design concepts or recommendations since the focus of the investigation was purely scientific.

  9. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) has often been involved in industrial projects, in which blade geometries are created automatic by means of numerical optimisation. Usually, these projects aim at the determination of the aerodynamic optimal wind turbine blade, i.e. the goal is to design a blade which is optimal with regard to energy yield. In other cases, blades have been designed which are optimal with regard to cost of generated energy. However, it is obvious that the wind turbine blade designs which result from these optimisations, are not necessarily optimal with regard to noise emission. In this paper an example is shown of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the ECN-program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. 11 figs., 8 refs

  10. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  11. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  12. Prediction of aerodynamic performance for MEXICO rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Zedong; Yang, Hua; Xu, Haoran;

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of the MEXICO (Model EXperiments In Controlled cOnditions) rotor at five tunnel wind speeds is predicted by making use of BEM and CFD methods, respectively, using commercial MATLAB and CFD software. Due to the pressure differences on both sides of the blade, the tip...... the reliability of the MEXICO data. Second, the SST turbulence model can better capture the flow separation on the blade and has high aerodynamic performance prediction accuracy for a horizontal axis wind turbine in axial inflow conditions. Finally, the comparisons of the axial and tangential forces as well...

  13. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC TRACKING OF AERODYNAMIC SURFACES AND AEROSPACE MODELS AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    OpenAIRE

    Shortis, Mark R.; Robson, Stuart; Jones, Thomas W.; Goad, William K.; Lunsford, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Aerospace engineers require measurements of the shape of aerodynamic surfaces and the six degree of freedom (6DoF) position and orientation of aerospace models to analyse structural dynamics and aerodynamic forces. The measurement technique must be non-contact, accurate, reliable, have a high sample rate and preferably be non-intrusive. Close range photogrammetry based on multiple, synchronised, commercial-off-the-shelf digital cameras can supply surface shape and 6DoF data at 5-15Hz with cus...

  14. Nonlinear Aerodynamic Modeling From Flight Data Using Advanced Piloted Maneuvers and Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    Results of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Seedling Project Phase I research project entitled "Nonlinear Aerodynamics Modeling using Fuzzy Logic" are presented. Efficient and rapid flight test capabilities were developed for estimating highly nonlinear models of airplane aerodynamics over a large flight envelope. Results showed that the flight maneuvers developed, used in conjunction with the fuzzy-logic system identification algorithms, produced very good model fits of the data, with no model structure inputs required, for flight conditions ranging from cruise to departure and spin conditions.

  15. A Hybrid Metaheuristic-Based Approach for the Aerodynamic Optimization of Small Hybrid Wind Turbine Rotors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert-Acero, José F.; Martínez-Lauranchet, Jaime; Probst, Oliver;

    2014-01-01

    the aerodynamic efficiency of small WT (SWT) rotors for a wide range of operational conditions. The design variables are (1) the airfoil shape at the different blade span positions and the radial variation of the geometrical variables of (2) chord length, (3) twist angle, and (4) thickness along the...... blade span. A wind tunnel validation study of optimized rotors based on the NACA 4-digit airfoil series is presented. Based on the experimental data, improvements in terms of the aerodynamic efficiency, the cut-in wind speed, and the amount of material used during themanufacturing process were achieved...

  16. Parametric approximation of airfoil aerodynamic coefficients at high angles of attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Three methods for estimating the lift and drag curves in the 360° angle of attack (α) range with harmonic approximation functions were analyzed in the present work. The first method assumes aerodynamic response of a flat plate, the second utilizes even sine and even cosine approximation functions...

  17. Ecology of tern flight in relation to wind, topography and aerodynamic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenström, Anders; Åkesson, Susanne

    2016-09-26

    Flight is an economical mode of locomotion, because it is both fast and relatively cheap per unit of distance, enabling birds to migrate long distances and obtain food over large areas. The power required to fly follows a U-shaped function in relation to airspeed, from which context dependent 'optimal' flight speeds can be derived. Crosswinds will displace birds away from their intended track unless they make compensatory adjustments of heading and airspeed. We report on flight track measurements in five geometrically similar tern species ranging one magnitude in body mass, from both migration and the breeding season at the island of Öland in the Baltic Sea. When leaving the southern point of Öland, migrating Arctic and common terns made a 60° shift in track direction, probably guided by a distant landmark. Terns adjusted both airspeed and heading in relation to tail and side wind, where coastlines facilitated compensation. Airspeed also depended on ecological context (searching versus not searching for food), and it increased with flock size. Species-specific maximum range speed agreed with predicted speeds from a new aerodynamic theory. Our study shows that the selection of airspeed is a behavioural trait that depended on a complex blend of internal and external factors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'. PMID:27528786

  18. A Hybrid Metaheuristic-Based Approach for the Aerodynamic Optimization of Small Hybrid Wind Turbine Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Herbert-Acero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a novel framework for the aerodynamic design and optimization of blades for small horizontal axis wind turbines (WT. The framework is based on a state-of-the-art blade element momentum model, which is complemented with the XFOIL 6.96 software in order to provide an estimate of the sectional blade aerodynamics. The framework considers an innovative nested-hybrid solution procedure based on two metaheuristics, the virtual gene genetic algorithm and the simulated annealing algorithm, to provide a near-optimal solution to the problem. The objective of the study is to maximize the aerodynamic efficiency of small WT (SWT rotors for a wide range of operational conditions. The design variables are (1 the airfoil shape at the different blade span positions and the radial variation of the geometrical variables of (2 chord length, (3 twist angle, and (4 thickness along the blade span. A wind tunnel validation study of optimized rotors based on the NACA 4-digit airfoil series is presented. Based on the experimental data, improvements in terms of the aerodynamic efficiency, the cut-in wind speed, and the amount of material used during the manufacturing process were achieved. Recommendations for the aerodynamic design of SWT rotors are provided based on field experience.

  19. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    Although aircraft operate over a wide range of flight conditions, current fixed-geometry aircraft are optimized for only a few of these conditions. By altering the shape of the aircraft, adaptive aerodynamics can be used to increase the safety and performance of an aircraft by tailoring the aircraft for multiple flight conditions. Of the various shape adaptation concepts currently being studied, the use of multiple trailing-edge flaps along the span of a wing offers a relatively high possibility of being incorporated on aircraft in the near future. Multiple trailing-edge flaps allow for effective spanwise camber adaptation with resulting drag benefits over a large speed range and load alleviation at high-g conditions. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the development of this concept of using trailing-edge flaps to tailor an aircraft for multiple flight conditions. One of the major tasks involved in implementing trailing-edge flaps is in designing the airfoil to incorporate the flap. The first part of this dissertation presents a design formulation that incorporates aircraft performance considerations in the inverse design of low-speed laminar-flow adaptive airfoils with trailing-edge cruise flaps. The benefit of using adaptive airfoils is that the size of the low-drag region of the drag polar can be effectively increased without increasing the maximum thickness of the airfoil. Two aircraft performance parameters are considered: level-flight maximum speed and maximum range. It is shown that the lift coefficients for the lower and upper corners of the airfoil low-drag range can be appropriately adjusted to tailor the airfoil for these two aircraft performance parameters. The design problem is posed as a part of a multidimensional Newton iteration in an existing conformal-mapping based inverse design code, PROFOIL. This formulation automatically adjusts the lift coefficients for the corners of the low-drag range for a given flap deflection as

  20. Iridescent aerodynamic contrails. The Norderney case of 27 June 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierens, Klaus; Kaestner, Martina [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Klatt, Dieter [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oldenburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    2011-06-15

    An iridescent aerodynamic contrail (AerC) of a 2-engine aircraft flying from Amsterdam to Copenhagen was observed and photographed at Norderney on 27 June 2008, 14:06 UTC. In order to see whether this event was caused by an unusual weather situation we investigate the meteorological situation. It turns out that the situation allows AerC to become visible because it was warm enough and sufficiently moist. The dynamical situation is studied, and it seems that the stable stratification at the flight level of 350 hPa supports the appearance of an AerC. Additionally we investigate the ambient cloudiness where interesting halo features have been displayed in cirrus clouds. We examine the special colours of the Norderney aerodynamic contrail which allows to conclude that the width of the ice crystal size distribution is the factor directly relevant for iridescence, in this case representing a mixture from different growth histories. Finally we present an argumentation that AerC can be differentiated from jet contrails as soon as they display iridescence which requires an angular distance from the sun of less than about 30 . (orig.)

  1. Exploring Discretization Error in Simulation-Based Aerodynamic Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian

    2010-01-01

    This work examines the level of discretization error in simulation-based aerodynamic databases and introduces strategies for error control. Simulations are performed using a parallel, multi-level Euler solver on embedded-boundary Cartesian meshes. Discretization errors in user-selected outputs are estimated using the method of adjoint-weighted residuals and we use adaptive mesh refinement to reduce these errors to specified tolerances. Using this framework, we examine the behavior of discretization error throughout a token database computed for a NACA 0012 airfoil consisting of 120 cases. We compare the cost and accuracy of two approaches for aerodynamic database generation. In the first approach, mesh adaptation is used to compute all cases in the database to a prescribed level of accuracy. The second approach conducts all simulations using the same computational mesh without adaptation. We quantitatively assess the error landscape and computational costs in both databases. This investigation highlights sensitivities of the database under a variety of conditions. The presence of transonic shocks or the stiffness in the governing equations near the incompressible limit are shown to dramatically increase discretization error requiring additional mesh resolution to control. Results show that such pathologies lead to error levels that vary by over factor of 40 when using a fixed mesh throughout the database. Alternatively, controlling this sensitivity through mesh adaptation leads to mesh sizes which span two orders of magnitude. We propose strategies to minimize simulation cost in sensitive regions and discuss the role of error-estimation in database quality.

  2. Range size patterns in European freshwater trematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieltges, David; Hof, Christian; Borregaard, Michael Krabbe;

    2011-01-01

    gradient in beta diversity reflects patterns observed in free-living species and probably results from recolonization in the aftermath of the ice ages. The similar beta-diversity patterns of allogenic and autogenic trematodes and the increasing proportion of autogenic trematodes with increasing latitude...

  3. Basamatikum - Combined Wide Size Range Aerosol Spectromeeter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondráček, Jakub; Mašková, Ludmila; Smolík, Jiří

    Praha: Czech Aerosol Society, 2013 - (Zíková, N.), s. 91-94 ISBN 978-80-86186-52-8. [Výroční konference České aerosolové společnosti /14./. Nový Smokovec, High Tatras (SK), 23.10.2013-25.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA MK DF11P01OVV020 Keywords : APS * indoor/outdoor * switching valve Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  4. Aerodynamic Aspects of Wind Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    -blade geometry. The basics of the blade-element momentum theory are presented along with guidelines for the construction of airfoil data. Various theories for aerodynamically optimum rotors are discussed, and recent results on classical models are presented. State-of-the-art advanced numerical simulation tools...

  5. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  6. Small Radial Compressors: Aerodynamic Design and Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    K. A. R. Ismail; Rosolen, C. V. A. G.; Benevenuto, F. J.; Lucato, D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a computational procedure for the analysis of steady one-dimensional centrifugal compressor. The numerical model is based on the conservation principles of mass, momentum and energy, and has been utilized to predict the operational and aerodynamic characteristics of a small centrifugal compressor as well as determining the performance and geometry of compressor blades, both straight and curved.

  7. Small Radial Compressors: Aerodynamic Design and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. R. Ismail

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computational procedure for the analysis of steady one-dimensional centrifugal compressor. The numerical model is based on the conservation principles of mass, momentum and energy, and has been utilized to predict the operational and aerodynamic characteristics of a small centrifugal compressor as well as determining the performance and geometry of compressor blades, both straight and curved.

  8. Computer Aided Aerodynamic Design of Missile Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Panneerselvam

    1987-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic configurations of tactical missiles have to produce the required lateral force with minimum time lag to meet the required manoeuvability and response time. The present design which is mainly based on linearised potential flow involves (a indentification of critical design points, (b design of lifting components and their integration with mutual interference, (c evaluation of aerodynamic characteristics, (d checking its adequacy at otherpoints, (e optimization of parameters and selection of configuration, and (f detailed evaluation including aerodynamic pressure distribution. Iterative design process in involed because of the mutual dependance between aerodynamic charactertistics and the parameters of the configuration. though this design method is based on third level of approximation with respect to real flow, aid of computer is essential for carrying out the iterative design process and also for effective selection of configuration by analysing performance. Futuristic design requirement which demand better accuracy on design and estimation calls for sophisticated super computer based theoretical methods viz. , full Euler solution/Navier-Strokes solutions.

  9. Study of the chemical interaction between the beryllium powders of different particles size and the air in the temperature range 500-1000degC form the viewpoint of ITER safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, D.A. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konovalov, Y.V.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Levin, V.B.; Chekhlatov, G.M.; Khomutov, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Under an effect of some factors characteristic for the ITER- operating condition a dense beryllium facing plasma can transit into various forms, changing its structural states. As a result of the bombardment of beryllium plasma facing components by ion fluxes, the production of a dust including the particles from a few micrometers to a few millimeters in size is possible. The specific features in the behaviour of various beryllium forms under emergency conditions are of an essential interest from the viewpoint of ITER safety. Some grades of powders of different average particles size (14-31 micron) have been produced in a given study, and their chemical interaction at high temperatures with air (500-1100degC), test duration effects simulating the emergency situation at ITER in the first approximation have been studied. The temperature dependence of beryllium powders (different particles size after disc abrased) interaction with air in the temperature range 500-1000degC at the exposure of 5 hours long for each temperature and kinetic dependence of interaction of these powders with air at 800degC for the exposure from half an hour to 7 hours long were studied. An analysis of granulometric weight fraction in the metallic and oxidized beryllium powders with different particles size has been done by the photosedimentational technique with the instrument `Analysette-20`. Construction of a mathematical model for the chemical interaction of beryllium powders with air at high temperatures have been carried out. (author)

  10. CFD Simulations in Support of Shuttle Orbiter Contingency Abort Aerodynamic Database Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Periklis E.; Prabhu, Dinesh; Wright, Michael; Davies, Carol; McDaniel, Ryan; Venkatapathy, E.; Wercinski, Paul; Gomez, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Modern Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques were used to compute aerodynamic forces and moments of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in specific portions of contingency abort trajectory space. The trajectory space covers a Mach number range of 3.5-15, an angle-of-attack range of 20deg-60deg, an altitude range of 100-190 kft, and several different settings of the control surfaces (elevons, body flap, and speed brake). Presented here are details of the methodology and comparisons of computed aerodynamic coefficients against the values in the current Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Data Book (OADB). While approximately 40 cases have been computed, only a sampling of the results is provided here. The computed results, in general, are in good agreement with the OADB data (i.e., within the uncertainty bands) for almost all the cases. However, in a limited number of high angle-of-attack cases (at Mach 15), there are significant differences between the computed results, especially the vehicle pitching moment, and the OADB data. A preliminary analysis of the data from the CFD simulations at Mach 15 shows that these differences can be attributed to real-gas/Mach number effects. The aerodynamic coefficients and detailed surface pressure distributions of the present simulations are being used by the Shuttle Program in the evaluation of the capabilities of the Orbiter in contingency abort scenarios.

  11. AN INVESTIGATION ON THE AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF 2-D AIRFIOL IN GROUND COLLISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AK KARTIGESH A/L KALAI CHELVEN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Near ground operation of airplanes represents a critical and an important aerodynamic practical problem due to the wing-ground collision. The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing are subjected to dramatic changes due to the flow field interference with the ground. In the present paper, the wing-ground collision was investigated experimentally and numerically. The investigation involved a series of wind tunnel measurements of a 2-D wing model having NACA4412 airfoil section. An experimental set up has been designed and constructed to simulate the collision phenomena in a low speed wind tunnel. The investigations were carried out at different Reynolds numbers ranging from 105 to 4×105, various model heights to chord ratios, H/C ranging from 0.1 to 1, and different angles of attack ranging from -4o to 20o. Numerical simulation of the wing-ground collision has been carried out using FLUENT software. The results of the numerical simulation have been validated by comparison with previous and recent experimental data and it was within acceptable agreement. The results have shown that the aerodynamic characteristics are considerably influenced when the wing is close to the ground, mainly at angles of attacks 4o to 8o. The take off and landing speeds are found to be very influencing parameters on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing in collision status, mainly the lift.

  12. Calibration of high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Thorpe, Andrew; Cauda, Emanuele; Harper, Martin

    2016-06-01

    High flow rate respirable size selective samplers, GK4.126 and FSP10 cyclones, were calibrated for thoracic-size selective sampling in two different laboratories. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) utilized monodisperse ammonium fluorescein particles and scanning electron microscopy to determine the aerodynamic particle size of the monodisperse aerosol. Fluorescein intensity was measured to determine sampling efficiencies of the cyclones. The Health Safety and Laboratory (HSL) utilized a real time particle sizing instrument (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer) and polydisperse glass sphere particles and particle size distributions between the cyclone and reference sampler were compared. Sampling efficiency of the cyclones were compared to the thoracic convention defined by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)/Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN)/International Standards Organization (ISO). The GK4.126 cyclone showed minimum bias compared to the thoracic convention at flow rates of 3.5 l min(-1) (NIOSH) and 2.7-3.3 l min(-1) (HSL) and the difference may be from the use of different test systems. In order to collect the most dust and reduce the limit of detection, HSL suggested using the upper end in range (3.3 l min(-1)). A flow rate of 3.4 l min(-1) would be a reasonable compromise, pending confirmation in other laboratories. The FSP10 cyclone showed minimum bias at the flow rate of 4.0 l min(-1) in the NIOSH laboratory test. The high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers might be used for higher sample mass collection in order to meet analytical limits of quantification. PMID:26891196

  13. Sizing up microbes

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    The size range of life forms is dictated by basic principles of physics. Large microorganisms, with sizes approaching a millimeter, have compensating features that address the immutable laws of physics. For pathogens, size may impact a range of functions, such as adherence and immune evasion. We review several recent studies on factors impacting, and impacted by, the size of microorganisms.

  14. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  15. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  16. Wind turbines. Unsteady aerodynamics and inflow noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riget Broe, B.

    2009-12-15

    Aerodynamical noise from wind turbines due to atmospheric turbulence has the highest emphasis in semi-empirical models. However it is an open question whether inflow noise has a high emphasis. This illustrates the need to investigate and improve the semi-empirical model for noise due to atmospheric turbulence. Three different aerodynamical models are investigated in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics. Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil. An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input. The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models for lift distribution is for completely anisotropic turbulence and the other for perfectly isotropic turbulence, and so is also the corresponding models for the lift fluctuations derived from the models for lift distribution. The models for lift distribution and lift are compared with pressure data which are obtained by microphones placed flush with the surface of an aerofoil. The pressure data are from two experiments in a wind tunnel, one experiment with a NACA0015 profile and a second with a NACA63415 profile. The turbulence is measured by a triple wired hotwire instrument in the experiment with a NACA0015 profile. Comparison of the aerodynamical models with data shows that the models capture the general characteristics of the measurements, but the data are hampered by background noise from the fan propellers in the wind tunnel. The measurements are in between the completely anisotropic turbulent model and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model by the measurements

  17. Research on aerodynamic means of isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a research program directed toward the understanding of the fundamental gas dynamics involved in aerodynamic isotope enrichment are summarized. The specific aerodynamic isotope enrichment method which was examined in this research is based on a velocity slip phenomenon which occurs in the rarefied hypersonic expansion of a heavy molecular weight gas and a light carrier gas in a nozzle or free jet. This particular aerodynamic method was chosen for study because it contains the fundamental molecular physics of other more complex techniques within the context of a one-dimensional flow without boundary effects. From both an experimental and theoretical modeling perspective this provides an excellent basis for testing the experimental and numerical tools with which to investigate more complex aerodynamic isotope enrichment processes. This report consists of three separate parts. Part I contains a theoretical analysis of the velocity slip effect in free jet expansions of binary and ternary gas mixtures. The analysis, based on a source flow model and using moment equations is derived from the Boltzmann equation using the hypersonic approximation. Part II contains the experimental measurements of velocity slip. The numerical simulation of the slip process was carried out by using a Monte-Carlo numerical technique. In addition, comparisons between the theoretical analysis of Part I and the experiments are presented. Part III describes impact pressure measurements of free jet expansions from slot shaped two dimensional nozzles. At least two methods of aerodynamic isotope enrichment (opposed jet and velocity slip) would depend on the use of this type of two dimensional expansion. Flow surveys of single free jet and the interferene of crossed free jets are presented

  18. Design Exploration of Aerodynamic Wing Shape for RLV Flyback Booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Kazuhisa; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    The wing shape of flyback booster for a Two-Stage-To-Orbit reusable launch vehicle has been optimized considering four objectives. The objectives are to minimize the shift of aerodynamic center between supersonic and transonic conditions, transonic pitching moment and transonic drag coefficient, as well as to maximize subsonic lift coefficient. The three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computation using the modified Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model is used in aerodynamic evaluation accounting for possible flow separations. Adaptive range multi-objective genetic algorithm is used for the present study because tradeoff can be obtained using a smaller number of individuals than conventional multi-objective genetic algorithms. Consequently, four-objective optimization has produced 102 non-dominated solutions, which represent tradeoff information among four objective functions. Moreover, Self-Organizing Maps have been used to analyze the present non-dominated solutions and to visualize tradeoffs and influence of design variables to the four objectives. Self-Organizing Maps contoured by the four objective functions and design variables are found to visualize tradeoffs and effects of each design variable.

  19. Aerodynamic interaction between forewing and hindwing of a hovering dragonfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng; Deng, Xin-Yan

    2014-12-01

    The phase change between the forewing and hindwing is a distinct feature that sets dragonfly apart from other insects. In this paper, we investigated the aerodynamic effects of varying forewing-hindwing phase difference with a 60° inclined stroke plane during hovering flight. Force measurements on a pair of mechanical wing models showed that in-phase flight enhanced the forewing lift by 17% and the hindwing lift was reduced at most phase differences. The total lift of both wings was also reduced at most phase differences and only increased at a phase range around in-phase. The results may explain the commonly observed behavior of the dragonfly where 0° is employed in acceleration. We further investigated the wing-wing interaction mechanism using the digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) system, and found that the forewing generated a downwash flow which is responsible for the lift reduction on the hindwing. On the other hand, an upwash flow resulted from the leading edge vortex of the hindwing helps to enhance lift on the forewing. The results suggest that the dragonflies alter the phase differences to control timing of the occurrence of flow interactions to achieve certain aerodynamic effects.

  20. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean Graham

    2007-10-31

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by a DOE category two Inventions and Innovations grant to commercialize and improve upon aerodynamic technology for semi-tuck trailers, capable of decreasing heavy vehicle fuel consumption, related environmental damage, and U.S. consumption of foreign oil. Major project goals included the demonstration of aerodynamic trailer technology in trucking fleet operations, and the development and testing of second generation products. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck’s fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Freight Wing utilized a 2003 category one Inventions and Innovations grant to develop practical solutions to trailer aerodynamics. Fairings developed for the front, rear, and bottom of standard semi-trailers together demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy in scientific tests conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC). Operational tests with major trucking fleets proved the functionality of the products, which were subsequently brought to market. This category two grant enabled Freight Wing to further develop, test and commercialize its products, resulting in greatly increased understanding and acceptance of aerodynamic trailer technology. Commercialization was stimulated by offering trucking fleets 50% cost sharing on trial implementations of Freight Wing products for testing and evaluation purposes. Over 230 fairings were implemented through the program with 35 trucking fleets including industry leaders such as Wal-Mart, Frito Lay and Whole Foods. The feedback from these testing partnerships was quite positive with product performance exceeding fleet expectations in many cases. Fleet feedback also was also valuable from a product development standpoint and assisted the design of several second generation products

  1. Aerodynamic performance of wind turbine under different yaw angles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Yali; Zuo, Hongmei; Yang, Hua;

    2015-01-01

    is set as 5×10-6 m to ensure the first dimensionless size near the wall Y+<0.5 on the wall, the 2 numbers of grids are determined by the error of axial load on the airfoil in the 60% section of blades, which respectively are 6 572 451 and 2 961 385. The aerodynamic performance of models under rated...... are drawn. The distributions of pressure coefficients along the airfoil chord in different blade sections calculated by CFD method are in good agreement with the experimental measurements, and the error on the suction surface of airfoil is mainly caused by stall separation occurring on the pressure...... surface of airfoil. With the increasing of yaw angle, the pressure coefficients of the suction side are increasing and the location of minimum pressure coefficient moves to airfoil trailing edge slightly. For the pressure side, the pressure coefficients increase at first and then decrease, and the...

  2. Two cases of aerodynamic adjustment of sastrugi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Amory

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In polar regions, sastrugi are a direct manifestation of wind driven snow and form the main surface roughness elements. In turn, sastrugi influence the local wind field and associated aeolian snow mass fluxes. Little attention has been paid to these feedback processes, mainly because of experimental difficulties, and, as a result most polar atmospheric models currently ignore sastrugi. More accurate quantification of the influence of sastrugi remains a major challenge. In the present study, wind profiles and aeolian snow mass fluxes were analyzed jointly on a sastrugi covered snowfield in Antarctica. Neutral stability 10 m air-snow drag coefficients CDN10 were computed from six level wind speed profiles collected in Adélie Land during austral winter 2013. The aeolian snow mass flux in the first meter above the surface of the snow was also measured using a windborne snow acoustic sensor. This paper focuses on two cases during which sastrugi responses to shifts in wind direction were evidenced by variations in snow mass flux and drag coefficients. Using this dataset, it was shown that (i the timescale of sastrugi aerodynamic adjustment can be as short as 3 h for friction velocities of 1 m s−1 or above and during strong windborne snow conditions, (ii CDN10 values were in the range of 1.3–1.5 × 103 when the wind was well aligned with the sastrugi and increased to 3 × 103 or higher when the wind only shifted 20–30°, (iii CDN10 can increase (to 120 % and the aeolian snow mass flux can decrease (to 80 % in response to a shift in wind direction, and (iv knowing CDN10 is not sufficient to estimate the erosion flux that results from drag partitioning at the surface because CDN10 includes the contribution of the sastrugi form drag. These results not only support the existence of feedback mechanisms linking sastrugi, aeolian particle transport and surface drag properties over snow surface but also provide orders of magnitude, although further

  3. Aerodynamics of intermittent bounds in flying birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W.; Hearn, Jason W. D.; Warrick, Douglas R.

    Flap-bounding is a common flight style in small birds in which flapping phases alternate with flexed-wing bounds. Body lift is predicted to be essential to making this flight style an aerodynamically attractive flight strategy. To elucidate the contributions of the body and tail to lift and drag during the flexed-wing bound phase, we used particle image velocimetry (PIV) and measured properties of the wake of zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata, N = 5), flying at 6-10 m s- 1 in a variable speed wind tunnel as well as flow around taxidermically prepared specimens (N = 4) mounted on a sting instrumented with force transducers. For the specimens, we varied air velocity from 2 to 12 m s- 1 and body angle from -15∘ to 50∘. The wake of bounding birds and mounted specimens consisted of a pair of counterrotating vortices shed into the wake from the tail, with induced downwash in the sagittal plane and upwash in parasagittal planes lateral to the bird. This wake structure was present even when the tail was entirely removed. We observed good agreement between force measures derived from PIV and force transducers over the range of body angles typically used by zebra finch during forward flight. Body lift:drag (L:D) ratios averaged 1.4 in live birds and varied between 1 and 1.5 in specimens at body angles from 10∘ to 30∘. Peak (L:D) ratio was the same in live birds and specimens (1.5) and was exhibited in specimens at body angles of 15∘ or 20∘, consistent with the lower end of body angles utilized during bounds. Increasing flight velocity in live birds caused a decrease in CL and CD from maximum values of 1.19 and 0.95 during flight at 6 m s- 1 to minimum values of 0.70 and 0.54 during flight at 10 m s- 1. Consistent with delta-wing theory as applied to birds with a graduated-tail shape, trimming the tail to 0 and 50% of normal length reduced L:D ratios and extending tail length to 150% of normal increased L:D ratio. As downward induced velocity is present in the

  4. Experimental Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Joined-wing Research Aircraft Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen C.; Stonum, Ronald K.

    1989-01-01

    A wind-tunnel test was conducted at Ames Research Center to measure the aerodynamic characteristics of a joined-wing research aircraft (JWRA). This aircraft was designed to utilize the fuselage and engines of the existing NASA AD-1 aircraft. The JWRA was designed to have removable outer wing panels to represent three different configurations with the interwing joint at different fractions of the wing span. A one-sixth-scale wind-tunnel model of all three configurations of the JWRA was tested in the Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel to measure aerodynamic performance, stability, and control characteristics. The results of these tests are presented. Longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics were measured over an angle of attack range of -7 to 14 deg and over an angle of sideslip range of -5 to +2.5 deg at a Mach number of 0.35 and a Reynolds number of 2.2x10(6)/ft. Various combinations of deflected control surfaces were tested to measure the effectiveness and impact on stability of several control surface arrangements. In addition, the effects on stall and post-stall aerodynamic characteristics from small leading-edge devices called vortilons were measured. The results of these tests indicate that the JWRA had very good aerodynamic performance and acceptable stability and control throughout its flight envelope. The vortilons produced a profound improvement in the stall and post-stall characteristics with no measurable effects on cruise performance.

  5. Synthesis and mechanical properties of silicon-doped TiAl-alloys with grain sizes in the submicron range; Herstellung und mechanische Eigenschaften silizidhaltiger TiAl-Werkstoffe mit Korngroessen im Submikronbereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, R. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a comprehensive insight into the mechanical properties of nano- and submicron-grained intermetallics, containing ceramic particles as a second phase. The investigations are focussed on {gamma}-TiAl-based alloys with a fine dispersion of titanium silicides. The samples are prepared by high energy milling and subsequent hot isostatic pressing. The mechanical properties are mainly dominated by the grain size as the most important structural feature. At room temperature, the grain size dependence of hardness and yield strength can be described by the well-known Hall-Petch relationship. Contrary to the behavior of conventional alloys, the ductility of submicron-grained alloys drops if the grain size is further reduced. This may be attributed to the insignificance of diffusional creep at room temperature and to arising difficulties evolving for dislocation-based deformation mechanisms. In the high temperature range, the flow stress is strongly reduced. Superplastic deformation becomes feasible already at 800 C. The silicide particles impede grain growth, but they also promote cavitation during tensile straining. The mechanisms of deformation are similar to those established for coarse-grained materials at higher temperatures ({>=}1000 C). (orig.)

  6. Advanced missile technology. A review of technology improvement areas for cruise missiles. [including missile design, missile configurations, and aerodynamic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronvich, L. L.; Liepman, H. P.

    1979-01-01

    Technology assessments in the areas of aerodynamics, propulsion, and structures and materials for cruise missile systems are discussed. The cruise missiles considered cover the full speed, altitude, and target range. The penetrativity, range, and maneuverability of the cruise missiles are examined and evaluated for performance improvements.

  7. Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong

    obtain more detailed information of the flow structures and to determine more accurately loads and power yield of wind turbines or cluster of wind turbines, it is required to resort to more sophisticated techniques, such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). As computer resources keep on improving year...... Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA). With the spread of wind turbines near urban areas, there is an increasing need for accurate predictions of aerodynamically generated noise. Indeed, noise has become one of the most important issues for further development of wind power, and the ability of controlling and......To analyse the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine rotors, the main tool in use today is the 1D-Blade Element Momentum (BEM) technique combined with 2D airfoil data. Because of its simplicity, the BEM technique is employed by industry when designing new wind turbine blades. However, in order to...

  8. Aerodynamic Design of a Tailless Aeroplan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Friedl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an aerodynamic analysis of a one-seat ultralight (UL tailless aeroplane named L2k, with a very complicated layout. In the first part, an autostable airfoil with a low moment coefficient was chosen as a base for this problem. This airfoil was refined and modified to satisfy the design requirements. The computed aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils for different Reynolds numbers (Re were compared with available experimental data. XFOIL code was used to perform the computations. In the second part, a computation of wing characteristics was carried out. All calculated cases were chosen as points on the manoeuvring and gust envelope. The vortex lattice method was used with consideration of fuselage and winglets for very complicated wing geometry. The PMW computer program developed at IAE was used to perform the computations. The computed results were subsequently used for structural and strength analysis and design.

  9. Aerodynamics of Rotor Blades for Quadrotors

    CERN Document Server

    Bangura, Moses; Naldi, Roberto; Mahony, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present the theory on aerodynamics of quadrotors using the well established momentum and blade element theories. From a robotics perspective, the theoretical development of the models for thrust and horizontal forces and torque (therefore power) are carried out in the body fixed frame of the quadrotor. Using momentum theory, we propose and model the existence of a horizontal force along with its associated power. Given the limitations associated with momentum theory and the inadequacy of the theory to account for the different powers represented in a proposed bond graph lead to the use of blade element theory. Using this theory, models are then developed for the different quadrotor rotor geometries and aerodynamic properties including the optimum hovering rotor used on the majority of quadrotors. Though this rotor is proven to be the most optimum rotor, we show that geometric variations are necessary for manufacturing of the blades. The geometric variations are also dictated by a desired th...

  10. Visualization of numerically simulated aerodynamic flow fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this paper is to describe the development and the application of an interactive integrated software to visualize numerically simulated aerodynamic flow fields so as to enable the practitioner of computational fluid dynamics to diagnose the numerical simulation and to elucidate essential flow physics from the simulation. The input to the software is the numerical database crunched by a supercomputer and typically consists of flow variables and computational grid geometry. This flow visualization system (FVS), written in C language is targetted at the Personal IRIS Workstations. In order to demonstrate the various visualization modules, the paper also describes the application of this software to visualize two- and three-dimensional flow fields past aerodynamic configurations which have been numerically simulated on the NEC-SXIA Supercomputer. 6 refs

  11. Particle Methods in Bluff Body Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj

    flow. The method is validated by simulating the turbulent flow past a flat plate and past the Great Belt East bridge, the Øresund bridge and the Busan-Geoje bridge. The dissertation introduces a novel multiresolution vortex-in-cell algorithm using patches of varying resolution. The Poisson equation...... important. This dissertation focuses on the use of vortex particle methods and computational efficiency. The work is divided into three parts. A novel method for the simulation of the aerodynamic admittance in bluff body aerodynamics is presented. The method involves a model for describing oncoming...... turbulence in two-dimensional discrete vortex method simulations by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles. The turbulence is generated prior to the simulations and is based on analytic spectral densities of the atmospheric turbulence and a coherence function defining the spatial correlation of the...

  12. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  13. Wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliore, P G [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Miller, L S [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Quandt, G A

    1995-04-01

    Five trailing-edge devices were investigated to determine their potential as wind-turbine aerodynamic brakes, and for power modulation and load alleviation. Several promising configurations were identified. A new device, called the spoiler-flap, appears to be the best alternative. It is a simple device that is effective at all angles of attack. It is not structurally intrusive, and it has the potential for small actuating loads. It is shown that simultaneous achievement of a low lift/drag ratio and high drag is the determinant of device effectiveness, and that these attributes must persist up to an angle of attack of 45{degree}. It is also argued that aerodynamic brakes must be designed for a wind speed of at least 45 m/s (100 mph).

  14. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR CALCULATING FAN AERODYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dostal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results obtained between 2010 and 2014 in the field of fan aerodynamics at the Department of Composite Technology at the VZLÚ aerospace research and experimental institute in Prague – Letnany. The need for rapid and accurate methods for the preliminary design of blade machinery led to the creation of a mathematical model based on the basic laws of turbomachine aerodynamics. The mathematical model, the derivation of which is briefly described below, has been encoded in a computer programme, which enables the theoretical characteristics of a fan of the designed geometry to be determined rapidly. The validity of the mathematical model is assessed continuously by measuring model fans in the measuring unit, which was developed and manufactured specifically for this purpose. The paper also presents a comparison between measured characteristics and characteristics determined by the mathematical model as the basis for a discussion on possible causes of measured deviations and calculation deviations.

  15. Aerodynamic control inside an internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to quantify the impact of intake port geometry on in-cylinder flow. The in-cylinder aerodynamics of an optical engine has been characterized using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Many geometries have been tested and their impact has been evaluated by an estimation of the tumble ratio, an analysis of the cycle-to-cycle variations and a flow structure analysis based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Such a tool allows the reduction of the PIV database in order to consider in-cylinder aerodynamic control by a device placed in the intake port. This simplification is based on a reduction of the number of modes and a polynomial fitting of the POD coefficients. Thus, some new geometries have been numerically created, and their impact on the tumble ratio has been evaluated

  16. Flight Test Maneuvers for Efficient Aerodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Novel flight test maneuvers for efficient aerodynamic modeling were developed and demonstrated in flight. Orthogonal optimized multi-sine inputs were applied to aircraft control surfaces to excite aircraft dynamic response in all six degrees of freedom simultaneously while keeping the aircraft close to chosen reference flight conditions. Each maneuver was designed for a specific modeling task that cannot be adequately or efficiently accomplished using conventional flight test maneuvers. All of the new maneuvers were first described and explained, then demonstrated on a subscale jet transport aircraft in flight. Real-time and post-flight modeling results obtained using equation-error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were used to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the new maneuvers, as well as the quality of the aerodynamic models that can be identified from the resultant flight data.

  17. Nash equilibrium and multi criterion aerodynamic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhili; Zhang, Lianhe

    2016-06-01

    Game theory and its particular Nash Equilibrium (NE) are gaining importance in solving Multi Criterion Optimization (MCO) in engineering problems over the past decade. The solution of a MCO problem can be viewed as a NE under the concept of competitive games. This paper surveyed/proposed four efficient algorithms for calculating a NE of a MCO problem. Existence and equivalence of the solution are analyzed and proved in the paper based on fixed point theorem. Specific virtual symmetric Nash game is also presented to set up an optimization strategy for single objective optimization problems. Two numerical examples are presented to verify proposed algorithms. One is mathematical functions' optimization to illustrate detailed numerical procedures of algorithms, the other is aerodynamic drag reduction of civil transport wing fuselage configuration by using virtual game. The successful application validates efficiency of algorithms in solving complex aerodynamic optimization problem.

  18. Specialized computer architectures for computational aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    In recent years, computational fluid dynamics has made significant progress in modelling aerodynamic phenomena. Currently, one of the major barriers to future development lies in the compute-intensive nature of the numerical formulations and the relative high cost of performing these computations on commercially available general purpose computers, a cost high with respect to dollar expenditure and/or elapsed time. Today's computing technology will support a program designed to create specialized computing facilities to be dedicated to the important problems of computational aerodynamics. One of the still unresolved questions is the organization of the computing components in such a facility. The characteristics of fluid dynamic problems which will have significant impact on the choice of computer architecture for a specialized facility are reviewed.

  19. Integrated structural-aerodynamic design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P. J.; Grossman, B.; Polen, D.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration, with emphasis on the major difficulty associated with multidisciplinary design optimization processes, their enormous computational costs. Methods are presented for reducing this computational burden through the development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculations and the implementation of approximate optimization procedures. Utilizing a modular sensitivity analysis approach, it is shown that the sensitivities can be computed without the expensive calculation of the derivatives of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix, and the derivatives of the structural flexibility matrix. The same process is used to efficiently evaluate the sensitivities of the wing divergence constraint, which should be particularly useful, not only in problems of complete integrated aircraft design, but also in aeroelastic tailoring applications.

  20. Wind Turbines: Unsteady Aerodynamics and Inflow Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Brian Riget

    the highest emphasis in semi-empirical models. However it is an open question whether inflow noise has a high emphasis. This illustrates the need to investigate and improve the semi-empirical model for noise due to atmospheric turbulence. Three different aerodynamical models are investigated...... (Sears, W. R.: 1941; and Graham, J. M. R.: 1970). An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input (Amiet, R. K.: 1975, Acoustic radiation from an airfoil in a turbulent stream). The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models...... profile. Comparison of the aerodynamical models with data shows that the models capture the general characteristics of the measurements, but the data are hampered by background noise from the fan propellers in the wind tunnel. The measurements are in between the completely anisotropic turbulent model...

  1. Mimicking the humpback whale: An aerodynamic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, S. M. A.; Razak, N. A.; Mohd Rafie, A. S.; Ahmad, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    This comprehensive review aims to provide a critical overview of the work on tubercles in the past decade. The humpback whale is of interest to aerodynamic/hydrodynamic researchers, as it performs manoeuvres that baffle the imagination. Researchers have attributed these capabilities to the presence of lumps, known as tubercles, on the leading edge of the flipper. Tubercles generate a unique flow control mechanism, offering the humpback exceptional manoeuverability. Experimental and numerical studies have shown that the flow pattern over the tubercle wing is quite different from conventional wings. Research on the Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE) concept has helped to clarify aerodynamic issues such as flow separation, tonal noise and dynamic stall. TLE shows increased lift by delaying and restricting spanwise separation. A summary of studies on different airfoils and reported improvement in performance is outlined. The major contributions and limitations of previous work are also reported.

  2. Electrochemical properties of nano-sized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 powders in the range from 56 to 101 nm prepared by flame spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 powders are prepared by flame spray pyrolysis. A lithium excess of 15% of the stoichiometric amount in the spray solution produced powder with good electrochemical properties for use as a cathode. The mean particle sizes of the powders post-treated at 700 and 800 °C are 56 and 101 nm, respectively. The powder prepared with 15% excess lithium results in the highest initial discharge capacity of 174 mAh g−1. Highlights: ► Nano-sized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 powders are prepared directly by flame spray pyrolysis. ► The mean particle sizes of the powders post-treated at 700 and 800 °C are 56 and 101 nm, respectively. ► The powder prepared with 15% excess lithium results in the highest initial discharge capacity of 174 mAh g−1. - Abstract: Nano-sized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 powders in the range from 56 to 101 nm with hexagonal α-NaFeO2 structures are prepared directly by flame spray pyrolysis. Post-treatment of the powders at 700 °C increases their crystallinity and mean particle sizes. The intensity ratios of the powders’ (0 0 3) and (1 0 4) peaks in the XRD patterns prepared from spray solutions with lithium excesses of 10, 15 and 20% of the stoichiometric amount are 0.83, 1.25 and 1.25, respectively. The powder prepared with 15% excess lithium results in the highest initial discharge capacity of 174 mAh g−1 when post-treated at 700 °C. The discharge capacity of the powder post-treated at 800 °C decreases from 168 to 120 mAh g−1 after 30 cycles.

  3. Motion of rotor supported on aerodynamic bearings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Šimek, J.; Kozánek, Jan

    Praha : Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR, v. v. i., 2007 - (Zolotarev, I.), s. 235-236 ISBN 978-80-87012-06-2. [Engineering Mechanics 2007: national conference with international participation. Svratka (CZ), 14.05.2007-17.05.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/06/1787 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : rotor dynamics * aerodynamic bearing * tilting pad s Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  4. Mutual interaction of two aerodynamic bearings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Kozánek, Jan

    Lodz : Department of Automatics and Biomechanics Technical University of Lodz, 2007, s. 387-394. ISBN 978-83-924382-9-8. [Conference on Dynamical Systems - Theory and Applications /9./. Lodz (PL), 17.12.2007-20.12.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/06/1787 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : aerodynamic bearing * evolutive systems * numerical solution Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  5. Unsteady aerodynamics of high work turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, David

    2009-01-01

    One method aircraft engine manufactures use to minimize engine cost and weight is to reduce the number of parts. A significant reduction includes reducing the turbine blade count or combining two moderately loaded turbines into one high-work turbine. The risk of High Cycle Fatigue in these configurations is increased by the additional aerodynamic forcing generated by the high blade loading and the nozzle trailing edge shocks. A lot of research has been done into the efficiency implications of...

  6. Aerodynamic investigations of ventilated brake discs.

    OpenAIRE

    Parish, D.; MacManus, David G.

    2005-01-01

    The heat dissipation and performance of a ventilated brake disc strongly depends on the aerodynamic characteristics of the flow through the rotor passages. The aim of this investigation was to provide an improved understanding of ventilated brake rotor flow phenomena, with a view to improving heat dissipation, as well as providing a measurement data set for validation of computational fluid dynamics methods. The flow fields at the exit of four different brake rotor geometrie...

  7. Influence of Icing on Bridge Cable Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Frej Henningsen, Jesper; Olsen, Idar

    2013-01-01

    determination of these force coefficients require a proper simulation of the ice layer occurring under the specific climatic conditions, favouring real ice accretion over simplified artificial reproduction. The work presented in this paper was performed to study the influence of ice accretion on the aerodynamic...... forces of different bridge cables types. The experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel facility capable amongst others to simulate incloud icing conditions....

  8. Analysis and Improvement of Aerodynamic Performance of Straight Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Baloutaki, Mojtaba

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) with straight blades are attractive for their relatively simple structure and aerodynamic performance. Their commercialization, however, still encounters many challenges. A series of studies were conducted in the current research to improve the VAWTs design and enhance their aerodynamic performance. First, an efficient design methodology built on an existing analytical approach is presented to formulate the design parameters influencing a straight bladed-VAWT (SB-VAWT) aerodynamic performance and determine the optimal range of these parameters for prototype construction. This work was followed by a series of studies to collectively investigate the role of external turbulence on the SB-VAWTs operation. The external free-stream turbulence is known as one of the most important factors influencing VAWTs since this type of turbines is mainly considered for urban applications where the wind turbulence is of great significance. Initially, two sets of wind tunnel testing were conducted to study the variation of aerodynamic performance of a SB-VAWT's blade under turbulent flows, in two major stationary configurations, namely two- and three-dimensional flows. Turbulent flows generated in the wind tunnel were quasi-isotropic having uniform mean flow profiles, free of any wind shear effects. Aerodynamic force measurements demonstrated that the free-stream turbulence improves the blade aerodynamic performance in stall and post-stall regions by delaying the stall and increasing the lift-to-drag ratio. After these studies, a SB-VAWT model was tested in the wind tunnel under the same type of turbulent flows. The turbine power output was substantially increased in the presence of the grid turbulence at the same wind speeds, while the increase in turbine power coefficient due to the effect of grid turbulence was small at the same tip speed ratios. The final section presents an experimental study on the aerodynamic interaction of VAWTs in arrays

  9. Integrated aerodynamic-structural-control wing design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais-Rohani, M.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Unger, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic-structural-control design of a forward-swept composite wing for a high subsonic transport aircraft is considered. The structural analysis is based on a finite-element method. The aerodynamic calculations are based on a vortex-lattice method, and the control calculations are based on an output feedback control. The wing is designed for minimum weight subject to structural, performance/aerodynamic and control constraints. Efficient methods are used to calculate the control-deflection and control-effectiveness sensitivities which appear as second-order derivatives in the control constraint equations. To suppress the aeroelastic divergence of the forward-swept wing, and to reduce the gross weight of the design aircraft, two separate cases are studied: (1) combined application of aeroelastic tailoring and active controls; and (2) aeroelastic tailoring alone. The results of this study indicated that, for this particular example, aeroelastic tailoring is sufficient for suppressing the aeroelastic divergence, and the use of active controls was not necessary.

  10. Aerodynamic sampling for landmine trace detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Gary S.; Kester, Douglas A.

    2001-10-01

    Electronic noses and similar sensors show promise for detecting buried landmines through the explosive trace signals they emit. A key step in this detection is the sampler or sniffer, which acquires the airborne trace signal and presents it to the detector. Practicality demands no physical contact with the ground. Further, both airborne particulates and molecular traces must be sampled. Given a complicated minefield terrain and microclimate, this becomes a daunting chore. Our prior research on canine olfactory aerodynamics revealed several ways that evolution has dealt with such problems: 1) proximity of the sniffer to the scent source is important, 2) avoid exhaling back into the scent source, 3) use an aerodynamic collar on the sniffer inlet, 4) use auxiliary airjets to stir up surface particles, and 5) manage the 'impedance mismatch' between sniffer and sensor airflows carefully. Unfortunately, even basic data on aerodynamic sniffer performance as a function of inlet-tube and scent-source diameters, standoff distance, etc., have not been previously obtained. A laboratory-prototype sniffer was thus developed to provide guidance for landmine trace detectors. Initial experiments with this device are the subject of this paper. For example, a spike in the trace signal is observed upon starting the sniffer airflow, apparently due to rapid depletion of the available signal-laden air. Further, shielding the sniffer from disruptive ambient airflows arises as a key issue in sampling efficiency.

  11. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    This paper shows an example of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. The aerodynamic optimised geometry from PVOPT is the `real` optimum (up to the latest decimal). The most important conclusion from this study is, that it is worthwhile to investigate the behaviour of the objective function (in the present case the energy yield) around the optimum: If the optimum is flat, there is a possibility to apply modifications to the optimum configuration with only a limited loss in energy yield. It is obvious that the modified configurations emits a different (and possibly lower) noise level. In the BLADOPT program (the successor of PVOPT) it will be possible to quantify the noise level and hence to assess the reduced noise emission more thoroughly. At present the most promising approaches for noise reduction are believed to be a reduction of the rotor speed (if at all possible), and a reduction of the tip angle by means of low lift profiles, or decreased twist at the outboard stations. These modifications were possible without a significant loss in energy yield. (LN)

  12. Aerodynamics of a rigid curved kite wing

    CERN Document Server

    Maneia, Gianmauro; Tordella, Daniela; Iovieno, Michele

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary numerical study on the aerodynamics of a kite wing for high altitude wind power generators is proposed. Tethered kites are a key element of an innovative wind energy technology, which aims to capture energy from the wind at higher altitudes than conventional wind towers. We present the results obtained from three-dimensional finite volume numerical simulations of the steady air flow past a three-dimensional curved rectangular kite wing (aspect ratio equal to 3.2, Reynolds number equal to 3x10^6). Two angles of incidence -- a standard incidence for the flight of a tethered airfoil (6{\\deg}) and an incidence close to the stall (18{\\deg}) -- were considered. The simulations were performed by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes flow model using the industrial STAR-CCM+ code. The overall aerodynamic characteristics of the kite wing were determined and compared to the aerodynamic characteristics of the flat rectangular non twisted wing with an identical aspect ratio and section (Clark Y profil...

  13. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight. PMID:27030773

  14. The aerodynamics of circulation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    Two dimensional subsonic wind tunnel tests were conducted on a 20% thickness: chord ratio circulation controlled elliptic aerofoil section equipped with forward and reverse blowing slots. Overall performance measurements were made over a range of trailing edge blowing momentum coefficients from 0 to 0.04; some included the effect of leading edge blowing. A detailed investigation of the trailing edge wall jet, using split film probes, hot wire probes and total head tubes, provided measurements of mean velocity components, Reynolds normal and shear stresses, and radial static pressure. The closure of the two dimensional angular momentum and continuity equations was examined using the measured data, with and without correction, and the difficulty of obtaining a satisfactory solution illustrated. Suggestions regarding the nature of the flow field which should aid the understanding of Coanda effect and the theoretical solution of highly curved wall jet flows are presented.

  15. Aerodynamic performance and particle image velocimetery of piezo actuated biomimetic manduca sexta engineered wings towards the design and application of a flapping wing flight vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Anthony M.

    Considerable research and investigation has been conducted on the aerodynamic performance, and the predominate flow physics of the Manduca Sexta size of biomimetically designed and fabricated wings as part of the AFIT FWMAV design project. Despite a burgeoning interest and research into the diverse field of flapping wing flight and biomimicry, the aerodynamics of flapping wing flight remains a nebulous field of science with considerable variance into the theoretical abstractions surrounding aerodynamic mechanisms responsible for aerial performance. Traditional FWMAV flight models assume a form of a quasi-steady approximation of wing aerodynamics based on an infinite wing blade element model (BEM). An accurate estimation of the lift, drag, and side force coefficients is a critical component of autonomous stability and control models. This research focused on two separate experimental avenues into the aerodynamics of AFIT's engineered hawkmoth wings|forces and flow visualization. 1. Six degree of freedom force balance testing, and high speed video analysis was conducted on 30°, 45°, and 60° angle stop wings. A novel, non-intrusive optical tracking algorithm was developed utilizing a combination of a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and ComputerVision (OpenCV) tools to track the wing in motion from multiple cameras. A complete mapping of the wing's kinematic angles as a function of driving amplitude was performed. The stroke angle, elevation angle, and angle of attack were tabulated for all three wings at driving amplitudes ranging from A=0.3 to A=0.6. The wing kinematics together with the force balance data was used to develop several aerodynamic force coefficient models. A combined translational and rotational aerodynamic model predicted lift forces within 10%, and vertical forces within 6%. The total power consumption was calculated for each of the three wings, and a Figure of Merit was calculated for each wing as a general expression of the overall efficiency of

  16. Experimental Evaluation of Aerodynamics Characteristics of a Baseline Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rasedul Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wind tunnel test of baseline airfoil NACA 0015 model was conducted in the Wind tunnel wall test section of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at KUET, Bangladesh . The primary goal of the test was to measure airfoil aerodynamic characteristics over a wide range of Angle of Attack (AOA mainly from Zero degree to 20 degree AOA and with a wind tunnel fixed free stream velocity of 12m/s and at Re = 1.89×105 . The pressure distribution in both upper and lower camber surface was calculated with the help of digital pressure manometer. After analysis the value of Cl and Cd was found around 1.3 and 0.31 respectively.

  17. A large-scale computer facility for computational aerodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of computer system technology and numerical modeling have advanced to the point that computational aerodynamics has emerged as an essential element in aerospace vehicle design methodology. To provide for further advances in modeling of aerodynamic flow fields, NASA has initiated at the Ames Research Center the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program. The objective of the Program is to develop a leading-edge, large-scale computer facility, and make it available to NASA, DoD, other Government agencies, industry and universities as a necessary element in ensuring continuing leadership in computational aerodynamics and related disciplines. The Program will establish an initial operational capability in 1986 and systematically enhance that capability by incorporating evolving improvements in state-of-the-art computer system technologies as required to maintain a leadership role. This paper briefly reviews the present and future requirements for computational aerodynamics and discusses the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program objectives, computational goals, and implementation plans

  18. Discrete vortex method simulations of the aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    generated prior to the simulations and is based on analytic spectral densities of the atmospheric turbulence and a coherence function defining the spatial correlation of the flow. The method is validated by simulating the turbulent flow past a flat plate and past the Great Belt East bridge. The results are......We present a novel method for the simulation of the aerodynamic admittance in bluff body aerodynamics. The method introduces a model for describing oncoming turbulence in two-dimensional discrete vortex method simulations by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles. The turbulence is...

  19. Analysis of New Aerodynamic Design of the Nose Cone Section Using CFD and SPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan-Alexandru BELEGA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new nose cones concept that promises a gain in performance over existing conventional nose cones is discussed in this paper. It is shown that significant performance gains result from the adaptation of the exhaust flow to the ambient pressure. For this complex work, it was necessary to collect and study the various nose cone shapes and the equations describing them? The paper objective was to identify the types of nose cones with ejector channels and specific aerodynamic characteristics of different types of nose cones. The scope of this paper is to develop some prototype profiles with outstanding aerodynamic qualities and low cost for use in construction projects for missile increasing their range and effect on target. The motivation for such a work is caused by a lack of data on aerodynamics for profiles of some nose cones and especially improved aerodynamic qualities that can be used in designing missiles/ rockets. This design method consists of a geometry creation step in which a three-dimensional geometry is generated, a mathematical model presented and a simple flow analysis (FLUENT Simulation from SolidWorks2012 and ANSYS Simulation with SPH for fluid-structure interaction, step which predicts the air intake mass flow rate. Flow phenomena observed in numerical simulations during different nose cone operations are highlighted, critical design aspects and operation conditions are discussed, and performance characteristics of the selected nose cone are presented.

  20. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T Muijres

    Full Text Available Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate

  1. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    OpenAIRE

    Gierens, K.; F. Dilger

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic contrails are defined in this paper as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and ...

  2. THE AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE PROFILES FOR FLYING WINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile PRISACARIU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using an un-piloted aerial vector is determined by the aerodynamic characteristics and performances. The design for a tailless unmanned aerial vehicles starts from defining the aerial vector mission and implies o series of geometrical and aerodynamic aspects for stability. This article proposes to remark the aerodynamic characteristics of three profiles used at flying wing airship through 2D software analysis.

  3. Unsteady aerodynamic models for agile flight at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Steven L.

    This work develops low-order models for the unsteady aerodynamic forces on a wing in response to agile maneuvers at low Reynolds number. Model performance is assessed on the basis of accuracy across a range of parameters and frequencies as well as of computational efficiency and compatibility with existing control techniques and flight dynamic models. The result is a flexible modeling procedure that yields accurate, low-dimensional, state-space models. The modeling procedures are developed and tested on direct numerical simulations of a two-dimensional flat plate airfoil in motion at low Reynolds number, Re=100, and in a wind tunnel experiment at the Illinois Institute of Technology involving a NACA 0006 airfoil pitching and plunging at Reynolds number Re=65,000. In both instances, low-order models are obtained that accurately capture the unsteady aerodynamic forces at all frequencies. These cases demonstrate the utility of the modeling procedure developed in this thesis for obtaining accurate models for different geometries and Reynolds numbers. Linear reduced-order models are constructed from either the indicial response (step response) or realistic input/output maneuvers using a flexible modeling procedure. The method is based on identifying stability derivatives and modeling the remaining dynamics with the eigensystem realization algorithm. A hierarchy of models is developed, based on linearizing the flow at various operating conditions. These models are shown to be accurate and efficient for plunging, pitching about various points, and combined pitch and plunge maneuvers, at various angle of attack and Reynolds number. Models are compared against the classical unsteady aerodynamic models of Wagner and Theodorsen over a large range of Strouhal number and reduced frequency for a baseline comparison. Additionally, state-space representations are developed for Wagner's and Theodorsen's models, making them compatible with modern control-system analysis. A number of

  4. Aerodynamic Modeling with Heterogeneous Data Assimilation and Uncertainty Quantification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear Science Corp. proposes to develop an aerodynamic modeling tool that assimilates data from different sources and facilitates uncertainty quantification. The...

  5. Reference values and improvement of aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Juan; Rodríguez-Marroyo, José Antonio; Juneau, Carl-Etienne; Peleteiro, José; Martínez, Alfredo Córdova; Villa, José Gerardo

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to measure the aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists, to obtain aerodynamic drag reference values in static and effort positions, to improve the cyclists' aerodynamic drag by modifying their position and cycle equipment, and to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these modifications. The study was performed in a wind tunnel with five professional cyclists. Four positions were assessed with a time-trial bike and one position with a standard racing bike. In all positions, aerodynamic drag and kinematic variables were recorded. The drag area for the time-trial bike was 31% higher in the effort than static position, and lower than for the standard racing bike. Changes in the cyclists' position decreased the aerodynamic drag by 14%. The aero-helmet was not favourable for all cyclists. The reliability of aerodynamic drag measures in the wind tunnel was high (r > 0.96, coefficient of variation < 2%). In conclusion, we measured and improved the aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists. Our results were better than those of other researchers who did not assess aerodynamic drag during effort at race pace and who employed different wheels. The efficiency of the aero-helmet, and the validity, reliability, and sensitivity of the wind tunnel and aerodynamic field testing were addressed. PMID:17943597

  6. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Takeshi; Seo, Kazuya

    2013-12-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through a wind tunnel test and ball trajectory simulations, this study shows that the aerodynamic resistance of the new 32-panel soccer ball is larger in the high-speed region and lower in the middle-speed region than that of the previous 14- and 8-panel balls. The critical Reynolds number of the Roteiro, Teamgeist II, Jabulani, and Tango 12 was ~2.2 × 10(5) (drag coefficient, C d  ≈ 0.12), ~2.8 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), ~3.3 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), and ~2.4 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.15), respectively. The flight trajectory simulation suggested that the Tango 12, one of the newest soccer balls, has less air resistance in the medium-speed region than the Jabulani and can thus easily acquire large initial velocity in this region. It is considered that the critical Reynolds number of a soccer ball, as considered within the scope of this experiment, depends on the extended total distance of the panel bonds rather than the small designs on the panel surfaces. PMID:23705104

  7. Photogrammetric measurement of 3D freeform millimetre-sized objects with micro features: an experimental validation of the close-range camera calibration model for narrow angles of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percoco, Gianluca; Sánchez Salmerón, Antonio J.

    2015-09-01

    The measurement of millimetre and micro-scale features is performed by high-cost systems based on technologies with narrow working ranges to accurately control the position of the sensors. Photogrammetry would lower the costs of 3D inspection of micro-features and would be applicable to the inspection of non-removable micro parts of large objects too. Unfortunately, the behaviour of photogrammetry is not known when photogrammetry is applied to micro-features. In this paper, the authors address these issues towards the application of digital close-range photogrammetry (DCRP) to the micro-scale, taking into account that in literature there are research papers stating that an angle of view (AOV) around 10° is the lower limit to the application of the traditional pinhole close-range calibration model (CRCM), which is the basis of DCRP. At first a general calibration procedure is introduced, with the aid of an open-source software library, to calibrate narrow AOV cameras with the CRCM. Subsequently the procedure is validated using a reflex camera with a 60 mm macro lens, equipped with extension tubes (20 and 32 mm) achieving magnification of up to 2 times approximately, to verify literature findings with experimental photogrammetric 3D measurements of millimetre-sized objects with micro-features. The limitation experienced by the laser printing technology, used to produce the bi-dimensional pattern on common paper, has been overcome using an accurate pattern manufactured with a photolithographic process. The results of the experimental activity prove that the CRCM is valid for AOVs down to 3.4° and that DCRP results are comparable with the results of existing and more expensive commercial techniques.

  8. Aerodynamic Modelling and Optimization of Axial Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft

    integrated propertiesshow that the computed results agree well with the measurements.Integrating a rotor-only version of the aerodynamic modelwith an algorithm for numerical designoptimization, enables the finding of an optimum fan rotor.The angular velocity of the rotor, the hub radius and the spanwise...... velocity, pressure andradial position are derived from the conservationlaws for mass, tangential momentum and energy.The resulting system of equations is non-linear and, dueto mass conservation and pressure equilibrium far downstream of the rotor,strongly coupled.The equations are solved using the Newton...

  9. Fitting aerodynamics and propulsion into the puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Patrick J.; Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.; Chapman, Gary T.

    1987-01-01

    The development of an airbreathing single-stage-to-orbit vehicle, in particular the problems of aerodynamics and propulsion integration, is examined. The boundary layer transition on constant pressure surfaces at hypersonic velocities, and the effects of noise on the transition are investigated. The importance of viscosity, real-gas effects, and drag at hypersonic speeds is discussed. A propulsion system with sufficient propulsive lift to enhance the performance of the vehicle is being developed. The difficulties of engine-airframe integration are analyzed.

  10. Basic rotor aerodynamics applied to wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, M.O.L.

    1998-01-01

    It is the hope of the author that the notes will impart a basic understanding of the mechanisms behind the production of forces on a wind turbine. Even though aero-elastic codes, including a standard Blade Element Momentum method, can be bought, it is considered important that the theory behind this method and its limitations is understood. The aerodynamics of a wind turbine is important, but building a wind turbine is a multi disciplinary task since it requires knowledge of meteorology, atmospheric turbulence, fluid mechanics, structural dynamics, generators, electrical grid connections, gear boxes, hydraulics, foundations, economics and so on. (au) 14 refs.

  11. Aerodynamics/ACEE: Aircraft energy efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of a 10 year program managed by NASA which seeks to make possible the most efficient use of energy for aircraft propulsion and lift as well as provide a technology that can be used by U.S. manufacturers of air transports and engines. Supercritical wings, winglets, vortex drag reduction, high lift, active control, laminar flow control, and aerodynamics by computer are among the topics discussed. Wind tunnel models in flight verification of advanced technology, and the design, construction and testing of various aircraft structures are also described.

  12. Insect Flight: Aerodynamics, Efficiency, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. Jane

    2007-11-01

    Insects, like birds and fish, locomote via interactions between fluids and flapping wings. Their motion is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation coupled to moving boundaries. In this talk, I will first describe how dragonflies fly: their wing motions and the flows and forces they generate. I will then consider insects in several species and discuss three questions: 1) Is insect flight optimal? 2) How does the efficiency of flapping flight compare to classical fixed-wing flight? 3) How might aerodynamic effects have influenced the evolution of insect flight?

  13. Sensor Systems Collect Critical Aerodynamics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    With the support of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Dryden Flight Research Center, Tao of Systems Integration Inc. developed sensors and other components that will ultimately form a first-of-its-kind, closed-loop system for detecting, measuring, and controlling aerodynamic forces and moments in flight. The Hampton, Virginia-based company commercialized three of the four planned components, which provide sensing solutions for customers such as Boeing, General Electric, and BMW and are used for applications such as improving wind turbine operation and optimizing air flow from air conditioning systems. The completed system may one day enable flexible-wing aircraft with flight capabilities like those of birds.

  14. Unsteady Aerodynamic Investigation of the Propeller-Wing Interaction for a Rocket Launched Unmanned Air Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, G Q; Yu, S. C. M.; A. Chien; Xu, Y

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of propeller-wing interaction for the rocket launched UAV have been investigated numerically by means of sliding mesh technology. The corresponding forces and moments have been collected for axial wing placements ranging from 0.056 to 0.5D and varied rotating speeds. The slipstream generated by the rotating propeller has little effects on the lift characteristics of the whole UAV. The drag can be seen to remain unchanged as the wing's location moves progressive...

  15. An aerodynamic approach in soil hydraulic conductivity estimation for investigating soil erosion degree

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey, V.; Vyacheslav, S.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method for determining the degree of erosion for zonal soils of the East European Plain. This new approach uses soil porosity and filtration to determine a coefficient of aerodynamic similarity. We evaluated the degree of soil erosion on ranges of the major zonal soils of the eastern part of European Russia by applying this new method. Based on these data, we developed a diagnostic scale to determine the extent of soil erosion in this area.

  16. How wing kinematics affect power requirements and aerodynamic force production in a robotic bat wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bats display a wide variety of behaviors that require different amounts of aerodynamic force. To control and modulate aerodynamic force, bats change wing kinematics, which, in turn, may change the power required for wing motion. There are many kinematic mechanisms that bats, and other flapping animals, can use to increase aerodynamic force, e.g. increasing wingbeat frequency or amplitude. However, we do not know if there is a difference in energetic cost between these different kinematic mechanisms. To assess the relationship between mechanical power input and aerodynamic force output across different isolated kinematic parameters, we programmed a robotic bat wing to flap over a range of kinematic parameters and measured aerodynamic force and mechanical power. We systematically varied five kinematic parameters: wingbeat frequency, wingbeat amplitude, stroke plane angle, downstroke ratio, and wing folding. Kinematic values were based on observed values from free flying Cynopterus brachyotis, the species on which the robot was based. We describe how lift, thrust, and power change with increases in each kinematic variable. We compare the power costs associated with generating additional force through the four kinematic mechanisms controlled at the shoulder, and show that all four mechanisms require approximately the same power to generate a given force. This result suggests that no single parameter offers an energetic advantage over the others. Finally, we show that retracting the wing during upstroke reduces power requirements for flapping and increases net lift production, but decreases net thrust production. These results compare well with studies performed on C. brachyotis, offering insight into natural flight kinematics. (paper)

  17. Elemental mass size distribution of the Debrecen urban aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Size distribution is one of the basic properties of atmospheric aerosol. It is closely related to the origin, chemical composition and age of the aerosol particles, and it influences the optical properties, environmental effects and health impact of aerosol. As part of the ongoing aerosol research in the Group of Ion Beam Applications of the Atomki, elemental mass size distribution of urban aerosol were determined using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analytical technique. Aerosol sampling campaigns were carried out with 9-stage PIXE International cascade impactors, which separates the aerosol into 10 size fractions in the 0.05-30 ?m range. Five 48-hours long samplings were done in the garden of the Atomki, in April and in October, 2007. Both campaigns included weekend and working day samplings. Basically two different kinds of particles could be identified according to the size distribution. In the size distribution of Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ba, Ti, Mn and Co one dominant peak can be found around the 3 m aerodynamic diameter size range, as it is shown on Figure 1. These are the elements of predominantly natural origin. Elements like S, Cl, K, Zn, Pb and Br appears with high frequency in the 0.25-0.5 mm size range as presented in Figure 2. These elements are originated mainly from anthropogenic sources. However sometimes in the size distribution of these elements a 2nd, smaller peak appears at the 2-4 μm size ranges, indicating different sources. Differences were found between the size distribution of the spring and autumn samples. In the case of elements of soil origin the size distribution was shifted towards smaller diameters during October, and a 2nd peak appeared around 0.5 μm. A possible explanation to this phenomenon can be the different meteorological conditions. No differences were found between the weekend and working days in the size distribution, however the concentration values were smaller during the weekend

  18. Experimental Investigation on the Aerodynamic Performance of NLF-0414 Iced-Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abbas ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Icing phenomenon on a natural laminar flow airfoil (NLF-0414 has been experimentally investigated. Double horn glaze ice geometry which was acquired during a 15 minutes spray time at-2.23℃ with liquid water content and a median volumetric diameter of 1.0 g/m3 and 20 μm, has been extracted from database of NASA Lewis Research Center. Pressure distribution over airfoil surfacewas evaluated at angles of attack between -2 to 6 degrees for both iced and clean airfoils. Aerodynamics performance degradation of the iced airfoil has been studied and it is shown that double horn ice accretion, due to its unique geometry, severely affects aerodynamic characteristics of natural laminar flow airfoils. Reattachment locations have been evaluated for upper and lower separation bubbles. The upper surface separation bubble was seen to increase in size in contrary to the lower surface separation bubble.

  19. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction for A Generic Sport Utility Vehicle Using Rear Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Ait Moussa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The high demand for new and improved aerodynamic drag reduction devices has led to the invention of flow control mechanisms and continuous suction is a promising strategy that does not have major impact on vehicle geometry. The implementation of this technique on sport utility vehicles (SUV requires adequate choice of the size and location of the opening as well as the magnitude of the boundary suction velocity. In this paper we introduce a new methodology to identifying these parameters for maximum reduction in aerodynamic drag. The technique combines automatic modeling of the suction slit, computational fluid dynamics (CFD and a global search method using orthogonal arrays. It is shown that a properly designed suction mechanism can reduce drag by up to 9%..

  20. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  1. SIMULATION STUDY OF AERODYNAMIC FORCE FOR HIGH-SPEED MAGNETICALLY-LEVITATED TRAINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Renxian; LIU Yingqing; ZHAI Wanming

    2006-01-01

    Based on Reynolds average Navier-Storkes equations of viscous incompressible fluid and k-ε two equations turbulent model, the aerodynamic forces of high-speed magnetically-levitated(maglev) trains in transverse and longitudinal wind are investigated by finite volume method. Near 80 calculation cases for 2D transverse wind fields and 20 cases for 3D longitudinal wind fields are and lyzed. The aerodynamic side force, yawing, drag, lift and pitching moment for different types of maglev trains and a wheel/rail train are compared under the different wind speeds. The types of maglev train models for 2D transverse wind analysis included electromagnetic suspension (EMS) type train,electrodynamic suspension (EDS) type train, EMS type train with shelter wind wall in one side or two sides of guideway and the walls, which are in different height or/and different distances from train body. The situation of maglev train running on viaduct is also analyzed. For 3D longitudinal wind field analysis, the model with different sizes of air clearances beneath maglev train is examined for the different speeds. Calculation result shows that: ① Different transverse effects are shown in different types of maglev trains. ② The shelter wind wall can fairly decrease the transverse effect on the maglev train. ③ When the shelter wall height is 2 m, there is minimum side force on the train.When the shelter wall height is 2.5 m, there is minimum yawing moment on the train. ④ When the distance between inside surfaces of the walls and center of guideway is 4.0 m, there is minimum transverse influence on the train. ⑤ The size of air clearance beneath train body has a small influence on aerodynamic drag of the train, but has a fairly large effect on aerodynamic lift and pitching moment of the train. ⑥ The calculating lift and pitching moment for maglev train models are minus values.

  2. Aeroassist flight experiment aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    The problem is to determine the transitional flow aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, including the base flow characteristics, of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The justification for the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) Application stems from MSFC's system integration responsibility for the AFE. To insure that the AFE objectives are met, MSFC must understand the limitations and uncertainties of the design data. Perhaps the only method capable of handling the complex physics of the rarefied high energy AFE trajectory is Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The 3-D code used in this analysis is applicable only to the AFE geometry. It uses the Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) collision model and five specie chemistry model available from Langley Research Center. The code is benchmarked against the AFE flight data and used as an Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design tool. The code is being used to understand the AFE flow field and verify or modify existing design data. Continued application to lower altitudes is testing the capability of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) to handle 3-D DSMC and its practicality as an ASTV/AFE design tool.

  3. Influence of ribs on train aerodynamic performances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Xiu-juan; GAO Guang-jun

    2015-01-01

    The influence of ribs on the train aerodynamic performance was computed using detached eddy simulation (DES), and the transient iteration was solved by the dual-time step lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) method. The results show that the ribs installed on the roof have a great effect on the train aerodynamic performance. Compared with trains without ribs, the lift force coefficient of the train with convex ribs changes from negative to positive, while the side force coefficient increases by 110% and 88%, respectively. Due to the combined effect of the lift force and side force, the overturning moment of the train with convex ribs and cutting ribs increases by 140% and 106%, respectively. There is larger negative pressure on the roof of the train without ribs than that with ribs. The ribs on the train would disturb the flow structure and contribute to the air separation, so the separation starts from the roof, while there is no air separation on the roof of the train without ribs. The ribs can also slow down the flow speed above the roof and make the air easily sucked back to the train surface. The vortices at the leeward side of the train without ribs are small and messy compared with those of the train with convex or cutting ribs.

  4. THERMAL STRESS IN METEOROIDS BY AERODYNAMIC HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Yu King

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stress in meteoroids by aerodynamic heating is calculated for the ideal case of an isotropic,homogeneous,elastic sphere being heated at the surface with a constant heattransfer coefficient. Given enough time, the tensile stress in the interior of the meteoroid can be as high as 10 kb. This stress value is greater than estimated tensile strengths of meteoroids and the aerodynamic compression they encounter. Significant thermal stress(1 kb) can develop quickly within a few tens of seconds) in a small(radius<10 cm) stony meteoroid and a somewhat large radius<l m)metallic meteoroid,and thus may cause tensile fracture to initiate in the meteotoid's interior. Fracture by thermal stress may have contributed to such observations as the existence of dust particles in upper atmosphere,the breakup of meteoroids at relatively low altitudes, the angular shape of meteorites and their wide scattering in a strewn field,and the explosive features of impact craters. In large meteoroids that require longer heating for thermal stress to fully develop,its effect is probably insignificant. The calculated stress values may be upper limits for real meteoroids which suffer melting and ablation at the surface.

  5. THERMAL STRESS IN METEOROIDS BY AERODYNAMIC HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-YuKing

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stress in meteoroids by aerodynamic heating is calculated for the ideal case of an isotropic,homogeneous,elastic sphere being heated at the surface with a constant heattransfer coefficient. Given enough time,the tensile stress in the interior of the meteoroid can be as high as 10 kb. This stress value is greater than estimated tensile strengths of meteoroids and the aerodynamic compression they encounter. Significant thermal stress(1 kb) can develop quickly (within a few tens of seconds) in a small(radius<10 cm) stony meteoroid and a somewhat large(radius<l m)metallic meteoroid,and thus may cause tensile fracture to initiate in the meteotoid's interior. Fracture by thermal stress may have contributed to such observations as the existence of dust particles in upper atmosphere,the breakup of meteoroids at relatively low altitudes, the angular shape of meteorites and their wide scattering in a strewn field,and the explosive features of impact craters. In large meteoroids that require longer heating for thermal stress to fully develop, its effect is probably insignificant. The calculated stress values may be upper limits for real meteoroids which suffer melting and ablation at the surface.

  6. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MEXICO Rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations are a very promising method for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines in an inexpensive and accurate way. One of the major drawbacks of this method is the lack of validated models. As a consequence, the reliability of numerical results is often difficult to assess. The MEXICO project aimed at solving this problem by providing the project partners with high quality measurements of a 4.5 meters rotor diameter wind turbine operating under controlled conditions. The large measurement data-set allows the validation of all kind of aerodynamic models. This work summarizes our efforts for validating a CFD model based on the open source software OpenFoam. Both steady- state and time-accurate simulations have been performed with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for several operating conditions. In this paper we will concentrate on axisymmetric inflow for 3 different wind speeds. The numerical results are compared with pressure distributions from several blade sections and PIV-flow data from the near wake region. In general, a reasonable agreement between measurements the and our simulations exists. Some discrepancies, which require further research, are also discussed

  7. Reliability and Applicability of Aerodynamic Measures in Dysphonia Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Edwin M.-L.; Yuen, Yuet-Ming; Whitehill, Tara; Winkworth, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Aerodynamic measures are frequently used to analyse and document pathological voices. Some normative data are available for speakers from the English-speaking population. However, no data are available yet for Chinese speakers despite the fact that they are one of the largest populations in the world. The high variability of aerodynamic measures…

  8. Influence of anisotropic piezoelectric actuators on wing aerodynamic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN De; LI Min; LI Wei; WANG MingChun

    2008-01-01

    Changing the shape of an airfoil to enhance overall aircraft performance has always been s goal of aircraft designers.Using smart material to reshape the wing can improve aerodynamic performance.The influence of anisotropic effects of piezo-electric actuators on the aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified HALE wing model was investigated.Test verification was conducted.

  9. Influence of anisotropic piezoelectric actuators on wing aerodynamic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Changing the shape of an airfoil to enhance overall aircraft performance has always been a goal of aircraft designers. Using smart material to reshape the wing can improve aerodynamic performance. The influence of anisotropic effects of piezoelectric actuators on the aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified HALE wing model was investigated. Test verification was conducted.

  10. State of the art in wind turbine aerodynamics and aeroelasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Voutsinas, S; Sørensen, Niels N.; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive review of wind turbine aeroelasticity is given. The aerodynamic part starts with the simple aerodynamic Blade Element Momentum Method and ends with giving a review of the work done applying CFD on wind turbine rotors. In between is explained some methods of intermediate complexity...

  11. Survey of Unsteady Computational Aerodynamics for Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frunzulicǎ, F.; Dumitrescu, H.; Cardoş, V.

    2010-09-01

    We present a short review of aerodynamic computational models for horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). Models presented have a various level of complexity to calculate aerodynamic loads on rotor of HAWT, starting with the simplest blade element momentum (BEM) and ending with the complex model of Navier-Stokes equations. Also, we present some computational aspects of these models.

  12. Exploring the Aerodynamic Drag of a Moving Cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilmann, Florian; Reinhard, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although the physics of cycling itself is a complex mixture of aerodynamics, physiology, mechanics, and heuristics, using cycling as a context for teaching physics has a tradition of certainly more than 30 years. Here, a possible feature is the discussion of the noticeable resistant forces such as aerodynamic drag and the associated power…

  13. Some Features of Aerodynamics of Cyclonic Chamber with Free Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Orekhov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper cites results of an experimental research in aerodynamics of a cyclonic chamber with a free exit that has a large relative length. Distributions of aerodynamic stream characteristics depending on geometry of working volume of the cyclonic chamber are given in the paper. Calculative dependences are proposed in the paper.

  14. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Revised Target Drone Vehicle at Mach Numbers from 1.60 to 2.86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.; Babb, C. Donald

    1968-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a revised target drone vehicle through a Mach number range from 1.60 to 2.86. The vehicle had canard surfaces and a swept clipped-delta wing with twin tip-mounted vertical tails.

  15. Aerodynamic performance of osculating-cones waveriders at high altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Rick Evan

    The steady-state aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional waverider configurations immersed in hypersonic rarefied flows are investigated. Representative geometries are generated using an inverse design procedure, the method of osculating cones, which defines an exit plane shock shape and approximates the flow properties of the compression surface by assuming that each spanwise station along the shock profile lies within a region of locally conical flow. Vehicle surface and flow field properties are predicted using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, a probabilistic numerical scheme in which simulated molecules are followed through representative collisions with each other and solid surfaces, and subsequent deterministic displacement. The aerodynamic properties of high- and low-Reynolds number waverider geometries, optimized for maximum lift-to-drag ratio and subject to mission-oriented constraints, are contrasted with results from reference caret and delta wings with similar internal volumes to quantify the relevance and advantage of the waverider concept at high altitudes. The high-Reynolds number waverider, optimized for the continuum regime at Minfinity = 4 and Reinfinity = 250 million, was the focus of recent wind tunnel testing for near on-design and off-design conditions, including low subsonic speeds. The present work extends the previous analyses into the high-altitude regime. The low-Reynolds number waverider, optimized at Minfinity = 20 and Reinfinity = 2.5 million, is studied to determine if optimization potential exists for a high-Mach number waverider at high altitudes. A characteristic length of 5 m is assumed for both waverider configurations, representative of a hypersonic missile concept. The geometries are aerodynamically evaluated over a parametric space consisting of an altitude variation of 95 km to 150 km and an angle of attack range of --5° to 10°. The effect of off-design Mach number on the performance of the high

  16. Evaluation of aerodynamic derivatives from a magnetic balance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, B. S.; Parker, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic testing of a model in the University of Virginia cold magnetic balance wind-tunnel facility is expected to consist of measurements of the balance forces and moments, and the observation of the essentially six degree of freedom motion of the model. The aerodynamic derivatives of the model are to be evaluated from these observations. The basic feasibility of extracting aerodynamic information from the observation of a model which is executing transient, complex, multi-degree of freedom motion is demonstrated. It is considered significant that, though the problem treated here involves only linear aerodynamics, the methods used are capable of handling a very large class of aerodynamic nonlinearities. The basic considerations include the effect of noise in the data on the accuracy of the extracted information. Relationships between noise level and the accuracy of the evaluated aerodynamic derivatives are presented.

  17. STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF VAN-BODY TRUCKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the van-body truck were studied by means of theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiments. The concept of critical length was presented for the van-body truck in wind tunnel experiments, the proper critical Reynolds number was found and the effects of ground parameters in ground effect simulation on the aerodynamic measurements were examined. It shows that two structure parameters, van height and the gap between the cab and the van, can obviously influence the aerodynamic characteristics, and the additional aerodynamic devices, the wind deflector and the vortex regulator in the rear, can considerably reduce the aerodynamic drag of the van-body truck. Numerical simulations provided rich information of the flow fields around the van-body trucks.

  18. Effect of particles size range on iron ore flotation Efeito da faixa de tamanho de partículas na flotação de minério de ferro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neymayer Pereira Lima

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Flotation is one of the main concentration processes being employed for many classes of minerals (sulfides, oxides, silicates, phosphates, for example at different particle sizes. In the iron ore industry, reverse quartz flotation has been successfully employed for particle sizes below ISOfim after the desliming process. The high demand for iron ore products has made flotation the main process for concentration in this industry, thus a better understanding of its mechanisms and the effect of the particle sizes in the process has become imperative. Flotation tests were carried out with three different size fractions of an itabirite iron ore, obtained using cyclone classification after desliming. The results showed distinct behaviors of the different size ranges. Higher etheramine dosages are required when coarse and fine fractions are floated separately and also this procedure is more sensitive to variations in etheramine dosages and pH values. The differences in particle size distributions and the specific surface area may explain the different flotation behavior of the distinct size fractions. The split flotation circuits for coarse and fine particles indicated an increase of 3% points in the metallurgical recovery with reduction of SiO2 content in final concentrate, increase of etheramine dosage and reduction of corn starch dosage. Economic feasibility analysis indicated a positive net present value of 50 million of dollars with split circuits for coarse and fine particles, considering a production of 10 million tons per year of pellet feed.A flotação é um dos principais processos de concentração, sendo empregada para diversas classes de minerais (sulfetos, óxidos, silicatos, fosfatos, etc., em relativamente ampla faixa de tamanhos de partículas. Na indústria de minério de ferro, a flotação reversa de quartzo tem sido empregada com sucesso para partículas abaixo de 150um, após a etapa de deslamagem. A elevada demanda por produtos

  19. Underwater Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Gaba

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with underwater laser ranging system, its principle of operation and maximum depth capability. The sources of external noise and methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio are also discussed.

  20. A generalized solution of elasto-aerodynamic lubrication for aerodynamic compliant foil bearings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Lie; QI Shemiao; GENG Haipeng

    2005-01-01

    Although aerodynamic compliant foil bearings are successfully applied in a number of turbo-machineries, theoretical researches on the modeling, performance prediction of compliant foil bearings and the dynamic analysis of the related rotor system seem still far behind the experimental investigation because of structural complexity of the foil bearings. A generalized solution of the elasto-aerodynamic lubrication is presented in this paper by introducing both static and dynamic deformations of foils and solving gas-lubricated Reynolds equations with deformation equations simultaneously. The solution can be used for the calculation of dynamic stiffness and damping, as well as the prediction of static performances of foil bearings. Systematical theories and methods are also presented for the purpose of the prediction of dynamic behavior of a rotor system equipped with foil bearings.

  1. Development and Evaluation of an Aerodynamic Model for a Novel Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Shires

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been a resurgence of interest in the development of vertical axis wind turbines which have several inherent attributes that offer some advantages for offshore operations, particularly their scalability and low over-turning moments with better accessibility to drivetrain components. This paper describes an aerodynamic performance model for vertical axis wind turbines specifically developed for the design of a novel offshore V-shaped rotor with multiple aerodynamic surfaces. The model is based on the Double-Multiple Streamtube method and includes a number of developments for alternative complex rotor shapes. The paper compares predicted results with measured field data for five different turbines with both curved and straight blades and rated powers in the range 100–500 kW. Based on these comparisons, the paper proposes modifications to the Gormont dynamic stall model that gives improved predictions of rotor power for the turbines considered.

  2. Model Structures and Algorithms for Identification of Aerodynamic Models for Flight Dynamics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, Ravi K.; Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.; Mehra, Raman K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes model structures and parameter estimation algorithms suitable for the identification of unsteady aerodynamic models from input-output data. The model structures presented are state space models and include linear time-invariant (LTI) models and linear parameter-varying (LPV) models. They cover a wide range of local and parameter dependent identification problems arising in unsteady aerodynamics and nonlinear flight dynamics. We present a residue algorithm for estimating model parameters from data. The algorithm can incorporate apriori information and is described in detail. The algorithms are evaluated on the F-16XL wind-tunnel test data from NAS Langley Research Center. Results of numerical evaluation are presented. The paper concludes with a discussion major issues and directions for future work.

  3. Photogrammetric Tracking of Aerodynamic Surfaces and Aerospace Models at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark R.; Robson, Stuart; Jones, Thomas W.; Goad, William K.; Lunsford, Charles B.

    2016-06-01

    Aerospace engineers require measurements of the shape of aerodynamic surfaces and the six degree of freedom (6DoF) position and orientation of aerospace models to analyse structural dynamics and aerodynamic forces. The measurement technique must be non-contact, accurate, reliable, have a high sample rate and preferably be non-intrusive. Close range photogrammetry based on multiple, synchronised, commercial-off-the-shelf digital cameras can supply surface shape and 6DoF data at 5-15Hz with customisable accuracies. This paper describes data acquisition systems designed and implemented at NASA Langley Research Center to capture surface shapes and 6DoF data. System calibration and data processing techniques are discussed. Examples of experiments and data outputs are described.

  4. Transonic Blunt Body Aerodynamic Coefficients Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Jorge; Vargas, M.; Gonzalez, Ezequiel; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    In the framework of EXPERT (European Experimental Re-entry Test-bed) accurate transonic aerodynamic coefficients are of paramount importance for the correct trajectory assessment and parachute deployment. A combined CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) modelling and experimental campaign strategy was selected to obtain accurate coefficients. A preliminary set of coefficients were obtained by CFD Euler inviscid computation. Then experimental campaign was performed at DNW facilities at NLR. A profound review of the CFD modelling was done lighten up by WTT results, aimed to obtain reliable values of the coefficients in the future (specially the pitching moment). Study includes different turbulence modelling and mesh sensitivity analysis. Comparison with the WTT results is explored, and lessons learnt are collected.

  5. Active aerodynamic stabilisation of long suspension bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Henrik Ditlev; Sørensen, Paul Haase; Jannerup, Ole Erik

    2004-01-01

    use of control analysis and design techniques, a linear model of the structural and aerodynamic motion around equilibriun is developed. The model is validated through comparison with finite element calculations and wind tunnel experimental data on the Great Belt East Bridge in Denmark. The developed......The paper describes the addition of actively controlled appendages (flaps) attached along the length of the bridge deck to dampen wind-induced oscillations in long suppension bridges. A novel approach using control systems methods for the analysis of dynamic stability is presented. In order to make...... active control scheme is local in that the flap control signal at a given longitudinal position along the bridge only depends on local motion measurements. The analysis makes use of the Nyquist stability criteria and an anlysis of the sensitivity function for stability analysis. The analysis shows that...

  6. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization using an Evolutionary Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on an evolutionary algorithm approach is presented and demonstrated. Results are presented for a number of model problems to access the effect of algorithm parameters on convergence efficiency and reliability. A transonic viscous airfoil optimization problem, both single and two-objective variations, is used as the basis for a preliminary comparison with an adjoint-gradient optimizer. The evolutionary algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the inviscid flow about transonic wings including multi-objective and multi-discipline solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the evolutionary algorithm approach is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

  7. Multiprocessing on supercomputers for computational aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1991-01-01

    Little use is made of multiple processors available on current supercomputers (computers with a theoretical peak performance capability equal to 100 MFLOPS or more) to improve turnaround time in computational aerodynamics. The productivity of a computer user is directly related to this turnaround time. In a time-sharing environment, such improvement in this speed is achieved when multiple processors are used efficiently to execute an algorithm. The concept of multiple instructions and multiple data (MIMD) is applied through multitasking via a strategy that requires relatively minor modifications to an existing code for a single processor. This approach maps the available memory to multiple processors, exploiting the C-Fortran-Unix interface. The existing code is mapped without the need for developing a new algorithm. The procedure for building a code utilizing this approach is automated with the Unix stream editor.

  8. Aerodynamic roughness length related to non-aggregated tillage ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kardous

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion in agricultural soils is dependent, in part, on the aerodynamic roughness length (z0 produced by tillage ridges. Although previous studies have related z0 to ridge characteristics (ridge height (RH and spacing (RS, these relationships have not been tested for tillage ridges observed in the North African agricultural fields. In these regions, due to climate and soil conditions, small plowing tools are largely used. Most of these tools produce non-aggregated and closely-spaced small ridges. Thus, experiments were conducted in a 7-m long wind tunnel to measure z0 for 11 ridge types covering the range of geometric characteristics frequently observed in south Tunisia. Experimental results suggest that RH2/RS is the first order parameter controlling z0. A strong relationship between z0 and RH2/RS is proposed for a wide range of ridge characteristics.

  9. Bird Flight as a Model for a Course in Unsteady Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jamey; Mitchell, Jonathan; Puopolo, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Traditional unsteady aerodynamics courses at the graduate level focus on theoretical formulations of oscillating airfoil behavior. Aerodynamics students with a vision for understanding bird-flight and small unmanned aircraft dynamics desire to move beyond traditional flow models towards new and creative ways of appreciating the motion of agile flight systems. High-speed videos are used to record kinematics of bird flight, particularly barred owls and red-shouldered hawks during perching maneuvers, and compared with model aircraft performing similar maneuvers. Development of a perching glider and associated control laws to model the dynamics are used as a class project. Observations are used to determine what different species and sizes of birds share in their methods to approach a perch under similar conditions. Using fundamental flight dynamics, simplified models capable of predicting position, attitude, and velocity of the flier are developed and compared with the observations. By comparing the measured data from the videos and predicted and measured motions from the glider models, it is hoped that the students gain a better understanding of the complexity of unsteady aerodynamics and aeronautics and an appreciation for the beauty of avian flight.

  10. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  11. Aerodynamic Optimization of Micro Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ping Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD study was done on the propeller design of a micro aerial vehicle (quadrotor-typed to optimize its aerodynamic performance via Shear Stress Transport K-Omega (SST k-ω turbulence model. The quadrotor model used was WL-V303 Seeker. The design process started with airfoils selection and followed by the evaluation of drone model in hovering and cruising conditions. To sustain a 400g payload, by Momentum Theory an ideal thrust of 5.4 N should be generated by each rotor of the quadrotor and this resulted in an induced velocity of 7.4 m/s on the propeller during hovering phase, equivalent to Reynolds number of 10403 at 75% of the propeller blade radius. There were 6 propellers investigated at this Reynolds number. Sokolov airfoil which produced the largest lift-to-drag ratio was selected for full drone installation to be compared with the original model (benchmark. The CFD results showed that the Sokolov propeller generated 0.76 N of thrust more than the benchmark propeller at 7750 rpm. Despite generating higher thrust, higher drag was also experienced by the drone installed with Sokolov propellers. This resulted in lower lift-to-drag ratio than the benchmark propellers. It was also discovered that the aerodynamic performance of the drone could be further improved by changing the rotating direction of each rotor. Without making changes on the structural design, the drone performance increased by 39.58% in terms of lift-to-drag ratio by using this method.

  12. Surface pressure and aerodynamic loads determination of a transonic airfoil based on particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation assesses a procedure to extract the aerodynamic loads and pressure distribution on an airfoil in the transonic flow regime from particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The wind tunnel model is a two-dimensional NACA-0012 airfoil, and the PIV velocity data are used to evaluate pressure fields, whereas lift and drag coefficients are inferred from the evaluation of momentum contour and wake integrals. The PIV-based results are compared to those derived from conventional loads determination procedures involving surface pressure transducers and a wake rake. The method applied in this investigation is an extension to the compressible flow regime of that considered by van Oudheusden et al (2006 Non-intrusive load characterization of an airfoil using PIV Exp. Fluids 40 988–92) at low speed conditions. The application of a high-speed imaging system allows the acquisition in relatively short time of a sufficient ensemble size to compute converged velocity statistics, further translated in turbulent fluctuations included in the pressure and loads calculation, notwithstanding their verified negligible influence in the computation. Measurements are performed at varying spatial resolution to optimize the loads determination in the wake region and around the airfoil, further allowing us to assess the influence of spatial resolution in the proposed procedure. Specific interest is given to the comparisons between the PIV-based method and the conventional procedures for determining the pressure coefficient on the surface, the drag and lift coefficients at different angles of attack. Results are presented for the experiments at a free-stream Mach number M = 0.6, with the angle of attack ranging from 0° to 8°

  13. Entrainment of radio frequency chaff by wind as a function of surface aerodynamic roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, John A; Nickling, William G

    2003-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) chaff (approximately 2-cm x 25-microm diameter aluminum-coated glass silicate cylinders) released by military aircraft during testing and training activities has the potential to become entrained by wind upon settling to the Earth's surface. Once entrained from the surface there is the potential for RF chaff to be abraded and produce PM10 and PM2.5, which are regulated pollutants and pose health concerns. A series of portable wind tunnel tests were carried out to examine the propensity of RF chaff to become entrained by wind by defining the relationship between the threshold friction velocity of RF chaff (u(*t RF chaff)) and aerodynamic roughness (z(o)) of surfaces onto which it may deposit. The test surfaces were of varying roughness including types near the Naval Air Station (NAS), Fallon, NV, where RF chaff is released. The u(*t) of this fibrous material ranged from 0.14 m/sec for a smooth playa to 0.82 m/sec for a rough crusted playa surface with larger cobble-sized (approximately 6-26-cm diameter) rocks rising above the surface. The u(*t RF chaff) is dependent on the z(o) of the surface onto which it falls as well as the physical characteristics of the roughness. The wind regime of Fallon would allow for chaff suspension events to occur should it settle on typical surfaces in the area. However, the wind climatology of this area makes the probability of such events relatively low. PMID:12617294

  14. Surface pressure and aerodynamic loads determination of a transonic airfoil based on particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, D.; Ashok, A.; van Oudheusden, B. W.; Scarano, F.

    2009-07-01

    The present investigation assesses a procedure to extract the aerodynamic loads and pressure distribution on an airfoil in the transonic flow regime from particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The wind tunnel model is a two-dimensional NACA-0012 airfoil, and the PIV velocity data are used to evaluate pressure fields, whereas lift and drag coefficients are inferred from the evaluation of momentum contour and wake integrals. The PIV-based results are compared to those derived from conventional loads determination procedures involving surface pressure transducers and a wake rake. The method applied in this investigation is an extension to the compressible flow regime of that considered by van Oudheusden et al (2006 Non-intrusive load characterization of an airfoil using PIV Exp. Fluids 40 988-92) at low speed conditions. The application of a high-speed imaging system allows the acquisition in relatively short time of a sufficient ensemble size to compute converged velocity statistics, further translated in turbulent fluctuations included in the pressure and loads calculation, notwithstanding their verified negligible influence in the computation. Measurements are performed at varying spatial resolution to optimize the loads determination in the wake region and around the airfoil, further allowing us to assess the influence of spatial resolution in the proposed procedure. Specific interest is given to the comparisons between the PIV-based method and the conventional procedures for determining the pressure coefficient on the surface, the drag and lift coefficients at different angles of attack. Results are presented for the experiments at a free-stream Mach number M = 0.6, with the angle of attack ranging from 0° to 8°.

  15. Open Source Software Openfoam as a New Aerodynamical Simulation Tool for Rocket-Borne Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, T.; Brede, M.; Strelnikov, B.

    2015-09-01

    The only way to do in-situ measurements, which are very important experimental studies for atmospheric science, in the mesoshere/lower thermosphere (MLT) is to use sounding rockets. The drawback of using rockets is the shock wave appearing because of the very high speed of the rocket motion (typically about 1000 mIs). This shock wave disturbs the density, the temperature and the velocity fields in the vicinity of the rocket, compared to undisturbed values of the atmosphere. This effect, however, can be quantified and the measured data has to be corrected not just to make it more precise but simply usable. The commonly accepted and widely used tool for this calculations is the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique developed by GA. Bird which is available as stand-alone program limited to use a single processor. Apart from complications with simulations of flows around bodies related to different flow regimes in the altitude range of MLT, that rise due to exponential density change by several orders of magnitude, a particular hardware configuration introduces significant difficulty for aerodynamical calculations due to choice of the grid sizes mainly depending on the demands on adequate DSMCs and good resolution of geometries with scale differences of factor of iO~. This makes either the calculation time unreasonably long or even prevents the calculation algorithm from converging. In this paper we apply the free open source software OpenFOAM (licensed under GNU GPL) for a three-dimensional CFD-Simulation of a flow around a sounding rocket instrumentation. An advantage of this software package, among other things, is that it can run on high performance clusters, which are easily scalable. We present the first results and discuss the potential of the new tool in applications for sounding rockets.

  16. Landing Gear Aerodynamic Noise Prediction Using Building-Cube Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Sasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Landing gear noise prediction method is developed using Building-Cube Method (BCM. The BCM is a multiblock-structured Cartesian mesh flow solver, which aims to enable practical large-scale computation. The computational domain is composed of assemblage of various sizes of building blocks where small blocks are used to capture flow features in detail. Because of Cartesian-based mesh, easy and fast mesh generation for complicated geometries is achieved. The airframe noise is predicted through the coupling of incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver and the aeroacoustic analogy-based Curle’s equation. In this paper, Curle’s equation in noncompact form is introduced to predict the acoustic sound from an object in flow. This approach is applied to JAXA Landing gear Evaluation Geometry model to investigate the influence of the detail components to flows and aerodynamic noises. The position of torque link and the wheel cap geometry are changed to discuss the influence. The present method showed good agreement with the preceding experimental result and proved that difference of the complicated components to far field noise was estimated. The result also shows that the torque link position highly affects the flow acceleration at the axle region between two wheels, which causes the change in SPL at observation point.

  17. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulation (CFD and Experimental Study on Wing-external Store Aerodynamic Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tholudin Mat Lazim

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present work is to study the effect of an external store to a subsonic fighter aircraft. Generally most modern fighter aircraft is designed with an external store installation. In this project a subsonic fighter aircraft model has been manufactured using a computer numerical control machine for the purpose of studying the effect of the external store aerodynamic interference on the flow around the aircraft wing. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD and wind tunnel testing experiments have been carried out to ensure the aerodynamic characteristic of the model then certified the aircraft will not facing any difficulties in stability and controllability. In the CFD experiment, commercial CFD code is used to simulate the interference and aerodynamic characteristics of the model. Subsequently, the model together with an external store was tested in a low speed wind tunnel with test section sized 0.45 m×0.45 m. Result in the two-dimensional pressure distribution obtained by both experiments are comparable. There is only 12% deviation in pressure distribution found in wind tunnel testing compared to the result predicted by the CFD. The result shows that the effect of the external storage is only significant at the lower surface of the wing and almost negligible at the upper surface of the wing. Aerodynamic interference is due to the external storage were mostly evidence on a lower surface of the wing and almost negligible on the upper surface at low angle of attack. In addition, the area of influence on the wing surface by store interference increased as the airspeed increase. 

  19. Kinematic control of aerodynamic forces on an inclined flapping wing with asymmetric strokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we conduct an experiment using a one-paired dynamically scaled model of an insect wing, to investigate how asymmetric strokes with different wing kinematic parameters are used to control the aerodynamics of a dragonfly-like inclined flapping wing in still fluid. The kinematic parameters considered are the angles of attack during the mid-downstroke (αmd) and mid-upstroke (αmu), and the duration (Δτ) and time of initiation (τp) of the pitching rotation. The present dragonfly-like inclined flapping wing has the aerodynamic mechanism of unsteady force generation similar to those of other insect wings in a horizontal stroke plane, but the detailed effect of the wing kinematics on the force control is different due to the asymmetric use of the angle of attack during the up- and downstrokes. For example, high αmd and low αmu produces larger vertical force with less aerodynamic power, and low αmd and high αmu is recommended for horizontal force (thrust) production. The pitching rotation also affects the aerodynamics of a flapping wing, but its dynamic rotational effect is much weaker than the effect from the kinematic change in the angle of attack caused by the pitching rotation. Thus, the influences of the duration and timing of pitching rotation for the present inclined flapping wing are found to be very different from those for a horizontal flapping wing. That is, for the inclined flapping motion, the advanced and delayed rotations produce smaller vertical forces than the symmetric one and the effect of pitching duration is very small. On the other hand, for a specific range of pitching rotation timing, delayed rotation requires less aerodynamic power than the symmetric rotation. As for the horizontal force, delayed rotation with low αmd and high αmu is recommended for long-duration flight owing to its high efficiency, and advanced rotation should be employed for hovering flight for nearly zero horizontal force. The present study

  20. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  1. Fourier analysis of the aerodynamic behavior of cup anemometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calibration results (the transfer function) of an anemometer equipped with several cup rotors were analyzed and correlated with the aerodynamic forces measured on the isolated cups in a wind tunnel. The correlation was based on a Fourier analysis of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. Three different cup shapes were studied: typical conical cups, elliptical cups and porous cups (conical-truncated shape). Results indicated a good correlation between the anemometer factor, K, and the ratio between the first two coefficients in the Fourier series decomposition of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. (paper)

  2. Particle size distributions in the Eastern Mediterranean troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivitis, N.; Birmili, W.; Stock, M.; Wehner, B.; Massling, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2008-11-01

    Atmospheric particle size distributions were measured on Crete island, Greece in the Eastern Mediterranean during an intensive field campaign between 28 August and 20 October, 2005. Our instrumentation combined a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and measured number size distributions in the size range 0.018 μm 10 μm. Four time periods with distinct aerosol characteristics were discriminated, two corresponding to marine and polluted air masses, respectively. In marine air, the sub-μm size distributions showed two particle modes centered at 67 nm and 195 nm having total number concentrations between 900 and 2000 cm-3. In polluted air masses, the size distributions were mainly unimodal with a mode typically centered at 140 nm, with number concentrations varying between 1800 and 2900 cm-3. Super-μm particles showed number concentrations in the range from 0.01 to 2.5 cm-3 without any clear relation to air mass origin. A small number of short-lived particle nucleation events were recorded, where the calculated particle formation rates ranged between 1.1 1.7 cm-3 s-1. However, no particle nucleation and growth events comparable to those typical for the continental boundary layer were observed. Particles concentrations (Diameter <50 nm) were low compared to continental boundary layer conditions with an average concentration of 300 cm-3. The production of sulfuric acid and its subsequently condensation on preexisting particles was examined with the use of a simplistic box model. These calculations suggested that the day-time evolution of the Aitken particle population was governed mainly by coagulation and that particle formation was absent during most days.

  3. Optimization of wind turbine rotors - using advanced aerodynamic and aeroelastic models and numerical optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Mads

    of very large machines introduces new problems in the practical design, and optimization tools are necessary. These must combine the dynamic eects of both aerodynamics and structure in an integrated optimization environment. This is referred to as aeroelastic optimization. The Ris DTU optimization......During the last decades the annual energy produced by wind turbines has increased dramatically and wind turbines are now available in the 5MW range. Turbines in this range are constantly being developed and it is also being investigated whether turbines as large as 10-20MW are feasible. The design...

  4. Reynolds Number, Compressibility, and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on Delta-Wing Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of Reynolds number, compressibility, and leading edge bluntness effects is presented for a 65 degree delta wing. The results of this study address both attached and vortex-flow aerodynamics and are based upon a unique data set obtained in the NASA-Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) for i) Reynolds numbers ranging from conventional wind-tunnel to flight values, ii) Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to transonic speeds, and iii) leading-edge bluntness values that span practical slender wing applications. The data were obtained so as to isolate the subject effects and they present many challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies.

  5. A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project tasks and deliverables are as follows: Computations and Experiments-(1) Simulation and analysis of a range of generic shapes, simplified to more complex, representative of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer flow characteristics using computational tools, (2) The establishment of an experimental data base for tractor-trailer models for code/computational method development and validation. The first shapes to be considered will be directed towards the investigation of tractor-trailer gaps and mismatch of tractor-trailer heights. (3) The evaluation and documentation of effective computational approaches for application to heavy vehicle aerodynamics based on the benchmark results with existing and advanced computational tools compared to experimental data, and (4) Computational tools and experimental methods for use by industry, National Laboratories, and universities for the aerodynamic modeling of heavy truck vehicles. Evaluation of current and new technologies-(1) The evaluation and documentation of current and new technologies for drag reduction based on published literature and continued communication with the heavy vehicle industry (e.g., identification and prioritization of tractor-trailer drag-sources, blowing and/or suction devices, body shaping, new experimental methods or facilities), and the identification and analysis of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer aerodynamic problem areas and possible solution strategies. (2) Continued industrial site visits. It should be noted that ''CFD tools'' are not only the actual computer codes, but descriptions of appropriate numerical solution methods. Part of the project effort will be to determine the restrictions or avenues for technology transfer

  6. Optimum Duty Cycle of Unsteady Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation for NACA0015 Airfoil Stall Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Yang, Bo; Peng, Tianxiang; Lei, Mingkai

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma aerodynamic actuation technology is employed to suppress airfoil stall separation and the technical parameters are explored with wind tunnel experiments on an NACA0015 airfoil by measuring the surface pressure distribution of the airfoil. The performance of the DBD aerodynamic actuation for airfoil stall separation suppression is evaluated under DBD voltages from 2000 V to 4000 V and the duty cycles varied in the range of 0.1 to 1.0. It is found that higher lift coefficients and lower threshold voltages are achieved under the unsteady DBD aerodynamic actuation with the duty cycles less than 0.5 as compared to that of the steady plasma actuation at the same free-stream speeds and attack angles, indicating a better flow control performance. By comparing the lift coefficients and the threshold voltages, an optimum duty cycle is determined as 0.25 by which the maximum lift coefficient and the minimum threshold voltage are obtained at the same free-stream speed and attack angle. The non-uniform DBD discharge with stronger discharge in the positive half cycle due to electrons deposition on the dielectric slabs and the suppression of opposite momentum transfer due to the intermittent discharge with cutoff of the negative half cycle are responsible for the observed optimum duty cycle. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21276036), Liaoning Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2015020123) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 3132015154)

  7. Mead Crater, Venus - Aerodynamic roughness of wind streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K. K.; Greeley, R.

    1997-03-01

    Radar backscatter images of Venus returned by the Magellan spacecraft revealed many aeolian features on the planet's surface. While much work has focused on terrestrial wind streaks, the harsh environment of Venus limits direct measurement of surface properties, such as aerodynamic roughness, that affect aeolian features on that planet. However, a correlation between radar backscatter and aerodynamic roughness (Z0) for the S-band radar system on Magellan can be used to study the aerodynamic roughnesses of areas in which Venusian wind streaks occur. The aerodynamic roughness of areas with both radar-bright and radar-dark wind streaks near Mead crater are calculated and compared to z0 values measured on Earth in order to compare the surface of Venus with known terrestrial surface textures.

  8. Space Launch System Ascent Static Aerodynamic Database Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Bennett, David W.; Blevins, John A.; Erickson, Gary E.; Favaregh, Noah M.; Houlden, Heather P.; Tomek, William G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the wind tunnel testing work and data analysis required to characterize the static aerodynamic environment of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) ascent portion of flight. Scaled models of the SLS have been tested in transonic and supersonic wind tunnels to gather the high fidelity data that is used to build aerodynamic databases. A detailed description of the wind tunnel test that was conducted to produce the latest version of the database is presented, and a representative set of aerodynamic data is shown. The wind tunnel data quality remains very high, however some concerns with wall interference effects through transonic Mach numbers are also discussed. Post-processing and analysis of the wind tunnel dataset are crucial for the development of a formal ascent aerodynamics database.

  9. Aerodynamic instability of a cylinder with thin ice accretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstrup, Henrik; Georgakis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    selected. This was then used in the generation of a generalized ice profile. The generalized ice profile was selected so as to depict with a fair degree of representation the most commonly observed ice accretion on the Great Belt East Bridge. Subsequently, the generalized ice profile was manufactured by...... use of rapid prototyping. Next, a series of static wind tunnel tests were undertaken to determine the aerodynamic force coefficients of the rapidly prototyped hanger sectional model. Finally the aerodynamic force coefficients (drag, lift and moment), found from the static wind tunnel tests, were used...... to determine the potential for aerodynamic instability of the hanger through application of the quasi-steady theory developed by Gjelstrup et al. [9-10]. The application of the theoretical model yield regions of expected aerodynamic instability in which the observed vibrations of the Great Belt East...

  10. Theoretical and applied aerodynamics and related numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Chattot, J J

    2015-01-01

    This book covers classical and modern aerodynamics, theories and related numerical methods, for senior and first-year graduate engineering students, including: -The classical potential (incompressible) flow theories for low speed aerodynamics of thin airfoils and high and low aspect ratio wings. - The linearized theories for compressible subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics. - The nonlinear transonic small disturbance potential flow theory, including supercritical wing sections, the extended transonic area rule with lift effect, transonic lifting line and swept or oblique wings to minimize wave drag. Unsteady flow is also briefly discussed. Numerical simulations based on relaxation mixed-finite difference methods are presented and explained. - Boundary layer theory for all Mach number regimes and viscous/inviscid interaction procedures used in practical aerodynamics calculations. There are also four chapters covering special topics, including wind turbines and propellers, airplane design, flow analogies and h...

  11. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design with Transition Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enhance aerodynamic design capabilities, Desktop Aeronautics proposes to significantly improve upon the integration (performed in Phase 1) of a new sweep/taper...

  12. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design with Transition Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enhance aerodynamic design capabilities, Desktop Aeronautics proposes to combine a new sweep/taper integrated-boundary-layer (IBL) code that includes transition...

  13. The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III : Trucks, Buses and Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Orellano, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International conference “The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III: Trucks, Buses and Trains” held in Potsdam, Germany, September 12-17, 2010 by Engineering Conferences International (ECI). Leading scientists and engineers from industry, universities and research laboratories, including truck and high-speed train manufacturers and operators were brought together to discuss computer simulation and experimental techniques to be applied for the design of more efficient trucks, buses and high-speed trains in the future.   This conference was the third in the series after Monterey-Pacific Groove in 2002 and Lake Tahoe in 2007.  The presentations address different aspects of train aerodynamics (cross wind effects, underbody flow, tunnel aerodynamics and aeroacoustics, experimental techniques), truck aerodynamics (drag reduction, flow control, experimental and computational techniques) as well as computational fluid dynamics and bluff body, wake and jet flows.

  14. On the quasi-steady aerodynamics of normal hovering flight part II: model implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces a generic, transparent and compact model for the evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of insect-like flapping wings in hovering flight. The model is generic in that it can be applied to wings of arbitrary morphology and kinematics without the use of experimental data, is transparent in that the aerodynamic components of the model are linked directly to morphology and kinematics via physical relationships and is compact in the sense that it can be efficiently evaluated for use within a design optimization environment. An important aspect of the model is the method by which translational force coefficients for the aerodynamic model are obtained from first principles; however important insights are also provided for the morphological and kinematic treatments that improve the clarity and efficiency of the overall model. A thorough analysis of the leading-edge suction analogy model is provided and comparison of the aerodynamic model with results from application of the leading-edge suction analogy shows good agreement. The full model is evaluated against experimental data for revolving wings and good agreement is obtained for lift and drag up to 90° incidence. Comparison of the model output with data from computational fluid dynamics studies on a range of different insect species also shows good agreement with predicted weight support ratio and specific power. The validated model is used to evaluate the relative impact of different contributors to the induced power factor for the hoverfly and fruitfly. It is shown that the assumption of an ideal induced power factor (k = 1) for a normal hovering hoverfly leads to a 23% overestimation of the generated force owing to flapping. PMID:24554578

  15. Design Of An Aerodynamic Measurement System For Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Velázquez-Araque

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and validation of a measurement system for aerodynamic characteristics of unmanned aerial vehicles. An aerodynamic balance was designed in order to measure the lift, drag forces and pitching moment for different airfoils. During the design process, several aspects were analyzed in order to produce an efficient design, for instance the range of changes of the angle of attack with and a small increment and the versatility of being adapted to different type of airfoils, since it is a wire balance it was aligned and calibrated as well. Wind tunnel tests of a two dimensional NACA four digits family airfoil and four different modifications of this airfoil were performed to validate the aerodynamic measurement system. The modification of this airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. Therefore, four different locations along the cord line for this blowing outlet were analyzed. This analysis involved the aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients curves as a function of the angle of attack experimentally for the situation where the engine of the aerial vehicle is turned off, called the no blowing condition, by means of wind tunnel tests. The experiments were performed in a closed circuit wind tunnel with an open test section. Finally, results of the wind tunnel tests were compared with numerical results obtained by means of computational fluid dynamics as well as with other experimental references and found to be in good agreement.

  16. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  17. Aerodynamic Analysis Models for Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Brahimi, M. T.; A. Allet; I. Paraschivoiu

    1995-01-01

    This work details the progress made in the development of aerodynamic models for studying Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT's) with particular emphasis on the prediction of aerodynamic loads and rotor performance as well as dynamic stall simulations. The paper describes current effort and some important findings using streamtube models, 3-D viscous model, stochastic wind model and numerical simulation of the flow around the turbine blades. Comparison of the analytical results with available e...

  18. Flexible Thermal Protection System Development for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Bruce, Walter E., III; Hughes, Stephen J.; Dec, John A.; Rezin, Marc D.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Guo, Haiquan; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Cheatwood, McNeil

    2012-01-01

    The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIAD) project has invested in development of multiple thermal protection system (TPS) candidates to be used in inflatable, high downmass, technology flight projects. Flexible TPS is one element of the HIAD project which is tasked with the research and development of the technology ranging from direct ground tests, modelling and simulation, characterization of TPS systems, manufacturing and handling, and standards and policy definition. The intent of flexible TPS is to enable large deployable aeroshell technologies, which increase the drag performance while significantly reducing the ballistic coefficient of high-mass entry vehicles. A HIAD requires a flexible TPS capable of surviving aerothermal loads, and durable enough to survive the rigors of construction, handling, high density packing, long duration exposure to extrinsic, in-situ environments, and deployment. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of key work being performed within the Flexible TPS element of the HIAD project. Included in this paper is an overview of, and results from, each Flexible TPS research and development activity, which includes ground testing, physics-based thermal modelling, age testing, margins policy, catalysis, materials characterization, and recent developments with new TPS materials.

  19. Drones for aerodynamic and structural testing /DAST/ - A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrow, H. N.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A program for providing research data on aerodynamic loads and active control systems on wings with supercritical airfoils in the transonic speed range is described. Analytical development, wind tunnel tests, and flight tests are included. A Firebee II target drone vehicle has been modified for use as a flight test facility. The program currently includes flight experiments on two aeroelastic research wings. The primary purpose of the first flight experiment is to demonstrate an active control system for flutter suppression on a transport-type wing. Design and fabrication of the wing are complete and after installing research instrumentation and the flutter suppression system, flight testing is expected to begin in early 1979. The experiment on the second research wing - a fuel-conservative transport type - is to demonstrate multiple active control systems including flutter suppression, maneuver load alleviation, gust load alleviation, and reduce static stability. Of special importance for this second experiment is the development and validation of integrated design methods which include the benefits of active controls in the structural design.

  20. Aerodynamic Performances of Corrugated Dragonfly Wings at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Masatoshi; He, Guowei; Hu, Hui

    2006-11-01

    The cross-sections of dragonfly wings have well-defined corrugated configurations, which seem to be not very suitable for flight according to traditional airfoil design principles. However, previous studies have led to surprising conclusions of that corrugated dragonfly wings would have better aerodynamic performances compared with traditional technical airfoils in the low Reynolds number regime where dragonflies usually fly. Unlike most of the previous studies of either measuring total aerodynamics forces (lift and drag) or conducting qualitative flow visualization, a series of wind tunnel experiments will be conducted in the present study to investigate the aerodynamic performances of corrugated dragonfly wings at low Reynolds numbers quantitatively. In addition to aerodynamics force measurements, detailed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements will be conducted to quantify of the flow field around a two-dimensional corrugated dragonfly wing model to elucidate the fundamental physics associated with the flight features and aerodynamic performances of corrugated dragonfly wings. The aerodynamic performances of the dragonfly wing model will be compared with those of a simple flat plate and a NASA low-speed airfoil at low Reynolds numbers.

  1. Effect of particles size range on iron ore flotation Efeito da faixa de tamanho de partículas na flotação de minério de ferro

    OpenAIRE

    Neymayer Pereira Lima; George Eduardo Sales Valadão; Antônio Eduardo Clark Peres

    2013-01-01

    Flotation is one of the main concentration processes being employed for many classes of minerals (sulfides, oxides, silicates, phosphates, for example) at different particle sizes. In the iron ore industry, reverse quartz flotation has been successfully employed for particle sizes below ISOfim after the desliming process. The high demand for iron ore products has made flotation the main process for concentration in this industry, thus a better understanding of its mechanisms and the effect of...

  2. IEA joint action. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-08-01

    The advances to be made in aerodynamic prediction requires a deeper understanding of the physical processes occurring at the blades, and in the wake, of a wind turbine. This can only come from a continuing process of experimental observation and theoretical analysis. The present symposium presents the opportunity to do this by exchange of data from experiments and simulations, and by discussion of new or modified wake theories. The symposium will consists of a number of presentations by invited speakers and conclude with a summary of the talks and a round-the-table technical discussion. The talks offer the change to present behaviour from full-scale and laboratory experiments that are not explained by existing prediction codes. In addition, presentations are welcome on new modelling techniques or formulations that could make existing codes more accurate, less computationally intensive and easier to use. This symposium is intended to provide a starting point for the formulation of advanced rotor performance methods, which will improve the accuracy of load and performance prediction codes useful to the wind turbine industry. (au)

  3. Rudolf Hermann, wind tunnels and aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Charles A.; Coleman, Anne M.

    2008-04-01

    Rudolf Hermann was born on December 15, 1904 in Leipzig, Germany. He studied at the University of Leipzig and at the Aachen Institute of Technology. His involvement with wind tunnels began in 1934 when Professor Carl Wieselsberger engaged him to work at Aachen on the development of a supersonic wind tunnel. On January 6, 1936, Dr. Wernher von Braun visited Dr. Hermann to arrange for use of the Aachen supersonic wind tunnel for Army problems. On April 1, 1937, Dr. Hermann became Director of the Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the Army installation at Peenemunde. Results from the Aachen and Peenemunde wind tunnels were crucial in achieving aerodynamic stability for the A-4 rocket, later designated as the V-2. Plans to build a Mach 10 'hypersonic' wind tunnel facility at Kochel were accelerated after the Allied air raid on Peenemunde on August 17, 1943. Dr. Hermann was director of the new facility. Ignoring destruction orders from Hitler as WWII approached an end in Europe, Dr. Hermann and his associates hid documents and preserved wind tunnel components that were acquired by the advancing American forces. Dr. Hermann became a consultant to the Air Force at its Wright Field in November 1945. In 1951, he was named professor of Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. In 1962, Dr. Hermann became the first Director of the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a position he held until he retired in 1970.

  4. Turbine stage aerodynamics and heat transfer prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Lisa W.; Mcconnaughey, H. V.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical study of the aerodynamic and thermal environment associated with axial turbine stages is presented. Computations were performed using a modification of the unsteady NASA Ames viscous code, ROTOR1, and an improved version of the NASA Lewis steady inviscid cascade system MERIDL-TSONIC coupled with boundary layer codes BLAYER and STAN5. Two different turbine stages were analyzed: the first stage of the United Technologies Research Center Large Scale Rotating Rig (LSRR) and the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbopump turbine. The time-averaged airfoil midspan pressure and heat transfer profiles were predicted for numerous thermal boundary conditions including adiabatic wall, prescribed surface temperature, and prescribed heat flux. Computed solutions are compared with each other and with experimental data in the case of the LSRR calculations. Modified ROTOR1 predictions of unsteady pressure envelopes and instantaneous contour plots are also presented for the SSME geometry. Relative merits of the two computational approaches are discussed.

  5. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  6. Computational aerodynamics and aeroacoustics for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, W.Z.

    2009-10-15

    The present thesis consists of 19 selected papers dealing with the development and use of CFD methods for studying the aerodynamics and aero-acoustics of wind turbines. The papers are written in the period from 1997 to 2008 and numbered according to the list in page v. The work consists of two parts: an aerodynamic part based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and an aero-acoustic part based on Computational Aero Acoustics for wind turbines. The main objective of the research was to develop new computational tools and techniques for analysing flows about wind turbines. A few papers deal with applications of Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory to wind turbines. In most cases the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables (velocity-pressure formulation) are employed as the basic governing equations. However, since fluid mechanical problems essentially are governed by vortex dynamics, it is sometimes advantageous to use the concept of vorticity (defined as the curl of velocity). In vorticity form the Navier-Stokes equations may be formulated in different ways, using a vorticity-stream function formulation, a vorticity-velocity formulation or a vorticity-potential-stream function formulation. In [1] - [3] two different vorticity formulations were developed for 2D and 3D wind turbine flows. In [4] and [5] numerical techniques for avoiding pressure oscillations were developed when solving the velocity-pressure coupling system in the in-house EllipSys2D/3D code. In [6] - [8] different actuator disc techniques combined with CFD are presented. This includes actuator disc, actuator line and actuator surface techniques, which were developed to simulate flows past one or more wind turbines. In [9] and [10] a tip loss correction method that improves the conventional models was developed for use in combination with BEM or actuator/Navier-Stokes computations. A simple and efficient technique for determining the angle of attack for flow past a wind turbine rotor

  7. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their

  8. Variational Methods in Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization for Aerodynamic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A. H.; Hou, G. J.-W.; Tiwari, S. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Variational methods (VM) sensitivity analysis, which is the continuous alternative to the discrete sensitivity analysis, is employed to derive the costate (adjoint) equations, the transversality conditions, and the functional sensitivity derivatives. In the derivation of the sensitivity equations, the variational methods use the generalized calculus of variations, in which the variable boundary is considered as the design function. The converged solution of the state equations together with the converged solution of the costate equations are integrated along the domain boundary to uniquely determine the functional sensitivity derivatives with respect to the design function. The determination of the sensitivity derivatives of the performance index or functional entails the coupled solutions of the state and costate equations. As the stable and converged numerical solution of the costate equations with their boundary conditions are a priori unknown, numerical stability analysis is performed on both the state and costate equations. Thereafter, based on the amplification factors obtained by solving the generalized eigenvalue equations, the stability behavior of the costate equations is discussed and compared with the state (Euler) equations. The stability analysis of the costate equations suggests that the converged and stable solution of the costate equation is possible only if the computational domain of the costate equations is transformed to take into account the reverse flow nature of the costate equations. The application of the variational methods to aerodynamic shape optimization problems is demonstrated for internal flow problems at supersonic Mach number range. The study shows, that while maintaining the accuracy of the functional sensitivity derivatives within the reasonable range for engineering prediction purposes, the variational methods show a substantial gain in computational efficiency, i.e., computer time and memory, when compared with the finite

  9. Predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of 2D airfoil and the performance of 3D wind turbine using a CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite of the laminar-turbulent transition region co-exist with fully turbulence region around the leading edge of an airfoil, still lots of researchers apply to fully turbulence models to predict aerodynamic characteristics. It is well known that fully turbulent model such as standard k-model couldn't predict the complex stall and the separation behavior on an airfoil accurately, it usually leads to over prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics such as lift and drag forces. So, we apply correlation based transition model to predict aerodynamic performance of the NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Phase IV wind turbine. And also, compare the computed results from transition model with experimental measurement and fully turbulence results. Results are presented for a range of wind speed, for a NREL Phase IV wind turbine rotor. Low speed shaft torque, power, root bending moment, aerodynamic coefficients of 2D airfoil and several flow field figures results included in this study. As a result, the low speed shaft torque predicted by transitional turbulence model is very good agree with the experimental measurement in whole operating conditions but fully turbulent model(K- ε) over predict the shaft torque after 7m/s. Root bending moment is also good agreement between the prediction and experiments for most of the operating conditions, especially with the transition model

  10. Effect of process variables on morphology and aerodynamic properties of voriconazole formulations produced by thin film freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinborn, Nicole A; Lirola, Hélène L; Williams, Robert O

    2012-06-15

    The particle engineering process, thin film freezing (TFF), was used to produce particulate voriconazole (VRC) formulations with enhanced properties. The effect of various processing parameters on the solid state properties and aerodynamic performance of the TFF-processed powders was investigated in order to evaluate the suitability of these formulations for dry powder inhalation and to optimize the aerodynamic properties. Thin film freezing of VRC solution without stabilizing excipients resulted in microstructured, crystalline low density aggregate particles with specific surface areas of approximately 10m(2)/g. Thin film freezing of VRC-PVP solutions produced nanostructured, amorphous low density aggregate particles with specific surface areas ranging from 15 to 180m(2)/g, depending on the solvent system composition, polymer grade, and drug to polymer ratio utilized. VRC formulations manufactured with 1,4-dioxane, with and without PVP K12, resulted in the lowest specific surface areas but displayed the best aerodynamic properties. Using a Handihaler(®) dry powder inhaler (DPI), microstructured crystalline TFF-VRC and nanostructured amorphous TFF-VRC-PVP K12 (1:2) displayed total emitted fractions of 80.6% and 96.5%, fine particle fractions of 43.1% and 42.4%, and mass median aerodynamic diameters of 3.5 and 4.5μm, respectively. PMID:22433472

  11. Aerodynamic Investigation of Incidence Angle Effects in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements showing the effects of large incidence angle variations on an HPT turbine blade set are presented. Measurements were made in NASA's Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility which has been used in previous studies to acquire detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer measurements for CFD code validation. The current study supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50 percent speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50deg or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The cascade facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Using existing blade geometry with previously acquired aerodynamic data, the tunnel was re-baselined and the new incidence angle range was exercised. Midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements were obtained at seven inlet flow angles. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with inlet Reynolds numbers varying from 6.83×10(exp 5) to 0.85×10(exp 5) and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.74 and 0.34. The midspan flowfield measurements were acquired using a three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition.

  12. Unsteady aerodynamics of fluttering and tumbling plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A.; Pesavento, U.; Wang, Z. Jane

    2005-10-01

    We investigate the aerodynamics of freely falling plates in a quasi-two-dimensional flow at Reynolds number of 10(3) , which is typical for a leaf or business card falling in air. We quantify the trajectories experimentally using high-speed digital video at sufficient resolution to determine the instantaneous plate accelerations and thus to deduce the instantaneous fluid forces. We compare the measurements with direct numerical solutions of the two-dimensional Navier Stokes equation. Using inviscid theory as a guide, we decompose the fluid forces into contributions due to acceleration, translation, and rotation of the plate. For both fluttering and tumbling we find that the fluid circulation is dominated by a rotational term proportional to the angular velocity of the plate, as opposed to the translational velocity for a glider with fixed angle of attack. We find that the torque on a freely falling plate is small, i.e. the torque is one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the torque on a glider with fixed angle of attack. Based on these results we revise the existing ODE models of freely falling plates. We get access to different kinds of dynamics by exploring the phase diagram spanned by the Reynolds number, the dimensionless moment of inertia, and the thickness-to-width ratio. In agreement with previous experiments, we find fluttering, tumbling, and apparently chaotic motion. We further investigate the dependence on initial conditions and find brief transients followed by periodic fluttering described by simple harmonics and tumbling with a pronounced period-two structure. Near the cusp-like turning points, the plates elevate, a feature which would be absent if the lift depended on the translational velocity alone.

  13. Diving-flight aerodynamics of a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ponitz

    Full Text Available This study investigates the aerodynamics of the falcon Falco peregrinus while diving. During a dive peregrines can reach velocities of more than 320 km h⁻¹. Unfortunately, in freely roaming falcons, these high velocities prohibit a precise determination of flight parameters such as velocity and acceleration as well as body shape and wing contour. Therefore, individual F. peregrinus were trained to dive in front of a vertical dam with a height of 60 m. The presence of a well-defined background allowed us to reconstruct the flight path and the body shape of the falcon during certain flight phases. Flight trajectories were obtained with a stereo high-speed camera system. In addition, body images of the falcon were taken from two perspectives with a high-resolution digital camera. The dam allowed us to match the high-resolution images obtained from the digital camera with the corresponding images taken with the high-speed cameras. Using these data we built a life-size model of F. peregrinus and used it to measure the drag and lift forces in a wind-tunnel. We compared these forces acting on the model with the data obtained from the 3-D flight path trajectory of the diving F. peregrinus. Visualizations of the flow in the wind-tunnel uncovered details of the flow structure around the falcon's body, which suggests local regions with separation of flow. High-resolution pictures of the diving peregrine indicate that feathers pop-up in the equivalent regions, where flow separation in the model falcon occurred.

  14. Aerodynamics, sensing and control of insect-scale flapping-wing flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, Wei; Kang, Chang-kwon; Chirarattananon, Pakpong; Ravi, Sridhar; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    There are nearly a million known species of flying insects and 13 000 species of flying warm-blooded vertebrates, including mammals, birds and bats. While in flight, their wings not only move forward relative to the air, they also flap up and down, plunge and sweep, so that both lift and thrust can be generated and balanced, accommodate uncertain surrounding environment, with superior flight stability and dynamics with highly varied speeds and missions. As the size of a flyer is reduced, the wing-to-body mass ratio tends to decrease as well. Furthermore, these flyers use integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic forces, muscles to move the wings, and sensing and control systems to guide and manoeuvre. In this article, recent advances in insect-scale flapping-wing aerodynamics, flexible wing structures, unsteady flight environment, sensing, stability and control are reviewed with perspective offered. In particular, the special features of the low Reynolds number flyers associated with small sizes, thin and light structures, slow flight with comparable wind gust speeds, bioinspired fabrication of wing structures, neuron-based sensing and adaptive control are highlighted. PMID:27118897

  15. Development and application of an optimization procedure for flutter suppression using the aerodynamic energy concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, E.; Abel, I.

    1978-01-01

    An optimization procedure is developed based on the responses of a system to continuous gust inputs. The procedure uses control law transfer functions which have been partially determined by using the relaxed aerodynamic energy approach. The optimization procedure yields a flutter suppression system which minimizes control surface activity in a gust environment. The procedure is applied to wing flutter of a drone aircraft to demonstrate a 44 percent increase in the basic wing flutter dynamic pressure. It is shown that a trailing edge control system suppresses the flutter instability over a wide range of subsonic mach numbers and flight altitudes. Results of this study confirm the effectiveness of the relaxed energy approach.

  16. Aerodynamic Design of a Propeller for High-Altitude Balloon Trajectory Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, Richard; Somers, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a propeller for the trajectory control of a high-altitude, scientific balloon has been performed using theoretical methods developed especially for such applications. The methods are described. Optimum, nonlinear chord and twist distributions have been developed in conjunction with the design of a family of airfoils, the SE403, SE404, and SE405, for the propeller. The very low Reynolds numbers along the propeller blade fall in a range that has yet to be rigorously investigated, either experimentally or theoretically.

  17. Modal structure of chemical mass size distribution in the high Arctic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillamo, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Aurela, Minna; MäKelä, Timo; Maenhaut, Willy; Leek, Caroline

    2001-11-01

    Chemical mass size distributions of aerosol particles were measured in the remote marine boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean as part of the Atmospheric Research Program on the Arctic Ocean Expedition 1996 (AOE-96). An inertial impaction method was used to classify aerosol particles into different size classes for subsequent chemical analysis. The particle chemical composition was determined by ion chromatography and by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. Continuous particle size spectra were extracted from the raw data using a data inversion method. Clear and varying modal structures for aerosols consisting of primary sea-salt particles or of secondary particles related to dimethyl sulfide emissions were found. Concentration levels of all modes decreased rapidly when the distance from open sea increased. In the submicrometer size range the major ions found by ion chromatography were sulfate, methane sulfonate, and ammonium. They had most of the time a clear Aitken mode and one or two accumulation modes, with aerodynamic mass median diameters around 0.1 μm, 0.3 μm, and between 0.5-1.0 μm, respectively. The overall submicron size distributions of these three ions were quite similar, suggesting that they were internally mixed over most of this size range. The corresponding modal structure was consistent with the mass size distributions derived from the particle number size distributions measured with a differential mobility particle sizer. The Aitken to accumulation mode mass ratio for nss-sulfate and MSA was substantially higher during clear skies than during cloudy periods. Primary sea-salt particles formed a mode with an aerodynamic mass median diameter around 2 μm. In general, the resulting continuous mass size distributions displayed a clear modal structure consistent with our understanding of the two known major source mechanisms. One is the sea-salt aerosol emerging from seawater by bubble bursting. The other is related to

  18. Full range resistive thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, E.; Rotter, M.; De Combarieu, M.; Forget, P.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Pari, P.

    2015-12-01

    Resistive thermometers are widely used in low temperature physics, thanks to portability, simplicity of operation and reduced size. The possibility to precisely follow the temperature from room temperature down to the mK region is of major interest for numerous applications, although no single thermometer can nowadays cover this entire temperature range. In this article we report on a method to realize a full range thermometer, capable to measure, by itself, temperatures in the whole above-cited temperature range, with constant sensitivity and sufficient precision for the typical cryogenic applications. We present here the first results for three different full range thermometer prototypes. A detailed description of the set-up used for measurements and characterization is also reported.

  19. Application Program Interface for the Orion Aerodynamics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip E.; Thompson, James

    2013-01-01

    The Application Programming Interface (API) for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Aerodynamic Database has been developed to provide the developers of software an easily implemented, fully self-contained method of accessing the CEV Aerodynamic Database for use in their analysis and simulation tools. The API is programmed in C and provides a series of functions to interact with the database, such as initialization, selecting various options, and calculating the aerodynamic data. No special functions (file read/write, table lookup) are required on the host system other than those included with a standard ANSI C installation. It reads one or more files of aero data tables. Previous releases of aerodynamic databases for space vehicles have only included data tables and a document of the algorithm and equations to combine them for the total aerodynamic forces and moments. This process required each software tool to have a unique implementation of the database code. Errors or omissions in the documentation, or errors in the implementation, led to a lengthy and burdensome process of having to debug each instance of the code. Additionally, input file formats differ for each space vehicle simulation tool, requiring the aero database tables to be reformatted to meet the tool s input file structure requirements. Finally, the capabilities for built-in table lookup routines vary for each simulation tool. Implementation of a new database may require an update to and verification of the table lookup routines. This may be required if the number of dimensions of a data table exceeds the capability of the simulation tools built-in lookup routines. A single software solution was created to provide an aerodynamics software model that could be integrated into other simulation and analysis tools. The highly complex Orion aerodynamics model can then be quickly included in a wide variety of tools. The API code is written in ANSI C for ease of portability to a wide variety of systems. The

  20. Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing of the Orion Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James C.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion aerodynamic testing team has completed more than 40 tests as part of developing the aerodynamic and loads databases for the vehicle. These databases are key to achieving good mechanical design for the vehicle and to ensure controllable flight during all potential atmospheric phases of a mission, including launch aborts. A wide variety of wind tunnels have been used by the team to document not only the aerodynamics but the aeroacoustic environment that the Orion might experience both during nominal ascents and launch aborts. During potential abort scenarios the effects of the various rocket motor plumes on the vehicle must be accurately understood. The Abort Motor (AM) is a high-thrust, short duration motor that rapidly separates Orion from its launch vehicle. The Attitude Control Motor (ACM), located in the nose of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle, is used for control during a potential abort. The 8 plumes from the ACM interact in a nonlinear manner with the four AM plumes which required a carefully controlled test to define the interactions and their effect on the control authority provided by the ACM. Techniques for measuring dynamic stability and for simulating rocket plume aerodynamics and acoustics were improved or developed in the course of building the aerodynamic and loads databases for Orion.

  1. Aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis of space mission vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Viviani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Presenting an up-to-date view on the most important space vehicle configurations, this book contains detailed analyses for several different type of space mission profiles while considering important factors such as aerodynamic loads, aerodynamic heating, vehicle stability and landing characteristics. With that in mind, the authors provide a detailed overview on different state-of-the-art themes of hypersonic aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, and consider different space vehicle shapes useful for different space mission objectives. These include: ·        Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) ·        Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) ·        Sample Return Vehicle (SRV) ·        Flying Test Bed (FTB). Throughout Aerodynamic and Aerothermodynamic Analysis of Space Mission Vehicles many examples are given, with detailed computations and results for the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of all such configurations. Moreover, a final chapter on future launchers is provided and an Appendix on...

  2. Ice Accretions and Full-Scale Iced Aerodynamic Performance Data for a Two-Dimensional NACA 23012 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lee, Sam; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, Emmanuel; Moens, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    in the IRT. From these molds, castings were made that closely replicated the features of the accreted ice. The castings were then mounted on the full-scale model in the F1 tunnel, and aerodynamic performance measurements were made using model surface pressure taps, the facility force balance system, and a large wake rake designed specifically for these tests. Tests were run over a range of Reynolds and Mach numbers. For each run, the model was rotated over a range of angles-of-attack that included airfoil stall. The benchmark data collected during these campaigns were, and continue to be, used for various purposes. The full-scale data form a unique, ice-accretion and associated aerodynamic performance dataset that can be used as a reference when addressing concerns regarding the use of subscale ice-accretion data to assess full-scale icing effects. Further, the data may be used in the development or enhancement of both ice-accretion prediction codes and computational fluid dynamic codes when applied to study the effects of icing. Finally, as was done in the wider study, the data may be used to help determine the level of geometric fidelity needed for artificial ice used to assess aerodynamic degradation due to aircraft icing. The structured, multifaceted approach used in this research effort provides a unique perspective on the aerodynamic effects of aircraft icing. The data presented in this report are available in electronic form upon formal approval by proper NASA and ONERA authorities.

  3. Assessment of two fast codes used for preliminary aerodynamic design of guided projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Ameer G.

    1986-07-01

    Two missile aerodynamic prediction fast codes, namely NSWCAP and Missile-DATCOM, have been applied to the geometry of the guided, gun-launched Copperhead projectile. Assessment of the two codes was made in comparison with wind tunnel and free-flight range test data. Two configurations were considered for computation: the launch configuration (body-tail) in the Mach range of 0.5 to 1.8 and the maneuvering configuration (body-wing-tail) in the Mach range of 0.3 to 0.95. Results show reasonable agreement for the drag coefficient, C sub D, and show very large disagreements for both C sub N sub alpha and C sub M sub alpha. The incapability of both codes to include body slots and fin gap effects seems to have contributed largely to these differences. The dynamic derivatives C sub l sub p and (C sub M sub q + C sub M sub alpha) are not adequately estimated by the NSWCAP code, and are not calculated in the DATCOM code. For the coefficients actually computed, the DATCOM code results were slightly more accurate than those of the NSWCAP code. Both codes lack the determination of the explicit effects of control surface deflection angles on the aerodynamic coefficients. Development is needed for the determination if both codes are to be used for predictions for guided projectiles. Several areas of improvements in both codes are identified.

  4. Unsteady aerodynamic forces and power requirements of a bumblebee in forward flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianghao Wu; Mao Sun

    2005-01-01

    Aerodynamic forces and power requirements in forward flight in a bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) were studied using the method of computational fluid dynamics. Actual wing kinematic data of free flight were used in the study (the speed ranges from 0 m/s to 4.5 m/s; advance ratio ranges from 0-0.66). The bumblebee employs the delayed stall mechanism and the fast pitching-up rotation mechanism to produce vertical force and thrust. The leading-edge vortex does not shed in the translatory phase of the half-strokes and is much more concentrated than that of the fruit fly in a previous study. At hovering and low-speed flight, the vertical force is produced by both the half-strokes and is contributed by wing lift; at medium and high speeds, the vertical force is mainly produced during the downstroke and is contributed by both wing lift and wing drag. At all speeds the thrust is mainly produced in the upstroke and is contributed by wing drag.The power requirement at low to medium speeds is not very different from that of hovering and is relatively large at the highest speed (advance ratio 0.66), i.e. the power curve is Jshaped. Except at the highest flight speed, storing energy elastically can save power up to 20%-30%. At the highest speed,because of the large increase of aerodynamic torque and the slight decrease of inertial torque (due to the smaller stroke amplitude and stroke frequency used), the power requirement is dominated by aerodynamic power and the effect of elastic storage of energy on power requirement is limited.

  5. Aerodynamic parameters of across-wind self-limiting vibration for square sections after lock-in in smooth flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jong-Cheng; Chang, Feng-Jung

    2011-08-01

    The paper aims to identify the across-wind aerodynamic parameters of two-dimensional square section structures after the lock-in stage from the response measurements of wind tunnel tests under smooth wind flow conditions. Firstly, a conceivable self-limiting model was selected from the existent literature and the revisit of the analytical solution shows that the aerodynamic parameters (linear and nonlinear aerodynamic dampings Y1 and ɛ, and aerodynamic stiffness Y2) are not only functions of the section shape and reduced wind velocity but also dependent on both the mass ratio ( mr) and structural damping ratio ( ξ) independently, rather than on the Scruton number as a whole. Secondly, the growth-to-resonance (GTR) method was adopted for identifying the aerodynamic parameters of four different square section models (DN1, DN2, DN3 and DN4) by varying the density ranging from 226 to 409 kg/m 3. To improve the accuracy of the results, numerical optimization of the curve-fitting for experimental and analytical response in time domain was performed to finalize the results. The experimental results of the across-wind self-limiting steady-state amplitudes after lock-in stage versus the reduced wind velocity show that, except the tail part of the DN1 case slightly decreases indicating a pure vortex-induced lock-in persists, the DN2, DN3 and DN4 cases have a trend of monotonically increasing with the reduced wind velocity, which shows an asymptotic combination with the galloping behavior. Due to such a combination effect, all three aerodynamic parameters decrease as the reduced wind velocity increases and asymptotically approaches to a constant at the high branch. In the DN1 case, the parameters Y1 and Y2 decrease as the reduced wind velocity increases while the parameter ɛ slightly reverses in the tail part. The 3-dimensional surface plot of the Y1, ɛ and Y2 curves further show that, excluding the DN1 case, the parameters in the DN2, DN3 and DN4 cases almost follow a

  6. Computational Design and Analysis of a Micro-Tab Based Aerodynamic Loads Control System for Lifting Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dam, C P; Nakafuji, D Y; Bauer, C; Chao, D; Standish, K

    2002-11-01

    A computational design and analysis of a microtab based aerodynamic loads control system is presented. The microtab consists of a small tab that emerges from a wing approximately perpendicular to its surface in the vicinity of its trailing edge. Tab deployment on the upper side of the wing causes a decrease in the lift generation whereas deployment on the pressure side causes an increase. The computational methods applied in the development of this concept solve the governing Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on structured, overset grids. The application of these methods to simulate the flows over lifting surface including the tabs has been paramount in the development of these devices. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the microtab and that it is possible to carry out a sensitivity analysis on the positioning and sizing of the tabs before they are implemented in successfully controlling the aerodynamic loads.

  7. Evaluating the catching performance of aerodynamic rain gauges through field comparisons and CFD modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Michael; Colli, Matteo; Stagnaro, Mattia; Lanza, Luca; Quinn, Paul; Dutton, Mark; O'Donnell, Greg; Wilkinson, Mark; Black, Andrew; O'Connell, Enda

    2016-04-01

    Accurate rainfall measurement is a fundamental requirement in a broad range of applications including flood risk and water resource management. The most widely used method of measuring rainfall is the rain gauge, which is often also considered to be the most accurate. In the context of hydrological modelling, measurements from rain gauges are interpolated to produce an areal representation, which forms an important input to drive hydrological models and calibrate rainfall radars. In each stage of this process another layer of uncertainty is introduced. The initial measurement errors are propagated through the chain, compounding the overall uncertainty. This study looks at the fundamental source of error, in the rainfall measurement itself; and specifically addresses the largest of these, the systematic 'wind-induced' error. Snowfall is outside the scope. The shape of a precipitation gauge significantly affects its collection efficiency (CE), with respect to a reference measurement. This is due to the airflow around the gauge, which causes a deflection in the trajectories of the raindrops near the gauge orifice. Computational Fluid-Dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to evaluate the time-averaged airflows realized around the EML ARG100, EML SBS500 and EML Kalyx-RG rain gauges, when impacted by wind. These gauges have a similar aerodynamic profile - a shape comparable to that of a champagne flute - and they are used globally. The funnel diameter of each gauge, respectively, is 252mm, 254mm and 127mm. The SBS500 is used by the UK Met Office and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency. Terms of comparison are provided by the results obtained for standard rain gauge shapes manufactured by Casella and OTT which, respectively, have a uniform and a tapered cylindrical shape. The simulations were executed for five different wind speeds; 2, 5, 7, 10 and 18 ms-1. Results indicate that aerodynamic gauges have a different impact on the time-averaged airflow patterns

  8. Aerodynamic window for high precision laser drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Steffen; Dausinger, Friedrich; Berger, Peter; Hügel, Helmuth

    2007-05-01

    High precision laser drilling is getting more and more interesting for industry. Main applications for such holes are vaporising and injection nozzles. To enhance quality, the energy deposition has to be accurately defined by reducing the pulse duration and thereby reducing the amount of disturbing melting layer. In addition, an appropriate processing technology, for example the helical drilling, yields holes in steel at 1 mm thickness and diameters about 100 μm with correct roundness and thin recast layers. However, the processing times are still not short enough for industrial use. Experiments have shown that the reduction of the atmospheric pressure down to 100 hPa enhances the achievable quality and efficiency, but the use of vacuum chambers in industrial processes is normally quite slow and thus expensive. The possibility of a very fast evacuation is given by the use of an aerodynamic window, which produces the pressure reduction by virtue of its fluid dynamic features. This element, based on a potential vortex, was developed and patented as out-coupling window for high power CO II lasers by IFSW 1, 2, 3. It has excellent tightness and transmission properties, and a beam deflection is not detectable. The working medium is compressed air, only. For the use as vacuum element for laser drilling, several geometrical modifications had to be realized. The prototype is small enough to be integrated in a micromachining station and has a low gas flow. During the laser pulse, which is focussed through the potential flow, a very high fluence is reached, but the measurements have not shown any beam deflection or focal shifting. The evacuation time is below 300 ms so that material treatment with changing ambient pressure is possible, too. Experimental results have proven the positive effect of the reduced ambient pressure on the drilling process for the regime of nano- and picosecond laser pulses. Plasma effects are reduced and, because of the less absorption, the

  9. Exploring the aerodynamic drag of a moving cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilmann, Florian; Reinhard, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although the physics of cycling itself is a complex mixture of aerodynamics, physiology, mechanics, and heuristics, using cycling as a context for teaching physics has a tradition of certainly more than 30 years. Here, a possible feature is the discussion of the noticeable resistant forces such as aerodynamic drag and the associated power consumption of cycling. We use an energy-based approach to model the power input for driving a bike at a constant speed. This approach uses a numerical simulation of the slowing down of a bike moving without pedaling which is implementable with standard spreadsheet software. The simulation can be compared directly to simple measurements with real bikes as well as to an analytic solution of the underlying differential equation. It is possible to derive realistic values for the aerodynamic drag coefficient {{c}\\text{D}} and the total power consumption within a secondary physics course. We also report experiences from teaching such a course to class 8 students.

  10. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  11. APPLICATION OF VARIABLE-FIDELITY MODELS TO AERODYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Lu; GAO Zheng-hong

    2006-01-01

    For aerodynamic shape optimization, the approximation management framework (AMF) method is used to organize and manage the variable-fidelity models. The method can take full advantage of the low-fidelity, cheaper models to concentrate the main workload on the low-fidelity models in optimization iterative procedure. Furthermore, it can take high-fidelity, more expensive models to monitor the procedure to make the method globally convergent to a solution of high-fidelity problem. Finally, zero order variable-fidelity aerodynamic optimization management framework and search algorithm are demonstrated on an airfoil optimization of UAV with a flying wing. Compared to the original shape, the aerodynamic performance of the optimal shape is improved. The results show the method has good feasibility and applicability.

  12. THERMAL AND AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCES OF THE SUPERSONIC MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan P Ninković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, Mach number of 4 can be taken as a boundary value for transition from conditions for supersonic, into the area of hypersonic flow, distinguishing two areas: area of supersonic in which the effects of the aerodynamic heating can be neglected and the area of hypersonic, in which the thermal effects become dominant. This paper presents the effects in static and dynamic areas, as well as presentation of G.R.O.M. software for determination of the values of aerodynamic derivatives, which was developed on the basis of linearized theory of supersonic flow. Validation of developed software was carried out through different types of testing, proving its usefulness for engineering practice in the area of supersonic wing aerodynamic loading calculations, even at high Mach numbers, with dominant thermal effects.

  13. Fuel Savings and Aerodynamic Drag Reduction from Rail Car Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Bruce; Salari, Kambiz; Babb, Alex

    2008-01-01

    The potential for energy savings by reducing the aerodynamic drag of rail cars is significant. A previous study of aerodynamic drag of coal cars suggests that a 25% reduction in drag of empty cars would correspond to a 5% fuel savings for a round trip [1]. Rail statistics for the United States [2] report that approximately 5.7 billion liters of diesel fuel were consumed for coal transportation in 2002, so a 5% fuel savings would total 284 million liters. This corresponds to 2% of Class I railroad fuel consumption nationwide. As part of a DOE-sponsored study, the aerodynamic drag of scale rail cars was measured in a wind tunnel. The goal of the study was to measure the drag reduction of various rail-car cover designs. The cover designs tested yielded an average drag reduction of 43% relative to empty cars corresponding to an estimated round-trip fuel savings of 9%.

  14. Aerodynamic performance of vertical and horizontal axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydew, R. C.; Klimas, P. C.

    1981-06-01

    The aerodynamic performance of vertical and horizontal axis wind turbines is investigated, and comparison of data of the 17-m Darrieus VAWT with the 60.7-m Mod-1 HAWT and 37.8-m Mod-0A HAWT is discussed. It is concluded that the maximum average measured power coefficients of the VAWT are about 0%-15% higher than those of the HAWTs. It is suggested that vertical wind shear may have lowered the Mod-1 HAWT aerodynamic performance, but, the magnitude of this effect could not be evaluated. It is included that generalizations which refer to the Darrieus VAWT as aerodynamically less efficient than the HAWT should be used carefully.

  15. Atmospheric testing of wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.S. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States); Migliore, P.G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Quandt, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    An experimental investigation was conducted using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable span trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. A primary goal was to directly compare study results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were utilized to define effective changes in the aerodynamic coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans and configurations. Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (<70%) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with characteristic vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  16. Fluidic Control of Aerodynamic Forces on an Axisymmetric Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a wind tunnel model of an axisymmetric bluff body are modified by induced local vectoring of the separated base flow. Control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jets that emanate from narrow, azimuthally-segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end within a small backward facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The model is suspended in the wind tunnel by eight thin wires for minimal support interference with the wake. Fluidic actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along the rear Coanda surface and induces asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments to effect maneuvering during flight. The aerodynamic effects associated with quasi-steady and transitory differential, asymmetric activation of the Coanda effect are characterized using direct force and PIV measurements.

  17. Structural and aerodynamic considerations of an active piezoelectric trailing-edge tab on a helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Gabriel Jon

    This dissertation is concerned with an active tab for use on a rotorcraft for noise and vibration reduction. The tab is located at the trailing edge of the airfoil. The tab consists of a shim sandwiched by layers of the piezoelectric actuators, macro fiber composites, of varying length. This configuration is similar to a bimorph. The modus operandi is similar to that of a trailing edge flap. The actuators deform the tab, bending it to achieve a tip displacement. This provides a change in the lift, moment, and drag coefficients of the airfoil. By actuating the system at 3/rev to 5/rev, reductions in noise and vibration can be realized. The system was examined and designed around using the UH-60 Blackhawk as the model rotorcraft. The tab is envisioned to operate between 65% to 85% of the main rotor span. The tab's chordwise dimensions considered were 20% and 15% of the blade chord. In order to assess the potential of the tab to change the lift and moment coefficients of the airfoil-tab system, a steady computational fluid dynamics study was conducted. The results were generated via the University of Maryland's Transonic Unsteady Navier-Stokes code. Various tab deflection angles, Mach numbers, and angle-of-attack values were computed. These results were compared to a trailing edge flap of similar size. The comparison shows that the tab produces lift and moment increments similar to that of the trailing edge flap. The design of the tab---composed of both active piezoelectric actuators and passive materials---was conducted using finite element analysis. The objectives were to maximize the tip deflection due to the actuators, while minimizing the deformation due to inertial and aerodynamic forces and loads. The inertial loads (acceleration terms) come from both blade motion, such as flapping and pitch, as well as the rotation of the rotor (centrifugal force). All of these previously mentioned terms cause the tab to undergo undesirable deflections. The original concept

  18. Hybrid Vortex Method for the Aerodynamic Analysis of Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid vortex method, in which vortex panel method is combined with the viscous-vortex particle method (HPVP, was established to model the wind turbine aerodynamic and relevant numerical procedure program was developed to solve flow equations. The panel method was used to calculate the blade surface vortex sheets and the vortex particle method was employed to simulate the blade wake vortices. As a result of numerical calculations on the flow over a wind turbine, the HPVP method shows significant advantages in accuracy and less computation resource consuming. The validation of the aerodynamic parameters against Phase VI wind turbine experimental data is performed, which shows reasonable agreement.

  19. Analysis of Flow Structures in Wake Flows for Train Aerodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Muld, Tomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Train transportation is a vital part of the transportation system of today anddue to its safe and environmental friendly concept it will be even more impor-tant in the future. The speeds of trains have increased continuously and withhigher speeds the aerodynamic effects become even more important. One aero-dynamic effect that is of vital importance for passengers’ and track workers’safety is slipstream, i.e. the flow that is dragged by the train. Earlier ex-perimental studies have found that ...

  20. Aerodynamic preliminary analysis system 2. Part 1: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, E.; Clever, W.; Dunn, K.

    1991-01-01

    An aerodynamic analysis system based on potential theory at subsonic and/or supersonic speeds and impact type finite element solutions at hypersonic conditions is described. Three dimensional configurations having multiple nonplanar surfaces of arbitrary planform and bodies of noncircular contour may be analyzed. Static, rotary, and control longitudinal and lateral directional characteristics may be generated. The analysis was implemented on a time sharing system in conjunction with an input tablet digitizer and an interactive graphics input/output display and editing terminal to maximize its responsiveness to the preliminary analysis problem. The program provides an efficient analysis for systematically performing various aerodynamic configuration tradeoff and evaluation studies.

  1. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, N. R.; Bergman, R. O.; Bonstrom, D. B.; Brinkman, T. W.; Chiu, S. H. J.; Green, S. S.; Hansen, S. D.; Klein, D. L.; Krohn, H. E.; Prow, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    A Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) was designed for the simulation of fluid flow around three-dimensional bodies, both in wind tunnel environments and in free space. The application of numerical simulation to this field of endeavor promised to yield economies in aerodynamic and aircraft body designs. A model for a NASF/FMP (Flow Model Processor) ensemble using a possible approach to meeting NASF goals is presented. The computer hardware and software are presented, along with the entire design and performance analysis and evaluation.

  2. Cruise aerodynamics of USB nacelle/wing geometric variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on aerodynamic effects of geometric variations in upper surface blown nacelle configurations at high speed cruise conditions. Test data include both force and pressure measurements on two and three dimensional models powered by upper surface blowing nacelles of varying geometries. Experimental results are provided on variations in nozzle aspect ratio, nozzle boattail angle, and multiple nacelle installations. The nacelles are ranked according to aerodynamic drag penalties as well as overall installed drag penalties. Sample effects and correlations are shown for data obtained with the pressure model.

  3. Aerodynamic Support of a Big Industrial Turboblower Rotor

    OpenAIRE

    Šimek, Jiří; Kozánek, Jan; Šafr, Milan

    2007-01-01

    Aerodynamic bearing support for the rotor of a 100 kW input industrial turboblower with operational speed of 18 000 rpm was designed and manufactured. Rotor with mass of about 50 kg is supported in two tilting-pad journal bearings 120 mm in diameter, axial forces are taken up by aerodynamic spiral groove thrust bearing 250 mm in diameter. Some specific features of the bearing design are described in the paper and the results of rotor support tests are presented. The paper is an extended versi...

  4. Aerodynamics of Dragonfly in Hover: Force measurements and PIV results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xinyan; Hu, Zheng

    2009-11-01

    We useda pair of dynamically scaled robotic dragonfly model wings to investigate the aerodynamic effects of wing-wing interaction in dragonflies. We follow the wing kinematics of real dragonflies in hover, while systematically varied the phase difference between the forewing and hindwing. Instantaneous aerodynamic forces and torques were measured on both wings, while flow visualization and PIV results were obtained. The results show that, in hovering flight, wing-wing interaction causes force reduction for both wings at most of the phase angle differences except around 0 degree (when the wings are beating in-phase).

  5. Analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise from VS45

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundabin, P. [Renewable Energy Systems Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the analysis of acoustic data taken from the VS45 at Kaiser-Wilhelm-Koog. The aim was to investigate the dependence of aerodynamic noise on tip speed and angle of attack. In particular, the dependence of noise in individual third octave bands on these variable is examined. The analysis is divided into 3 sections: data selection, data checks and analysis of broadband nacelle noise; analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise and its sensitivity to tip speed and angle of attack. (LN)

  6. Improvements on computations of high speed propeller unsteady aerodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousquet, J.M.; Gardarein, P. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France)

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents the application of the CANARI flow solver to the computation of unsteady effects in the aerodynamic interaction of a high speed propeller with the aircraft. The method is first validated on the APIAN isolated propeller test case by comparison with experiment at M = 0.7. The method is then applied to the time accurate 3D Euler computation of a generic transport aircraft at M = 0.68. Analysis of the results shows significant unsteady effects both on the propeller forces and on the wing aerodynamic flows, by comparison with steady computations. (authors)

  7. Improved Aerodynamic Influence Coefficients for Dynamic Aeroelastic Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Currently at Bombardier Aerospace, aeroelastic analyses are performed using the Doublet Lattice Method (DLM) incorporated in the NASTRAN solver. This method proves to be very reliable and fast in preliminary design stages where wind tunnel experimental results are often not available. Unfortunately, the geometric simplifications and limitations of the DLM, based on the lifting surfaces theory, reduce the ability of this method to give reliable results for all flow conditions, particularly in transonic flow. Therefore, a new method has been developed involving aerodynamic data from high-fidelity CFD codes which solve the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. These new aerodynamic loads are transmitted to the NASTRAN aeroelastic module through improved aerodynamic influence coefficients (AIC). A cantilevered wing model is created from the Global Express structural model and a set of natural modes is calculated for a baseline configuration of the structure. The baseline mode shapes are then combined with an interpolation scheme to deform the 3-D CFD mesh necessary for Euler and Navier-Stokes analyses. An uncoupled approach is preferred to allow aerodynamic information from different CFD codes. Following the steady state CFD analyses, pressure differences ( DeltaCp), calculated between the deformed models and the original geometry, lead to aerodynamic loads which are transferred to the DLM model. A modal-based AIC method is applied to the aerodynamic matrices of NASTRAN based on a least-square approximation to evaluate aerodynamic loads of a different wing configuration which displays similar types of mode shapes. The methodology developed in this research creates weighting factors based on steady CFD analyses which have an equivalent reduced frequency of zero. These factors are applied to both the real and imaginary part of the aerodynamic matrices as well as all reduced frequencies used in the PK-Method which solves flutter problems. The modal-based AIC method

  8. Supersonic Plasma Flows and their Influence on Aerodynamics of Flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of gas discharges were considered from the point of view of plasma technique applications for aerodynamic problem solutions. They are: the longitudinal one (when electric current j is parallel to airflow's velocity v) and the transverse one (when electric current j is perpendicular to v) stationary discharges, high frequency discharges, microwave and optical discharges. Generation of gas discharges directly before an airplane or on its surface could be the possible means of plasma affect the supersonic airflow. It could lead to the substantial improvement of its aerodynamic characteristics, and particularly to a considerable decrease of the head drag coefficient. (author)

  9. Efficient optimization of integrated aerodynamic-structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Eppard, W. M.; Kao, P. J.; Polen, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for reducing the computational complexity of multidisciplinary design optimization (DO) of aerodynamic structures are described and demonstrated. The basic principles of aerodynamic and structural DO are reviewed; the formulation of the combined DO problem is outlined; and particular attention is given to (1) the application of perturbation methods to cross-sensitivity computations and (2) numerical approximation procedures. Trial DOs of a simple sailplane design are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. The IBM 3090 CPU time for the entire integrated DO was reduced from an estimated 10 h to about 6 min.

  10. Aeolian Sand Transport in the Planetary Context: Respective Roles of Aerodynamic and Bed-Dilatancy Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Bratton, C.

    1999-01-01

    . High-speed photography showed them to grow in both diameter and depth after the impactor had ricochetted from the crater site. The delayed response of the bed was "explosive" in nature, and created a miniature ejecta curtain spreading upward and outward for many centimeters for impact of 100-300 micron-diameter grains into similar material. Elastic energy deposited in the bed by the impacting grain creates a subsurface stress regime or "quasi-Boussinesq" compression field. Elastic recovery of the bed occurs by dilatancy; shear stresses suddenly convert the grains from closed to open packing, and grains are consequently able to eject themselves forcefully from the impact site. Random jostling of the grains causes radial homogenization of stress vectors and a resulting circular crater. There is a great temptation to draw parallels with cratering produced by meteorite impacts, but a rigorous search for common modelling ground between the two phenomena has not been conducted at this time. For every impact of an aerodynamically energized grain, there are several hundred grains ejected into the wind for the high-energy transport that might occur on Mars. Many of these grains will themselves become subject to the boundary layer's aerodynamic lift forces (their motion will not immediately die and add to the creep population), and these grains will become indistinguishable from those lifted entirely by aerodynamic forces. As each grain impacts the bed, it will eject even more grains into the flow. A cascading effect will take place, but because it must be finite in its growth, damping will occur as the number of grains set in motion causes mid-air collisions that prevent much of the impact energy from reaching the surface of the bed -thus creating a dynamic equilibrium in a high-density saltation cloud. It is apparent that for a given impact energy, the stress field permits a smaller volume of grains to convert to open packing as the size of the bed grains increases, or as the

  11. Subsampling in Smoothed Range Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Jeff M.; Zheng, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We consider smoothed versions of geometric range spaces, so an element of the ground set (e.g. a point) can be contained in a range with a non-binary value in $[0,1]$. Similar notions have been considered for kernels; we extend them to more general types of ranges. We then consider approximations of these range spaces through $\\varepsilon $-nets and $\\varepsilon $-samples (aka $\\varepsilon$-approximations). We characterize when size bounds for $\\varepsilon $-samples on kernels can be extended...

  12. Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle: Aerodynamic and Aerothermal Analysis of Trajectory Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumble, Kerry; Dyakonov, Artem; Fuller, John

    2010-01-01

    Multi-mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV) is designed to deliver small payloads from space to Earth's surface by flying an uncontrolled ballistic entry, which ends with ground impact. The included range of entry velocities is from 10 to 16 km/s. The range of ballistic coefficients is from 41.94 to 128.74 kg/m2, which insures a low subsonic terminal velocity on the order of 50 m/sec. The range of entry flight path angles, considered in this analysis is from -5 to -25 degrees. The assessment and parametric characterization of aeroheating and aerodynamic performance of the capsule during entry is the subject of this paper.

  13. Aerodynamic Characteristics and Flying Qualities of a Tailless Triangular-wing Airplane Configuration as Obtained from Flights of Rocket-propelled Models at Transonic and Supersonic Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitcham, Grady L; Stevens, Joseph E; Norris, Harry P

    1956-01-01

    A flight investigation of rocket-powered models of a tailless triangular-wing airplane configuration was made through the transonic and low supersonic speed range at the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Station at Wallops Island, Va. An analysis of the aerodynamic coefficients, stability derivatives, and flying qualities based on the results obtained from the successful flight tests of three models is presented.

  14. Extended Range of a Gun Launched Smart Projectile Using Controllable Canards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Costello

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This effort investigates the extent to which moveable canards can extend the range of indirect fire munitions using both projectile body and canard lift. Implications on terminal velocity and time of flight using this mechanism to extend range are examined for various canard configurations. Performance predictions are conducted using a six-degree-of-freedom simulation model that has previously been validated against range data. The projectile dynamic equations are formed in the body frame and aerodynamic loads from the body and canards are Mach number and angle of attack dependent. The projectile body aerodynamic moments include unsteady aerodynamic damping. The focus of the study is directed toward low cost competent munitions that extend range and as such a simple flight control system is considered which utilizes only timer, roll rate, and roll attitude inputs.

  15. Thoracic size-selective sampling of fibres: performance of four types of thoracic sampler in laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A D; Aitken, R J; Fabriès, J F; Kauffer, E; Liden, G; Maynard, A; Riediger, G; Sahle, W

    2005-08-01

    The counting of fibres on membrane filters could be facilitated by using size-selective samplers to exclude coarse particulate and fibres that impede fibre counting. Furthermore, the use of thoracic size selection would also remove the present requirement to discriminate fibres by diameter during counting. However, before thoracic samplers become acceptable for sampling fibres, their performance with fibres needs to be determined. This study examines the performance of four thoracic samplers: the GK2.69 cyclone, a Modified SIMPEDS cyclone, the CATHIA sampler (inertial separation) and the IOM thoracic sampler (porous foam pre-selector). The uniformity of sample deposit on the filter samples, which is important when counts are taken on random fields, was examined with two sizes of spherical particles (1 and 10 microm) and a glass fibre aerosol with fibres spanning the aerodynamic size range of the thoracic convention. Counts by optical microscopy examined fields on a set scanning pattern. Hotspots of deposition were detected for one of the thoracic samplers (Modified SIMPEDS with the 10 microm particles and the fibres). These hotspots were attributed to the inertial flow pattern near the port from the cyclone pre-separator. For the other three thoracic samplers, the distribution was similar to that on a cowled sampler, the current standard sampler for fibres. Aerodynamic selection was examined by comparing fibre concentration on thoracic samples with those measured on semi-isokinetic samples, using fibre size (and hence calculated aerodynamic diameter) and number data obtained by scanning electron microscope evaluation in four laboratories. The size-selection characteristics of three thoracic samplers (GK2.69, Modified SIMPEDS and CATHIA) appeared very similar to the thoracic convention; there was a slight oversampling (relative to the convention) for d(ae) < 7 microm, but that would not be disadvantageous for comparability with the cowled sampler. Only the IOM

  16. Compositional short-range ordering in metallic alloys: Band-filling, charge-transfer, and size effects from a first-principles all-electron Landau-type theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, J. B.; Johnson, D. D.; Pinski, F. J.

    1994-07-01

    Using a mean-field statistical description, we derive a general formalism to investigate atomic short-range order in alloys based on a density-functional description of the finite-temperature, grand potential of the random alloy. This ``first-principles,'' Landau-type approach attempts to treat several contributions (electronic structure, Fermi surface, electrostatics, magnetism, etc.) to the electronic energy on an equal footing. An important ingredient for the statistical averaging is the replacement of the molecular mean fields (Weiss fields) with Onsager cavity fields, which forces the diagonal part of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to be obeyed. To show its general applicability and usefulness, we apply the theory to three fcc alloy systems. In Cu0.75Pd0.25, the incommensurate atomic short-range order is driven by a Fermi-surface effect, in agreement with earlier work. In contrast, Pd0.5Rh0.5 exhibits clustering tendencies, with both band-filling and charge-rearrangement effects being important in setting the spinodal temperature at 1150 K, in good agreement with experiment. In the final examples of three nickel-rich NiCr alloys, previously ignored electrostatic effects are found to play a significant role in determining the atomic short-range order.

  17. Smolyak-Grid-Based Flutter Analysis with the Stochastic Aerodynamic Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Yuting Dai; Chao Yang

    2014-01-01

    How to estimate the stochastic aerodynamic parametric uncertainty on aeroelastic stability is studied in this current work. The aerodynamic uncertainty is more complicated than the structural one, and it takes more significant effect on the flutter boundary. First, the nominal unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficients were calculated with the doublet lattice method. Based on this nominal model, the stochastic uncertainty model for unsteady aerodynamic pressure coefficients was constructed w...

  18. Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Transport-type Airfoil in a Simulated Heavy Rain Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of simulated heavy rain on the aerodynamic characteristics of an NACA 64-210 airfoil section equipped with leading-and trailing-edge high-lift devices were investigated in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The model had a chord of 2.5 ft, a span of 8 ft, and was mounted on the tunnel centerline between two large endplates. Aerodynamic measurements in and out of the simulated rain environment were obtained for dynamic pressures of 30 and 50 psf and an angle-of-attack range of 0 to 20 degrees for the cruise configuration. The rain intensity was varied to produce liquid water contents ranging from 16 to 46 gm/cu m. The results obtained for various rain intensity levels and tunnel speeds showed significant losses in maximum lift capability and increases in drag for a given lift as the liquid water content was increased. The results obtained on the landing configuration also indicate a progressive decrease in the angle of attack at which maximum lift occurred and an increase in the slope of the pitching-moment curve as the liquid water content was increased. The sensitivity of test results to the effects of the water surface tension was also investigated. A chemical was introduced into the rain environment that reduced the surface tension of water by a factor of 2. The reduction in the surface tension of water did not significantly alter the level of performance losses for the landing configuration.

  19. Correlation-based Transition Modeling for External Aerodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medida, Shivaji

    Conventional turbulence models calibrated for fully turbulent boundary layers often over-predict drag and heat transfer on aerodynamic surfaces with partially laminar boundary layers. A robust correlation-based model is developed for use in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations to predict laminar-to-turbulent transition onset of boundary layers on external aerodynamic surfaces. The new model is derived from an existing transition model for the two-equation k-omega Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model, and is coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. The transition model solves two transport equations for intermittency and transition momentum thickness Reynolds number. Experimental correlations and local mean flow quantities are used in the model to account for effects of freestream turbulence level and pressure gradients on transition onset location. Transition onset is triggered by activating intermittency production using a vorticity Reynolds number criterion. In the new model, production and destruction terms of the intermittency equation are modified to improve consistency in the fully turbulent boundary layer post-transition onset, as well as ensure insensitivity to freestream eddy viscosity value specified in the SA model. In the original model, intermittency was used to control production and destruction of turbulent kinetic energy. Whereas, in the new model, only the production of eddy viscosity in SA model is controlled, and the destruction term is not altered. Unlike the original model, the new model does not use an additional correction to intermittency for separation-induced transition. Accuracy of drag predictions are improved significantly with the use of the transition model for several two-dimensional single- and multi-element airfoil cases over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The new model is able to predict the formation of stable and long laminar separation bubbles on low-Reynolds number airfoils that

  20. Fe and S K-edge XAS determination of iron-sulfur species present in a range of acid sulfate soils: Effects of particle size and concentration on quantitative XANES determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kate E.; Burton, Edward D.; Cook, Perran; Raven, Mark D.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.

    2009-11-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) are soils and soft sediments in which sulfuric acid may be produced from iron sulfides or have been produced leaving iron oxyhydroxysulfates in amounts that have a long lasting effect on soil characteristics. If soil material is exposed to rotting vegetation or other reducing material, the Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates can be bacterially reduced to sulfides including disulfides (pyrite and marcasite), and Monosulfidic Black Ooze (MBO) a poorly characterised material known to be a mixture of iron sulfides (especially mackinawite) and organic matter. The chemistry of these environments is strongly affected by Fe and S cycling processes and herein we have sought to identify key differences in environments that occur as a function of Fe and S concentration. In addition to our chemical results, we have found that the effects of particle size on self absorption in natural sediments play an important role in the spectroscopic identification of the relative proportions of different species present.