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Sample records for aerobic microbial degradation

  1. Aerobic Microbial Degradation of Chlorochromate Compounds Polluting the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight soil and sludge samples which have been polluted with petroleum wastes for more than 41 years were used for isolation of adapted indigenous microbial communities able to mineralize the chloro aromatic compounds [3-chlorobenzoic acid (3-CBA), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,6-dichlorophenol indole phenol (2,6-DCPP) and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB)] and use them as a sole carbon and energy sources. From these communities, the most promising bacterial strain MAM-24 which has the ability to degrade the four chosen aromatic compounds was isolated and identified by comparative sequence analysis for its 16S-rRNA coding genes and it was identified as Bacillus mucilaginosus HQ 013329. Degradation percentage was quantified by HPLC. Degradation products were identified by GC-MS analysis which revealed that the isolated strain and its mutant dechlorinated the four chloro aromatic compounds in the first step forming acetophenone which is considered as the corner stone of the intermediate compounds

  2. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial degradation of crude (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol in river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Zhi, Wei; Liu, Yangsheng; Smiley, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Daniel; Chen, Xi; Dietrich, Andrea; Zhang, Husen

    2016-03-15

    Cyclohexane and some of its derivatives have been a major concern because of their significant adverse human health effects and widespread occurrence in the environment. The 2014 West Virginia chemical spill has raised public attention to (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol (4-MCHM), one cyclohexane derivative, which is widely used in coal processing but largely ignored. In particular, the environmental fate of its primary components, cis- and trans-4-MCHM, remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the degradation kinetics and mineralization of cis- and trans-4-MCHM by sediment microorganisms under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We found the removal of cis- and trans-4-MCHM was mainly attributed to biodegradation with little contribution from sorption. A nearly complete aerobic degradation of 4-MCHM occurred within 14days, whereas the anaerobic degradation was reluctant with residual percentages of 62.6% of cis-4-MCHM and 85.0% of trans-4-MCHM after 16-day incubation. The cis-4-MCHM was degraded faster than the trans under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating an isomer-specific degradation could occur during the 4-MCHM degradation. Nitrate addition enhanced 4-MCHM mineralization by about 50% under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both cis- and trans-4-MCHM fit well with the first-order kinetic model with respective degradation rates of 0.46-0.52 and 0.19-0.31day(-)(1) under aerobic condition. Respective degradation rates of 0.041-0.095 and 0.013-0.052day(-)(1) occurred under anaerobic condition. One bacterial strain capable of effectively degrading 4-MCHM isomers was isolated from river sediments and identified as Bacillus pumilus at the species level based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and 97% identity. Our findings will provide critical information for improving the prediction of the environmental fate of 4-MCHM and other cyclohexane derivatives with similar structure as well as enhancing the development of feasible treatment

  3. Effects of gene-augmentation on the formation, characteristics and microbial community of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid degrading aerobic microbial granules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The first study to cultivate aerobic granules capable of utilizing 2,4-D as the sole carbon source. ► Granules cultivated through gene-augmentation were first compared systematically with the control on granule formation, degradation kinetics, morphology, and microbial community. ► The first report on the fate of transconjugats in the granules during long term operation after bioaugmentation. ► The first study to isolate in dominant bacteria in 2,4-D degrading microbial granules. - Abstract: Development of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) degrading aerobic granular sludge was conducted in two sequencing batch reactors (SBR) with one bioaugmented with a plasmid pJP4 donor strain Pseudomonas putida SM1443 and the other as a control. Half-matured aerobic granules pre-grown on glucose were used as the starting seeds and a two-stage operation strategy was applied. Granules capable of utilizing 2,4-D (about 500 mg/L) as the sole carbon source was successfully cultivated in both reactors. Gene-augmentation resulted in the enhancement of 2,4-D degradation rates by the percentage of 65–135% for the granules on Day 18, and 6–24% for the granules on Day 105. Transconjugants receiving plasmid pJP4 were established in the granule microbial community after bioaugmentation and persisted till the end of operation. Compared with the control granules, the granules in the bioaugmented reactor demonstrated a better settling ability, larger size, more abundant microbial diversity and stronger tolerance to 2,4-D. The finally obtained granules in the bioaugmented and control reactor had a granule size of around 600 μm and 500 μm, a Shannon–Weaver diversity index (H) of 0.96 and 0.55, respectively. A shift in microbial community was found during the granulation process.

  4. Interaction of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Aerobic Granular Sludge: Biosorption and Microbial Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Shou-Qing Ni; Qingjie Cui; Zhen Zheng

    2014-01-01

    As a new category of persistent organic pollutants, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have become ubiquitous global environmental contaminants. No literature is available on the aerobic biotransformation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209). Herein, we investigated the interaction of PBDEs with aerobic granular sludge. The results show that the removal of BDE-209 from wastewater is mainly via biosorption onto aerobic granular sludge. The uptake capacity increased when temperature, contac...

  5. Microbial Degradation of Indole and Its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Indole and its derivatives, including 3-methylindole and 4-chloroindole, are environmental pollutants that are present worldwide. Microbial degradation of indole and its derivatives can occur in several aerobic and anaerobic pathways; these pathways involve different known and characterized genes. In this minireview, we summarize and explain the microbial degradation of indole, indole-3-acetic acid, 4-chloroindole, and methylindole.

  6. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torsvik, T. [Univ. of Bergen (Norway); Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  7. Investigations in the microbial degradation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and means of reductive dechlorination and aerobic mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work had the objective to develop a biological method for cleaning up PCDD/PCDF contaminated upper soil layers (PCDDs/PCDFs: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans). Since highly chlorinated aromatic compounds persist in soil under aerobic conditions, reductive dechlorination of the compounds under anaerobic conditions was aimed at in a first phase of the project. A second, topped phase was destined for aerobic mineralization of the dechlorinated matrices. The tests were carried out on three farmland soils following long-term contamination with PCDDs/PCDFs. (orig./MG)

  8. Enhanced selection of micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol degrading granular sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Yuancai, E-mail: donkey1204@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chen, Yuancai, E-mail: chenyc@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Song, Wenzhe, E-mail: songwenzhe007@126.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Hu, Yongyou, E-mail: ppyyhu@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: In this work, an aerobic column reactor was placed before the USB to maintain micro-oxygen condition in the reactor and the micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L{sup −1}) was successfully obtained. PCP degradation by the micro-aerobic system was studied and the variance of microbial community was also discussed by using PCR-DGGE analysis. - Highlights: • Micro-aerobic granular sludge was cultivated in column-type combined reactors. • PCP biodegradation, VFA accumulation and biogas production were studied. • The function of Methanogenic archaeon in the system was investigated. • Fluctuation and diversity of microbial community were discussed by DGGE analysis. • The dominated microorganisms were identified by 16S rDNA sequences. - Abstract: Column-type combined reactors were designed to cultivate micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L{sup −1}) over 39-day experimental period. Micro-aerobic granular had both anaerobic activity (SMA: 2.34 mMCH{sub 4}/h g VSS) and aerobic activity (SOUR: 2.21 mMO{sub 2}/h g VSS). Metabolite analysis results revealed that PCP was sequentially dechlorinated to TCP, DCP, and eventually to MCP. Methanogens were not directly involved in the dechlorination of PCP, but might played a vital role in stabilizing the overall structure of the granule sludge. For Eubacteria, the Shannon Index (2.09 in inoculated granular sludge) increased both in micro-aerobic granular sludge (2.61) and PCP-degradation granular sludge (2.55). However, for Archaea, it decreased from 2.53 to 1.85 and 1.84, respectively. Although the Shannon Index demonstrated slight difference between micro-aerobic granular sludge and PCP-degradation granular sludge, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated obvious variance of the microbial composition, revealing significant effect of micro-aerobic

  9. Enhanced selection of micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol degrading granular sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: In this work, an aerobic column reactor was placed before the USB to maintain micro-oxygen condition in the reactor and the micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L−1) was successfully obtained. PCP degradation by the micro-aerobic system was studied and the variance of microbial community was also discussed by using PCR-DGGE analysis. - Highlights: • Micro-aerobic granular sludge was cultivated in column-type combined reactors. • PCP biodegradation, VFA accumulation and biogas production were studied. • The function of Methanogenic archaeon in the system was investigated. • Fluctuation and diversity of microbial community were discussed by DGGE analysis. • The dominated microorganisms were identified by 16S rDNA sequences. - Abstract: Column-type combined reactors were designed to cultivate micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L−1) over 39-day experimental period. Micro-aerobic granular had both anaerobic activity (SMA: 2.34 mMCH4/h g VSS) and aerobic activity (SOUR: 2.21 mMO2/h g VSS). Metabolite analysis results revealed that PCP was sequentially dechlorinated to TCP, DCP, and eventually to MCP. Methanogens were not directly involved in the dechlorination of PCP, but might played a vital role in stabilizing the overall structure of the granule sludge. For Eubacteria, the Shannon Index (2.09 in inoculated granular sludge) increased both in micro-aerobic granular sludge (2.61) and PCP-degradation granular sludge (2.55). However, for Archaea, it decreased from 2.53 to 1.85 and 1.84, respectively. Although the Shannon Index demonstrated slight difference between micro-aerobic granular sludge and PCP-degradation granular sludge, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated obvious variance of the microbial composition, revealing significant effect of micro-aerobic condition and PCP on

  10. DETECTION OF A MICROBIAL CONSORTIUM, INCLUDING TYPE 2 METHANOTROPHS, BY USE OF PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACIDES IN AN AEROBIC HALOGENATED HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING SOIL COLUMN ENRICHED WITH NATURAL GAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The phospholipid ester-linked normal and lipopolysaccharide layer hydroxy fatty acids from microbes in a natural gas (85% methane)-stimulated soil column capable of degrading halogenated hydrocarbons were analyzed in detail by capillary column GC-MS. Microbial biomass, calculated...

  11. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene Mark;

    2015-01-01

    Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically...... denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off...... and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our...

  12. Aerobic microbial metabolism of condensed thiophenes found in petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aerobic microbial degradation of 21 condensed thiophenes found in petroleum or synthetic fuels have been studied, motivated by recent research which showed that resistance to biodegradation increases with increasing methyl-substitution. The specific objective was to identify metabolites in pure cultures of aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading Pseudomonas spp. incubated in mineral medium in the presence of an aromatic growth substrate and a condensed thiophene. Over 80 metabolites of the condensed thiophenes were identified using gas chromatography analysis with an atomic emission detector. Among the metabolites identified were sulfoxides, sulfones, hydroxy- and carboxyl-substituted benzothiophenes, hydroxy-substituted dibenzothiophenes, substituted benzothiophene-2,3-diones, and 3-hydroxy-2-formylbenzothiophenes

  13. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene Mark;

    2015-01-01

    denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off...... and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our......Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic...

  14. Aerobic Degradation of N-Methyl-4-Nitroaniline (MNA) by Pseudomonas sp. Strain FK357 Isolated from Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Vyas, Bhawna; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA) is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole car...

  15. Microbial fuel cells with highly active aerobic biocathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Edward M.; Popescu, Dorin; Curtis, Tom; Head, Ian M.; Scott, Keith; Yu, Eileen H.

    2016-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which convert organic waste to electricity, could be used to make the wastewater infrastructure more energy efficient and sustainable. However, platinum and other non-platinum chemical catalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of MFCs are unsustainable due to their high cost and long-term degradation. Aerobic biocathodes, which use microorganisms as the biocatalysts for cathode ORR, are a good alternative to chemical catalysts. In the current work, high-performing aerobic biocathodes with an onset potential for the ORR of +0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl were enriched from activated sludge in electrochemical half-cells poised at -0.1 and + 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Gammaproteobacteria, distantly related to any known cultivated gammaproteobacterial lineage, were identified as dominant in these working electrode biofilms (23.3-44.3% of reads in 16S rRNA gene Ion Torrent libraries), and were in very low abundance in non-polarised control working electrode biofilms (0.5-0.7%). These Gammaproteobacteria were therefore most likely responsible for the high activity of biologically catalysed ORR. In MFC tests, a high-performing aerobic biocathode increased peak power 9-fold from 7 to 62 μW cm-2 in comparison to an unmodified carbon cathode, which was similar to peak power with a platinum-doped cathode at 70 μW cm-2.

  16. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100% in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  17. Studies about behavior of microbial degradation of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of TRU waste include organic compounds, thus these organic compounds might be nutrients for microbial growth at disposal site. This disposal system might be exposed to high alkali condition by cement compounds as engineering barrier material. In the former experimental studies, it has been supposed that microbial exist under pH = 12 and the microbial activity acclimated to high alkali condition are able to degrade asphalt under anaerobic condition. Microbes are called extremophile that exist in cruel habitat as high alkali or reductive condition. We know less information about the activity of extremophile, though any recent studies reveal them. In this study, the first investigation is metabolic pathway as microbial activity, the second is microbial degradation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic condition, and the third is microbial activity under high alkali. Microbial metabolic pathway consist of two systems that fulfill their function each other. One system is to generate energy for microbial activities and the other is to convert substances for syntheses of organisms' structure materials. As these systems are based on redox reaction between substances, it is made chart of the microbial activity region using pH, Eh, and depth as parameter, There is much report that microbe is able to degrade aromatic compounds under aerobic or molecular O2 utilizing condition. For degradation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic condition, supplying electron acceptor is required. Co-metabolism and microbial consortia has important role, too. Alcalophile has individual transporting system depending Na+ and acidic compounds contained in cell wall. Generating energy is key for survival and growth under high alkali condition. Co-metabolism and microbial consortia are effective for microbial degradation of aromatic compounds under high alkali and reductive condition, and utilizable electron acceptor and degradable organic compounds are required for keeping microbial activity and

  18. Formation and functions of aerobic microbial granula; Entstehung und Funktionen aerober mikrobieller Granula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etterer, T.; Wilderer, P.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Pruefamt fuer Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft

    1999-07-01

    The present project investigates the phenomenon of the formation of aerobic microbial granula and their properties. To generate granula, sequencing batch reactors fed in batches were used. As shown by microbiological assays, fungi played an above-average role in granula formation and build-up. In first degradation experiments, furthermore, chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be reduced by over 90 %. The determination yielded comparable values to activated sludge, standing on average at 1.044g/ml. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen des hier vorgestellten Projekts wurde das Phaenomen der Bildung aerober mikrobieller Granula sowie deren Eigenschaften untersucht. Zur Erzeugung von Granula wurden schubweise beschickte Reaktoren, sogenannte Sequencing-Batch-Reaktoren (SBR) verwendet. Wie mikrobiologische Untersuchungen zeigten spielen Pilze bei der Entstehung und beim Aufbau eine ueberdurchschnittliche Rolle. Des weiteren konnte in ersten Abbauversuchen der chemische Sauerstoff-Bedarf (CSB) um ueber 90% gesenkt werden. Die Dichtebestimmung ergab vergleichbare Werte zu Belebtschlamm und zwar im Durchschnitt 1,044 g/ml. (orig.)

  19. Aerobic degradation of BDE-209 by Enterococcus casseliflavus: Isolation, identification and cell changes during degradation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaoyu; Yin, Hua; Chen, Shuona; Peng, Hui; Chang, Jingjing; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) is one of the most commonly used brominated flame retardants that have contaminated the environment worldwide. Microbial bioremediation has been considered as an effective technique to remove these sorts of persistent organic pollutants. Enterococcus casseliflavus, a gram-positive bacterium capable of aerobically transforming BDE-209, was isolated by our team from sediments in Guiyu, an e-waste dismantling area in Guangdong Province, China. To promote microbial bioremediation of BDE-209 and elucidate the mechanism behind its aerobic degradation, the effects of BDE-209 on the cell changes of E. casseliflavus were examined in this study. The experimental results demonstrated that the high cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of E. casseliflavus made the bacteria absorb hydrophobic BDE-209 more easily. E. casseliflavus responded to BDE-209 stress, resulting in an increase in cell membrane permeability and accumulation of BDE-209 inside the cell. The differential expression of intracellular protein was analyzed through two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 50 differentially expressed protein spots were reproducibly detected, including 25 up, and 25 down regulated after a 4 days exposure. Moreover, the apoptotic-like cell changes were observed during E. casseliflavus mediated degradation of BDE-209 by means of flow cytometry. PMID:26852209

  20. Degradation of the herbicide mecoprop in an aerobic aquifer determined by laboratory batch studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, Gorm; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    The potential of a shallow aerobic aquifer to degrade the herbicide Mecoprop (2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid) was evaluated in the laboratory using groundwater and sediment suspension batches. Mecoprop was added to the batches to obtain concentrations of 65, 140, 400 and 1400 μg...... the second lag period. The natural degradation potential for mecoprop varied among locations within a distance of few metres and was affected by different mecoprop concentrations. The observed stepwise degradation was supposedly due to different populations or different microbial mechanisms involved...

  1. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments

  2. Biological degradation of triclocarban and triclosan in a soil under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and comparison with environmental fate modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triclocarban and triclosan are two antimicrobial agents widely used in many personal care products. Their biodegradation behaviour in soil was investigated by laboratory degradation experiments and environmental fate modelling. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses showed that triclocarban and triclosan had a tendency to partition into soil or sediment in the environment. Fate modelling suggests that either triclocarban or triclosan 'does not degrade fast' with its primary biodegradation half-life of 'weeks' and ultimate biodegradation half-life of 'months'. Laboratory experiments showed that triclocarban and triclosan were degraded in the aerobic soil with half-life of 108 days and 18 days, respectively. No negative effect of these two antimicrobial agents on soil microbial activity was observed in the aerobic soil samples during the experiments. But these two compounds persisted in the anaerobic soil within 70 days of the experimental period. - Triclocarban and triclosan can be degraded by microbial processes in aerobic soil, but will persist in anaerobic soil

  3. Aerobic degradation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) via novel degradation intermediates by Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pandey, Janmejay; Vikram, Surendra; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh, E-mail: ssc@imtech.res.in

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • This study reports isolation of a novel bacterium capable of mineralizing 4-nitroaniline (4-NA). • This bacterium has been identified as Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48. • Strain FK48 degrades 4-NA via a novel aerobic degradation pathway that involves 4-AP and 1,2,4-BT. • Subsequent degradation proceeds via ring fission and formation of maleylacetate. • This is the first report showing elucidation of catabolic pathway for microbial degradation 4-NA. -- Abstract: An aerobic strain, Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48, capable of growing on 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy has been isolated from enrichment cultures originating from contaminated soil samples. During growth studies with non- induced cells of FK48 catalyzed sequential denitrification (release of NO{sub 2} substituent) and deamination (release of NH{sub 2} substituent) of 4-NA. However, none of the degradation intermediates could be identified with growth studies. During resting cell studies, 4-NA-induced cells of strain FK48 transformed 4-NA via a previously unknown pathway which involved oxidative hydroxylation leading to formation of 4-aminophenol (4-AP). Subsequent degradation involved oxidated deamination of 4-AP and formation of 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT) as the major identified terminal aromatic intermediate. Identification of these intermediates was ascertained by HPLC, and GC–MS analyses of the culture supernatants. 4-NA-induced cells of strain FK48 showed positive activity for 1,2,4-benzenetriol dioxygenase in spectrophotometric assay. This is the first conclusive study on aerobic microbial degradation of 4-NA and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway.

  4. Aerobic degradation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) via novel degradation intermediates by Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This study reports isolation of a novel bacterium capable of mineralizing 4-nitroaniline (4-NA). • This bacterium has been identified as Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48. • Strain FK48 degrades 4-NA via a novel aerobic degradation pathway that involves 4-AP and 1,2,4-BT. • Subsequent degradation proceeds via ring fission and formation of maleylacetate. • This is the first report showing elucidation of catabolic pathway for microbial degradation 4-NA. -- Abstract: An aerobic strain, Rhodococcus sp. strain FK48, capable of growing on 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy has been isolated from enrichment cultures originating from contaminated soil samples. During growth studies with non- induced cells of FK48 catalyzed sequential denitrification (release of NO2 substituent) and deamination (release of NH2 substituent) of 4-NA. However, none of the degradation intermediates could be identified with growth studies. During resting cell studies, 4-NA-induced cells of strain FK48 transformed 4-NA via a previously unknown pathway which involved oxidative hydroxylation leading to formation of 4-aminophenol (4-AP). Subsequent degradation involved oxidated deamination of 4-AP and formation of 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT) as the major identified terminal aromatic intermediate. Identification of these intermediates was ascertained by HPLC, and GC–MS analyses of the culture supernatants. 4-NA-induced cells of strain FK48 showed positive activity for 1,2,4-benzenetriol dioxygenase in spectrophotometric assay. This is the first conclusive study on aerobic microbial degradation of 4-NA and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway

  5. Improved RDX detoxification with starch addition using a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium from soil contaminated with explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Yang, Jihoon; Yoo, Byungun; Park, Joonhong

    2015-04-28

    In this work, we developed and characterized a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium for the complete detoxification of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Aerobic RDX biodegradation coupled with microbial growth and nitrogen fixation activity were effectively stimulated by the co-addition of starch and RDX under nitrogen limiting conditions. In the starch-stimulated nitrogen-fixing RDX degradative consortium, the RDX degradation activity was correlated with the xplA and nifH gene copy numbers, suggesting the involvement of nitrogen fixing populations in RDX biodegradation. Formate, nitrite, nitrate, and ammonia were detected as aerobic RDX degradation intermediates without the accumulation of any nitroso-derivatives or NDAB (4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal), indicating nearly complete mineralization. Pyrosequencing targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the Rhizobium, Rhizobacter and Terrimonas population increased as the RDX degradation activity increased, suggesting their involvement in the degradation process. These findings imply that the nitrogen-fixing aerobic RDX degrading consortium is a valuable microbial resource for improving the detoxification of RDX-contaminated soil or groundwater, especially when combined with rhizoremediation. PMID:25661171

  6. Microbial degradation of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (CHCl2F and CHCl2CF3) in soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Lonergan, D.J.; Culbertson, C.W.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to degrade trace levels of the hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-21 and HCFC-123 was investigated. Methanotroph- linked oxidation of HCFC-21 was observed in aerobic soils, and anaerobic degradation of HCFC-21 occurred in freshwater and salt marsh sediments. Microbial degradation of HCFC-123 was observed in anoxic freshwater and salt marsh sediments, and the recovery of 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane indicated the involvement of reductive dechlorination. No degradation of HCFC-123 was observed in aerobic soils. In same experiments, HCFCs were degraded at low (parts per billion) concentrations, raising the possibility that bacteria in nature remove HCFCs from the atmosphere.

  7. Anaerobic/aerobic degradation of a textile dye wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Loyd, Chapman Kemper

    1992-01-01

    Consumer demands have led to the development of new, more stable textile dyes. These dyes, many of the azo type, are often incompletely degraded/removed in wastewater treatment plants, leading to the discharge of highlycolored effluents to rivers and streams. Concerns by downstream users of that water have led to enactment of effluent color and toxicity standards for plants that treat textile dye wastewater. Both anaerobic and aerobic biological degradation of a...

  8. Aerobic remediation of petroleum sludge through soil supplementation: Microbial community analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Enhanced aerobic-degradation of PAHs was noticed with increasing soil concentration. ► Lower ring PAHs showed superior degradation over higher ring PAHs. ► Role of dehydrogenase activity, redox pattern and dissolved oxygen was investigated. ► Community analysis detected survival of efficient aromatic degrading microorganisms. - Abstract: The effect of soil concentration on the aerobic degradation of real-field petroleum sludge was studied in slurry phase reactor. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) showed effective removal but found to depend on the soil concentration. Aromatic fraction (48.12%) documented effective degradation compared to aliphatics (47.31%), NSO (28.69%) and asphaltenes (26.66%). PAHs profile showed efficient degradation of twelve individual aromatic compounds where lower ring compounds showed relatively higher degradation efficiency compared to the higher ring compounds. The redox behaviour and dehydrogenase activity showed a linear increment with the degradation pattern. Microbial community composition and changes during bioremediation were studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Among the 12 organisms identified, Proteobacteria was found to be dominant representing 50% of the total population (25% of γ-proteobacteria; 16.6% of β-proteobacteria; 8.3% of α-proteobacteria), while 33.3% were of uncultured bacteria and 16.6% were of firmicutes.

  9. Aerobic Microbial Skin Flora in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Rajaa M. Milyani

    2001-01-01

    The aerobic microbial skin flora of 40 healthy subjects living in Jeddah city (Saudi Arabia) was determined. Two age groups: children and adults; including males and females were investigated. Seven sites were studied: forehead, axilla, chest, groin, leg, toe web and anterior nares. The skin was sampled by rubbing the chosen site with a surfactant substance (Tween 80) moistened cotton swab which was dipped back in the surfactant container and the resulted suspension was agitated for one minut...

  10. Isolation of microorganisms capable of degrading isoquinoline under aerobic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Aislabie, J; Rothenburger, S; Atlas, R M

    1989-01-01

    Isoquinoline-degrading microbial cultures were isolated from oil- and creosote-contaminated soils. The establishment of initial enrichment cultures required the use of emulsified isoquinoline. Once growth on isoquinoline was established, isoquinoline emulsification was no longer required for utilization of isoquinoline as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen by these cultures. An isoquinoline-degrading Acinetobacter strain was isolated from one of the enrichment cultures. The degradation of...

  11. Ammonium-oxidizing bacteria facilitate aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2014-01-01

    Sulfanilic acid (SA) is a toxic sulfonated aromatic amine commonly found in anaerobically treated azo dye contaminated effluents. Aerobic acclimatization of SA-degrading mixed microbial culture could lead to co-enrichment of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) because of the concomitant release of ammonium from SA oxidation. To what extent the co-enriched AOB would affect SA oxidation at various ammonium concentrations was unclear. Here, a series of batch kinetic experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of AOB on aerobic SA degradation in an acclimatized activated sludge culture capable of oxidizing SA and ammonium simultaneously. To account for the effect of AOB on SA degradation, allylthiourea was used to inhibit AOB activity in the culture. The results indicated that specific SA degradation rate of the mixed culture was negatively correlated with the initial ammonium concentration (0-93 mM, R²= 0.99). The presence of AOB accelerated SA degradation by reducing the inhibitory effect of ammonium (≥ 10 mM). The Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to correlate substrate concentration (SA and ammonium) and oxygen uptake rate. This study revealed, for the first time, that AOB could facilitate SA degradation at high concentration of ammonium (≥ 10 mM) in an enriched activated sludge culture. PMID:25259503

  12. Aerobic granules: microbial landscape and architecture, stages, and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Holliger, Christof

    2014-06-01

    For the successful application of aerobic granules in wastewater treatment, granules containing an appropriate microbial assembly able to remove contaminants should be retained and propagated within the reactor. To manipulate and/or optimize this process, a good understanding of the formation and dynamic architecture of the granules is desirable. Models of granules often assume a spherical shape with an outer layer and an inner core, but limited information is available regarding the extent of deviations from such assumptions. We report on new imaging approaches to gain detailed insights into the structural characteristics of aerobic granules. Our approach stained all components of the granule to obtain a high quality contrast in the images; hence limitations due to thresholding in the image analysis were overcome. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the granular structure was obtained that revealed the mesoscopic impression of the cavernlike interior of the structure, showing channels and dead-end paths in detail. In "old" granules, large cavities allowed for the irrigation and growth of dense microbial colonies along the path of the channels. Hence, in some areas, paradoxically higher biomass content was observed in the inner part of the granule compared to the outer part. Microbial clusters "rooting" from the interior of the mature granule structure indicate that granules mainly grow via biomass outgrowth and not by aggregation of small particles. We identify and discuss phenomena contributing to the life cycle of aerobic granules. With our approach, volumetric tetrahedral grids are generated that may be used to validate complex models of granule formation. PMID:24657859

  13. Combined Anaerobic-Aerobic Bacterial Degradation of Dyes

    OpenAIRE

    R. Wilfred Sugumar; Sandhya Sadanandan

    2010-01-01

    Wastewaters from the dye baths of a non-formal textile-dyeing unit containing C.I. Acid Orange 7 and C.I. Reactive Red 2 were subjected to degradation in a sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment process based on mixed culture of bacteria. The technical samples of the dyestuffs and the dye bath wastes were treated in an anaerobic reactor, using an adapted mixed culture of anaerobic microorganisms. The dyestuffs were biotransformed into colourless substituted amine metabolites in the reactor. T...

  14. Enzymes and Genes Involved in Aerobic Alkane Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZongzeShao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes , transport across cell membrane of alkanes , the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation.

  15. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Li; Bing Li; Cui-Ping Wang; Jun-Zhao Fan; Hong-Wen Sun

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached ...

  16. Toxicity of vapor phase petroleum contaminants to microbial degrader communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleum products constitute the largest quantity of synthetic organic chemical products produced in the US. They are comprised of mostly hydrocarbon constituents from many different chemical classes including alkenes, cycloalkanes, aromatic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Many petroleum constituents are classified as volatile organic compounds or VOCs. Petroleum products also constitute a major portion of environmental pollution. One emerging technology, with promise for applications to VOCs in subsurface soil environments, is bioventing coupled with soil vapor extraction. These technologies involve volatilization of contaminants into the soil gas phase by injection and withdrawal of air. This air movement causes enhancement of the aerobic microbial degradation of the mobilized vapors by the indigenous populations. This study investigated the effects of exposure of mixed, subsurface microbial communities to vapor phase petroleum constituents or vapors of petroleum mixtures. Soil slurries were prepared and plated onto mineral salts agar plates and exposed to vapor phase contaminants at equilibrium with pure product. Representative n-alkane, branched alkane, cycloalkane, and aromatic compounds were tested as well as petroleum product mixtures. Vapor exposure altered the numbers and morphologies of the colonies enumerated when compared to controls. However, even at high, equilibrium vapor concentrations, microbial degrader populations were not completely inhibited

  17. Sorption and degradation of bisphenol A by aerobic activated sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory-scale batch experiments were conducted to investigate the sorption and degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) at μg/L range in an aerobic activated sludge system. The sorption isotherms and thermodynamics indicated that the sorption of BPA on sludge was mainly a physical process in which partitioning played a dominating role. The values of sorption coefficient Koc were between 621 and 736 L/kg in the temperature range of 10-30 deg. C. Both mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) and temperature influenced BPA sorption on sludge. The degradation of BPA by acclimated activated sludge could be described by first-order reaction equation with the first-order degradation rate constant of 0.80 h-1 at 20 deg. C. The decrease of initial COD concentration and the increase of MLSS concentration and temperature enhanced BPA degradation rate. The removal of BPA in the activated sludge system was characterized by a quick sorption on the activated sludge and subsequent biodegradation

  18. Biological degradation of triclocarban and triclosan in a soil under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and comparison with environmental fate modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying Guangguo [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); CSIRO Land and Water, Adelaide Laboratory, PMB2, Glen Osmond SA 5064 (Australia)], E-mail: guang-guo.ying@gig.ac.cn; Yu Xiangyang [CSIRO Land and Water, Adelaide Laboratory, PMB2, Glen Osmond SA 5064 (Australia); Food Safety Research Institute, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Kookana, Rai S. [CSIRO Land and Water, Adelaide Laboratory, PMB2, Glen Osmond SA 5064 (Australia)

    2007-12-15

    Triclocarban and triclosan are two antimicrobial agents widely used in many personal care products. Their biodegradation behaviour in soil was investigated by laboratory degradation experiments and environmental fate modelling. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses showed that triclocarban and triclosan had a tendency to partition into soil or sediment in the environment. Fate modelling suggests that either triclocarban or triclosan 'does not degrade fast' with its primary biodegradation half-life of 'weeks' and ultimate biodegradation half-life of 'months'. Laboratory experiments showed that triclocarban and triclosan were degraded in the aerobic soil with half-life of 108 days and 18 days, respectively. No negative effect of these two antimicrobial agents on soil microbial activity was observed in the aerobic soil samples during the experiments. But these two compounds persisted in the anaerobic soil within 70 days of the experimental period. - Triclocarban and triclosan can be degraded by microbial processes in aerobic soil, but will persist in anaerobic soil.

  19. Aerobic Degradation of N-Methyl-4-Nitroaniline (MNA) by Pseudomonas sp. Strain FK357 Isolated from Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Vyas, Bhawna; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA) is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source, was isolated from soil microcosms. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of the samples obtained from growth and resting cell studies showed the formation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA), 4-aminophenol (4-AP), and 1, 2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) as major metabolic intermediates in the MNA degradation pathway. Enzymatic assay carried out on cell-free lysates of MNA grown cells confirmed N-demethylation reaction is the first step of MNA degradation with the formation of 4-NA and formaldehyde products. Flavin-dependent transformation of 4-NA to 4-AP in cell extracts demonstrated that the second step of MNA degradation is a monooxygenation. Furthermore, conversion of 4-AP to BT by MNA grown cells indicates the involvement of oxidative deamination (release of NH2 substituent) reaction in third step of MNA degradation. Subsequent degradation of BT occurs by the action of benzenetriol 1, 2-dioxygenase as reported for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. This is the first report on aerobic degradation of MNA by a single bacterium along with elucidation of metabolic pathway. PMID:24116023

  20. Aerobic degradation of N-methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA by Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357 isolated from soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlurrahman Khan

    Full Text Available N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source, was isolated from soil microcosms. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of the samples obtained from growth and resting cell studies showed the formation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA, 4-aminophenol (4-AP, and 1, 2, 4-benzenetriol (BT as major metabolic intermediates in the MNA degradation pathway. Enzymatic assay carried out on cell-free lysates of MNA grown cells confirmed N-demethylation reaction is the first step of MNA degradation with the formation of 4-NA and formaldehyde products. Flavin-dependent transformation of 4-NA to 4-AP in cell extracts demonstrated that the second step of MNA degradation is a monooxygenation. Furthermore, conversion of 4-AP to BT by MNA grown cells indicates the involvement of oxidative deamination (release of NH2 substituent reaction in third step of MNA degradation. Subsequent degradation of BT occurs by the action of benzenetriol 1, 2-dioxygenase as reported for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. This is the first report on aerobic degradation of MNA by a single bacterium along with elucidation of metabolic pathway.

  1. EVALUATION OF A TWO-STAGE TREATMENT OF DOMESTIC SEWAGE WITH ANAEROBIC-AEROBIC MICROBIAL FILM

    OpenAIRE

    A.Mesdaghinia

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the feasibility of a two stage continuous system employing anaerobic-aerobic microbial film for domestic wastewater treatment and the effect of iron on the behavior of sulfate reducing bacteria in anaerobic metabolism. A bench scale system with an anaerobic filter followed by aerobic fixed units used plastic media and was operated in up flow manner with hydraulic detention times of 6 hours, whereas the aerobic unit utilized diffused aeration. Raw do...

  2. Aerobic Microbial Skin Flora in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaa M. Milyani

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The aerobic microbial skin flora of 40 healthy subjects living in Jeddah city (Saudi Arabia was determined. Two age groups: children and adults; including males and females were investigated. Seven sites were studied: forehead, axilla, chest, groin, leg, toe web and anterior nares. The skin was sampled by rubbing the chosen site with a surfactant substance (Tween 80 moistened cotton swab which was dipped back in the surfactant container and the resulted suspension was agitated for one minute. Thirty three microbial species were isolated from the seven sites of the study group, in which Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter lwoffii, corynebacterium species and Staphylococcus (Staph. aureus dominated among children (30% each. The most other prevalent isolates recovered were Alkaligenes species, Bacillus species, Chryseomonas luteola, Staph. epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staph. hominis (27.5% each. Organisms including Candida albicans, Enterobacter agglomerans, Escherichia coli, Flavobacterium meningosepticum, Klebsiella oxytoca, Micrococcus luteus, Micrococcus roseus, Micrococcus varians, Micrococcus species, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas paucimobilis, Pseudomonas fluorescence, Pseudomonas species, Staph. capitis, Staph. cohnii, Staph. saprophyticus, Staph. simulans, Staph. warneri, Staph. xylosus, viridans-type streptococcus and yeasts were also found in different percentage. Higher isolation rates of Acinetobacter lwoffii, Staph. aureus, Alkaligenes species, Corynebacterium species, Chryseomonas luteola, Enterobacter agglomerans, Staph. epidermidis and other coagulase negative Staphylococci were noted in children from the seven sites. However, Chryseomonas luteola, and Pseudomonas species, were found only in the groin area among males. Otherwise, no significant differences were recorded in the isolation rates from each site separately in relation to age and sex. The role of the isolated microorganisms

  3. Bioaugmentation of aerobic sludge granules with a plasmid donor strain for enhanced degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerobic sludge granules pre-grown on glucose were bioaugmented with a plasmid pJP4 carrying strain Pseudomonas putida SM1443 in a fed-batch microcosm system and a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to enhance their degradation capacity to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The fed-batch test results showed that the bioaugmented aerobic granule system gained 2,4-D degradation ability faster and maintained a more stable microbial community than the control in the presence of 2,4-D. 2,4-D at the initial concentration of about 160 mg/L was nearly completely removed by the bioaugmented granule system within 62 h, while the control system only removed 26% within 66 h. In the bioaugmented SBR which had been operated for 90 days, the seeded aerobic granules pre-grown on glucose successfully turned into 2,4-D degrading granules through bioaugmentation and stepwise increase of 2,4-D concentration from 8 to 385 mg/L. The granules showed a compact structure and good settling ability with the mean diameter of about 450 μm. The degradation kinetics of 2,4-D by the aerobic granules can be described with the Haldane kinetics model with Vmax = 31.1 mg 2,4-D/gVSS h, Ki = 597.9 mg/L and Ks = 257.3 mg/L, respectively. This study shows that plasmid mediated bioaugmentation is a feasible strategy to cultivate aerobic granules degrading recalcitrant pollutants.

  4. Trichloroethylene degradation by subsurface microbial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyzes some of the monitoring data, the effects of methane dosing on methanotrophic populations, and the trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation potentials of the microbial communities from an in situ bioremediation demonstration at the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of Technology Development, Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRS). A series of treatments were delivered into a lower horizontal well coupled with vacuum extraction from a vadose zone horizontal well to stimulate TCE-degrading microorganisms. A control phase without treatment was followed by air injection, injection of 1% methane in air, 4% methane in air, pulsed methane and air injection, and continuous addition of triethyl phosphate and nitrous oxide in air with pulsed additions of methane and air. Microbial monitoring was utilized to demonstrate the effectiveness of bioremediation and to optimize the treatment regimes and continued for a few months after termination of all treatments. Examination of the methane present in specific wells indicated that methanotrophic populations responded to methane delivery, whereas TCE degradation capacity was not as directly tied to the methane availability. Other factors such as nitrate and phosphate availability apparently played a crucial role in the TCE degradation activity

  5. Improved TNT detoxification by starch addition in a nitrogen-fixing Methylophilus-dominant aerobic microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Jaejin; Yoo, Keunje; Kim, Seonghoon; Park, Joonhong

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a novel aerobic microbial consortium for the complete detoxification of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was developed using starch as a slow-releasing carbon source under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Aerobic TNT biodegradation coupled with microbial growth was effectively stimulated by the co-addition of starch and TNT under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The addition of starch with TNT led to TNT mineralization via ring cleavage without accumulation of any toxic by-products, indicating improved TNT detoxification by the co-addition of starch and TNT. Pyrosequencing targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene suggested that Methylophilus and Pseudoxanthomonas population were significantly stimulated by the co-addition of starch and TNT and that the Methylophilus population became predominant in the consortium. Together with our previous study regarding starch-stimulated RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) degradation (Khan et al., J. Hazard. Mater. 287 (2015) 243-251), this work suggests that the co-addition of starch with a target explosive is an effective way to stimulate aerobic explosive degradation under nitrogen-fixing conditions for enhancing explosive detoxification. PMID:26342802

  6. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Kandasamy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM and glucose (0.2% w/v. The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  7. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  8. Microbial Degradation of Organic Wastes at Low Temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Ramana

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial degradation of organic wastes mainly comprising animal and human wastes, is drastically reduced at extreme low temperatures. For the biodegradation of these wastes, technological inputs are required from disciplines like microbiology, biochemistry, molecular biology, digester modelling and heat transfer at extreme low temperature climates. Various steps in the process of biodegradation have to be studied to formulate an effective organic waste disposal method. Anaerobic digestion of organic wastes is preferred over aerobic waste treatment method, since it yields biogas as a by-product, which in turn can be utilised for heating the digester contents to increase its efficiency. Furthermore, one of the possibilities that can be explored is the utilisation of high rate anaerobic digesters which maintain temperature by means of artificial heating. It is either met by non-conventional energy sources, such as solar and wind energy, or by expending liquid fuels. In addition, insulation of the digester with polymeric materials and immobilisation of slow growing bacterial population may enhance the digester performance to a great extent. In spite of several developments, inoculum adaptation is considered to be one of the essential steps for low temperature anaerobic digestion to obtain methane as a by-product. With advancements in recombinant DNA technology, it may be possible to increase the efficiency of various microbial population that take part in the anaerobic digestion. However, till date, the options available for low temperature biodegradation are digester insulation, inoculum adaptation, and use of high rate/second-generation digesters.

  9. Microbial-influenced cement degradation: Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. Because of apparent ease of use and normal structural integrity, cement has been widely used as a binder to solidify LLW. However, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. This report reviews literature which addresses the effect of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms are identified, which are capable of metabolically converting organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with concrete and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Mechanisms inherent in microbial-influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this report. This report provides sufficient evidence of the potential for microbial-influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW to justify the enumeration of the conditions necessary to support the microbiological growth and population expansion, as well as the development of appropriate tests necessary to determine the resistance of cement-solidified LLW to microbiological-induced degradation that could impact the stability of the waste form

  10. Theagalloflavic Acid, a New Pigment Derived from Hexahydroxydiphenoyl Group, and Lignan Oxidation Products Produced by Aerobic Microbial Fermentation of Green Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yosuke; Matsuda, Tomoko; Sugihara, Keisuke; Saito, Yoshinori; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Yang, Chong-Ren; Tanaka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Chinese ripe pu-erh tea is produced by aerobic microbial fermentation of green tea. To clarify the microbial degradation of tea polyphenols, Japanese commercial green tea was mixed with Chinese ripe pu-erh tea, which retains microorganisms, and fermented for 5 d. Chromatographic separation yielded a novel water-soluble yellow pigment termed theagalloflavic acid. Spectroscopic and chemical evidence suggested that this pigment was produced by oxidative ring cleavage of hexahydroxydiphenoyl esters. In addition, two new oxygenated lignin metabolites, (+)-5,5'-dihydroxypinoresinol and 5-hydroxydihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol, were also isolated together with known degradation products of quercetin and tea catechins. PMID:27373646

  11. Degradation of weathered diesel fuel by microorganisms from a contaminated aquifer in aerobic and anaerobic microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diesel fuel-contaminated aquifer in Menziken, Canton of Aargau, Switzerland, was in situ bioremediated from 1989 to 1994 by adding O2, NO3-, PO43-, and NH4+ through an infiltration well. After a remediation time of 3.5 years, aquifer material from the contaminated zone was excavated and found to contain > 106 hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms/g and 1.15 ± 0.15 mg/g weathered diesel fuel comprising mainly isoprenoid alkanes and an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of unknown components. Samples of this material were incubated for up to 470 days in aerobic and anaerobic microcosms. The microbial activity was determined by measuring the production of inorganic carbon and the consumption of O2 and NO3-. The degradation of the weathered diesel fuel was quantified by infrared spectroscopy and by capillary gas chromatography. In aerobic microcosms, all isoprenoid alkanes and most of the UCM were biodegraded as long as a nitrogen source was present. The O2 consumption could be stimulated by adding KH2PO4 and by elevating the temperature to 22 C. In anaerobic microcosms with KNO3, NO3- was consumed, inorganic carbon was produced, and the isoprenoid alkanes and the UCM were partially metabolized. In some selected microcosms, the NO3- consumption rate was stimulated by adding external substrates such as toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, n-alkanes, or fatty acids. Mineralization of toluene, naphthalene, and hexadecane to CO2 under denitrifying conditions was confirmed by using [14C]-labelled substrates

  12. Comparative investigation on microbial community and electricity generation in aerobic and anaerobic enriched MFCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiang-chun; Quan, Yan-ping; Tao, Kun; Jiang, Xiao-man

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the difference in microbial community and power generation capacity of air-cathode MFCs enriched under anode aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Results showed that MFCs successfully started with continuous air inputting to anode chamber. The aerobic enriched MFC produced comparable and even more electricity with the fuels of acetate, glucose and ethanol compared to the anaerobic MFC when returning to anaerobic condition. The two MFCs showed a slightly different microbial community for anode biofilms (a similarity of 77%), but a highly similar microbial community (a similarity of 97%) for anolyte microbes. The anode biofilm of aerobic enriched MFC showed the presence of some specific bacteria closely related to Clostridium sticklandii, Leucobacter komagatae and Microbacterium laevaniformans. The anaerobic enriched MFC found the presence of a large number of yeast Trichosporon sp. This research demonstrates that it is possible to enrich oxygen-tolerant anode respiring bacteria through purposely aeration in anode chamber. PMID:23196248

  13. Limitations of microbial hydrocarbon degradation at the Amon mud volcano (Nile deep-sea fan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Felden

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Amon mud volcano (MV, located at 1250 m water depth on the Nile deep-sea fan, is known for its active emission of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons into the hydrosphere. Previous investigations showed a low efficiency of hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microbial communities inhabiting the Amon MV center in the presence of sulfate and hydrocarbons in the seeping subsurface fluids. By comparing spatial and temporal patterns of in situ biogeochemical fluxes, temperature gradients, pore water composition, and microbial activities over 3 yr, we investigated why the activity of anaerobic hydrocarbon degraders can be low despite high energy supplies. We found that the central dome of the Amon MV, as well as a lateral mud flow at its base, showed signs of recent exposure of hot subsurface muds lacking active hydrocarbon degrading communities. In these highly disturbed areas, anaerobic degradation of methane was less than 2% of the methane flux. Rather high oxygen consumption rates compared to low sulfide production suggest a faster development of more rapidly growing aerobic hydrocarbon degraders in highly disturbed areas. In contrast, the more stabilized muds surrounding the central gas and fluid conduits hosted active anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading microbial communities. The low microbial activity in the hydrocarbon-vented areas of Amon MV is thus a consequence of kinetic limitations by heat and mud expulsion, whereas most of the outer MV area is limited by hydrocarbon transport.

  14. Physiological and functional diversity of phenol degraders isolated from phenol-grown aerobic granules: Phenol degradation kinetics and trichloroethylene co-metabolic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic granule is a novel form of microbial aggregate capable of degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. Aerobic granules have been formed on phenol as the growth substrate, and used to co-metabolically degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), a synthetic solvent not supporting aerobic microbial growth. Granule formation process, rate limiting factors and the comprehensive toxic effects of phenol and TCE had been systematically studied. To further explore their potential at the level of microbial population and functions, phenol degraders were isolated and purified from mature granules in this study. Phenol and TCE degradation kinetics of 15 strains were determined, together with their TCE transformation capacities and other physiological characteristics. Isolation in the presence of phenol and TCE exerted stress on microbial populations, but the procedure was able to preserve their diversity. Wide variation was found with the isolates' kinetic behaviors, with the parameters often spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Haldane kinetics described phenol degradation well, and the isolates exhibited actual maximum phenol-dependent oxygen utilization rates of 9-449 mg DO g DW(-1) h(-1), in phenol concentration range of 4.8-406 mg L(-1). Both Michaelis-Menten and Haldane types were observed for TCE transformation, with the actual maximum rate of 1.04-21.1 mg TCE g DW(-1) h(-1) occurring between TCE concentrations of 0.42-4.90 mg L(-1). The TCE transformation capacities and growth yields on phenol ranged from 20-115 mg TCE g DW(-1) and 0.46-1.22 g DW g phenol(-1), respectively, resulting in TCE transformation yields of 10-70 mg TCE g phenol(-1). Contact angles of the isolates were between 34° and 82°, suggesting both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cell surface. The diversity in the isolates is a great advantage, as it enables granules to be versatile and adaptive under different operational conditions. PMID:26720328

  15. Bioaugmentation and enhanced formation of microbial granules used in aerobic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Tay, Stephen Tiong-Lee; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2006-04-01

    Microbial aggregates of an aerobic granular sludge can be used for the treatment of industrial or municipal wastewater, but their formation from a microbial activated sludge requires several weeks. Therefore, the aim of this research was the selection of microbial cultures to shorten the granule-forming period from several weeks to a few days. An enrichment culture with the ability to accelerate granulation was obtained by repeating the selection and batch cultivation of fast-settling microbial aggregates isolated from the aerobic granular sludge. Bacterial cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain B and Pseudomonas veronii strain F, with self-aggregation indexes of 65 and 51%, respectively, and a coaggregation index of 58%, were isolated from the enrichment culture. A mixture of these strains with the activated sludge was used as an inoculum in an experimental sequencing batch reactor to start up an aerobic granulation process. Aerobic granules with a mean diameter of 446+/-76 microm were formed in an experiment after 8 days of cultivation, but microbial granules were absent in controls. Considering biosafety issues, K. pneumoniae strain B was excluded from further studies, but P. veronii strain F was selected for larger-scale testing. PMID:16091930

  16. Bioaugmentation and enhanced formation of microbial granules used in aerobic wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, V.; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Tay, S.T.L.; Tay, Joo-Hwa [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-04-15

    Microbial aggregates of an aerobic granular sludge can be used for the treatment of industrial or municipal wastewater, but their formation from a microbial activated sludge requires several weeks. Therefore, the aim of this research was the selection of microbial cultures to shorten the granule-forming period from several weeks to a few days. An enrichment culture with the ability to accelerate granulation was obtained by repeating the selection and batch cultivation of fast-settling microbial aggregates isolated from the aerobic granular sludge. Bacterial cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain B and Pseudomonas veronii strain F, with self-aggregation indexes of 65 and 51%, respectively, and a coaggregation index of 58%, were isolated from the enrichment culture. A mixture of these strains with the activated sludge was used as an inocolum in an experimental sequencing batch reactor to start up an aerobic granulation process. Aerobic granules with a mean diameter of 446{+-}76 {mu}m were formed in an experiment after 8 days of cultivation, but microbial granules were absent in controls. Considering biosafety issues, K. pneumoniae strain B was excluded from further studies, but P. veronii strain F was selected for larger-scale testing. (orig.)

  17. Photochemically enhanced microbial degradation of environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradation of persistent halogenated organic pollutants is of great interest from the viewpoint of its potential use to cleanup the contaminated sites and industrial waste streams on-site (i.e., in situ remediation). Recent studies have shown that lignin-degrading white rot fungi possess capabilities to degrade a variety of highly recalcitrant and toxic compounds. On the other hand, photodegradation by sunlight or ultraviolet light (UV) has not been considered as a potential technology to detoxify the contaminated sites, in spite of the availability of extensive research data, because of its limited reaching ability to subsurface locations. In view of the urgent needs for the development of technology to deal with mounting problems of toxic wastes, the authors have decided to experiment with the ideas of combining photochemical and microbial technologies. The main obstacle in developing such simultaneous combination systems has been the susceptibilities of microorganisms in general to UV irradiation. To overcome this problem, the authors have developed an ultraviolet- and fungicide-resistant strain of white rot fungus and now report their results

  18. The lack of microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal-rich soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical techniques used to assess the environmental risk of contamination from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) typically consider only abiotic sample parameters. Supercritical fluid extraction and sorption enthalpy experiments previously suggested slow desorption rates for PAH compounds in two coal-contaminated floodplain soils. In this study, the actual PAH availability for aerobic soil microorganisms was tested in two series of soil-slurry experiments. The experimental conditions supported microbial degradation of phenanthrene if it was weakly sorbed onto silica gel. Native coals and coal-derived particles in two soils effectively acted as very strong sorbents and prevented microbial PAH degradation. The long history of PAH exposure and degree of coal contamination apparently had no influence on the capability of the microbial soil community to overcome constraints of PAH availability. Within the context of the experimental conditions and the compounds chosen, our results confirm that coal-bound PAHs are not bioavailable and hence of low environmental concern. - Native PAH compounds from coal-rich soils were not degraded by indigenous microorganisms in aerobic soil-slurry experiments.

  19. Acetylene degradation by new isolates of aerobic bacteria and comparison of acetylene hydratase enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Rosner, Bettina M; Rainey, Frederick A.; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M.; Schink, Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    Aerobic acetylene-degrading bacteria were isolated from soil samples. Two isolates were assigned to the species Rhodococcus opacus, two others to Rhodococcus ruber and Gordona sp. They were compared with known strains of aerobic acetylene-, cyanide-, or nitrile-utilizing bacteria. The acetylene hydratases of R. opacus could be measured in cell-free extracts only in the presence of a strong reductant like titanium(III) citrate. Expression of these enzymes was molybdenum-dependent. Acetylene hy...

  20. Isolation and Characteristics of a Microbial Consortium for Effectively Degrading Phenanthrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Xu Hongke; Guo Shaohui

    2007-01-01

    A microbial consortium (named W4) capable of aerobic biodegradation of solid phenanthrene as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment from petroleum-contaminated soil in the Henan oilfield,China. The strains of the consortium were identified as Sphingomonas cloacae, Rhizobium sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter xylosoxidans respectively by means of genetic methods. The major metabolites of phenanthrene were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The biodegradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 7 days of growth was greater than 99%. The degradation of phenanthrene was compared between individual predominant strains and the microbial consortium in different treatment processes. The microbial consortium showed a significant improvement of phenanthrene degradation rates in either static or shaking culture. The degradation percentage of phenanthrene by the consortium W4 decreased to some degree when C 16 coexisted, however it was hardly affected by C30. Furthermore, the ability of consortium W4 to remediate oil sludge from the Dagang oil refinery was studied by composting; and it was found that the consortium W4 could obviously remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and paraffinic hydrocarbons. All the results indicated that the microbial consortium W4 had a promising application in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments and could be potentially used in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

  1. A novel denitrifying bacterial isolate that degrades trimethylamine both aerobically and anaerobically via two different pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S G; Bae, H S; Lee, S T

    2001-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium from an enrichment culture with trimethylamine inoculated with activated sludge was studied. Based on 16S rDNA analysis, this strain was identified as a Paracoccus sp. The isolate, strain T231, aerobically degraded trimethylamine, dimethylamine and methylamine and released a stoichiometric amount of ammonium ion into the culture fluid as a metabolic product, indicating that these methylated amines were completely degraded to formaldehyde and ammonia. The strain degraded trimethylamine also under denitrifying conditions and consumed a stoichiometric amount of nitrate, demonstrating that complete degradation of trimethylamine was coupled with nitrate reduction. Cell-free extract prepared from cells grown aerobically on trimethylamine exhibited activities of trimethylamine mono-oxygenase, trimethylamine N-oxide demethylase, dimethylamine mono-oxygenase, and methylamine mono-oxygenase. Cell-free extract from cells grown anaerobically on trimethylamine and nitrate exhibited activities of trimethylamine dehydrogenase and dimethylamine dehydrogenase. These results indicate that strain T231 had two different pathways for aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine. This is a new feature for trimethylamine metabolism in denitrifying bacteria. PMID:11685371

  2. Variability of Biological Degradation of Phenolic Hydrocarbons in an Aerobic Aquifer Determined by Laboratory Batch Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    The biological aerobic degradation of 7 phenolic hydrocarbons (phenol, o-cresol, o-nitrophenol, p-nitrophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4,6-o-dichlorocresol) and 1 aromatic hydrocarbon (nitrobenzene) was studied for 149 days in replicate laboratory batch microcosms with sediment and...... groundwater from 8 localities representing a 15 m × 30 m section of an aerobic aquifer. Three patterns of variation were found: (1) phenol, o-cresol and in most cases p-nitrophenol showed very fast degradation with no or only short lag phases and with very little variation among localities; (2) 2...

  3. Microbial transformation and degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the potential of microorganisms to transform polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In anaerobic environments, higher chlorinated biphenyls can undergo reductive dehalogenation. Meta- and para-chlorines in PCB congeners are more susceptible to dechlorination than ortho-chlorines. Anaerobes catalyzing PCB dechlorination have not been isolated in pure culture but there is strong evidence from enrichment cultures that some Dehalococcoides spp. and other microorganisms within the Chloroflexi phylum can grow by linking the oxidation of H2 to the reductive dechlorination of PCBs. Lower chlorinated biphenyls can be co-metabolized aerobically. Some aerobes can also grow by utilizing PCB congeners containing only one or two chlorines as sole carbon/energy source. An example is the growth of Burkholderia cepacia by transformation of 4-chlorobiphenyl to chlorobenzoates. The latter compounds are susceptible to aerobic mineralization. Higher chlorinated biphenyls therefore are potentially fully biodegradable in a sequence of reductive dechlorination followed by aerobic mineralization of the lower chlorinated products. - Higher chlorinated biphenyls are potentially fully biodegradable in a sequence of anaerobic reductive dechlorination followed by aerobic mineralization of the lower chlorinated products

  4. Limitations of microbial hydrocarbon degradation at the Amon Mud Volcano (Nile Deep Sea Fan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Felden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Amon mud volcano (MV, located at 1250 m water depth on the Nile Deep Sea Fan, is known for its active emission of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons into the hydrosphere. Previous investigations showed a low efficiency of hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microbial communities inhabiting the Amon MV center in the presence of sulphate and hydrocarbons in the seeping subsurface fluids. By comparing spatial and temporal patterns of in situ biogeochemical fluxes, temperature gradients, pore water composition and microbial activities over three years, we investigated why the activity of anaerobic hydrocarbon degraders can be low despite high energy supplies. We found that the central dome of the Amon MV, as well as a lateral mud flow at its base, showed signs of recent exposure of hot subsurface muds lacking active hydrocarbon degrading communities. In these highly disturbed areas, anaerobic degradation of methane was less than 2% of the methane flux. Rather high oxygen consumption rates compared to low sulphide production suggest a faster development of more rapidly growing aerobic hydrocarbon degraders in highly disturbed areas. In contrast, the more stabilized muds surrounding the central gas and fluid conduits hosted active anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading microbial communities. Furthermore, within three years, cell numbers and hydrocarbon degrading activity increased at the gas-seeping sites. The low microbial activity in the hydrocarbon-vented areas of Amon mud volcano is thus a consequence of kinetic limitations by heat and mud expulsion, whereas most of the outer mud volcano area is limited by hydrocarbon transport.

  5. Kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin; Xu Hongke; An Mingquan; Yan Guiwen

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium W4 isolated from Henan Oilfield were investigated. The degradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 6 days of incubation was higher than 95% under the condition of 37 ℃ and 120 r/min by this microbial consortium. The degradation of phenanthrene could be fitted to a first-order kinetic model with the half-life of 1.25 days. The optimum conditions for degradation of phenanthrene by consortium W4 were as follows: temperature about 37 ℃, pH from 6.0 to 7.0 and salinity about 8.0 g/L.It was concluded that microbial consortium W4 might degrade phenanthrene via both salicylic acid and o-phthalic acid pathways by analyzing products with GC-MS.

  6. Aerobic Microbial Community of Insectary Population of Phlebotomus papatasi

    OpenAIRE

    Naseh Maleki-Ravasan; Mohammad Ali Oshaghi; Sara Hajikhani; Zahra Saeidi; Amir Ahmad Akhavan; Mohsen Gerami-Shoar; Mohammad Hasan Shirazi; Bagher Yakhchali; Yavar Rassi; Davoud Afshar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Microbes particularly bacteria presenting in the gut of haematophagous insects may have an important role in the epidemiology of human infectious disease. Methods: The microbial flora of gut and surrounding environmental of a laboratory strain of Phlebotomus papatasi, the main vector of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the old world, was investigated. Biochemical reactions and 16s rDNA sequencing of the isolated bacteria against 24 sugars and amino acids were used for bac...

  7. Anaerobic-Aerobic Process for Microbial Degradation of Tetrabromobisphenol A

    OpenAIRE

    Ronen, Zeev; Abeliovich, Aharon

    2000-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a flame retardant that is used as an additive during manufacturing of plastic polymers and electronic circuit boards. Little is known about the fate of this compound in the environment. In the current study we investigated biodegradation of TBBPA, as well as 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP), in slurry of anaerobic sediment from a wet ephemeral desert stream bed contaminated with chemical industry waste. Anaerobic incubation of the sediment with TBBPA and peptone-try...

  8. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Levi, Suzi; Hybel, Anne-Marie; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential for the herbicides. In the presence of oxygen 14C-labelled bentazone and mecoprop were removed significantly from the two monitoring wells' groundwater samples. Oxygen was added to microcosms in orde...

  9. Variability of Biological Degradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an Aerobic Aquifer Determined by Laboratory Batch Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    The biological aerobic degradation of 7 aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, o-xylene, p-dichlorobenzene, o-dichlorobenzene, naphthalene and biphenyl) was studied for 149 days in replicate laboratory batch experiments with groundwater and sediment from 8 localities representing a 15 m × 30 m...

  10. Degradation of the herbicide mecoprop in an aerobic aquifer determined by laboratory batch studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, Gorm; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    The potential of a shallow aerobic aquifer to degrade the herbicide Mecoprop (2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid) was evaluated in the laboratory using groundwater and sediment suspension batches. Mecoprop was added to the batches to obtain concentrations of 65, 140, 400 and 1400 μg...

  11. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Harb, Moustapha

    2016-07-09

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower.

  12. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Moustapha; Wei, Chun-Hai; Wang, Nan; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower. PMID:27441825

  13. Dynamics of Microbial Community Structure of and Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal by Aerobic Granules Cultivated on Propionate or Acetate▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Holliger, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic granules are dense microbial aggregates with the potential to replace floccular sludge for the treatment of wastewaters. In bubble-column sequencing batch reactors, distinct microbial populations dominated propionate- and acetate-cultivated aerobic granules after 50 days of reactor operation when only carbon removal was detected. Propionate granules were dominated by Zoogloea (40%), Acidovorax, and Thiothrix, whereas acetate granules were mainly dominated by Thiothrix (60%). Thereafte...

  14. Degradation of alkenones by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria: Selective or not ?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rontani, J-F.; Harji, R.; Guasco, S.; Prahl, F.G.; Volkman, J.K.; Bhosle, N.B.; Bonin, P.

    Géochimie et d’Ecologie Marines (UMR 6117), Centre d'Océanologie de Marseille, F-13288 Marseille, France b National Institute of Oceanography (CSIR), Dona Paula – 403 004, Goa, India c College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University... with antibiotics. 2. Experimental 2.1. Substrate preparation for degradation studies Emiliania huxleyi strain TWP1 obtained from the Caen (France) Algobank were used as substrate for alkenone degradation. A 100 ml starter culture was transferred to flasks...

  15. EVALUATION OF A TWO-STAGE TREATMENT OF DOMESTIC SEWAGE WITH ANAEROBIC-AEROBIC MICROBIAL FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Mesdaghinia

    1986-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study the feasibility of a two stage continuous system employing anaerobic-aerobic microbial film for domestic wastewater treatment and the effect of iron on the behavior of sulfate reducing bacteria in anaerobic metabolism. A bench scale system with an anaerobic filter followed by aerobic fixed units used plastic media and was operated in up flow manner with hydraulic detention times of 6 hours, whereas the aerobic unit utilized diffused aeration. Raw domestic sewage was fed to the anaerobic unit, and the aerobic unit was fed with the anaerobic unit was fed with the anaerobic effluent. Although, the anaerobic filter did not show a considerable organic removal with domestic sex age it was improved when glucose was added to the influent to increase influent soluble COD. When glucose was added the anaerobic filter removed about 290 mg/1 of influent soluble COD. The aerobic unit produced an excellent effluent with COD, BOD5 and TSS concentrations of 37 mg/1, 9 mg/1 and 10 mg/l respectively. Overall, the system removed 95 percent of influent COD, 97 percent of influent BOD5 and 96 percent of influent TSS.

  16. Microbial PAH-Degradation in Soil: Degradation Pathways and Contributing Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu-Xiang; CHENG Shu-Pei; ZHU Cheng-Jun; SUN Shi-Lei

    2006-01-01

    Adverse effects on the environment and high persistence in the microbial degradation and environmental fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are motivating interest. Many soil microorganisms can degrade PAHs and use various metabolic pathways to do so. However, both the physio-chemical characteristics of compounds as well as the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils can drastically influence the degradation capacity of naturally occurring microorganisms for field bioremediation. Modern biological techniques have been widely used to promote the efficiency of microbial PAH-degradation and make the biodegradation metabolic pathways more clear. In this review microbial degradation of PAHs in soil is discussed, with emphasis placed on the main degradation pathways and the environmental factors affecting biodegradation.

  17. Investigation of a metagenomic library for aerobic toluene degradation genes

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhajja, Emna; George, Isabelle; Liles, Marc; Agathos, Spiros N.; 14th International Symposium on Microbial Ecology (ISME14)

    2012-01-01

    A metagenomic study on sediment from a former gasworks site located in Düsseldorf- Flingern was conducted to assess the tar oil hydrocarbon degradation potential at that site. A sediment sample was collected from 6.70 m to 7.10 m below surface in the anoxic contaminant plume. This plume consisted mainly of benzene, toluene, ethylene, xylene and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The first step was to extract enough high quality, high molecular weight DNA despite low cell density within the sediment. ...

  18. Microbial diversity differences within aerobic granular sludge and activated sludge flocs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, M-K H; Kleerebezem, R; de Bruin, L M M; Verheijen, P J T; Abbas, B; Habermacher, J; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we investigated during 400 days the microbial community variations as observed from 16S DNA gene DGGE banding patterns from an aerobic granular sludge pilot plant as well as the from a full-scale activated sludge treatment plant in Epe, the Netherlands. Both plants obtained the same wastewater and had the same relative hydraulic variations and run stable over time. For the total bacterial population, a similarity analysis was conducted showing that the community composition of both sludge types was very dissimilar. Despite this difference, general bacterial population of both systems had on average comparable species richness, entropy, and evenness, suggesting that different bacteria were sharing the same functionality. Moreover, multi-dimensional scaling analysis revealed that the microbial populations of the flocculent sludge system moved closely around the initial population, whereas the bacterial population in the aerobic granular sludge moved away from its initial population representing a permanent change. In addition, the ammonium-oxidizing community of both sludge systems was studied in detail showing more unevenness than the general bacterial community. Nitrosomonas was the dominant AOB in flocculent sludge, whereas in granular sludge, Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira were present in equal amounts. A correlation analysis of process data and microbial data from DGGE gels showed that the microbial diversity shift in ammonium-oxidizing bacteria clearly correlated with fluctuations in temperature. PMID:23064482

  19. Aerobic Microbial Community of Insectary Population of Phlebotomus papatasi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseh Maleki-Ravasan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbes particularly bacteria presenting in the gut of haematophagous insects may have an important role in the epidemiology of human infectious disease.The microbial flora of gut and surrounding environmental of a laboratory strain of Phlebotomus papatasi, the main vector of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ZCL in the old world, was investigated. Biochemical reactions and 16s rDNA sequencing of the isolated bacteria against 24 sugars and amino acids were used for bacteria species identification. Common mycological media used for fungi identification as well.Most isolates belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae, a large, heterogeneous group of gram-negative rods whose natural habitat is the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Enterobacteriaceae groups included Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Kluyvera, Leminorella, Pantoea, Proteus, Providencia, Rahnella, Serratia, Shigella, Tatumella, and Yersinia and non Enterobacteriaceae groups included Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas. The most prevalent isolates were Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris. These saprophytic and swarming motile bacteria were isolated from all immature, pupae, and mature fed or unfed male or female sand flies as well as from larval and adult food sources. Five fungi species were also isolated from sand flies, their food sources and colonization materials where Candida sp. was common in all mentioned sources.Midgut microbiota are increasingly seen as an important factor for modulating vector competence in insect vectors so their possible effects of the mirobiota on the biology of P. papatasi and their roles in the sandfly-Leishmania interaction are discussed.

  20. Kinetic Modelling of Pesticidal Degradation and Microbial Growth in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUDUO-SEN; WANGZONG-SHENG; 等

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses such models for the degradation kinetics of pesticides in soil as the model expressing the degradation rate as a function of two varables:the pesticide concentration and the number of pesticide degrading microorganisms,the model expressing the pesticide concentration as explicit or implicit function of time ,and the model exprssing the pesticide loss rate constants as functions of temperature,These models may interpret the degradation curves with an inflection point.A Kinetic model describing the growth processes of microbial populations in a closed system is reported as well.

  1. Recent studies in microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Zhereppa Fathepure

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many hypersaline environments are often contaminated with petroleum compounds. Among these, oil and natural gas production sites all over the world and hundreds of kilometers of coastlines in the more arid regions of Gulf countries are of major concern due to the extent and magnitude of contamination. Because conventional microbiological processes do not function well at elevated salinities, bioremediation of hypersaline environments can only be accomplished using high salt-tolerant microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum compounds. In the last two decades, there have been many reports on the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in moderate to high salinity environments. Numerous microorganisms belonging to the domain Bacteria and Archaea have been isolated and their phylogeny and metabolic capacity to degrade a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in varying salinities have been demonstrated. This article focuses on our growing understanding of bacteria and archaea responsible for the degradation of hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions in moderate to high salinity conditions. Even though organisms belonging to various genera have been shown to degrade hydrocarbons, members of the genera Halomonas Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Haloferax, Haloarcula, and Halobacterium dominate the published literature. Despite rapid advances in understanding microbial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions, not much is known about organisms that carry out similar processes in anaerobic conditions. Also, information on molecular mechanisms and pathways of hydrocarbon degradation in high salinity is scarce and only recently there have been a few reports describing genes, enzymes and breakdown steps for some hydrocarbons. These limited studies have clearly revealed that degradation of oxygenated and non-oxygenated hydrocarbons by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms occur by pathways similar to those found in non-halophiles.

  2. Microbial assisted High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arya J; Sekhar, Vini C; Bhaskar, Thallada; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-08-01

    The efficacy of newly isolated Pseudomonas and Bacillus strains to degrade brominated High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) was investigated. Viability of these cultures while using e-plastic as sole carbon source was validated through Triphenyl Tetrazolium Chloride (TTC). Four days incubation of HIPS emulsion with Bacillus spp. showed 94% reduction in turbidity and was 97% with Pseudomonas spp. Confirmation of degradation was concluded by HPLC, NMR, FTIR, TGA and weight loss analysis. NMR spectra of the degraded film revealed the formation of aliphatic carbon chain with bromine and its release. FTIR analysis of the samples showed a reduction in CH, CO and CN groups. Surface changes in the brominated HIPS film was visualized through SEM analysis. Degradation with Bacillus spp showed a weight loss of 23% (w/w) of HIPS film in 30days. PMID:26993201

  3. Anaerobic microbial LCFA degradation in bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, D.Z.; Pereira, M.A.; Alves, J.I.; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, A.J.M.; Alves, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent results obtained on long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) anaerobic degradation. Two LCFA were used as model substrates: oleate, a mono-unsaturated LCFA, and palmitate, a saturated LCFA, both abundant in LCFA-rich wastewaters. 16S rRNA gene analysis of sludge samples submitted to continuous oleate- and palmitate-feeding followed by batch degradation of the accumulated LCFA demonstrated that bacterial communities were dominated by members of the Clostridiaceae and Sy...

  4. Dynamic Changes of Microbial Community for Degradation of Lignocellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wenzhe; LIU Shuang; WANG Chunying; ZHENG Guoxiang

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic changes of a microbial community for lignocellulose degradation were explored in details.Community composition and development were investigated by the means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE),and results showed that the microbial community was constituted of 14 kinds of bacteria and presented the fluctuation in some degrees with fermentation.Furthmore,the result of cluster analysis of DGGE pattern was accordant with growth curve,and the degradation process was divided into three stages: initial stage(0-12 h),intermediate stage(24-144 h)and end stage(144-216 h).

  5. Bioreactor microbial ecosystems for thiocyanate and cyanide degradation unravelled with genome-resolved metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Rose S; van Zyl, A Wynand; van Hille, Robert P; Thomas, Brian C; Harrison, Susan T L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-12-01

    Gold ore processing uses cyanide (CN(-) ), which often results in large volumes of thiocyanate- (SCN(-) ) contaminated wastewater requiring treatment. Microbial communities can degrade SCN(-) and CN(-) , but little is known about their membership and metabolic potential. Microbial-based remediation strategies will benefit from an ecological understanding of organisms involved in the breakdown of SCN(-) and CN(-) into sulfur, carbon and nitrogen compounds. We performed metagenomic analysis of samples from two laboratory-scale bioreactors used to study SCN(-) and CN(-) degradation. Community analysis revealed the dominance of Thiobacillus spp., whose genomes harbour a previously unreported operon for SCN(-) degradation. Genome-based metabolic predictions suggest that a large portion of each bioreactor community is autotrophic, relying not on molasses in reactor feed but using energy gained from oxidation of sulfur compounds produced during SCN(-) degradation. Heterotrophs, including a bacterium from a previously uncharacterized phylum, compose a smaller portion of the reactor community. Predation by phage and eukaryotes is predicted to affect community dynamics. Genes for ammonium oxidation and denitrification were detected, indicating the potential for nitrogen removal, as required for complete remediation of wastewater. These findings suggest optimization strategies for reactor design, such as improved aerobic/anaerobic partitioning and elimination of organic carbon from reactor feed. PMID:26031303

  6. Microbial degradation of metalaxyl in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of the fungicide metalaxyl in purple latosol soil was investigated using a ring - 14C labelled compound under laboratory conditions. In nonsterile soil samples under aerobic conditions, metalaxyl was degrated into two metabolites. After 60 days, 60% of the radiocarbon on TLC plates corresponded to the parent fungicide, 22% to its metabolite N-(2-methoxyacetyl)-N-(2,6-xylyl)-DL-alanine, and 2.7% to a second and unidentified metabolite. The U.V. absorbance value of metalaxyl decreased after seven days incubation with a soil microorganisms suspension. Incubation of 14C-metalaxyl for 50 days with a bacterium or a fungus isolated from that suspension resulted in metalaxyl gradual disappearance from the medium, but not metabolites were detected during this period. (Author)

  7. Aerobic biodegradation of natural and xenobiotic organic compounds by subsurface microbial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were conducted to characterize the diversity of degradative abilities of microbial communities from pristine aquifer solids samples. Biodegradation was measured in aquifer solids slurries as both the conversion of radiolabeled substrate to 14CO2 and the incorporation of label into cell biomass. The microbial community degraded aniline hydrochloride, chlorobenzene, p-chlorophenol, m-cresol, ethylene dibromide, naphthalene, phenol, toluene, and trichlorobenzene. Several kinetic parameters were calculated from the uptake and mineralization data. The results show that uptake into cell biomass represents a large fraction of total metabolism for many of the xenobiotic compounds

  8. Subsurface microbial communities and degradative capacities during trichloroethylene bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subsurface amendments of air, methane, and nutrients were investigated for the in situ stimulation of trichloroethylene- degrading microorganisms at the US DOE Savannah River Integrated Demonstration. Amendments were injected into a lower horizontal well coupled with vacuum extraction from the vadose zone horizontal well. The amendments were sequenced to give increasingly more aggressive treatments. Microbial populations and degradative capacities were monitored in groundwaters samples bimonthly

  9. Electrical Stimulation of Microbial PCB Degradation in Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Chan Lan; Payne, Rayford B; Sowers, Kevin R.; May, Harold D.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been precluded in part by the lack of a cost-effective method to stimulate microbial degradation in situ. A common limitation is the lack of an effective method of providing electron donors and acceptors to promote in situ PCB biodegradation. Application of an electric potential to soil/sediment could be an effective means of providing electron-donors/-acceptors to PCB dechlorinating and degrading microorganisms. In this study, electrical...

  10. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Suzi; Hybel, Anne-Marie; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup;

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential...... herbicides in microcosms using groundwater and sandy aquifer materials. To maintain a certain oxygen concentration this level was measured from the outside of the bottles with a fibre oxygen meter using oxygen-sensitive luminescent sensor foil mounted inside the microcosm, to which supplementary oxygen was...

  11. Hydrolysis and degradation of filtrated organic particulates in a biofilm reactor under anoxic and aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janning, K.F.; Mesterton, K.; Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    carbon to the bulk liquid was observed as an indication of hydrolysis taking place. The second experiment was designed as a series of on-line OUR batch experiments in a biofilm reactor with recirculation, in order to investigate further the degradation of particulate organic matter. After the biofilm had......Two experiments were performed in order to investigate the anoxic and the aerobic degradation of filtrated organic matter in a biofilter. In submerged lab: scale reactors with Biocarbone media as filter material, accumulated particulate organic matter from pre-settled wastewater served as the only...

  12. Modeling Aerobic Carbon Source Degradation Processes using Titrimetric Data and Combined Respirometric-Titrimetric Data: Experimental Data and Model Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Petersen, B.; Nopens, I.;

    2002-01-01

    Experimental data are presented that resulted from aerobic batch degradation experiments in activated sludge with simple carbon sources (acetate and dextrose) as substrates. Data collection was done using combined respirometric-titrimetric measurements. The respirometer consists of an open aerate...

  13. Microbial degradation of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone in surface water and bacteria responsible for the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Jan; Fusková, Jana; Křížek, Karel; Měrková, Markéta; Černotová, Alena; Smělík, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Due to widespread utilization in many industrial spheres and agrochemicals, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) is a potential contaminant of different surface water ecosystems. Hence, investigation was made into its aerobic microbial degradability in samples of water from a river, wetland area and spring. The results showed that the compound was degradable in all water types, and that the fastest NMP removal occurred in 4 days in river water, while in the wetland and spring samples the process was relatively slow, requiring several months to complete. Key bacterial degraders were successfully isolated in all cases, and their identification proved that pseudomonads played a major role in NMP degradation in river water, while the genera Rhodococcus and Patulibacter fulfilled a similar task in the wetland sample. Regarding spring water, degrading members of the Mesorhizobium and Rhizobium genera were found. PMID:26877048

  14. Microbial Degradation of Natural Rubber Vulcanizates

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuchii, Akio; Suzuki, Tomoo; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    1985-01-01

    An actinomycete, Nocardia sp. strain 835A, grows well on unvulcanized natural rubber and synthetic isoprene rubber, but not on other types of synthetic rubber. Not only unvulcanized but also various kinds of vulcanized natural rubber products were more or less utilized by the organism as the sole source of carbon and energy. The thin film from a latex glove was rapidly degraded, and the weight loss reached 75% after a 2-week cultivation period. Oligomers with molecular weights from 104 to 103...

  15. Enhanced degradation of 14C-HCB in two tropical clay soils using multiple anaerobic–aerobic cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to induce and enhance the degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), a highly-chlorinated persistent organic pollutant, in two ecologically different tropical soils: a paddy soil (PS) and a non-paddy soil (FS). The degradation of HCB was enhanced using two anaerobic–aerobic cycles in model laboratory experiments. There was greater degradation of HCB in the PS (half-life of 224 days) relative to the FS (half-life of 286 days). It was further shown that soils amended with compost had higher metabolite concentrations relative to the non-amended soils. In the first cycle, there was little degradation of HCB in both soils. However, in the second cycle, there was enhanced mineralization in the PS under aerobic conditions, with the compost-treated samples showing higher mineralization. There was also extensive volatilization in both soils. The metabolite pattern revealed that the increased mineralization and volatilization was due to the formation of lower chlorinated benzenes. - Highlights: ► Two anaerobic–aerobic cycles enhanced the dissipation of HCB in two tropical soils – a paddy and non-paddy soil. ► The paddy soil was more effective in degrading HCB. ► The non-paddy soil adapted and degraded HCB in the second anaerobic–aerobic cycle. ► An additional carbon source enhanced degradation and mineralisation of HCB in both soils. - Two anaerobic–aerobic cycles enhance the degradation of HCB in two ecologically different tropical clay soils.

  16. Aerobic microbial dolomite at the nanometer scale: Implications for the geologic record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Vasconcelos, Crisógono; Schmid, Thomas; Dittrich, Maria; McKenzie, Judith A.; Zenobi, Renato; Rivadeneyra, Maria A.

    2008-11-01

    Microbial experiments are the only proven approach to produceexperimental dolomite under Earth's surface conditions. Althoughmicrobial metabolisms are known to induce dolomite precipitationby favoring dolomite growth kinetics, the involvement of microbesin the dolomite nucleation process is poorly understood. Inparticular, the nucleation of microbially mediated dolomiteremains a matter for investigation because the metabolic diversityinvolved in this process has not been fully explored. Hereinwe demonstrate that Halomonas meridiana and Virgibacillus marismortui,two moderately halophilic aerobic bacteria, mediate primaryprecipitation of dolomite at low temperatures (25, 35 °C).This report emphasizes the biomineralogical implications fordolomite formation at the nanometer scale. We describe nucleationof dolomite on nanoglobules in intimate association with thebacterial cell surface. A combination of both laboratory cultureexperiments and natural samples reveals that these nanoglobulestructures may be: (1) the initial step for dolomite nucleation,(2) preserved in the geologic record, and (3) used as microbialtracers through time and/or as a proxy for ancient microbialdolomite, as well as other carbonate minerals.

  17. Location and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic and aerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañas, A; Spérandio, M; Decker, F; Biscans, B

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on combined scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) applied to granular sludge used for biological treatment of high-strength wastewater effluents. Mineral precipitation is shown to occur in the core of microbial granules under different operating conditions. Three dairy wastewater effluents, from three different upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors and two aerobic granular sequenced batch reactors (GSBR) were evaluated. The relationship between the solid phase precipitation and the chemical composition of the wastewater was investigated with PHREEQC software (calculation of saturation indexes). Results showed that pH, Ca:P ratios and biological reactions played a major role in controlling the biomineralization phenomena. Thermodynamics calculations can be used to foresee the nature of bio-precipitates, but the location of the mineral concretions will need further investigation as it is certainly due to local microbial activity. PMID:23393959

  18. Evaluation of microbially-influenced degradation of massive concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many low level waste disposal vaults, both above and below ground, are constructed of concrete. One potential contributing agent to the destruction of concrete structures is microbially-influenced degradation (MID). Three groups of bacteria are known to create conditions that are conducive to destroying concrete integrity. They are sulfur oxidizing bacteria, nitrifying bacteria, and heterotrophic bacteria. Research is being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assess the extent of naturally occurring microbially influenced degradation (MID) and its contribution to the deterioration of massive concrete structures. The preliminary steps to understanding the extent of MID, require assessing the microbial communities present on degrading concrete surfaces. Ultimately such information can be used to develop guidelines for preventive or corrective treatments for MID and aid in formulation of new materials to resist corrosion. An environmental study was conducted to determine the presence and activity of potential MID bacteria on degrading concrete surfaces of massive concrete structures. Scanning electron microscopy detected bacteria on the surfaces of concrete structures such as bridges and dams, where corrosion was evident. Enumeration of sulfur oxidizing thiobacilli and nitrogen oxidizing Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from surface samples was conducted. Bacterial community composition varied between sampling locations, and generally the presence of either sulfur oxidizers or nitrifiers dominated, although instances of both types of bacteria occurring together were encountered. No clear correlation between bacterial numbers and degree of degradation was exhibited

  19. The direct role of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria associated with cyanobacteria in the degradation of oil compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abed, R.M.M. [Max-Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen (Germany); Koester, J. [University of Oldenburg (Germany). Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the role of cyanobacteria and their associated aerobic heterotrophic bacteria in biodegradation of petroleum compounds. We investigated the potential of ten non-axenic typical mat-forming cyanobacterial strains to degrade phenanthrene, pristane, n-octadecane, and dibenzothiophene. Five strains (Aphanothece halophyletica, Dactyolococcopsis salina, Halothece strain EPUS, Oscillatoria strain OSC, and Synechocystis strain UNIGA) were able to degrade n-alkanes. In case of the other five strains (Microcoleus chthonoplastes, Oscillatoria sp. MPI 95 OS 01, Halothece strain EPUG, Halomicronema exentricum, and Phormidium strain UNITF) alkanes were not significantly affected. Moderate changes in the concentration of the aromatic compounds were observed for three isolates only. In follow-up experiments with Oscillatoria strain OSC, we demonstrated that the cyanobacteria-associated aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were responsible for the observed biodegradation. The cyanobacteria themselves apparently do not degrade petroleum compounds, but more likely play a significant, indirect role in biodegradation by supporting the growth and activity of the actual degraders. (author)

  20. Kinetics of microbial degradation of deicing chemicals in percolated porous media - the modeling perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, Markus; Lissner, Heidi; Totsche, Kai

    2013-04-01

    A quantitative knowledge of the fate of deicing chemicals in the subsurface can be provided by analysis of laboratory and field experiments with numerical simulation models. In the present study, experimental data of microbial degradation of the deicing chemical propylene glycol (PG) under flow conditions in soil columns and field lysimeters were simulated to analyze the process conditions of degradation and to obtain the according parameters. Results from the column experiment were evaluated applying different scenarios of an advection-dispersion model using HYDRUS-1D. To reconstruct the data, different competing degradation models were included, i.e., zero order, first order and inclusion of a growing and decaying biomass. The general breakthrough behavior of propylene glycol in soil columns can be simulated well using a coupled model of solute transport and degradation with growth and decay of biomass. The susceptibility of the model to non-unique solutions was investigated using systematical forward and inverse simulations. We found that the model tends to equifinal solutions under certain conditions. Complex experimental boundary conditions can help to avoid this. Under field conditions, the situation is far more complex than in the laboratory. Studying the fate of PG with undisturbed lysimeters we found that aerobic and anaerobic degradation occurs simultaneously. We attribute this to the physical structure and the aggregated nature of the undisturbed soil material . This results in the presence of spatially disjoint oxidative and reductive regions of microbial activity and requires, but is not fully reflected by a dual porosity model. Currently, the numerical simulation of this system is in progress, considering several flow and transport models. A stochastic global search algorithm (DREAM-ZS) is used in conjuction with HYDRUS-1D to avoid local minima in the inverse simulations. The study shows the current limitations and potentials of modeling degradation

  1. Enhanced pyrene degradation by a microbial surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, J.D.; Churchill, P.F. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Churchill, S.A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A microbial biosurfactant was investigated for its ability to enhance the biodegradation of a bacterial enrichment culture. The biosurfactants used in this study were a mixture of rhamnolipids produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 grown in phosphate-limited media. The rhamnolipid preparation was found to lower the surface tension of a phosphate buffered solution to 32 dyne cm{sup -1} and to dramatically increase the apparent aqueous solubility of pyrene. The mineralization of [{sup 14}C]-pyrene in liquid phase and in soil-water systems was quantified by measuring the production of [{sup 14}C]-carbon dioxide. In liquid phase studies, an initial lag phase was observed when rhamnolipid was added at concentrations higher than the CMC. However, mineralization in the surfactant amended cultures eventually exceeded that observed in unamended samples. In soil-water systems, mineralization was slightly more rapid in rhamnolipid amended samples then in unamended samples. These results suggest that rhamnolipids may help facilitate bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  2. Degradation of dead microbial biomass in a marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of dead microbial biomass in a marine beach sand to degradation and mineralization was examined. Microbial sand populations were labeled with [14C]glutamic acid, [3H]adenine, or [3H]thymidine and killed with chloroform. Live sand or seawater (or both) was added to the sterile labeled sand, and biochemical components of the populations were monitored for 10 days. Labeled RNA was degraded more quickly than labeled DNA, but both nucleic acids were degraded to approximately the same extent (60 to 70%). 3H2O was a major acid-soluble breakdown product. RNA (and possibly DNA) breakdown products were reincorporated into DNA (and possibly RNA) during the incubation period. In addition to metabolite salvage, 32% of the total macromolecular 14C was respired in the 10-day period regardless of whether sand or seawater was used as the inoculum. Respiration was essentially complete in 3 days, whereas nucleic acid degradation continued throughout the 10-day incubation. The results indicate that dead microbial biomass is a labile component of the sediment ecosystem

  3. Microbial degradation of pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benotti, Mark J. [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Brownawell, Bruce J. [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States)], E-mail: bruce.brownawell@sunysb.edu

    2009-03-15

    Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal surface water samples. Antipyrine, carbamazepine, cotinine, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim were the most refractory (half-lives, t{sub 1/2} = 35 to >100 days), making them excellent candidates for wastewater tracers. Nicotine, acetaminophen, and fluoxetine were labile across all treatments (t{sub 1/2} = 0.68-11 days). Caffeine, diltiazem, and nifedipine were also and relatively labile in all but one of the treatments (t{sub 1/2} = 3.5-13 days). Microbial degradation of caffeine was further confirmed by production {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The fastest decay of non-refractory compounds was always observed in more sewage-affected Jamaica Bay waters. Degradation rates for the majority of these pharmaceuticals are much slower than reported rates for small biomolecules, such as glucose and amino acids. Batch sorption experiments indicate that removal of these soluble pharmaceuticals from the water column to sediments is a relatively insignificant removal process in these receiving waters. - Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 structurally variable pharmaceuticals in wastewater-impacted estuarine and coastal seawater.

  4. Evaluation of microbial transport during aerobic bioaugmentation of an RDX-contaminated aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Jung, Carina M; Hancock, Dawn E; Fuller, Mark E; Hatzinger, Paul B; Vainberg, Simon; Istok, Jonathan D; Wilson, Edward; Michalsen, Mandy M

    2015-11-01

    In situ bioaugmentation with aerobic hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX)-degrading bacteria is being considered for treatment of explosives-contaminated groundwater at Umatilla Chemical Depot, Oregon (UMCD). Two forced-gradient bacterial transport tests of site groundwater containing chloride or bromide tracer and either a mixed culture of Gordonia sp. KTR9 (xplA (+)Km(R)), Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 (pGKT2 transconjugant; xplA (+)Km(R)) and Pseudomonas fluorescens I-C (xenB (+)), or a single culture of Gordonia sp. KTR9 (xplA (+); i.e. wild-type) were conducted at UMCD. Groundwater monitoring evaluated cell viability and migration in the injection well and downgradient monitoring wells. Enhanced degradation of RDX was not evaluated in these demonstrations. Quantitative PCR analysis of xplA, the kanamycin resistance gene (aph), and xenB indicated that the mixed culture was transported at least 3 m within 2 h of injection. During a subsequent field injection of bioaugmented groundwater, strain KTR9 (wild-type) migrated up to 23-m downgradient of the injection well within 3 days. Thus, the three RDX-degrading strains were effectively introduced and transported within the UMCD aquifer. This demonstration represents an innovative application of bioaugmentation to potentially enhance RDX biodegradation in aerobic aquifers. PMID:26438043

  5. Acetate-fed aerobic granular sludge for the degradation of 4-chlorophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorinated phenols are considered a critical environmental problem, due to their extreme toxicity and their widespread use both in industrial and agricultural activities. In this study, aerobic granular sludge was initially developed into an acetate-fed Granulated Sequencing Batch Reactor (GSBR) and then used for the degradation of low chlorinated 4-mono-chlorophenol (4CP), with readily biodegradable sodium acetate (NaAc) as co-substrate. Influent 4CP concentration ranged between 0 and 50 mg/l, with a maximum volumetric organic loading rate of 0.20 kg4CP/m3 d (0.32 kgCOD-4CP/m3 d). Differences in granules shape and size were observed with 4CP dosed in the influent at different concentrations, and the effects of such toxic compound on acetate removal were evaluated, with both unacclimated and acclimated biomass. Aerobic granules grown on acetate as carbon source proved to be an interesting solution for the degradation of 4CP, showing good resistance to high 4CP concentrations in the influent even if unacclimated (short term effects). Moreover, the monitoring of intermediate products and the evaluation of chloride release due to 4CP degradation proved that acclimated granular sludge could completely remove 4CP (long term effects), with high specific removal rates.

  6. Fungal degradation of pesticides - construction of microbial consortia for bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard-Jensen, Lea

    Pesticides are used worldwide on agricultural land as well as in urban areas. This use has often led to contamination of the environment with serious effects on our natural resources. Frequent pesticide use and spills have led to deterioration of soil quality and pesticide leaching has resulted in...... pesticide contaminated soil and water. The objectives of this PhD were to investigate fungal degradation of pesticides and following to construct microbial consortia for bioremediation. In Manuscript I the fungal degradation of the phenylurea herbicide diuron was studied. Isolates of soil fungi of the genus...... constructing fungal-bacterial consortia and examining whether their degradation would be superior to that of the single strains in unsaturated systems. In Manuscript II a consortium was created for degradation of the pesticide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM). A consortium with Mortierella sp. LEJ702 and...

  7. Photochemical and microbial degradation technologies to remove toxic chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effort was made to apply photochemical degradation technology on biodegradation processes to increase the bioremediation potential of microbial actions. For this purpose, we have chosen Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a wood decaying white-rot fungus and a variety of chlorinated pesticides and aromatics as study materials. By using UV-irradiation and benomyl (a commonly used fungicide) as selection methods, a strain of UV-resistant P. chrysosporium was developed. This strain was found to be capable of rapidly degrading these chlorinated chemicals when they were incubated in N-deficient medium which received 1 hr/day of UV-irradiation. UV-irradiation either at 300 or 254 nm showed the beneficial effect of speeding up the rate of degradation on most of test chemicals with the exception of toxaphene and HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane). By adding fresh glucose to the medium it was possible to maintain high degradation capacity for several weeks

  8. AromaDeg, a novel database for phylogenomics of aerobic bacterial degradation of aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Márcia; Jauregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Junca, Howard; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding prokaryotic transformation of recalcitrant pollutants and the in-situ metabolic nets require the integration of massive amounts of biological data. Decades of biochemical studies together with novel next-generation sequencing data have exponentially increased information on aerobic aromatic degradation pathways. However, the majority of protein sequences in public databases have not been experimentally characterized and homology-based methods are still the most routinely used approach to assign protein function, allowing the propagation of misannotations. AromaDeg is a web-based resource targeting aerobic degradation of aromatics that comprises recently updated (September 2013) and manually curated databases constructed based on a phylogenomic approach. Grounded in phylogenetic analyses of protein sequences of key catabolic protein families and of proteins of documented function, AromaDeg allows query and data mining of novel genomic, metagenomic or metatranscriptomic data sets. Essentially, each query sequence that match a given protein family of AromaDeg is associated to a specific cluster of a given phylogenetic tree and further function annotation and/or substrate specificity may be inferred from the neighboring cluster members with experimentally validated function. This allows a detailed characterization of individual protein superfamilies as well as high-throughput functional classifications. Thus, AromaDeg addresses the deficiencies of homology-based protein function prediction, combining phylogenetic tree construction and integration of experimental data to obtain more accurate annotations of new biological data related to aerobic aromatic biodegradation pathways. We pursue in future the expansion of AromaDeg to other enzyme families involved in aromatic degradation and its regular update. Database URL: http://aromadeg.siona.helmholtz-hzi.de PMID:25468931

  9. Biodegradation of dimethyl phthalate by Sphingomonas sp. isolated from phthalic-acid-degrading aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ping; Moy, Benjamin Yan-Pui; Song, Yong-Hui; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2008-10-01

    Phthalic acid esters (PAEs) contamination in water, air, and soil is one of the major environmental concerns in many countries. Besides the PAE biodegradation process, the PAE degrading bacteria have become one of the focuses of study. This study reports the successful isolation of one kind of indigenous bacterium PA-02 from phthalic acid (PA)-degrading aerobic granules. Based on its 16S ribosomal DNA sequence, isolate PA-02 was identified as Sphingomonas genus with 100% similarity to Sphingomonas sp. strain D84532. Strain PA-02 was a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium with strong auto-aggregation ability. In particular, the strain PA-02 possessed PAE-degrading ability without acclimation. Results of growth tests showed that strain PA-02 could degrade dimethyl phthalate (DMP), dibutyl phthalate, and diethylhexyl phthalate. The specific degradation rates of DMP and PA were concentration-dependent with maximum values of 0.4 g-DMP g(-1) biomass h(-1) and 1.3 g-PA g(-1) biomass h(-1), respectively. Kinetic studies also revealed that PA-02 was robust under high concentrations of DMP and PA. Even when the PA concentration was increased to 1,000.0 mg l(-1), the specific PA degradation rate was about 0.25 g-PA g(-1) biomass h(-1). The corresponding value for DMP was 0.067 g-DMP g(-1) biomass h(-1) at 1,000 mg l(-1). PMID:18751698

  10. Microbial deterioration and degradation of Polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mohan

    2010-12-01

    -bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}  Polymeric materials due to its structural versatility are widely used in aerospace applications, aviation and space industries. As they are potential source of carbon and energy for heterotrophic microorganisms including bacteria and fungi in several ways its biodegradation affect these industries. The information on degradability can provide fundamental information facilitating design and life-time analysis of materials. Literature survey shows that polymers which are susceptible to biofilm formation includes paints, adhesives, plastics, rubbers, sealants, FRPCMs, lubricating materials, fuels etc. Even though the understanding of polymer degradation has been advanced in recent years the subject is still inadequately addressed because of the lack of information available. The review focuses on polymer biodeterioration and biodegradation and its mechanisms, the types of microorganisms involved, the reactions of enzymes of importance in the biodegradation of polymers, consequences, of biodegradation, the factors involved in biodegradation of polymers and its prevention and the tests used to evaluate it.

  11. Molecular characterization of a microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification under micro-aerobic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jingjing; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Liang; Ju, Xi; Wu, Weixiang; Chen, Yingxu

    2013-01-01

    Methane can be used as an alternative carbon source in biological denitrification because it is nontoxic, widely available and relatively inexpensive. A microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (MOD) was enriched with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions. The 16S rRNA gene combined with pmoA phylogeny of methanotrophs and nirK phylogeny of denitrifiers were analysed to reveal the dominant microbial populations and functi...

  12. Physicochemical and Microbial Caracteristics Performency in Wastewater Treated Under Aerobic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma B. Rajeb

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The current work study the efficiency of biological wastewater treatment by an aerobic reactor which could be used in small agglomerations. RBC reduced physicochemical and microbiological load of wastewater but values remain above Tunisian standard. Approach: Experiments were conducted on a sand filled PVC column fed with wastewater treated by Rotating Biological Contactor (RBC at a pulsed rhythm of 8 sequences per day. For performances study process, physicochemical and bacterial analyses effluent at inlet and outlet of column were realized. Results: The results showed that through filter mass (D10 = 0.55 mm, D60 = 1.3 mm and coefficient uniformity = 2.36 96% of suspended solids, 99% of NH4 +-N (during first phase, 92% of COD, 91% of BOD5 and 46% of phosphorus are retained by surface filtration. The microbial abatement results is E. coli. The microbial water quality is slightly higher than Tunisian standards. The removal of microbial indicators in the considered reactor depends on the depth of the filter and negatively correlated with NO3 --N (r = -0.99, with E. coli at 3rd OPD. Conclusion/Recommendation: Results confirmed that the reactor tested is performed as an advanced treatment system for DBO, COD, SS, NH4 +-N and NO3 --N. Despite that 96% of SS efficiency reduction, clogging is not achieved quickly that due to biofilm detachment phenomena. The removal of microbial indicators in the considered reactor depends on the depth of the filter and negatively correlated with NO3 --N. Disinfection performances for the considered reactor reduce microbial load, however chlore, ozone or UV disinfection should be considered.

  13. Organic contaminants in soil, desorption kinetics and microbial degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Schlebaum, W.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of organic contaminants in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g.) soil washing or soil venting) depends on the desorption kinetics of these contaminants from the soil matrix. When the organic contaminants desorb very slow from the soil matrix, remediation of polluted sites may be hampered. In this thesis, sorption kinetics of organic contaminants in soil was investigated with emphasis on the influence of natural organic matter on slow...

  14. Soil microbial response to photo-degraded C60 fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Timothy D; Clavijo, Andrea P; Zhao, Yingcan; Jafvert, Chad T; Turco, Ronald F; Filley, Timothy R

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that while unfunctionalized carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) exhibit very low decomposition rates in soils, even minor surface functionalization (e.g., as a result of photochemical weathering) may accelerate microbial decay. We present results from a C60 fullerene-soil incubation study designed to investigate the potential links between photochemical and microbial degradation of photo-irradiated C60. Irradiating aqueous (13)C-labeled C60 with solar-wavelength light resulted in a complex mixture of intermediate products with decreased aromaticity. Although addition of irradiated C60 to soil microcosms had little effect on net soil respiration, excess (13)C in the respired CO2 demonstrates that photo-irradiating C60 enhanced its degradation in soil, with ∼ 0.78% of 60 day photo-irradiated C60 mineralized. Community analysis by DGGE found that soil microbial community structure was altered and depended on the photo-treatment duration. These findings demonstrate how abiotic and biotic transformation processes can couple to influence degradation of CNMs in the natural environment. PMID:26774781

  15. Microcosm experiments of oil degradation by microbial mats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several microcosm experiments were run in parallel to evaluate the efficiency of microbial mats for crude oil degradation as compared with physico-chemical weathering. The oils used in the experiments constituted representative examples of those currently used for commercial purposes. One was aliphatic and of low viscosity (33.4 American Petroleum Institute degrees, o API) and the other was predominantly aromatic, with high sulphur content (ca. 2.7%) and viscosity (16.6o API). After crude oil introduction, the microcosms were kept under cyclic changes in water level to mimic coastal tidal movements. The transformations observed showed that water weathering leads to more effective and rapid elimination of low molecular weight hydrocarbons than microbial mat metabolism, e.g. n-alkanes with chain length shorter than n-pentadecane or n-heptadecane, regular isoprenoid hydrocarbons with chain length lower than C16 or C18 or lower molecular weight naphthalenes. Microbial mats preserved these hydrocarbons from volatilization and water washing. However, hydrocarbons of lower volatility such as the C24-C3 n-alkanes or containing nitrogen atoms, e.g. carbazoles, were eliminated in higher proportion by microbial mats than by water weathering. The strong differences in composition between the two oils used for the experiments were also reflected in significant differences between water weathering and microbial mat biodegradation. Higher oil viscosity seemed to hinder the former but not the later

  16. Microcosm experiments of oil degradation by microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oteyza, Tirso García; Grimalt, Joan O; Llirós, Marc; Esteve, Isabel

    2006-03-15

    Several microcosm experiments were run in parallel to evaluate the efficiency of microbial mats for crude oil degradation as compared with physico-chemical weathering. The oils used in the experiments constituted representative examples of those currently used for commercial purposes. One was aliphatic and of low viscosity (33.4 American Petroleum Institute degrees, degrees API) and the other was predominantly aromatic, with high sulphur content (ca. 2.7%) and viscosity (16.6 degrees API). After crude oil introduction, the microcosms were kept under cyclic changes in water level to mimic coastal tidal movements. The transformations observed showed that water weathering leads to more effective and rapid elimination of low molecular weight hydrocarbons than microbial mat metabolism, e.g. n-alkanes with chain length shorter than n-pentadecane or n-heptadecane, regular isoprenoid hydrocarbons with chain length lower than C16 or C18 or lower molecular weight naphthalenes. Microbial mats preserved these hydrocarbons from volatilization and water washing. However, hydrocarbons of lower volatility such as the C24-C30 n-alkanes or containing nitrogen atoms, e.g. carbazoles, were eliminated in higher proportion by microbial mats than by water weathering. The strong differences in composition between the two oils used for the experiments were also reflected in significant differences between water weathering and microbial mat biodegradation. Higher oil viscosity seemed to hinder the former but not the later. PMID:15935450

  17. Particulate organics degradation and sludge minimization in aerobic, complete SRT bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanatidou, Elisavet; Samiotis, Georgios; Trikoilidou, Eleni; Tsikritzis, Lazaros

    2016-05-01

    The study evaluates the assumption that in activated sludge processes and under specific operating conditions, the considered unbiodegradable particulate organic fractions of influent (XU) organic solids and biomass decay residues (cell debris, XE) are degraded. The evaluation was performed by comparing sludge observed yield (Yobs) evolution in two full scale, complete solids retention time (SRT), aerobic bioreactors, to the predictions of two activated sludge models. The results showed that in steady state operating conditions of complete solids retention AS processes very low solids accumulation occur. In these conditions, solids accumulation is slightly affected by kinetic coefficients and significantly affected by XU and XE degradation rates. High endogenous residues degradation rate values of 0.05 d(-1) and 0.02 d(-1) were estimated for the two bioreactors, resulting in low solids accumulation, calculated at 1.6 tons and 3.59 tons per year respectively, of which 1.37 and 0.87 tons were non volatile suspended solids. Depending on WWTP operating conditions the endogenous residues degradation rate is the limiting factor of solids accumulation and consequently for particulate organics degradation. PMID:26971804

  18. Cultivation and characters of aerobic granules for pentachlorophenol (PCP) degradation under microaerobic condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Hui-xia; CHEN Yuan-cai; CHEN Zhong-hao; CHEN Rong

    2005-01-01

    Cultivation of aerobic granular sludge for pentachlorophenol (PCP) degradation under microaerobic condition ( DO concentration was controlled at 0.2-0.7 mg/L) was studied in this paper. Anaerobic granules were selected as inoculum. The changes of appearance were observed and the variations of SVI, VSS/TSS, PN/PS and the size of sludge were measured during cultivating. The capabilities for degradation of PCP, AOX and CODcr were also studied. Observations on mature granules were carried out by scanning electron microscope, and the results indicated bacillus was dominant on the surface of granules while in the inner of granules both bacillus and coccus were the dominant microorganisms. K, Na, Fe, Ca, Mg, Ni, Co, Mn, Cu and Zn were detected in the granules by element analysis.

  19. Aerobic stability, chemical composition and ruminal degradability of sugarcane silage with glycerin from biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Bensimon Gomes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was performed with the objective of studying the ensiled sugarcane silage with 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% of glycerin in experimental PVC silos. The aerobic stability was assessed by measuring the pH and the temperature of the silage at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120h. The chemical composition, the levels of non-fiber carbohydrates (NFC and the total digestible nutrients (TDN were evaluated. The in vitro digestibility of dry matter (IVDDM and the in vitro digestibility of the cell wall (IVDCW in the silages were evaluated. In three fistulated cattle the in situ degradability of dry matter (DM and the disappearance percentage of the neutral detergent fiber (NDF in samples incubated at 0, 2, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96h were analyzed. The experimental design was completely randomized and the statistical analyzes were done using Bayesian inference. Increases were observed in DM, TDN, mineral matter, NFC and reductions in NDF, acid detergent fiber, crude protein and ether extract as the inclusion of glycerin was higher. IVDDM increased (P <0.05 in silage with 15 and 20% of glycerin in relation to those with 0, 5 and 10%. The IVDCW at levels of 10, 15 and 20% of glycerin was higher (P <0.05 compared to the other treatments. Increases were observed in the soluble portion (a, a reduction in the insoluble fraction (b, and an increase in the degradability fraction constant (c of the silages with 5, 10, 15 and 20% of glycerin (P <0.05 compared to the control. Glycerin improved aerobic stability while maintaining a low pH and temperature during the observation period at levels of 15 and 20% of glycerin against the silage with 0, 5 and 10%. These results indicate glycerin as a promising additive for sugarcane silage, being able to enhance energy density and improve the aerobic stability of the ensiled matter when its inclusion is from 10 to 20%.

  20. The Effect of Microbial Inoculants Applied at Ensiling on Sorghum Silage Characteristics and Aerobic Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Wu-tai; Ashbell G; Hen Y; Weinberg Z G

    2002-01-01

    Whole crop forage sorghum (Saccharatum) cultivar FS5 was harvested at the soft dough stage of maturity. The sorghum was chopped to approximately 2 cm pieces and ensiled under laboratory conditions in 1.5 L Weck glass jars. At ensiling, it was treated with two commercial microbial inoculants: inoculant A and inoculant B. The inoculants were applied at 2 × 105 colony forming units g- 1 DM. Silage with no additives served as a control. Three jars per treatment were opened on days 2, 4, 8, 15 and 60 post-ensiling to study fermentation dynamics. After 60 days of ensiling, the silages were analyzed and subjected to an aerobic stability test lasting 5 days. Results showed that both inoculants caused a more rapid rate of pH decline and a higher amount of lactic acid production. Silages treated with each inoculant produced a little more CO2 and resulted in more glucose loss as compared with the control. Addition of inoculants did not influence ( P > 0.05) the ash and crude protein contents, but tended to decrease the concentration of acetic acid (P < 0.05), butyric acid (P < 0.01) and propionic acid ( P < 0.01 ), and increase the lactic acid concentration ( P < 0.01 ). Silages treated with inoculant A possess the more DM loss, and the higher yeast counts upon aerobic exposure. Silage treated with inoculant B had the most DM (P < 0.05), lactic acid contents (P < 0.01 ), the least acetic acid content (P < 0.05). Inoculant B reduced the ADF (P < 0.01), ADL and NDF ( P < 0.05) contents. It was concluded that lactic bacteria inoculants may improve the fermentation but might impair the aerobic stability for sorghum ensilage.

  1. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Information has been presented by a number of researchers, which indicated that those tests may be inappropriate for examining microbial degradation of cement-solidified LLW. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program was to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that would be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluation of the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. The procedures that have been developed in this work are presented and discussed. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites were employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this final report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides developed during this study are presented

  2. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr

    1996-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Information has been presented by a number of researchers, which indicated that those tests may be inappropriate for examining microbial degradation of cement-solidified LLW. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program was to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that would be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluation of the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. The procedures that have been developed in this work are presented and discussed. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites were employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this final report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides developed during this study are presented.

  3. Enhancement of microbial degradation of hydrocarbons in soil and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major focus in the biotechnology program at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is to develop bioremediation processes for soil and water contaminated with hazaardous organic chemicals. Aerobic microbial cultures that have been developed in the past and anaerobic microbial cultures recently enriched for, are being used in a variety of ways to develop viable treatment strategies for these wastes. The authors have found that the chief factor limiting the rate and extent of PAH biodegradation in contaminated soil is mass transfer and when PAH's are rendered bioavailable in extensively. The most effective biodegradation is observed for polycyclic compounds of three- and fewer rings. Although not to as remarkable an extent, cultures are also able to decompose four, five and six ring PAH's. Studies with 14C-labelled PAH's haave revealed thaat two-, three-, four-, five-, and six-ring compounds can be completely mineralized with bacterial cultures or the white-rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, either as pure reagent chemicals or in complex organic mixtures derived from contaminated town gas site soils. Continued scientific investigations must endeavor to overcome hazaardous waste mass transfer difficulties as an integral part of the development of practical treatment processes

  4. Effect of microbial inoculants on the quality and aerobic stability of bermudagrass round-bale haylage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola, K G; Queiroz, O C M; Romero, J J; Casper, D; Muniz, E; Hamie, J; Adesogan, A T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of using 4 commercially available microbial inoculants to improve the fermentation and aerobic stability of bermudagrass haylage. We hypothesized that the microbial inoculants would increase the fermentation and aerobic stability of the haylages. Bermudagrass (4-wk regrowth) was harvested and treated with (1) deionized water (control); (2) Buchneri 500 (B500; Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Milwaukee, WI) containing 1×10(5) of Pediococcus pentosaceus and 4×10(5) of Lactobacillus buchneri 40788; (3) Biotal Plus II (BPII; Lallemand Animal Nutrition) containing 1.2×10(5) of P. pentosaceus and Propionibacteria freudenreichii; (4) Silage Inoculant II (SI; AgriKing Inc., Fulton, IL) containing 1×10(5) of Lactobacillus plantarum and P. pentosaceus; and (5) Silo King (SK; AgriKing Inc.), containing 1×10(5) of L. plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, and P. pentosaceus, respectively. Forty round bales (8 per treatment; 441±26kg; 1.2×1.2 m diameter) were made and each was wrapped with 7 layers of plastic. Twenty bales were stored for 112 d and the remaining 20 were stored for 30 d and sampled by coring after intermediary storage periods of 0, 3, 7, and 30 d. The pH of control and inoculated haylages sampled on d 3 did not differ. However, B500 and BPII had lower pH (5.77±0.04 vs. 6.16±0.04; 5.06±0.13 vs. 5.52±0.13) than other treatments by d 7 and 30, respectively. At final bale opening on d 112, all treatments had lower pH than the control haylage (4.77±0.07 vs. 5.37±0.07). The B500, BPII, and SI haylages had greater lactic acid and lactic-to-acetic acid ratios than SK and control haylages. No differences were detected in neutral detergent fiber digestibility, dry matter losses, dry matter, lactic and acetic acid concentrations, and yeast and coliform counts. The SK haylage had lower clostridia counts compared with the control (1.19±0.23 vs. 1.99±0.23 cfu/g). Treatments B500, BPII, SI, and SK tended to reduce

  5. Survey of microbial degradation of asphalts with notes on relationship to nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey has been made of the microbial degradation of asphalts. Topics covered include chemical and physical properties of asphalts, their chemical stability, methods of demonstrating their microbial degradation, and environmental extremes for microbial activity based on existing literature. Specific concerns for the use of asphalt in nuclear waste management, plus potential effects and consequences thereof are discussed. 82 references

  6. Survey of microbial degradation of asphalts with notes on relationship to nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZoBell, C.E.; Molecke, M.A.

    1978-12-01

    A survey has been made of the microbial degradation of asphalts. Topics covered include chemical and physical properties of asphalts, their chemical stability, methods of demonstrating their microbial degradation, and environmental extremes for microbial activity based on existing literature. Specific concerns for the use of asphalt in nuclear waste management, plus potential effects and consequences thereof are discussed. 82 references.

  7. Microbially-influenced degradation of solidified/stabilized metal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmalin Sophia, A; Swaminathan, K; Sandhya, S

    2007-09-01

    In the present study, a refined microbially-influenced degradation method was used to evaluate the stability of a solidified synthetic waste containing chromium salt, cement and fly ash in two different proportions. The experimental samples showed evidence of microbial growth by leaching of sulfate. Chromium leached by Thiobacillus thiooxidans from the experimental samples 'C1' (10.26% CrCl3 .6H2O; 89.74% cement) and 'FC1' (10.26% CrCl3 .6H2O; 10% fly ash; 79.74% cement), after 30 days of exposure was 14.53 mg/g and 9.53 mg/g, respectively. The corresponding concentration of chromium in the leachate was 0.189 mg/l and 0.124 mg/l, respectively, which was lower than the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), regulatory limit (5 mg/l). Replacement of cement by 10% fly ash in FC1 restricted the leaching of chromium more effectively. Model equations based on two shrinking core models namely, acid dissolution and bulk diffusion model, were used to analyze the kinetics of microbial degradation. Of the two approaches, the bulk diffusion model fit the data better than the acid dissolution model as indicated by the correlation coefficients of >0.97. PMID:17107784

  8. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. Because of apparent ease of use and normal structural integrity, cement has been widely used as a binder to solidify LLW. However, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. This report reviews laboratory efforts that are being developed to address the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms are being employed that are capable of metabolically converting organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this report. Sufficient data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW has been developed during the course of this study. These data support the continued development of appropriate tests necessary to determine the resistance of cement-solidified LLW to microbially induced degradation that could impact the stability of the waste form. They also justify the continued effort of enumeration of the conditions necessary to support the microbiological growth and population expansion

  9. Enrichment and characterization of microbial consortia degrading soluble microbial products discharged from anaerobic methanogenic bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na-Kyung; Oh, Seungdae; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-03-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) produced in bioprocesses have been known as a main cause to decrease treatment efficiency, lower effluent quality, and promote membrane fouling in water reclamation plants. In this study, biological degradation of SMP using selectively enriched microbial consortia in a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor was introduced to remove SMP discharged from anaerobic methanogenic reactors. On average, 68.9-87.5% SMP removal was achieved by the enriched microbial consortia in the DHS reactor for >800 days. The influent SMP fed to the DHS reactor exhibited a bimodal molecular weight (MW) distribution with 14-20 kDa and <4 kDa. Between these two types of SMP, the small MW SMP were biodegraded in the upper part of the reactor, together with most of the large MW SMP. Using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing technology, the microbial community composition and structure were characterized and correlated with operational factors, such as hydraulic retention time, organic loading rate, and removal of soluble chemical oxygen demand at different depths of the reactor, by performing network and redundancy analyses. The results revealed that Saprospiraceae was strongly correlated to the increasing SMP loading condition, indicating positive co-occurrences with neighboring bacterial populations. Different microbial diversity along with the depth of the reactor implies that stratified microbial communities could participate in the process of SMP degradation. Taken together, these observations indicate that the spatial and temporal variability of the enriched microbial community in the DHS reactor could effectively treat SMP with respect to changes in the operational factors. PMID:26771162

  10. Treatment of colour industry wastewaters with concomitant bioelectricity production in a sequential stacked mono-chamber microbial fuel cells-aerobic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Eustace; Keshavarz, Taj; Kyazze, Godfrey; Fonseka, Keerthi

    2016-01-01

    The scalability of any microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based system is of vital importance if it is to be utilized for potential field applications. In this study, an integrated MFC-aerobic bioreactor system was investigated for its scalability with the purpose of treating a simulated dye wastewater and industrial wastewaters originated from textile dyebaths and leather tanning. The influent containing real wastewater was fed into the reactor in continuous mode at ambient temperature. Three MFC units were integrated to act in unison as a single module for wastewater treatment and a continuously stirred aerobic bioreactor operating downstream to the MFC module was installed in order to ensure more complete degradation of colouring agents found in the wastewater. Total colour removal in the final effluent exceeded 90% in all experiments where both synthetic (AO-7 containing) and real wastewater were used as the influent feed. The chemical oxygen demand reduction also exceeded 80% in all experiments under the same conditions. The MFC modules connected in parallel configuration allowed obtaining higher current densities than that can be obtained from a single MFC unit. The maximum current density of the MFC stack reached 1150 mA m(-2) when connected in a parallel configuration. The outcome of this work implies that suitably up-scaled MFC-aerobic integrated bioprocesses could be used for colour industry wastewater treatment under industrially relevant conditions with possible prospects of bioelectricity generation. PMID:26212183

  11. Biofuel components change the ecology of bacterial volatile petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in aerobic sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tested the hypothesis that the biodegradation of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (VPHs) in aerobic sandy soil is affected by the blending with 10 percent ethanol (E10) or 20 percent biodiesel (B20). When inorganic nutrients were scarce, competition between biofuel and VPH degraders temporarily slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Ethanol had a bigger impact than biodiesel, reflecting the relative ease of ethanol compared to methyl ester biodegradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that each fuel mixture selected for a distinct bacterial community, each dominated by Pseudomonas spp. Despite lasting impacts on soil bacterial ecology, the overall effects on VHP biodegradation were minor, and average biomass yields were comparable between fuel types, ranging from 0.40 ± 0.16 to 0.51 ± 0.22 g of biomass carbon per gram of fuel carbon degraded. Inorganic nutrient availability had a greater impact on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation than fuel composition. Highlights: ► The effect of 10% ethanol or 20% biodiesel on the biodegradability of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons in soil was investigated. ► Competition for scarce inorganic nutrients between biofuel and VPH degraders slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. ► Biofuel effects were transitional. ► Each fuel selected for a distinct predominant bacterial community. ► All bacterial communities were dominated by Pseudomonas spp. - Blending of petroleum with ethanol or biodiesel changes the fuel degrading soil bacterial community structure, but the long-term effects on fuel biodegradability are minor.

  12. Physiological and phylogenetic characterization of a stable benzene-degrading, chlorate-reducing microbial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelink, S.A.B.; Tan, N.C.G.; Broeke, H. ten; Doesburg, W. van; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Gerritse, J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    A stable anoxic enrichment culture was obtained that degraded benzene with chlorate as an electron acceptor. The benzene degradation rate was 1.65 mM benzene per day, which is similar to reported aerobic benzene degradation rates but 20-1650 times higher than reported for anaerobic benzene degradati

  13. Enzymes Involved in the Aerobic Bacterial Degradation of N-Heteroaromatic Compounds: Molybdenum Hydroxylases and Ring-Opening 2,4-Dioxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, S.

    Many N-heteroaromatic compounds are utilized by micro-organisms as a source of carbon (and nitrogen) and energy. The aerobic bacterial degradation of these growth substrates frequently involves several hydroxylation steps and subsequent dioxygenolytic cleavage of (di)hydroxy-substituted heteroaromatic intermediates to aliphatic metabolites which finally are channeled into central metabolic pathways. As a rule, the initial bacterial hydroxylation of a N-heteroaromatic compound is catalyzed by a molybdenum hydroxylase, which uses a water molecule as source of the incorporated oxygen. The enzyme's redox-active centers - the active site molybdenum ion coordinated to a distinct pyranopterin cofactor, two different [2Fe2S] centers, and in most cases, flavin adenine dinucleotide - transfer electrons from the N-heterocyclic substrate to an electron acceptor, which for many molybdenum hydroxylases is still unknown. Ring-opening 2,4-dioxygenases involved in the bacterial degradation of quinaldine and 1H-4-oxoquinoline catalyze the cleavage of two carbon-carbon bonds with concomitant formation of carbon monoxide. Since they contain neither a metal center nor an organic cofactor, and since they do not show any sequence similarity to known oxygenases, these unique dioxygenases form a separate enzyme family. Quite surprisingly, however, they appear to be structurally and mechanistically related to enzymes of the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. Microbial enzymes are a great resource for biotechnological applications. Microbial strains or their enzymes may be used for degradative (bioremediation) or synthetic (biotransformation) purposes. Modern bioremediation or biotransformation strategies may even involve microbial catalysts or strains designed by protein engineering or pathway engineering. Prerequisite for developing such modern tools of biotechnology is a comprehensive understanding of microbial metabolic pathways, of the structure and function of enzymes, and of the

  14. Microbial Dynamics during Aerobic Exposure of Corn Silage Stored under Oxygen Barrier or Polyethylene Films▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Paola; Tabacco, Ernesto; Cocolin, Luca; Borreani, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the effects of sealing forage corn with a new oxygen barrier film with those obtained by using a conventional polyethylene film. This comparison was made during both ensilage and subsequent exposure of silage to air and included chemical, microbiological, and molecular (DNA and RNA) assessments. The forage was inoculated with a mixture of Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Enterococcus faecium and ensiled in polyethylene (PE) and oxygen barrier (OB) plastic bags. The oxygen permeability of the PE and OB films was 1,480 and 70 cm3 m−2 per 24 h at 23°C, respectively. The silages were sampled after 110 days of ensilage and after 2, 5, 7, 9, and 14 days of air exposure and analyzed for fermentation characteristics, conventional microbial enumeration, and bacterial and fungal community fingerprinting via PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-DGGE. The yeast counts in the PE and OB silages were 3.12 and 1.17 log10 CFU g−1, respectively, with corresponding aerobic stabilities of 65 and 152 h. Acetobacter pasteurianus was present at both the DNA and RNA levels in the PE silage samples after 2 days of air exposure, whereas it was found only after 7 days in the OB silages. RT-PCR-DGGE revealed the activity of Aspergillus fumigatus in the PE samples from the day 7 of air exposure, whereas it appeared only after 14 days in the OB silages. It has been shown that the use of an oxygen barrier film can ensure a longer shelf life of silage after aerobic exposure. PMID:21821764

  15. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential for the herbicides. In the presence of oxygen 14C-labelled bentazone and mecoprop were removed significantly from the two monitoring wells' groundwater samples. Oxygen was added to microcosms in order to investigate whether different oxygen concentrations stimulate the biodegradation of the three herbicides in microcosms using groundwater and sandy aquifer materials. To maintain a certain oxygen concentration this level was measured from the outside of the bottles with a fibre oxygen meter using oxygen-sensitive luminescent sensor foil mounted inside the microcosm, to which supplementary oxygen was added. The highest oxygen concentrations (corresponding to 4–11 mg L−1) stimulated degradation (a 14–27% increase for mecoprop, 3–9% for dichlorprop and 15–20% for bentazone) over an experimental period of 200 days. Oxygen was required to biodegrade the herbicides, since no degradation was observed under anaerobic conditions. This is the first time bentazone degradation has been observed in aquifer material at low oxygen concentrations (2 mg L−1). The sediment had substantial oxygen consumption (0.92–1.45 O2 g-1 dw over 200 days) and oxygen was depleted rapidly in most incubations soon after its addition, which might be due to the oxidation of organic matter and other reduced species such as Fe2+, S2− and Mn in sediment before the biodegradation of herbicides takes place. This study suggests that oxygen enhancement around a drinking water abstraction field could stimulate the bioremediation of diffuse source contamination. - Highlights: • Addition of different oxygen concentrations stimulated degradation of herbicides in anaerobic aquifer sediment material.

  16. Microbial degradation of 4-monobrominated diphenyl ether with anaerobic sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► BDE-3 was degraded with two anaerobes in different rates. ► Glucose addition augment the debromination efficiencies. ► Hydrogen gas was detected and relative microbes were identified. ► Extra-carbon source enhanced degradation partial due to H2-generation bacteria. - Abstract: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardant additives for many plastic and electronic products. Owing to their ubiquitous distribution in the environment, multiple toxicity to humans, and increasing accumulation in the environment, the fate of PBDEs is of serious concern for public safety. In this study, the degradation of 4-monobrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-3) in anaerobic sludge and the effect of carbon source addition were investigated. BDE-3 can be degraded by two different anaerobic sludge samples. The by-products, diphenyl ether (DE) and bromide ions, were monitored, indicating the reaction of debromination within these anaerobic samples. Co-metabolism with glucose facilitated BDE-3 biodegradation in terms of kinetics and efficiency in the Jhongsing sludge. Through the pattern of amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments in denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), the composition of the microbial community was analyzed. Most of the predominant microbes were novel species. The fragments enriched in BDE-3-degrading anaerobic sludge samples are presumably Clostridium sp. This enrichment coincides with the H2 gas generation and the facilitation of debromination during the degradation process. Findings of this study provide better understanding of the biodegradation of brominated DEs and can facilitate the prediction of the fate of PBDEs in the environment.

  17. Microbial degradation of sulfentrazone in a Brazilian rhodic hapludox soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila O. Martinez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulfentrazone is amongst the most widely used herbicides for treating the main crops in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, but few studies are available on the biotransformation of this compound in Brazilian soils. Soil samples of Rhodic Hapludox soil were supplemented with sulfentrazone (0.7 µg active ingredient (a.i. g-1 soil and maintained at 27ºC. The soil moisture content was corrected to 30, 70 or 100 % water holding capacity (WHC and maintained constant until the end of the experimental period. Herbicide-free soil samples were used as controls. Another experiment was carried out using soil samples maintained at a constant moisture content of 70% WHC, supplemented or otherwise with the herbicide, and submitted to different temperatures of 15, 30 and 40º C. In both experiments, aliquots were removed after various incubation periods for the quantitative analysis of sulfentrazone residues by gas chromatography. Herbicide-degrading microorganisms were isolated and identified. After 120 days a significant effect on herbicide degradation was observed for the factor of temperature, degradation being higher at 30 and 40º C. A half-life of 91.6 days was estimated at 27º C and 70 % WHC. The soil moisture content did not significantly affect sulfentrazone degradation and the microorganisms identified as potential sulfentrazone degraders were Nocardia brasiliensis and Penicillium sp. The present study enhanced the prospects for future studies on the bio-prospecting for microbial populations related to the degradation of sulfentrazone, and may also contribute to the development of strategies for the bioremediation of sulfentrazone-polluted soils.

  18. Modeling Aerobic Carbon Source Degradation Processes using Titrimetric Data and Combined Respirometric-Titrimetric Data: Structural and Practical Identifiability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Petersen, B.; Dochain, D.;

    2002-01-01

    The structural and practical identifiability of a model for description of respirometric-titrimetric data derived from aerobic batch substrate degradation experiments of a CxHyOz carbon source with activated sludge was evaluated. The model processes needed to describe titrimetric data included su...

  19. A novel biosensor for p-nitrophenol based on an aerobic anode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengjun; Niu, Yongyan; Zhao, Shuai; Khan, Aman; Ling, Zhenmin; Chen, Yong; Liu, Pu; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-11-15

    P-nitrophenol is one of the most common contaminants in chemical industrial wastewater, and in situ real-time monitoring of PNP cannot be achieved by conventional analytical techniques. Here, a two-chamber microbial fuel cell with an aerobic anode chamber was tested as a biosensor for in situ real-time monitoring of PNP. Pseudomonas monteilii LZU-3, which was used as the biological recognition element, can form a biofilm on the anode electrode using PNP as a sole substrate. The optimal operation parameters of the biosensor were as follows: external resistance 1000Ω, pH 7.8, temperature 30°C, and maximum PNP concentration 50mgL(-1). Under these conditions, the maximum voltages showed a linear relationship with PNP concentrations ranging from 15±5 to 44±4.5mgL(-1). Furthermore, we developed a novel portable device for in situ real-time monitoring of PNP. When the device was applied to measure PNP in wastewater containing various additional aromatic compounds and metal ions, the performance of the biosensor was not affected and the correlation between the maximum voltages and the PNP concentrations ranging from 9±4mgL(-1) to 36 ± 5mgL(-1) was conserved. The results demonstrated that the MFC biosensor provides a rapid and cost-efficient analytical method for real-time monitoring of toxic and recalcitrant pollutants in environmental samples. PMID:27295573

  20. Effect of wastewater COD/N ratio on aerobic nitrifying sludge granulation and microbial population shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wu; Chengyao Peng; Yongzhen Peng; Lingyun Li; Shuying Wang; Yong Ma

    2012-01-01

    The effect of COD/N ratio on the granulation process and microbial population succession was investigated.Four identical sequencing batch reactors,R1,R2,R3 and R4,were operated with various initial COD/N ratios ranging from 0/200 to 800/200 (m/n).Ethanol was fed as the source of COD.Aerobic granules were successfully cultivated in R2 and R3,operating with the COD/N ratio of 200/200 and 400/200,respectively.Scanning electron microscope observations indicated that short rod-shaped and spherical bacteria were dominant in R2,while granules produced in R3 were surrounded with a large amount of filamentous bacteria.The average specific nitritation rate in R2 and R3 were 0.019 and 0.008 mg N/(mg MLVSS.hr),respectively.Fluorescence in situ hybridization results demonstrated that nitrifying bacteria population was enriched remarkably in R2.It indicated that nitrification ability and nitrifying bacteria population were enriched remarkably at low COD/N ratio.However,no granules were formed in R1and R4 which might attribute to either limited or excessive extracellular polymeric substances production.This study contributed to a better understanding of the role of COD/N ratio in nitrifying sludge granulation.

  1. Treatment of anthraquinone dye wastewater by hydrolytic acidification-aerobic process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian; WU Min; Li Dan

    2004-01-01

    Experiment on microbial degradation with two kinds of biological process, hydrolytic acidification-aerobic process and aerobic process was conducted to treat the anthraquinone dye wastewater with CODCr concentration of 400 mg/L and chroma 800. The experimental result demonstrated that the hydrolytic-aerobic process could raise the biodegradability of anthraquinone dye wastewater effectively. The effluent CODCr can reach 120-170 mg/L and chroma 150 which is superior to that from simple aerobic process.

  2. Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-06

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic

  3. Characteristics of oil microbes and microbial degradation on heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T.S.; Jiang, Z.Y.; Chen, X.; Huang, S. [Southwest Petroleum Univ. (China)

    2006-07-01

    Strains of bacteria were investigated for a microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) project at an oilfield in China. Samples of oil and bacteria were packed into conical flasks and incubated for 3 to 5 days at formation temperatures. The polymerase chain reaction was used to alter the DNA sequence of the microbes and increase the recovery mechanisms of the bacteria and enable them to more effectively degrade gums and asphaltenes. The gas-producing properties of the bacteria were then investigated. Changes in oil group composition were analyzed. The results of gas chromatography analyses showed that the bacteria combination selectively degraded different components of the phenanthrene series. As they matured, the bacteria caused the light aromatics in the oil to increase and evolved towards a naphthalene nucleus structure with greater stability. The bacteria were then tested within an oil well at the Xinjiang oilfield in China. Results of the field tests showed that the bacteria altered the group composition of oils as well as the phenanthrene series. The MEOR experiment increased oil output from 8.53 per cent to 35.72 per cent. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  4. Protective effect of hop ß-acids on microbial degradation of thick juice during storage

    OpenAIRE

    Justé, Annelies; Krause, M.S.; Lievens, Bart; Klingeberg, M; Michiels, Christiaan; Willems, Kris

    2008-01-01

    Storing sugar extracts as thick juice, a form of sucrose syrup, is common practice in the sugar industry. However, thick juice storage commonly faces problems due to microbial degradation. In this study the value of a commercial alkaline solution of hop β-acids (HBA) was assessed for prevention of microbial degradation of thick juice. The antimicrobial effect of different concentrations of HBA against juice degradation was tested in a pilot-scale thick juice storage experiment. Thick juice de...

  5. Continuous exposure of pesticides in an aquifer changes microbial biomass, diversity and degradation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, J. R.; Johnsen, K.; Aamand, J.; Tuxen, Nina; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    We studied in situ effects of pesticide exposure on microbial degradation potential and community structure of aquifer sediments. Sediment samples pre-exposed to pesticides were significantly different to non-exposed control samples. Pre-exposed sediment showed an increased degradation potential...... towards phenoxyalcanoic acid herbicides as well as impact on microbial diversity was observed. Furthermore, bacterial biomass was changed, e.g. increased numbers of phenoxyalcanoic acid degraders in pesticide exposed sediment....

  6. Microrespirometric determination of the effectiveness factor and biodegradation kinetics of aerobic granules degrading 4-chlorophenol as the sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital-Jacome, Miguel; Buitrón, Germán; Moreno-Andrade, Ivan; Garcia-Rea, Victor; Thalasso, Frederic

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a microrespirometric method was used, i.e., pulse respirometry in microreactors, to characterize mass transfer and biodegradation kinetics in aerobic granules. The experimental model was an aerobic granular sludge in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) degrading synthetic wastewater containing 4-chlorophenol as the sole carbon source. After 15 days of acclimation, the SBR process degraded 4-chlorophenol at a removal rate of up to 0.9kg CODm(-3)d(-1), and the degradation kinetics were well described by the Haldane model. The microrespirometric method consisted of injecting pulses of 4-chlorophenol into the 24 wells of a microreactor system containing the SBR samples. From the respirograms obtained, the following five kinetic parameters were successfully determined during reactor operation: (i) Maximum specific oxygen uptake rate, (ii) substrate affinity constant, (iii) substrate inhibition constant, (iv) maximum specific growth rate, and (v) cell growth yield. Microrespirometry tests using granules and disaggregated granules allowed for the determination of apparent and intrinsic parameters, which in turn enabled the determination of the effectiveness factor of the granular sludge. It was concluded that this new high-throughput method has the potential to elucidate the complex biological and physicochemical processes of aerobic granular biosystems. PMID:27054670

  7. Impact of Land Degradation on Soil Microbial Biomass and Activity in Northeast Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. S. NUNES; A. S. F. ARAUJO; L. A. P. L. NUNES; L. M. LIMA; R. F. V. CARNEIRO; A. A. C. SALVIANO; S. M. TSAI

    2012-01-01

    Land degradation causes great changes in the soil biological properties.The process of degradation may decrease soil microbial biomass and consequently decrease soil microbial activity.The study was conducted out during 2009 and 2010 at the four sites of land under native vegetation (NV),moderately degraded land (LDL),highly degraded land (HDL) and land under restoration for four years (RL) to evaluate changes in soil microbial biomass and activity in lands with different degradation levels in comparison with both land under native vegetation and land under restoration in Northeast Brazil.Soil samples were collected at 0-10 cm depth.Soil organic carbon (SOC),soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN),soil respiration (SR),and hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and dehydrogenase (DHA) activities were analyzed.After two years of evaluation,soil MBC,MBN,FDA and DHA had higher values in the NV,followed by the RL.The decreases of soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities in the degraded lands were approximately 8-10 times as large as those found in the NV.However,after land restoration,the MBC and MBN increased approximately 5-fold and 2-fold,respectively,compared with the HDL.The results showed that land degradation produced a strong decrease in soil microbial biomass.However,land restoration may promote short- and long-term increases in soil microbial biomass.

  8. Soil degradation and amendment effects on soil properties, microbial communities, and plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, M.; Fehmi, J. S.; Rasmussen, C.; Gallery, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities that disrupt soil properties are fundamentally changing ecosystems. Soil degradation, caused by anthropogenic disturbance can decrease microbial abundance and activity, leading to changes in nutrient availability, soil organic matter, and plant establishment. The addition of amendments to disturbed soils have the potential ameliorate these negative consequences. We studied the effects of soil degradation, via an autoclave heat shock method, and the addition of amendments (biochar and woodchips) on microbial activity, soil carbon and nitrogen availability, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen content, and plant growth of ten plant species native to the semi-arid southwestern US. Relative to non-degraded soils, microbial activity, measured via extracellular enzyme assays, was significantly lower for all seven substrates assayed. These soils also had significantly lower amounts of carbon assimilated into microbial biomass but no change in microbial biomass nitrogen. Soil degradation had no effect on plant biomass. Amendments caused changes in microbial activity: biochar-amended soils had significant increases in potential activity with five of the seven substrates measured; woodchip amended soils had significant increases with two. Soil carbon increased with both amendments but this was not reflected in a significant change in microbial biomass carbon. Biochar-amended soils had increases in soil nitrogen availability but neither amendment caused changes in microbial biomass nitrogen. Biochar amendments had no significant effect on above- or belowground plant biomass while woodchips significantly decreased aboveground plant biomass. Results show that soil degradation decreases microbial activity and changes nutrient dynamics, but these are not reflected in changes in plant growth. Amendments provide nutrient sources and change soil pore space, which cause microbial activities to fluctuate and may, in the case of woodchips, increase plant drought

  9. Microbial Community Transplant Results in Increased and Long-Term Oxalate Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron W; Oakeson, Kelly F; Dale, Colin; Dearing, M Denise

    2016-08-01

    Gut microbes are essential for the degradation of dietary oxalate, and this function may play a role in decreasing the incidence of kidney stones. However, many oxalate-degrading bacteria are susceptible to antibiotics and the use of oxalate-degrading probiotics has only led to an ephemeral reduction in urinary oxalate. The objective of the current study was to determine the efficacy of using whole-community microbial transplants from a wild mammalian herbivore, Neotoma albigula, to increase oxalate degradation over the long term in the laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus. We quantified the change in total oxalate degradation in lab rats immediately after microbial transplants and at 2- and 9-month intervals following microbial transplants. Additionally, we tracked the fecal microbiota of the lab rats, with and without microbial transplants, using high-throughput Illumina sequencing of a hyper-variable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Microbial transplants resulted in a significant increase in oxalate degradation, an effect that persisted 9 months after the initial transplants. Functional persistence was corroborated by the transfer, and persistence of a group of bacteria previously correlated with oxalate consumption in N. albigula, including an anaerobic bacterium from the genus Oxalobacter known for its ability to use oxalate as a sole carbon source. The results of this study indicate that whole-community microbial transplants are an effective means for the persistent colonization of oxalate-degrading bacteria in the mammalian gut. PMID:27312892

  10. Soil-Derived Microbial Consortia Enriched with Different Plant Biomass Reveal Distinct Players Acting in Lignocellulose Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Brossi, Maria Julia; Jiménez, Diego Javier; Cortes-Tolalpa, Larisa; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Here, we investigated how different plant biomass, and-for one substrate-pH, drive the composition of degrader microbial consortia. We bred such consortia from forest soil, incubated along nine aerobic sequential - batch enrichments with wheat straw (WS1, pH 7.2; WS2, pH 9.0), switchgrass (SG, pH 7.2), and corn stover (CS, pH 7.2) as carbon sources. Lignocellulosic compounds (lignin, cellulose and xylan) were best degraded in treatment SG, followed by CS, WS1 and WS2. In terms of composition, the consortia became relatively stable after transfers 4 to 6, as evidenced by PCR-DGGE profiles obtained from each consortium DNA. The final consortia differed by ~40 % (bacteria) and ~60 % (fungi) across treatments. A 'core' community represented by 5/16 (bacteria) and 3/14 (fungi) bands was discerned, next to a variable part. The composition of the final microbial consortia was strongly driven by the substrate, as taxonomically-diverse consortia appeared in the different substrate treatments, but not in the (WS) different pH one. Biodegradative strains affiliated to Sphingobacterium kitahiroshimense, Raoultella terrigena, Pseudomonas putida, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila (bacteria), Coniochaeta ligniaria and Acremonium sp. (fungi) were recovered in at least three treatments, whereas strains affiliated to Delftia tsuruhatensis, Paenibacillus xylanexedens, Sanguibacter inulus and Comamonas jiangduensis were treatment-specific. PMID:26487437

  11. Evaluation of Biostimulation and Bioaugmentation To Stimulate Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5,-triazine Degradation in an Aerobic Groundwater Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Mandy M; King, Aaron S; Rule, Rebecca A; Fuller, Mark E; Hatzinger, Paul B; Condee, Charles W; Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Jung, Carina M; Istok, Jack D

    2016-07-19

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5,-triazine (RDX) is a toxic and mobile groundwater contaminant common to military sites. This study compared in situ RDX degradation rates following bioaugmentation with Gordonia sp. strain KTR9 (henceforth KTR9) to rates under biostimulation conditions in an RDX-contaminated aquifer in Umatilla, OR. Bioaugmentation was achieved by injecting site groundwater (6000 L) amended with KTR9 cells (10(8) cells mL(-1)) and low carbon substrate concentrations (15 mM fructose) carbon substrate concentrations in an effort to stimulate aerobic or anaerobic microbial activity, respectively. Single-well push-pull tests were conducted to measure RDX degradation rates for each treatment. Average rate coefficients were 1.2 day(-1) for bioaugmentation and 0.7 day(-1) for high carbon biostimulation; rate coefficients for low carbon biostimulation were not significantly different from zero (p values ≥0.060). Our results suggest that bioaugmentation with KTR9 is a feasible strategy for in situ biodegradation of RDX and, at this site, is capable of achieving RDX concentration reductions comparable to those obtained by high carbon biostimulation while requiring ~97% less fructose. Bioaugmentation has potential to minimize substrate quantities and associated costs, as well as secondary groundwater quality impacts associated with anaerobic biostimulation processes (e.g., hydrogen sulfide, methane production) during full-scale RDX remediation. PMID:27301804

  12. Methods of lab silos sealing and fermentation characteristics and aerobic stability of sugarcane silage treated with microbial additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Ortiz Novinski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental assay evaluated the effect of lab silo sealing methods on the ensilage of the sugarcane, with or without microbial additives (Lactobacillus plantarum and Propionibacterium acidipropionici. Twenty-liter plastic buckets were used as experimental silos, which were sealed with either a polyethylene sheet (silo cover with a mesh size of 200 µm or an appropriate plastic lid equipped with Bunsen valve. Silos were stored for 30, 60, or 90 days. Fermentative losses, chemical composition, organic acids, ethanol and aerobic stability were evaluated. The sealing method employed did not influence most of evaluated variables, showing a small decrease of effluent production in silos covered with polyethylene sheet. The microbial additive did not avoid dry matter (DM fermentative losses in sugarcane silages (216 g kg-1, nor affected aerobic stability (44.6 hours. The levels of neutral and acid detergent fiber of fresh sugarcane increased after ensiling due to DM losses as gases and effluent. The ethanol content of silages was not influenced by treatments (mean 146 g kg-1 of DM. The sealing methods of experimental silos were not affected by the evaluated variables; polyethylene sheet and plastic lid show the same performance on the fermentative model and both methods represent well the conditions of large scale farm silos.

  13. Comparative metagenomic analysis of PAH degradation in soil by a mixed microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, German; Taylor, Todd D; Absalón, Angel E; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2016-11-15

    In this study, we used a taxonomic and functional metagenomic approach to analyze some of the effects (e.g. displacement, permanence, disappearance) produced between native microbiota and a previously constructed Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading microbial consortium during the bioremediation process of a soil polluted with PAHs. Bioaugmentation with a fungal-bacterial consortium and biostimulation of native microbiota using corn stover as texturizer produced appreciable changes in the microbial diversity of polluted soils, shifting native microbial communities in favor of degrading specific populations. Functional metagenomics showed changes in gene abundance suggesting a bias towards aromatic hydrocarbon and intermediary degradation pathways, which greatly favored PAH mineralization. In contrast, pathways favoring the formation of toxic intermediates such as cytochrome P450-mediated reactions were found to be significantly reduced in bioaugmented soils. PAH biodegradation in soil using the microbial consortium was faster and reached higher degradation values (84% after 30 d) as a result of an increased co-metabolic degradation when compared with other mixed microbial consortia. The main differences between inoculated and non-inoculated soils were observed in aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, laccase, protocatechuate, salicylate and benzoate-degrading enzyme genes. Based on our results, we propose that several concurrent metabolic pathways are taking place in soils during PAH degradation. PMID:27484946

  14. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediment of Tama River in Tokyo urban area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons, i.e., hexadecane (HEX), phenanthrene (PHE), and anthracene (ANT), were determined in estuarine sediment of the Tama River in urban Tokyo, followed by estimating their respective degradation potential. While in a sediment slurry, the aerobic biodegradation rates of these petroleum hydrocarbons ranged from 40 to 70 μg.g-1 dry sediment:day-1. The anaerobic biodegradation rate of HEX was found to be 5 -8 μg.g-1 dry sediment.day-1, whereas that of PHE and ANT could not be detected following a 2-month incubation. Aerobic degradation of HEX was not affected by coexistence with either PHE or ANT, nor by the salinity level. The number of HEX-, PHE-, or ANT-utilizing bacteria ranged from 5 - 10% of the total number of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. We calculated their biodegradation potentials using the biomass of naturally existing petroleum hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria present in the sampled sediment, with results for HEX, PHE, and ANT being 1.0 -3.5, 4.2 x 10-2, and 1.2 x 10-2 -9.4 x 10-1 μg.g-1 dry sediment day-1, respectively. In the aerobic tidal sediment of the Tama River, the purification potentials of HEX, PHE, and ANT were assessed to be approximately equal to their accumulation potentials occurring at the normal water level. (Author)

  15. DECOLORIZATION AND BIOLOGICAL DEGRADATION OF AZO DYE REACTIVE RED2 BY ANAEROBIC/AEROBIC SEQUENTIAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Naimabadi ، H. Movahedian Attar ، A. Shahsavani

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the anaerobic treatability of reactive Red2 in an anaerobic/aerobic sequential process. Laboratory scale anaerobic baffled reactor and fixed activated sludge reactor were operated at different organic loadings and hydraulic retention times. The effects of shock dye concentration on the chemical oxygen demand and color removal efficiencies were investigated in the anaerobic baffled reactor. The effect of hydraulic retention time on the color and chemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies were also investigated in the aerobic reactor. The studies were carried out in continuous mode and the effluent of the anaerobic baffled reactor was used as feed for the fixed activated sludge reactor. Chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 54.5% was obtained at HRT =1 day in the anaerobic reactor. The average color removal was 89.5%. Chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 69% was obtained at HRT =7 h in the aerobic fixed activated sludge reactor. A slight decrease of the color was also observed in the aerobic reactor. This investigation has shown that successful treatment of a highly colored wastewater is possible in the anaerobic baffled reactor. Also the results showed that, anaerobic biological system has higher efficiency in dye removal than fixed activated sludge system, while aerobic system has higher efficiency in chemical oxygen demand removal comparing with the anaerobic baffled reactor.

  16. Fermentation Characteristics, In Situ Rumen Degradation and Aerobic Stability of Whole Crop Barley Ensiled with Urea or Aqueous Ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vatandoost, Moosa; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; Vakili, AliReza

    2011-01-01

    Various chemical compounds might be added to forage to maintain or improve the quality value of a crop ensiled. The aim of the present experiment was to evaluate the fermentation characteristics, in situ rumen degradation and Aerobic Stability of whole crop barley ensiled with Urea or aqueous Ammonia. In the first experiment, Whole crop barley was harvested (35% DM), chopped, and then ensiled using laboratory silos (n= 4) as untreated (UT) or treated with urea (10, 20, 30 and 40 g kg-1 DM; U1...

  17. Ideonella sakaiensis sp. nov., isolated from a microbial consortium that degrades poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Takehana, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Oda, Kohei

    2016-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium, designed strain 201-F6T, was isolated from a microbial consortium that degrades poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) collected in Sakai city, Japan, and was characterized on the basis of a polyphasic taxonomic study. The cells were motile with a polar flagellum. The strain contained cytochrome oxidase and catalase. It grew within the pH range 5.5-9.0 (optimally at pH 7-7.5) and at 15-42 ºC (optimally at 30-37 ºC). The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone with eight isoprene units (Q-8). C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo, C18 :1ω7c and C12 : 0 2-OH were the predominant cellular fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 70.4 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain 201-F6T was affiliated to the genus Ideonella, and was closely related to Ideonella dechloratans LMG 28178T (97.7 %) and Ideonella azotifigens JCM 15503T (96.6 %). Strain 201-F6T could be clearly distinguished from the related species of the genus Ideonella by its physiological and biochemical characteristics as well as by its phylogenetic position and DNA-DNA relatedness. Therefore, the strain represents a novel species of the genus Ideonella, for which the name Ideonella sakaiensis sp. nov. (type strain 201-F6T=NBRC 110686T=TISTR 2288T) is proposed. PMID:27045688

  18. About the order in aerobic heterotrophic microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    The organizational structure of communities of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria was studied by means of physiological and molecular typing of the members of arbitrary samples of isolates, ASsI. The isolate sample assay (ISA) was applied to three different hydrocarbon-polluted sites: a dry windrow pile

  19. Effects of microbial inoculants on corn silage fermentation, microbial contents, aerobic stability, and milk production under field conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Bastian; Sloth, Karen Helle; Højberg, Ole;

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of 2 corn silage inoculation strategies (homofermentative vs. heterofermentative inoculation) under field conditions and to monitor responses in silage variables over the feeding season from January to August. Thirty-nine commercial dairy farms...... sufficiently from the epiphytic flora on whole-crop corn to affect fermentation in standard qualities of corn silage. Heterofermentative inoculation increased aerobic stability and numerous fermentation variables. None of the treatments affected milk production, and more-stable corn silage seemed to have a...

  20. Methanogenic degradation of lignin-derived monoaromatic compounds by microbial enrichments from rice paddy field soil

    OpenAIRE

    Souichiro Kato; Kanako Chino; Naofumi Kamimura; Eiji Masai; Isao Yumoto; Yoichi Kamagata

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of lignin-derived aromatics is an important metabolism for carbon and nutrient cycles in soil environments. Although there are some studies on degradation of lignin-derived aromatics by nitrate- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, knowledge on their degradation under methanogenic conditions are quite limited. In this study, methanogenic microbial communities were enriched from rice paddy field soil with lignin-derived methoxylated monoaromatics (vanillate and syringate) and t...

  1. Microbial degradation of furanic compounds: biochemistry, genetics, and impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierckx, N.; Koopman, F.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.; De Winde. J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial metabolism of furanic compounds, especially furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), is rapidly gaining interest in the scientific community. This interest can largely be attributed to the occurrence of toxic furanic aldehydes in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. However, these compounds ar

  2. Metabolism of 2-Chloro-4-Nitroaniline via Novel Aerobic Degradation Pathway by Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB-P1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  3. Metabolism of 2-chloro-4-nitroaniline via novel aerobic degradation pathway by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlurrahman Khan

    Full Text Available 2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP, which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium.

  4. Metabolism of 2-chloro-4-nitroaniline via novel aerobic degradation pathway by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  5. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye using anaerobic/aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) and photochemical membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different types of advance treatment methods were evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5). The performance of two stage anaerobic SBR-aerobic MBR, anaerobic MBR with immobilized and suspended biocells and an integrated membrane photocatalytic reactor (MPR) using slurry UV/TiO2 system were investigated. The results suggest that, nearly 99.9% color removal and 80-95% organic COD and TOC removal can be achieved using different reactor systems. Considering the Taiwan EPA effluent standard discharge criteria for COD/TOC, the degree of treatment achieved by combining the anaerobic-aerobic system was found to be acceptable. Anew, Bacilluscereus, high color removal bacterium was isolated from Anaerobic SBR. Furthermore, when this immobilized into PVA-calcium alginate pellets, and suspended in the anaerobic MBR was able to achieve high removal efficiencies, similar to the suspended biocells system. However, the immobilized cell Anaerobic MBR was found to be more advantageous, due to lower fouling rates in the membrane unit. Results from slurry type MPR system showed that this system was capable of mineralizing RB5 dyes with faster degradation rate as compared to other systems. The reactor was also able to separate the catalyst effectively and perform efficiently without much loss of catalyst activity.

  6. Oil degrading microbial population along the Texas coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantity of petroleum degrading bacteria in the coastal waters of Texas was evaluated to determine if the number varies according to the oil contamination history of the sampling sites. In most of the collected water samples, saturate and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degraders exist, regardless of the site's contamination history. Saturate degraders are more abundant than PAH degraders and there may be a correlation between the quantity of hydrocarbon degraders at a given site and its proximity to anthropogenic petroleum activities. But the stronger direct association seems to be between the total heterotroph numbers and the hydrocarbon degrader numbers. Extensive studies are still underway to confirm these results. 22 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  7. Effect of microbial inoculant or molasses on fermentative quality and aerobic stability of sawdust-based spent mushroom substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J S; Lee, Y H; Kim, Y I; Ahmadi, F; Oh, Y K; Park, J M; Kwak, W S

    2016-09-01

    In the first experiment, the effect of two novel Lactobacillus plantarum strains was studied on the fermentation of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) through 10d of ensiling. Based on lactic acid production and lactic acid bacteria population, L. plantarum KU5 was identified as the best strain for fermentation with a 5-L bag silo. Spent mushroom substrate was ensiled with 0.5% (v/w) L. plantarum KU5 without or with 5% molasses. Silages treated with microbial inoculant and molasses had the lowest pH and the highest fermentative odors. In a second set of experiments similar to the above 5-L silo study, the simultaneous application of L. plantarum KU5 inoculant and molasses to 80-L silos improved fermentability and aerobic stability of SMS silages. For similar treatment using ton-bag silos, aerobic stability decreased and NH3-N content increased dramatically. In conclusion, sawdust-based SMS for animal use was successfully ensiled with L. plantarum KU5 inoculant and molasses. PMID:27240234

  8. Microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steels by aerobic bacteria; Kokisei saikin no kanyoshita sutenresu ko no biseibutsu fushoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, H.; Miyuki, H. [Sumitomo Metal Inductries Ltd., Osaka (Japan). Corporate Research and Development Lab.

    1996-03-20

    Influence of microorganisms on the corrosion of metals has been recognized since Kuhr proposed the hypothesis of corrosion promotion due to so called hydrogen double electrode when hydrogen formed in corrosion reaction of steel is used by anaerobic bacteria. Corrosion of metals caused by the influence of such type of microorganisms is known as Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), and recently is paid attention specially in Europe and America. These recent years, research on MIC is showing active trend even in Japan. As for the research subjects of MIC, the example of corrosion promotion of carbon steel by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in anaerobic environment is paid attention conventionally. Further, at present, effect of general type of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria on the corrosion of steel is paid attention and research is carried out actively. In this report, effect of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria on the corrosion of stainless steel is introduced focusing to the authors knowhow regarding the ennoblement phenomena of corrosion potential of stainless steel in natural sea water. 44 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Microbial Community Profiling of Biodegradable Municipal Solid Waste Treatments : Aerobic Composting and Anaerobic Digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    An enormous quantity of solid waste is generated annually all over the world. Solid waste can be divided into three main categories: municipal waste, industrial waste and agricultural waste. The focus of the research presented in this thesis was on the biodegradable fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW), and particularly on the biowaste and sewage sludge generated in the Nordic countries. In general, there are two major options for processing biodegradable MSW in a sustainable manner: aerob...

  10. Aerobic degradation of highly chlorinated polychlorobiphenyls by a marine bacterium, Pseudomonas CH07

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.; Sarkar, A.

    studied in recent years. The genetic organization of biphenyl catabolic genes has been elucidated in various groups of microorganisms, their structures have been analyzed with respect to their evolutionary relationships, and new information on mobile... positions (3 or 5 position). The lack of ortho groups allows the atoms in these congeners to line up in a single plane (referred to as coplanar PCBs), that makes them especially toxic. A combination of anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation has been...

  11. DECOLORIZATION AND BIOLOGICAL DEGRADATION OF AZO DYE REACTIVE RED2 BY ANAEROBIC/AEROBIC SEQUENTIAL PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    A. Naimabadi ، H. Movahedian Attar ، A. Shahsavani

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the anaerobic treatability of reactive Red2 in an anaerobic/aerobic sequential process. Laboratory scale anaerobic baffled reactor and fixed activated sludge reactor were operated at different organic loadings and hydraulic retention times. The effects of shock dye concentration on the chemical oxygen demand and color removal efficiencies were investigated in the anaerobic baffled reactor. The effect of hydraulic retention time on the color and chemical oxygen demand r...

  12. DEGRADATION OF ASPHALTENES BY INDIVIDUAL OIL-UTILIZING AEROBIC BACTERIAL STRAINS

    OpenAIRE

    Shkidchenko, Alexander; Akhmetov, Lenar; Gafarov, Arslan

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of biodegradation of asphaltenes at a room temperature by single aerobic strains Microbacterium liquefaciens Ash-10, Pseudomonas putida Ash-4, Rhodococcus erythropolis Sh-3 and Bacillus sp. 2, isolated from soil with chronic petroleum pollution has been shown. All strains possess high oil-utilizing activity and the ability to grow on agar media containing polycondensed hydrocarbons, black oil, alcohol-benzene resins, benzene resins as sole sources of carbon and energy. The str...

  13. Mechanism and kinetics of organic matter degradation based on particle structure variation during pig manure aerobic composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jinyi; Huang, Guangqun; Huang, Jing; Zeng, Jianfei; Han, Lujia

    2015-07-15

    Characterization of the dynamic structure of composting particles may facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms of organic matter degradation during pig manure-wheat straw aerobic composting. In this study, changes in the size, shape, pores, chemical compositions, and crystal structures of pig manure particles during composting were investigated. The results showed that the median diameter (D50) decreased exponentially, while the particle aspect ratio and sphericity were unchanged, suggesting that particles were degraded uniformly along different radial directions. Pores had a mean diameter of 15-30 μm and were elliptical. The particle porosity increased linearly mainly because of hemicellulose degradation. Furthermore, the influence of particle structure variation on the first order rate constant (k) of organic matter degradation was corrected, which may facilitate the optimization of operation conditions. The k value was proportional to the reciprocal of D50 according to the specific surface area of particles, and it decreased with increased porosity due to the stabilized chemical compositions and crystal structures of particles. However, the applicability of these data to other composting materials should be verified. PMID:25781372

  14. New insights into the genetic and metabolic diversity of thiocyanate-degrading microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mathew P; Moreau, John W

    2016-02-01

    Thiocyanate is a common contaminant of the gold mining and coal coking industries for which biological degradation generally represents the most viable approach to remediation. Recent studies of thiocyanate-degrading bioreactor systems have revealed new information on the structure and metabolic activity of thiocyanate-degrading microbial consortia. Previous knowledge was limited primarily to pure-culture or co-culture studies in which the effects of linked carbon, sulfur and nitrogen cycling could not be fully understood. High throughput sequencing, DNA fingerprinting and targeted gene amplification have now elucidated the genetic and metabolic diversity of these complex microbial consortia. Specifically, this has highlighted the roles of key consortium members involved in sulfur oxidation and nitrification. New insights into the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and nitrogen in bioreactor systems allow tailoring of the microbial metabolism towards meeting effluent composition requirements. Here we review these rapidly advancing studies and synthesize a conceptual model to inform new biotechnologies for thiocyanate remediation. PMID:26596573

  15. Simulation Biomass Effecting On Microbial Fuel Cell Electricity Properties and Substrate Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Jinxiang Fu; Xiangxin Xue; Yulan Tang; Jiao Wang; Xingguan Ma

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) mathematical model was established with suspended microorganisms, biomass on the electrode material, soluble chemical substrates and intermediary. By simulating the process of the substrate degradation, biomass growth and the electric current production process, With different initial biomass concentration, suspended microbial biomass and biomass attaching on electrode varing with time,current and charge varing with time,substrate concentration varing with time and m...

  16. Temperature-induced changes in treatment efficiency and microbial structure of aerobic granules treating landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieczkowski, Dorian; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Rusanowska, Paulina; Świątczak, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the effect of temperature on nitrogen and carbon removal by aerobic granules from landfill leachate with a high ammonium concentration and low concentration of biodegradable organics. The study was conducted in three stages; firstly the operating temperature of the batch reactor with aerobic granules was maintained at 29 °C, then at 25 °C, and finally at 20 °C. It was found that a gradual decrease in operational temperature allowed the nitrogen-converting community in the granules to acclimate, ensuring efficient nitrification even at ambient temperature (20 °C). Ammonium was fully removed from leachate regardless of the temperature, but higher operational temperatures resulted in higher ammonium removal rates [up to 44.2 mg/(L h) at 29 °C]. Lowering the operational temperature from 29 to 20 °C decreased nitrite accumulation in the GSBR cycle. The highest efficiency of total nitrogen removal was achieved at 25 °C (36.8 ± 10.9 %). The COD removal efficiency did not exceed 50 %. Granules constituted 77, 80 and 83 % of the biomass at 29, 25 and 20 °C, respectively. Ammonium was oxidized by both aerobic and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. Accumulibacter sp., Thauera sp., cultured Tetrasphaera PAO and Azoarcus-Thauera cluster occurred in granules independent of the temperature. Lower temperatures favored the occurrence of denitrifiers of Zooglea lineage (not Z. resiniphila), bacteria related to Comamonadaceae, Curvibacter sp., Azoarcus cluster, Rhodobacter sp., Roseobacter sp. and Acidovorax spp. At lower temperatures, the increased abundance of denitrifiers compensated for the lowered enzymatic activity of the biomass and ensured that nitrogen removal at 20 °C was similar to that at 25 °C and significantly higher than removal at 29 °C. PMID:27116957

  17. Performance of microbial phytases for gastric inositol phosphate degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Nyffenegger, Christian; Meyer, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial phytases catalyze dephosphorylation of phytic acid, thereby potentially releasing chelated iron and improving human iron absorption from cereal-based diets. For this catalysis to take place in vivo, the phytase must be robust to low pH and proteolysis in the gastric ventricle. This study...

  18. Microbial urea-formaldehyde degradation involves a new enzyme, methylenediurease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahns, T; Schepp, R; Siersdorfer, C; Kaltwasser, H

    1998-01-01

    The enzymic mechanism of metabolization of urea-formaldehyde condensation products (methyleneureas; MU) and the fate of the degradation products ammonium, urea and formaldehyde were studied in bacteria isolated from garden soil, which were able to use methyleneureas as the sole source of nitrogen for growth. An organism identified as Ochrobactrum anthropi completely degraded methylenediurea (MDU) and dimethylenetriurea (DMTU) to urea, ammonia, formaldehyde and carbon dioxide. An enzyme designated as methylenediurease (methylenediurea deiminase; MDUase) was responsible for the degradation of both MDU and DMTU as well as higher polymerized MU. Growth on MU as the nitrogen source specifically induced the synthesis of this enzyme, which seems to be located in the periplasm of the bacterium. Under these growth conditions, urease as well as NAD-specific formaldehyde and formiate dehydrogenase were expressed to high levels, efficiently using the products of MU degradation, and high-affinity transport systems for urea and ammonia were synthesized scavenging the environment for these products. PMID:10526991

  19. Degradation of chlorophenols by a defined mixed microbial community.

    OpenAIRE

    E. Schmidt; Hellwig, M.; Knackmuss, H J

    1983-01-01

    Synthetic sewage containing phenol, acetone, and alkanols plus 4-chlorophenol or a mixture of isomeric chlorophenols is completely degraded by a defined mixed culture with Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 as a chlorocatechol-dissimilating member of the community. Total degradation of the organic carbon was indicated by release of stoichiometric amounts of chloride and low content of dissolved organic carbon in the cell-free effluents. During adaptation to high loads of chlorophenols the initial met...

  20. Incomplete aerobic degradation of the antidiabetic drug Metformin and identification of the bacterial dead-end transformation product Guanylurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients as well as personal care products are detected in increasing prevalence in different environmental compartments such as surface water, groundwater and soil. Still little is known about the environmental fate of these substances. The type II antidiabetic drug Metformin has already been detected in different surface waters worldwide, but concentrations were significantly lower than the corresponding predicted environmental concentration (PEC). In human and mammal metabolism so far no metabolites of Metformin have been identified, so the expected environmental concentrations should be very high. To assess the aerobic biodegradability of Metformin and the possible formation of degradation products, three Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test series were performed in the present study. In the Closed Bottle test (OECD 301 D), a screening test that simulates the conditions of an environmental surface water compartment, Metformin was classified as not readily biodegradable (no biodegradation). In the Manometric Respiratory test (OEDC 301 F) working with high bacterial density, Metformin was biodegraded in one of three test bottles to 48.7% and in the toxicity control bottle to 57.5%. In the Zahn-Wellens test (OECD 302 B) using activated sludge, Metformin was biodegraded in both test vessels to an extent of 51.3% and 49.9%, respectively. Analysis of test samples by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to multiple stage mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS(n)) showed in the tests vessels were biodegradation was observed full elimination of Metformin and revealed Guanylurea (Amidinourea, Dicyandiamidine) as single and stable aerobic bacterial degradation product. In another Manometric Respiratory test Guanylurea showed no more transformation. Photodegradation of Guanylurea was also negative. A first screening in one of the greatest sewage treatment plant in southern Germany found Metformin with high concentrations

  1. Microbial degradation of resins fractionated from Arabian light crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment samples from the Japanese coasts were screened for microorganisms able to degrade resin components of crude oil. A mixed population that could degrade 35% of 5000 ppm resin in 15 days was obtained. This population also metabolized 50% of saturates and aromatics present in crude oil (5000 ppm) in 7 days. A Pseudomonas sp., isolated from the mixed population, emulsified and degraded 30% of resins. It also degraded saturates and aromatics (30%) present in crude oil (5000 ppm). These results were obtained from Iatroscan analysis. Degradation of crude oil was also analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). The peaks corresponding to known aliphatic hydrocarbons in crude oil greatly decreased within the first two days of incubation in the cultures of the RY-mixed population and of Pseudomonas strain UN3. Aromatic compounds detected as a broad peak by GC were significantly degraded at day 7 by Pseudomonas strain UN3, and at day 15 by the RY-mixed population. Investigations are ongoing to determine the genetic basis for the ability of these organisms to grow on the resin fractions of crude oil as a sole source of carbon and energy. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial activity in deep subsurface sediments from the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methanogenesis, sulfate reduction, and rates of carbon mineralization were determined for samples derived at different depths from four cores drilled at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken South Carolina. Three gram subsamples of the sediments were dispersed to 10-ml serum bottles under 5% H2 95% N2 and amended with 0.5 mL degassed distilled water with or without the following solutes: formate plus acetate, bicarbonate, lactate, and radiolabeled sulfate, glucose, and indole. After incubating 1 to 5 days, the sediments were assayed for methane, H2, 35S, and 14CO2. No methanogenesis was detected at any depth in any core and sulfate was rarely reduced. Evolution of 14CO2 from glucose and indole was detected in sediments as deep as 262 and 259 m, respectively. At some depths the 14CO2 evolution rate was comparable to that of surface soils; however, at other depths no 14CO2 evolution could be detected. Injection of sterile air into anaerobic incubations increased rates of carbon mineralization at all depths that had demonstrated anaerobic activity and stimulated mineralization activity in sediments that were inactive anaerobically, suggesting a predominance of aerobic metabolism. Increasing the concentration of added glucose and indole often increased the resulting rates of 14CO2 evolved from these substrates. The data indicate that both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms are present and metabolically active in samples from deep subsurface environments. 16 refs., 3 figs

  3. Autochthonous microbial community associated with pine needle forest litterfall influences its degradation under natural environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Rishi; Nikitina, Anna; Litti, Yury; Nozhevnikova, Alla; Goel, Gunjan

    2016-07-01

    The slow natural degradation of chir pine (Pinus roxburghii) needle litterfall and its accumulation on forest floors have been attributed to its lignocellulosic complexities of the biomass. The present study offers a microbiological insight into the role of autochthonous microflora associated with pine needle litterfall in its natural degradation. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting indicated actinomycetes (Saccharomonospora sp., Glycomyces sp., Agrococcus sp., Leifsonia sp., Blastocatella sp., and Microbacterium sp.) as a dominant microbial community associated with pine needle litterfall with the absence of fungal decomposers. On exclusion of associated autochthonous microflora from pine litterfall resulted in colonization by decomposer fungi identified as Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus sp., which otherwise failed to colonize the litterfall under natural conditions. The results, therefore, indicated that the autochthonous microbial community of pine needle litterfall (dominated by actinomycetes) obstructs the colonization of litter-degrading fungi and subsequently hinders the overall process of natural degradation of litterfall. PMID:27317052

  4. Modeling microbially induced carbon degradation in redox-stratified subsurface environments: concepts and open questions

    OpenAIRE

    Thullner, M.; Regnier, P.

    2007-01-01

    The degradation of organic matter, including organic contaminants, in subsurface environments is controlled by the abundances and functional capabilities of the resident microorganisms. As a consequence, modeling approaches simulating the fate of organics and related changes in redox conditions have to account for the effects of microbial activity on the degradation kinetics, as well as for the spatial and temporal distributions of the chemical species (e.g., terminal electron acceptors, nutr...

  5. Cometabolic microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the presence of toluene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Hong; LI Xin-Gang; XU Shi-Min1

    2004-01-01

    Trichloroethylene(TCE), a common groundwater pollutant, was cometabolized by microorganisms in the presence of toluene as a growth substrate. The effect of concentrations of toluene and TCE and temperature on biodegradation was discussed. Acclimated microorganisms degraded TCE after a lag period of 5 to 22 h depending on toluene concentrations. Approximately 60%, 90% and 64% of TCE were degraded at toluene to TCE concentration ratios of 23:1, 115:1 and 230:1, respectively. At a TCE concentration of 1.46 μg/ml, 80% of TCE and 98.4% of toluene were removed. But less degradation of TCE and toluene was observed when TCE concentration was above 48.8 μg/ml. The lag time of TCE decreased and the TCE biodegradation rates increased with the increase of temperature.

  6. Improving phosphorus removal in aerobic granular sludge processes through selective microbial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Olivier; Meunier, Christophe; Henry, Paul; Mahillon, Jacques

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to improve phosphorus removal in aerobic granular sludge sequential batch reactors (AGS-SBR) by a differential selection of the granules containing the highest proportion of phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). The abundance of PAOs in granules with different density was analyzed by PCR-DGGE, pyrosequencing and qPCR. Dense granules contained a higher proportion of Candidatus Accumulibacter (PAO) with a 16S rRNA gene frequency up to 45%. Starting with an AGS-SBR with low height/diameter ratio performing unstable P removal, two strategies of biomass removal were assessed. First, a high selective pressure (short settling time) was applied and second, an increase of the settling time was combined with a homogeneous purge of the sludge bed. The first strategy resulted in a reduction of P removal efficiency while the second improved and stabilized P removal over 90%. This study offers a new approach of biomass management in AGS-SBR. PMID:27023385

  7. Studies on Microbial Degradation of Natural Rubber Using Dilute Solution Viscosity Measurement and Weight Loss Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Onyeagoro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of molecular weight of rubber polymers for easy absorption of compounding ingredients is critical in every rubber compounding operation. Yet, rubber mastication which is the current practice of achieving this is expensive, requiring high energy and equipment cost. To address this problem, microbial degradation of natural rubber (NR and waste rubber tire (WRT by Nocardia sp. strain 385A was studied using dilute solution viscosity measurement and weight loss methods. Solutions of NR and WRT in toluene were inoculated with the microbes (Nocardia sp. strain 385A and kept in incubator. Incubation period varied between 0 to 10 weeks. The results obtained show that NR and WRT were mineralized and degraded by the microbes. Intrinsic viscosity values of both NR and WRT decreased with increasing period of incubation, indicating that degradation increases with increase in the incubation period. For the incubation periods investigated, WRT produced higher intrinsic viscosity values than NR due to the inhibitory effect of additives present in WRT to microbial degradation. Equivalent reduction in molecular weight obtained by rubber mastication technique was achieved by microbial degradation after 10 weeks incubation period. Rubber degrading bacteria can be useful for the disposal of discarded rubber products.

  8. Microbiological Degradation of Malodorous Substances of Swine Waste under Aerobic Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Bourque, Denis; Bisaillon, Jean-Guy; Beaudet, Réjean; Sylvestre, M; Ishaque, Muhammad; Morin, André

    1987-01-01

    Phenol, p-cresol, and volatile fatty acids (VFA; acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids) were used as odor indicators of swine waste. Aeration of the waste allowed the indigenous microorganisms to grow and degrade these malodorous substances. The time required for degradation of these substances varied according to the waste used, and it was not necessarily related to their concentrations. Using a minimal medium which contained one of the malodorous compounds as...

  9. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Alpha-cypermethrin (α-CP) can be degraded by microorganisms in soil. • Biodegradation of α-CP resulted in carbon isotope fractionation. • A relationship was found between carbon isotope ratios and concentrations of α-CP. • An enrichment factor ϵ of α-CP was determined as −1.87‰. • CSIA is applicable to assess biodegradation of α-CP. - Abstract: To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days’ incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to −29.14 ± 0.22‰ and −29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = −1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field

  10. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Zhang, Xi-Chang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liu, Weiping [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Alpha-cypermethrin (α-CP) can be degraded by microorganisms in soil. • Biodegradation of α-CP resulted in carbon isotope fractionation. • A relationship was found between carbon isotope ratios and concentrations of α-CP. • An enrichment factor ϵ of α-CP was determined as −1.87‰. • CSIA is applicable to assess biodegradation of α-CP. - Abstract: To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days’ incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to −29.14 ± 0.22‰ and −29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = −1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  11. Limitations of microbial hydrocarbon degradation at the Amon mud volcano (Nile deep-sea fan)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felden, J.; Lichtschlag, A.; Wenzhöfer, F.; de Beer, D.; Feseker, T.; Pop Ristova, P.; de Lange, G.; Boetius, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Amon mud volcano (MV), located at 1250m water depth on the Nile deep-sea fan, is known for its active emission of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons into the hydrosphere. Previous investigations showed a low efficiency of hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microbial communities inhabiting the Amo

  12. Microbial degradation of fluometuron is influenced by Roundup WeatherMAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to describe the influence of glyphosate and fluometuron on soil microbial activity and to determine the effect of glyphosate on fluometuron degradation in soil and by Rhizoctonia solani. Soil and liquid medium were amended with formulated fluometuron alone or w...

  13. Microbial dynamics in anaerobic enrichment cultures degrading di-n-butyl phthalic acid ester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trably, Eric; Batstone, Damien J.; Christensen, Nina;

    2008-01-01

    enrichment cultures degrading phthalic acid esters under methanogenic conditions. A selection pressure was applied by adding DBP at 10 and 200 mg L(-1) in semi-continuous anaerobic reactors. The microbial dynamics were monitored using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). While only limited abiotic...... microorganism described previously as an anaerobic benzaldehyde degrader. Within the archaeal community, there was a shift between two different species of the genus Methanosaeta sp., indicating a highly specific impact of DBP or degradation products on archaeal species. RNA-directed probes were designed from...

  14. Microbial activity and bacterial community structure during degradation of microcystins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, K.; Lyck, Susanne; Winding, A.

    2002-01-01

    Degradation of realistic microcystin concentrations in lake water with indigenous bacteria was studied in laboratory and field experiments following inoculation with lysed toxic algal material containing microcystin primarily from Microcystis sp. or purified commercial microcystin-LR to microcosms...... experiment, using toxic natural algal material from 3 lakes and purified microcystin-LR, and between 2 and 54 mug 1(-1) in the field experiment, using toxic natural algal material and material from a highly toxic culture. Lysed material from a non-toxic algal culture (Scenedesmus sp.) was included in the...... slow initial degradation rates occurred in 2 out of 7 cases, Microcystin was almost eliminated from the water after around 8 d. Results from concomitant measurements of bacterial abundance and net production showed an elevated bacterial activity within 1 to 2 d after the inoculation with algal lysates...

  15. Methyltert-butyl Ether (MTBE) Degradation by a Microbial Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    S. B. Mortazavi; A Nikpey; A. Rezaee; H Asilian; A Khavanin; H. Kazemian

    2005-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is added to reformulated gasoline to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act directives. Widespread use of MTBE in gasoline has resulted in groundwater contamination. Because of its undesirable effects on drinking water and ecologically harmful effects, MTBE removal has become a public health and environmental concern. In this study, we have isolated a mixed bacterial culture which is capable of degrading the MTBE as a sole carbon and energy source. This consortium was deve...

  16. Microbial Degradation of a Macrotetrolide Miticide in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Koji; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Sawada, Mikio; Iwane, Yoshitaka; Ando, Kunio

    1980-01-01

    Macrotetrolide, a miticide consisting of tetranactin, trinactin, and dinactin, was readily biodegradable and hence did not accumulate in soil. [U-14C]macrotetrolide was rapidly degraded via its constituent hydroxycarboxylic acids to carbon dioxide and water. In culture media, however, the mixture was hydrolyzed to homononactic and nonactic acids by three strains of Bacillus sp. and two of Micrococcus sp. The latter strains were able to hydrolyze 500 μg of the antibiotic per ml within a few da...

  17. Methyltert-butyl Ether (MTBE Degradation by a Microbial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Mortazavi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE is added to reformulated gasoline to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act directives. Widespread use of MTBE in gasoline has resulted in groundwater contamination. Because of its undesirable effects on drinking water and ecologically harmful effects, MTBE removal has become a public health and environmental concern. In this study, we have isolated a mixed bacterial culture which is capable of degrading the MTBE as a sole carbon and energy source. This consortium was developed from mixed urban and petrochemical activated sludge after 4 month's enrichment. Enrichment was conducted in batch reactor, fitted with a screw cap and butyl rubber septum. MTBE concentration was measured in head space by gas chromatography. Degradation was determined by MTBE removal. MTBE biodegradation was depended to Dissolved Oxygen (DO concentration and not affected by the changes in concentration of trace element solution or other stimulator Substances. Degradation rates were nearly 1.478 mg MTBE h-1 g-1 (wet biomass and didn't change with MTBE concentration (up 500 mg L-1.

  18. Strategies of aerobic microbial Fe acquisition from Fe-bearing montmorillonite clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Keshia M.; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2013-09-01

    This research investigated strategies used by the common aerobic soil bacterium Pseudomonas mendocina to acquire Fe associated with Fe(III)-bearing montmorillonite (MMT) clay. Given the known importance of Fe(III)-chelating siderophores, Fe-limited batch experiments were conducted using a wild-type (WT) strain that produces siderophores and a ΔpmhA mutant with a siderophore(-) phenotype. Growth measurements were coupled with a transcriptional biosensor assay that monitors the siderophore biosynthesis gene pmhA, measurements of cells' reducing ability, and quantification of exopolymeric substance (EPS) production. WT cells actively grow when MMT is the sole Fe source, but sorption to MMT may decrease the concentration of dissolved Fe-siderophore complex accessible to cells. Cells also obtain Fe by reducing MMT-associated Fe(III), but because P. mendocina lacks a secreted/diffusible reductant, direct physical contact is required. Dual strategies for Fe acquisition—a reducing mechanism that requires contact and that is likely facilitated by biofilm production and a siderophore related mechanism that does not require contact—provide flexibility to address the environmental Fe challenge.

  19. Screening of a microbial consortium for highly simultaneous degradation of lignocellulose and chlorophenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiajin; Peng, Xiang; Yin, Dexing; Li, Beiyin; Wang, Dehan; Lin, Yunqin

    2015-08-01

    In this work, spent mushroom substrates were utilized for screening a microbial consortium with highly simultaneous degradation of lignocellulose and chlorophenols. The desired microbial consortium OEM1 was gained through successive cultivation for about 50 generations and its stability of composition was verified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) during screening process. It could degrade lignocellulose and chlorophenols at around 50% and 100%, respectively, within 7days. The diversity analysis and the growth characteristics of OEM1 during degradation process were investigated by PCR-DGGE combined with clone and sequence. The results indicated that OEM1 consisted of 31 strains. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the predominant bacterial groups. The dynamic change of OEM1 illustrated that consortium community structure was effected by pH and substrate alteration and tended to be stable after 6days' cultivation. Furthermore, bacteria (11 strains) and actinomycetes (2 strains) were obtained based on plate isolation and identified via 16S rDNA sequence. PMID:25974352

  20. Continuous aerobic phenol degradation by defined mixed immobilized cultutre in packed bed reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Páca jr., J.; Páca, J.; Kostečková, A.; Stiborová, M.; Sobotka, Miroslav; Gerrard, A. M.; Soccol, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 4 (2005), s. 301-308. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : phenol degradation * pseudomonas putida * commamonas testosteroni Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2005

  1. ANALYSIS OF AN AEROBIC FLUIDIZED BED REACTOR DEGRADING MTBE AND BTEX AT REDUCED EBCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of MTBE and BTEX using a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) with granular activated carbon (GAC) as a biological attachment medium. Batch experiments were run to analyze the MTBE and TBA degradation kinetics of the culture ...

  2. Study on the aerobic biodegradability and degradation kinetics of 3-NP; 2,4-DNP and 2,6-DNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, Zonglian; Xie, Tian; Zhu, Yingjie; Li, Leilei; Tang, Gaifeng [Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science and Ecology, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Huang, Jian, E-mail: jianhuang666@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Ecology, College of Marine Life Sciences, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the biodegradability of three nitrophenols using four methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We simulated the degradation kinetics model and estimated relevant parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compared the kinetics performances of solo substrates and co-substrates. - Abstract: Four biodegradability tests (BOD{sub 5}/COD ratio, production of carbon dioxide, relative oxygen uptake rate and relative enzymatic activity) were used to determine the aerobic biodegradability of 3-nitrophenol (3-NP), 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) and 2,6-dinitrophenol (2,6-DNP). Furthermore, biodegradation kinetics of the compounds was investigated in sequencing batch reactors both in the presence of glucose (co-substrate) and with nitrophenol as the sole carbon source. Among the three tested compounds, 3-NP showed the best biodegradability while 2,6-DNP was the most difficult to be biodegraded. The Haldane equation was applied to the kinetic test data of the nitrophenols. The kinetic constants are as follows: the maximum specific degradation rate (K{sub max}), the saturation constants (K{sub S}) and the inhibition constants (K{sub I}) were in the range of 0.005-2.98 mg (mgSS d){sup -1}, 1.5-51.9 mg L{sup -1} and 1.8-95.8 mg L{sup -1}, respectively. The presence of glucose enhanced the degradation of the nitrophenols at low glucose concentrations. The degradation of 3-NP was found to be accelerated with the increasing of glucose concentrations from 0 to 660 mg L{sup -1}. At high (1320-2000 mg L{sup -1}) glucose concentrations, the degradation rate of 3-NP was reduced and the K{sub max} of 3-NP was even lower than the value obtained in the absence of glucose, suggesting that high concentrations of co-substrate could inhibit 3-NP biodegradation. At 2,4-DNP concentration of 30 mg L{sup -1}, the K{sub max} of 2,4-DNP with glucose as co-substrate was about 30 times the value with 2,4-DNP as sole substrate. 2,6-DNP preformed high

  3. Study on the aerobic biodegradability and degradation kinetics of 3-NP; 2,4-DNP and 2,6-DNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We assessed the biodegradability of three nitrophenols using four methods. ► We simulated the degradation kinetics model and estimated relevant parameters. ► We compared the kinetics performances of solo substrates and co-substrates. - Abstract: Four biodegradability tests (BOD5/COD ratio, production of carbon dioxide, relative oxygen uptake rate and relative enzymatic activity) were used to determine the aerobic biodegradability of 3-nitrophenol (3-NP), 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) and 2,6-dinitrophenol (2,6-DNP). Furthermore, biodegradation kinetics of the compounds was investigated in sequencing batch reactors both in the presence of glucose (co-substrate) and with nitrophenol as the sole carbon source. Among the three tested compounds, 3-NP showed the best biodegradability while 2,6-DNP was the most difficult to be biodegraded. The Haldane equation was applied to the kinetic test data of the nitrophenols. The kinetic constants are as follows: the maximum specific degradation rate (Kmax), the saturation constants (KS) and the inhibition constants (KI) were in the range of 0.005–2.98 mg (mgSS d)−1, 1.5–51.9 mg L−1 and 1.8–95.8 mg L−1, respectively. The presence of glucose enhanced the degradation of the nitrophenols at low glucose concentrations. The degradation of 3-NP was found to be accelerated with the increasing of glucose concentrations from 0 to 660 mg L−1. At high (1320–2000 mg L−1) glucose concentrations, the degradation rate of 3-NP was reduced and the Kmax of 3-NP was even lower than the value obtained in the absence of glucose, suggesting that high concentrations of co-substrate could inhibit 3-NP biodegradation. At 2,4-DNP concentration of 30 mg L−1, the Kmax of 2,4-DNP with glucose as co-substrate was about 30 times the value with 2,4-DNP as sole substrate. 2,6-DNP preformed high toxicity in the case of sole carbon source degradation and the kinetic data was hardly obtained.

  4. Dynamic changes in functional gene copy numbers and microbial communities during degradation of pyrene in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the dynamics of pyrene degradation rates, microbial communities, and functional gene copy numbers during the incubation of pyrene-spiked soils. Spiking pyrene to the soil was found to have negligible effects on the bacterial community present. Our results demonstrated that there was a significant difference in nidA gene copy numbers between sampling dates in QZ soil. Mycobacterium 16S rDNA clone libraries showed that more than 90% mycobacteria detected were closely related to fast-growing PAH-degrading Mycobacterium in pyrene-spiked soil, while other sequences related to slow-growing Mycobacterium were only detected in the control soil. It is suggested that nidA gene copy number and fast-growing PAH-degrading Mycobacterium could be used as indicators to predict pyrene contamination and its degradation activity in soils. - nidA gene and fast-growing PAH-degrading Mycobacterium can serve as indicators for pyrene contamination.

  5. N20 and NH3 emissions from a bioreactor landfill operated under limited aerobic degradation conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pinjing He; Na Yang; Huili Gu; Hua Zhang; Liming Shao

    2011-01-01

    The combination of leachate recirculation and aeration to landfill may be an efficient way for in-situ nitrogen removal. However,nitrogenous substances contained in the landfill layer are concomitantly transformed into N20 and NH3, leading to increased emissions into the atmosphere. In the present study, the emissions of N20 and NH3 were measured under conditions of fresh or partially stabilized refuse with or without leachate recirculation or intermittent aeration. The results showed that the largest N20 emission (12.4 mg-N/L of the column) was observed in the aerated column loaded with partially stabilized refuse and recycled with the leachate of low C/N ratio; while less than 0.33 mg-N/L of the column was produced in the other columns. N20 production was positively correlated with the prolonged aerobic time and negatively related with the C/N ratio in the recycled leachate. NH3 volatilization increased with enhanced gas flow and concentration of free ammonia in the leachate, and the highest cumulative vola tilization quantity was 1.7 mg-N/L of the column.

  6. Acidification increases microbial polysaccharide degradation in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontek, J.; Lunau, M.; Händel, N.; Borchard, C.; Wurst, M.; Engel, A.

    2010-05-01

    With the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2), a proceeding decline in seawater pH has been induced that is referred to as ocean acidification. The ocean's capacity for CO2 storage is strongly affected by biological processes, whose feedback potential is difficult to evaluate. The main source of CO2 in the ocean is the decomposition and subsequent respiration of organic molecules by heterotrophic bacteria. However, very little is known about potential effects of ocean acidification on bacterial degradation activity. This study reveals that the degradation of polysaccharides, a major component of marine organic matter, by bacterial extracellular enzymes was significantly accelerated during experimental simulation of ocean acidification. Results were obtained from pH perturbation experiments, where rates of extracellular α- and β-glucosidase were measured and the loss of neutral and acidic sugars from phytoplankton-derived polysaccharides was determined. Our study suggests that a faster bacterial turnover of polysaccharides at lowered ocean pH has the potential to reduce carbon export and to enhance the respiratory CO2 production in the future ocean.

  7. Toxicity assessment and microbial degradation of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswari, N; Muthukrishnan, J; Gunasekaran, P

    2006-08-01

    Toxic effluents containing azo dyes are discharged from various industries and they adversely affect water resources, soil fertility, aquatic organisms and ecosystem integrity. They pose toxicity (lethal effect, genotoxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity) to aquatic organisms (fish, algae, bacteria, etc.) as well as animals. They are not readily degradable under natural conditions and are typically not removed from waste water by conventional waste water treatment systems. Benzidine based dyes have long been recognized as a human urinary bladder carcinogen and tumorigenic in a variety of laboratory animals. Several microorganisms have been found to decolourize, transform and even to completely mineralize azo dyes. A mixed culture of two Pseudomonas strains efficiently degraded mixture of 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CBA) and phenol/cresols. Azoreductases of different microorganisms are useful for the development of biodegradation systems as they catalyze reductive cleavage of azo groups (-N=N-) under mild conditions. In this review, toxic impacts of dyeing factory effluents on plants, fishes, and environment, and plausible bioremediation strategies for removal of azo dyes have been discussed. PMID:16924831

  8. Acidification increases microbial polysaccharide degradation in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piontek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available With the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2, a proceeding decline in seawater pH has been induced that is referred to as ocean acidification. The ocean's capacity for CO2 storage is strongly affected by biological processes, whose feedback potential is difficult to evaluate. The main source of CO2 in the ocean is the decomposition and subsequent respiration of organic molecules by heterotrophic bacteria. However, very little is known about potential effects of ocean acidification on bacterial degradation activity. This study reveals that the degradation of polysaccharides, a major component of marine organic matter, by bacterial extracellular enzymes was significantly accelerated during experimental simulation of ocean acidification. Results were obtained from pH perturbation experiments, where rates of extracellular α- and β-glucosidase were measured and the loss of neutral and acidic sugars from phytoplankton-derived polysaccharides was determined. Our study suggests that a faster bacterial turnover of polysaccharides at lowered ocean pH has the potential to affect the cycling of organic carbon in the future ocean by weakening the biological carbon pump and increasing the respiratory production of CO2.

  9. Acidification increases microbial polysaccharide degradation in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piontek

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available With the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2, a proceeding decline in seawater pH has been induced that is referred to as ocean acidification. The ocean's capacity for CO2 storage is strongly affected by biological processes, whose feedback potential is difficult to evaluate. The main source of CO2 in the ocean is the decomposition and subsequent respiration of organic molecules by heterotrophic bacteria. However, very little is known about potential effects of ocean acidification on bacterial degradation activity. This study reveals that the degradation of polysaccharides, a major component of marine organic matter, by bacterial extracellular enzymes was significantly accelerated during experimental simulation of ocean acidification. Results were obtained from pH perturbation experiments, where rates of extracellular α- and β-glucosidase were measured and the loss of neutral and acidic sugars from phytoplankton-derived polysaccharides was determined. Our study suggests that a faster bacterial turnover of polysaccharides at lowered ocean pH has the potential to reduce carbon export and to enhance the respiratory CO2 production in the future ocean.

  10. Storage and degradation of poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate in activated sludge under aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dircks, Klaus; Henze, Mogens; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Mosbæk, Hans; Aspegren, H.

    2001-01-01

    This research analyses the accumulation and degradation of poly-b-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in experiments with pulse addition of acetate to samples of activated sludge from pilot-plant and full-scale wastewater treatment plants. The experiments are divided into two periods: a feast period defined as...... the time when acetate is consumed and a famine period when the added acetate has been exhausted. In the feast period the significant process occurring is the production of PHB from acetate. The produced PHB is utilised in the famine period for production of glycogen and biomass. According to modelling...... results approximately 90% of the total potential growth occurs in the famine period utilising the stored PHB. The degradation rate for PHB in the famine period is found to be dependent on the level of PHB obtained at the end of the feast period. It was found that multiple order kinetics gives a good...

  11. Aerobic degradation of ibuprofen in batch and continuous reactors by an indigenous bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, María Susana; Fuentes Abril, Nancy Piedad; Martinefski, Manuela; Trípodi, Valeria; Papalia, Mariana; Rádice, Marcela; Gutkind, Gabriel; Gallego, Alfredo; Korol, Sonia Edith

    2016-10-01

    Water from six points from the Riachuelo-Matanza basin was analyzed in order to assess ibuprofen biodegradability. In four of them biodegradation of ibuprofen was proved and degrading bacterial communities were isolated. Biodegradation in each point could not be correlated with sewage pollution. The indigenous bacterial community isolated from the point localized in the La Noria Bridge showed the highest degradative capacity and was selected to perform batch and continuous degradation assays. The partial 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the community consisted of Comamonas aquatica and Bacillus sp. In batch assays the community was capable of degrading 100 mg L(-1) of ibuprofen in 33 h, with a specific growth rate (μ) of 0.21 h(-1). The removal of the compound, as determined by High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), exceeded 99% of the initial concentration, with a 92.3% removal of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). In a down-flow fixed-bed continuous reactor, the community shows a removal efficiency of 95.9% of ibuprofen and 92.3% of COD for an average inlet concentration of 110.4 mg. The reactor was kept in operation for 70 days. The maximal removal rate for the compound was 17.4 g m(-3) d(-1). Scanning electron microscopy was employed to observe biofilm development in the reactor. The ability of the isolated indigenous community can be exploited to improve the treatment of wastewaters containing ibuprofen. PMID:26905769

  12. Riverine Dissolved Organic Matter Degradation Modeled Through Microbial Incubations of Vascular Plant Leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfmann, J.; Hernes, P.; Chuang, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains as much carbon as is in the atmosphere, provides the main link between terrestrial and marine carbon reservoirs, and fuels the microbial food web. The fate and removal of DOM is a result of several complex conditions and processes, including photodegradation, sorption/desorption, dominant vascular plant sources, and microbial abundance. In order to better constrain factors affecting microbial degradation, laboratory incubations were performed using Sacramento River water for microbial inoculums and vascular plant leachates. Four vascular plant sources were chosen based on their dominance in the Sacramento River Valley: gymnosperm needles from Pinus sabiniana (foothill pine), angiosperm dicot leaves from Quercus douglassi (blue oak), angiosperm monocot mixed annual grasses, and angiosperm monocot mixed Schoenoplectus acutus (tule) and Typha spp. (cattails). Three concentrations of microbial inoculum were used for each plant material, ranging from 0.2% to 10%. Degradation was monitored as a function of time using dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV-Vis absorbance, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM), and was compared across vascular plant type and inoculum concentration.

  13. Protocol for the microbial degradation of coumaphos from cattle dip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insecticide wastes generated from livestock dipping operations are well suited for biodegradation processes since these wastes are concentrated, contained, and have no other significant toxic components. About 400,000 L of cattle dip wastes containing approximately 1500 mg/L of the organophosphate coumaphos are generated yearly along the Mexican border from a USDA program designed to control disease carrying cattle ticks. Use of unlined evaporation pits for the disposal of these wastes has resulted in highly contaminated soils underlying these sites. Previous work has shown that microbial consortia present in selected dip wastes can be induced to mineralize coumaphos. Our laboratory results show that these consortia are able to colonize plastic fibers in trickling biofilters and can be used in these filters to quickly metabolize coumaphos from dip wastes. A field scale biofilter capable of treating 15,000 litre batches of dip waste was used to reduce the coumaphos concentration in two successive 11,000 litre batch trials from 2000 mg/L to 10 mg/L in approximately 14 d. (author)

  14. Microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizosphere: Potential application to biological remediation of waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility that vegetation may be used to actively promote microbial restoration of chemically contaminated soils was tested by using rhizosphere and nonvegetated soils collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated field site. Biomass determinations, disappearance of TCE from the headspace of spiked soil slurries, and mineralization of [14C]TCE to 14CO2 all showed that microbial activity is greater in rhizosphere soils and that TCE degradation occurs faster in the rhizosphere than in the edaphosphere. Thus, vegetation may be an important variable in the biological restoration of surface and near-surface soils

  15. Microbial Degradation of Propylene Glycol - Modelling Approach of a Batch Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, Annette; Fernandez, Perrine; Bakken, Lars; Bloem, Esther; French, Helen

    2016-04-01

    De-icing chemicals are applied in large amounts at airports during winter conditions to keep the runways and aircrafts ice-free. At Gardermoen airport, Norway, most of the applied chemicals can be captured, but about 10 to 20 % infiltrate into the soil along the runways and during take-off. While the commonly used propylene glycol (PG) is easily degradable by local microbial communities, its biological oxygen demand is high, anoxic zones can develop and soluble Fe+2 and Mn+2 ions eventually can reach the groundwater. The objectives of the presented study are to quantify the mechanisms, which control the order of reduction processes in an unsaturated sandy soil, and to test whether measured redox potentials can help to determine underlying biogeochemical reactions. To investigate the mechanisms of microbial degradation, the water phase of soil samples from Gardermoen Airport was replaced by deionized water with 10 mMol PG or 10 mMol glutamate and the samples were incubated at 10°C for about two weeks. The gas phase was sampled and analyzed automatically every three hours. Microbial degradation of the substrate (PG or glutamate) was modelled following a Monod kinetics using the FME (Flexible Modelling Environment) package of R (Project for Statistical Computing). The model was calibrated against measurements of O2 depletion and CO2 production. The initial concentrations of O2, CO2 and PG or glutamate are known and microbial yields and stoichiometric constants can be calculated from the measurements. Parameter values for the initial microbial population size, maximum microbial growth rate, the half saturation constant, and microbial degradation and respiration rates were fitted using the FME package. The model accounts for carbon from the substrate (PG or glutamate) incorporated into the biomass. Results are promising, but because of the large number of parameters needed to fit a Monod kinetics it is challenging to accurately model a whole redox sequence. The

  16. Microbial degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons on organoclay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-11-01

    The role of organoclays in hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/oil microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clays used for this study were Na-montmorillonite and saponite. These two clays were treated with didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce organoclays which were used in this study. The study indicated that clays with high cation exchange capacity (CEC) such as Na-montmorillonite produced an organomontmorillonite that was inhibitory to biodegradation of the crude oil hydrocarbons. Extensive hydrophobic interaction between the organic phase of the organoclay and the crude oil hydrocarbons is suggested to render the hydrocarbons unavailable for biodegradation. However, untreated Na-montmorillonite was stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbons and is believed to have done so because of its high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients making it easy for the microbes to access the nutrients. This study indicates that unlike unmodified montmorillonites, organomontmorillonite may not serve any useful purpose in the bioremediation of crude oil spill sites where hydrocarbon removal by biodegradation is desired within a rapid time period. PMID:24956464

  17. Does microbial cm-scale heterogeneity impact pesticide degradation in and leaching from loamy agricultural soils?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Binning, Philip John; Aamand, Jens; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.; Johnsen, Anders R.

    2014-01-01

    The potential for pesticide degradation varies greatly at the cm-scale in agricultural soil. Three dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate how such small-scale spatial heterogeneity may affect the leaching of the biodegradable pesticide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA......) in the upper metre of a variably-saturated, loamy soil profile. To incorporate realistic spatial variation in degradation potential, we used data from a site where 420 mineralization curves over 5 depths have been measured. Monod kinetics was fitted to the individual curves to derive initial degrader...... either matrix flow or preferential flow through a soil matrix with a wormhole. MCPA leached, within 250 days, below 1 metre only when degrader biomass was absent and preferential flow occurred. Both biodegradation in the plough layer and the microbially active lining of the wormhole contributed to...

  18. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Ambuchi, John J.; He, Weihua; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m−2. Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which process 79.1 ± 5.6% of soluble protein and 86.6 ± 2.2% of soluble carbohydrates were degraded by anaerobic digestion in the CMZ and short-chain volatile fatty acids were further decomposed and generated current in the MEZ. Co-existence of fermentative bacteria (Clostridium and Bacteroides, 19.7% and 5.0%), acetogenic bacteria (Syntrophobacter, 20.8%), methanogenic archaea (Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium, 40.3% and 38.4%) and exoelectrogens (Geobacter, 12.4%) as well as a clear spatial distribution and syntrophic interaction among them contributed to the cascade degradation process in CSMER. The CSMER shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application due to high pre-hydrolysis and acidification rate, high energy recovery and low capital cost. PMID:27270788

  19. Degradation of corn stalk by the composite microbial system of MC1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The composite microbial system of MC1 was used to degrade corn stalk in order to determine properties of the degraded products as well as bacterial composition of MC1. Results indicated that the pH of the fermentation broth was typical of lignocellulose degradatioin by MC1, decreasing in the early phase and increasing in later stages of the degradation. The microbial biomass peaked on the day 3 after degradation. The MC1 effeciently degraded the corn stalk by nearly 70% during which its cellulose content decreased by 71.2%, hemicellulose by 76.5% and lignin by 24.6%. The content of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) in the fermentation broth increased progressively during the first three days, and decreased thereafter, suggesting an accumulation of WSC in the early phase of the degradation process. Total levels of various volatile products peaked in the third day after degradation , and 7 types of volatile products were detected in the fermentation broth. These were ethanol, acetic acid, 1,2-ethanediol, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, 3-methyl-butanoic acid and glycerine. Six major compounds were quantitatively analysed and the contents of each compound were ethanol (0.584 g/L), acetic acid (0.735 g/L), 1,2-ethanediol (0.772 g/L), propanoic acid (0.026 g/L), butanoic acid (0.018 g/L) and glycerine (4.203 g/L). Characterization of bacterial cells collected from the culture solution, based on 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE analysis of DNAs, showed that the composition of bacterial community in MC1 coincided basically with observations from previous studies. This indicated that the structure of MC1 is very stable during degradation of different lignocellulose materials.

  20. Investigation of the rumen microbial community responsible for degradation of a putative toxin in Acacia angustissima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acacia angustissima has been proposed as a protein supplement in countries where availability of high quality fodder for grazing animals is a problem due to extreme, dry climates. While A. angustissima thrives in harsh environments and provides valuable nutrients required by ruminants, it has also been found to contain anti-nutritive factors that currently preclude its widespread application. A number of non-protein amino acids have been identified in the leaves of A. angustissima and in the past these have been linked to toxicity in ruminants. The non-protein amino acid 4-n-acetyl-2,4-diaminobutyric acid (ADAB) had been determined to be the major non-protein amino acid in the leaves of A. angustissima. Thus, in this study, the aim was to identify microorganisms from the rumen environment capable of degrading ADAB. Using an ADAB-containing plant extract, a mixed enrichment culture was obtained that exhibited substantial ADAB-degrading ability. Attempts to isolate an ADAB-degrading micro-organism were carried out, but no isolates were able to degrade ADAB in pure culture. The mixed microbial community of the ADAB-degrading enrichment culture was further examined through the use of pure-culture-independent techniques. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed to investigate the diversity within this sample. In addition two bacterial 16S rDNA clone libraries were constructed in an attempt to further elucidate the members of the microbial population. The clone libraries were constructed from serial dilutions of the enrichment culture, a 10-5 dilution where complete degradation of ADAB occurred, and a 10-7 dilution where ADAB degradation did not occur. Through the comparison of these two libraries it was hypothesized that clones belonging to the Firmicutes phylum were involved in ADAB degradation. A FISH probe, ADAB1268, was then designed to target these clones and was applied to the enrichment cultures to investigate their relative abundance within the

  1. Electron donors and co-contaminants affect microbial community composition and activity in perchlorate degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiangyu; Xie, Yuxuan; Wang, Jinfeng; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-01

    Although microbial reduction of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a promising and effective method, our knowledge on the changes in microbial communities during ClO4(-) degradation is limited, especially when different electron donors are supplied and/or other contaminants are present. Here, we examined the effects of acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and nitrate and ammonium as co-contaminants on ClO4(-) degradation by anaerobic microcosms using six treatments. The process of degradation was divided into the lag stage (SI) and the accelerated stage (SII). Quantitative PCR was used to quantify four genes: pcrA (encoding perchlorate reductase), cld (encoding chlorite dismutase), nirS (encoding copper and cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase), and 16S rRNA. While the degradation of ClO4(-) with acetate, nitrate, and ammonia system (PNA) was the fastest with the highest abundance of the four genes, it was the slowest in the autotrophic system (HYP). The pcrA gene accumulated in SI and played a key role in initiating the accelerated degradation of ClO4(-) when its abundance reached a peak. Degradation in SII was primarily maintained by the cld gene. Acetate inhibited the growth of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), but its effect was weakened by nitrate (NO3(-)), which promoted the growth of PRB in SI, and therefore, accelerated the ClO4(-) degradation rate. In addition, ammonia (NH4(+)), as nitrogen sources, accelerated the growth of PRB. The bacterial communities' structure and diversity were significantly affected by electron donors and co-contaminants. Under heterotrophic conditions, both ammonia and nitrate promoted Azospira as the most dominant genera, a fact that might significantly influence the rate of ClO4(-) natural attenuation by degradation. PMID:25382499

  2. Effects of soil organic matter on the development of the microbial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbial activity in soils was a critical factor governing the degradation of organic micro-pollutants. The present study was conducted to analyze the effects of soil organic matter on the development of degradation potentials for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Most of the degradation kinetics for PAHs by the indigenous microorganisms developed in soils can be fitted with the Logistic growth models. The microbial activities were relatively lower in the soils with the lowest and highest organic matter content, which were likely due to the nutrition limit and PAH sequestration. The microbial activities developed in humic acid (HA) were much higher than those developed in humin, which was demonstrated to be able to sequester organic pollutants stronger. The results suggested that the nutrition support and sequestration were the two major mechanisms, that soil organic matter influenced the development of microbial PAHs degradation potentials. - Research highlights: → PAH degradation kinetics obey Logistic model. → Degradation potentials depend on soil organic carbon content. → Humin inhibits the development of PAH degradation activity. → Nutrition support and sequestration regulate microbial degradation capacity. - Soil organic matter regulated PAH degradation potentials through nutrition support and sequestration.

  3. Microbial degradation of street dust polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in microcosms simulating diffuse pollution of urban soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anders R; de Lipthay, Julia R; Sørensen, Søren J;

    2006-01-01

    Diffuse pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of topsoil in urban regions has caused increasing concerns in recent years. We simulated diffuse pollution of soil in microcosms by spiking sandy topsoil (A-horizon) and coarse, mineral subsoil (C-horizon) with street dust (PM63...... the persistence and low bioaccessibility of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in diffusely polluted soil.......) isolated from municipal street sweepings from central Copenhagen. The microbial communities adapted to PAH degradation in microcosms spiked with street dust in both A-horizon and C-horizon soils, in spite of low PAH-concentrations. The increased potential for PAH degradation was demonstrated on several...

  4. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics’era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana eCravo-Laureau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment’s complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature, nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment’s reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying ‘omics’ approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon

  5. Studies on Microbial Degradation of Natural Rubber Using Dilute Solution Viscosity Measurement and Weight Loss Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    G. N. Onyeagoro; E. G. Ohaeri; U. J. Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of molecular weight of rubber polymers for easy absorption of compounding ingredients is critical in every rubber compounding operation. Yet, rubber mastication which is the current practice of achieving this is expensive, requiring high energy and equipment cost. To address this problem, microbial degradation of natural rubber (NR) and waste rubber tire (WRT) by Nocardia sp. strain 385A was studied using dilute solution viscosity measurement and weight loss methods. Solutions of NR...

  6. Molecular assessment of complex microbial communities degrading long chain fatty acids in methanogenic bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, D.Z.; Pereira, M.A.; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, A.J.M.; Alves, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial diversity of anaerobic sludge after extended contact with long chain fatty acids (LCFA) was studied using molecular approaches. Samples containing high amounts of accumulated LCFA were obtained after continuous loading of two bioreactors with oleate or with palmitate. These sludge samples were then incubated in batch assays to allow degradation of the biomass-associated LCFA. In addition, sludge used as inoculum for the reactors was also characterized. Predominant ...

  7. Microbial communities involved in anaerobic degradation of unsaturated or saturated long chain fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, D.Z.; Pereira, M.A.; Stams, A.J.M.; Alves, M. M.; Smidt, H.

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic long-chain fatty acid (LCFA)-degrading bacteria were identified by combining selective enrichment studies with molecular approaches. Two distinct enrichment cultures growing on unsaturated and saturated LCFAs were obtained by successive transfers in medium containing oleate and palmitate, respectively, as the sole carbon and energy sources. Changes in the microbial composition during enrichment were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling of PCR...

  8. Effect of particle size and microbial phytase on phytate degradation in incubated maize and soybean meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ton Nu, Mai Anh; Blaabjerg, Karoline; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2014-01-01

    . Samples were analysed for pH, dry matter and phytate phosphorus (P). Particle size distribution (PSD) and average particle size (APS) of samples were measured by the Laser Diffraction and Bygholm method. PSD differed between the two methods, whereas APS was similar. Decreasing screen size from 3 to 1 mm......The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of screen size (1, 2 and 3 mm) and microbial phytase (0 and 1000 FTU/kg as-fed) on phytate degradation in maize (100% maize), soybean meal (100% SBM) and maize–SBM (75% maize and 25% SBM) incubated in water for 0, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h at 38°C...... reduced APS by 48% in maize, 30% in SBM and 26% in maize–SBM. No interaction between screen size and microbial phytase on phytate degradation was observed, but the interaction between microbial phytase and incubation time was significant (P<0.001). This was because microbial phytase reduced phytate P by...

  9. Microbial degradation of endosulfan in contaminated soil with the elution of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fei; Xiong, Bailian; Chen, Benshou; Zheng, Guocan; Zhang, Jinzhong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an endosulfan-degrading strain was isolated from the aged soil contaminated by endosulfan, and identified as Ochrobactrum sp. EB-4 by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The microbial degradation characteristics of endosulfan in three eluents (Tween 80 + SDS, Tween 80 + Na2SiO3, Tween 80 + SDS + Na2SiO3) were investigated. The results showed that the degradation percents of α-, β-endosulfan in the three eluents were 86.83 %∼92.91 % and 88.90 %∼93.94 % in 15 days, respectively. The degradation process can be well described by the first-order kinetic model, and the half-times of α-endosulfan in eluent 1∼eluent 3 were 3.83, 5.29, and 4.53 days, while those of β-endosulfan were 3.35, 4.50 and 3.79 days, respectively. The endosulfan diol and endosulfan sulfate as main metabolites were detected, and the former can be further degraded by this strain, which revealed that the simultaneously happened hydrolysis and oxidation reactions were the main degradation processes, and dominated by hydrolysis reaction. After 5 days of washing with the eluents, 56.00∼84.33 % of α-endosulfan, and 46.49∼68.56 % of β-endosulfan in soil were eluted, respectively, and can be entirely biodegraded in 12 days, which indicated that the microbial degradation was the rate-determining step. PMID:27023814

  10. Comprehensive microbial analysis of combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process treating high-strength food wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon;

    2015-01-01

    A combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process was used to treat high-strength food wastewater in this study. During the experimental period, most of solid residue from the mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R1) was separated by centrifugation and introduced into the thermophilic aerobic...

  11. Microbial Degradation and Carbon Biosequestration Potential of Biochar in Contrasting Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, N.; Castanha, C.; Reichl, K.; Fischer, M. L.; Brodie, E. L.; Torn, M. S.; Jansson, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich product that is produced by high-temperature and low-oxygen pyrolysis of biomass, whose addition to soil has been proposed as a promising method for carbon sequestration. Biochar carbon has been assumed to be stable in soil, but recent research shows that it is at least partly degradable by soil microbes. However, the influence of environmental conditions on microbial transformation of biochar is poorly understood. Our overall goal is to determine the factors that regulate microbial decomposition of biochar in soils. We performed laboratory incubation experiments to compare the potential for biochar decomposition in soils from contrasting ecosystems (tropical forest from Puerto Rico and Mediterranean grassland from California), varied temperatures (ambient and +6°C) and depths (A and B horizons). Soil incubations with pyrolyzed 13C-enriched wood were continuously monitored for heterotrophic respiration using an online Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer. Samples collected after 10 and 150 days of incubation were analyzed for the activity of extracellular enzymes while changes in microbial community composition were assessed via pyrotag sequencing of both 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes. 13C-CO2 measurements confirmed that a fraction of added biochar was degraded in both soils during the one-year incubation period. Biochar addition was associated with a decline in cellulose and hemicellulose degrading enzyme activity in grassland soils, although not in tropical soils. In both soils, native soil organic carbon decomposition was not significantly impacted by biochar addition. Principle coordinates analysis of microbial composition showed that both soils harbored different microbial communities and those communities at different depths were distinct. The main bacterial groups enriched by biochar addition were Actinobacteria in the grassland soil, and α-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria in the tropical soil. Analysis of 16S r

  12. Integrative computational approach for genome-based study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorapreeda, Tayvich; Thammarongtham, Chinae; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2016-07-01

    Lipid-degrading or lipolytic enzymes have gained enormous attention in academic and industrial sectors. Several efforts are underway to discover new lipase enzymes from a variety of microorganisms with particular catalytic properties to be used for extensive applications. In addition, various tools and strategies have been implemented to unravel the functional relevance of the versatile lipid-degrading enzymes for special purposes. This review highlights the study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes through an integrative computational approach. The identification of putative lipase genes from microbial genomes and metagenomic libraries using homology-based mining is discussed, with an emphasis on sequence analysis of conserved motifs and enzyme topology. Molecular modelling of three-dimensional structure on the basis of sequence similarity is shown to be a potential approach for exploring the structural and functional relationships of candidate lipase enzymes. The perspectives on a discriminative framework of cutting-edge tools and technologies, including bioinformatics, computational biology, functional genomics and functional proteomics, intended to facilitate rapid progress in understanding lipolysis mechanism and to discover novel lipid-degrading enzymes of microorganisms are discussed. PMID:27263017

  13. Investigation of the rumen microbial community responsible for degradation of a putative toxin in Acacia angustissima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tropical legume Acacia angustissima, has been proposed as an alternative feed source for ruminants in countries where limited choice and restricted availability of feedstock is an issue for farmers, due to extreme, harsh environments. The widespread use of A. angustissima as fodder is currently impeded by its potential toxicity to the animal, as observed in feed trials. Consequently, much research has been directed towards identifying the possible causes of its toxicity. Non-protein amino acids present in A. angustissima have been hypothesised to be responsible for the toxic effect of this plant. The non-protein amino acid 4-N-acetyl-2, 4-diaminobutanoic acid (ADAB) has been implicated in the toxicity of A. angustissima due to its high abundance and similarity to well known neurotoxins. Thus, investigation into members of the rumen microbial community responsible for the degradation of ADAB has resulted. Selective enrichments were carried out for ADAB degrading microorganisms from the rumen. Defined rumen-simulating media with an amino acid extract from A. angustissima, as the source of ADAB, were used. Additionally, ADAB degrading rumen enrichments were decimally diluted in an effort to determine at which dilution ADAB degrading activity was still present, and to further define the microbial community present. Investigations into the members of these mixed ADAB degrading rumen enrichments was achieved through culture independent techniques. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with oligonucleotide probes specific for the bacterial and archaeal domains and for major taxonomic groupings were used [2], highlighting that the microorganisms in the ADAB degrading mixed cultures were Bacteria. Consequently, bacterial 16S rDNA clone libraries were constructed from dilutions of an ADAB-degrading mixed culture and of a non-ADAB-degrading mixed culture. The two bacterial 16S rDNA clone libraries were then subjected to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP

  14. Application of organic amendments to restore degraded soil: effects on soil microbial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jennifer; Saxena, Jyotisna; Basta, Nicholas; Hundal, Lakhwinder; Busalacchi, Dawn; Dick, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Topsoil removal, compaction, and other practices in urban and industrial landscapes can degrade soil and soil ecosystem services. There is growing interest to remediate these for recreational and residential purposes, and urban waste materials offers potential to improve degraded soils. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the effects of urban waste products on microbial properties of a degraded industrial soil. The soil amendments were vegetative yard waste compost (VC), biosolids (BioS), and a designer mix (DM) containing BioS, biochar (BC), and drinking water treatment residual (WTR). The experiment had a completely randomized design with following treatments initiated in 2009: control soil, VC, BioS-1 (202 Mg ha(-1)), BioS-2 (403 Mg ha(-1)), and DM (202 Mg BioS ha(-1) plus BC and WTR). Soils (0-15-cm depth) were sampled in 2009, 2010, and 2011 and analyzed for enzyme activities (arylsulfatase, β-glucosaminidase, β-glucosidase, acid phosphatase, fluorescein diacetate, and urease) and soil microbial community structure using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). In general, all organic amendments increased enzyme activities in 2009 with BioS treatments having the highest activity. However, this was followed by a decline in enzyme activities by 2011 that were still significantly higher than control. The fungal PLFA biomarkers were highest in the BioS treatments, whereas the control soil had the highest levels of the PLFA stress markers (P treatment significantly increased fungal biomass over the other treatments; addition of BioS to soils decreased microbial stress levels; and microbial measures showed no statistical differences between BioS and VC treatments after 3 years of treatment. PMID:25673270

  15. Current State of Knowledge in Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Shreya; Dutta, Tapan K.; Ahn, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) include a group of organic priority pollutants of critical environmental and public health concern due to their toxic, genotoxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties and their ubiquitous occurrence as well as recalcitrance. The increased awareness of their various adverse effects on ecosystem and human health has led to a dramatic increase in research aimed toward removing PAHs from the environment. PAHs may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical oxidation, although transformation by microorganisms is the major neutralization process of PAH-contaminated sites in an ecologically accepted manner. Microbial degradation of PAHs depends on various environmental conditions, such as nutrients, number and kind of the microorganisms, nature as well as chemical property of the PAH being degraded. A wide variety of bacterial, fungal and algal species have the potential to degrade/transform PAHs, among which bacteria and fungi mediated degradation has been studied most extensively. In last few decades microbial community analysis, biochemical pathway for PAHs degradation, gene organization, enzyme system, genetic regulation for PAH degradation have been explored in great detail. Although, xenobiotic-degrading microorganisms have incredible potential to restore contaminated environments inexpensively yet effectively, but new advancements are required to make such microbes effective and more powerful in removing those compounds, which were once thought to be recalcitrant. Recent analytical chemistry and genetic engineering tools might help to improve the efficiency of degradation of PAHs by microorganisms, and minimize uncertainties of successful bioremediation. However, appropriate implementation of the potential of naturally occurring microorganisms for field bioremediation could be considerably enhanced by optimizing certain factors such as bioavailability, adsorption and mass transfer of PAHs. The main

  16. Microbial degradation and impact of Bracken toxin ptaquiloside on microbial communities in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, Pernille; Brandt, Kristian Koefoed; Rasmussen, Lars Holm;

    2007-01-01

    The carcinogenic and toxic ptaquiloside (PTA) is a major secondary metabolite in Bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn) and was hypothesized to influence microbial communities in soil below Bracken stands. Soil and Bracken tissue were sampled at field sites in Denmark (DK) and New Zealand (NZ......). PTA contents of 2.1 ± 0.5 mg g1 and 37.0 ± 8.7 mg g1 tissue were measured in Bracken fronds from DK and NZ, respectively. In the two soils the PTA levels were similar (0–5 lg g1 soil); a decrease with depth could be discerned in the deeper B and C horizons of the DK soil (weak acid sandy Spodosol......]leucine incorporation assay) increased after PTA exposure, indicating that the Bracken toxin served as a C substrate for the organotrophic microorganisms. On the other hand, there was no apparent impact of PTA on community size as measured by substrate-induced respiration or composition as indicated by community...

  17. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Volume 1, Annual report for FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. Because of apparent ease of use and normal structural integrity, cement has been widely used as a binder to solidify LLW. However, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. This report reviews laboratory efforts that are being developed to address the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms are being employed that are capable of metabolically converting organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this report. Sufficient data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW has been developed during the course of this study. These data support the continued development of appropriate tests necessary to determine the resistance of cement-solidified LLW to microbially induced degradation that could impact the stability of the waste form. They also justify the continued effort of enumeration of the conditions necessary to support the microbiological growth and population expansion.

  18. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Volume 2, Annual report for FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program is to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that will be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluating the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites are being employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results over the past year on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of the annual report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides has been developed during this study

  19. Response of aerobic granular sludge to the long-term presence to nanosilver in sequencing batch reactors: Reactor performance, sludge property, microbial activity and community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Xiangchun, E-mail: xchquan@bnu.edu.cn; Cen, Yan; Lu, Fang; Gu, Lingyun; Ma, Jingyun

    2015-02-15

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) raises concerns about their potential toxic effects on the environment. Granular shape sludge is a special type of microbial aggregate. The response of aerobic granular sludge (AGS) to the long-term presence of Ag NPs has not been well studied. In this study, AGS was exposed to 5 and 50 mg/L Ag NPs in sequence batch reactors (SBRs) for 69 days, and its response was evaluated based on the sludge properties, microbial activity and community, and reactor performance. The results showed that Ag NPs caused inhibition to microbial activities of AGS from Day 35. At the end of 69 days of Ag NPs exposure, the microbial activity of AGS was significantly inhibited in terms of inhibitions of the ammonia oxidizing rate (33.0%), respiration rate (17.7% and 45.6%) and denitrification rate (6.8%), as well as decreases in the ammonia mono-oxygenase and nitrate reductase activities. During the long-term exposure, the AGS maintained its granular shape and large granule size (approximately 900 μm); the microbial community of AGS slightly changed, but the dominant microbial population remained. Overall, the AGS tolerated the toxicity of Ag NPs well, but a long-term exposure may produce chronic toxicity to the AGS, which is concerning. - Highlights: • AGS demonstrated a good tolerance to the long-term presence of Ag NPs. • Ag NPs did not produce acute toxicity but cause chronic toxicity to AGS. • AGS maintained granular shape, granule size and good settling ability. • The microbial community of AGS slightly changed after long-term Ag NPs exposure.

  20. Response of aerobic granular sludge to the long-term presence to nanosilver in sequencing batch reactors: Reactor performance, sludge property, microbial activity and community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) raises concerns about their potential toxic effects on the environment. Granular shape sludge is a special type of microbial aggregate. The response of aerobic granular sludge (AGS) to the long-term presence of Ag NPs has not been well studied. In this study, AGS was exposed to 5 and 50 mg/L Ag NPs in sequence batch reactors (SBRs) for 69 days, and its response was evaluated based on the sludge properties, microbial activity and community, and reactor performance. The results showed that Ag NPs caused inhibition to microbial activities of AGS from Day 35. At the end of 69 days of Ag NPs exposure, the microbial activity of AGS was significantly inhibited in terms of inhibitions of the ammonia oxidizing rate (33.0%), respiration rate (17.7% and 45.6%) and denitrification rate (6.8%), as well as decreases in the ammonia mono-oxygenase and nitrate reductase activities. During the long-term exposure, the AGS maintained its granular shape and large granule size (approximately 900 μm); the microbial community of AGS slightly changed, but the dominant microbial population remained. Overall, the AGS tolerated the toxicity of Ag NPs well, but a long-term exposure may produce chronic toxicity to the AGS, which is concerning. - Highlights: • AGS demonstrated a good tolerance to the long-term presence of Ag NPs. • Ag NPs did not produce acute toxicity but cause chronic toxicity to AGS. • AGS maintained granular shape, granule size and good settling ability. • The microbial community of AGS slightly changed after long-term Ag NPs exposure

  1. Microbial dynamics during azo dye degradation in a UASB reactor supplied with yeast extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S.Q.; Silva, D.C.; Lanna, M.C.S.; Baeta, B.E.L.; Aquino, S.F.

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the microbial dynamics during the anaerobic treatment of the azo dye blue HRFL in bench scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at ambient temperature. Sludge samples were collected under distinct operational phases, when the reactor were stable (low variation of color removal), to assess the effect of glucose and yeast extract as source of carbon and redox mediators, respectively. Reactors performance was evaluated based on COD (chemical oxygen demand) and color removal. The microbial dynamics were investigated by PCR-DGGE (Polimerase Chain Reaction - Denaturing Gradient of Gel Electrophoresis) technique by comparing the 16S rDNA profiles among samples. The results suggest that the composition of microorganisms changed from the beginning to the end of the reactor operation, probably in response to the presence of azo dye and/or its degradation byproducts. Despite the highest efficiency of color removal was observed in the presence of 500 mg/L of yeast extract (up to 93%), there were no differences regarding the microbial profiles that could indicate a microbial selection by the yeast extract addition. On the other hand Methosarcina barkeri was detected only in the end of operation when the best efficiencies on color removal occurred. Nevertheless the biomass selection observed in the last stages of UASB operation is probably a result of the washout of the sludge in response of accumulation of aromatic amines which led to tolerant and very active biomass that contributed to high efficiencies on color removal. PMID:25763018

  2. Adaptability of microbial inoculators and their contribution to degradation of mineral oil and PAHs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Five dominant bacteria strains(Acetobacter sp., Alcaligenes sp., Micrococcus sp., Arthrobacter sp. and Bacillus sp.) and five fungi strains (Cephalosporium sp. I, Cephalosporium sp. Ⅱ, Aspergillus sp. Ⅰ, Aspergillus sp. Ⅱ and Fusarium sp.) isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil were used to assess the potential capability of mineral oil and PAH enhanced degradation separately and jointly using the batch liquid medium cultivation with diesel oil spiked at 1000 mg/L. The experiment was performed on a reciprocal shaker in the darkness at 25℃ to 30℃ for 100 d. The dynamic variation in the activity of microbial inoculators in each treatment and the degradation of the target pollutants during the period of experiment were monitored. Results showed a more rapid biodegradation of mineral oil and PAHs at the beginning of the experiment (about 20 d) by dominant bacteria, fungi and their mixture than that of the indigenous microorganisms, however, thereafter an opposite trend was exhibited that the removal ratio by indigenous microorganisms was superior to any other dominant treatments and the tendency lasted till the end of the experiment, indicating the limited competitive capability of dominant microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, and the natural selection of indigenous microorganisms for use in the removal of the contaminants. At the end of the experiment, the removal ratio of mineral oil ranged from 56.8 % to 79.2 % and PAHs ranged from 96.8 % to 99.1% in each treatment by microbial inoculators.

  3. Chlorophenol removal from soil suspensions: effects of a specialised microbial inoculum and a degradable analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggi, Grazia; Cavalca, Lucia; Francia, Priscilla; Zangrossi, Maurizio

    2004-06-01

    Two soils of different contamination history were tested in slurry for their self-remediability towards mono-, di- and trisubstituted chlorophenols. The landfill soil showed poor ability in removing the compounds. Instead, the soil from the golf course, treated for many years with a 2,4,6-trichlorophenol derivative (Prochloraz), remediated different concentrations of the same 2,4,6TCP, 2,4-dichlorophenol and monochlorophenol isomers, singly and in mixtures, at varying degradation rates. Ralstonia eutropha TCP, a specialised microorganism capable of degrading 2,4,6TCP, proved highly efficient in removing the compound from both tested soils. The same microbial inoculum allowed total removal of the ternary mixture of monochlorophenol isomers from the golf course soil, but it did not accelerate the removal of the same compounds when singly supplied. The addition of phenol as a degradable analogue was more effective in co-metabolically removing not only the single monochlorophenols, but also their mixtures, the removal occurring faster and independently of the presence of the microbial inoculum. From the golf course soil, a microorganism, phenotypically and genetically identical to R. eutropha TCP, was isolated and classified as R. eutropha TCP II. PMID:15228073

  4. Ruminal degradation kinetic of Brachiaria brizantha silages with different microbial additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odimári Pricila Pires do Prado

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the carbohydrate fractions and estimate ruminal fermentation kinetics parameters of silages Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu with the inclusion of two microbial additives: Additive LPPP Pasture (Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus and additive BSLPPA Pasture (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus acidilactici. The experimental design was completely randomized with three different silages and three replications per silage. The silos were opened after 34 days of fermentation and then sent for laboratory analysis. For the fractionation of carbohydrates were determined total carbohydrates (TC, non-fiber carbohydrates (NFC, fractions A + B1 (fractions of fast and average ruminal degradation, B2 fraction (fraction slowly degraded in the rumen and fraction C (carbohydrates no digestible in the rumen. The gas production data were fitted to a logistic model bicompartimental. There was no difference in the values of the variables of fiber degradation (FC kinetic and no-fiber carbohydrates (NFC of the silages. However, silages Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu with use of additives LPPP and BSLPPA had higher fractions of digestible carbohydrates, reducing total carbohydrates and low indigestible fiber fraction of carbohydrates. Thus, the two microbial additives improved the nutritional value of silage Marandu-grass.

  5. Monomethylhydrazine degradation and its effect on carbon dioxide evolution and microbial populations in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monomethylhydrazine (MMH), along with hydrazine and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine are the main components of hydrazine fuels. Information on the fate of MMH in soil and its overall effect on soil microbial activity is not known, though MMH is known to be toxic to a number of soil bacteria. Despite the fact that axenic bacterial cultures are inhibited by the three hydrazines, Ou and Street reported that soil respiration, and total bacterial and fungal populations in soil, were not inhibited by hydrazine at concentrations of 100 μg/g and lower. Even at 500 μg/g, only total bacterial populations in soil were inhibited by the presence of hydrazine. They also reported that hydrazine rapidly disappeared in soil. The authors initiated this study to investigate the effect of MMH on soil microbial activity and on degradation of the chemical in soil

  6. Methanogenic degradation of lignin-derived monoaromatic compounds by microbial enrichments from rice paddy field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro; Chino, Kanako; Kamimura, Naofumi; Masai, Eiji; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of lignin-derived aromatics is an important metabolism for carbon and nutrient cycles in soil environments. Although there are some studies on degradation of lignin-derived aromatics by nitrate- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, knowledge on their degradation under methanogenic conditions are quite limited. In this study, methanogenic microbial communities were enriched from rice paddy field soil with lignin-derived methoxylated monoaromatics (vanillate and syringate) and their degradation intermediates (protocatechuate, catechol, and gallate) as the sole carbon and energy sources. Archaeal community analysis disclosed that both aceticlastic (Methanosarcina sp.) and hydrogenotrophic (Methanoculleus sp. and Methanocella sp.) methanogens dominated in all of the enrichments. Bacterial community analysis revealed the dominance of acetogenic bacteria (Sporomusa spp.) only in the enrichments on the methoxylated aromatics, suggesting that Sporomusa spp. initially convert vanillate and syringate into protocatechuate and gallate, respectively, with acetogenesis via O-demethylation. As the putative ring-cleavage microbes, bacteria within the phylum Firmicutes were dominantly detected from all of the enrichments, while the dominant phylotypes were not identical between enrichments on vanillate/protocatechuate/catechol (family Peptococcaceae bacteria) and on syringate/gallate (family Ruminococcaceae bacteria). This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation among acetogens, ring-cleaving fermenters/syntrophs and aceticlastic/hydrogenotrophic methanogens for degradation of lignin-derived aromatics under methanogenic conditions. PMID:26399549

  7. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation potential of Gulf of Mexico coastal microbial communities after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Kappell

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH blowout resulted in oil transport, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs to the Gulf of Mexico shoreline. The microbial communities of these shorelines are thought to be responsible for the intrinsic degradation of PAHs. To investigate the Gulf Coast beach microbial community response to hydrocarbon exposure, we examined the functional gene diversity, bacterial community composition, and PAH degradation capacity of a heavily oiled and non-oiled beach following the oil exposure. With a non-expression functional gene microarray targeting 539 gene families, we detected 28,748 coding sequences. Of these sequences, 10% were uniquely associated with the severely oil-contaminated beach and 6.0% with the non-oiled beach. There was little variation in the functional genes detected between the two beaches; however the relative abundance of functional genes involved in oil degradation pathways, including PAHs, were greater in the oiled beach. The microbial PAH degradation potentials of both beaches, were tested in mesocosms. Mesocosms were constructed in glass columns using sands with native microbial communities, circulated with artificial sea water and challenged with a mixture of PAHs. The low-molecular weight PAHs, fluorene and naphthalene, showed rapid depletion in all mesocosms while the high-molecular weight benzo[α]pyrene was not degraded by either microbial community. Both the heavily oiled and the non-impacted coastal communities showed little variation in their biodegradation ability for low molecular weight PAHs. Massively-parallel sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from mesocosm DNA showed that known PAH degraders and genera frequently associated with oil hydrocarbon degradation represented a major portion of the bacterial community. The observed similar response by microbial communities from beaches with a different recent history of oil exposure suggests that Gulf Coast beach communities are primed for PAH

  8. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Finke, Niko; Larsen, Ole;

    2005-01-01

    Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates—Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high...... of carbon degradation diverged, with an additional 43%, 32%, 33%, and 8% of Isochrysis, Iso-Ex, Spirulina, and Spir-Ex carbon respired to CO2 over the next 750 h of incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, the soluble, carbohydrate-rich extracts did not prove to be more labile substrates than the whole...... cells from which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the...

  9. Microbial phytase and liquid feeding increase phytate degradation in the gastrointestinal tract of growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Karoline; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative degradation of inositol phosphates (InsP6 to InsP2) in the stomach and small intestine as influenced by microbial phytase and fermented liquid feeding was compared by combining the results from two experiments. Six pigs (49 kg) were fitted with gastric cannulas ( Exp. 1 ) and 3...... was considerably smaller compared with pigs fed diet 1 due to phytase addition (P ≤ 0.001). On the other hand, the amount of ileal InsP6-P was only slightly less in pigs fed diet 2 compared with diet 1 indicating that InsP6 is greatly degraded in the small intestine. Furthermore, the amounts of gastric or ileal...

  10. Rates of CO2 production from the microbial degradation of transuranic wastes under simulated geologic isolation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transuranic wastes containing organic matter can serve as an energy source for microbial growth. The rates of microbial respiration during decomposition of several transuranic-contaminated waste materials were measured under environmental conditions representative of a geologic waste repository in bedded salt. The major observed effect of microbial activity on organic-matrix wastes was the generation of CO2 gas. Experimental variables studied include: incubation temperature (250 to 700C), atmosphere (aerobic and anaerobic), moisture content, brine content, and plutonium contamination level (0 to 40 microcuries of alpha activity per gram of waste). The maximum rate of CO2 generation observed was 11 g/day per gram of waste. The addition of 300 μg (20 μCi) of defense-grade PuO2 per gram of waste reduced the rate of CO2 generation by approximately 70%. Results indicate that microbial activity in existing drums of defense-related transuranic wastes has the potential to generate significant quantities of gas under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Carbon dioxide was the only gas detected in these studies. 42 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  11. Atrazine and terbutryn degradation in deposits from groundwater environment within the boreal region in Lahti, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talja, K Marja; Kaukonen, Sanna; Kilpi-Koski, Johanna; Malin, Ismo; Kairesalo, Timo; Romantschuk, Martin; Tuominen, Jari; Kontro, Merja H

    2008-12-24

    The degradation of pesticides atrazine and terbutryn was investigated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the northern boreal region subsurface deposits and sterilized controls from the depths of 6.3-21.0 m below the surface and 1.2-16.9 m below the groundwater table. During 1.3-1.7 years of laboratory incubation, atrazine degradation under aerobic conditions varied from rapid (half-live 38 days) to no degradation. Anaerobically, atrazine half-lives were 430-829 days. Organic matter, nitrogen, and lead in deposits correlated positively with the atrazine concentration in groundwater. Aerobic and anaerobic terbutryn half-lives were 193-644 and 266-400 days, respectively. Microbial aerobic atrazine and terbutryn degradation was confirmed in the deep deposits near the water table. Under aerobic conditions, the high amounts of Cr, Mn, Ni, and Zn in deposits decreased the chemical degradation of terbutryn. PMID:19053391

  12. Mining of hemicellulose and lignin degrading genes from differentially enriched methane producing microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Prabhakar D; Gulhane, Madhuri K; Khardenavis, Anshuman A; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-09-01

    Study creates a scenario for enrichment and selection of ligno-hemicellulose degrading genotypes with anaerobic bioreactor as a model using rice straw, vegetable waste and food waste as substrates. Relative discrimination analysis showed that the hydrolytic pathways and associated microbial communities for ligno-hemicellulose degradation were dominatingly colonized with rice straw as substrate. The dominating bacteria were Caldicellulosiruptor, Fervidobacterium, Cytophaga, Ruminococcus, Thermotoga associated with hemicellulose degradation and Burkholderia, Pandorea, Sphingomonas, Spirochaeta, Pseudomonas for lignocellulose hydrolysis. This was further supported by the abundance of anaerobic aromatic compound degrading genes along with genes for xylanase and xylosidase in rice straw enriched community. The metagenome analysis data was validated by evaluation of the biochemical methane potential for these substrates. Food waste being most amenable substrate yielded 1410mL of biogas/gVS added whereas, biogas yield of 1160mL/gVS and 1080mL/gVS was observed in presence of vegetable waste and rice straw respectively. PMID:27323244

  13. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulpa, C.F. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  14. Microbial community structure and diversity in an integrated system of anaerobic-aerobic reactors and a constructed wetland for the treatment of tannery wastewater in Modjo, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adey Feleke Desta

    Full Text Available A culture-independent approach was used to elucidate the microbial diversity and structure in the anaerobic-aerobic reactors integrated with a constructed wetland for the treatment of tannery wastewater in Modjo town, Ethiopia. The system has been running with removal efficiencies ranging from 94%-96% for COD, 91%-100% for SO4(2- and S(2-, 92%-94% for BOD, 56%-82% for total Nitrogen and 2%-90% for NH3-N. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed and microbial community assemblies were determined by analysis of a total of 801 unique clone sequences from all the sites. Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU--based analysis of the sequences revealed highly diverse communities in each of the reactors and the constructed wetland. A total of 32 phylotypes were identified with the dominant members affiliated to Clostridia (33%, Betaproteobacteria (10%, Bacteroidia (10%, Deltaproteobacteria (9% and Gammaproteobacteria (6%. Sequences affiliated to the class Clostridia were the most abundant across all sites. The 801 sequences were assigned to 255 OTUs, of which 3 OTUs were shared among the clone libraries from all sites. The shared OTUs comprised 80 sequences belonging to Clostridiales Family XIII Incertae Sedis, Bacteroidetes and unclassified bacterial group. Significantly different communities were harbored by the anaerobic, aerobic and rhizosphere sites of the constructed wetland. Numerous representative genera of the dominant bacterial classes obtained from the different sample sites of the integrated system have been implicated in the removal of various carbon- containing pollutants of natural and synthetic origins. To our knowledge, this is the first report of microbial community structure in tannery wastewater treatment plant from Ethiopia.

  15. Application of high OLR-fed aerobic granules for the treatment of low-strength wastewater: performance, granule morphology and microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingyun; Quan, Xiangchun; Li, Huai

    2013-08-01

    Aerobic granules, pre-cultivated at the organic loading rate (OLR) of 3.0 kg COD/(m3 x day), were used to treat low-strength wastewater in two sequencing batch reactors at low OLRs of 1.2 and 0.6 kg COD/(m3 x day), respectively. Reactor performance, evolution of granule morphology, structure and microbial community at low OLRs under long-term operation (130 days) were investigated. Results showed that low OLRs did not cause significant damage to granule structure as a dominant granule morphology with size over 540 microm was maintained throughout the operation. Aerobic granules at sizes of about 750 microm were finally obtained at the low OLRs. The granule reactors operated at low OLRs demonstrated effective COD and ammonia removals (above 90%), smaller granule sizes and less biomass. The contents of extracellular polymeric substances in the granules were decreased while the ratios of exopolysaccharide/exoprotein were increased (above 1.0). The granules cultivated at the low OLRs showed a smoother surface and more compact structure than the seeded granules. A significant shift in microbial community was observed but the microbial diversity remained relatively stable. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy observation showed that the live cells were spread throughout the whole granule, while the dead cells were mainly concentrated in the outer layer of the granule, and the proteins, polysaccharides and lipids were mainly located in the central regime of the granule. In conclusion, granules cultivated at high OLRs show potential for treating low-strength organic wastewater steadily under long-term operation. PMID:24520692

  16. Microbial Community Structure and Diversity in an Integrated System of Anaerobic-Aerobic Reactors and a Constructed Wetland for the Treatment of Tannery Wastewater in Modjo, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desta, Adey Feleke; Assefa, Fassil; Leta, Seyoum; Stomeo, Francesca; Wamalwa, Mark; Njahira, Moses; Appolinaire, Djikeng

    2014-01-01

    A culture-independent approach was used to elucidate the microbial diversity and structure in the anaerobic-aerobic reactors integrated with a constructed wetland for the treatment of tannery wastewater in Modjo town, Ethiopia. The system has been running with removal efficiencies ranging from 94%–96% for COD, 91%–100% for SO42- and S2-, 92%–94% for BOD, 56%–82% for total Nitrogen and 2%–90% for NH3-N. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed and microbial community assemblies were determined by analysis of a total of 801 unique clone sequences from all the sites. Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) - based analysis of the sequences revealed highly diverse communities in each of the reactors and the constructed wetland. A total of 32 phylotypes were identified with the dominant members affiliated to Clostridia (33%), Betaproteobacteria (10%), Bacteroidia (10%), Deltaproteobacteria (9%) and Gammaproteobacteria (6%). Sequences affiliated to the class Clostridia were the most abundant across all sites. The 801 sequences were assigned to 255 OTUs, of which 3 OTUs were shared among the clone libraries from all sites. The shared OTUs comprised 80 sequences belonging to Clostridiales Family XIII Incertae Sedis, Bacteroidetes and unclassified bacterial group. Significantly different communities were harbored by the anaerobic, aerobic and rhizosphere sites of the constructed wetland. Numerous representative genera of the dominant bacterial classes obtained from the different sample sites of the integrated system have been implicated in the removal of various carbon- containing pollutants of natural and synthetic origins. To our knowledge, this is the first report of microbial community structure in tannery wastewater treatment plant from Ethiopia. PMID:25541981

  17. Degradation of chlorpyrifos in laboratory soil and its impact on soil microbial functional diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Hua; YU Yunlong; CHU Xiaoqiang; WANG Xiuguo; YANG Xiaoe; YU Jingquan

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of chlorpyrifos at different concentrations in soil and its impact on soil microbial functional diversity were investigated under laboratory conditions. The degradation half-lives of chlorpyrifos at levels of 4, 8, and 12 mg/kg in soil were calculated to be 14.3, 16.7, and 18.0 d, respectively. The Biolog study showed that average well color development (AWCD) in soils was significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited by chlorpyrifos within the first two weeks and thereafter recovered to the similar level as the control. A similar variation in the diversity indices (Simpson index 1/D and McIntosh index U) in chlorpyrifos-treated soils was observed, no significant difference in the Shannon-Wiener index H' was found in these soils. With increasing chlorpyrifos concentration, the half-lives of chlorpyrifos were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) extended and its inhibitory effects on soil microorganisms were aggravated. It is concluded that chlorpyrifos residues in soil had a temporary or short-term inhibitory effect on soil microbial functional diversity.

  18. Degradation of oxytetracycline and its impacts on biogas-producing microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Halil; Ertekin, Emine; Ince, Orhan; Turker, Gokhan; Akyol, Çağrı; Ince, Bahar

    2016-07-01

    The effect of veterinary antibiotics in anaerobic digesters is a concern where methane production efficiency is highly dependent on microbial community structure. In this study, both anaerobic degradation of a common veterinary antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC), and its effects on an anaerobic digester microbial community were investigated. Qualitative and quantitative molecular tools were used to monitor changes in microbial community structure during a 60-day batch incubation period of cow manure with the addition of different concentrations of the antibiotic. Molecular data were interpreted by a further redundancy analysis as a multivariate statistics approach. At the end of the experiment, approximately 48, 33, and 17 % of the initially added 50, 100, and 200 mg l(-1) of OTC was still present in the serum bottles which reduced the biogas production via accumulation of some of the volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Biogas production was highly correlated with Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales gene copy numbers, and those parameters were negatively affected with oxytetracycline and VFA concentrations. PMID:26974525

  19. Polyphenols as enzyme inhibitors in different degraded peat soils: Implication for microbial metabolism in rewetted peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Dominik; Roth, Cyril; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Fenner, Nathalie; Reuter, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Recently, more than 30,000 ha of drained minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) in NE Germany were rewetted to restore their ecological functions. Due to an extended drainage history, a re-establishment of their original state is not expected in the short-term. Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, ammonium and phosphate have been measured in the soil porewater of the upper degraded peat layers of rewetted fens at levels of one to three orders higher than the values in pristine systems; an indicator of increased microbial activity in the upper degraded soil layers. On the other hand there is evidence that the substrate availability within the degraded peat layer is lowered since the organic matter has formerly been subject to intense decomposition over the decades of drainage and intense agricultural use of the areas. Previously however, it was suggested that inhibition of hydrolytic enzymes by polyphenolic substances is suspended during aeration of peat soils mainly due to the decomposition of the inhibiting polyphenols by oxidising enzymes such as phenol oxidase. Accordingly we hypothesised a lack of enzyme inhibiting polyphenols in degraded peat soils of rewetted fens compared to less decomposed peat of more natural fens. We collected both peat samples at the soil surface (0-20 cm) and fresh roots of dominating vascular plants and mosses (as peat parent material) from five formerly drained rewetted sites and five more natural sites of NE Germany and NW Poland. Less decomposed peat and living roots were used to obtain an internal standard for polyphenol analysis and to run enzyme inhibition tests. For all samples we determined the total phenolic contents and in addition we distinguished between the contents of hydrolysable and condensed tannic substances. From a methodical perspective the advantage of internal standards compared to the commercially available standards cyanidin chloride and tannic acid became apparent. Quantification with cyanidin or

  20. Microbial degradation of plant leachate alters lignin phenols and trihalomethane precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Brian A.; Hernes, Peter J.; Saraceno, John Franco; Spencer, Robert G.M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of vascular plant-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems has been studied, the role of leached DOC as precursors of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment is not well known. Here we measured the propensity of leachates from four crops and four aquatic macrophytes to form trihalomethanes (THMs)—a regulated class of DBPs—before and after 21 d of microbial degradation. We also measured lignin phenol content and specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) to test the assumption that aromatic compounds from vascular plants are resistant to microbial degradation and readily form DBPs. Leaching solubilized 9 to 26% of total plant carbon, which formed 1.93 to 6.72 mmol THM mol C-1 However, leachate DOC concentrations decreased by 85 to 92% over the 21-d incubation, with a concomitant decrease of 67 to 92% in total THM formation potential. Carbon-normalized THM yields in the residual DOC pool increased by 2.5 times on average, consistent with the preferential uptake of nonprecursor material. Lignin phenol concentrations decreased by 64 to 96% over 21 d, but a lack of correlation between lignin content and THM yields or SUVA254 suggested that lignin-derived compounds are not the source of increased THM precursor yields in the residual DOC pool. Our results indicate that microbial carbon utilization alters THM precursors in ecosystems with direct plant leaching, but more work is needed to identify the specific dissolved organic matter components with a greater propensity to form DBPs and affect watershed management, drinking water quality, and human health.

  1. Microbial degradation of acenapthene and napthalene under denitrification conditions in soil--water systems: Annual report, October 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihelcic, J.R.; Luthy, R.G.

    1987-10-01

    This study examined the microbial degradation of acenaphthene and naphthalene under denitrification conditions at soil-to-water ratios of 1:25 and 1:50 with soil containing approximately 10/sup 5/ denitrifying organisms per gram of soil. Under nitrate-excess conditions, both acenaphthene and naphthalene were degraded microbially from initial aqueous-phase concentrations of about one and several mg/l, respectively, to nondetectable levels (<0.01 mg/l) in time periods less than 9 weeks. Acclimation periods of 12 to 36 days were observed prior to the onset of microbial degradation in tests with soil not previously exposed to PAH, while acclimation periods were absent in tests with soil reserved from prior PAH degradation tests. It was judged that the apparent acclimation period resulted from the time for a small population of organisms capable of PAH degradation to attain sufficient densities to exhibit detectable PAH reduction. About 0.9 percent of the naturally occurring soil organic carbon could be mineralized under denitrification conditions, and this accounted for the greater proportion of the nitrate depletion. The mineralization of the labile fraction of the soil organic carbon via microbial denitrification occurred without an observed acclimation period, and was rapid compared to PAH degradation. Under nitrate-limiting conditions the PAH compounds were stable owing to the depletion of nitrate via the more rapid process of soil organic carbon mineralization. The microbial degradation of the PAH compound depends on the interrelationships between: the desorption kinetics and the reversibility of desorption of sorbed compound from the soil, the concentration of PAH-degrading microorganisms, and the competing reaction for nitrate utilization via mineralization of the labile fraction of naturally occurring soil organic carbon. 44 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Hydrocarbons: From Enzymatic Reactions to the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, Ralf; Boll, Matthias; Heider, Johann; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Buckel, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Golding, Bernard T; Gunsalus, Robert P; Kroneck, Peter M H; Krüger, Martin; Lueders, Tillmann; Martins, Berta M; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Schink, Bernhard; Seifert, Jana; Szaleniec, Maciej; Treude, Tina; Ullmann, G Matthias; Vogt, Carsten; von Bergen, Martin; Wilkes, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant in anoxic environments and pose biochemical challenges to their anaerobic degradation by microorganisms. Within the framework of the Priority Program 1319, investigations funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft on the anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons ranged from isolation and enrichment of hitherto unknown hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microorganisms, discovery of novel reactions, detailed studies of enzyme mechanisms and structures to process-oriented in situ studies. Selected highlights from this program are collected in this synopsis, with more detailed information provided by theme-focused reviews of the special topic issue on 'Anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons' [this issue, pp. 1-244]. The interdisciplinary character of the program, involving microbiologists, biochemists, organic chemists and environmental scientists, is best exemplified by the studies on alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases. Here, research topics ranged from in-depth mechanistic studies of archetypical toluene-activating benzylsuccinate synthase, substrate-specific phylogenetic clustering of alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases (toluene plus xylenes, p-cymene, p-cresol, 2-methylnaphthalene, n-alkanes), stereochemical and co-metabolic insights into n-alkane-activating (methylalkyl)succinate synthases to the discovery of bacterial groups previously unknown to possess alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases by means of functional gene markers and in situ field studies enabled by state-of-the-art stable isotope probing and fractionation approaches. Other topics are Mo-cofactor-dependent dehydrogenases performing O2-independent hydroxylation of hydrocarbons and alkyl side chains (ethylbenzene, p-cymene, cholesterol, n-hexadecane), degradation of p-alkylated benzoates and toluenes, glycyl radical-bearing 4-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase, novel types of carboxylation reactions (for acetophenone, acetone, and potentially also benzene and

  3. Supplementing barley or rapeseed meal to dairy cows fed grass-red clover silage: I. Rumen degradability and microbial flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahvenjärvi, S; Vanhatalo, A; Huhtanen, P

    2002-08-01

    The present study was conducted to measure the flow of microbial and nonmicrobial N fractions entering the omasal canal of lactating dairy cows fed grass-red clover silage supplemented with barley and rapeseed meal. Four ruminally cannulated Finnish Ayrshire dairy cows were fed, in a 4 x 4 Latin square design, grass-red clover silage alone or supplemented with (on DM basis) 5.1 kg/d of barley, 1.9 kg/d of rape-seed meal or 5.1 kg/d of barley and 1.9 kg/d rapeseed meal. Nonammonia N flow entering the omasal canal was fractionated into microbial and nonmicrobial N using 15N. Microbial N was fractionated into N associated with liquid-associated bacteria, particle-associated bacteria, and protozoa. Supplementation of diets with barley increased microbial N flow entering the omasal canal (P degradability, but increased true ruminal N degradability (P degradability (P degradability. Despite higher N excretion in urine, rapeseed meal improved daily N retention (P improvements in energy and protein supply for the animal. However, provision of readily digestible carbohydrates in barley did not improve microbial capture of ruminal ammonia. Benefits associated with rapeseed meal supplementation were explained as an increase in the supply of ruminally undegradable protein. PMID:12211388

  4. Microbial degradation of phosmet on blueberry fruit and in aqueous systems by indigenous bacterial flora on lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, K M; Bushway, A A; Bushway, R J; Davis-Dentici, K

    2007-10-01

    Phosmet-adapted bacteria isolated from lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium) were evaluated for their ability to degrade phosmet on blueberry fruit and in minimal salt solutions. Microbial metabolism of phosmet by isolates of Enterobacter agglomerans and Pseudomonas fluorescens resulted in significant reductions (P agglomerans or P. fluorescens and supplemented with phosmet or phosmet and glucose. Microbial degradation concurrent with the proliferation of P. fluorescens was similar in both liquid systems, indicative of preferential utilization of phosmet as an energy substrate. E. agglomerans exhibited the ability to degrade phosmet as a carbon source, yet in the presence of added glucose, phosmet degradation occurred within the 1st 24 h only followed by total population mortality resulting in no appreciable degradation. Characteristic utilization of glucose by this isolate suggests a possible switch in carbon substrate utilization away from phosmet, which resulted in toxicity from the remaining phosmet. Overall, microbial metabolism of phosmet as an energy source resulted in significant degradation of residues on blueberries and in minimal salt solutions. Thus, the role of adapted strains of E. agglomerans and P. fluorescens in degrading phosmet on blueberries represents an extensive plant-microorganism relationship, which is essential to determination of phosmet persistence under pre- and postharvest conditions. PMID:17995608

  5. Microbial colonization and degradation of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic bags in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauendorf, Alice; Krause, Stefan; Bigalke, Nikolaus K; Gorb, Elena V; Gorb, Stanislav N; Haeckel, Matthias; Wahl, Martin; Treude, Tina

    2016-02-15

    To date, the longevity of plastic litter at the sea floor is poorly constrained. The present study compares colonization and biodegradation of plastic bags by aerobic and anaerobic benthic microbes in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments. Samples of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic carrier bags were incubated in natural oxic and anoxic sediments from Eckernförde Bay (Western Baltic Sea) for 98 days. Analyses included (1) microbial colonization rates on the bags, (2) examination of the surface structure, wettability, and chemistry, and (3) mass loss of the samples during incubation. On average, biodegradable plastic bags were colonized five times higher by aerobic and eight times higher by anaerobic microbes than polyethylene bags. Both types of bags showed no sign of biodegradation during this study. Therefore, marine sediment in temperate coastal zones may represent a long-term sink for plastic litter and also supposedly compostable material. PMID:26790603

  6. Oil sands to the rescue: oil sand microbial communities can degrade recalcitrant alkyl phenyl alkanoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, Corinne [University of Essex (Canada)], email: cwhitby@essex.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    Almost half of all global oil reserves are found as biodegraded heavy oils found in vast tar sand deposits located in North and South America and these account for 47% of Canadian oil production. Oil sand extraction generates large amounts of toxic waste water, known as oil sand process waters (OSPW), that are stored in large tailing ponds that contain toxic compounds like naphthenic acids (NAs). The presence of NAs creates problems like toxicity, corrosion, and the formation of calcium napthenate deposits which block pipelines and other infrastructure and need to be removed. This paper presents oil sand microbial communities that can degrade these NAs. The approach is to apply new aliphatic and aromatic NAs as substrates to supplement and identify NA degrading microbes and also to identify the metabolites produced and explain NA degradation pathways and the functional genes involved. The chemistry and the processes involved are explained. From the results, it is suggested that pure cultures of P. putida KT2440 be used against NAs.

  7. Fate of organo-mineral particles in streams: Microbial degradation by streamwater & biofilm assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W. R.; Raich, M.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Inland waters are of global biogeochemical importance. They receive carbon inputs of ~ 4.8 Pg C/ y of which, 12 % is buried, 18 % transported to the oceans, and 70 % supports aquatic secondary production. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of organic matter (OM) in these systems are poorly defined. One aspect of this is the formation of organo-mineral complexes in aquatic systems and their potential as a route for OM transport and burial vs. their use as carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources within aquatic systems. Organo-mineral particles form by sorption of dissolved OM to freshly eroded mineral surfaces and may contribute to ecosystem-scale particulate OM fluxes. We experimentally tested the availability of mineral-sorbed OM as a C & N source for streamwater microbial assemblages and streambed biofilms. Organo-mineral particles were constructed in vitro by sorption of 13C:15N-labelled amino acids to hydrated kaolin particles, and microbial degradation of these particles compared with equivalent doses of 13C:15N-labelled free amino acids. Experiments were conducted in 120 ml mesocosms over 7 days using biofilms and water sampled from the Oberer Seebach stream (Austria). Each incubation experienced a 16:8 light:dark regime, with metabolism monitored via changes in oxygen concentrations between photoperiods. The relative fate of the organo-mineral particles was quantified by tracing the mineralization of the 13C and 15N labels and their incorporation into microbial biomass. Here we present the initial results of 13C-label mineralization, incorporation and retention within dissolved organic carbon pool. The results indicate that 514 (× 219) μmol/ mmol of the 13:15N labeled free amino acids were mineralized over the 7-day incubations. By contrast, 186 (× 97) μmol/ mmol of the mineral-sorbed amino acids were mineralized over a similar period. Thus, organo-mineral complexation reduced amino acid mineralization by ~ 60 %, with no differences observed

  8. Post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 using aerobic moving bed biofilm process: Enhanced removal of aromatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Biofilm process was applied as post-treatment of anaerobically degraded an azo dye. → More than 65% of the dye total metabolites was completely mineralized. → Based on HPLC analysis, more than 80% of 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate was removed. → Inhibition of biofilm growth was increased with increasing the initial dye concentration. → Considerable porous morphology was observed in the SEM photographs of the biofilm. - Abstract: The application of aerobic moving bed biofilm process as post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 was investigated in this study. The main objective of this work was to enhance removal of anaerobically formed the dye aromatic metabolites. Three separate sequential treatment systems were operated with different initial dye concentrations of 100, 500 and 1000 mg/L. Each treatment system consisted of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (An-SBR) followed by an aerobic moving bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (MB-SBBR). Up to 98% of the dye decolorization and more than 80% of the COD removal occurred anaerobically. The obtained results suggested no significant difference in COD removal as well as the dye decolorization efficiency using three An-SBRs receiving different initial dye concentrations. Monitoring the dye metabolites through HPLC suggested that more than 80% of anaerobically formed 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate was completely removed in the aerobic biofilm reactors. Based on COD analysis results, at least 65-72% of the dye total metabolites were mineralized during the applied treatment systems. According to the measured biofilm mass and also based on respiration-inhibition test results, increasing the initial dye concentration inhibited the growth and final mass of the attached-growth biofilm in MB-SBBRs.

  9. 不同微生物菌剂对玉米秸秆好氧堆肥效果的影响%Effects of Different Microbial Inoculants on Aerobic Composting of Corn Stalk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯致; 李杰; 张国斌; 李雯琳; 贾豪语; 刘赵帆; 郁继华

    2013-01-01

    This study was committed to screen out the suitable corn stalk single fermentation mi-crobial inoculants on the northwest desert region of non-cultivated land in an aerobic composting test. Three representative microbial inoculants (microbial inoculant 1 is mainly consisted of cellulose fungus and degraded starch bacillus;microbial inoculant 2 is mainly consisted of Bacillus subtilis,Strepto-myces tendae,Streptomyces albogriseolus,Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma reesei;microbial inoculant 3 is mainly consisted of dozens microorganisms and bio-enzyme) were selected to do the com-post experiment on corn stalk,not adding inoculants for the control check. The stacking temperature, moisture content,pH,germination seed index and other factors were surveyed and analyzed during the composting. The results show that adding microbial inoculants can effectively speed up the fermentation. The effects are better than that without addition.The temperatures of adding microbial inoculant 1 and microbial inoculant 3 treatments are relatively higher,which rose to 55 °C after 2 days.High tempera-ture lasted for 27 and 33 days,respectively.In the microbial inoculant 2 treatment,high temperature had short duration.The seed germination index was over 80% after 30 d,when treated by microbial inoculant 1 and microbial inoculant 3,while the CK needed 40 d.The total organic carbon contents of various treatments showed a downward trend,when fermentation was implemented. Treatment of micro-bial inoculant 3 had the fastest speed for organic carbon degradation.The pH values of all treatments were within the scope suitable for matured compost.We can summarize that the effect of microbial in-oculant 3 is the best,microbial inoculant 1 is second and microbial inoculant 2 is worst.%  为了筛选适合西北非耕地荒漠区玉米秸秆单一发酵的微生物菌剂,以不添加菌剂为对照,研究了3种微生物菌剂(菌剂1主要由纤维素菌和降解淀

  10. Microbial community structure in a thermophilic aerobic digester used as a sludge pretreatment process for the mesophilic anaerobic digestion and the enhancement of methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Park, Sang Kyu; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-10-01

    An effective two-stage sewage sludge digestion process, consisting of thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) followed by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD), was developed for efficient sludge reduction and methane production. Using TAD as a biological pretreatment, the total volatile suspended solid reduction (VSSR) and methane production rate (MPR) in the MAD reactor were significantly improved. According to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, the results indicated that the dominant bacteria species such as Ureibacillus thermophiles and Bacterium thermus in TAD were major routes for enhancing soluble organic matter. TAD pretreatment using a relatively short SRT of 1 day showed highly increased soluble organic products and positively affected an increment of bacteria populations which performed interrelated microbial metabolisms with methanogenic species in the MAD; consequently, a quantitative real-time PCR indicated greatly increased Methanosarcinales (acetate-utilizing methanogens) in the MAD, resulting in enhanced methane production. PMID:23419990

  11. The Analysis of a Microbial Community in the UV/O3-Anaerobic/Aerobic Integrated Process for Petrochemical Nanofiltration Concentrate (NFC) Treatment by 454-Pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; He, Wenjie; Wei, Li; Li, Chunying; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, high-throughput pyrosequencing was applied on the analysis of the microbial community of activated sludge and biofilm in a lab-scale UV/O3- anaerobic/aerobic (A/O) integrated process for the treatment of petrochemical nanofiltration concentrate (NFC) wastewater. NFC is a type of saline wastewater with low biodegradability. From the anaerobic activated sludge (Sample A) and aerobic biofilm (Sample O), 59,748 and 51,231 valid sequence reads were obtained, respectively. The dominant phylotypes related to the metabolism of organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation, assimilation of carbon from benzene, and the biodegradation of nitrogenous organic compounds were detected as genus Clostridium, genera Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas, class Betaproteobacteria, and genus Hyphomicrobium. Furthermore, the nitrite-oxidising bacteria Nitrospira, nitrite-reducing and sulphate-oxidising bacteria (NR-SRB) Thioalkalivibrio were also detected. In the last twenty operational days, the total Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal efficiencies on average were 64.93% and 62.06%, respectively. The removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen and Total Nitrogen (TN) on average were 90.51% and 75.11% during the entire treatment process. PMID:26461260

  12. The Analysis of a Microbial Community in the UV/O3-Anaerobic/Aerobic Integrated Process for Petrochemical Nanofiltration Concentrate (NFC Treatment by 454-Pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wei

    Full Text Available In this study, high-throughput pyrosequencing was applied on the analysis of the microbial community of activated sludge and biofilm in a lab-scale UV/O3- anaerobic/aerobic (A/O integrated process for the treatment of petrochemical nanofiltration concentrate (NFC wastewater. NFC is a type of saline wastewater with low biodegradability. From the anaerobic activated sludge (Sample A and aerobic biofilm (Sample O, 59,748 and 51,231 valid sequence reads were obtained, respectively. The dominant phylotypes related to the metabolism of organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH biodegradation, assimilation of carbon from benzene, and the biodegradation of nitrogenous organic compounds were detected as genus Clostridium, genera Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas, class Betaproteobacteria, and genus Hyphomicrobium. Furthermore, the nitrite-oxidising bacteria Nitrospira, nitrite-reducing and sulphate-oxidising bacteria (NR-SRB Thioalkalivibrio were also detected. In the last twenty operational days, the total Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD and Total Organic Carbon (TOC removal efficiencies on average were 64.93% and 62.06%, respectively. The removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen and Total Nitrogen (TN on average were 90.51% and 75.11% during the entire treatment process.

  13. Relationship Between Vegetation Restoration and Soil Microbial Characteristics in Degraded Karst Regions: A Case StudyABSTRACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yuan; YU Li-Fei; MANG Jin-Chi; YU Yuan-Chun; D.L.DEANGELIS

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of vegetation restoration on degraded karst regions has been a research focus of soil science and ecology for the last decade. In an attempt to preferably interpret the soil microbiological characteristic variation associated with vegetation restoration and further to explore the role of soil microbiology in vegetation restoration mechanisin of degraded karst regions, we measured microbial biomass C and basal respiration in soils during vegetation restoration in Zhenfeng County of southwestern Guizhou Province,China. The community level physiological profiles (CLPP) of the soil microbial community to were estimated determine if vegetation changes were accompanied by changes in functioning of soil microbial communities. The results showed that soil microbial biomass C and microbial quotient (microbial biomass C/organic C) tended to increase with vegetation restoration, being in the order arboreal community stage > shrubby community stage > herbaceous community stage > bare land stage. Similar trend was found in the change of basal respiration (BR). The metabolic quotient (thc ratio of basal respiration to microbial biomass, qCO2) decreased with vegetation restoration, and remained at a constantly low level in the arboreal community stage. Analyses of the CLPP data indicated that vegetation restoration tended to result in higher average well color development, substrate richness, and functional diversity.Average utilization of specific substrate guilds was highest in the arboreal community stage. Principle component analysis of the CLPP data further indicated that the arboreal community stage was distinctly different from the other three stages. In conclusion,vegetation restoration improved soil microbial biomass C, respiration, and utilization of carbon sources, and decreased qCO2, thus creating better soil conditions, which in turn could promote the restoration of vegetation on degraded karst regions.

  14. Biomarkers of Microbial Metabolism for Monitoring in-situ Anaerobic PAH Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L.; Phelps, C.; Battistelli, J.

    2002-12-01

    Monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic compounds found in petroleum and its products are subject to biodegradation in the absence of oxygen. These anaerobic pathways reveal novel mechanism of microbial transformation through a series of metabolites and intermediates which are unique to the anaerobic degradation process. The presence of these compounds in-situ, then conceptually can serve as indicators that anaerobic degradation is taking place. We have laboratory studies and field samples which support this concept for BTX and PAH compounds. Environments in which these anaerobic degradation processes have been observed include freshwater and estuarine sediments, groundwater from impacted aquifers at a former manufactured gas plant and gasoline station, and a creosote-contaminated aquifer. Analytical protocols were developed to detect nanomolar concentrations from soil slurries and groundwater samples and microcosm studies verified their formation from field samples and use as biomarkers of activity. Recent studies on the mechanisms of anaerobic naphthalene and methylnaphthalene metabolism have identified several unusual compounds that can serve as biomarkers for monitoring in situ PAH biodegradation. For naphthalene these include 2-naphthoic acid (2-NA), tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid (TH-2-NA), hexahydro-2-naphthoic acid (HH-2-NA) and methylnaphthoic acid (MNA) generated by sulfate-reducing bacteria degrading naphthalene or methylnaphthalene. Groundwater samples were analyzed from wells distributed throughout an anaerobic, creosote-contaminated aquifer and also from a leaking underground storage site. Samples were extracted, derivatized and analyzed by GC/MS. The concentration of 2-NA at each monitoring well was quantified and correlated to the zones of naphthalene contamination. Taken together with measurements of the aquifer's physical characteristics, these biomarker data can be used to describe the extent of naphthalene biodegradation at these site.

  15. Microbial degradation of pesticides in rapid sand filters for treatment of drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark drinking water supply is based on groundwater which is treated by aeration followed by filtration in rapid sand filters. Unfortunately pesticide contamination of the groundwater poses a threat to the water supply, since the simple treatment process at the waterworks is not considered to...... remove pesticides from the water phase and pesticides are detected in 24% of the active Danish waterworks wells. This study aimed at investigating the potential of microbial pesticide removal in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment. Removal of the pesticides MCPP, bentazone, glyphosate and the...... degradation compound p-nitrophenol was investigated in the rapid sand filters at Islevbro and Sjælsø waterworks plant I and II. Microcosms were set up with sand from rapid sand filters, water and an initial pesticide concentration of 0.03-0.38 μg/L. In all the investigated waterworks the concentration of...

  16. Limited microbial degradation of pyrene metabolites from the estuarine polychaete Nereis diversicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessing, Anders M B; Johnsen, Anders R

    2005-12-01

    We compared microbial mineralization of [4,5,9,10-14C]pyrene and its eukaryotic [4,5,9,10-14C]pyrene metabolites in estuarine sediments. Metabolites were obtained by exposing the estuarine deposit-feeding polychaete Nereis diversicolor to sediment-associated 14C-pyrene, followed by homogenization of the worms and extraction of the pyrene-metabolites. In sediment from a pristine Danish Fjord only 2.6% of the added metabolite-label and 1.7% of the pyrene-label were mineralized to 14CO2 during 175 days incubation. Pre-exposure of the pristine sediment to unlabelled pyrene for 60 days increased the mineralization potential for 14C-pyrene substantially, as 81.2% was mineralized to 14CO2 during 95 days incubation, whereas 14C-pyrene metabolite label was unaffected by pre-exposure to pyrene. In comparison, naturally aged bunker-oil contaminated sediment did not show elevated potentials for mineralization of neither 14C-pyrene nor 14C-metabolites. Six bacterial strains of known pyrene degraders were tested for growth on crystalline 1-hydroxypyrene. 1-Hydroxypyrene is the only intermediate eucaryotic metabolite of pyrene. The results indicate that 1-hydroxypyrene was not utilized as a sole source of carbon and energy by any of them. In addition, respiration was depressed in all six strains when exposed to crystalline 1-Hydroxypyrene, demonstrating an acute toxic effect of 1-hydroxypyrene. The results presented here suggest that microbial degradation of pyrene is not enhanced by release of aqueous and polar metabolites by marine invertebrates. PMID:15922404

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) anaerobic degradation in marine sediments: microcosm study and role of autochthonous microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, Bruna; Ubaldi, Carla; Grenni, Paola; Caracciolo, Anna Barra; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) biodegradation was followed for 1 year in microcosms containing marine sediments collected from Mar Piccolo (Taranto, Italy) chronically contaminated by this class of hazardous compounds. The microcosms were performed under strictly anaerobic conditions with or without the addition of Dehalococcoides mccartyi, the main microorganism known to degrade PCBs through the anaerobic reductive dechlorination process. Thirty PCB congeners were monitored during the experiments revealing that the biodegradation occurred in all microcosms with a decrease in hepta-, hexa-, and penta-chlorobiphenyls (CBs) and a parallel increase in low chlorinated PCBs (tri-CBs and tetra-CBs). The concentrations of the most representative congeners detected in the original sediment, such as 245-245-CB and 2345-245-CB, and of the mixture 2356-34-CB+234-245-CB, decreased by 32.5, 23.8, and 46.7 %, respectively, after only 70 days of anaerobic incubation without any bioaugmentation treatment. Additionally, the structure and population dynamics of the microbial key players involved in the biodegradative process and of the entire mixed microbial community were accurately defined by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) in both the original sediment and during the operation of the microcosm. The reductive dehalogenase genes of D. mccartyi, specifically involved in PCB dechlorination, were also quantified using real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results demonstrated that the autochthonous microbial community living in the marine sediment, including D. mccartyi (6.32E+06 16S rRNA gene copy numbers g(-1) sediment), was able to efficiently sustain the biodegradation of PCBs when controlled anaerobic conditions were imposed. PMID:26162439

  18. Impact of long term pesticide usage on soil microbial activities and 14C-monocrotophos degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of long term pesticide usage on soil microbial activities and degradation of 14C-monocrotophos was observed under cotton field conditions. The experimental field was divided into treated and untreated plots. Pesticides were applied to treated plots at weekly intervals as in common practice in Thailand. The total numbers of applications were 11, 16 and 16 for first, second and third crop seasons, during the three years from 1996 to 1998. Soil samples at depths of 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm were sampled before and after pesticide application for the first two crops, while in the third crop season only the surface layer of soil was taken. The samples were assessed for CO2 from respiration, soil microbial population, iron reduction capacity, and rates of nitrification. Soil biomass and microbial activities as measured from respiration and iron reduction decreased in the treated plots at both depths after each pesticide application over the three crop seasons, whereas samples from untreated plots at both depths did not show decreases. Repeated application of pesticides did not show any effect on nitrification rates of the first crop but there was inhibition in the second and third crops. Soil columns, treated with 14C-monocrotophos one week after last pesticide application, were harvested after 0, 3, 6, 9, 18, 24 and 30 months. Extractable residues of 14C were found only in the 0-15 cm layer. In treated and untreated plots, residues declined from 80.17 and 85.68 to 0.44% of the applied 14C within 6 months. The long term usage of pesticides did not affect the half-life of 14C-monocrotophos. Bound residues of 14C were found at the highest concentrations, 18.94 and 12.58% of that applied, at 6 months in treated and untreated plots, thereafter the binding decreased to 4.68 and 2.74% within 30 months. (author)

  19. Dynamic changes of the dominant functioning microbial community in the compost of a 90-m(3) aerobic solid state fermentor revealed by integrated meta-omics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Huaiqiang; Wang, Zhiheng; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic changes in the composition and function of both bacterial and fungal communities over time and at various depths in the compost of a 90-m(3) industrial-scale fermentor were explored using integrated meta-omics. The microbial communities in the middle layer (1.2m) of the compost developed a stable and simple structure over time, which was mainly composed of Thermobifida, Bacillus, Thermomyces and Aspergillus. According to the metaproteomic results, the bacterial community was more focused on cellulose degradation, characterized by 44% of the cellulases that were secreted by Thermobifida, while the fungal community was more likely to degrade hemicellulose, mainly via Thermomyces and Aspergillus. The results revealed that, under artificial control of the temperature and oxygen concentration, the efficiency of organic waste degradation was greatly increased and the fermentation cycle was shortened to 11days. PMID:26720133

  20. A comparative study of microbial communities in four soil slurries capable of RDX degradation using illumina sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamani, Indumathy; Cupples, Alison M

    2015-06-01

    The nitramine explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) has contaminated many military sites. Recently, attempts to remediate these sites have focused on biostimulation to promote RDX biodegradation. Although many RDX degrading isolates have been obtained in the laboratory, little is known about the potential of microorganisms to degrade this chemical while existing in a soil community. The current study examined and compared the RDX degrading communities in four soil slurries to elucidate the potential of natural systems to degrade this chemical. These soils were selected as they had no previous exposure to RDX, therefore their microbial communities offered an excellent baseline to determine changes following RDX degradation. High throughput sequencing was used to determine which phylotypes experienced an increase in relative abundance following RDX degradation. For this, total genomic DNA was sequenced from (1) the initial soil, (2) soil slurry microcosms following RDX degradation and (3) control soil slurry microcosms without RDX addition. The sequencing data provided valuable information on which phylotypes increased in abundance following RDX degradation compared to control microcosms. The most notable trend was the increase in abundance of Brevundimonas and/or unclassified Bacillaceae 1 in the four soils studied. Although isolates of the family Bacillaceae 1 have previously been linked to RDX degradation, isolates of the genus Brevundimonas have not been previously associated with RDX degradation. Overall, the data suggest these two phylotypes have key roles in RDX degradation in soil communities. PMID:25913213

  1. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Microbial Contributions to Stable Soil OC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.; Egerton-Warburton, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal OC can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2 month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. Additionally, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes were among the dominant fungal species involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycetes. At the end of the 2 month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibit varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16 and C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue, others maintaining steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (e.g. C18), and some increasing in concentration throughout the degradation (e.g. C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties, including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker distributions, and OC turnover times.

  2. Microbial degradation. Mass transfer in the system pollutant - water - sediment; Mikrobieller Abbau. Massentransfer im System Schadstoff - Wasser - Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiehm, Andreas [Technologiezentrum Wasser (TZW), Karlsruhe (Germany). Abt. Umweltbiotechnologie und Altlasten; Kranzioch, Irene; Stoll, Claudia

    2011-09-15

    The microbial degradation of pollutants in the aquatic environment essentially is influenced by the prevailing redox conditions and mass exchange processes (bioavailability). Within a new project, the Technologiezentrum Wasser TZW (Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany) deals with the microbial conversion under dynamic conditions such as those expected in the area of the Three Gorges Dam at the Yangtze River. In particular, molecular-biological methods (PCR, polymerase chain reaction and DGGE Denatured gradient gel electrophoresis) are used for a targeted monitoring and further developed. The focus of the investigation initially focuses on the degradation of halogenated substances which are used as main substances for understanding the mass exchange between sediment and water as well as the microbial conversion processes. An enhanced understanding of the process and the compilation of the dynamic sales performance can be defined as a target.

  3. [Electricity generation and contaminants degradation performances of a microbial fuel cell fed with Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Xiu-Ping; Xu, Nan; Ni, Jin-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The electricity generation performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) utilizing Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater was studied with an H-shape reactor. Indexes including pH, conductivity, oxidation peak potential and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the anolyte were monitored to investigate the contaminants degradation performance of the MFC during the electricity generation process, besides, contaminant ingredients in anodic influent and effluent were analyzed by GC-MS and IR spectra as well. The maximum power density of the MFC could achieve 118.1 mW/m2 and the internal resistance was about 480 omega. Connected with a 1 000 omega external resistance, the output potential was about 0.4 V. Fed with 5 mL Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater, the electricity generation lasted about 133 h and the coulombic efficiency was about 3.93%. At the end of electricity generation cycle, COD decreased by 90.1% while NH4(+) -N decreased by 66.8%. Furfural compounds, phenols and some other complicated organics could be decomposed and utilized in the electricity generation process, and the residual contaminants in effluent included some long-chain fatty acids, esters, ethers, and esters with benzene ring, cycloalkanes, cycloolefins, etc. The results indicate that MFC, which can degrade and utilize the organic contaminants in Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater simultaneously, provides a new approach for resource recovery treatment of Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater. PMID:21404685

  4. 水解单宁的微生物降解%Microbial Degradation of Hydrolysable Tannins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明姝; 姚开; 贾冬英; 何强

    2006-01-01

    单宁为高等植物的次生代谢产物,是相对分子质量为300到3 000的多酚类化合物,主要分为水解单宁和缩合单宁两大类.根据水解单宁结构特性的差异,又将其分为棓单宁和鞣花单宁.自然界中的某些微生物具有忍耐单宁的特性,甚至可以将单宁降解成具有一定生理或药理活性的小分子单宁或其衍生物.由于缩合单宁的分子结构复杂,对其微生物降解的研究远不及水解单宁深入.本文综述了近年来关于细菌和真菌降解棓单宁和鞣花单宁的研究情况,阐述了其降解机理,提出了微生物降解单宁需要解决的问题,可为单宁生物降解的进一步研究提供参考.%Tannins are water-soluble polyphenolic secondary metabolites of higher plants with the molar mass from 300 to 3 000 . Hydrolysable and condensed tannins are the two major classes of tannins. There are two groups of hydrolysable tannins: gallotannins and ellagitannins on the basis of structural characteristics. In nature, some microbes are resistant to tannins, even capable of degrading tannins into low-molar-mass tannins and lots of derivatives which have marked biological and pharmacological activities. Gallotannins can be degraded more easily than ellagitannins which have complicated structures with the further coupling C-C bond. However, some bacteria and fungi from the ellagitannin-rich soil, leaves and tannery liquors can hydrolyze ellagitannins. Because of the complicated structures of the further coupling C-C bonds, both complex tannins and condensed tannins are harder to be degraded than gallotannins and ellagitannins in both aerobic and anaerobic environments. This review could provide much references for the further researches on biodegradation of tannins.

  5. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microbial consortia enriched from three soils using two different culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium composed of many different bacterial species is required to efficiently degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in oil-contaminated soil. We obtained six PAH-degrading microbial consortia from three oil-contaminated soils using two different isolation culture media. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequence analyses of amplified 16s rRNA genes confirmed the bacterial community was greatly affected by both the culture medium and the soil from which the consortia were enriched. Three bacterial consortia enriched using malt yeast extract (MYE) medium showed higher degradation rates of PAHs than consortia enriched using Luria broth (LB) medium. Consortia obtained from a soil and then added back to that same soil was more effective in degrading PAHs than adding, to the same soil, consortia isolated from other, unrelated soils. This suggests that inoculum used for bioremediation should be from the same, or very similar nearby soils, as the soil that is actually being bioremediated. -- Highlights: •Six PAH-degrading microbial consortia were isolated from three oil-contaminated soils. •The bacterial community by 16s rRNA genes was affected by culture media and source soil. •Inoculum should be from the same or similar soil as the soil being bioremediated. -- Bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils was most effective when using inoculum of microbial consortia from the same or similar soil as the soil being bioremediated

  6. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo;

    2014-01-01

    hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas...

  7. In situ exposure to low herbicide concentrations affects microbial population composition and catabolic gene frequency in an aerobic shallow aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, J.R.; Tuxen, Nina; Johnsen, Kaare;

    2003-01-01

    probable number assays, and their presence was only detected in herbicide-exposed sediments. Similarly, PCR analysis showed that the 2,4-dichlorophe-noxyacetic acid degradation pathway genes tfdA and tfdB (10(2) to 10(3) gene copies g(-1) sediment) were only detected in sediments from contaminated areas of...... the aquifer. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism measurements demonstrated the presence of different populations of tfd genes, suggesting that the in situ herbicide degradation was caused by the activity of a heterogeneous population of phenoxy acid degraders. The number of Pseudomonas...

  8. Metabolism of 2-Chloro-4-Nitroaniline via Novel Aerobic Degradation Pathway by Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB-P1

    OpenAIRE

    Fazlurrahman Khan; Deepika Pal; Surendra Vikram; Swaranjit Singh Cameotra

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium...

  9. MALDI-TOF MS Imaging evidences spatial differences in the degradation of solid polycaprolactone diol in water under aerobic and denitrifying conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Daniel; Ginebreda, Antoni; Pérez, Sandra; Quero, Carmen; Barceló, Damià

    2016-10-01

    Degradation of solid polymers in the aquatic environment encompasses a variety of biotic and abiotic processes giving rise to heterogeneous patterns across the surface of the material, which cannot be investigated using conventional Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) that only renders an "average" picture of the sample. In that context, MALDI-TOF MS Imaging (MALDI MSI) provides a rapid and efficient tool to study 2D spatial changes occurred in the chemical composition of the polymer surface. Commercial polycaprolactone diol (average molecular weight of 1250Da) was selected as test material because it had been previously known to be amenable to biological degradation. The test oligomer probe was incubated under aerobic and denitrifying conditions using synthetic water and denitrifying mixed liquor obtained from a wastewater treatment plant respectively. After ca. seven days of exposure the mass spectra obtained by MALDI MSI showed the occurrence of chemical modifications in the sample surface. Observed heterogeneity across the probe's surface indicated significant degradation and suggested the contribution of biotic processes. The results were investigated using different image processing tools. Major changes on the oligomer surface were observed when exposed to denitrifying conditions. PMID:27213667

  10. Stable isotope fractionation during PCE halorespiration and aerobic cisDCE and VC biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of our study were to identify the anaerobic/aerobic dechlorination mechanisms at two chloroethene-contaminated sites, to assess the isotopic enrichment factors in groundwater microcosms, and to evaluate microbial degradation in the field based on the isotopic signatures. In anaerobic microcosms, a transformation of PCE and TCE to cisDCE was observed. Halo respiration was accompanied by isotopic fractionation effects similar to previous publications. In aerobic microcosms, cisDCE and VC were degraded indicating a co-metabolic degradation of cisDCE in the course of VC degradation. In other experiments, only VC was degraded. Enrichment factors were determined during aerobic degradation of cisDCE and VC. These factors are significantly higher than factors published previously. This study demonstrates that isotope fractionation is suitable for assessing anaerobic/aerobic chloroethene degradation. However, the factors vary for different degradation pathways and micro organisms. Therefore, site-specific enrichment factors have to be determined in order to quantify natural attenuation processes in the field. (author)

  11. Triclosan affects the microbial community in simulated sewage-drain-field soil and slows down xenobiotic degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of the common antibacterial agent triclosan on microbial communities and degradation of domestic xenobiotics were studied in simulated sewage-drain-field soil. Cultivable microbial populations decreased 22-fold in the presence of 4 mg kg-1 of triclosan, and triclosan-resistant Pseudomonas strains were strongly enriched. Exposure to triclosan also changed the general metabolic profile (Ecoplate substrate profiling) and the general profile (T-RFLP) of the microbial community. Triclosan degradation was slow at all concentrations tested (0.33-81 mg kg-1) during 50-days of incubation. Mineralization experiments (14C-tracers) and chemical analyses (LC-MS/MS) showed that the persistence of a linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) and a common analgesic (ibuprofen) increased with increasing triclosan concentrations (0.16-100 mg kg-1). The largest effect was seen for LAS mineralization which was severely reduced by 0.16 mg kg-1 of triclosan. Our findings indicate that environmentally realistic concentrations of triclosan may affect the efficiency of biodegradation in percolation systems. - Highlights: → Triclosan may enter the soil environment through sewage. → Triclosan impacts the microbial community in sewage-drain-field soil. → Triclosan-resistant pseudomonads are strongly enriched. → Degradation of co-occurring LAS and ibuprofen is reduced. - Environmentally realistic triclosan concentrations in percolation systems may reduce the biodegradation of other xenobiotics and select for triclosan-resistant bacteria.

  12. Triclosan affects the microbial community in simulated sewage-drain-field soil and slows down xenobiotic degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenningsen, Hanne [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Solvgade 83H, DK-1307 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Henriksen, Trine [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Prieme, Anders [Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Solvgade 83H, DK-1307 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Johnsen, Anders R., E-mail: arj@geus.dk [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark)

    2011-06-15

    Effects of the common antibacterial agent triclosan on microbial communities and degradation of domestic xenobiotics were studied in simulated sewage-drain-field soil. Cultivable microbial populations decreased 22-fold in the presence of 4 mg kg{sup -1} of triclosan, and triclosan-resistant Pseudomonas strains were strongly enriched. Exposure to triclosan also changed the general metabolic profile (Ecoplate substrate profiling) and the general profile (T-RFLP) of the microbial community. Triclosan degradation was slow at all concentrations tested (0.33-81 mg kg{sup -1}) during 50-days of incubation. Mineralization experiments ({sup 14}C-tracers) and chemical analyses (LC-MS/MS) showed that the persistence of a linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) and a common analgesic (ibuprofen) increased with increasing triclosan concentrations (0.16-100 mg kg{sup -1}). The largest effect was seen for LAS mineralization which was severely reduced by 0.16 mg kg{sup -1} of triclosan. Our findings indicate that environmentally realistic concentrations of triclosan may affect the efficiency of biodegradation in percolation systems. - Highlights: > Triclosan may enter the soil environment through sewage. > Triclosan impacts the microbial community in sewage-drain-field soil. > Triclosan-resistant pseudomonads are strongly enriched. > Degradation of co-occurring LAS and ibuprofen is reduced. - Environmentally realistic triclosan concentrations in percolation systems may reduce the biodegradation of other xenobiotics and select for triclosan-resistant bacteria.

  13. Influence of reductive diet and physical aerobic training on binding and degradation of 125J-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in children with simple obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insuline resistance, expressed by lower insuline binding by receptors, is related to the obesity. Improvement of the binding was observed together with reduction of body weight and in result of physical exercise. In the work was investigated an influence of complex result of reductive diet at the level of 1300-1500 kcal and systematic half-an-hour aerobic exercise on binding and degradation of 125J-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in children with simple obesity. The rest binding of insulin by erythrocyte receptors in obese children was compared with the result observed in the children having normal body weight. Results of these researches confirm that systematic physical exercise connected with reductive diet improves the indexes of lipid balance, increases efficiency of the organism, estimated by maximal oxygen absorption, decreases body weight and improves binding of 125J-insulin to erythrocyte receptors. (authors)

  14. Effect of fly ash amendment on metolachlor and atrazine degradation and microbial activity in two soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Neera; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-08-01

    The study reports the effect of Inderprastha (IP) and Badarpur (BP) fly ashes on degradation of metolachlor and atrazine in Inceptisol and Alfisol soils. Metolachlor dissipated at faster rate in Alfisol (t1/2 8.2-8.6 days) than in Inceptisol (t1/2 13.2-14.3 days). The fly ashes enhanced the persistence of metolachlor in both the soils; however, the extent of effect was more in Inceptisol (t1/2 16.6-33.8 days) than Alfisol (t1/2 8.4-12 days) and effect increased with fly ash dose. 2-Ethyl-6-methylacetanilide was detected as the only metabolite of metolachlor. Atrazine was more persistent in flooded soils (t1/2 10.8-20.3 days) than nonflooded soils (t1/2 3.7-12.6 days) and fly ash increased its persistence, but effect was more pronounced in the flooded Inceptisol (t1/2 23.7-31 days) and nonflooded Alfisol (t1/2 6.3-10.1 days). Increased herbicide sorption in the fly ash-amended soils might have contributed to the increased pesticide persistence. The IP fly ash inhibited microbial biomass carbon at 5 % amendment levels in both the soils, while BP fly ash slightly increased microbial biomass carbon (MBC) content. Dehydrogenase activity was inhibited by both fly ashes in both the soils with maximum inhibition observed in the IP fly ash-amended Alfisol. No significant effect of fly ash amendment was observed on the fluorescein diacetate activity. PMID:27456695

  15. Microbial degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on the Greenland ice sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibal, Marek; Bælum, Jacob; Holben, William E; Sørensen, Sebastian R; Jensen, Anders; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2012-08-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) receives organic carbon (OC) of anthropogenic origin, including pesticides, from the atmosphere and/or local sources, and the fate of these compounds in the ice is currently unknown. The ability of supraglacial heterotrophic microbes to mineralize different types of OC is likely a significant factor determining the fate of anthropogenic OC on the ice sheet. Here we determine the potential of the microbial community from the surface of the GrIS to mineralize the widely used herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Surface ice cores were collected and incubated for up to 529 days in microcosms simulating in situ conditions. Mineralization of side chain- and ring-labeled [(14)C]2,4-D was measured in the samples, and quantitative PCR targeting the tfdA genes in total DNA extracted from the ice after the experiment was performed. We show that the supraglacial microbial community on the GrIS contains microbes that are capable of degrading 2,4-D and that they are likely present in very low numbers. They can mineralize 2,4-D at a rate of up to 1 nmol per m(2) per day, equivalent to ∼26 ng C m(-2) day(-1). Thus, the GrIS should not be considered a mere reservoir of all atmospheric contaminants, as it is likely that some deposited compounds will be removed from the system via biodegradation processes before their potential release due to the accelerated melting of the ice sheet. PMID:22582066

  16. Process of rice straw degradation and dynamic trend of pH by the microbial community MC1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-bin; WANG Wei-dong; YANG Hong-yan; WANG Xiao-fen; GAO Li-juan; CUI Zong-jun

    2006-01-01

    The process of the rice straw degradation in the fermentor with aeration at 290 ml/h was studied. The results of dissolved oxygen (DO) indicated that the optimum DO during cellulose degradation by microbial community MC1 ranged from 0.01 to 0.12mg/L. The change model of pH values was as follows: irrespective of the initial pH of the medium, pH values decreased rapidly to approximate 6.0 after being inoculated within 48 h when cellulose was strongly degraded, and then increased slowly to 8.0-9.0 until cellulose was degraded completely. During the degradation process, 15 kinds of organic compounds were checked out by GC-MS.Most of them were organic acids. Quantity analysis was carried out, and the maximum content compound was ethyl acetate which reached 13.56 g/L on the day 4. The cellulose degradation quantity and ratio analyses showed that less quantity (under batch fermentation conditions) and longer interval (under semi-fermentation conditions) of rice straw added to fermentation system were contributed to matching the change model of pH, and increasing the quantity and ratio of rice straw degradation during cellulose degrading process. The highest degradation ratio was observed under the condition of rice straw added one time every five days (under semi-fermentation conditions).

  17. Responses of butachlor degradation and microbial properties in a riparian soil to the cultivation of three different plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changming Yang; Mengmeng Wang; Haiyan Chen; Jianhua Li

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the biodegradation dynamics and related microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition in a riparian soil planted with different plants such as Phragmites australis,Zizaaia aquatica,and Acorus calamus.The results showed that there were significant differences in microbial degradation dynamics of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils among the three riparian plants.A.calamus displays a significantly higher degradation efficiency of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils,as compared with Z aquatica and P.australis.Half-life time of butachlor degradation in the rhizospheric soils of P.australis,Z.aquatica,and A.calamus were 7.5,9.8 and 5.4 days,respectively.Residual butachlor concentration in A.calamus rhizosphere soil was 35.2% and 21.7% lower than that in Z.aquatica and P.australis rhizosphere soils,respectively,indicating that A.calamus showed a greater improvement effect on biodegradation of butachlor in rhizosphere soils than the other two riparian plant.In general,microbial biomass and biochemical activities in rhizosphere soils were depressed by butachlor addition,despite the riparian plant types.However,rhizospheric soil microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition significantly (P < 0.05) differed between riparian plant species.Compared to Z.aquatica and P.australis,A.calamus showed significantly larger microbial number,higher enzyme activities and soil respiration rates in the rhizosphere soils.The results indicated that A.calamus have a better alleviative effect on inhibition of microbial growth due to butachlor addition and can be used as a suitable riparian plant for detoxifying and remediating butaehlor contamination from agricultural nonpoint pollution.

  18. Development of a predictive model for the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population on pomegranate marinated chicken breast fillets under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytou, Anastasia; Panagou, Efstathios Z; Nychas, George-John E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a model to describe the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population of chicken breast fillets marinated in pomegranate juice under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions. Moreover, the effect of pomegranate juice on the extension of the shelf life of the product was investigated. Samples (10 g) of chicken breast fillets were immersed in marinades containing pomegranate juice for 3 h at 4 °C following storage under aerobic conditions at 4, 10, and 15 °C for 10 days. Total Viable Counts (TVC), Pseudomonas spp and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were enumerated, in parallel with sensory assessment (odor and overall appearance) of marinated and non-marinated samples. The Baranyi model was fitted to the growth data of TVC to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μmax) that was further modeled as a function of temperature using a square root-type model. The validation of the model was conducted under dynamic temperature conditions based on two fluctuating temperature scenarios with periodic changes from 6 to 13 °C. The shelf life was determined both mathematically and with sensory assessment and its temperature dependence was modeled by an Arrhenius type equation. Results showed that the μmax of TVC of marinated samples was significantly lower compared to control samples regardless temperature, while under dynamic temperature conditions the model satisfactorily predicted the growth of TVC in both control and marinated samples. The shelf-life of marinated samples was significantly extended compared to the control (5 days extension at 4 °C). The calculated activation energies (Ea), 82 and 52 kJ/mol for control and marinated samples, respectively, indicated higher temperature dependence of the shelf life of control samples compared to marinated ones. The present results indicated that pomegranate juice could be used as an alternative ingredient in marinades to prolong the shelf life of chicken. PMID:26742613

  19. Strain-resolved microbial community proteomics reveals simultaneous aerobic and anaerobic function during gastrointestinal tract colonization of a preterm infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon eBrooks

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While there has been growing interest in the gut microbiome in recent years, it remains unclear whether closely related species and strains have similar or distinct functional roles and if organisms capable of both aerobic and anaerobic growth do so simultaneously. To investigate these questions, we implemented a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins in fecal samples collected on days of life 13-21 from an infant born at 28 weeks gestation. No prior studies have coupled strain-resolved community metagenomics to proteomics for such a purpose. Sequences were manually curated to resolve the genomes of two strains of Citrobacter that were present during the later stage of colonization. Proteome extracts from fecal samples were processed via a nano-2D-LC-MS/MS and peptides were identified based on information predicted from the genome sequences for the dominant organisms, Serratia and the two Citrobacter strains. These organisms are facultative anaerobes, and proteomic information indicates the utilization of both aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms throughout the time series. This may indicate growth in distinct niches within the gastrointestinal tract. We uncovered differences in the physiology of coexisting Citrobacter strains, including differences in motility and chemotaxis functions. Additionally, for both Citrobacter strains we resolved a community-essential role in vitamin metabolism and a predominant role in propionate production. Finally, in this case study we detected differences between genome abundance and activity levels for the dominant populations. This underlines the value in layering proteomic information over genetic potential.

  20. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, Peter K; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo; Lange, Lene

    2014-01-01

    The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls. PMID:25461894

  1. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Busk

    Full Text Available The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls.

  2. Thick juice degradation: study of the microbial population dynamics and control of the causative flora during storage

    OpenAIRE

    Justé, Annelies

    2008-01-01

    Table of contents Abstract i Samenvatting iii Publications v List of abbreviations vii 1. CURRENT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT SUGAR THICK JUICE PRODUCTION 1 1.1 SUGAR PRODUCTION FROM SUGAR BEETS 2 1.2 THICK JUICE DEGRADATION DURING STORAGE 4 1.3 MICROBIAL COMMUNITY ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES IN FOOD AND FOOD- ASSOCIATED MATRICES 9 1.3.1 Choice of target genes 10 1.3.1.1. Ubiquitously conserved genes 10 1.3.1.2. Functional genes 11 1.3.2 Microbial community analysis tech...

  3. Methods of lab silos sealing and fermentation characteristics and aerobic stability of sugarcane silage treated with microbial additive

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Ortiz Novinski; Daniel Junges; Patrick Schmidt; Paulo Rossi Junior; João Paulo Gomes de Carvalho; Rodrigo de Almeida Teixeira

    2012-01-01

    The present experimental assay evaluated the effect of lab silo sealing methods on the ensilage of the sugarcane, with or without microbial additives (Lactobacillus plantarum and Propionibacterium acidipropionici). Twenty-liter plastic buckets were used as experimental silos, which were sealed with either a polyethylene sheet (silo cover with a mesh size of 200 µm) or an appropriate plastic lid equipped with Bunsen valve. Silos were stored for 30, 60, or 90 days. Fermentative losses, chemical...

  4. Comparison of Aerobic and Anaerobic Biodegradation of Sugarcane Vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, V T; Araújo, T A; Amaral, M C S

    2015-07-01

    Vinasse is the main liquid waste from ethanol production, and it has a considerable pollution potential. Biological treatment is a promising alternative to reduce its organic load. The aim of this study was to analyze the biodegradation of sugarcane juice vinasse in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The content of carbohydrates, proteins and volatile fatty acids was evaluated. Vinasse samples showed a high biodegradability (>96.5 %) and low percentage of inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) (<3.2 %) in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rates of substrate utilization were slightly higher in aerobic reactors, but COD stabilization occurred simultaneously in the anaerobic reactors, confirming its suitability for anaerobic digestion. Inert COD in anaerobic conditions was lower than in aerobic conditions. On the other hand, COD from metabolic products in the anaerobic reactors was higher than in the aerobic ones, indicating an increased release of soluble microbial products (SMPs) by anaerobic microorganisms. The results indicated that carbohydrates were satisfactorily degraded and protein-like substances were the major components remaining after biological degradation of vinasse. PMID:25957273

  5. Composition of toluene-degrading microbial communities from soil at different concentrations of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, C; Shen, Y; Voordouw, G

    1999-07-01

    Toluene-degrading bacteria were isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil by incubating liquid enrichment cultures and agar plate cultures in desiccators in which the vapor pressure of toluene was controlled by dilution with vacuum pump oil. Incubation in desiccators equilibrated with either 100, 10, or 1% (wt/wt) toluene in vacuum pump oil and testing for genomic cross-hybridization resulted in four genomically distinct strains (standards) capable of growth on toluene (strains Cstd1, Cstd2, Cstd5, and Cstd7). The optimal toluene concentrations for growth of these standards on plating media differed considerably. Cstd1 grew best in an atmosphere equilibrated with 0.1% (wt/wt) toluene, but Cstd5 failed to grow in this atmosphere. Conversely, Cstd5 grew well in the presence of 10% (wt/wt) toluene, which inhibited growth of Cstd1. 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing and cross-hybridization analysis indicated that both Cstd1 and Cstd5 are members of the genus Pseudomonas. An analysis of the microbial communities in soil samples that were incubated with 10% (wt/wt) toluene with reverse sample genome probing indicated that Pseudomonas strain Cstd5 was the dominant community member. However, incubation of soil samples with 0.1% (wt/wt) toluene resulted in a community that was dominated by Pseudomonas strain Q7, a toluene degrader that has been described previously (Y. Shen, L. G. Stehmeier, and G. Voordouw, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:637-645, 1998). Q7 was not able to grow by itself in an atmosphere equilibrated with 0.1% (wt/wt) toluene but grew efficiently in coculture with Cstd1, suggesting that toluene or metabolic derivatives of toluene were transferred from Cstd1 to Q7. PMID:10388704

  6. Prolonged aerobic degradation of shredded and pre-composted municipal solid waste: report from a 21-year study of leachate quality characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisey, Elise; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the degree of long-term waste maturation at a closed landfill (Etueffont, France) over a period of 21 years (1989-2010) through analysis of the physicochemical characteristics of leachates as well as biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and metal content in waste. The results show that the leachates, generated in two different sections (older and newer) of the landfill, have low organic, mineral, and metallic loads, as the wastes were mainly of household origin from a rural area where sorting and composting were required. Based on pH and BOD/COD assessments, leachate monitoring in the landfill's newer section showed a rapid decrease in the pollution load over time and an early onset of methanogenic conditions. The closing of the older of the two sections contributed to a significant decline for the majority of parameters, attributable to degradation and leaching. A gradual decreasing trend was observed after waste placement had ceased in the older section, indicating that degradation continued and the waste mass had not yet fully stabilized. At the end of monitoring, leachates from the two landfill linings contained typical old leachates in the maturation period, with a pH ≥ 7 and a low BOD/COD ratio indicating a low level of waste biodegradability. Age actually contributes to a gradual removal of organic, inorganic, and metallic wastes, but it is not the only driving factor behind advanced degradation. The lack of compaction and cover immediately after deposit extended the aerobic degradation phase, significantly reducing the amount of organic matter. In addition, waste shredding improved water infiltration into the waste mass, hastening removal of polluting components through percolation. PMID:26341336

  7. Evaluation of microbially influenced degradation as a method for the decontamination of radioactively contaminated concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because there are literally square kilometers of radioactively contaminated concrete surfaces within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex, the task (both scope and cost) of decontamination is staggering. Complex-wide cleanup using conventional methodology does not appear to be feasible for every facility because of prioritization, cost, and manual effort required. The authors are investigating the feasibility of using microbially influenced degradation (MID) of concrete as a unique, innovative approach for the decontamination of concrete. Currently, work is being conducted to determine the practicality and cost effectiveness of using this environmentally acceptable method for decontamination of large surface concrete structures. Under laboratory conditions, the biodecontamination process has successfully been used to remove 2 mm of the surface of concrete slabs. Subsequently, initial field application data from an ongoing pilot-scale demonstration have shown that an average of 2 mm of surface can be removed from meter-square areas of contaminated concrete. The cost for the process has been estimated as $1.29/m2. Methodologies for field application of the process are being developed and will be tested. This paper provides information on the MID process, laboratory evaluation of its use for decontamination, and results from the pilot field application

  8. Effect of humic acids on electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Pentose and humic acids (HA) are the main components of hydrolysates, the liquid fraction produced during thermohydrolysis of lignocellulosic material. Electricity generation integrated with xylose (typical pentose) degradation as well as the effect of HA on electricity production in microbial fuel...... cells (MFCs) was examined. Without HA addition the maximum power density increased from 39.5 mW/m2 to 83 mW/m2 when initial xylose concentrations increased from 1.5 to 30 mM, while coulombic efficiency ranged from 13.5% to 52.4% for xylose concentrations of 15 and 0.5 mM, respectively. Compared to...... controls where HAs were not added, addition of commercial HA resulted in increase of power density and coulombic efficiency, which ranged from 7.5% to 67.4% and 24% to 92.6%, respectively. Digested manure wastewater (DMW) was tested as potential mediator for power generation due to its content of natural...

  9. Solid-, Solution-, and Gas-state NMR Monitoring of 13C-Cellulose Degradation in an Anaerobic Microbial Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Date

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion of biomacromolecules in various microbial ecosystems is influenced by the variations in types, qualities, and quantities of chemical components. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing the degradation of solids to gases in anaerobic digestion processes. Here we describe a characterization strategy using NMR spectroscopy for targeting the input solid insoluble biomass, catabolized soluble metabolites, and produced gases. 13C-labeled cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was added as a substrate to stirred tank reactors and gradually degraded for 120 h. The time-course variations in structural heterogeneity of cellulose catabolism were determined using solid-state NMR, and soluble metabolites produced by cellulose degradation were monitored using solution-state NMR. In particular, cooperative changes between the solid NMR signal and 13C-13C/13C-12C isotopomers in the microbial degradation of 13C-cellulose were revealed by a correlation heat map. The triple phase NMR measurements demonstrated that cellulose was anaerobically degraded, fermented, and converted to methane gas from organic acids such as acetic acid and butyric acid.

  10. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Haiman Wang; Youpeng Qu; Da Li; Ambuchi, John J.; Weihua He; Xiangtong Zhou; Jia Liu; Yujie Feng

    2016-01-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m−2. Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank re...

  11. Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms Rid A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    KUHL, M.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1992-01-01

    The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO4(2-) reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100-mu-m) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured......, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H2S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O2 in a narrow reaction zone, and no H2S escaped to the overlying...... water. Turnover times of H2S and O2 in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H2S oxidation. Anaerobic H2S oxidation with NO3- could be induced by addition of nitrate to the medium. Total sulfate reduction rates increased when the availability of SO4(2-) or organic substrate...

  12. Degradation pathway, toxicity and kinetics of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol with different co-substrate by aerobic granules in SBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Zain; Mondal, Pijush Kanti; Sabir, Suhail; Tare, Vinod

    2011-07-01

    The present study deals with cultivation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) degrading aerobic granules in two SBR systems based on glucose and acetate as co-substrate. Biodegradation of TCP containing wastewater starting from 10 to 360 mg L(-1) with more than 90% efficiency was achieved. Sludge volume index decreases as the operation proceeds to stabilize at 35 and 30 mL g(-1) while MLVSS increases from 4 to 6.5 and 6.2 g L(-1) for R1 (with glucose as co-substrate) and R2 (with sodium acetate as co-substrate), respectively. FTIR, GC and GC/MS spectral studies shows that the biodegradation occurred via chlorocatechol pathway and the cleavage may be at ortho-position. Haldane model for inhibitory substrate was applied to the system and it was observed that glucose fed granules have a high specific degradation rate and efficiency than acetate fed granules. Genotoxicity studies shows that effluent coming from SBRs was non-toxic. PMID:21565491

  13. Microbial oil-degradation under mild hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa): which pathways are impacted in piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria?

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Scoma; Marta Barbato; Emma Hernandez-Sanabria; Francesca Mapelli; Daniele Daffonchio; Sara Borin; Nico Boon

    2016-01-01

    Oil spills represent an overwhelming carbon input to the marine environment that immediately impacts the sea surface ecosystem. Microbial communities degrading the oil fraction that eventually sinks to the seafloor must also deal with hydrostatic pressure, which linearly increases with depth. Piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are ideal candidates to elucidate impaired pathways following oil spills at low depth. In the present paper, we tested two strains of the ubiquitous Alcanivora...

  14. Investigations on degradation of nitrogen compounds by anaerobic-aerobic treatment of concentrated wastewaters with special regard to nitrogen removal via nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main result is, that the two-stage anaerobic-aerobic treatment of high strength ammonium wastewater is an economical solution, save to operate and with high efficiency. Therefore its very important, to project and optimize the total process. On the one hand the biogas production has to be maximized, on the other hand the energy consumption for aeration and excess sludge treatment and resulting excess sludge has to be minimized. One possibility to realize this, is the nitrogen removal via nitrite. This process has been investigated in half-technical pilot plants. The carbon consumption amounts only to 63% in comparison with dentrification via nitrate. The 37% which are saved could be transformed into biogas during the anaerobic stage. The excess sludge production and the energy consumption in the aerobic stage is correspondingly lower. The essential parameter for regulating the process is the concentration of free ammonia (1-5 mg NH3/l) in the reactor (controlled by means of a continuous NH4- and pH-measurement). The inhibition of the nitrobacter amounts to 80%. - The storage of nitrifying biomass for several months (for industries working in campaigns) is possible without adding nitrogen and with an aeration intensity of e.g. 1 h/d, depending on the actual ammonium increase in the reactor (< 10 mg/l). To avoid inhibition during the reactivation of the sludge, the load has to be adapted to the actual activity (measured by means of an ammonium-degradation-test) and the dentrification has to be started at the same time. (orig.). 27 figs., 42 tabs., 104 refs

  15. Microbial degradation of a metal organic biocide in soils; Mikrobieller Abbau eines im Holzschutz verwendeten metallorganischen Biozids im Boden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobs, Desiree

    2010-06-17

    The soil microbial community is able to degrade wood and variety of chemical wood-preservatives (WP) to generate energy by producing CO{sub 2} and as nutrition source to establish biomass. This work is focused on the characterisation of the microbial degradation of metal-organic WP including Copper-HDO (Cu-HDO) as biocide via {sup 13}C tracer experiments. Investigations with sterilized and non-sterilized soul incubated with Cu-HDO demonstrated that degradation of Cu-HDO was accelerated by the presence of the soil microbial community. Leaching of treated wood into the surrounding soil is characterized by low Cu-HDO concentrations (5 {mu}g - 20 {mu}g). Measurements of such biocide-concentrations by HPLC over time showed that Cu-HDO was degraded within a few days of soil incubation. Cu-HDO solely was degraded faster in soil compared to Cu-HDO as part of a WP. Presence of Cu-HDO significantly decreased the overall soil respiration compared to samples without Cu-HDO. Detailed information of the microbial metabolic pathways was achieved by comparison of {sup 12}C and {sup 13}C enriched Cu-HDO experiments and thereafter SIP-PLFA analysis. Monitoring of the {delta}{sup 13}C in PLFAs revealed that the carbon derived from the biocide was integrated nearly exclusively into the abundant PLFAs affiliated to gram negative bacteria. PLFAs indicative for fungi and other eukaryotic organism could be found only in low relative abundances and without {delta}{sup 13}C enrichment. This result suggests that eukaryotes were not involved in utilization of Copper-HADO based carbon. To characterise the impact of the co-biocide HDO on the microbial community the composition of the microbial community present at the surface of Copper-HDO, Copper-Amine treated specimens as well as of untreated specimens in soil contact was investigated. The bacterial community structure was characterized by the T-RFLP fingerprinting technique whereas the eukaryotic community structure was analyzed by the SSCP

  16. Evidence of α-, β- and γ-HCH mixture aerobic degradation by the native actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. M7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineli, P E; Tortella, G; Dávila Costa, J S; Benimeli, C S; Cuozzo, S A

    2016-05-01

    The organochlorine insecticide γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH, lindane) and its non-insecticidal α- and β-isomers continue to pose serious environmental and health concerns, although their use has been restricted or completely banned for decades. In this study we report the first evidence of the growth ability of a Streptomyces strain in a mineral salt medium containing high doses of α- and β-HCH (16.6 mg l(-1)) as a carbon source. Degradation of HCH isomers by Streptomyces sp. M7 was investigated after 1, 4, and 7 days of incubation, determining chloride ion release, and residues in the supernatants by GC with µECD detection. The results show that both the α- and β-HCH isomers were effectively metabolized by Streptomyces sp. M7, with 80 and 78 % degradation respectively, after 7 days of incubation. Moreover, pentachlorocyclohexenes and tetrachlorocyclohexenes were detected as metabolites. In addition, the formation of possible persistent compounds such as chlorobenzenes and chlorophenols were studied by GC-MS, while no phenolic compounds were detected. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that Streptomyces sp. M7 can degrade α- and β-isomers individually or combined with γ-HCH and could be considered as a potential agent for bioremediation of environments contaminated by organochlorine isomers. PMID:27038951

  17. Adaptation of phytoplankton-degrading microbial communities to thermal reactor effluent in a new cooling reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In water column and sediment inocula from a nuclear reactor cooling reservoir, natural phytoplankton substrate labeled with 14C was used to determine aerobic and anaerobic mineralization rates for a range of temperatures (25, 40, 55, and 700C) expected during reactor operation. For experiments that were begun during reactor shutdown, aerobic decomposition occurred at temperatures of 0C. After two months of reactor operation, aerobic rates increased substantially at 55 and 700C, although maximum rates were observed at temperatures of ≤ 400C. The temperature range for which maximum anaerobic mineralization (i.e., the sum of CH4 and CO2) was observed was 25 to 400C when the reactor was off, expanding to 25 to 550C during reactor operation. Increased rates of 550C, but not 700C, correlated with an increase in the ratio of cumulative methane to carbon dioxide produced over 21 days. When reduced reactor power lowered the maximum temperature of the reservoir to 420C, aerobic decomposition at 700C was negligible, but remained substantial at 550C. Selection for thermophilic decomposers occurred rapidly in this system in both aerobic and anaerobic communities and did not require prolonged exposure to elevated temperatures

  18. Lessons learned from the Febex in situ test: geochemical processes associated to the microbial degradation and gas generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    existence of gaps between the bentonite blocks, which favour the development and growth of inactive and dormant cells or spores belonging to the original bentonite. In this work, the observed geochemical and corrosion processes influenced both by organic matter degradation and micro-organisms in the 1:1 scale FEBEX in situ test (Grimsel, Switzerland) are described. This test consists of two heaters, simulating radioactive waste containers, emplaced in a horizontal gallery and surrounded by a highly compacted bentonite barrier. Samples from pore water, gases and bentonite (SHSDI-01: clay in contact with AISI 316L metal; S29 and BSBI-26: clay in contact with carbon steel) have been analysed. The samples were obtained during the test and the dismantling of the heater 1 after six years of experiment. The solid samples were analysed by XRD, SEM, XPS, FTIR, ATD-TG and chemical analysis; the water samples by IC and ICP-OES, and the gases by gas chromatography. Different geochemical processes have been detected as a function of the temperature and water content of the samples. When the water content is high, there are aerobic respiration and fermentation processes, anaerobic respiration with SO42- as electron acceptor, and anaerobic production of methane with CO2 as electron acceptor. In a first phase, both oxygen consumption and an increase of CH4 and CO2 is observed. Afterwards, there is a reduction of sulfates by SRB bacteria, which provokes corrosion processes. As a consequence, a precipitation of sulphurs, iron oxy-hydroxides and carbonates occurs, as well as H2 generation. There is an increase of the iron content in the smectite and the neo-formation of zeolites. However this alteration is punctual and localized. The redox potential of the bentonite pore water was of -284 mV. When the temperature is high and water content is low, other processes take place

  19. Ultrasonically enhanced delivery and degradation of PAHs in a polymer-liquid partitioning system by a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaza, Pedro A; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2009-09-01

    The current study examined the effects of ultrasonic irradiation on mass transfer and degradation of PAHs, by an enriched consortium, when delivered from polymeric matrices. Rates of release into methanol under sonicated conditions, relative to unmixed cases, for phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene were increased approximately fivefold, when delivered from Desmopan 9370 A (polyurethane). Similar effects were observed in Hytrel and Kraton D4150 K polymers as well as recycled Bridgestone tires. Enhancements were also displayed as shifts to higher release equilibria under sonicated conditions, relative to non-sonicated cases, agreeing with current knowledge in sonochemistry and attributed to cavitation. Ultrasonic effects on microbial activity were also investigated and cell damage was found to be non- permanent with consortium re-growth being observed after sonic deactivation. Finally, the lumped effect of sonication on degradation of phenanthrene delivered from Desmopan was examined under the absence and presence of sonication. Rates of degradation were found to be increased by a factor of four demonstrating the possibility of using ultrasonic irradiation for improved mass transport in solid-liquid systems. Cellular inactivation effects were not evident, and this was attributed to the attenuation of sonic energy arising from the presence of solid polymer materials in the medium. The findings of the study demonstrate that sonication can be used to improve mass transport of poorly soluble compounds in microbial degradations, and alleviate limiting steps of soil remediation processes proposed in previous research. PMID:19418561

  20. Degradation of vinasse in soil under different humidity levels: CO2 liberation, microbial biomass formation and immobilization of added nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of vinasse added to a sandy Red-Yellow Latosol at the rate of 200m3/ha and kept at 40,60 and 80% of the holding capacity (w.h.c.), was studied and compared for liberation of CO2, formation of microbial biomass and immobilization of nitrogen added. The CO2 liberated was evaluated by NaOH retention followed by titration with HCl. The microbial biomass was determined by using gamma radiation as biocide. Nitrogen immobilization was determined using the Kjeldahl method and 15N enrichment according to Rittemberg's method. Soil moisture, which affected the oxygen level of the soil, had a significant influence in CO2 liberation, formation of microbial biomassa and nitrogen immobilization. Samples kept under drier conditions (40% w.h.c.) showed initially greater Co2 liberation. However, at the end of 3 month incubation period, total carbon evolved was similar at all misture levels used, with an average of 3805μg C/g soil. The microbial biomass showed greater formation for the drier samples (40% w.h.c.), reaching a maximum of 519μg C/g soil. Immobilization of the N added showed an increasing initial rate, which was greater with dryness of the soil, followed by stabilization. Nevertheless, at the end of 3 month incubation period, the percentages of immobilization were similar and about 40% of total 15N irrespective of the soil moisture content. Therefore, the increasing rate of carbon assimilation was not totally acompanied by an increasing immobilization for the N added. The greatest intensity was reached by CO2 liberation in residue degradation, 2/3 of the carbon having evolved to CO2 and than 1/3 having been immobilized by the microbial biomass. (author)

  1. System and method for preparing near-surface heavy oil for extraction using microbial degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busche, Frederick D.; Rollins, John B.; Noyes, Harold J.; Bush, James G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method for enhancing the recovery of heavy oil in an oil extraction environment by feeding nutrients to a preferred microbial species (bacteria and/or fungi). A method is described that includes the steps of: sampling and identifying microbial species that reside in the oil extraction environment; collecting fluid property data from the oil extraction environment; collecting nutrient data from the oil extraction environment; identifying a preferred microbial species from the oil extraction environment that can transform the heavy oil into a lighter oil; identifying a nutrient from the oil extraction environment that promotes a proliferation of the preferred microbial species; and introducing the nutrient into the oil extraction environment.

  2. Microbial dynamics and properties of aerobic granules developed in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor with an intermediate filamentous bulking stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, H; Basuvaraj, M; Hall, M; Neufeld, J D; Liss, S N

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic granules offer enhanced biological nutrient removal and are compact and dense structures resulting in efficient settling properties. Granule instability, however, is still a challenge as understanding of the drivers of instability is poorly understood. In this study, transient instability of aerobic granules, associated with filamentous outgrowth, was observed in laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). The transient phase was followed by the formation of stable granules. Loosely bound, dispersed, and pinpoint seed flocs gradually turned into granular flocs within 60 days of SBR operation. In stage 1, the granular flocs were compact in structure and typically 0.2 mm in diameter, with excellent settling properties. Filaments appeared and dominated by stage 2, resulting in poor settleability. By stage 3, the SBRs were selected for larger granules and better settling structures, which included filaments that became enmeshed within the granule, eventually forming structures 2-5 mm in diameter. Corresponding changes in sludge volume index were observed that reflected changes in settleability. The protein-to-polysaccharide ratio in the extracted extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) from stage 1 and stage 3 granules was higher (2.8 and 5.7, respectively), as compared to stage 2 filamentous bulking (1.5). Confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging of the biomass samples, coupled with molecule-specific fluorescent staining, confirmed that protein was predominant in stage 1 and stage 3 granules. During stage 2 bulking, there was a decrease in live cells; dead cells predominated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint results indicated a shift in bacterial community composition during granulation, which was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In particular, Janthinobacterium (known denitrifier and producer of antimicrobial pigment) and Auxenochlorella protothecoides (mixotrophic green algae) were predominant during stage

  3. Does microbial centimeter-scale heterogeneity impact MCPA degradation in and leaching from a loamy agricultural soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Binning, Philip J; Aamand, Jens; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F; Johnsen, Anders R

    2014-02-15

    The potential for pesticide degradation varies greatly at the centimeter-scale in agricultural soil. Three dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate how such small-scale spatial heterogeneity may affect the leaching of the biodegradable pesticide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in the upper meter of a variably-saturated, loamy soil profile. To incorporate realistic spatial variation in degradation potential, we used data from a site where 420 mineralization curves over 5 depths have been measured. Monod kinetics was fitted to the individual curves to derive initial degrader biomass values, which were incorporated in a reactive transport model to simulate heterogeneous biodegradation. Six scenarios were set up using COMSOL Multiphysics to evaluate the difference between models having different degrader biomass distributions (homogeneous, heterogeneous, or no biomass) and either matrix flow or preferential flow through a soil matrix with a wormhole. MCPA leached, within 250 days, below 1m only when degrader biomass was absent and preferential flow occurred. Both biodegradation in the plow layer and the microbially active lining of the wormhole contributed to reducing MCPA-leaching below 1m. The spatial distribution of initial degrader biomass within each soil matrix layer, however, had little effect on the overall MCPA-leaching. PMID:24291558

  4. Two-stage anaerobic and post-aerobic mesophilic digestion of sewage sludge: Analysis of process performance and hygienization potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Levantesi, Caterina

    2016-03-01

    Sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion has been demonstrated to be effective for enhanced sludge stabilization, in terms of increased solid reduction and improvement of sludge dewaterability. In this study, we propose a modified version of the sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion process by operating the aerobic step under mesophilic conditions (T=37 °C), in order to improve the aerobic degradation kinetics of soluble and particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD). Process performance has been assessed in terms of "classical parameters" such as volatile solids (VS) removal, biogas production, COD removal, nitrogen species, and polysaccharide and protein fate. The aerobic step was operated under intermittent aeration to achieve nitrogen removal. Aerobic mesophilic conditions consistently increased VS removal, providing 32% additional removal vs. 20% at 20 °C. Similar results were obtained for nitrogen removal, increasing from 64% up to 99% at the higher temperature. Improved sludge dewaterability was also observed with a capillary suction time decrease of ~50% during the mesophilic aerobic step. This finding may be attributable to the decreased protein content in the aerobic digested sludge. The post-aerobic digestion exerted a positive effect on the reduction of microbial indicators while no consistent improvement of hygienization related to the increased temperature was observed. The techno-economic analysis of the proposed digestion layout showed a net cost saving for sludge disposal estimated in the range of 28-35% in comparison to the single-phase anaerobic digestion. PMID:26760266

  5. Microbial degradation of the brominated flame retardant TBNPA by groundwater bacteria: laboratory and field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Noa; Bernstein, Anat; Gelman, Faina; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the biodegradation of the brominated flame retardant tribromoneopentylalcohol (TBNPA) by a groundwater enrichment culture was investigated using a dual carbon ((13)C/(12)C)- bromine ((81)Br/(79)Br) stable isotope analysis. An indigenous aerobic bacterial consortium was enriched from the polluted groundwater underlying an industrial site in the northern Negev Desert, Israel, where TBNPA is an abundant pollutant. Aerobic biodegradation was shown to be rapid, with complete debromination within a few days, whereas anaerobic biodegradation was not observed. Biodegradation under aerobic conditions was accompanied by a significant carbon isotope effect with an isotopic enrichment factor of ɛCbulk = -8.8‰ ± 1.5‰, without any detectable bromine isotope fractionation. It was found that molecular oxygen is necessary for biodegradation to occur, suggesting an initial oxidative step. Based on these results, it was proposed that H abstraction from the C-H bond is the first step of TBNPA biodegradation under aerobic conditions, and that the C-H bond cleavage results in the formation of unstable intermediates, which are rapidly debrominated. A preliminary isotopic analysis of TBNPA in the groundwater underlying the industrial area revealed that there are no changes in the carbon and bromine isotope ratio values downstream of the contamination source. Considering that anoxic conditions prevail in the groundwater of the contaminated site, the lack of isotope shifts in TBNPA indicates the lack of TBNPA biodegradation in the groundwater, in accordance with our findings. PMID:27183339

  6. Effects of Different Types of Sludge on Soil Microbial Properties: A Field Experiment on Degraded Mediterranean Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.TARRAS(O)N; G.OJEDA; O.ORTIZ; J.M.ALCA(N)IZ

    2010-01-01

    T The recycling of suitable organic wastes can enhance soil fertility via effects on soil physical, chemical and biological properties. To compare the effects of digested (DS), thermally dried (TDS) and composted dewatered (CDS) sewage sludge on soil microbiological properties, an experiment was conducted at field sites for more than one year (401 d) when applied to two Mediterranean degraded soils (loam and loamy sand soils). All three types of sewage sludge had a significant effect on measured parameters. In a short time, the plots of both loamy sand and loam soils amended with TDS showed the highest microbial basal respiration (loam soil: P < 0.01; loamy sand soil: P < 0.001) and carbon mineralization coefficient (loam soil: P < 0.01; loamy sand soil: P < 0.001). Furthermore, on loamy sand soil, the plots amended with TDS showed the highest microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) (P < 0.05). This study revealed that the addition of sludge caused transient non-equilibrium effects on almost all soil microbial properties. However, there were no differences one year later because the remaining organic carbon was stable and quite similar in all treatments. These results may have practical implications for the rehabilitation of degraded soils.

  7. Metataxonomic profiling and prediction of functional behaviour of wheat straw degrading microbial consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez Avella, Diego; Dini Andreote, Francisco; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mixed microbial cultures, in which bacteria and fungi interact, have been proposed as an efficient way to deconstruct plant waste. The characterization of specific microbial consortia could be the starting point for novel biotechnological applications related to the efficient conversion

  8. Microbial formation and degradation of oxygen-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs) in soil during short-term incubation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tested whether OPAHs were formed during 19-wk incubation of a fertile soil at optimum moisture in the dark. The soil had initial mean (±s.e., n = 3) concentrations of 22 ± 1.7 (Σ28PAHs) and 4.2 ± 0.34 μg g−1 (Σ14OPAHs). After 19 wk, individual PAH and OPAH concentrations had decreased by up to 14 and 37%, respectively. Decreases in % of initial concentrations were positively correlated with their KOW values for PAHs (r = 0.48, p = 0.022) and 9 OPAHs (r = 0.78, p = 0.013) but negatively, albeit not significantly, for 5 OPAHs (r = −0.75, p = 0.145) suggesting net formation of some OPAHs. The latter was supported by significantly increasing 1-indanone/fluorene ratios while the other OPAH to parent-PAH ratios remained constant or tended to increase. We conclude that OPAHs are formed in soils during microbial turnover of PAHs in a short time. -- Highlights: • Some OPAHs were microbially produced in an urban soil with aged PAHs contamination. • Naphthalene and acenaphthylene were microbially produced in a fertile urban soil. • KOW values predicted degradation of PAHs and those OPAHs which were not net formed. • OPAH concentrations must be controlled during remediation of PAH-contaminated soil. -- In soil, low molecular weight PAHs and some OPAHs are formed microbially during incubation of four months

  9. Mono-chlorophenol degradation by pseudomonas putida CP1 and a mixed microbial population

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell, Alan

    2000-01-01

    A commercial mixed culture, Biolyte HAB, degraded mono-chlorophenols using a metci- cleavage pathway. 2- and 3-chlorophenol degradation was incomplete, leading to the accumulation of dead-end metabolites. Biolyte HAB was capable of the complete degradation of 2.34 mM 4-chlorophenol, via the intermediate 5-chloro-2- hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, using the meta- cleavage pathway. Pseudomonas putida CPI degraded mono-chlorophenols to completion via an orthocleavage pathway. The ability of P. ...

  10. Kinetic analysis of data obtained from studies on microbial degradation of cement waste forms, using shrinking core models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idachaba, M A; Nyavor, K; Egiebor, N O

    2003-04-01

    Model equations based on analytical solutions of two shrinking core models (acid dissolution or shrinking unreacted core (SUC) model, and bulk diffusion model), were used to analyze the kinetics of microbial degradation of cement waste forms. Two current approaches of waste form microbial stability evaluation (Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) method and refined biofilm formation) were used to generate the data. Good linear correlations with R(2)>0.95 were obtained for the leaching data from both the NRC and biofilm approaches, using the model equation based on the bulk diffusion concept. Analyses using the model equation based on the acid dissolution model generally gave poor correlations except when data obtained from biofilm formation method was normalized. PMID:12686024

  11. Kinetic analysis of data obtained from studies on microbial degradation of cement waste forms, using shrinking core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model equations based on analytical solutions of two shrinking core models (acid dissolution or shrinking unreacted core (SUC) model, and bulk diffusion model), were used to analyze the kinetics of microbial degradation of cement waste forms. Two current approaches of waste form microbial stability evaluation (Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) method and refined biofilm formation) were used to generate the data. Good linear correlations with R2>0.95 were obtained for the leaching data from both the NRC and biofilm approaches, using the model equation based on the bulk diffusion concept. Analyses using the model equation based on the acid dissolution model generally gave poor correlations except when data obtained from biofilm formation method was normalized

  12. Assessment of the effects of microbially influenced degradation on a massive concrete structure. Final report, Report 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a need to estimate the effect of environmental conditions on construction materials to be used in the repository at Yucca Mountain. Previous reports from this project have demonstrated that it is important to develop an understanding of microbially influenced degradation (MID) development and its influence on massive concrete structures. Further, it has been shown that the most effective way to obtain quantitative data on the effects of MID on the structural integrity of repository concrete is to study manmade, analog structures known to be susceptible to MID. The cooling tower shell located at the Ohaaki Power Station near Wairakei, New Zealand is such a structure

  13. Assessment of the effects of microbially influenced degradation on a massive concrete structure. Final report, Report 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D. [Biodegradation Systems, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-07-08

    There is a need to estimate the effect of environmental conditions on construction materials to be used in the repository at Yucca Mountain. Previous reports from this project have demonstrated that it is important to develop an understanding of microbially influenced degradation (MID) development and its influence on massive concrete structures. Further, it has been shown that the most effective way to obtain quantitative data on the effects of MID on the structural integrity of repository concrete is to study manmade, analog structures known to be susceptible to MID. The cooling tower shell located at the Ohaaki Power Station near Wairakei, New Zealand is such a structure.

  14. Development of test methods for assessing microbial influenced degradation of cement-solidified radioactive and industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the development of accelerated tests for evaluating microbial influenced degradation (MID) of cement-solidified wastes. An existing U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission accelerated test cannot distinguish between degradation caused by biogenic acid produced under optimal conditions in a bioreactor and that caused by active biofilms formed on the waste materials. Nutrient limitations were also observed that would significantly limit the activity of any developing biofilm. Results from this work have shown that it is possible to modify this test to remove nutrient limitations and enable the effects of MID resulting from active biofilms to be examined. Aggressive MID microorganisms can form a biofilm on the surface of cement-solidified waste so that when nutrients are provided the microbes remain active. Elemental mass loss data from exposed solidified waste forms indicate the continued development and growth of microbes on the surface of samples

  15. Impact of soil matric potential on the fine-scale spatial distribution and activity of specific microbial degrader communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monard, Cécile; Mchergui, Chokri; Nunan, Naoise; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Vieublé-Gonod, Laure

    2012-09-01

    The impact of the soil matric potential on the relationship between the relative abundance of degraders and their activity and on the spatial distribution of both at fine scales was determined to understand the role of environmental conditions in the degradation of organic substrates. The mineralization of (13) C-glucose and (13) C-2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was measured at different matric potentials (-0.001, -0.01 and -0.316 MPa) in 6 × 6 × 6 mm(3) cubes excised from soil cores. At the end of the incubation, total bacterial and 2,4-D degrader abundances were determined by quantifying the 16S rRNA and the tfdA genes, respectively. The mineralization of 2,4-D was more sensitive to changes in matric potential than was that of glucose. The amount and spatial structure of 2,4-D mineralization decreased with matric potential, whilst the spatial variability increased. On the other hand, the spatial variation of glucose mineralization was less affected by changes in matric potential. The relationship between the relative abundance of 2,4-D degraders and 2,4-D mineralization was significantly affected by matric potential: the relative abundance of tfdA needed to be higher to reach a given level of 2,4-D mineralization in dryer than in moister conditions. The data show how microbial interactions with their microhabitat can have an impact on soil processes at larger scales. PMID:22531018

  16. Linamarase production by some microbial isolates and a comparison of the rate of degradation of cassava cyanide by microbial and cassava linamarases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbonnaya Nwokoro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of linamarase and the effects of media composition on enzyme production were studied. A total of eight linamarase-producing bacteria were isolated from fermenting cassava tubers and soil samples. Selection of the isolates was based on their high growth in media containing 800 mg/L potassium cyanide solution. Eight of the isolates which showed very high growth in the growth medium as demonstrated by increase in their optical density readings to at least 0.6 in the cyanide containing media were selected for further studies. The isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus cellobiosus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis. All the isolates were grown in media containing Tween 80 solution and in control media without the surfactant. Best enzyme activity of 6.82 U/mL was obtained in the medium containing Tween 80 solution and Lactobacillus fermentum as the test bacterium. Comparatively, linamarase production by the isolates in media without Tween 80 showed lower enzyme productivity. Cassava endogenous and microbial enzymes were tested for their abilities to hydrolyze cyanide in cassava flour samples pretreated to either remove the endogenous or microbial enzyme. Residual cyanide in cassava flour samples treated with linamarase of Lactobacillus plantarum was undecteded in 30 h, while in contrast, the residual cyanide in cassava flour samples treated with endogenous linamarase was 0.39 mg/10g cassava flour after 80 h. Residual cyanide in the untreated control sample was 1.98 mg HCN /10g cassava flour after 80 h. The results from this finding demonstrated improved cassava cyanide degradation with microbial linamarase as compared to endogenous cassava linamarase. Massive inoculation of fermenting cassava tubers with the isolates reported in this study would enable better control of the cassava fermentation process and may

  17. Towards quantitative understanding on microbial community structure and functioning: a modelling-centred approach using degradation of marine oil spills as example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred F.M.Roling

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular ecology approaches are rapidly advancing our insights into the microorganisms involved in the degradation of marine oil spills and their metabolic potentials. Yet, many questions remain open: How do oil-degrading microbial communities assemble in terms of functional diversity, species abundances and organisation and what are the drivers? How do the functional properties of microorganisms scale to processes at the ecosystem level? How does mass flow among species, and which factors and species control and regulate fluxes, stability and other ecosystem functions? Can generic rules on oil-degradation be derived, and what drivers underlie these rules? How can we engineer oil-degrading microbial communities such that toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are degraded faster? These types of questions apply to the field of microbial ecology in general. We outline how recent advances in single-species systems biology might be extended to help answer these questions. We argue that bottom-up mechanistic modelling allows deciphering the respective roles and interactions among microorganisms. In particular constraint-based, metagenome-derived community-scale flux balance analysis appears suited for this goal as it allows calculating degradation-related fluxes based on physiological constraints and growth strategies, without needing detailed kinetic information. We subsequently discuss what is required to make these approaches successful, and identify a need to better understand microbial physiology in order to advance microbial ecology. We advocate the development of databases containing microbial physiological data. Answering the posed questions is far from trivial. Oil-degrading communities are, however, an attractive setting to start testing systems biology-derived models and hypotheses as they are relatively simple in diversity and key activities, with several key players being isolated and a high availability of experimental data and

  18. In vitro degradation of dicyclopentadiene by microbial consortia isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD), an extremely odoriferous by-product of the production of hydrocarbon feed stocks in petrochemical plants, was discussed. A laboratory study was described in which DCPD was degraded to carbon dioxide and oxygenated intermediates were established. More than 100 isolated organisms and cultures were screened for DCPD degradation using BIOLOGTM MT plates incubated in an atmosphere containing the test hydrocarbon. No single colony isolate readily mineralized DCPD, but mixed cultures produced 14CO2 when incubated with [14C]DCPD. For bioremediation purposes, the objective was to remove odor. In the presence of a hydrocarbon degradation medium, the complete degradation to CO2 was achieved in less than 6 months. 15 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  19. Survey of microbial oxygenases: trichloroethylene degradation by propane-oxidizing bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Wackett, L P; Brusseau, G A; Householder, S R; Hanson, R S

    1989-01-01

    Microorganisms that biosynthesize broad-specificity oxygenases to initiate metabolism of linear and branched-chain alkanes, nitroalkanes, cyclic ketones, alkenoic acids, and chromenes were surveyed for the ability to biodegrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The results indicated that TCE oxidation is not a common property of broad-specificity microbial oxygenases. Bacteria that contained nitropropane dioxygenase, cyclohexanone monooxygenase, cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases, 4-methoxybenzoate monoo...

  20. Microbial degradation processes in radioactive waste repository and in nuclear fuel storage areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intent of the workshop organizers was to convene experts in the fields of corrosion and spent nuclear fuels. The major points which evolved from the interaction of microbiologists, material scientists, and fuel storage experts are as follows: Corrosion of basin components as well as fuel containers or cladding is occurring; Water chemistry monitoring, if done in the storage facility does not take into account the microbial component; Microbial influenced corrosion is an area that many have not considered to be an important contributor in the aging of metallurgical materials especially those exposed to a radiation field; Many observations indicate that there is a microbial or biological presence in the storage facilities but these observations have not been correlated with any deterioration or aging phenomena taking place in the storage facility; The sessions on the fundamentals of microbial influenced corrosion and biofilm pointed out that these phenomena are real, occurring on similar materials in other industries and probably are occurring in the wet storage of spent fuel; All agreed that more monitoring, testing, and education in the field of biological mediate processes be performed and financially supported; Loosing the integrity of fuel assemblies can only cause problems, relating to the future disposition of the fuel, safety concerns, and environmental issues; In other rad waste scenarios, biological processes may be playing a role, for instance in the mobility of radionuclides in soil, decomposition of organic materials of the rad waste, gas production, etc. The fundamental scientific presentations discussed the full gamut of microbial processes that relate to biological mediated effects on metallic and non-metallic materials used in the storage and containment of radioactive materials

  1. Physiological and Chemical Investigations into Microbial Degradation of Synthetic Poly(cis-1,4-isoprene)

    OpenAIRE

    Bode, Helge B; Zeeck, Axel; Plückhahn, Kirsten; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor 1A and Pseudomonas citronellolis were able to degrade synthetic high-molecular-weight poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) and vulcanized natural rubber. Growth on the polymers was poor but significantly greater than that of the nondegrading strain Streptomyces lividans 1326 (control). Measurement of the molecular weight distribution of the polymer before and after degradation showed a time-dependent increase in low-molecular-weight polymer molecules for S. coelicolor 1A and P. citr...

  2. Nitrogen removal characteristics of indigenous aerobic denitrifiers and changes in the microbial community of a reservoir enclosure system via in situ oxygen enhancement using water lifting and aeration technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shilei; Huang, Tinglin; Ngo, Huu Hao; Zhang, Haihan; Liu, Fei; Zeng, Mingzheng; Shi, Jianchao; Qiu, Xiaopeng

    2016-08-01

    Indigenous aerobic denitrifiers of a reservoir system were enhanced in situ by water lifting and aeration technology. Nitrogen removal characteristics and changes in the bacterial community were investigated. Results from a 30-day experiment showed that the TN in the enhanced water system decreased from 1.08-2.02 to 0.75-0.91mg/L and that TN removal rates varied between 21.74% and 52.54% without nitrite accumulation, and TN removal rate of surface sediments reached 41.37±1.55%. The densities of aerobic denitrifiers in the enhanced system increased. Furthermore, the enhanced system showed a clear inhibition of Fe, Mn, and P performances. Community analysis using Miseq showed that diversity was higher in the in situ oxygen enhanced system than in the control system. In addition, the microbial composition was significantly different between systems. It can be concluded that in situ enhancement of indigenous aerobic denitrifiers is very effective in removing nitrogen from water reservoir systems. PMID:27128190

  3. Identification of Metabolic Intermediates in Microbial Degradation of Chrysene by Armillaria sp. F022

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hadibarata

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To degrade chrysene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, Armillaria sp. F022, a fungus collected from a soil, was used. Maximal degradation (77% was obtained when Armillaria sp. F022 was incubated in cultures agitated at 120 rpm for 30 days, as compared to just 41% degradation in stationary culture. Furthermore, the degradation of chrysene was affected by the addition of surfactants. The mechanism of degradation was determined through identification of the intermediates. Several enzymes (manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, laccase, 1,2-dioxygenase and 2,3-dioxygenase produced by Armillaria sp. F022 were detected in the culture. The highest level of activity was shown by 1,2-dioxygenase after 20 days (143.6 U l-1. Theseligninolytic and dioxygenase enzymes played an important role in the oxidation of chrysene. Chrysene was indeed degraded by Armillaria sp. F022 through several intermediates, chrysenequinone, 2-((1E,3E-4-carboxy-3-hydroxybuta-1,3-dien-1-yl-1-naphthoic acid , 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, and gentisic acid.Keywords : Biodegradation, Chrysene, Metabolites, Armillaria sp. F022

  4. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 g yr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 g m-2 yr-1 (1.45 x 10-3 and 1.51 x 10-3 gal. ft.-2 yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  5. The effect of organic matter and oxygen on the degradation of bacterial membrane lipids in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Rodger; Fallon, Robert D.; Patton, John S.

    1986-05-01

    The biodegradation of purified radiolabelled membrane lipids from a methanogenic bacterium and a pseudomonad were investigated in mangrove, beach and high marsh marine sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effect of organic matter on the amount and rate of degradation was also examined by supplementing beach sediments with humic acids. In aerobic sediments, CO 2 was the major product of lipid degradation while under anaerobic conditions both CO 2 and CH 4 were major end products and the overall rates were reduced (up to 40%) relative to aerobic conditions. Total bacterial numbers increased during all incubations with the largest increases occurring in anaerobic sediments supplemented with humic acids. No lipid degradation occurred in aerobic or anaerobic sediments treated with formaldehyde or autoclaving. In low organic beach sediments, the ester-linked phospholipid of the pseudomonad was degraded much more rapidly than the diphytanyl glycerol diether of the methanogen with 69% of the phospholipid degraded in 96 hours versus only 4% of the methanogen lipid. Lipid degradation in both aerobic and anaerobic sediments was highly correlated to organic matter content with increasing amounts of organic matter inhibiting degradation. Long incubations (75 days) of the diphytanyl glycerol ether resulted in 51% degraded to CO 2 in low (0.5%) organic mangrove sediments while only 9% was mineralized in high (10.8%) organic marsh sediments. Physicochemical sorption of membrane lipids to the organic matrix is proposed as a mechanism which protects membrane lipids from microbial attack and degradation.

  6. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  7. Microbial activity in subsurface samples before and during nitrate-enhanced bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to determine the microbial activity at a site contaminated with JP-4 jet fuel before and during nitrate-enhanced bioremediation. Samples at three depths from six different locations were collected aseptically under anaerobic conditions before and during treatment. Cores were located in or close to the source of contamination, downgradient of the source, or outside the zone of contamination. Parameters for microbial characterization included (1) viable counts of aerobic heterotrophic, JP-4 degrading, and oligotrophic bacteria; (2) the most probable number (MPN) of aerobic and anaerobic protozoa; (3) the MPN of total denitrifiers; and (4) the MPN of denitrifiers in hydrocarbon-amended microcosms. The results indicate that the total number of denitrifiers increased by an order of magnitude during nitrate-enhanced bioremediation in most samples. The number of total heterotrophs and JP-4-degrading microorganisms growing aerobically also increased. In addition, the first anaerobic protozoa associated with hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface materials were detected

  8. 微生物降解有机磷农药残留的研究进展%A review on microbial degradation of residues of organophosphorus pesticide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何霞; 白红娟

    2011-01-01

    This article focused on the review of the types of microbial degradation of Organophosphorus pesticide,degradation mechanism and degradation genes in recent years and discussed development trend of microbial degradation of organophosphorus pesticide,and exhibited some suggestions for further research.%从微生物降解有机磷农药的种类、降解机理、降解基因等方面综述了微生物降解有机磷农药近年来的研究进展,探讨了微生物降解有机磷农药研究领域的发展趋势及进一步的研究方向,并提出建议。

  9. Microbial degradation of hydrocarbons and its applications to enhanced oil recovery at lab scale

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Jorge F. B.; Gudiña, Eduardo J.; L. R. Rodrigues; J.A. Teixeira; Coutinho, J.A.P.

    2011-01-01

    The renewed interest in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques as a consequence of the current oil prices is boosting the development of the Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR). This technique is useful to recover incremental oil from a reservoir beyond primary and secondary recovery operations and can be carried by the injection of exogenous or stimulation of indigenous microorganisms. This last approach is here investigated. In this work we address the isolation and identification of mic...

  10. Microbial Degradation of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Stibal, Marek; Bælum, Jacob; Holben, William E.; Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Jensen, Anders; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2012-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) receives organic carbon (OC) of anthropogenic origin, including pesticides, from the atmosphere and/or local sources, and the fate of these compounds in the ice is currently unknown. The ability of supraglacial heterotrophic microbes to mineralize different types of OC is likely a significant factor determining the fate of anthropogenic OC on the ice sheet. Here we determine the potential of the microbial community from the surface of the GrIS to mineralize the ...

  11. Rapid Evaluation of Power Degradation in Series Connection of Single Feeding Microsized Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-07-08

    We have developed a sustainable, single feeding, microsized, air-cathode and membrane-free microbial fuel cells with a volume of 40 mu L each, which we have used for rapid evaluation of power generation and viability of a series array of three cells seeking higher voltage levels. Contrary to expectations, the achieved power density was modest (45 mWm(-3)), limited due to non-uniformities in assembly and the single-channel feeding system.

  12. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of [2-14C]glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of 14C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A330. Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid

  13. Bioprospecting metagenomics of a microbial community on cotton degradation: Mining for new glycoside hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoxiu; Liu, Pei; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Wei; Wang, Xuedong; Wei, Dongzhi; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-20

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHases) of higher performance are immediately needed for efficient degradation of plant biomass into fermentable sugars in industrial processes. The current study represents functional characterization of the enzymatic repertoire involved in crude cotton biomass degradation. Physical contact between cells and substrate is necessary for efficient hydrolysis of cellulose. Cytophagales, which plays a major role in cotton biomass decomposition, was identified as a prevalent community member by 16S rRNA analysis. From the metagenome data, 2058 GHase homologs were identified, of which sixteen were successfully expressed in E. coli. Four enzymes showed activities on p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside, four showed activities on p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside, two had activities against p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucuronide, one showed activity on laminarin, three had activities against p-nitrophenyl-N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminide, one had activity towards carboxymethyl cellulose, and one towards p-nitrophenyl-β-d-mannopyranoside. Metagenomics provides a good resource for mining novel biomass degrading enzymes. The sixteen GHases that were cloned may have potential application for biomass conversion and bioproduct production. Functional characterization of the enzymatic repertoire in cotton biomass degradation and analysis of the GHases provide insight into the composition and interaction of enzymes and pathways of plant biomass degradation. PMID:27460447

  14. Miniaturised tests for determining the hydrocarbon degrading potential of microbial biocenoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reported cases studies show that, unlike established methods of water analysis or contaminant accumulation, screening tests for the characterisation of isolate samples permit conclusions about the hydrocarbon degrading potential of bacterial biocenoses at a given site. It turned out that the diversity and quantity of substrate (C sources) available in an ecosystem decisively influences the proportion of contaminant degraders within a population. While addition of ammonium and phosphate by means of soil infiltration did raise the number of cells, the proportion of hydrocarbon utilisers in the individual biocenoses remained unaffected by inorganic additives (except for decomposers of long chain n-alkanes, which proliferated upon addition of hydrogen peroxide). No correlation was found between xenobiotics degrading potential and the taxonomic affiliations or species spectra of the biocenoses under study. This is probably due to the widespread capacity of microbes to adapt to contaminated sites (possibly through transfer of catabolized genes). (orig./EF)

  15. Lipid Biomarkers Indicating Aerobic Methanotrophy at Ancient Marine Methane- Seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgel, D.; Peckmann, J.

    2007-12-01

    The inventory of lipid biomarkers of a number of ancient methane-seep limestones has been studied over the last decade. The molecular fingerprints of the chemosynthesis-based microbial communities tend to be extremely well-preserved in these limestones. The key process at seeps is the anaerobic oxidation of methane, performed by consortia of sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanotrophic archaea. Compounds preserved within modern and ancient seep settings comprise C-13-depleted lipid biomarkers. Besides the occurrence of C-13- depleted isoprenoids (archaea) and n-alkyl-chains (bacteria), C-13-depleted hopanoids have been reported in seep limestones. Here, lipid biomarker data are presented from three ancient methane-seep limestones embedded in Miocene and Campanian strata. These examples provide strong evidence that methane was not solely oxidized by an anaerobic process. In a Miocene limestone, 3-beta-methylated hopanoids were found (delta C-13: -100 per mil). Most likely, 3-beta-methylated hopanepolyols, prevailing in aerobic methanotrophs were the precursor lipids. In another Miocene limestone, a series of C-13-depleted 4-methylated steranes (lanostanes; -80 to -70 per mil) is derived from aerobic methanotrophs. Lanosterol is the most likely precursor of lanostanes, known to be produced by aerobic methanotrophs, some of which are outstanding among bacteria in having the capacity to produce steroids. In a Campanian seep limestone a suite of conspicuous secohexahydrobenzohopanes (-110 to -107 per mil) is found. These hopanoids probably represent early degradation products of seep-endemic aerobic methanotrophs. This interpretation is supported by the presence of "regular" hopanoids that can be discriminated from the unusual secohexahydrobenzohopanes by only moderately low delta C-13 values (-49 to -42 per mil). Structural and carbon isotope data reveal that aerobic methanotrophy is more common at ancient methane- seeps than previously noticed. Our data indicate that

  16. Microbial community structure analysis of a benzoate-degrading halophilic archaeal enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Sonal; Youssef, Noha H; Fathepure, Babu Z

    2016-05-01

    A benzoate-degrading archaeal enrichment was developed using sediment samples from Rozel Point at Great Salt Lake, UT. The enrichment degraded benzoate as the sole carbon source at salinity ranging from 2.0 to 5.0 M NaCl with highest rate of degradation observed at 4.0 M. The enrichment was also tested for its ability to grow on other aromatic compounds such as 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA), gentisic acid, protocatechuic acid (PCA), catechol, benzene and toluene as the sole sources of carbon and energy. Of these, the culture only utilized 4-HBA as the carbon source. To determine the initial steps in benzoate degradation pathway, a survey of ring-oxidizing and ring-cleaving genes was performed using degenerate PCR primers. Results showed the presence of 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-monooxygenase (4-HBMO) and protocatechuate 3, 4-dioxygenase (3,4-PCA) genes suggesting that the archaeal enrichment might degrade benzoate to 4-HBA that is further converted to PCA by 4-HBMO and, thus, formed PCA would undergo ring-cleavage by 3,4-PCA to form intermediates that enter the Krebs cycle. Small subunit rRNA gene-based diversity survey revealed that the enrichment consisted entirely of class Halobacteria members belonging to the genera Halopenitus, Halosarcina, Natronomonas, Halosimplex, Halorubrum, Salinarchaeum and Haloterrigena. Of these, Halopenitus was the dominant group accounting for almost 91 % of the total sequences suggesting their potential role in degrading oxygenated aromatic compounds at extreme salinity. PMID:26995683

  17. Microbial oil-degradation under mild hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa): which pathways are impacted in piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Barbato, Marta; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Mapelli, Francesca; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Oil spills represent an overwhelming carbon input to the marine environment that immediately impacts the sea surface ecosystem. Microbial communities degrading the oil fraction that eventually sinks to the seafloor must also deal with hydrostatic pressure, which linearly increases with depth. Piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are ideal candidates to elucidate impaired pathways following oil spills at low depth. In the present paper, we tested two strains of the ubiquitous Alcanivorax genus, namely A. jadensis KS_339 and A. dieselolei KS_293, which is known to rapidly grow after oil spills. Strains were subjected to atmospheric and mild pressure (0.1, 5 and 10 MPa, corresponding to a depth of 0, 500 and 1000 m, respectively) providing n-dodecane as sole carbon source. Pressures equal to 5 and 10 MPa significantly lowered growth yields of both strains. However, in strain KS_293 grown at 10 MPa CO2 production per cell was not affected, cell integrity was preserved and PO4(3-) uptake increased. Analysis of its transcriptome revealed that 95% of its genes were downregulated. Increased transcription involved protein synthesis, energy generation and respiration pathways. Interplay between these factors may play a key role in shaping the structure of microbial communities developed after oil spills at low depth and limit their bioremediation potential. PMID:27020120

  18. Microbial oil-degradation under mild hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa): which pathways are impacted in piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Barbato, Marta; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Mapelli, Francesca; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara; Boon, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Oil spills represent an overwhelming carbon input to the marine environment that immediately impacts the sea surface ecosystem. Microbial communities degrading the oil fraction that eventually sinks to the seafloor must also deal with hydrostatic pressure, which linearly increases with depth. Piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are ideal candidates to elucidate impaired pathways following oil spills at low depth. In the present paper, we tested two strains of the ubiquitous Alcanivorax genus, namely A. jadensis KS_339 and A. dieselolei KS_293, which is known to rapidly grow after oil spills. Strains were subjected to atmospheric and mild pressure (0.1, 5 and 10 MPa, corresponding to a depth of 0, 500 and 1000 m, respectively) providing n-dodecane as sole carbon source. Pressures equal to 5 and 10 MPa significantly lowered growth yields of both strains. However, in strain KS_293 grown at 10 MPa CO2 production per cell was not affected, cell integrity was preserved and PO43‑ uptake increased. Analysis of its transcriptome revealed that 95% of its genes were downregulated. Increased transcription involved protein synthesis, energy generation and respiration pathways. Interplay between these factors may play a key role in shaping the structure of microbial communities developed after oil spills at low depth and limit their bioremediation potential.

  19. Microbial oil-degradation under mild hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa): which pathways are impacted in piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria?

    KAUST Repository

    Scoma, Alberto

    2016-03-29

    Oil spills represent an overwhelming carbon input to the marine environment that immediately impacts the sea surface ecosystem. Microbial communities degrading the oil fraction that eventually sinks to the seafloor must also deal with hydrostatic pressure, which linearly increases with depth. Piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are ideal candidates to elucidate impaired pathways following oil spills at low depth. In the present paper, we tested two strains of the ubiquitous Alcanivorax genus, namely A. jadensis KS_339 and A. dieselolei KS_293, which is known to rapidly grow after oil spills. Strains were subjected to atmospheric and mild pressure (0.1, 5 and 10 MPa, corresponding to a depth of 0, 500 and 1000 m, respectively) providing n-dodecane as sole carbon source. Pressures equal to 5 and 10 MPa significantly lowered growth yields of both strains. However, in strain KS_293 grown at 10 MPa CO2 production per cell was not affected, cell integrity was preserved and PO43− uptake increased. Analysis of its transcriptome revealed that 95% of its genes were downregulated. Increased transcription involved protein synthesis, energy generation and respiration pathways. Interplay between these factors may play a key role in shaping the structure of microbial communities developed after oil spills at low depth and limit their bioremediation potential.

  20. Development of methodology to evaluate microbially influenced degradation of cement-solidified low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its apparent structural integrity, cement has been widely used in the United States as a binder to solidify Class B and C low-level radioactive waste (LLW). However, the resulting cement preparations are susceptible to failure due to the actions of stress and environment. An environmentally mediated process that could affect cement stability is the action of naturally occurring microorganisms. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), recognizing this eventuality, stated that the effects of microbial action on waste form integrity must be addressed. This paper provides present results from an ongoing program that addresses the effects of microbially influenced degradation (MID) on cement-solidified LLW. Data are provided on the development of an evaluation method using acid-producing bacteria. Results are from work with one type of these bacteria, the sulfur-oxidizing Thiobacillus. This work involved the use of a system in which laboratory- and vendor-manufactured, simulated waste forms were exposed on an intermittent basis to media containing thiobacilli. Testing demonstrated that MID has the potential to severely compromise the structural integrity of ion-exchange resin and evaporator-bottoms waste that is solidified with cement. In addition, it was found that a significant percentage of calcium and other elements were leached from the treated waste forms. Also, the surface pH of the treated specimens decreased to below 2. These conditions apparently contributed to the physical deterioration of simulated waste forms after 60 days of exposure to the thiobacilli

  1. Microbial oil-degradation under mild hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa): which pathways are impacted in piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Barbato, Marta; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Mapelli, Francesca; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Oil spills represent an overwhelming carbon input to the marine environment that immediately impacts the sea surface ecosystem. Microbial communities degrading the oil fraction that eventually sinks to the seafloor must also deal with hydrostatic pressure, which linearly increases with depth. Piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are ideal candidates to elucidate impaired pathways following oil spills at low depth. In the present paper, we tested two strains of the ubiquitous Alcanivorax genus, namely A. jadensis KS_339 and A. dieselolei KS_293, which is known to rapidly grow after oil spills. Strains were subjected to atmospheric and mild pressure (0.1, 5 and 10 MPa, corresponding to a depth of 0, 500 and 1000 m, respectively) providing n-dodecane as sole carbon source. Pressures equal to 5 and 10 MPa significantly lowered growth yields of both strains. However, in strain KS_293 grown at 10 MPa CO2 production per cell was not affected, cell integrity was preserved and PO43− uptake increased. Analysis of its transcriptome revealed that 95% of its genes were downregulated. Increased transcription involved protein synthesis, energy generation and respiration pathways. Interplay between these factors may play a key role in shaping the structure of microbial communities developed after oil spills at low depth and limit their bioremediation potential. PMID:27020120

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and microbial community shifts during co-composting of creosote-treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covino, Stefano; Fabianová, Tereza; Křesinová, Zdena; Čvančarová, Monika; Burianová, Eva; Filipová, Alena; Vořísková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    The feasibility of decontaminating creosote-treated wood (CTW) by co-composting with agricultural wastes was investigated using two bulking agents, grass cuttings (GC) and broiler litter (BL), each employed at a 1:1 ratio with the matrix. The initial concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in CTW (26,500 mg kg(-1)) was reduced to 3 and 19% after 240 d in GC and BL compost, respectively. PAH degradation exceeded the predicted bioaccesible threshold, estimated through sequential supercritical CO2 extraction, together with significant detoxification, assessed by contact tests using Vibrio fisheri and Hordeum vulgare. GC composting was characterized by high microbial biomass growth in the early phases, as suggested by phospholipid fatty acid analyses. Based on the 454-pyrosequencing results, fungi (mostly Saccharomycetales) constituted an important portion of the microbial community, and bacteria were characterized by rapid shifts (from Firmicutes (Bacilli) and Actinobacteria to Proteobacteria). However, during BL composting, larger amounts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic PLFA markers were observed during the cooling and maturation phases, which were dominated by Proteobacteria and fungi belonging to the Ascomycota and those putatively related to the Glomeromycota. This work reports the first in-depth analysis of the chemical and microbiological processes that occur during the co-composting of a PAH-contaminated matrix. PMID:26342147

  3. Metagenome reveals potential microbial degradation of hydrocarbon coupled with sulfate reduction in an oil-immersed chimney from Guaymas Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eHe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys contain a high diversity of microorganisms, yet the metabolic activity and the ecological functions of the microbial communities remain largely unexplored. In this study, a metagenomic approach was applied to characterize the metabolic potential in a Guaymas hydrothermal vent chimney and to conduct comparative genomic analysis among a variety of environments with sequenced metagenomes. Complete clustering of functional gene categories with a comparative metagenomic approach showed that this Guaymas chimney metagenome was clustered most closely with a chimney metagenome from Juan de Fuca. All chimney samples were enriched with genes involved in recombination and repair, chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, highlighting their roles in coping with the fluctuating extreme deep-sea environments. A high proportion of transposases was observed in all the metagenomes from deep-sea chimneys, supporting the previous hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer may be common in the deep-sea vent chimney biosphere. In the Guaymas chimney metagenome, thermophilic sulfate reducing microorganisms including bacteria and archaea were found predominant, and genes coding for the degradation of refractory organic compounds such as cellulose, lipid, pullullan, as well as a few hydrocarbons including toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene were identified. Therefore, this oil-immersed chimney supported a thermophilic microbial community capable of oxidizing a range of hydrocarbons that served as electron donors for sulphate reduction under anaerobic conditions.

  4. Microbial degradation pathways of the herbicide dichlobenil in soils with different history of dichlobenil-exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first detailed study of metabolite production during degradation of the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (dichlobenil). Degradation of dichlobenil and three potential metabolites: 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM), 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (2,6-DCBA) and ortho-chlorobenzamide (OBAM) was studied in soils either previously exposed or not exposed to dichlobenil using a newly developed HPLC method. Dichlobenil was degraded in all four soils; BAM and 2,6-DCBA were only degraded in soils previously exposed to dichlobenil (100% within 35-56 days and 85-100% in 56 days, respectively), and OBAM in all four soils (25-33% removal in 48 days). BAM produced from dichlobenil was either hydrolyzed to 2,6-DCBA or dechlorinated to OBAM, which was further hydrolyzed to ortho-chlorobenzoic acid. BAM was rapidly mineralized in previously exposed soils only. All potential metabolites and the finding that BAM was a dead-end metabolite of dichlobenil in soils not previously exposed to dichlobenil needs to be included in risk assessments of the use of dichlobenil. - BAM produced from dichlobenil was either hydrolyzed to 2,6-DCBA or dechlorinated to OBAM, which was further hydrolyzed to ortho-chlorobenzoic acid

  5. Adsorption, Persistence and Degradation of Pesticides in Brazilian Soils. Influence of Organic Matter and Microbial Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of repeated applications of parathion on a humic gley soil was studied. Results showed an increased rate of formation of 14CO2 indicating a more rapid breakdown of parathion after one, five and eleven months storage. The enhanced degradation was shown to occur as a function of the period of incubation, independent of the parathion treatments

  6. Factors that affect the degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands wastewater by indigenous microbial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acute toxicity of wastewater generated during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands is believed to be due to naphthenic acids (NAs). To determine the factors that affect the rate of degradation of representative NAs in microcosms containing wastewater and the acute toxicity of treated and untreated wastewater, the effects of temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and phosphate addition on the rate of 14CO2 release form two representative naphthenic acid substrates, (linear) U-14C-palmitic acid (PA) and (bicyclic) decahydro-2-naphthoic acid-8-14C (DHNA), were monitored. Tailings pond water (TPW) contained microorganisms well adapted to mineralizing both PA and DHNA:PA was degraded more quickly (10--15% in 4 weeks) compared to DHNA (2--4% in 8 weeks). On addition of phosphate, the rate of NA degradation increased up to twofold in the first 4 weeks, with a concurrent increase in the rate of oxygen consumption by oil sands TPW. The degradation rate then declined to levels equivalent to those measured in flasks without phosphate. The observed plateau was not due to phosphate limitation. Decreases in either the dissolved oxygen concentration or the temperature reduced the rate. Phosphate addition also significantly decreased the acute toxicity of TPW to fathead minnows. In contrast, Microtox reg-sign analyses showed no reduction in the toxicity of treated or untreated TPW after incubation for up to 8 weeks at 15 C

  7. Microbial litter degradation across a land-use gradient of Danish streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jes; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Kronvang, Brian

    functions. In consequence, it is highly important to address and characterise relations between stream functions and anthropogenic stress. In streams, fungi and bacteria are key organism groups in the decomposition and conversion of riparian plant litter into more palatable food resources for.......05) for leaf packs that were positioned at sites with low flow compared to sites with turbulent flow. Moreover, we calculated summed Toxic Units (TU) for all pesticides in each sample by weighing the toxic contribution of each compound against its toxicity for Selenastrum capricornotum (a microbial...

  8. The stability of aerobic granular sludge under 4-chloroaniline shock in a sequential air-lift bioreactor (SABR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Lv, Mei-le; Dai, Xin; Zhou, Jia-heng; Xu, Xiang-yang

    2013-07-01

    The aerobic granular sludge technology has a great potential in treatment of municipal wastewater and industrial wastewater containing toxic non-degradable pollutants. However, the formation and structural stability of aerobic granular sludge is susceptible to toxic shock. In the study, the effect of 4-chloroaniline (4-ClA) as a common toxic pollutant on the granular structure and performance was investigated, and the mechanism was revealed to provide more information on 4-ClA degradation with aerobic granular sludge process. The results showed that a 4-ClA shock at influent 200 mg L(-1) could cause the disintegration of aerobic granular sludge and decrease of the pollutant removal performance. The analysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) within the mature and disintegrated granular sludge showed that the decrease of protein content in EPS, especially the components like Amide I 3-turn helix and β-sheet structures and aspartate, was not good for the stability of aerobic granular sludge. The microbial community results demonstrated that the disappearance of dominant bacteria like Kineosphaera limosa or appearance like Acinetobacter, might contribute to the reduction of EPS and disintegration of aerobic granular sludge. PMID:23685649

  9. Litter degradation by the saprotrophic basidiomycete Hypholoma fasciculare and the changes of microbial community composition in fungus-colonized soil and wood

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valášková, Vendula; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Gunneviek, P. K.; do Boer, W.; Baldrian, Petr

    Manchester: BMS, 2007, s. 38-38. [Annual Scientific Meeting 2007. Manchester (GB), 09.09.2007-12.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/06/0974; GA MŠk LC06066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : forest litter * microbial community * degradation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  10. Remediation of PAH-contaminated soil at a gas manufacturing plant by a combined two-phase partition system washing and microbial degradation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xuan; Xu, Xinyang; Gong, Zongqiang; Li, Xiaojun; Jia, Chunyun; Guo, Meixia; Li, Haibo

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to design a remediation technique using both soil washing and microbial degradation to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soil. PAH biodegradation by inoculation of Mycobacterium sp. was first tested. The effectiveness of washing agents (Tween 80 solution, biodiesel, and a two-phase partition system (TPPS)) was then evaluated with column experiments. Third, the combination of TPPS washing and microbial degradation was studied. PAH bioavailability before and after biodegradation and the joint remediation was also assessed using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) extraction. Only phenanthrene and anthracene were noticeably biodegradable when the soil was inoculated with Mycobacterium sp. TPPS containing 2% (v/v) biodiesel and 2.5% (w/v) Tween 80 was used as the washing agent for the joint remediation test because it gave higher PAH extractions than Tween 80 solution with lower doses, and there was less residue in the soil. Joint TPPS washing and microbial degradation gave a total PAH removal of 92.6%, which was much higher than the results from either the biodegradation or washing experiments alone. Removals of all high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs were improved. Bioavailable concentrations of all PAHs decreased significantly after the joint remediation process, indicating that there were reduced risks from all PAHs. The results demonstrate that the combination of TPPS washing and microbial degradation is a useful and innovative process for remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. PMID:25874432

  11. Aspirated pits in wetwood and micromorphology of microbial degradation in subalpine fir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yaoli; CAI Liping; XU Yongji

    2006-01-01

    Differentiating from normal wood,pit membranes in wetwood of subalpine fir contain bacteria of water drop shape or orbicular shape,and flaky shape,as observed using Scanning Electronic Microscope.Not only are ray parenchyma cells in wetwood partially degraded but also margo strands in pit membranes are somewhat degraded by bacterial activities.Most of the bordered-pit membranes in normal wood are unaspirated in green conditions and the proportions of aspirated pits in earlywood and latewood account for only 6.8% and 13.4%,respectively.Nevertheless,most of the bordered-pit membranes in wetwood are aspirated in green conditions and the proportions of aspirated pits account for 77.7% and 72.1%,respectively.The problem of hard-to-dry for subalpine fir could be reasoned from the considerable amount of aspirated pit membranes in wetwood.

  12. Microbial degradation of cyanide from gold metallurgical plants utilizing P. fluorecens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium cyanide is traditionally used in chemical metallurgy to obtain precious metals (gold and silver). Cyanide produces damages because of its toxicity and breath cell inhibition. Here we try a biotechnological process to degrade cyanide with P. fluorescens obtained by cyanide heap leaching process in gold metallurgy in Segovia, Colombia. In Colombia cyanide heap-leaching process in gold metallurgy is not controlled and cyanide is used excessively. It means that great quantities of sodium cyanide are lost in sands and in wastewater. Toxicity tests made by D. pulex show less than 54 ppm of cyanide is enough to kill them. Traditional treatments to cyanide degradation are useful and normal but they are expensive. Microbiological process eliminates cyanide successfully and cheap

  13. Degradation of hazardous chemicals in liquid radioactive wastes from biomedical research using a mixed microbial population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the costs associated with treatment of mixed wastes by conventional methods increase, new technologies will be investigated as alternatives. This study examines the potential of using a selected mixed population of microorganisms to treat hazardous chemical compounds in liquid low level radioactive wastes from biomedical research procedures. Microorganisms were isolated from various waste samples and enriched against compounds known to occur in the wastes. Individual isolates were tested for their ability to degrade methanol, ethanol, phenol, toluene, phthalates, acetonitrile, chloroform, and trichloroacetic acid. Following these tests, the organisms were combined in a media with a mixture of the different compounds. Three compounds: methanol, acetonitrile, and pseudocumene, were combined at 500 microliter/liter each. Degradation of each compound was shown to occur (75% or greater) under batch conditions with the mixed population. Actual wastes were tested by adding an aliquot to the media, determining the biomass increase, and monitoring the disappearance of the compounds. The compounds in actual waste were degraded, but at different rates than the batch cultures that did not have waste added. The potential of using bioprocessing methods for treating mixed wastes from biomedical research is discussed

  14. Degradation of hazardous chemicals in liquid radioactive wastes from biomedical research using a mixed microbial population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfram, J.H.; Radtke, M.; Wey, J.E.; Rogers, R.D. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Rau, E.H. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Div. of Safety

    1997-10-01

    As the costs associated with treatment of mixed wastes by conventional methods increase, new technologies will be investigated as alternatives. This study examines the potential of using a selected mixed population of microorganisms to treat hazardous chemical compounds in liquid low level radioactive wastes from biomedical research procedures. Microorganisms were isolated from various waste samples and enriched against compounds known to occur in the wastes. Individual isolates were tested for their ability to degrade methanol, ethanol, phenol, toluene, phthalates, acetonitrile, chloroform, and trichloroacetic acid. Following these tests, the organisms were combined in a media with a mixture of the different compounds. Three compounds: methanol, acetonitrile, and pseudocumene, were combined at 500 microliter/liter each. Degradation of each compound was shown to occur (75% or greater) under batch conditions with the mixed population. Actual wastes were tested by adding an aliquot to the media, determining the biomass increase, and monitoring the disappearance of the compounds. The compounds in actual waste were degraded, but at different rates than the batch cultures that did not have waste added. The potential of using bioprocessing methods for treating mixed wastes from biomedical research is discussed.

  15. Aerobic granulation strategy for bioaugmentation of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treating high strength pyridine wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Yan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Xin [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Suzhou Institute of Architectural Design Co., Ltd, Suzhou 215021, Jiangsu Province (China); Jiang, Xinbai; Wu, Shijing [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Shen, Jinyou, E-mail: shenjinyou@mail.njust.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Lu, Lude [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Lianjun, E-mail: wanglj@mail.njust.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-09-15

    Abstract: Aerobic granules were successfully cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), using a single bacterial strain Rhizobium sp. NJUST18 as the inoculum. NJUST18 presented as both a good pyridine degrader and an efficient autoaggregator. Stable granules with diameter of 0.5–1 mm, sludge volume index of 25.6 ± 3.6 mL g{sup −1} and settling velocity of 37.2 ± 2.7 m h{sup −1}, were formed in SBR following 120-day cultivation. These granules exhibited excellent pyridine degradation performance, with maximum volumetric degradation rate (V{sub max}) varied between 1164.5 mg L{sup −1} h{sup −1} and 1867.4 mg L{sup −1} h{sup −1}. High-throughput sequencing analysis exhibited a large shift in microbial community structure, since the SBR was operated under open condition. Paracoccus and Comamonas were found to be the most predominant species in the aerobic granule system after the system had stabilized. The initially inoculated Rhizobium sp. lost its dominance during aerobic granulation. However, the inoculation of Rhizobium sp. played a key role in the start-up process of this bioaugmentation system. This study demonstrated that, in addition to the hydraulic selection pressure during settling and effluent discharge, the selection of aggregating bacterial inocula is equally important for the formation of the aerobic granule.

  16. Aerobic granulation strategy for bioaugmentation of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treating high strength pyridine wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstract: Aerobic granules were successfully cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), using a single bacterial strain Rhizobium sp. NJUST18 as the inoculum. NJUST18 presented as both a good pyridine degrader and an efficient autoaggregator. Stable granules with diameter of 0.5–1 mm, sludge volume index of 25.6 ± 3.6 mL g−1 and settling velocity of 37.2 ± 2.7 m h−1, were formed in SBR following 120-day cultivation. These granules exhibited excellent pyridine degradation performance, with maximum volumetric degradation rate (Vmax) varied between 1164.5 mg L−1 h−1 and 1867.4 mg L−1 h−1. High-throughput sequencing analysis exhibited a large shift in microbial community structure, since the SBR was operated under open condition. Paracoccus and Comamonas were found to be the most predominant species in the aerobic granule system after the system had stabilized. The initially inoculated Rhizobium sp. lost its dominance during aerobic granulation. However, the inoculation of Rhizobium sp. played a key role in the start-up process of this bioaugmentation system. This study demonstrated that, in addition to the hydraulic selection pressure during settling and effluent discharge, the selection of aggregating bacterial inocula is equally important for the formation of the aerobic granule

  17. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils. PMID:26037076

  18. Degradation of microbial fluorescence biosignatures by solar ultraviolet radiation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Patel, Manish R.

    2014-04-01

    Recent and proposed robotic missions to Mars are equipped with implements to expose or excavate fresh material from beneath the immediate surface. Once brought into the open, any organic molecules or potential biosignatures of present or past life will be exposed to the unfiltered solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and face photolytic degradation over short time courses. The key question, then, is what is the window of opportunity for detection of recently exposed samples during robotic operations? Detection of autofluorescence has been proposed as a simple method for surveying or triaging samples for organic molecules. Using a Mars simulation chamber we conduct UV exposures on thin frozen layers of two model microorganisms, the radiation-resistant polyextremophile Deinococcus radiodurans and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) are generated of the full fluorescence response to quantify the change in signal of different cellular fluorophores over Martian equivalent time. Fluorescence of Deinococcus cells, protected by a high concentration of carotenoid pigments, was found to be relatively stable over 32 h of Martian UV irradiation, with around 90% of the initial signal remaining. By comparison, fluorescence from protein-bound tryptophan in Synechocystis is much more sensitive to UV photodegradation, declining to 50% after 64 h exposure. The signal most readily degraded by UV irradiation is fluorescence of the photosynthetic pigments - diminished to only 35% after 64 h. This sensitivity may be expected as the biological function of chlorophyll and phycocyanin is to optimize the harvesting of light energy and so they are readily photobleached. A significant increase in a ~450 nm emission feature is interpreted as accumulation of fluorescent cellular degradation products from photolysis. Accounting for diurnal variation in Martian sunlight, this study calculates that frozen cellular biosignatures would remain detectable by

  19. Microbial diversity and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation potential in an oil-contaminated mangrove sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Luiza L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mangrove forests are coastal wetlands that provide vital ecosystem services and serve as barriers against natural disasters like tsunamis, hurricanes and tropical storms. Mangroves harbour a large diversity of organisms, including microorganisms with important roles in nutrient cycling and availability. Due to tidal influence, mangroves are sites where crude oil from spills farther away can accumulate. The relationship between mangrove bacterial diversity and oil degradation in mangrove sediments remains poorly understood. Results Mangrove sediment was sampled from 0–5, 15–20 and 35–40 cm depth intervals from the Suruí River mangrove (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, which has a history of oil contamination. DGGE fingerprinting for bamA, dsr and 16S rRNA encoding fragment genes, and qPCR analysis using dsr and 16S rRNA gene fragment revealed differences with sediment depth. Conclusions Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity revealed changes with depth. DGGE for bamA and dsr genes shows that the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community profile also changed between 5 and 15 cm depth, and is similar in the two deeper sediments, indicating that below 15 cm the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community appears to be well established and homogeneous in this mangrove sediment. qPCR analysis revealed differences with sediment depth, with general bacterial abundance in the top layer (0–5 cm being greater than in both deeper sediment layers (15–20 and 35–40 cm, which were similar to each other.

  20. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, N.; Aamand, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified...... across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of...

  1. Morphological observation and microbial population dynamics in anaerobic polyurethane foam biofilm degrading gelatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports on a preliminary study of anaerobic degradation of gelatin with emphasis on the development of the proteolytic biofilm in polyurethane foam matrices in differential reactors. The evolution of the biofilm was observed during 22 days by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analyses. Three distinct immobilization patterns could be observed in the polyurethane foam: cell aggregates entrapped in matrix pores, thin biofilms attached to inner polyurethane foam surfaces and individual cells that have adhered to the support. Rods, cocci and vibrios were observed as the predominant morphologies of bacterial cells. Methane was produced mainly by hydrogenothrophic reactions during the operation of the reactors.

  2. Mechanism of aerobic biological destabilisation of wool scour effluent emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Andrew J; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; William Jones, F

    2005-07-01

    Wool scouring effluent is a highly polluted industrial wastewater in which the main pollutant, wool wax, is held in a stable oil-in-water emulsion by non-ionic detergent. The use of microbial action to cause emulsion destabilisation has been proposed as a new treatment strategy for this effluent stream. This strategy aims at improving aerobic treatment performance by physically removing the high-COD, slowly bio-degradable wool wax from the system without bio-degradation. The mechanism by which an aerobic-mixed culture destabilises the wool scouring effluent emulsion was investigated. Our results show that destabilisation is due to partial bio-degradation of both the scouring detergent and the wool wax. Cleavage of the wool wax esters was the first stage in wax degradation, when 40-50% of wax was de-emulsified. Over the same period, detergent degradation was low, at 7-21%. With further incubation, detergent degradation increased, aiding further breakdown of the emulsion. The degradation of the detergent, a nonylphenol ethoxylate, resulted in both a reduction in molar concentration (of up to 82%) and a shortening of the ethoxylate chain length. The latter reduced the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) from 12 to approximately 7, thereby reducing the ability of the residual detergent to stabilise the emulsion. Analysis of the emulsified and de-emulsified wax fractions could not identify a group of compounds that were preferentially de-emulsified based on molecular weight or polarity. These findings will assist in using a de-emulsification strategy in both existing and new treatment systems in order to save on aeration costs and treatment times for biological treatment of this highly polluted wastewater. PMID:15979119

  3. Optimization for Microbial Degradation of Dibenzothiophene by Pseudomonas sp. LKY-5 Using Response Surface Methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lin; Zhao Chaocheng; Liu Qiyou; Zhang Yunbo; Liu Chunshuang; Xue Jianliang

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the degradation of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was investigated by using Pseudomonas sp. LKY-5 isolated from oil contaminated soil. The response surface methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken design (BBD) was applied for evaluating the interactive effects of four independent variables including substrate concentration, tempera-ture, pH and agitation rate on the DBT removal response. A total of 29 experiments for four factors at three levels were conducted in present study. A second-order regression model was then developed, and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) illustrated that the proposed quadratic model could be utilized to navigate the design space. The value of determination coefif-cient (R2=0.953 4) indicated a satisfactory agreement between the quadratic model and the experimental data. It was found that DBT removal was more signiifcantly affected (P<0.000 1) by substrate concentration compared with other three parameters. An 100%degradation of DBT could be obtained by Pseudomonas sp. LKY-5 at a substrate concentration of 100 mg/L.

  4. Cometabolic degradation of lincomycin in a Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) and its microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yancheng; Zhou, Jian; Gong, Benzhou; Wang, Yingmu; He, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Cometabolism technology was employed to degrade lincomycin wastewater in Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR). In contrast with the control group, the average removal rate of lincomycin increased by 56.0% and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) increased by 52.5% in the cometabolic system with glucose as growth substrate. Under the same condition, Oxidation-Reduction Potential (ORP) was 85.1±7.3mV in cometabolic system and 198.2±8.4mV in the control group, indicating that glucose changed the bulk ORP and created an appropriate growing environment for function bacteria. Functional groups of lincomycin were effectively degraded in cometabolic system proved by FTIR and GC-MS. Meanwhile, results of DGGE and 16S rDNA showed great difference in dominant populations between cometabolic system and the control group. In cometabolic system, Roseovarius (3.35%), Thiothrix (2.74%), Halomonas (2.49%), Ignavibacterium (2.02%), and TM7_genus_incertae_sedis (1.93%) were verified as dominant populations at genus level. Cometabolism may be synergistically caused by different functional dominant bacteria. PMID:27183234

  5. Performances and microbial features of an aerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor developed to post-treat an olive mill effluent from an anaerobic GAC reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Leonardo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive mill wastewater (OMW is the aqueous effluent of olive oil producing processes. Given its high COD and content of phenols, it has to be decontaminated before being discharged. Anaerobic digestion is one of the most promising treatment process for such an effluent, as it combines high decontamination efficiency with methane production. The large scale anaerobic digestion of OMWs is normally conducted in dispersed-growth reactors, where however are generally achieved unsatisfactory COD removal and methane production yields. The possibility of intensifying the performance of the process using a packed bed biofilm reactor, as anaerobic treatment alternative, was demonstrated. Even in this case, however, a post-treatment step is required to further reduce the COD. In this work, a biological post-treatment, consisting of an aerobic biological "Manville" silica bead-packed bed aerobic reactor, was developed, tested for its ability to complete COD removal from the anaerobic digestion effluents, and characterized biologically through molecular tools. Results The aerobic post-treatment was assessed through a 2 month-continuous feeding with the digested effluent at 50.42 and 2.04 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. It was found to be a stable process, able to remove 24 and 39% of such organic loads, respectively, and to account for 1/4 of the overall decontamination efficiency displayed by the anaerobic-aerobic integrated system when fed with an amended OMW at 31.74 and 1.70 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of biomass samples from the aerobic reactor biofilm revealed that it was colonized by Rhodobacterales, Bacteroidales, Pseudomonadales, Enterobacteriales, Rhodocyclales and genera incertae sedis TM7. Some taxons occurring in the influent were not detected in the biofilm, whereas others, such as Paracoccus, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Enterobacter

  6. Adaptive microbial population shifts in response to a continuous ethanol blend release increases biodegradation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate of fuel releases largely depends on the poorly-understood response in microbial community structure and function. Here, we evaluate the impacts to the microbial community resulting from a pilot-scale continuous release (10 months) of a 10% v:v ethanol solution mixed with benzene and toluene (50 mg/L each). Microbial population shifts were characterized by pyrosequencing-based 16S rRNA analysis and by quantitative PCR targeting Bacteria, Archaea, and functional genes for methanogenesis (mcrA), acetogenesis (fhs) and aerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons (PHE), which could occur in hypoxic micro-environments. The release stimulated microbial growth, increased species richness and diversity, and selected for genotypes involved in fermentative degradation (the relative abundance of mcrA and fhs increased 18- and 6-fold, respectively). The growth of putative hydrocarbon degraders and commensal anaerobes, and increases in microbial diversity and in degradation rates suggest an adaptive response that increases the potential for natural attenuation of ethanol blend releases. -- Highlights: •Pyrosequencing discerned microbial community changes after an ethanol blend release. •Adaptive microbial population shifts that enhance bioremediation were observed. •Hydrocarbon degraders and fermentation syntrophs proliferated. •Surprisingly, both species richness and taxonomic diversity increased. -- Pyrosequencing analysis discerned adaptive microbial population shifts that increase natural attenuation potential of an ethanol-blended fuel release

  7. Deep Sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an Epibiotic Sponge on Cold-Seep Tubeworms, Reveals Methylotrophic, Thiotrophic, and Putative Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Associations

    KAUST Repository

    Arellano, Shawn M.

    2012-10-11

    The encrusting sponge Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila (Poecilosclerida: Myxillidae) is an epibiont on vestimentiferan tubeworms at hydrocarbon seeps on the upper Louisiana slope of the Gulf of Mexico. It has long been suggested that this sponge harbors methylotrophic bacteria due to its low δ13C value and high methanol dehydrogenase activity, yet the full community of microbial associations in M. methanophila remained uncharacterized. In this study, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes representing the microbial community in M. methanophila collected from two hydrocarbon-seep sites (GC234 and Bush Hill) using both Sanger sequencing and next-generation 454 pyrosequencing technologies. Additionally, we compared the microbial community in M. methanophila to that of the biofilm collected from the associated tubeworm. Our results revealed that the microbial diversity in the sponges from both sites was low but the community structure was largely similar, showing a high proportion of methylotrophic bacteria of the genus Methylohalomonas and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria of the genera Cycloclasticus and Neptunomonas. Furthermore, the sponge microbial clone library revealed the dominance of thioautotrophic gammaproteobacterial symbionts in M. methanophila. In contrast, the biofilm communities on the tubeworms were more diverse and dominated by the chemoorganotrophic Moritella at GC234 and methylotrophic Methylomonas and Methylohalomonas at Bush Hill. Overall, our study provides evidence to support previous suggestion that M. methanophila harbors methylotrophic symbionts and also reveals the association of PAH-degrading and thioautotrophic microbes in the sponge. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  8. Radiation-induced impacts on the degradation of 2,4-D and the microbial population in soil microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a soil microcosm experiment, the influence of low-level 137Cs and 90Sr contamination on the degradation of 14C-ring-labeled 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was studied. Two differently treated soils (one native soil and one soil sterilized and reinoculated with a biotic soil aliquot) were artificially contaminated with various concentrations of 137Cs and 90Sr as nitrate salts. The cumulative doses increased up to 4 Gy for 30 days of incubation in soil microcosms. Changes in microbial community structure were observed with help of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A radiation-induced impact appeared only in the microcosms treated with 30 times the maximum contamination appearing in the exclusion zone around reactor 4 in Chernobyl. In contrast to the less contaminated soils, the mineralization of 2,4-D was delayed for 4 days before it recovered. Slight shifts in the microbial communities could be traced to radiation effects. However, other parameters had a major impact on mineralization and community structure. Thus the sterilization and reinoculation and, of course, application of the 2,4-D were predominantly reflected in the 14CO2 emissions and the DGGE gel patterns. - Highlights: ► We observed the impact of contamination with Cs-137 and Sr-90 on soil functions. ► The contamination went up to 30-fold of that in the 30 km Chernobyl zone. ► The radioactive contamination inhibited the 2,4-D mineralization temporary. ► The bacterial and fungal community structure was also affected.

  9. A procedure to evaluate the potential for microbially influenced degradation of cement-solidified low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its apparent structural integrity, cement has been widely used in the US as a binder to solidify Class B and C low-level radioactive waste (LLW). However, the resulting cement preparations are susceptible to failure due to the actions of stress and environment. An environmentally mediated process that could affect cement stability is the action of naturally occurring microorganisms. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), recognizing this eventuality, stated in their Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1, that the effects of microbial action on waste form integrity must be addressed. This paper provides recent results from a program that examined the effects of microbially influenced degradation (MID) on cement-solidified LLW. Data are provided which were obtained during the development of an evaluation method using acid-producing bacteria. Results presented here are from work with one type of these bacteria, the sulfur-oxidizing thiobacillus. Commercially prepared, cement-solidified, low-level radioactive waste form samples made from power reactor wastes were evaluated using a new biodegradation test developed for the NRC. Testing demonstrated that MID has the potential to severely compromise the structural integrity and nuclide retentiveness of ion-exchange resin and evaporator-bottoms wastes that have been solidified with cement. It was found that the waste form specimens physically deteriorated after 60 days of exposure to the thiobacilli. Also, the data show that significant amounts of Cs-137, Cs-134, Co-60, C-14, Tc-99, and Sr-90 contained in the waste forms were leached in the presence of Thiobacillus

  10. Bioelectricity generation from coconut husk retting wastewater in fed batch operating microbial fuel cell by phenol degrading microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) operated at fed batch mode for the treatment of retting wastewater has potently achieved both current generation and phenol removal. Hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the reactor was varied from 40 days to 10 days. COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal was 91% at 40 days HRT, with an initial COD concentration of 530 ± 50 g m−3. Retting wastewater with an initial phenol concentration of 320 ± 60 g m−3 procured a highest phenol removal of 93% at 40 days HRT of the microbial fuel cell. Maximum power density of 362 mW m−2 was achieved using retting wastewater at HRT of 20 days with an internal resistance of 150 Ω in a dual chambered MFC. The bacterial strains in anode region, reported to be responsible for potential phenol removal, were identified as Ochrobactrum sp. RA1 (KJ408266), Ochrobactrum sp. RA2 (KJ408267) and Pesudomonas aeruginosa RA3 (KJ408268) using phylogenetic analysis. The study reveals that, dual chambered MFC effectively removed the phenol from retting wastewater along with power generation. - Highlights: • Maximum power density of 362 mW m−2 (150 Ω) was achieved at HRT of 20 days. • 91% COD removal and 93% phenol removal was observed at HRT of 40 days. • 25% coulombic efficiency was achieved in treatment of retting wastewater with MFC. • Phylogenetic analysis detect phenol degrading Ochrobactrum sp.RA1 in anode biofilm. • In addition, Ochrobactrum sp.RA2 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa RA3 were also isolated

  11. Microbial degradation of fluorinated drugs: biochemical pathways, impacts on the environment and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cormac D

    2016-03-01

    Since the discovery over 60 years ago of fluorocortisone's biological properties (9-α-Fluoro derivatives of cortisone and hydrocortisone; Fried J and Sabo EF, J Am Chem Soc 76: 1455-1456, 1954), the number of fluorinated drugs has steadily increased. With the improvement in synthetic methodologies, this trend is likely to continue and will lead to the introduction of new fluorinated substituents into pharmaceutical compounds. Although the biotransformation of organofluorine compounds by microorganisms has been well studied, specific investigations on fluorinated drugs are relatively few, despite the increase in the number and variety of fluorinated drugs that are available. The strength of the carbon-fluorine bond conveys stability to fluorinated drugs; thus, they are likely to be recalcitrant in the environment or may be partially metabolized to a more toxic metabolite. This review examines the research done on microbial biotransformation and biodegradation of fluorinated drugs and highlights the importance of understanding how microorganisms interact with this class of compound from environmental, clinical and biotechnological perspectives. PMID:26830103

  12. Examination of protein degradation in continuous flow, microbial electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Cellulose fermentation wastewaters (FWWs) contain short chain volatile fatty acids and alcohols, but they also have high concentrations of proteins. Hydrogen gas production from FWW was examined using continuous flow microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), with a focus on fate of the protein. H2 production rates were 0.49±0.05m3/m3-d for the FWW, compared to 0.63±0.02m3/m3-d using a synthetic wastewater containing only acetate (applied potential of 0.9V). Total organic matter removal was 76±6% for the FWW, compared to 87±5% for acetate. The MEC effluent became relatively enriched in protein (69%) compared to that in the original FWW (19%). Protein was completely removed using higher applied voltages (1.0 or 1.2V), but current generation was erratic due to more positive anode potentials (-113±38mV, Eap=1.2V; -338±38mV, 1.0V; -0.426±4mV, 0.9V). Bacteria on the anodes with FWW were primarily Deltaproteobacteria, while Archaea were predominantly Methanobacterium.

  13. Degradation of atrazine by microbial consortium in an anaerobic submerged biological filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Simin; Baghapour, Mohammad Ali; Derakhshan, Zahra; Faramarzian, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) (ATZ) is one of the components of S-triazine. Due to its certain characteristics, ATZ causes pollution in various ecosystems and has been of concern for its probable carcinogenic effects on humans. Researchers have used chemical and physical methods for removing ATZ from the environment. Although these methods are quick, they have not been capable of complete mineralization. Therefore, researchers are looking for methods with lower energy consumption and cost and higher efficiency. In this study, biodegradation of ATZ by microbial consortium was evaluated in the aquatic environment. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of ATZ removal from aqueous environments by using an anaerobic submerged biological filter in four concentration levels of atrazine and three hydraulic retention times. The maximum efficiencies of ATZ and soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) were 51.1 and 45.6%, respectively. There was no accumulation of ATZ in the biofilm and the loss of ATZ in the control reactor was negligible. This shows that ATZ removal in this system was due to biodegradation. Furthermore, the results of modeling showed that the Stover-Kincannon model had desirable fitness (R² > 99%) in loading ATZ in this biofilter. PMID:25252353

  14. Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term ( 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation

  15. The effect of continuous Zn (II) exposure on the organic degradation capability and soluble microbial products (SMP) of activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jing-chao [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Liu, Yan, E-mail: liuyan@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Liu, Xiang, E-mail: liuxiang@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, Yi; Yan, Yang-wei; Dai, Rui-hua; Zha, Xiao-song; Wang, Cheng-shan [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► After acclimation, the activated sludge could endure 400 mg/L Zn (II). ► A close correlation was found between SMP content and effluent COD. ► The change in DNA might reflect the Zn (II) toxicity to the biomass. -- Abstract: This study describes the change of organic degradation capability and soluble microbial products (SMP) generated in activated sludge under continuous exposure to Zn (II) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). In 338 days of operation, the added Zn (II) concentrations were gradually increased from 50 to 100, 200, 400 to 600 and 800 mg/L. Results showed that after adaptation, the activated sludge could endure 400 mg/L Zn (II) without showing evident reduction in organic degradation ability (92 ± 1% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in stable state). However, when 600 and 800 mg/L Zn (II) were applied, the effluent water quality significantly deteriorated. Meanwhile, under increasing Zn (II) concentrations, the SMP content in the activated sludge, together with its main biochemical constituents, first increased slightly below 400 mg/L of Zn (II), then rose sharply under 600 and 800 mg/L Zn (II). Furthermore, a close correlation was found between SMP content and effluent soluble COD in both the Experimental Reactor and Control Reactor. In addition, the Zn (II) concentrations in the effluent and SMP extraction liquid were further analyzed and discussed to reveal the role that SMP constituents played in defense and resistance to the toxicity of Zn (II)

  16. Metagenomic profiling reveals lignocellulose degrading system in a microbial community associated with a wood-feeding beetle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin D Scully

    Full Text Available The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophoraglabripennis is an invasive, wood-boring pest that thrives in the heartwood of deciduous tree species. A large impediment faced by A. glabripennis as it feeds on woody tissue is lignin, a highly recalcitrant biopolymer that reduces access to sugars and other nutrients locked in cellulose and hemicellulose. We previously demonstrated that lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose are actively deconstructed in the beetle gut and that the gut harbors an assemblage of microbes hypothesized to make significant contributions to these processes. While lignin degrading mechanisms have been well characterized in pure cultures of white rot basidiomycetes, little is known about such processes in microbial communities associated with wood-feeding insects. The goals of this study were to develop a taxonomic and functional profile of a gut community derived from an invasive population of larval A. glabripennis collected from infested host trees and to identify genes that could be relevant for the digestion of woody tissue and nutrient acquisition. To accomplish this goal, we taxonomically and functionally characterized the A. glabripennis midgut microbiota through amplicon and shotgun metagenome sequencing and conducted a large-scale comparison with the metagenomes from a variety of other herbivore-associated communities. This analysis distinguished the A. glabripennis larval gut metagenome from the gut communities of other herbivores, including previously sequenced termite hindgut metagenomes. Genes encoding enzymes were identified in the A. glabripennis gut metagenome that could have key roles in woody tissue digestion including candidate lignin degrading genes (laccases, dye-decolorizing peroxidases, novel peroxidases and β-etherases, 36 families of glycoside hydrolases (such as cellulases and xylanases, and genes that could facilitate nutrient recovery, essential nutrient synthesis, and detoxification. This community

  17. Tracing organic compounds in aerobically altered methane-derived carbonate pipes (Gulf of Cadiz, SW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merinero, Raúl; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Menor-Salván, César; Lunar, Rosario; Martínez-Frías, Jesús

    2012-07-01

    The primary geochemical process at methane seeps is anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), performed by methanotrophic archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The molecular fingerprints (biomarkers) of these chemosynthetic microorganisms can be preserved in carbonates formed through AOM. However, thermal maturity and aerobic degradation can change the original preserved compounds, making it difficult to establish the relation between AOM and carbonate precipitation. Here we report a study of amino acid and lipid abundances in carbonate matrices of aerobically altered pipes recovered from the seafloor of the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula). This area is characterized by a complex tectonic regime that supports numerous cold seeps. Studies so far have not determined whether the precipitation of carbonate pipes in the Gulf of Cadiz is a purely chemical process or whether microbial communities are involved. Samples from this site show signs of exposure to oxygenated waters and of aerobic alteration, such as oxidation of authigenic iron sulfides. In addition, the degradation index, calculated from the relative abundance of preserved amino acids, indicates aerobic degradation of organic matter. Although crocetane was the only lipid identified from methanotrophic archaea, the organic compounds detected (n-alkanes, regular isoprenoids and alcohols) are compatible with an origin from AOM coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) and subsequent aerobic degradation. We establish a relation among AOM, BSR and pipe formation in the Gulf of Cadiz through three types of analysis: (1) stable carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate minerals; (2) carbonate microfabrics; and (3) mineralogical composition. Our results suggest that carbonate pipes may form through a process similar to the precipitation of vast amounts of carbonate pavements often found at cold seeps. Our approach suggests that some organic compound patterns, in combination with additional

  18. Linking chemical extraction to microbial degradation of 14C-hexadecane in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical extractions have been shown to measure the biodegradable fraction of aromatic contaminants in soil; however, there is little research on the chemical prediction of aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential for cyclodextrin extractions to predict hexadecane biodegradation in soil. Soils were amended with 10 or 100 mg kg-1 of a model alkane n-hexadecane and 100 Bq g-114C-n-hexadecane. Correlations between the extents of mineralisation and extractions of the 14C-contaminant were determined. Solvent shake extractions and aqueous CaCl2 extractions were poor predictors of hexadecane bioaccessibility. However, the novel HP-α-CD shake extraction showed close correlation (r2 = 0.90, n = 36, p < 0.05) to the mineralisation data. This novel extraction technique has the potential to be used to assess the biodegradable aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction in contaminated soils. - Cyclodextrin shake extractions have the potential to predict the bioaccessibility of aliphatic hydrocarbons in soil

  19. Influence of freshwater discharge on the microbial degradation processes of dissolved organic nitrogen in a subtropical estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Juan C; Ketover, Rheannon D J; Loh, Ai Ning; Parsons, Michael L; Urakawa, Hidetoshi

    2015-02-01

    River bacterioplankton communities, influenced by watershed usage, are responsible for water purification. Bacterioplankton may be critical in the degradation of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), the major nitrogen pool in the Caloosahatchee River, Florida. We investigated how freshwater discharge influences estuarine bacterioplankton and how the freshwater-originated DON is utilized by estuarine bacterioplankton. Microcosm experiments were conducted during low and high discharge using two upstream freshwater samples: one site primarily influenced by Lake Okeechobee and the other site moderately influenced by an agricultural watershed. These freshwater samples were filtered to eliminate indigenous microbial populations, then mixed with estuarine bacterioplankton. High-throughput sequencing revealed that bacterioplankton differed between low and high discharge and were influenced by salinity. Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominated in low discharge while Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria dominated during high discharge. In the microcosm experiment, DON concentration decreased with increasing cell densities, suggesting that the DON was utilized as a carbon and nitrogen source. Band signals in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis corresponding to Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria decreased while Gammaproteobacteria increased during the 1 month incubation. This data suggests that estuarine bacterioplankton communities are influenced by variations in discharge patterns and use freshwater-originated DON as demonstrated by a shift in community structure. PMID:25542211

  20. Effect of dietary fat and residues on fecal loss of sterols and on their microbial degradation in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, C; Lepage, G; Morin, C L; Bertrand, J M; Dufour-Larue, O; Roy, C C

    1986-09-01

    Although various etiologic factors have been implicated, the mechanism responsible for bile acid malabsorption in CF remains unknown. Eight CF children studied twice on a normal diet supplemented with pancreatic enzymes and once during a one-month period of Vivonex administered by continuous nasogastric infusion were compared to age-matched controls. On the fat and residue-free elemental diet, there was a modest decrease in steatorrhea and no change in the daily excretion of nitrogen and neutral sterols. However, normalization of bile acid output (485.6 +/- 65.0 to 160.6 +/- 29.2 mg/24 hr) to control levels (150.2 +/- 60.7) was noted. Diminished microbial degradation of both neutral and acidic sterols and a smaller amount of bile acids adsorbed to decreased residues were also found. The data do not support the possibility of a bile acid ileal transport defect and suggest that the most important single factor responsible for the intraluminal sequestration of bile acids in CF is dietary residues. Because of significant ongoing losses of nitrogen and lipids, pancreatic enzymes should be given to CF patients on elemental diets. PMID:3089744

  1. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  2. Alternative primer sets for PCR detection of genotypes involved in bacterial aerobic BTEX degradation: Distribution of the genes in BTEX degrading isolates and in subsurface soils of a BTEX contaminated industrial site

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hendrickx, B.; Junca, H.; Vosáhlová, Jolana; Lindner, A.; Rüegg, I.; Bucheli-Vitschel, M.; Faber, F.; Egli, F.; Mau, M.; Schlömann, M.; Brennerová, Mária; Brenner, Vladimír; Pieper, D. H.; Top, E.M.; Dejonghe, W.; Bastiaens, L.; Springael, D.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 64, - (2006), s. 250-265. ISSN 0167-7012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : pcr detection * aerobic btex biodegradation * catabolic gene distribution Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.442, year: 2006

  3. Microbial analyses of cement and grouting additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbeck, L.; Jaegevall, S.; Paeaejaervi, A.; Rabe, L.; Edlund, J.; Eriksson, S. [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    During sampling in the ONKALO tunnel in 2006, heavy growth of a slimy material was observed in connection with grouting. It was suggested to be microbial growth on organic additives leaching from the grout. Two sampling campaigns resulted in the isolation of several aerobic bacterial strains. Some of these strains were used in biodegradation studies of three solid cement powders, eight liquid grout additives, and six plastic drainage materials. Degradation was also studied using ONKALO groundwaters as inoculums. The isolated strains were most closely related to hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms. The biodegradation of seven of the products was tested using microorganisms isolated from the ONKALO slime in 2006; none of these strains could degrade the tested products. When ONKALO drillhole groundwaters were used as inoculums in the degradation studies, it was demonstrated that Structuro 111X, Mighty 150, and Super-Parmix supported growth of the groundwater microorganisms. Structuro 111X is a polycarboxylate condensate while Mighty 150 and Super-Parmix are condensates with formaldehyde and naphthalene. Some of the isolated microorganisms belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, many strains of which can degrade organic molecules. None of the plastic drainage materials supported growth during the degradation studies. Microorganisms were present in two of the liquid products when delivered, GroutAid and Super-Parmix. The potential of the organic compounds in grout additives to be degraded by microorganisms, increasing the risk of biofilm formation and complexing compound production, must be considered. Microbial growth will also increase the possibility of hydrogen sulphide formation. (orig.)

  4. Formation of aerobic granules in the presence of a synthetic chelating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the development of aerobic granular sludge in the presence of a synthetic chelating agent, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), in sequencing batch reactors (SBR). The growth of seed sludge at 0.26 mM, 0.52 mM and 1.05 mM of NTA was found to be significantly lower as compared to that in the absence of NTA. Aerobic granulation was significantly enhanced in the three SBRs (R2, R3 and R4), which were fed with 0.26 mM, 0.52 mM and 1.05 mM of NTA as a co-substrate, in comparison to the acetate-alone fed SBR (R1). After 2 months of operation, the mean diameter of the biomass stabilized at 0.35 mm in R1 (acetate alone), as compared to 2.18 mm in R4 (1.05 mM NTA + acetate). NTA degradation was established in SBRs, with almost complete removal during the SBR cycle. Batch experiments also showed efficient degradation of NTA by the aerobic granules. - Synthetic chelating agent enhances aerobic microbial granulation

  5. Formation of aerobic granules in the presence of a synthetic chelating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)], E-mail: yvn@igcar.ernet.in; Joshi, Hiren M.; Krishna Mohan, Tulsi V.; Venugopalan, Vayalam P.; Narasimhan, Sevilimedu V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2008-05-15

    This paper examines the development of aerobic granular sludge in the presence of a synthetic chelating agent, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), in sequencing batch reactors (SBR). The growth of seed sludge at 0.26 mM, 0.52 mM and 1.05 mM of NTA was found to be significantly lower as compared to that in the absence of NTA. Aerobic granulation was significantly enhanced in the three SBRs (R2, R3 and R4), which were fed with 0.26 mM, 0.52 mM and 1.05 mM of NTA as a co-substrate, in comparison to the acetate-alone fed SBR (R1). After 2 months of operation, the mean diameter of the biomass stabilized at 0.35 mm in R1 (acetate alone), as compared to 2.18 mm in R4 (1.05 mM NTA + acetate). NTA degradation was established in SBRs, with almost complete removal during the SBR cycle. Batch experiments also showed efficient degradation of NTA by the aerobic granules. - Synthetic chelating agent enhances aerobic microbial granulation.

  6. Effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on alfalfa nutrient degradation characteristics and rumen microbial populations of steers fed diets with different concentrate-to-forage ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Gengzhi; Chang, Ying; Zhao, Liping; Zhou, Zhenming; Ren, Liping; Meng, Qingxiang

    2014-01-01

    Live yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) constitutes an effective additive for animal production; its probiotic effect may be related to the concentrate-to-forage ratio (CTFR). The objective of this study was to assess the effects of S. cerevisiae (SC) on fiber degradation and rumen microbial populations in steers fed diets with different levels of dietary concentrate. Ten Simmental × Local crossbred steers (450 ± 50 kg BW) were assigned to a control group or an SC group. Both groups were fed the same basal diet but the SC group received SC supplementation (8 × 10(9) cfu/h/d through the ruminal fistula) following a two-period crossover design. Each period consisted of four phases, each of which lasted 17 d: 10 d for dietary adaptation, 6 d for degradation study, and 1 d for rumen sample collection. From the 1(st) to the 4(th) phase, steers were fed in a stepwise fashion with increasing CTFRs, i.e., 30:70, 50:50, 70:30, and 90:10. The kinetics of dry matter and fiber degradation of alfalfa pellets were evaluated; the rumen microbial populations were detected using real-time PCR. The results revealed no significant (P > 0.05) interactions between dietary CTFR and SC for most parameters. Dietary CTFR had a significant effect (P alfalfa pellets and the copies of rumen microorganism; the increasing concentrate level resulted in linear, quadratic or cubic variation trend for these parameters. SC supplementation significantly (P neutral detergent fiber (NDF) degradation rates (c DM, c NDF) and NDF effective degradability (EDNDF). Compared with the control group, there was an increasing trend of rumen fungi and protozoa in SC group (P < 0.1); copies of total bacteria in SC group were significantly higher (P < 0.05). Additionally, percentage of Ruminobacter amylophilus was significantly lower (P < 0.05) but percentage of Selenomonas ruminantium was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the SC group. In a word, dietary CTFR had a

  7. Methane oxidation in a crude oil contaminated aquifer: Delineation of aerobic reactions at the plume fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Blowes, D.W.; Kirshtein, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution direct-push profiling over short vertical distances was used to investigate CH4 attenuation in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. The contaminant plume was delineated using dissolved gases, redox sensitive components, major ions, carbon isotope ratios in CH4 and CO2, and the presence of methanotrophic bacteria. Sharp redox gradients were observed near the water table. Shifts in ??13CCH4 from an average of - 57.6??? (?? 1.7???) in the methanogenic zone to - 39.6??? (?? 8.7???) at 105 m downgradient, strongly suggest CH4 attenuation through microbially mediated degradation. In the downgradient zone the aerobic/anaerobic transition is up to 0.5 m below the water table suggesting that transport of O2 across the water table is leading to aerobic degradation of CH4 at this interface. Dissolved N2 concentrations that exceeded those expected for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere indicated bubble entrapment followed by preferential stripping of O2 through aerobic degradation of CH4 or other hydrocarbons. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to distinguish between areas of significant bubble entrapment and areas where other processes such as the infiltration of O 2 rich recharge water were important O2 transport mechanisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchman, David L. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  9. Changes in microbial structure and functional communities at different soil depths during 13C labelled root litter degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaullah, Muhammad; Baumann, Karen; Chabbi, Abad; Dignac, Marie-France; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter turnover depends on substrate quality and microbial activity in soil but little is known about how addition of freshly added organic material modifies the diversity of soil microbial communities with in a soil profile. We took advantage of a decomposition experiment, which was carried out at different soil depths under field conditions and sampled litterbags with 13C-labelled wheat roots, incubated in subsoil horizons at 30, 60 and 90 cm depth for up to 36 months. The effect of root litter addition on microbial community structure, diversity and activity was studied by determining total microbial biomass, PLFA signatures, molecular tools (DNA genotyping and pyrosequencing of 16S and 18S rDNAs) and extracellular enzyme activities. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was also carried out to determine the differences in microbial community structure. We found that with the addition of root litter, total microbial biomass as well as microbial community composition and structure changed at different soil depths and change was significantly higher at top 30cm soil layer. Moreover, in the topsoil, population of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria increased with root litter addition over time, while subsoil horizons were relatively dominated by fungal community. Extra-cellular enzyme activities confirmed relatively higher fungal community at subsoil horizons compared with surface soil layer with bacteria dominant microbial population. Bacterial-ARISA profiling illustrated that the addition of root litter enhanced the abundance of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, at all three soil depths. These bacteria correspond to copiotrophic attributes, which can preferentially consume of labile soil organic C pools. While disappearance of oligotrophic Acidobacteria confirmed the shifting of microbial communities due to the addition of readily available substrate. We concluded that root litter mixing altered microbial community

  10. Relationships between chemical oxygen demand (COD) components and toxicity in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor/aerobic completely stirred reactor system treating Kemicetine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the interactions between toxicity removals and Kemicetine, COD removals, intermediate products of Kemicetine and COD components (CODs originating from slowly degradable organics, readily degradable organics, inert microbial products and from the inert compounds) were investigated in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system with a real pharmaceutical wastewater. The total COD and Kemicetine removal efficiencies were 98% and 100%, respectively, in the sequential ABR/CSTR systems. 2-Amino-1 (p-nitrophenil)-1,3 propanediol, l-p-amino phenyl, p-amino phenol and phenol were detected in the ABR as the main readily degradable inter-metabolites. In the anaerobic ABR reactor, the Kemicetin was converted to corresponding inter-metabolites and a substantial part of the COD was removed. In the aerobic CSTR reactor the inter-metabolites produced in the anaerobic reactor were completely removed and the COD remaining from the anerobic reactor was biodegraded. It was found that the COD originating from the readily degradable organics did not limit the anaerobic degradation process, while the CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and from the inert microbial products significantly decreased the anaerobic ABR reactor performance. The acute toxicity test results indicated that the toxicity decreased from the influent to the effluent of the aerobic CSTR reactor. The ANOVA test statistics showed that there was a strong linear correlation between acute toxicity, CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and inert microbial products. A weak correlation between acute toxicity and CODs originating from the inert compounds was detected.

  11. Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and {sup 14}C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the {sup 14}C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

  12. Integrated ‘omics analysis for studying the microbial community response to a pH perturbation of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaro, Amy A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Konopka, Allan; Callister, Stephen J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated ‘omics have been used on pure cultures and co-cultures, yet they have not been applied to complex microbial communities to examine questions of perturbation response. In this study, we used integrated ‘omics to measure the perturbation response of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor community fed with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). We predicted that a pH decrease by addition of a pulse of acid would reduce microbial community diversity and temporarily reduce reactor function such as cellulose degradation. However, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing results revealed increased alpha diversity in the microbial community after the perturbation, and a persistence of the dominant community members over the duration of the experiment. Proteomics results showed a decrease in activity of proteins associated with Fibrobacter succinogenes two days after the perturbation followed by increased protein abundances six days after the perturbation. The decrease in cellulolytic activity suggested by the proteomics was confirmed by the accumulation of Avicel in the reactor. Metabolomics showed a pattern similar to that of the proteome, with amino acid production decreasing two days after the perturbation and increasing after six days. This study demonstrated that community ‘omics data provides valuable information about the interactions and function of anaerobic cellulolytic community members after a perturbation.

  13. Impact of continuous and intermittent supply of electric assistance on high-strength 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) degradation in electro-microbial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhanping; Zhang, Minghui; Zhang, Jingli; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-07-01

    The high-strength 2,4-DCP, which exists in two states: dissolved and colloidal, was studied by a continuously electro-microbial system (CEMS) and an intermittently electro-microbial system (IEMS). The hydrolysis rate of colloidal 2,4-DCP in the IEMS without electric assistance was much higher than that in the CEMS. However, the degradation rate of the dissolved 2,4-DCP and the dissolved intermediates (2-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol) in the IEMS without electric assistance were much lower than that in the CEMS. By adjusting the intermittent operation mode, the degradation time of 2,4-DCP was shortened greatly. Microbial characteristics in the CEMS and the IEMS were different. The correlation analysis for the main factors affecting the hydrolysis was performed by SPSS, and it was found that the correlation coefficient (rp) was -0.912 for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content, 0.823 for zeta potential and 0.632 for relative hydrophobicity, respectively. PMID:27092992

  14. Evolution of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Communities in the Aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Well Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, G.; Dubinsky, E. A.; Chakraborty, R.; Hollibaugh, J. T.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill created large plumes of dispersed oil and gas that remained deep in the water column and stimulated growth of several deep-sea bacteria that can degrade hydrocarbons at cold temperatures. We tracked microbial community composition before, during and after the 83-day spill to determine relationships between microbial dynamics, and hydrocarbon and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Dominant bacteria in plumes shifted drastically over time and were dependent on the concentration of hydrocarbons, and the relative quantities of insoluble and soluble oil fractions. Unmitigated flow from the wellhead early in the spill resulted in the highest concentrations of oil and relatively more n-alkanes suspended in the plume as small oil droplets. These conditions resulted in near complete dominance by alkane-degrading Oceanospirillales, Pseudomonas and Shewanella. Six-weeks into the spill overall hydrocarbon concentrations in the plume decreased and were almost entirely composed of BTEX after management actions reduced emissions into the water column. These conditions corresponded with the emergence of Colwellia, Pseudoalteromonas, Cycloclasticus and Halomonas that are capable of degrading aromatic compounds. After the well was contained dominant plume bacteria disappeared within two weeks after the spill and transitioned to an entirely different set of bacteria dominated by Flavobacteria, Methylophaga, Alteromonas and Rhodobacteraceae that were found in anomalous oxygen depressions throughout August and are prominent degraders of both high molecular weight organic matter as well as hydrocarbons. Bio-Sep beads amended with volatile hydrocarbons from MC-252 oil were used from August through September to create hydrocarbon-amended traps for attracting oil-degrading microbes in situ. Traps were placed at multiple depths on a drilling rig about 600-m from the original MC-252 oil spill site. Microbes were isolated on media using MC-252 oil as the sole

  15. Influence of thermophilic aerobic digestion as a sludge pre-treatment and solids retention time of mesophilic anaerobic digestion on the methane production, sludge digestion and microbial communities in a sequential digestion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Cho, Hyun Uk; Park, Sang Kyu; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the changes in sludge reduction, methane production and microbial community structures in a process involving two-stage thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) and mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) under different solid retention times (SRTs) between 10 and 40 days were investigated. The TAD reactor (RTAD) was operated with a 1-day SRT and the MAD reactor (RMAD) was operated at three different SRTs: 39, 19 and 9 days. For a comparison, control MAD (RCONTROL) was operated at three different SRTs of 40, 20 and 10 days. Our results reveal that the sequential TAD-MAD process has about 42% higher methane production rate (MPR) and 15% higher TCOD removal than those of RCONTROL when the SRT decreased from 40 to 20 days. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR results indicate that RMAD maintained a more diverse bacteria and archaea population compared to RCONTROL, due to the application of the biological TAD pre-treatment process. In RTAD, Ureibacillus thermophiles and Bacterium thermus were the major contributors to the increase in soluble organic matter. In contrast, Methanosaeta concilii, a strictly aceticlastic methanogen, showed the highest population during the operation of overall SRTs in RMAD. Interestingly, as the SRT decreased to 20 days, syntrophic VFA oxidizing bacteria, Clostridium ultunense sp., and a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanobacterium beijingense were detected in RMAD and RCONTROL. Meanwhile, the proportion of archaea to total microbe in RMAD and RCONTROL shows highest values of 10.5 and 6.5% at 20-d SRT operation, respectively. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the increased COD removal and methane production at different SRTs in RMAD might be attributed to the increased synergism among microbial species by improving the hydrolysis of the rate limiting step in sludge with the help of the biological TAD pre-treatment. PMID:23871253

  16. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhenmei; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; He, Zhili; Voordeckers, James; Zhou, Aifen; Lee, Yong-Jin; Olivia U Mason; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Chavarria, Krystle L.; Lauren M Tom; Fortney, Julian L.; Lamendella, Regina; Jansson, Janet K.; D'haeseleer, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the deepest and largest offshore spill in the United State history and its impacts on marine ecosystems are largely unknown. Here, we showed that the microbial community functional composition and structure were dramatically altered in a deep-sea oil plume resulting from the spill. A variety of metabolic genes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in the plume compared with outside the plume...

  17. Exploring the functional diversity of the supraglacial environment: Microbial degradation of the pesticide 2,4-D on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibal, M.; Bælum, J.; Holben, W. E.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The surface of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) harbours a diverse community of heterotrophic microorganisms. Organic compounds of anthropogenic origin, including pesticides, are deposited on the GrIS; however, the fate of these compounds in the ice is currently unknown. In this study we determine the potential of the microbial community from the surface of the GrIS to mineralise the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). It is one of the most easily degraded compounds among the phenoxyacetic acid pesticides, and the ability to mineralise 2,4-D has been found to be widespread in microbial communities around the globe. Functional genes involved in the degradation pathway have also been characterised. Thus, 2,4-D represents a very suitable model compound to use in order to gain an insight into pollutant degradation dynamics in the rapidly changing Arctic region. We collected surface ice cores on the GrIS and incubated them for up to 529 days in microcosms simulating in situ conditions. We measured mineralisation of side-chain- and ring-labelled 14C-2,4-D in the samples and performed quantitative PCR targeting the tfdA gene, encoding an enzyme catalysing the first step in the degradation pathway of 2,4-D, in the DNA extracted from the ice after the experiments. We show that the microbial community on the surface of the GrIS is of low diversity, but contains microbes capable of degrading 2,4-D. The low diversity of the community and the similarity of the detected clones to those from other icy environment clones suggest that the bacterial community on the GrIS is selected from a pool of propagules deposited on the surface of the ice sheet, based on the level of adaptation to the conditions in the surface ice. The 2,4-D degraders are likely present in very low numbers, and they can mineralise 2,4-D at a rate of up to 1 nmol per m2 per day, equivalent to ~26 ng C m-2 d-1. We contend that the surface of the GrIS should not be considered to be a mere reservoir of

  18. Research progress in microbial degradation of antibiotics%微生物降解抗生素的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘元望; 李兆君; 冯瑶; 成登苗; 胡海燕; 张文娟

    2016-01-01

    近几十年来,抗生素的大量使用所引起的公共健康、资源利用和环境污染等问题倍受社会关注。由于微生物对抗生素削减的高效、低耗、环保和操作简单等优点,微生物降解法已成为处理抗生素污染的有效途径。在综述近几十年来利用微生物方法处理抗生素污染的技术、抗生素降解功能微生物的筛选、降解条件优化、降解效果及其降解机制等方面研究进展的基础上,指出了今后的研究方向。%Antibiotics, a group of chemicals, are widely used in treating human diseases and animal diseases and promoting animal growth. It was estimated that approximately 2300 tons of antibiotics were consumed in veterinary medicine in European countries and about 52%of all antibiotics(approximately 162 000 tons)were used for veterinary medicine in China in 2013. However, antibiotics could not be completely absorbed by the animal body, and most is excreted along with urine or feces, either unaltered or as metabolites. Antibiotics entered the envi-ronmental compartments at high rates, which resulted in concerns over public health, resource utilization and environmental pollution. Therefore, more and more attention has been paid to their effective elimination in the environment. The degradation of antibiotics by special microorganisms has been considered to be an efficient method for getting rid of antibiotics from the environment because of its low cost, simple management, and high degradation rates compared to other methods such as advanced oxidation processes, active carbon adsorption, low-temperature plasma technology, and membrane processing. In the present paper, the progress in antibiotic degradation by microorgan-isms and its mechanisms were reviewed in aspects of screening of specific functional microorganisms responsible for antibiotic degradation, optimization of microbial degradation conditions, degradation efficiencies and mechanisms including

  19. An acyl homoserine lactone-degrading microbial community improves the survival of first-feeding turbot larvae (Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Tinh, N.T.N.; Yen, V.H.N.; Dierckens, K.; Sorgeloos, P.; P. Bossier

    2008-01-01

    Two N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) degrading enrichment cultures (EC3 and EC5), originating from the microbial community of the Penaeus vannamei shrimp gut, were incorporated into first-feeding turbot larvae through addition to the rearing water and/or bio-encapsulation in rotifers, prior to their feeding to the turbot larvae. Both ECs were able to colonize the larval gut and to persist up to five days after their addition was discontinued. However, only EC5 was effective in improving turbot...

  20. Microbial and metabolic profiling reveal strong influence of water table and land-use patterns on classification of degraded tropical peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mishra

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tropical peatlands from Southeast Asia are undergoing extensive drainage, deforestation and degradation for agriculture and human settlement purposes. This is resulting in biomass loss and subsidence of peat from its oxidation. Molecular profiling approaches were used to understand the relative influences of different land-use patterns, hydrological and physiochemical parameters on the state of degraded tropical peatlands. As microbial communities play a critical role in biogeochemical cascades in the functioning of peatlands, we used microbial and metabolic profiles as surrogates of community structure and functions, respectively. Profiles were generated from 230 bacterial 16S rDNA fragments and 145 metabolic markers of 46 samples from ten sites, including those from above and below water table in a contiguous area of 48 km2 covering five land-use types. These were degraded forest, degraded land, oil palm plantation, mixed crop plantation and settlements. Bacterial profiles were most influenced by variations in water table and land-use patterns, followed by age of drainage and peat thickness in that order. Bacterial profiling revealed differences in sites, based on the duration and frequency of water table fluctuations and on oxygen availability. Bacterial and metabolic profiles of degraded forest and mixed crop plantations were most diverse compared to other land-use types. Metabolic profiling, being closely associated with biogeochemical functions could distinguish communities not only based on land-use types but also their geographic locations, thus providing a finer resolution than bacterial profiles. Agricultural inputs, such as nitrates were highly associated with bacterial community structure of oil palm plantations, whereas phosphates and dissolved organic carbon influenced those from mixed crop plantations and settlements. Our results provide a basis for adopting molecular marker-based approaches to classify peatlands and determine

  1. Variability in aerobic methane oxidation over the past 1.2 Myrs recorded in microbial biomarker signatures from Congo fan sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Helen M.; Handley, Luke; Spencer-Jones, Charlotte L.; Dinga, Bienvenu Jean; Schefuß, Enno; Mann, Paul J.; Poulsen, John R.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Wabakanghanzi, Jose N.; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Methane (CH4) is a strong greenhouse gas known to have perturbed global climate in the past, especially when released in large quantities over short time periods from continental or marine sources. It is therefore crucial to understand and, if possible, quantify the individual and combined response of these variable methane sources to natural climate variability. However, past changes in the stability of greenhouse gas reservoirs remain uncertain and poorly constrained by geological evidence. Here, we present a record from the Congo fan of a highly specific bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) biomarker for aerobic methane oxidation (AMO), 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol), that identifies discrete periods of increased AMO as far back as 1.2 Ma. Fluctuations in the concentration of aminopentol, and other 35-aminoBHPs, follow a pattern that correlates with late Quaternary glacial-interglacial climate cycles, with highest concentrations during warm periods. We discuss possible sources of aminopentol, and the methane consumed by the precursor methanotrophs, within the context of the Congo River setting, including supply of methane oxidation markers from terrestrial watersheds and/or marine sources (gas hydrate and/or deep subsurface gas reservoir). Compound-specific carbon isotope values of -30‰ to -40‰ for BHPs in ODP 1075 and strong similarities between the BHP signature of the core and surface sediments from the Congo estuary and floodplain wetlands from the interior of the Congo River Basin, support a methanotrophic and likely terrigenous origin of the 35-aminoBHPs found in the fan sediments. This new evidence supports a causal connection between marine sediment BHP records of tropical deep sea fans and wetland settings in the feeding river catchments, and thus tropical continental hydrology. Further research is needed to better constrain the different sources and pathways of methane emission. However, this study identifies the large potential

  2. Identification of chlorinated solvents degradation zones in clay till by high resolution chemical, microbial and compound specific isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Bælum, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in clay till was investigated at a contaminated site (Vadsby, Denmark) by high resolution sampling of intact cores combined with groundwater sampling. Over decades of contamination, bioactive zones with degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1...... distributed bioactive zones with partial degradation to ethene were identified in the clay till matrix (thickness from 0.10 to 0.22 m). In one sub-section profile the presence of Dhc with the vcrA gene supported the occurrence of degradation of cis-DCE and VC, and in another enriched δ13C for TCE, cis-DCE and...

  3. Conversion of Uric Acid into Ammonium in Oil-Degrading Marine Microbial Communities: a Possible Role of Halomonads

    KAUST Repository

    Gertler, Christoph

    2015-04-29

    Uric acid is a promising hydrophobic nitrogen source for biostimulation of microbial activities in oil-impacted marine environments. This study investigated metabolic processes and microbial community changes in a series of microcosms using sediment from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea amended with ammonium and uric acid. Respiration, emulsification, ammonium and protein concentration measurements suggested a rapid production of ammonium from uric acid accompanied by the development of microbial communities containing hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria after 3 weeks of incubation. About 80 % of uric acid was converted to ammonium within the first few days of the experiment. Microbial population dynamics were investigated by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Illumina sequencing as well as by culture-based techniques. Resulting data indicated that strains related to Halomonas spp. converted uric acid into ammonium, which stimulated growth of microbial consortia dominated by Alcanivorax spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Several strains of Halomonas spp. were isolated on uric acid as the sole carbon source showed location specificity. These results point towards a possible role of halomonads in the conversion of uric acid to ammonium utilized by hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  4. Estabilidade aeróbica de silagens de capim-elefante (Pennisetum purpureum, Schum emurchecido e tratado com inoculante microbiano Aerobic stability of wilted grass silages (Pennisetum Purpureum, Schum. treated with microbial inoculant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Guim

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Para avaliar o efeito de um inoculante microbiano sobre a estabilidade aeróbica de silagens de capim-elefante (Pennisetum purpureum, Schum pré-seco, foi conduzido um experimento na UNESP, Campus de Jaboticabal. O capim foi cortado com 96 dias de crescimento, permanecendo sob ação do sol, por aproximadamente 5 horas para o emurchecimento. Foram confeccionados silagens, em barricas plásticas de 200 L de capacidade, que receberam (CI ou não (SI o inoculante no momento da ensilagem. Para o estudo da deterioração aeróbica, na abertura dos silos (T0, cada barrica foi subdividida em três profundidades e as silagens expostas ao ar em um sistema, usado para a determinação de CO2, por 2 (T2, 4 (T4, 6 (T6 e 8 (T8 dias. A silagem da camada superficial não apresentou diferenças no valor de pH e contagem de leveduras, em relação à da camada intermediária, porém ambas apresentaram valores superiores à camada mais profunda. O teor de N-NH3 da camada superior foi menor que o da intermediária e profunda, que não diferiram entre si. A interação significativa entre inóculo e tempo de exposição mostrou que nos primeiros tempos de aeração (T0; T2 e T4 as silagens inoculadas não diferiram das controle em termos de pH, teor de N-NH3 e contagem de bolores, mas com avanço do tempo (T6 e T8 passaram a apresentar menor valor de pH, menor contagem de fungos e tendência a menor produção de CO2, indicando menor velocidade de deterioração após seis dias de exposição aeróbica.An experiment was carried out at UNESP, Jaboticabal Campus to evaluate the effect of a microbial inoculant on aerobic stability of wilted grass silage (Pennisetum purpureum, Schum. The grass was cut with 96 days of growing, remaining under sun action 5 hours to wilt. Silages were made in plastic silos, 0.2m³ capacity, that received (CI or not (SI inoculant at the ensilage time. For the study of aerobic deterioration, each silo was subdivided in three levels and the

  5. Aerobic exercise (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerobic exercise gets the heart working to pump blood through the heart more quickly and with more force than ... must be oxygenated more quickly, which quickens respiration. Aerobic exercise strengthens the heart and boosts healthy cholesterol ...

  6. Short-term degradation of terrestrial DOM in the coastal ocean: Implications for nutrient subsidies and marine microbial community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, A. A.; Tank, S. E.; Kellogg, C.

    2015-12-01

    The export of riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the coastal ocean provides an important link between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The coastal temperate rainforests of British Columbia contain extensive freshwater networks that export significant amounts of water and DOM to the ocean, representing significant cross-system hydrologic and biogeochemical linkages. To better understand the importance of these linkages and implications for ecosystem structure and function, we used an experimental approach to investigate the role of microbial and photodegradation transformations of DOM exported from small coastal catchments to the marine environment. At two time periods (August 2014, March 2015), stream water from the outlets of two coastal watersheds was filtered (dark conditions for 8 days. At 0, 3 and 8 days, samples were analyzed for DOC, TDN, DIN, and DON. Changes in DOM composition were determined with optical characterization techniques such as absorbance (SUVA, S, Sr) and fluorescence (EEM). Microbial community response was measured using cell counts and DNA/RNA amplicon sequencing to determine changes in bacterial abundance and community composition. General patterns indicated that microbial communities from the high salinity treatment (i.e. most marine) were the most effective at utilizing freshwater DOM, especially under light conditions. In some treatments, DOM appeared as a potential source of inorganic nitrogen with corresponding shifts in microbial community composition. Incubations using inoculum from low and mid salinity levels demonstrated smaller changes, indicating that DOM exported from these streams may not be extensively utilized until exposed to higher salinity environments further from stream outlets. These results suggest a role for terrestrial sourced-DOM as a subsidy for microbial communities within the near shore marine environment, and emphasize that changes in DOM exports due to land development or climate change may have

  7. Microbial degradation of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by Aspergillus clavatus strain JASK1 isolated from landfill soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gajendiran, Anudurga; Krishnamoorthy, Sharmila; Abraham, Jayanthi

    2016-01-01

    Polythene and plastic waste are found to accumulate in the environment, posing a major ecological threat. They are found to be considered non-degradable, once it enters the environment it has been found to remain there indefinitely. However, significant attention has been placed on biodegradable polymer, identification of microbes with degradative potential on plastic material. The aim of the present investigation was to biodegrade low-density polyethylene (LDPE) using potential fungi isolate...

  8. Degradation of transuranic-contaminated wastes under geological isolation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of extensive experimental studies on the degradation of existing defense transuranic-contaminated (TRU) wastes are presented. Environmental conditions for waste degradation are representative of deep geological isolation of TRU wastes in a bedded-salt repository, as anticipated for the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. TRU-contaminated waste matrices investigated include cellulosics, plastics, rubbers, mixed organic composite, bitumen, a developmental concrete-TRU ash matrix, mild steel, and inorganic process sludges. Degradation mechanisms studied were alpha radiolysis, microbial action, thermal decomposition and dewatering, and chemical corrosion. Experimental variables are waste composition, alpha-contamination level, temperature, pressure, time, water or brine content, aerobic or anaerobic conditions, etc. Results of waste degradation are presented in terms of gas generation rates, gas compositions, container corrosion rates, effectiveness of anti-corrosion coatings, microbial formation and degradation of chelating agents. Based on experimental results, the relative quantities of gas generated by individual mechanisms acting on the organic matrix wastes can be ranked as follows: (1) microbial action, (2) thermal decomposition (at 400C and higher), (3) alpha radiolysis, and (4) corrosion. Corrosion of metallic waste canisters and realistic bedded-salt repository conditions was determined not to have a significant effect on potential waste retrievability. The technical data provided in these studies are used in assessments to determine whether existing forms of TRU wastes are acceptable for safe geological isolation. (author)

  9. Microbial degradation of toluene under sulfate-reducing conditions and the influence of iron on the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toluene degradation occurred concomitantly with sulfate reduction in anaerobic microcosms inoculated with contaminated subsurface soil from an aviation fuel storage facility near the Patuxent River (Md.). Similar results were obtained for enrichment cultures in which toluene was the sole carbon source. Several lines of evidence suggest that toluene degradation was directly coupled to sulfate reduction in Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures: (1) the two processes were synchronous and highly correlated, (2) the observed stoichiometric ratios of moles of sulfate consumed per mole of toluene consumed were consistent with the theoretical ratio for the oxidation of toluene to CO2 coupled with the reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide, and (3) toluene degradation ceased when sulfate was depleted, and conversely, sulfate reduction ceased when toluene was depleted. Mineralization of toluene was confirmed in experiments with [ring-U-14C]toluene. The addition of millimolar concentrations of amorphous Fe(OH)3 to Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures either greatly facilitated the onset of toluene degradation or accelerated the rate once degradation had begun. In iron-amended microcosms and enrichment cultures, ferric iron reduction proceeded concurrently with toluene degradation and sulfate reduction. Stoichiometric data and other observations indicate that ferric iron reduction was not directly coupled to toluene oxidation but was a secondary, presumably abiotic, reaction between ferric iron and biogenic hydrogen sulfide

  10. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  11. Substrate interactions of benzene, toluene, and para-xylene during microbial degradation by pure cultures and mixed culture aquifer slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Release of petroleum hydrocarbons in the environment is a widespread occurrence. One particular concern is the contamination of drinking water sources by the toxic, water-soluble, and mobile petroleum components benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX). Benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTX) were degraded by indigenous mixed cultures in sandy aquifer material and by two pure cultures isolated from the same site. Although BTX compounds have a similar chemical structure, the fate of individual BTX compounds differed when the compounds were fed to each pure culture and mixed culture aquifer slurries. The identification of substrate interactions aided the understanding of this behavior. Beneficial substrate interactions included enhanced degradation of benzene-dependent degradation of toluene and p-xylene by Arthrobacter sp. strain HCB. Detrimental substrate interactions included retardation in benzene and toluene degradation by the presence of p-xylene in both aquifer slurries and Pseudomonas incubations. The catabolic diversity of microbes in the environment precludes generalizations about the capacity of individual BTX compounds to enhance or inhibit the degradation of other BTX compounds

  12. A novel isolated Terrabacter-like bacterium can mineralize 2-aminopyrimidine, the principal metabolite of microbial sulfadiazine degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Diana; Disko, Ulrich; Koeppchen, Stephan; Kummer, Sirgit; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Recently we showed that during the degradation of sulfadiazine (SDZ) by Microbacterium lacus strain SDZm4 the principal metabolite 2-aminopyrimidine (2-AP) accumulated to the same molar amount in the culture as SDZ disappeared (Tappe et al. Appl Environ Microbiol 79:2572-2577, 2013). Although 2-AP is considered a recalcitrant agent, long-term lysimeter experiments with (14)C-pyrimidine labeled SDZ ([(14)C]pyrSDZ) provided indications for substantial degradation of the pyrimidine moiety of the SDZ molecule. Therefore, we aimed to enrich 2-AP degrading bacteria and isolated a pure culture of a Terrabacter-like bacterium, denoted strain 2APm3. When provided with (14)C-labeled SDZ, M. lacus strain SDZm4 degraded [(14)C]pyrSDZ to [(14)C]2-AP. Resting cells of 2APm3 at a concentration of 5 × 10(6) cells ml(-1) degraded 62 µM [(14)C]2-AP to below the detection limit (0.6 µM) within 5 days. Disappearance of 2-AP resulted in the production of at least two transformation products (M1 and M2) with M2 being identified as 2-amino-4-hydroxypyrimidine. After 36 days, the transformation products disappeared and 83 % of the applied [(14)C]2-AP radioactivity was trapped as (14)CO2. From this we conclude that a consortium of two species should be able to almost completely degrade SDZ in soils. PMID:25715827

  13. Microbial transformation of low-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.

    1980-06-01

    Microorganisms play a significant role in the transformation of the radioactive waste and waste forms disposed of at shallow-land burial sites. Microbial degradation products of organic wastes may influence the transport of buried radionuclides by leaching, solubilization, and formation of organoradionuclide complexes. The ability of indigenous microflora of the radioactive waste to degrade the organic compounds under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was examined. Leachate samples were extracted with methylene chloried and analyzed for organic compounds by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In general, several of the organic compounds in the leachates were degraded under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, the degradation of the organics was very slow, and changes in concentrations of several acidic compounds were observed. Several low-molecular-weight organic acids are formed by breakdown of complex organic materials and are further metabolized by microorganisms; hence these compounds are in a dynamic state, being both synthesized and destroyed. Tributyl phosphate, a compound used in the extraction of metal ions from solutions of reactor products, was not degraded under anaerobic conditions.

  14. Microbial transformation of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microorganisms play a significant role in the transformation of the radioactive waste and waste forms disposed of at shallow-land burial sites. Microbial degradation products of organic wastes may influence the transport of buried radionuclides by leaching, solubilization, and formation of organoradionuclide complexes. The ability of indigenous microflora of the radioactive waste to degrade the organic compounds under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was examined. Leachate samples were extracted with methylene chloried and analyzed for organic compounds by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In general, several of the organic compounds in the leachates were degraded under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, the degradation of the organics was very slow, and changes in concentrations of several acidic compounds were observed. Several low-molecular-weight organic acids are formed by breakdown of complex organic materials and are further metabolized by microorganisms; hence these compounds are in a dynamic state, being both synthesized and destroyed. Tributyl phosphate, a compound used in the extraction of metal ions from solutions of reactor products, was not degraded under anaerobic conditions

  15. Effect of incorporation of walnut cake (Juglans regia in concentrate mixture on degradation of dry matter, organic matter and production of microbial biomass in vitro in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin Ahmad Mir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was carried out to investigate the effect of incorporation of different level of walnut cake in concentrate mixture on in vitro dry matter degradation in order to determine its level of supplementation in ruminant ration. Materials and Methods: Walnut cake was used @ 0, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% level to formulate an iso-nitrogenous concentrate mixtures and designated as T1, T2, T3, T4, T5 and T6 respectively. The different formulae of concentrate mixtures were used for in vitro gas production studies using goat rumen liquor with wheat straw in 40:60 ratio. Proximate composition, fiber fractionation and calcium and phosphrous content of walnut cake were estimated. Result: The per cent IVDMD value of T1 and T2 diets was 68.42 ± 1.20 and 67.25 ± 1.37 respectively which was found highest (P<0.05 T3, T4, T5 and T6. Similar trend was also found for TDOM and MBP. Inclusion of walnut cake at 10% level in the concentrate mixture does not affect in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD, truly degradable organic matter (TDOM, mg/200 mg DM, total gas production, microbial biomass production (MBP and efficiency of microbial biomass production (EMP. Conclusion: It is concluded that walnut cake incorporation up to 10% level in the iso -nitrogenous concentrate mixture has no any negative effect on in vitro digestibility of dry matter (DM, TDOM, MBP, EMP and total gas production in goat.

  16. Microbial Degradation of Phenols and Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Creosote-contaminated Groundwater Under Nitrate-reducing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, John; Arvin, Erik; Jensen, Bjørn K.; Olsen, Susan K.

    of toluene, 2,4-DMP, 3,4-DMP and p-cresol depended on nitrate or nitrite as electron acceptors. 40–80% of the nitrate consumed during degradation of the aromatic compounds was recovered as nitrite, and the consumption of nitrate was accompanied by a production of ATP. Stoichiometric calculations...

  17. Aerobic biodegradation potential of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in surface-water sediment at Rocky Mountain National Park, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M; Battaglin, William A; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Clark, Jimmy M; Journey, Celeste A

    2016-05-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in surface water and bed sediment threaten the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. In natural, remote, and protected surface-water environments where contaminant releases are sporadic, contaminant biodegradation is a fundamental driver of exposure concentration, timing, duration, and, thus, EDC ecological risk. Anthropogenic contaminants, including known and suspected EDCs, were detected in surface water and sediment collected from 2 streams and 2 lakes in Rocky Mountain National Park (Colorado, USA). The potential for aerobic EDC biodegradation was assessed in collected sediments using 6 (14) C-radiolabeled model compounds. Aerobic microbial mineralization of natural (estrone and 17β-estradiol) and synthetic (17α-ethinylestradiol) estrogen was significant at all sites. Bed sediment microbial communities in Rocky Mountain National Park also effectively degraded the xenoestrogens bisphenol-A and 4-nonylphenol. The same sediment samples exhibited little potential for aerobic biodegradation of triclocarban, however, illustrating the need to assess a wider range of contaminant compounds. The present study's results support recent concerns over the widespread environmental occurrence of carbanalide antibacterials, like triclocarban and triclosan, and suggest that backcountry use of products containing these compounds should be discouraged. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1087-1096. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. PMID:26588039

  18. Aerobic biodegradation potential of endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface-water sediment at Rocky Mountains National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Battaglin, William A.; Iwanowicz, Luke; Clark, Jimmy M.; Journey, Celeste A.

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) in surface water and bed sediment threaten the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. In natural, remote, and protected surface-water environments where contaminant releases are sporadic, contaminant biodegradation is a fundamental driver of exposure concentration, timing, duration, and, thus, EDC ecological risk. Anthropogenic contaminants, including known and suspected EDC, were detected in surface water and sediment collected from 2 streams and 2 lakes in Rocky Mountains National Park (ROMO). The potential for aerobic EDC biodegradation was assessed in collected sediments using 6 14C-radiolabeled model compounds. Aerobic microbial mineralization of natural (estrone and 17β-estradiol) and synthetic (17α-ethinylestradiol) estrogen was significant at all sites. ROMO bed sediment microbial communities also effectively degraded the xenoestrogens, bisphenol-A and 4-nonylphenol. The same sediment samples exhibited little potential for aerobic biodegradation of triclocarban, however, illustrating the need to assess a wider range of contaminant compounds. The current results support recent concerns over the widespread environmental occurrence of carbanalide antibacterials, like triclocarban and triclosan, and suggest that backcountry use of products containing these compounds should be discouraged.

  19. Enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments using microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► One of the 1st studies on sediments MFC-enhanced hydrocarbon degradation. ► MFCs realizes close-to-aerobic biodegradation in anaerobic sediments. ► MFC-enhanced in situ biodegradation is 12× fold of the background sediments. ► Wicking electrode design increases DO in sediments while enhancing degradation. ► Results offers a passive, effective remedy for cleaning HC contaminated sediments. - Abstract: A sediment microbial fuel cell (MFC) was tested to determine if electron transfer from the anaerobic zone of contaminated sediments to the overlying aerobic water could facilitate an enhanced and aerobic equivalent degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Results indicate that voltages as high as 190 mV (2162 mW/m3) were achieved in a sediment MFC with an anode buried in sediments containing TPH concentrations at approximately 16,000 mg kg−1. Additionally, after approximately 66 days, the TPH degradation rates were 2% and 24% in the open-circuit control sediment MFC and active sediment MFC, respectively. Therefore, it appears that applying MFC technology to contaminated sediments enhances natural biodegradation by nearly 12 fold. Additionally, a novel sediment MFC was designed to provide a cost-effective method of passive oxidation or indirect aerobic degradation of contaminants in an otherwise anaerobic environment. In addition, the use of a wicking air cathode in this study maintained dissolved oxygen concentrations 1–2 mg l−1 higher than submerged cathodes, demonstrating that this technology can be applied to environments with either aerobic or anaerobic overlying water and an anaerobic matrix, such as shallow lagoon, ponds, and marshes, and groundwater.

  20. [Anaerobic-aerobic infection in acute appendicitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamchich, V I; Ulitovskiĭ, I V; Savich, E I; Znamenskiĭ, V A; Beliaeva, O A

    1998-01-01

    362 patients with acute appendicitis (AA) were examined. For microbiological diagnosis of aerobic and anaerobic nonclostridial microflora we used complex accelerated methods (including evaluation of gram-negative microorganisms in comparison with tinctorial-fermentative method of differential staining according to oxygen sensitivity of catalasopositive together with aerobic and cathalasonegative anaerobic microorganisms) as well as complete bacteriologic examination with determination of sensitivity of the above microorganism to antimicrobial remedies. High rate of aerobic-anaerobic microbial associations and substantial identity of microflora from appendicis and exudate from abdominal cavity was revealed, which evidenced the leading role of endogenous microorganisms in etiology and pathogenesis of AA and peritonitis i. e. autoinfection. In patients with destructive forms of AA, complicated by peritonitis it is recommended to use the accelerated method of examination of pathologic material as well as the complete scheme of examination with the identification of the isolated microorganisms and the correction of antibiotic treatment. PMID:9511291

  1. Mechanism of Kenaf Retting Using Aerobes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢士森; 陈季华; 黄秀宝

    2001-01-01

    The experimental results showed that the duration of microbial retting processing of kenaf fibers by using aerobic microbe was four times shorter than that by using anaerobic microbe. The residual gum percentage,breaking strength, breaking elongation and linear density of aerobic retted kenaf bundle fibers did not show significantly difference with that of anaerobic retted kenaf bundle fibers by ANOVA-Tukey's studentized test at a = 5% except for the softness. The bioenergetic principle and the calculation of the amount of ATP produced during the decomposition processing of kenaf gums were used to explain why the retting duration in the case of using aerobic microbes was much shorter than that of using anaerobic microbes.

  2. Impairment of cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria by two acidic herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Stefanie; Drake, Harold L; Kolb, Steffen

    2012-02-01

    Herbicides have the potential to impair the metabolism of soil microorganisms. The current study addressed the toxic effect of bentazon and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid on aerobic and anaerobic Bacteria that are involved in cellulose and cellobiose degradation in an agricultural soil. Aerobic saccharide degradation was reduced at concentrations of herbicides above environmental values. Microbial processes (e.g. fermentations, ferric iron reduction) that were linked to anaerobic cellulose and cellobiose degradation were reduced in the presence of both herbicides at concentrations above and at those that occur in crop field soil. 16S rRNA gene transcript numbers of total Bacteria, and selected bacterial taxa (Clostridia [Group I], Planctomycetaceae, and two uncultivated taxa of Bacteroidetes) decreased more in anoxic than in oxic cellulose-supplemented soil microcosms in the presence of both herbicides. Collectively, the results suggested that the metabolism of anaerobic cellulose-degrading Bacteria was impaired by typical in situ herbicide concentrations, whereas in situ concentrations did not impair metabolism of aerobic cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria. PMID:22098368

  3. Parallel characterization of anaerobic toluene- and ethylbenzene-degrading microbial consortia by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, RNA-DNA membrane hybridization, and DNA microarray technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kelly, John J.; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El-Fantroussi, Said; Al-Muzaini, Saleh; Fukui, Manabu; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A mesophilic toluene-degrading consortium (TDC) and an ethylbenzene-degrading consortium (EDC) were established under sulfate-reducing conditions. These consortia were first characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, followed by sequencing. The sequences of the major bands (T-1 and E-2) belonging to TDC and EDC, respectively, were affiliated with the family Desulfobacteriaceae. Another major band from EDC (E-1) was related to an uncultured non-sulfate-reducing soil bacterium. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 16S rRNAs of target organisms corresponding to T-1, E-1, and E-2 were designed, and hybridization conditions were optimized for two analytical formats, membrane and DNA microarray hybridization. Both formats were used to characterize the TDC and EDC, and the results of both were consistent with DGGE analysis. In order to assess the utility of the microarray format for analysis of environmental samples, oil-contaminated sediments from the coast of Kuwait were analyzed. The DNA microarray successfully detected bacterial nucleic acids from these samples, but probes targeting specific groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria did not give positive signals. The results of this study demonstrate the limitations and the potential utility of DNA microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  4. New pathway for degradation of sulfonated azo dyes by microbial peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Streptomyces chromofuscus.

    OpenAIRE

    Goszczynski, S; Paszczynski, A; Pasti-Grigsby, M B; Crawford, R L; Crawford, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Pathways for the degradation of 3,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-azobenzene-4'-sulfonic acid (I) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyazobenzene-4'-sulfonamide (II) by the manganese peroxidase and ligninase of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and by the peroxidase of Streptomyces chromofuscus have been proposed. Twelve metabolic products were found, and their mechanisms of formation were explained. Preliminary oxidative activation of the dyes resulted in the formation of cationic species, making the molecules vulnerable ...

  5. Influence of microbial inoculation and molasses and their combination on fermentation characteristics and ruminal degradability of grass silages

    OpenAIRE

    Gül, Mehmet; YÖRÜK, M. Akif; Karaoğlu, Mavlüt; Macit, Muhlis

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The aim of the current investigation was to determine the effect of applying a bacterial inoculant, molasses, and inoculantplus molasses combination on the fermentation dynamics of grass silages under laboratory conditions and ruminal degradabilities of drymatter (DM), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) for various incubation times. After harvesting, fresh grassforages containing 32% DM with or without additives were ensiled in 1-liter glass silos. Experime...

  6. PHA Production in Aerobic Mixed Microbial Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    K. Johnson

    2010-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a common intracellular energy and carbon storage material in bacteria, which is considered as a bioplastic due to its plastic like properties. PHAs are versatile materials which are biodegradable and made from renewable resources. Commercial production of PHAs is currently based on pure culture processes employing either natural PHA producers or genetically modified bacteria. Pure culture processes use generally pure sterile substrates and axenic reactors, leadin...

  7. Ecogenomics of microbial communities in bioremediation of chlorinated contaminated sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farai Maphosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Organohalide compounds such as chloroethenes, chloroethanes and polychlorinated benzenes are among the most significant pollutants in the world. These compounds are often found in contamination plumes with other pollutants such as solvents, pesticides and petroleum derivatives. Microbial bioremediation of contaminated sites, has become commonplace whereby key processes involved in bioremediation include anaerobic degradation and transformation of these organohalides by organohalide respiring bacteria and also via hydrolytic, oxygenic and reductive mechanisms by aerobic bacteria. Microbial ecogenomics has enabled us to not only study the microbiology involved in these complex processes but also develop tools to better monitor and assess these sites during bioremediation. Microbial ecogenomics have capitalized on recent advances in high-throughput and -output genomics technologies in combination with microbial physiology studies to address these complex bioremediation problems at a system level. Advances in environmental metagenomics, transcriptomics and proteomics have provided insights into key genes and their regulation in the environment. They have also given us clues into microbial community structures, dynamics and functions at contaminated sites. These techniques have not only aided us in understanding the lifestyles of common organohalide respirers, for example Dehalococcoides, Dehalobacter and Desulfitobacterium, but also provided insights into novel and yet uncultured microorganisms found in organohalide respiring consortia. In this paper we look at how ecogenomic studies have aided us to understand the microbial structures and functions in response to environmental stimuli such as the presence of chlorinated pollutants.

  8. Application of 13C and 15N stable isotope probing to characterize RDX degrading microbial communities under different electron-accepting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • SIP characterized RDX-degrading communities under different e-accepting conditions. • Dominant RDX degradation pathways differed under different e-accepting conditions. • More complete detoxification of RDX occurred under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions than under manganese(IV) and iron(III)-reducing conditions. - Abstract: This study identified microorganisms capable of using the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or its metabolites as carbon and/or nitrogen sources under different electron-accepting conditions using 13C and 15N stable isotope probing (SIP). Mesocosms were constructed using groundwater and aquifer solids from an RDX-contaminated aquifer. The mesocosms received succinate as a carbon source and one of four electron acceptors (nitrate, manganese(IV), iron(III), or sulfate) or no additional electron acceptor (to stimulate methanogenesis). When RDX degradation was observed, subsamples from each mesocosm were removed and amended with 13C3- or ring-15N3-, nitro-15N3-, or fully-labeled 15N6-RDX, followed by additional incubation and isolation of labeled nucleic acids. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA sequences, clustering in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, Clostridia, and Actinobacteria, were detected in the 13C-DNA fractions. A total of twenty seven sequences were derived from different 15N-DNA fractions, with the sequences clustered in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, and Clostridia. Interestingly, sequences identified as Desulfosporosinus sp. (in the Clostridia) were not only observed to incorporate the labeled 13C or 15N from labeled RDX, but also were detected under each of the different electron-accepting conditions. The data suggest that 13C- and 15N-SIP can be used to characterize microbial communities involved in RDX biodegradation, and that the dominant pathway of RDX biodegradation may differ under different electron-accepting conditions

  9. Relating groundwater and sediment chemistry to microbial characterization at a BTEX-contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Center for Manufacturing Science is investigating bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon at a site in Belleville, Michigan. As part of this study we examined the microbial communities to help elucidate biodegradative processes currently active at the site. We observed high densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers in the less-contaminated sediments. Low densities of iron and sulfate reducers were measured in the same sediments. In contrast, the highly-contaminated sediments showed low densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers and high densities of iron and sulfate reducers. Methanogens were also found in these highly-contaminated sediments. These contaminated sediments also showed a higher biomass, by phospholipid fatty acids, and greater ratios of phospholipid fatty acids which indicate stress within the microbial community. Aquifer chemistry analyses indicated that the more-contaminated area was more reduced and had lower sulfate than the less-contaminated area. These conditions suggest that the subsurface environment at the highly-contaminated area had progressed into sulfate reduction and methanogensis. The less-contaminated area, although less reduced, also appeared to be progressing into primarily iron- and sulfate-reducing microbial communities. The proposed treatment to stimulate bioremediation includes addition of oxygen and nitrate. Groundwater chemistry and microbial analyses revealed significant differences resulted from the injection of dissolved oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface. These differences included increases in pH and Eh and large decreases in BTEX, dissolved iron, and sulfate concentrations at the injection well

  10. Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

  11. Simultaneous processes of electricity generation and ceftriaxone sodium degradation in an air-cathode single chamber microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qing; Kong, Fanying; Zheng, Hongtao; Yin, Jinling; Cao, Dianxue; Ren, Yueming; Wang, Guiling

    2011-03-01

    A single chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an air-cathode is successfully demonstrated using glucose-ceftriaxone sodium mixtures or ceftriaxone sodium as fuel. Results show that the ceftriaxone sodium can be biodegraded and produce electricity simultaneously. Interestingly, these ceftriaxone sodium-glucose mixtures play an active role in production of electricity. The maximum power density is increased in comparison to 1000 mg L-1 glucose (19 W m-3) by 495% for 50 mg L-1 ceftriaxone sodium + 1000 mg L-1 glucose (113 W m-3), while the maximum power density is 11 W m-3 using 50 mg L-1 ceftriaxone sodium as the sole fuel. Moreover, ceftriaxone sodium biodegradation rate reaches 91% within 24 h using the MFC in comparison with 51% using the traditional anaerobic reactor. These results indicate that some toxic and bio-refractory organics such as antibiotic wastewater might be suitable resources for electricity generation using the MFC technology.

  12. Microbial degradation of whole-grain complex carbohydrates and impact on short-chain fatty acids and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2015-01-01

    polyphenolic ether lignin. The highest concentration of NSPs and lignin is found in the outer cell layers of the grain, and refined flour will consequently be depleted of a large proportion of insoluble DF components. The flow and composition of carbohydrates to the large intestine are directly related to the...... intake of DF. The type and composition of cereal DF can consequently be used to modulate the microbial composition and activity as well as the production and molar ratios of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Arabinoxylans and β-glucan in whole-grain cereals and cereal ingredients have been shown to...... augment SCFA production, with the strongest relative effect on butyrate. When arabinoxylans were provided as a concentrate, the effect was only on total SCFA production. Increased SCFA production in the large intestine was shown by the concentration in the portal vein, whereas the impact on the...

  13. Microbial degradation of whole-grain complex carbohydrates and impact on short-chain fatty acids and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik

    2015-03-01

    Whole-grain cereals have a complex dietary fiber (DF) composition consisting of oligosaccharides (mostly fructans), resistant starch, and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSPs); the most important are arabinoxylans, mixed-linkage β(1,3; 1,4)-d-glucan (β-glucan), and cellulose and the noncarbohydrate polyphenolic ether lignin. The highest concentration of NSPs and lignin is found in the outer cell layers of the grain, and refined flour will consequently be depleted of a large proportion of insoluble DF components. The flow and composition of carbohydrates to the large intestine are directly related to the intake of DF. The type and composition of cereal DF can consequently be used to modulate the microbial composition and activity as well as the production and molar ratios of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Arabinoxylans and β-glucan in whole-grain cereals and cereal ingredients have been shown to augment SCFA production, with the strongest relative effect on butyrate. When arabinoxylans were provided as a concentrate, the effect was only on total SCFA production. Increased SCFA production in the large intestine was shown by the concentration in the portal vein, whereas the impact on the concentration in peripheral blood was less because the majority of propionate and butyrate is cleared in the liver. Active microbial fermentation with increased SCFA production reduced the exposure of potentially toxic compounds to the epithelium, potentially stimulating anorectic hormones and acting as signaling molecules between the gut and the peripheral tissues. The latter can have implications for insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25770259

  14. Microbial processes in the final repository, the silo part. Theoretical approach and preliminary experiments on the biodegradation of bitumen. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On Commission of SKBF/KBS the microbial processes that are likely to occur in the silo part of SFR, the final repository for medium- and low-level nuclear wastes, have been put together. The experimental studies concerning microbial degradation of bitumen are described. From a microbial point of view it is the biodegradation of bitumen that constitutes the greatest risk in the silo part of SFR. The degradation, aerobic as well as anaerobic, leads to production of carbon dioxide which might cause a decrease in pH to such an extent that hydrogen-gas producing corrosion of metal could occur. This production of gas can cause an increase in internal pressure of the repository. A culture of bacteria able to degrade bitumen aerobically has been enriched. Uptil now no culture degrading bitumen under anaerobic conditions have been obtained. When making a risk assessment of the SFR at the present time it is not possible to completely disregard the microbial activity. An account is also given for some international contacts in this area. 11 references

  15. Aerobic phenol degradation in packed bed reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Páca, J.; Marek, J.; Sobotka, Miroslav; Schmauder, H. P.

    Vol. 2. Praha : Czech Society of Chemical Engineering, 1998. s. 20. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA'98 /13./. 23.08.1998-28.08.1998, Praha] Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Effects of thermo-chemical pretreatment plus microbial fermentation and enzymatic hydrolysis on saccharification and lignocellulose degradation of corn straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Chang, Juan; Yin, Qingqiang; Wang, Erzhu; Zhu, Qun; Song, Andong; Lu, Fushan

    2015-10-01

    In order to increase corn straw degradation, the straw was kept in the combined solution of 15% (w/w) lime supernatant and 2% (w/w) sodium hydroxide with liquid-to-solid ratio of 13:1 (mL/g) at 83.92°C for 6h; and then added with 3% (v/v) H2O2 for reaction at 50°C for 2h; finally cellulase (32.3 FPU/g dry matter) and xylanase (550 U/g dry matter) was added to keep at 50°C for 48 h. The maximal reducing sugars yield (348.77 mg/g) was increased by 126.42% (Pcorn straw with enzymatic hydrolysis were increased by 40.08%, 45.71% and 52.01%, compared with the native corn straw with enzymatic hydrolysis (Pstraw degradation and reducing sugar yield (442.85 mg/g, P<0.05). PMID:26188559

  17. Microbial Degradation of Phenols and Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Creosote-contaminated Groundwater Under Nitrate-reducing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, John; Arvin, Erik; Jensen, Bjørn K.;

    1993-01-01

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the biodegradation of phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons under anaerobic, nitrate-reducing conditions in groundwater from a creosote-contaminated site at Fredensborg, Denmark. The bacteria in the creosote-contaminated groundwater degraded a mixture...... of toluene, phenol, the cresols (o-, m- and p-cresol) and the dimethylphenols 2,4-DMP and 3,4-DMP at both 10° and 20°C. Benzene, the xylenes, napthalene, 2,3-DMP, 2,5-DMP, 2,6-DMP and 3,5-DMP were resistant to biodegradation during 7–12 months of incubation. It was demonstrated that the degradation...... indicated that in addition to the phenols are toluene other carbon sources present in the groundwater contributed to the consumption of nitrate. If the groundwater was incubated under anaerobic conditions without nitrate, sulphate-reducing conditions evolved after ∼ 1 month at 20°C and ∼2 months at 10°C. In...

  18. Numerical simulation of competitive aerobic / anaerobic hydrocarbon plume biodegradation in two-dimensional bench scale lab-experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, C.; Ballarini, E.; Bauer, R.; Griebler, C.; Bauer, S.

    2011-12-01

    The biodegradation of oxidizable hydrocarbon contaminants in the subsurface requires the presence of compatible microbial communities as well as sufficient amounts of electron acceptors and nutrients. In this context, transverse mixing, driven by dispersion and diffusion, is one of the main mechanisms governing the availability of dissolved electron acceptors at a hydrocarbon plume fringe. Aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons limited by transverse mixing has been studied experimentally in 2D bench-scale flow-through tanks, filled with a saturated porous medium. Flow of groundwater through the tanks was induced by pumping water at one side through injection ports, and simultaneously extracting water at the other side of the tank. An ethylbenzene plume was established by injection through the central inlet port. A mixture of unlabeled and fully deuterium-labeled isotopomers was used in order to investigate the spatial distribution of degradation processes via monitoring of compound-specific stable isotope fractionation. In the first phase of the experiment, aerobic biodegradation was studied. For this purpose, the tank was recharged with water containing oxygen as a dissolved electron acceptor and the aerobic strain Pseudomonas putida F1 was inoculated. Later, nitrate was added to the recharge water as an additional electron acceptor and the denitrifying strain Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1 was amended to study competitive aerobic/anaerobic biodegradation. A numerical reactive transport model of the experiment was set up for a model based interpretation of the observed degradation patterns. In a sensitivity analysis, the influence of the relevant hydrodynamic parameters on the observable distributions of ethylbenzene isotopomers, oxygen and nitrate was studied. Subsequent model calibration allowed for a good agreement with ethylbenzene concentrations measured at the tank outlet ports as well as oxygen concentrations, which were measured at several

  19. Microbial degradation and stabilization of 14C-labeled lignins, phenols, and phenolic polymers in relation to soil humus formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of specifically 14C-labeled phenols, lignins, fungal melanins, and model humic acid polymers makes it possible to determine which of the constituent carbons of polymers are utilized most readily by the soil organisms and which are relatively more important in soil humus formation. The studies summarized in this contribution involve: (1) the decomposition in soil of specifically 14C-labeled phenols, including lignin alcohols, monolignols; phenols, and phenolic acids formed through microbial transformations of these alcohols in the free state; (2) decomposition of model and plant lignins prepared by polymerization of specifically 14C-labeled p-hydroxyclinnamyl alcohols or by incorporation of labeled lignin precursors into plants; (3) decomposition of specific carbons of model humic acid polymers and fungal melanins prepared by the action of phenolases on reaction mixtures containing 14C-labeled phenols, amino acids, peptides, or amino sugar compounds and by placing 14C- labeled phenolic compounds under the pads of appropriate fungal cultures; and (4) some comparative properties of model, fungal, and soil humic polymers and lignins. (Refs. 70)

  20. Non-microbial methane formation in oxic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jugold

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Methane plays an important role as a radiatively and chemically active gas in our atmosphere. Until recently, sources of atmospheric methane in the biosphere have been attributed to strictly anaerobic microbial processes during degradation of organic matter. However, a large fraction of methane produced in the anoxic soil layers does not reach the atmosphere due to methanotrophic consumption in the overlaying oxic soil. Although methane fluxes from aerobic soils have been observed, an alternative source other than methanogenesis has not been identified thus far.

    Here we provide evidence for non-microbial methane formation in soils under oxic conditions. We found that soils release methane upon heating and other environmental factors like ultraviolet irradiation, and drying-rewetting cycles. We suggest that chemical formation of methane during degradation of soil organic matter may represent the missing soil source that is needed to fully understand the methane cycle in aerobic soils. Although the emission fluxes are relatively low when compared to those from wetlands, they may be important in warm and wet regions subjected to ultraviolet radiation. We suggest that this methane source is highly sensitive to global change.

  1. Anaerobic microbial transformations of radioactive wastes in subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive wastes disposed of in subsurface environments contain a variety of radionuclides and organic compounds. Microorganisms play a major role in the transformation of organic and inorganic constituents of the waste and are partly responsible for the problems encountered at the waste disposal sites. These include microbial degradation of waste forms resulting in trench cover subsidence, migration of radionuclides, and production of radioactive gases such as /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, /sup 14/CH/sub 4/, HT, and CH/sub 3/T. Microbial processes involved in solubilization, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are reviewed. Complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and heavy metals from the wastes. Microorganisms play a significant role in the transformation and cycling of tritium in the environment by (i) oxidation of tritium and tritiated methane under aerobic conditions and (ii) production of tritium and tritiated methane from wastes containing tritiated water and organic compounds under anaerobic conditions. 23 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Anaerobic microbial transformations of radioactive wastes in subsurface environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes disposed of in subsurface environments contain a variety of radionuclides and organic compounds. Microorganisms play a major role in the transformation of organic and inorganic constituents of the waste and are partly responsible for the problems encountered at the waste disposal sites. These include microbial degradation of waste forms resulting in trench cover subsidence, migration of radionuclides, and production of radioactive gases such as 14CO2, 14CH4, HT, and CH3T. Microbial processes involved in solubilization, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are reviewed. Complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and heavy metals from the wastes. Microorganisms play a significant role in the transformation and cycling of tritium in the environment by (i) oxidation of tritium and tritiated methane under aerobic conditions and (ii) production of tritium and tritiated methane from wastes containing tritiated water and organic compounds under anaerobic conditions. 23 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  3. Anaerobic degradation of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and association with microbial communities in a freshwater tidal wetland, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland : laboratory experiments and comparisons to field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Jones, Elizabeth J., (Phillips)

    2003-01-01

    Defining biodegradation rates and processes is a critical part of assessing the feasibility of monitored natural attenuation as a remediation method for ground water containing organic contaminants. During 1998?2001, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a microbial study at a freshwater tidal wetland along the West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, as part of an investigation of natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the wetland sediments. Geochemical analyses and molecular biology techniques were used to investigate factors controlling anaerobic degradation of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA), and to characterize the microbial communities that potentially are important in its degradation. Rapid TeCA and daughter product degradation observed in laboratory experiments and estimated with field data confirm that natural attenuation is a feasible remediation method at this site. The diverse microbial community that seems to be involved in TeCA degradation in the wetland sediments varies with changing spatial and seasonal conditions, allowing continued effective natural attenuation throughout the year. Rates of TeCA degradation in anaerobic microcosm experiments conducted with wetland sediment collected from two different sites (WB23 and WB30) and during three different seasons (March?April 1999, July?August 1999, and October?November 2000) showed little spatial variability but high seasonal variability. Initial first-order degradation rate constants for TeCA ranged from 0.10?0.01 to 0.16?0.05 per day (half-lives of 4.3 to 6.9 days) for March?April 1999 and October?November 2000 microcosms incubated at 19 degrees Celsius, whereas lower rate constants of 0 ? 0.03 and 0.06 ? 0.03 per day were obtained in July?August 1999 microcosms incubated at 19 degrees Celsius. Microbial community profiles showed that low microbial biomass and microbial diversity in the summer, possibly due to competition for nutrients by the

  4. Atividade microbiana em um Latossolo degradado tratado com lodo de esgoto Microbial activity in a degraded Latosol treated with sewage sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Colodro

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Em geral, os solos degradados se apresentam com fraca atividade biológica, tendo em vista suas características físicas, baixa fertilidade e teores de matéria orgânica, devido principalmente à remoção ou degradação de sua camada superficial. O elevado teor de matéria orgânica facilmente decomposta do lodo de esgoto, que é uma fonte alternativa de resíduos orgânicos, aliado à sua elevada taxa dos principais elementos nutrientes às plantas, pode ser um fator importante do retorno ou incremento da atividade biológica dos solos degradados. Com a finalidade de se estudar as ações do lodo de esgoto na recuperação de um Latossolo degradado, utilizaram-se, como indicadores dos efeitos, o carbono na biomassa microbiana (Cmic, o carbono do CO2 (C-CO2 liberado e a relação entre o carbono microbiano e o carbono orgânico (Cmic/Corg; para isto, foram definidas duas doses de lodo de esgoto aplicadas em cobertura e incorporada, de 30 e 60 Mg ha-1 à base seca, juntamente com um tratamento com fertilizante mineral, utilizando-se o eucalipto como cultura teste. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente casualizado, com 4 tratamentos e 4 repetições. O lodo de esgoto promove aumento do C-CO2 liberado e do Cmic, os quais constituem indicativos de qualidade adequados ao monitoramento da recuperação do solo.The degraded soil shows, in general, poor biological activity, considering its physical characteristics, low fertility and organic matter, mainly due to removal or degradation of its superficial layer. The sewage sludge, due to its high content of easily decomposed organic matter can be an alternate source of organic residues and combined to its high content of the principal nutrients for the plants can be an important factor to promote biological activities in degraded soil. In order to study the actions of the sewage sludge in the recovery of a degraded Latosol, the carbon in the microbial biomass (Cmic, the carbon released CO2 (C

  5. Microbial nitrogen transformation potential in surface run-off leachate from a tropical landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Microbial nitrogen transformations can alleviate toxic ammonium discharge. ► Aerobic ammonium oxidation was rate-limiting in Indonesian landfill leachate. ►Organic nitrogen ammonification was most dominant. ► Anaerobic nitrate reduction and ammonium oxidation potential were also high. ► A two-stage aerobic-anaerobic nitrogen removal system needs to be implemented. - Abstract: Ammonium is one of the major toxic compounds and a critical long-term pollutant in landfill leachate. Leachate from the Jatibarang landfill in Semarang, Indonesia, contains ammonium in concentrations ranging from 376 to 929 mg N L−1. The objective of this study was to determine seasonal variation in the potential for organic nitrogen ammonification, aerobic nitrification, anaerobic nitrate reduction and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) at this landfilling site. Seasonal samples from leachate collection treatment ponds were used as an inoculum to feed synthetic media to determine potential rates of nitrogen transformations. Aerobic ammonium oxidation potential (−1 h−1) was more than a hundred times lower than the anaerobic nitrogen transformation processes and organic nitrogen ammonification, which were of the same order of magnitude. Anaerobic nitrate oxidation did not proceed beyond nitrite; isolates grown with nitrate as electron acceptor did not degrade nitrite further. Effects of season were only observed for aerobic nitrification and anammox, and were relatively minor: rates were up to three times higher in the dry season. To completely remove the excess ammonium from the leachate, we propose a two-stage treatment system to be implemented. Aeration in the first leachate pond would strongly contribute to aerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrate by providing the currently missing oxygen in the anaerobic leachate and allowing for the growth of ammonium oxidisers. In the second pond the remaining ammonium and produced nitrate can be converted by a combination

  6. Degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms and helminths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingthom Chung; Stevens, S.E. Jr. (Memphis State Univ., TN (United States). Dept. of Biology)

    1993-11-01

    The degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms, fungi, and helminths is reviewed. Azo dyes are used in a wide variety of products and can be found in the effluent of most sewage treatment facilities. Substantial quantities of these dyes have been deposited in the environment, particularly in streams and rivers. Azo dyes were shown to affect microbial activities and microbial population sizes in the sediments and in the water columns of aquatic habitats. Only a few aerobic bacteria have been found to reduce azo dyes under aerobic conditions, and little is known about the process. A substantial number of anaerobic bacteria capable of azo dye reduction have been reported. The enzyme responsible for azo dye reduction has been partially purified, and characterization of the enzyme is proceeding. The nematode Ascaris lumbricoides and the cestode Moniezia expanza have been reported to reduce azo dyes anaerobically. Recently the fungus Phanerochaete chrysoporium was reported to mineralize azo dyes via a peroxidation-mediated pathway. A possible degradation pathway for the mineralization of azo dye is proposed and future research needs are discussed.

  7. Anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate using an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor with microbial sulfate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate and sulfate reduction as a function of COD/(SO42-) ratio in an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The reactor, which was inoculated with a mixed consortium, was operated under a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 days. We investigated the effect of COD/(SO42-) ratio variation on the sulfate reduction efficiency, hydrogen sulfide production, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, conductivity, and pH variation. The best reactor performance, with significant sulfate reduction efficiency and COD removal efficiency of 91% and 87%, respectively, was reached under a COD/(SO42-) ratio of 1.17. Under these conditions, microscopic analysis showed the abundance of vibrios and rod-shaped bacterial cells. Two anaerobic bacteria were isolated from the reactor sludge. Phylogenetic studies performed on these strains identified strain A1 as affiliated to Clostridium genus and strain H1 as a new species of sulfate-reducing bacteria affiliated to the Desulfovibrio genus. The closest phylogenetic relative of strain H1 was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, at 96% similarity for partial 16S RNA gene sequence data. Physiological and metabolic characterization was performed for this strain.

  8. Microbial diversity and hydrocarbon degrading gene capacity of a crude oil field soil as determined by metagenomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Firouz; Palanisami, Thavamani; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi; Lockington, Robin; Ramadass, Kavitha

    2016-05-01

    Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation processes and improvement of crude oil during its refining steps. Due to the long term selection, crude oil fields are unique environments for the identification of microorganisms with the ability to produce these enzymes. In this metagenomic study, based on Hiseq Illumina sequencing of samples obtained from a crude oil field and analysis of data on MG-RAST, Actinomycetales (9.8%) were found to be the dominant microorganisms, followed by Rhizobiales (3.3%). Furthermore, several functional genes were found in this study, mostly belong to Actinobacteria (12.35%), which have a role in the metabolism of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (2.51%), desulfurization (0.03%), element shortage (5.6%), and resistance to heavy metals (1.1%). This information will be useful for assisting in the application of microorganisms in the removal of hydrocarbon contamination and/or for improving the quality of crude oil. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:638-648, 2016. PMID:26914145

  9. Bioaugmentation of sewage sludge with Trametes versicolor in solid-phase biopiles produces degradation of pharmaceuticals and affects microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Jelić, Aleksandra; Pereira, M Alcina; Sousa, Diana Z; Petrović, Mira; Alves, M Madalena; Barceló, Damià; Caminal, Glòria; Vicent, Teresa

    2012-11-01

    The use of sludge (biosolids) in land application may contribute to the spread of organic micropollutants as wastewater treatments do not completely remove these compounds. Therefore, the development of alternative strategies for sludge treatment is a matter of recent concern. The elimination of pharmaceuticals at pre-existent concentrations from sewage sludge was assessed, for the first time, in nonsterile biopiles by means of fungal bioaugmentation with Trametes versicolor (BTV-systems) and compared with the effect of autochthonous microbiota (NB-systems). The competition between the autochthonous fungal/bacterial communities and T. versicolor was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and the cloning/sequencing approach. An inhibitory effect exerted by T. versicolor over bacterial populations was suggested. However, after 21 days, T. versicolor was no longer the main taxon in the fungal communities. The elimination profiles revealed an enhanced removal of atorvastatin-diclofenac-hydrochlorothiazide (during the whole treatment) and ranitidine-fenofibrate (at short periods) in the BTV biopiles in respect to NB biopiles, coincident with the presence of the fungus. For ibuprofen-clarithromycin-furosemide, the elimination profiles were similar irrespective of the system, and with carbamazepine no significant degradation was obtained. The results suggest that a fungal treatment with T. versicolor could be a promising process for the remediation of some pharmaceuticals in complex matrices such as biosolids. PMID:23030544

  10. Influência do nitrogênio degradável no rúmen sobre a degradabilidade in situ, os parâmetros ruminais e a eficiência de síntese microbiana em novilhos alimentados com cana-de-açúcar Ruminal degradable nitrogen for steers fed sugar cane: in situ degradability, ruminal parameters and microbial synthesis efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselene Nunes da Silveira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito da deficiência de nitrogênio degradável no rúmen (NDR, utilizando como volumoso cana-de-açúcar suplementada com uréia, farelo de soja ou farelo de glúten de milho - 60, sobre a eficiência de síntese microbiana e a degradabilidade in situ da matéria seca (MS e da fibra em detergente neutro (FDN em novilhos mestiços. Utilizaram-se oito novilhos canulados no rúmen e duodeno, distribuídos em dois quadrados latinos 4 × 4 e alimentados com cana-de-açúcar e cana-de-açúcar suplementada com uréia, farelo de soja ou farelo de glúten de milho-60. O pH e a concentração de N-NH3 foram mensurados no fluido ruminal antes e 2, 4, 6 e 8 horas após o fornecimento da ração. Utilizou-se a fibra em detergente ácido indigestível como indicador de fluxo duodenal. A eficiência microbiana foi determinada pelas bases purinas.As fontes de proteína degradável no rúmen não influenciaram a degradabilidade da matéria seca, entretanto, o maior valor de degradabilidade efetiva da FDN foi obtido com a cana-de-açúcar com farelo de soja. O pH e a concentração de N-NH3 observados com todas as dietas foram adequados para o crescimento dos microrganismos ruminais. A deficiência de nitrogênio degradável no rúmen não influencia a síntese de proteína microbiana e a dinâmica de fase líquida.The objective of this work was to evaluate the ruminal degradable nitrogen (RDN deficit using as roughage sugar cane supplemented with urea, soybean meal, or corn gluten meal 60 on the microbial synthesis efficiency, in situ dry matter (DM and neutral detergent fiber (NDF degradability. The treatments were: sugar cane, sugar cane with urea, soybean meal or corn gluten meal 60. Eight rumen and duodenum cannulated steers were used and arranged according to two 4 × 4 Latin Squares. The pH and N-NH3 were determined in the ruminal fluid before and 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours after feeding. The duodenal flow was estimated by indigestible

  11. Application of {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N stable isotope probing to characterize RDX degrading microbial communities under different electron-accepting conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Lee, Do Gyun [Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 (United States); Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Condee, Charles W. [CB& I Federal Services, Lawrenceville, NJ (United States); Chu, Kung-Hui, E-mail: kchu@civil.tamu.edu [Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • SIP characterized RDX-degrading communities under different e-accepting conditions. • Dominant RDX degradation pathways differed under different e-accepting conditions. • More complete detoxification of RDX occurred under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions than under manganese(IV) and iron(III)-reducing conditions. - Abstract: This study identified microorganisms capable of using the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or its metabolites as carbon and/or nitrogen sources under different electron-accepting conditions using {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N stable isotope probing (SIP). Mesocosms were constructed using groundwater and aquifer solids from an RDX-contaminated aquifer. The mesocosms received succinate as a carbon source and one of four electron acceptors (nitrate, manganese(IV), iron(III), or sulfate) or no additional electron acceptor (to stimulate methanogenesis). When RDX degradation was observed, subsamples from each mesocosm were removed and amended with {sup 13}C{sub 3}- or ring-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-, nitro-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-, or fully-labeled {sup 15}N{sub 6}-RDX, followed by additional incubation and isolation of labeled nucleic acids. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA sequences, clustering in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, Clostridia, and Actinobacteria, were detected in the {sup 13}C-DNA fractions. A total of twenty seven sequences were derived from different {sup 15}N-DNA fractions, with the sequences clustered in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, and Clostridia. Interestingly, sequences identified as Desulfosporosinus sp. (in the Clostridia) were not only observed to incorporate the labeled {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N from labeled RDX, but also were detected under each of the different electron-accepting conditions. The data suggest that {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-SIP can be used to characterize microbial communities involved in RDX biodegradation, and that the dominant pathway of RDX biodegradation may differ under different

  12. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; He, Z.; Voordeckers, J.; Zhou, A.; Lee, Y.-J.; Mason, O.U.; Dubinsky, E.; Chavarria, K.; Tom, L.; Fortney, J.; Lamendella, R.; Jansson, J.K.; D?haeseleer, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2011-06-15

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the deepest and largest offshore spill in U.S. history and its impacts on marine ecosystems are largely unknown. Here, we showed that the microbial community functional composition and structure were dramatically altered in a deep-sea oil plume resulting from the spill. A variety of metabolic genes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in the plume compared to outside the plume, indicating a great potential for intrinsic bioremediation or natural attenuation in the deep-sea. Various other microbial functional genes relevant to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur and iron cycling, metal resistance, and bacteriophage replication were also enriched in the plume. Together, these results suggest that the indigenous marine microbial communities could play a significant role in biodegradation of oil spills in deep-sea environments.

  13. Physical injury stimulates aerobic methane emissions from terrestrial plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.-P. Wang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical injury is common in terrestrial plants as a result of grazing, harvesting, trampling, and extreme weather events. Previous studies demonstrated enhanced emission of non-microbial CH4 under aerobic conditions from plant tissues when they were exposed to increasing UV radiation and temperature. Since physical injury is also a form of environmental stress, we sought to determine whether it would also affect CH4 emissions from plants. Physical injury (cutting stimulated CH4 emission from fresh twigs of Artemisia species under aerobic conditions. More cutting resulted in more CH4 emissions. Hypoxia also enhanced CH4 emission from both uncut and cut Artemisia frigida twigs. Physical injury typically results in cell wall degradation, which may either stimulate formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS or decrease scavenging of them. Increased ROS activity might explain increased CH4 emission in response to physical injury and other forms of stress. There were significant differences in CH4 emissions among 10 species of Artemisia, with some species emitting no detectable CH4 under any circumstances. Consequently, CH4 emissions may be species-dependent and therefore difficult to estimate in nature based on total plant biomass. Our results and those of previous studies suggest that a variety of environmental stresses stimulate CH4 emission from a wide variety of plant species. Global change processes, including climate change, depletion of stratospheric ozone, increasing ground-level ozone, spread of plant pests, and land-use changes, could cause more stress in plants on a global scale, potentially stimulating more CH4 emission globally.

  14. Physical injury stimulates aerobic methane emissions from terrestrial plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.-P. Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical injury is common in terrestrial plants as a result of grazing, trampling, and extreme weather events. Previous studies demonstrated enhanced emission of non-microbial CH4 under aerobic conditions from plant tissues when they were exposed to increasing UV radiation and temperature. Since physical injury is also a form of environmental stress, we sought to determine whether it would also affect CH4 emissions from plants. Physical injury (cutting stimulated CH4 emission from fresh twigs of Artemisiaspecies under aerobic conditions. More cutting resulted in more CH4 emissions. Hypoxia also enhanced CH4 emission from both uncut and cut Artemisia frigida twigs. Physical injury typically results in cell wall degradation, which may either stimulate formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS or decrease scavenging of them. Increased ROS activity might explain increased CH4 emission in response to physical injury and other forms of stress. There were significant differences in CH4 emissions among 10 species of Artemisia, with some species emitting no detectable CH4 under any circumstances. Consequently, CH4 emissions may be species-dependent and therefore difficult to estimate in nature based on total plant biomass. Our results and those of previous studies suggest that a variety environmental stresses stimulate CH4 emission from a wide variety of plant species. Global change processes, including climate change, depletion of stratospheric ozone, increasing ground-level ozone, spread of plant pests, and land-use changes, could cause more stress in plants on a global scale, potentially stimulating more CH4 emission globally.

  15. Development of an Intermediate-Scale Aerobic Bioreactor to Regenerate Nutrients from Inedible Crop Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Barry W.; Strayer, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    Three Intermediate-Scale Aerobic Bioreactors were designed, fabricated, and operated. They utilized mixed microbial communities to bio-degrade plant residues. The continuously stirred tank reactors operated at a working volume of 8 L, and the average oxygen mass transfer coefficient, k(sub L)a, was 0.01 s(exp -1). Mixing time was 35 s. An experiment using inedible wheat residues, a replenishment rate of 0.125/day, and a solids loading rate of 20 gdw/day yielded a 48% reduction in biomass. Bioreactor effluent was successfully used to regenerate a wheat hydroponic nutrient solution. Over 80% of available potassium, calcium, and other minerals were recovered and recycled in the 76-day wheat growth experiment.

  16. Microbial responses to chitin and chitosan in oxic and anoxic agricultural soil slurries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Wieczorek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Chitin is the second most abundant biopolymer in terrestrial ecosystems and is subject to microbial degradation. Chitin can be deacetylated to chitosan or can be hydrolyzed to N,N′-diacetylchitobiose and oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Which pathway of chitin hydrolysis is preferred by soil microbial communities has previously been unknown. Supplementation of chitin stimulated microbial activity under oxic and anoxic conditions in agricultural soil slurries, whereas chitosan had no effect. Thus, the soil microbial community likely was more adapted to chitin as a substrate. In addition, this finding suggested that direct hydrolysis of chitin was preferred to the pathway that starts with deacetylation. Chitin was apparently degraded by aerobic respiration, ammonification, and nitrification to carbon dioxide and nitrate under oxic conditions. When oxygen was absent, fermentation products (acetate, butyrate, propionate, hydrogen, carbon dioxide and ammonia were detected, suggesting that butyric and propionic acid fermentation were along with ammonification likely responsible for apparent anaerobic chitin degradation. In total, 42 different chiA genotypes were detected of which twenty were novel at an amino acid sequence dissimilarity of >50%. Various chiA genotypes responded to chitin supplementation and affiliated with a novel deep-branching bacterial chiA genotype (anoxic conditions, genotypes of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria (oxic and anoxic conditions, and Planctomycetes (oxic conditions. Thus, this study provides evidence that detected chitinolytic bacteria were catabolically diverse and occupied different ecological niches with regard to oxygen availability enabling chitin degradation under various redox conditions at the level of the community.

  17. Microbial responses to chitin and chitosan in oxic and anoxic agricultural soil slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, A. S.; Hetz, S. A.; Kolb, S.

    2014-06-01

    Microbial degradation of chitin in soil substantially contributes to carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Chitin is globally the second most abundant biopolymer after cellulose and can be deacetylated to chitosan or can be hydrolyzed to N,N'-diacetylchitobiose and oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Which pathway of chitin hydrolysis is preferred by soil microbial communities is unknown. Supplementation of chitin stimulated microbial activity under oxic and anoxic conditions in agricultural soil slurries, whereas chitosan had no effect. Thus, the soil microbial community likely was more adapted to chitin as a substrate. In addition, this finding suggested that direct hydrolysis of chitin was preferred to the pathway that starts with deacetylation. Chitin was apparently degraded by aerobic respiration, ammonification, and nitrification to carbon dioxide and nitrate under oxic conditions. When oxygen was absent, fermentation products (acetate, butyrate, propionate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide) and ammonia were detected, suggesting that butyric and propionic acid fermentation, along with ammonification, were likely responsible for anaerobic chitin degradation. In total, 42 different chiA genotypes were detected of which twenty were novel at an amino acid sequence dissimilarity of less than 50%. Various chiA genotypes responded to chitin supplementation and affiliated with a novel deep-branching bacterial chiA genotype (anoxic conditions), genotypes of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria (oxic and anoxic conditions), and Planctomycetes (oxic conditions). Thus, this study provides evidence that detected chitinolytic bacteria were catabolically diverse and occupied different ecological niches with regard to oxygen availability enabling chitin degradation under various redox conditions on community level.

  18. What Is Aerobic Dancing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after exercising, see a physician. Common Aerobics Injuries Plantar fasciitis (arch pain) -- Arch pain is often caused by ... rearfoot instability, with excessive pronation, may result in plantar fasciitis. Shoes with proper support in the arch often ...

  19. [Research of aerobic granule characteristics with different granule age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Man; Yang, Chang-Zhu; Pu, Wen-Hong; Luo, Ying-Dong; Gong, Jian-Yu

    2012-03-01

    In the SBR reactor, we studied the different style, physicochemical characteristic, pollutants removal and microbial activity between the short age and long age aerobic granule, respectively. The short age aerobic granule was cultivated from activated floccules sludge and the other was gotten from aerobic granular sludge which was operated stably more than one year. The results indicated that the wet density, the specific gravity and integrated coefficient (IC) of the short age aerobic granule were 1.066 g x cm(-1), 1.013 g x cm(-3) and 98.7%, respectively. And that of long age were 1.026 g x cm(-3), 1.010 g x cm(-3) and 98.4%, respectively. All of them were higher than the long age aerobic granule. The mean diameters of them were 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively. The settling velocity of short age and long age aerobic granule were 0.005-0.032 m x s(-1) and 0.003-0.028 m x s(-1), respectively, and two kinds of aerobic granule settling velocity increased with the diameter increased. SVI of the former was lower. The COD removal rates of two aerobic granules were above 90%, and the NH4(+) -N removal rates of them were about 85%. The results of the COD effluent concentration, NH4(+) -N effluent concentration and the pollutants concentration in a typical cycle indicated that the short age aerobic granule had better pollutants removal efficiency. The TP removal rates of them were between 40% -90% and 32% -85%, respectively. The TN removal rates of them were about 80%. The SOUR(H) SOUR(NH4) and SOUR(NO2) of the short age aerobic granule were 26.4, 14.8 and 11.2 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. And that of long age were 25.2, 14.4 and 8.4 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. In summary, the aerobic granule had significantly different physical and chemical characteristics because of different granule age, and the short age aerobic granule exhibited better pollutants removal ability, higher microbial activity and more stability than the long age aerobic granule. PMID:22624385

  20. Microbial transformation of synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajthaml, Tomas, E-mail: cajthaml@biomed.cas.c [Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, CZ-142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Kresinova, Zdena; Svobodova, Katerina; Sigler, Karel; Rezanka, Tomas [Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, CZ-142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2009-12-15

    Natural estrogens such as estrone, 17beta-estradiol, estriol, and the particularly recalcitrant synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol used as oral contraceptive, accumulate in the environment and may give rise to health problems. The processes participating in their removal from soil, wastewater, water-sediments, groundwater-aquifer material, and wastewater or sewage treatment plant effluents may involve the action of bacterial and microbial consortia, and in some cases fungi and algae. This review discusses the different efficiencies of bacterial degradation of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the role of sulfate-, nitrate-, and iron-reducing conditions in anaerobic degradation, and the role of sorption. The participation of autotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria and heterotrophic bacteria in cometabolic degradation of estrogens, the estrogen-degrading action of ligninolytic fungi and their extracellular enzymes (lignin peroxidase, manganese-dependent peroxidase, versatile peroxidase, laccase), and of algae are discussed in detail. - Current knowledge of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol microbial transformation is summarized.

  1. Nitrobenzene biodegradation ability of microbial communities in water and sediments along Songhua River after a nitrobenzene pollution event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zonglai; YANG Min; LI Dong; QI Rong; LIU Huijuan; SUN Jingfang; QU Jiuhui

    2008-01-01

    More than 100 t of nitrobenzene (NB) and related compounds were discharged into the Songhua River, the fourth longest river in China, because of the world-shaking explosion of an aniline production factory located in Jilin City on November 13, 2005. As one of the efforts to predict the fate of residual NB in the river, NB biodegradation abilities of the microbes in the water and sediments from different river sections were evaluated systematically. The results indicated that microbial communities from any section of the river, including one section at the upper stream of the NB discharging point, had the ability to biodegrade NB under aerobic (for river water samples) conditions at 22±1℃ or anaerobic (for sediment samples) conditions at 10±1℃. NB degradation rates of microbial communities in the downstream sites were markedly higher than those in the upstream site, indicating that the NB degradation abilities were enhanced because of the pollution of NB. Aerobic degradation got neglected at a temperature of 10℃ or lower. The production of nitrosobenzene and aniline during the aerobic biodegradation suggested the existence of at least two different NB degradation pathways, and the occurrence of the catechol-2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) gene and the significant decrease of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) indicated that NB could be mineralized under aerobic conditions. Although it was a fact that the river have frozen-up during the NB accident, it was speculated that biodegradation was not the major process responsible for the decrease of NB flux in the river.

  2. A new mechanism for the aerobic catabolism of dimethyl sulfide.

    OpenAIRE

    Visscher, P T; Taylor, B F

    1993-01-01

    Aerobic degradation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), previously described for thiobacilli and hyphomicrobia, involves catabolism to sulfide via methanethiol (CH3SH). Methyl groups are sequentially eliminated as HCHO by incorporation of O2 catalyzed by DMS monooxygenase and methanethiol oxidase. H2O2 formed during CH3SH oxidation is destroyed by catalase. We recently isolated Thiobacillus strain ASN-1, which grows either aerobically or anaerobically with denitrification on DMS. Comparative experimen...

  3. Effect of biochar on the fate of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons in an aerobic sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnaf, Khaled M.; Puricelli, Sara; Saponaro, Sabrina; Werner, David

    2011-11-01

    Biochar addition to soil is currently being investigated as a novel technology to remediate polluted sites. A critical consideration is the impact of biochar on the intrinsic microbial pollutant degradation, in particular at sites polluted with a mixture of readily biodegradable and more persistent organic pollutants. We therefore studied the impact of biochar (2% on dry weight basis) on the fate of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons in an aerobic sandy soil with batch and column studies. The soil-water partitioning coefficient, K d, was enhanced in the biochar-amended soil up to a factor 36, and petroleum hydrocarbon vapor migration was retarded accordingly. Despite increased sorption, in particular of monoaromatic hydrocarbons, the overall microbial respiration was comparable in the biochar-amended and unamended soil. This was due to more rapid biodegradation of linear, cyclic and branched alkanes in the biochar amended soil. We concluded that the total petroleum hydrocarbon degradation rate was controlled by a factor other than substrate availability and the reduced availability of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in the biochar amended soil led to greater biodegradation of the other petroleum compounds.

  4. Biodegradation of trichloroethylene and toluene by indigenous microbial populations in soil.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fan; Scow, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    The biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene, incubated separately and in combination, by indigenous microbial populations was measured in three unsaturated soils incubated under aerobic conditions. Sorption and desorption of TCE (0.1 to 10 micrograms ml-1) and toluene (1.0 to 20 micrograms ml-1) were measured in two soils and followed a reversible linear isotherm. At a concentration of 1 micrograms ml-1, TCE was not degraded in the absence of toluene in any of the soils. In comb...

  5. Microbial adaption to a pesticide in agricultural soils: Accelerated degradation of 14C-atrazine in field soils from Brazil and Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Nicolai David; Martinazzo, Rosane; Hamacher, Georg; Accinelli, Cesare; Köppchen, Stephan; Langen, Ulrike; Linden, Andreas; Krause, Martina; Burauel, Peter

    2010-05-01

    An increasing demand for food, feed and bioenergy, and simultaneously a decline of arable land will require an intensive agricultural production including the use of pesticides. With an increasing use of pesticides the occurrence of an accelerated degradation potential has to be assessed. Atrazine [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine] is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. Even though its use was banned in several countries it is still widely used throughout America and the Asia-Pacific region. Atrazine is the most widely used herbicide in maize plantations in Brazil and the US. The use of atrazine in Belgium and all EU member states was banned in September 2004, with the permission to consume existing stocks until October 2005. Atrazine and its residues are still regularly detected in soil, ground and surface waters even years after its prohibition. Its persistence in soil and in association with organic particles might become crucial in terms of erosion due to climate and environmental changes. Due to its potential microbiological accessibility, the microbial mineralization of atrazine competes with chemical/physical interaction such as sorption and binding processes of the chemical molecule in the soil matrix. Binding or intrusion of the chemical on soil components results in a decrease of its accessibility for soil microbes, which does not necessarily exclude the molecule from environmental interactions. In the present study the accelerated atrazine degradation in agriculturally used soils was examined. Soil samples were collected from a Rhodic Ferralsol, Campinas do Sul, South Brazil, and Geric Ferralsol, Correntina, Northeastern Brazil. The sampling site of the Rhodic Ferralsol soil has been under crop rotation (soybean/wheat/maize/oat) since 1990. The Geric Ferralsol site has alternately been cultivated with maize and soybean since 2000. Both areas have been treated biennially with atrazine at recommended doses of 1.5 - 3

  6. Application of (13)C and (15)N stable isotope probing to characterize RDX degrading microbial communities under different electron-accepting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Lee, Do Gyun; Fuller, Mark E; Hatzinger, Paul B; Condee, Charles W; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2015-10-30

    This study identified microorganisms capable of using the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or its metabolites as carbon and/or nitrogen sources under different electron-accepting conditions using (13)C and (15)N stable isotope probing (SIP). Mesocosms were constructed using groundwater and aquifer solids from an RDX-contaminated aquifer. The mesocosms received succinate as a carbon source and one of four electron acceptors (nitrate, manganese(IV), iron(III), or sulfate) or no additional electron acceptor (to stimulate methanogenesis). When RDX degradation was observed, subsamples from each mesocosm were removed and amended with (13)C3- or ring-(15)N3-, nitro-(15)N3-, or fully-labeled (15)N6-RDX, followed by additional incubation and isolation of labeled nucleic acids. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA sequences, clustering in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, Clostridia, and Actinobacteria, were detected in the (13)C-DNA fractions. A total of twenty seven sequences were derived from different (15)N-DNA fractions, with the sequences clustered in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, and Clostridia. Interestingly, sequences identified as Desulfosporosinus sp. (in the Clostridia) were not only observed to incorporate the labeled (13)C or (15)N from labeled RDX, but also were detected under each of the different electron-accepting conditions. The data suggest that (13)C- and (15)N-SIP can be used to characterize microbial communities involved in RDX biodegradation, and that the dominant pathway of RDX biodegradation may differ under different electron-accepting conditions. PMID:25935409

  7. Effect of whey protein coating on quality attributes of low-fat, aerobically packaged sausage during refrigerated storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, J; Chin, K B

    2008-08-01

    Whey protein-based edible coating was used to reduce oxidative degradation and microbial growth of low-fat sausages (LFSs) stored at 4 degrees C for 8 wk, under aerobic package. Whey protein coating reduced (P<0.05) thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide value (PV) formation compared to control sausages. The percent inhibition of TBARS and PV for whey protein-coated sausages, compared to the control, was 31.3% and 27.1%, respectively. The ability of the whey protein coating to provide a moisture barrier for the sausages was reduced (P<0.05). In addition, a reduction of moisture loss by 36.7% compared to the control was achieved by whey coating. However, whey protein coating of LFSs did not inhibit the growth of either the total number of aerobic bacteria or of Listeria monocytogenes. These results indicated that whey protein coating had an antioxidative activity in LFSs under aerobic package during refrigerated storage. PMID:19241536

  8. Effect of oil dispersants on microbially-mediated processes in freshwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of 15 oil dispersants on the microbial degradation of Norman Wells oil has been investigated using capillary gas chromatography (CGC) and C14-radiometric techniques. Other ecologically important microbial biochemical processes, such as phosphatase, aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen fixation and methane production in natural waters and sediments were studied with selected dispersants. Several dispersants, when used at manufacturer's recommended rates, were found by CGC to have slightly stimulatory or no inhibitory effects on oil degradation under laboratory conditions. Other dispersants were toxic or inhibited degradation. The CGC results were confirmed by C14-labelled CO2 evolution from labelled substrates in laboratory cultures and natural waters. phosphatase activity was stimulated by 2 of 4 dispersants tested in the presence of oil. In the absence of oil, all 4 dispersants stimulated phosphatase activity. Aerobic N2 fixation was stimulated by three dispersants, while anaerobic N2-fixation was stimulated only at high concentrations of dispersants. One dispersant stimulated methane production in anaerobic sediments in proportion to the dispersant concentration. 16 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    1993-09-01

    Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

  10. Aerobic biotransformation of polyfluoroalkyl phosphate esters (PAPs) in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-05-01

    Microbial transformation of polyfluoroalkyl phosphate esters (PAPs) into perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) has recently been confirmed to occur in activated sludge and soil. However, there lacks quantitative information about the half-lives of the PAPs and their significance as the precursors to PFCAs. In the present study, the biotransformation of 6:2 and 8:2 diPAP in aerobic soil was investigated in semi-dynamics reactors using improved sample preparation methods. To develop an efficient extraction method for PAPs, six different extraction solvents were compared, and the phenomenon of solvent-enhanced hydrolysis was investigated. It was found that adding acetic acid could enhance the recoveries of the diPAPs and inhibit undesirable hydrolysis during solvent extraction of soil. However 6:2 and 8:2 monoPAPs, which are the first breakdown products from diPAPs, were found to be unstable in the six solvents tested and quickly hydrolyzed to form fluorotelomer alcohols. Therefore reliable measurement of the monoPAPs from a live soil was not achievable. The apparent DT50 values of 6:2 diPAP and 8:2 diPAP biotransformation were estimated to be 12 and > 1000 days, respectively, using a double first-order in parallel model. At the end of incubation of day 112, the major degradation products of 6:2 diPAP were 5:3 fluorotelomer carboxylic acid (5:3 acid, 9.3% by mole), perfluoropentanoic acid (PFPeA, 6.4%) and perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA, 6.0%). The primary product of 8:2 diPAP was perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, 2.1%). The approximately linear relationship between the half-lives of eleven polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs, including 6:2 and 8:2 diPAPs) that biotransform in aerobic soils and their molecular weights suggested that the molecular weight is a good indicator of the general stability of low-molecular-weight PFAS-based compounds in aerobic soils. PMID:26849529

  11. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 7 entitled: Development of degradation processes, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackin, M.J.; Heitkamp, M.A.; Ho, Sa V. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to law permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The Lasagna technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The general concept of the technology is to use electrokinetics to move contaminants from the soils into {open_quotes}treatment zones{close_quotes} where the contaminants can be removed from the water by either adsorption or degradation. The focus of technical task No. 7 was to optimize the conditions required for electro-osmotic movement of contaminants and microbial degradation in the treatment zones. This topical report summarizes the results of aerobic microbial research performed to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating the chemical-degrading organisms into biotreatment zones in laboratory-scale electro-osmosis units and to demonstrate the combination of electrokinetics and aerobic microbial degradation for the removal of contaminants from clay. Also included in this report are the results of investigating microbial movement during electro-osmosis and studies involving the optimization of the microbial support matrix in the biozone. The Stanford study was conducted in order to obtain a better understanding of rates of anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of TCE to ethylene and of factors affecting these rates in order to determine the potential for application of TCE biodegradation as part of the Lasagna technology.

  12. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 7 entitled: Development of degradation processes, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to law permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The Lasagna technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The general concept of the technology is to use electrokinetics to move contaminants from the soils into open-quotes treatment zonesclose quotes where the contaminants can be removed from the water by either adsorption or degradation. The focus of technical task No. 7 was to optimize the conditions required for electro-osmotic movement of contaminants and microbial degradation in the treatment zones. This topical report summarizes the results of aerobic microbial research performed to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating the chemical-degrading organisms into biotreatment zones in laboratory-scale electro-osmosis units and to demonstrate the combination of electrokinetics and aerobic microbial degradation for the removal of contaminants from clay. Also included in this report are the results of investigating microbial movement during electro-osmosis and studies involving the optimization of the microbial support matrix in the biozone. The Stanford study was conducted in order to obtain a better understanding of rates of anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of TCE to ethylene and of factors affecting these rates in order to determine the potential for application of TCE biodegradation as part of the Lasagna technology

  13. BIOLOGICAL AMENDMENTS AND CROP ROTATIONS FOR MANAGING SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AND SOILBORNE DISEASES OF POTATO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various biological amendments, including commercial biocontrol agents, microbial inoculants, mycorrhizae, and an aerobic