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Sample records for aerobic microbial degradation

  1. Interaction of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Aerobic Granular Sludge: Biosorption and Microbial Degradation

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    Shou-Qing Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new category of persistent organic pollutants, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs have become ubiquitous global environmental contaminants. No literature is available on the aerobic biotransformation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209. Herein, we investigated the interaction of PBDEs with aerobic granular sludge. The results show that the removal of BDE-209 from wastewater is mainly via biosorption onto aerobic granular sludge. The uptake capacity increased when temperature, contact time, and sludge dosage increased or solution pH dropped. Ionic strength had a negative influence on BDE-209 adsorption. The modified pseudo first-order kinetic model was appropriate to describe the adsorption kinetics. Microbial debromination of BDE-209 did not occur during the first 30 days of operation. Further study found that aerobic microbial degradation of 4,4′-dibromodiphenyl ether happened with the production of lower BDE congeners.

  2. Aerobic versus Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Clothianidin under Simulated California Rice Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Rebecca A; Tomco, Patrick L; Howard, Megan W; Schempp, Tabitha T; Stewart, Davis J; Stacey, Phillip M; Ball, David B; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2016-09-28

    Microbial degradation of clothianidin was characterized under aerobic and anaerobic California rice field conditions. Rate constants (k) and half-lives (DT50) were determined for aerobic and anaerobic microcosms, and an enrichment experiment was performed at various nutrient conditions and pesticide concentrations. Temperature effects on anaerobic degradation rates were determined at 22 ± 2 and 35 ± 2 °C. Microbial growth was assessed in the presence of various pesticide concentrations, and distinct colonies were isolated and identified. Slow aerobic degradation was observed, but anaerobic degradation occurred rapidly at both 25 and 35 °C. Transformation rates and DT50 values in flooded soil at 35 ± 2 °C (k = -7.16 × 10(-2) ± 3.08 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 9.7 days) were significantly faster than in 25 ± 2 °C microcosms (k= -2.45 × 10(-2) ± 1.59 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 28.3 days). At the field scale, biodegradation of clothianidin will vary with extent of oxygenation.

  3. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial degradation of crude (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol in river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Zhi, Wei; Liu, Yangsheng; Smiley, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Daniel; Chen, Xi; Dietrich, Andrea; Zhang, Husen

    2016-03-15

    Cyclohexane and some of its derivatives have been a major concern because of their significant adverse human health effects and widespread occurrence in the environment. The 2014 West Virginia chemical spill has raised public attention to (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol (4-MCHM), one cyclohexane derivative, which is widely used in coal processing but largely ignored. In particular, the environmental fate of its primary components, cis- and trans-4-MCHM, remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the degradation kinetics and mineralization of cis- and trans-4-MCHM by sediment microorganisms under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We found the removal of cis- and trans-4-MCHM was mainly attributed to biodegradation with little contribution from sorption. A nearly complete aerobic degradation of 4-MCHM occurred within 14 days, whereas the anaerobic degradation was reluctant with residual percentages of 62.6% of cis-4-MCHM and 85.0% of trans-4-MCHM after 16-day incubation. The cis-4-MCHM was degraded faster than the trans under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating an isomer-specific degradation could occur during the 4-MCHM degradation. Nitrate addition enhanced 4-MCHM mineralization by about 50% under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both cis- and trans-4-MCHM fit well with the first-order kinetic model with respective degradation rates of 0.46-0.52 and 0.19-0.31 day(-)(1) under aerobic condition. Respective degradation rates of 0.041-0.095 and 0.013-0.052 day(-)(1) occurred under anaerobic condition. One bacterial strain capable of effectively degrading 4-MCHM isomers was isolated from river sediments and identified as Bacillus pumilus at the species level based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and 97% identity. Our findings will provide critical information for improving the prediction of the environmental fate of 4-MCHM and other cyclohexane derivatives with similar structure as well as enhancing the development of feasible treatment

  4. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionations of alkane compounds and crude oil during aerobically microbial degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xianzhi; ZHANG Gan; CHEN Fanzhong; LIU Guoqing

    2004-01-01

    Normal alkane compounds dodecane, pentadecane, hexadecane, octadecane, tetracosane, isoprenoid alkane pristane and a crude oil sample were aerobically biodegraded with a pure bacterial strain GIM2.5 and white rot fungus Phanerochaete Chrysosporium-1767 to monitor the kinetic fractionation of the molecular stable carbon (δ13C) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes in the course of biodegradation. Both δ13C (V-PDB) and δ D (V-SMOW) remained stable for the standard alkane compounds and n-alkane components (from n-C13 to n-C25) of the crude oil, generally varying in the range of ±0.5‰ and ±5‰ respectively, within the range of the instrumental precisions, especially for those molecularly heavier than n-C16 during microbial degradation. These results indicate that molecular stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic fingerprints can be promising indicators for tracing the sources of petroleum-related contaminants in the environment, especially in the case of severe weathering when they are difficult to be unambiguously identified by the chemical fingerprints alone.

  5. Effect of exposure history on microbial herbicide degradation in an aerobic aquifer affected by a point source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, Nina; de Lipthay, J.R.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen;

    2002-01-01

    The effects of in situ exposure to low concentrations (micrograms per liter) of herbicides on aerobic degradation of herbicides in aquifers were studied by laboratory batch experiments. Aquifer material and groundwater were collected from a point source with known exposure histories to the herbic......The effects of in situ exposure to low concentrations (micrograms per liter) of herbicides on aerobic degradation of herbicides in aquifers were studied by laboratory batch experiments. Aquifer material and groundwater were collected from a point source with known exposure histories...... to the herbicides mecoprop (MCPP), dichlorprop, BAM, bentazone, isoproturon, and DNOC. Degradation of the phenoxy acids, mecoprop and dichlorprop, was observed in five of six sampling points from within the plume. Mecoprop was mineralized, and up to 70% was recovered as 14CO2. DNOC was degraded in only two of six...... sampling points from within the plume, and neither BAM, bentazone, nor isoproturon was degraded in any sampling point. A linear correlation (R2 g 0.83) between pre-exposure and amount of herbicide degraded within 50 days was observed for the phenoxy acids, mecoprop and dichlorprop. An improved model fit...

  6. Microbial Degradation of Indole and Its Derivatives

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    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Indole and its derivatives, including 3-methylindole and 4-chloroindole, are environmental pollutants that are present worldwide. Microbial degradation of indole and its derivatives can occur in several aerobic and anaerobic pathways; these pathways involve different known and characterized genes. In this minireview, we summarize and explain the microbial degradation of indole, indole-3-acetic acid, 4-chloroindole, and methylindole.

  7. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

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    Torsvik, T. [Univ. of Bergen (Norway); Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  8. Aerobic degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls

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    Pieper, D.H. [Dept. of Environmental Microbiology, German Research Center for Biotechnology, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The microbial degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been extensively studied in recent years. The genetic organization of biphenyl catabolic genes has been elucidated in various groups of microorganisms, their structures have been analyzed with respect to their evolutionary relationships, and new information on mobile elements has become available. Key enzymes, specifically biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenases, have been intensively characterized, structure/sequence relationships have been determined and enzymes optimized for PCB transformation. However, due to the complex metabolic network responsible for PCB degradation, optimizing degradation by single bacterial species is necessarily limited. As PCBs are usually not mineralized by biphenyl-degrading organisms, and cometabolism can result in the formation of toxic metabolites, the degradation of chlorobenzoates has received special attention. A broad set of bacterial strategies to degrade chlorobenzoates has recently been elucidated, including new pathways for the degradation of chlorocatechols as central intermediates of various chloroaromatic catabolic pathways. To optimize PCB degradation in the environment beyond these metabolic limitations, enhancing degradation in the rhizosphere has been suggested, in addition to the application of surfactants to overcome bioavailability barriers. However, further research is necessary to understand the complex interactions between soil/sediment, pollutant, surfactant and microorganisms in different environments. (orig.)

  9. Enhanced selection of micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol degrading granular sludge

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    Lv, Yuancai, E-mail: donkey1204@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chen, Yuancai, E-mail: chenyc@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Song, Wenzhe, E-mail: songwenzhe007@126.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Hu, Yongyou, E-mail: ppyyhu@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: In this work, an aerobic column reactor was placed before the USB to maintain micro-oxygen condition in the reactor and the micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L{sup −1}) was successfully obtained. PCP degradation by the micro-aerobic system was studied and the variance of microbial community was also discussed by using PCR-DGGE analysis. - Highlights: • Micro-aerobic granular sludge was cultivated in column-type combined reactors. • PCP biodegradation, VFA accumulation and biogas production were studied. • The function of Methanogenic archaeon in the system was investigated. • Fluctuation and diversity of microbial community were discussed by DGGE analysis. • The dominated microorganisms were identified by 16S rDNA sequences. - Abstract: Column-type combined reactors were designed to cultivate micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L{sup −1}) over 39-day experimental period. Micro-aerobic granular had both anaerobic activity (SMA: 2.34 mMCH{sub 4}/h g VSS) and aerobic activity (SOUR: 2.21 mMO{sub 2}/h g VSS). Metabolite analysis results revealed that PCP was sequentially dechlorinated to TCP, DCP, and eventually to MCP. Methanogens were not directly involved in the dechlorination of PCP, but might played a vital role in stabilizing the overall structure of the granule sludge. For Eubacteria, the Shannon Index (2.09 in inoculated granular sludge) increased both in micro-aerobic granular sludge (2.61) and PCP-degradation granular sludge (2.55). However, for Archaea, it decreased from 2.53 to 1.85 and 1.84, respectively. Although the Shannon Index demonstrated slight difference between micro-aerobic granular sludge and PCP-degradation granular sludge, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated obvious variance of the microbial composition, revealing significant effect of micro-aerobic

  10. Microbial aerobic and anaerobic degradation of acrylamide in sludge and water under environmental conditions--case study in a sand and gravel quarry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guezennec, A G; Michel, C; Ozturk, S; Togola, A; Guzzo, J; Desroche, N

    2015-05-01

    Polyacrylamides (PAMs) are used in sand and gravel quarries as water purification flocculants for recycling process water in a recycling loop system where the flocculants remove fine particles in the form of sludge. The PAM-based flocculants, however, contain residual amounts of acrylamide (AMD) that did not react during the polymerization process. This acrylamide is released into the environment when the sludge is discharged into a settling basin. Here, we explore the microbial diversity and the potential for AMD biodegradation in water and sludge samples collected in a quarry site submitted to low AMD concentrations. The microbial diversity, analyzed by culture-dependent methods and the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis approach, reveals the presence of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria, among which some species are known to have an AMD biodegradation activity. Results also show that the two main parts of the water recycling loop-the washing process and the settling basin-display significantly different bacterial profiles. The exposure time with residual AMD could, thus, be one of the parameters that lead to a selection of specific bacterial species. AMD degradation experiments with 0.5 g L(-1) AMD showed a high potential for biodegradation in all parts of the washing process, except the make-up water. The AMD biodegradation potential in samples collected from the washing process and settling basin was also analyzed taking into account on-site conditions: low (12 °C) and high (25 °C) temperatures reflecting the winter and summer seasons, and AMD concentrations of 50 μg L(-1). Batch tests showed rapid (as little as 18 h) AMD biodegradation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions at both the winter and summer temperatures, although there was a greater lag time before activity started with the AMD biodegradation at 12 °C. This study, thus, demonstrates that bacteria present in sludge and water samples exert an in situ and rapid

  11. Acclimation of aerobic-activated sludge degrading benzene derivatives and co-metabolic degradation activities of trichloroethylene by benzene derivative-grown aerobic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizong; Yang, Qi; Bai, Zhiyong; Wang, Shidong; Wang, Yeyao; Nowak, Karolina M

    2015-01-01

    The acclimation of aerobic-activated sludge for degradation of benzene derivatives was investigated in batch experiments. Phenol, benzoic acid, toluene, aniline and chlorobenzene were concurrently added to five different bioreactors which contained the aerobic-activated sludge. After the acclimation process ended, the acclimated phenol-, benzoic acid-, toluene-, aniline- and chlorobenzene-grown aerobic-activated sludge were used to explore the co-metabolic degradation activities of trichloroethylene (TCE). Monod equation was employed to simulate the kinetics of co-metabolic degradation of TCE by benzene derivative-grown sludge. At the end of experiments, the mixed microbial communities grown under different conditions were identified. The results showed that the acclimation periods of microorganisms for different benzene derivatives varied. The maximum degradation rates of TCE for phenol-, benzoic acid-, toluene-, aniline- and chlorobenzene-grown aerobic sludge were 0.020, 0.017, 0.016, 0.0089 and 0.0047 mg g SS(-1) h(-1), respectively. The kinetic of TCE degradation in the absence of benzene derivative followed Monod equation well. Also, eight phyla were observed in the acclimated benzene derivative-grown aerobic sludge. Each of benzene derivative-grown aerobic sludge had different microbial community composition. This study can hopefully add new knowledge to the area of TCE co-metabolic by mixed microbial communities, and further the understanding on the function and applicability of aerobic-activated sludge.

  12. Evaluation of aerobic co-composting of penicillin fermentation fungi residue with pig manure on penicillin degradation, microbial population dynamics and composting maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Zhao, Juan; Yu, Cigang; Dong, Shanshan; Zhang, Dini; Yu, Ran; Wang, Changyong; Liu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Improper treatment of penicillin fermentation fungi residue (PFFR), one of the by-products of penicillin production process, may result in environmental pollution due to the high concentration of penicillin. Aerobic co-composting of PFFR with pig manure was determined to degrade penicillin in PFFR. Results showed that co-composting of PFFR with pig manure can significantly reduce the concentration of penicillin in PFFR, make the PFFR-compost safer as organic fertilizer for soil application. More than 99% of penicillin in PFFR were removed after 7-day composting. PFFR did not affect the composting process and even promote the activity of the microorganisms in the compost. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that the bacteria and actinomycetes number in the AC samples were 40-80% higher than that in the pig-manure compost (CK) samples in the same composting phases. This research indicated that the aerobic co-composting was a feasible PFFR treatment method.

  13. Microbial degradation of chloro- and methylphenol mixtures under aerobic and denitrifying conditions. Regulation and interaction in a mixed culture; Mikrobieller Abbau von Chlor- und Methylphenolen im Gemisch unter aeroben und denitrifizierenden Bedingungen. Regulation und Interaktion in einer Mischkultur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollender, J.

    1994-12-31

    The mechanism and the regulation of the microbial aerobic degradation of chloro- and methylphenol mixtures were investigated by comparing the mixed culture enriched of these phenolic compounds with the isolated pure cultures. The degradation assays and the characterization of the central degrading enzymes involved show that the degradation potential of the mixed culture was essentially determined by the additive abilities of the three pure cultures Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subspecies denitrificans JH1, Pseudomonas stutzeri JH3 and Comamonas testosteroni JH5. Degradation of some substrate mixtures and avoidance of enrichment of metabolites can only be explained by the interaction of the pure cultures or the participation of other organisms in the mixed culture which were not further investigated. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei den Untersuchungen zum Mechanismus und der Regulation des aeroben Abbaus von Chlor- und Methylphenolen im Gemisch stand der Vergleich zwischen der auf diesen Phenolen angereicherten Mischkultur und den daraus isolierten Reinkulturen im Vordergrund. Die Abbauversuche und die Charakterisierung der am Metabolismus beteiligten zentralen Enzyme zeigen, dass fuer das Abbaupotential der Mischkultur im wesentlichen die additiven Abbauleistungen der drei Reinkulturen Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subspecies dentrificans JH1, Pseudomonas stutzeri JH3 und Comamonas testosteroni JH5 verantwortlich sind. Der Abbau einiger Substratmischungen und die Vermeidung einer Anreicherung von Metaboliten in der Mischkultur sind jedoch nur durch eine Interaktion der Reinkulturen oder durch eine Beteiligung anderer nicht naeher untersuchter Organismen in der Mischkultur zu erklaeren. (orig.)

  14. Microbial fuel cells with highly active aerobic biocathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Edward M.; Popescu, Dorin; Curtis, Tom; Head, Ian M.; Scott, Keith; Yu, Eileen H.

    2016-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which convert organic waste to electricity, could be used to make the wastewater infrastructure more energy efficient and sustainable. However, platinum and other non-platinum chemical catalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of MFCs are unsustainable due to their high cost and long-term degradation. Aerobic biocathodes, which use microorganisms as the biocatalysts for cathode ORR, are a good alternative to chemical catalysts. In the current work, high-performing aerobic biocathodes with an onset potential for the ORR of +0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl were enriched from activated sludge in electrochemical half-cells poised at -0.1 and + 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Gammaproteobacteria, distantly related to any known cultivated gammaproteobacterial lineage, were identified as dominant in these working electrode biofilms (23.3-44.3% of reads in 16S rRNA gene Ion Torrent libraries), and were in very low abundance in non-polarised control working electrode biofilms (0.5-0.7%). These Gammaproteobacteria were therefore most likely responsible for the high activity of biologically catalysed ORR. In MFC tests, a high-performing aerobic biocathode increased peak power 9-fold from 7 to 62 μW cm-2 in comparison to an unmodified carbon cathode, which was similar to peak power with a platinum-doped cathode at 70 μW cm-2.

  15. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A; Graco, Michelle I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  16. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100% in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  17. Anaerobic microbial degradation of organochlorine insecticides Aldrin

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    Chiu, T.C.; Yen, J.H.; Wang, Y.S. [National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan)

    2004-09-15

    Aldrin (1,2,3,4,10,10-hexachloro-1,4,4a,5,8,8a-hexahydro-1,4-endo-exo-5,8-dimethanonnaphthalene), a cyclodiene organochlorine insecticide, was banned by nations and classified as B2 carcinogen by United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Because of its chemical stability and lipophilicity, aldrin is regarded as a persistent and recalcitrant compound. Aldrin is easily adsorbed to soil and sediment after spreading to the environments, furthermore, it may be accumulated in animal's tissue or milk and then cause adverse effects by food-chain. The dissipation process of aldrin in environments has continuously been paid much attention by researchers. In general, the dissipation of aldrin has been thought as relating to three mechanisms: photo-degradation, chemical hydrolysis, and microbial degradation. And it has been well known that microbial degradation is the most important agent for breakdown of organochlorine pesticides. There has been shown that aldrin could be transformed to its metabolites, such as dieldrin or photo-dieldrin, by microorganisms under aerobic conditions, however, limited information has been shown under anaerobic conditions. For this reason, the degradation potential of aldrin by anaerobic microorganisms obtained from indigenous river sediment was evaluated, and the effect of environmental factors such as temperatures and nutrients on the aldrin degradation was also investigated in this study.

  18. Aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid using activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Cheng, Ka Yu; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid (SA) by an acclimatized activated sludge. The sludge was enriched for over three months with SA (>500 mg/L) as the sole carbon and energy source and dissolved oxygen (DO, >5mg/L) as the primary electron acceptor. Effects of aeration rate (0-1.74 L/min), DO concentration (0-7 mg/L) and initial SA concentration (104-1085 mg/L) on SA biodegradation were quantified. A modified Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to obtain kinetic parameters of SA biodegradation and oxygen uptake rate (OUR). Positive linear correlations were obtained between OUR and SA degradation rate (R(2)≥ 0.91). Over time, the culture consumed more oxygen per SA degraded, signifying a gradual improvement in SA mineralization (mass ratio of O(2): SA at day 30, 60 and 120 were 0.44, 0.51 and 0.78, respectively). The concomitant release of near stoichiometric quantity of sulphate (3.2 mmol SO(4)(2-) released from 3.3 mmol SA) and the high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficacy (97.1%) indicated that the enriched microbial consortia could drive the overall SA oxidation close to a complete mineralization. In contrast to other pure-culture systems, the ammonium released from the SA oxidation was predominately converted into nitrate, revealing the presence of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the mixed culture. No apparent inhibitory effect of SA on the nitrification was noted. This work also indicates that aerobic SA biodegradation could be monitored by real-time DO measurement.

  19. Formation and functions of aerobic microbial granula; Entstehung und Funktionen aerober mikrobieller Granula

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    Etterer, T.; Wilderer, P.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Pruefamt fuer Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft

    1999-07-01

    The present project investigates the phenomenon of the formation of aerobic microbial granula and their properties. To generate granula, sequencing batch reactors fed in batches were used. As shown by microbiological assays, fungi played an above-average role in granula formation and build-up. In first degradation experiments, furthermore, chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be reduced by over 90 %. The determination yielded comparable values to activated sludge, standing on average at 1.044g/ml. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen des hier vorgestellten Projekts wurde das Phaenomen der Bildung aerober mikrobieller Granula sowie deren Eigenschaften untersucht. Zur Erzeugung von Granula wurden schubweise beschickte Reaktoren, sogenannte Sequencing-Batch-Reaktoren (SBR) verwendet. Wie mikrobiologische Untersuchungen zeigten spielen Pilze bei der Entstehung und beim Aufbau eine ueberdurchschnittliche Rolle. Des weiteren konnte in ersten Abbauversuchen der chemische Sauerstoff-Bedarf (CSB) um ueber 90% gesenkt werden. Die Dichtebestimmung ergab vergleichbare Werte zu Belebtschlamm und zwar im Durchschnitt 1,044 g/ml. (orig.)

  20. Microbial community degradation of widely used quaternary ammonium disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seungdae; Kurt, Zohre; Tsementzi, Despina; Weigand, Michael R; Kim, Minjae; Hatt, Janet K; Tandukar, Madan; Pavlostathis, Spyros G; Spain, Jim C; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2014-10-01

    Benzalkonium chlorides (BACs) are disinfectants widely used in a variety of clinical and environmental settings to prevent microbial infections, and they are frequently detected in nontarget environments, such as aquatic and engineered biological systems, even at toxic levels. Therefore, microbial degradation of BACs has important ramifications for alleviating disinfectant toxicity in nontarget environments as well as compromising disinfectant efficacy in target environments. However, how natural microbial communities respond to BAC exposure and what genes underlie BAC biodegradation remain elusive. Our previous metagenomic analysis of a river sediment microbial community revealed that BAC exposure selected for a low-diversity community, dominated by several members of the Pseudomonas genus that quickly degraded BACs. To elucidate the genetic determinants of BAC degradation, we conducted time-series metatranscriptomic analysis of this microbial community during a complete feeding cycle with BACs as the sole carbon and energy source under aerobic conditions. Metatranscriptomic profiles revealed a candidate gene for BAC dealkylation, the first step in BAC biodegradation that results in a product 500 times less toxic. Subsequent biochemical assays and isolate characterization verified that the putative amine oxidase gene product was functionally capable of initiating BAC degradation. Our analysis also revealed cooperative interactions among community members to alleviate BAC toxicity, such as the further degradation of BAC dealkylation by-products by organisms not encoding amine oxidase. Collectively, our results advance the understanding of BAC aerobic biodegradation and provide genetic biomarkers to assess the critical first step of this process in nontarget environments.

  1. Degradation of acid orange 7 in an aerobic biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Michael F; Kinkle, Brian K; Bishop, Paul L

    2002-01-01

    A stable microbial biofilm community capable of completely mineralizing the azo dye acid orange 7 (AO7) was established in a laboratory scale rotating drum bioreactor (RDBR) using waste liquor from a sewage treatment plant. A broad range of environmental conditions including pH (5.8-8.2), nitrification (0.0-4.0 mM nitrite), and aeration (0.2-6.2 mg O2 l(-1)) were evaluated for their effects on the biodegradation of AO7. Furthermore the biofilm maintained its biodegradative ability for over a year while the effects of these environmental conditions were evaluated. Reduction of the azo bond followed by degradation of the resulting aromatic amine appears to be the mechanism by which this dye is biodegraded. Complete loss of color, sulfanilic acid, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) indicate that AO7 is mineralized. To our knowledge this is the first reported occurrence of a sulfonated phenylazonaphthol dye being completely mineralized under aerobic conditions. Two bacterial strains (ICX and SAD4i) originally isolated from the RDBR were able to mineralize, in co-culture, up to 90% of added AO7. During mineralization of AO7, strain ICX reduces the azo bond under aerobic conditions and consumes the resulting cleavage product 1-amino-2-naphthol. Strain SAD4i consumes the other cleavage product, sulfanilic acid. The ability of the RDBR biofilm to aerobically mineralize an azo dye without exogenous carbon and nitrogen sources suggests that this approach could be used to remediate industrial wastewater contaminated with spent dye.

  2. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years.

  3. Effects of environmental conditions on aerobic degradation of a commercial naphthenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinley, Ciera M; Gaspari, Daniel P; McQueen, Andrew D; Rodgers, John H; Castle, James W; Friesen, Vanessa; Haakensen, Monique

    2016-10-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are problematic constituents in energy-derived waters, and aerobic degradation may provide a strategy for mitigating risks to aquatic organisms. The overall objective of this study was to determine the influence of concentrations of N (as ammonia) and P (as phosphate), and DO, as well as pH and temperatures on degradation of a commercial NA in bench-scale reactors. Commercial NAs provided replicable compounds necessary to compare influences of environmental conditions on degradation. NAs were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Microbial diversity and relative abundance were measured in treatments as explanatory parameters for potential effects of environmental conditions on microbial populations to support analytically measured NA degradation. Environmental conditions that positively influenced degradation rates of Fluka NAs included nutrients (C:N 10:1-500:1, C:P 100:1-5000:1), DO (4.76-8.43 mg L(-1)), pH (6-8), and temperature (5-25 °C). Approximately 50% removal of 61 ± 8 mg L(-1) was achieved in less than 2 d after NA introduction, achieving the method detection limit (5 mg L(-1)) by day 6 of the experiment in treatments with a C:N:P ratio of 100:10:1, DO > 8 mg L(-1), pH ∼8-9, and temperatures >23 °C. Microbial diversity was lowest in lower temperature treatments (6-16 °C), which may have resulted in observed slower NA degradation. Based on results from this study, when macro- and micronutrients were available, DO, pH, and temperature (within environmentally relevant ranges) influenced rates of aerobic degradation of Fluka NAs. This study could serve as a model for systematically evaluating environmental factors that influence NA degradation in field scenarios.

  4. Microbial degradation of clomazone under simulated California rice field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomco, Patrick L; Holstege, Dirk M; Zou, Wei; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2010-03-24

    Clomazone (trade names Cerano and Command) is a popular herbicide used on California rice fields to control aquatic weeds. Its physicochemical characteristics indicate that it will persist primarily in the water column, where microbial degradation may drive its environmental fate. The objectives were to determine microbial degradation rates and compare the metabolic products under aerobic and anaerobic conditions similar to those in California rice fields during the summer. Time-series samples were extracted and analyzed by LC/MS/MS. Metabolic profiling revealed the following clomazone-derived transitions: m/z 240 --> 125 (clomazone), m/z 242 --> 125 (ring-open clomazone), m/z 256 --> 125 (5-hydroxyclomazone), m/z 256 --> 141 (aromatic hydroxyclomazone), m/z 268 --> 125 (unknown metabolite), and m/z 272 --> 141 (4'5-dihydroxyclomazone). Results indicate an anaerobic half-life of 7.9 days, with ring-open clomazone reaching 67.4% of application at 38 days. Aerobically, clomazone degraded more slowly (t(1/2) = 47.3 days), forming mostly soil-bound residues. Thus, under summer conditions, clomazone is likely to dissipate rapidly from fields via anaerobic degradation.

  5. Nitroglycerin degradation mediated by soil organic carbon under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Bamba, Abraham N'Valoua; Blais, Jean-François; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2014-10-01

    The presence of nitroglycerin (NG) has been reported in shallow soils and pore water of several military training ranges. In this context, NG concentrations can be reduced through various natural attenuation processes, but these have not been thoroughly documented. This study aimed at investigating the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the natural attenuation of NG, under aerobic conditions typical of shallow soils. The role of SOM in NG degradation has already been documented under anoxic conditions, and was attributed to SOM-mediated electron transfer involving different reducing agents. However, unsaturated soils are usually well-oxygenated, and it was not clear whether SOM could participate in NG degradation under these conditions. Our results from batch- and column-type experiments clearly demonstrate that in presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) leached from a natural soil, partial NG degradation can be achieved. In presence of particulate organic matter (POM) from the same soil, complete NG degradation was achieved. Furthermore, POM caused rapid sorption of NG, which should result in NG retention in the organic matter-rich shallow horizons of the soil profile, thus promoting degradation. Based on degradation products, the reaction pathway appears to be reductive, in spite of the aerobic conditions. The relatively rapid reaction rates suggest that this process could significantly participate in the natural attenuation of NG, both on military training ranges and in contaminated soil at production facilities.

  6. Chemical and microbial community analysis during aerobic biostimulation assays of non-sulfonated alkyl-benzene-contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pascual, Eulàlia; Jiménez, Nuria; Vidal-Gavilan, Georgina; Viñas, Marc; Solanas, A M

    2010-10-01

    A chemical and microbial characterization of lab-scale biostimulation assays with groundwater samples taken from an industrial site in which the aquifer had been contaminated by linear non-sulfonate alkyl benzenes (LABs) was carried out for further field-scale bioremediation purposes. Two lab-scale biodegradability assays were performed, one with a previously obtained gas-oil-degrading consortium and another with the native groundwater flora. Results for the characterization of the groundwater microbial population of the site revealed the presence of an important LAB-degrading microbial population with a strong degrading capacity. Among the microorganisms identified at the site, the detection of Parvibaculum lavamentivorans, which have been described in other studies as alkyl benzene sulfonates degraders, is worth mentioning. Incubation of P. lavamentivorans DSMZ13023 with LABs as reported in this study shows for the first time the metabolic capacity of this strain to degrade such compounds. Results from the biodegradation assays in this study showed that the indigenous microbial population had a higher degrading capacity than the gas-oil-degrading consortium, indicating the strong ability of the native community to adapt to the presence of LABs. The addition of inorganic nutrients significantly improved the aerobic biodegradation rate, achieving levels of biodegradation close to 90%. The results of this study show the potential effectiveness of oxygen and nutrients as in situ biostimulation agents as well as the existence of a complex microbial community that encompasses well-known hydrocarbon- and LAS-degrading microbial populations in the aquifer studied.

  7. Ammonium-oxidizing bacteria facilitate aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2014-01-01

    Sulfanilic acid (SA) is a toxic sulfonated aromatic amine commonly found in anaerobically treated azo dye contaminated effluents. Aerobic acclimatization of SA-degrading mixed microbial culture could lead to co-enrichment of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) because of the concomitant release of ammonium from SA oxidation. To what extent the co-enriched AOB would affect SA oxidation at various ammonium concentrations was unclear. Here, a series of batch kinetic experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of AOB on aerobic SA degradation in an acclimatized activated sludge culture capable of oxidizing SA and ammonium simultaneously. To account for the effect of AOB on SA degradation, allylthiourea was used to inhibit AOB activity in the culture. The results indicated that specific SA degradation rate of the mixed culture was negatively correlated with the initial ammonium concentration (0-93 mM, R²= 0.99). The presence of AOB accelerated SA degradation by reducing the inhibitory effect of ammonium (≥ 10 mM). The Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to correlate substrate concentration (SA and ammonium) and oxygen uptake rate. This study revealed, for the first time, that AOB could facilitate SA degradation at high concentration of ammonium (≥ 10 mM) in an enriched activated sludge culture.

  8. Degradation of toxaphene in water during anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LacayoR, M; van Bavel, B; Mattiasson, B

    2004-08-01

    The degradation of technical toxaphene in water with two kinds of bioreactors operating in sequence was studied. One packed bed reactor was filled with Poraver (foam glass particles) running at anaerobic conditions and one suspended carrier biofilm reactor working aerobically. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), chloride, sulphate, pH, dissolved oxygen, total toxaphene and specific toxaphene isomers were measured. After 6 weeks approx. 87% of the total toxaphene was degraded reaching 98% by week 39. The majority of the conversion took place in the anaerobic reactor. The concentrations of toxaphene isomers with more chlorine substituents decreased more rapidly than for isomers with less chlorine substituents.

  9. Degradation of typical antibiotics during human feces aerobic composting under different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Honglei; Wang, Xiaochang C; Li, Qian; Jiang, Shanqing

    2016-08-01

    Four typical antibiotics were added to human feces for aerobic composting using batch reactors with sawdust as the bulk matrix. Under three composting temperatures (room temperature, 35 ± 2 °C and 55 ± 2 °C), decreases in the extractable concentrations of antibiotics in the compost were monitored for 20 days. As a result, the removals of extractable tetracycline and chlortetracycline were found to be more temperature-dependent than the removals of sulfadiazine and ciprofloxacin. However, more than 90 % of all of the extractable antibiotics were removed at 55 ± 2 °C. Three specific experiments were further conducted to identify the possible actions for antibiotic removal, including self-degradation in aqueous solution, composting with a moist sterile sawdust matrix without adding feces and composting with human feces and moist sterile sawdust. As a result, it was found that the removal of tetracycline and chlortetracycline was mainly due to chemical degradation in water, whereas the removal of sulfadiazine was mainly attributed to adsorption onto sawdust particles. The microbial activity of compost varied with temperature to a certain extent, but the differences were insignificant among different antibiotics. Although microbial action is important for organic matter decomposition, its contribution to antibiotic degradation was small for the investigated antibiotics, except for ciprofloxacin, which was degraded by up to 20 % due to microbial action.

  10. Anaerobic microbial degradation of organic pollutants with chlorate as electron acceptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehboob, F.

    2010-01-01

    Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons are two groups of compounds that are widespread pollutants. The aerobic microbial degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons proceeds in general fast and has been widely studied, while the biodegradation in anoxic environments is often incomplete, proceeds

  11. Enzymes and Genes Involved in Aerobic Alkane Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongze eShao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes , transport across cell membrane of alkanes , the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation.

  12. Aerobic degradation and photolysis of tylosin in water and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dingfei; Coats, Joel R

    2007-05-01

    Veterinary antibiotics enter the environment through the application of organic fertilizers to cropland. In this study, the aerobic degradation of tylosin, a widely used antibiotic in the production of livestock and poultry, was conducted in water and in soil in an effort to further investigate its environmental fate. Tylosin is a macrolide antibiotic, which consists of four factors (A, B, C, D). Water and soil were sampled at selected times and analyzed for tylosin and its degradation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with product identification confirmed by HPLC-mass spectrometry. Tylosin A is degraded with a half-life of 200 d in the light in water, and the total loss of tylosin A in the dark is 6% of the initial spiked amount during the experimental period. Tylosin C and D are relatively stable except in ultrapure water in the light. Slight increases of tylosin B after two months and formation of two photoreaction isomers of tylosin A were observed under exposure to light. However, tylosin probably would degrade faster if the experimental containers did not prevent ultraviolet transmission. In soil, tylosin A has a dissipation half-life of 7 d, and tylosin D is slightly more stable, with a dissipation half-life of 8 d in unsterilized and sterilized soil. Sorption and abiotic degradation are the major factors influencing the loss of tylosin in the environment, and no biotic degradation was observed at the test concentration either in pond water or in an agronomic soil, as determined by comparing dissipation profiles in sterilized and unsterilized conditions.

  13. Microbial Aspects of Anaerobic BTEX Degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Combined with conventional methods, developments in both geochemical (delineation of redox processes) and molecular microbial methods (analysis of 16S rDNA genes and functional genes) have allowed us to study in details microorganisms and genes involved in the anaerobic degradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) under specific redox conditions. This review summarizes recent research in this field. The potential for anaerobic BTEX degradation is widely spread. Specific groups of microorganisms appear to be involved in degradation under different redox conditions. Members of the Azoarcus/Thauera cluster perform BTEX degradation under denitrifying conditions, Geobacteraceae under Fe (III) reducing conditions and Desulfobacteriaceae under sulfate reducing conditions. The information so far obtained on biochemistry and molecular genetics of BTEX degradation indicates that each BTEX compound is funneled into the central benzyol-CoA pathway by a different peripheral pathway. The peripheral pathways of per BTEX compound show similarities among different physiological groups of microorganisms. We also describe how knowledge obtained on the microbial aspects of BTEX degradation can be used to enhance and monitor anaerobic BTEX degradation.

  14. Biological degradation of triclocarban and triclosan in a soil under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and comparison with environmental fate modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying Guangguo [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); CSIRO Land and Water, Adelaide Laboratory, PMB2, Glen Osmond SA 5064 (Australia)], E-mail: guang-guo.ying@gig.ac.cn; Yu Xiangyang [CSIRO Land and Water, Adelaide Laboratory, PMB2, Glen Osmond SA 5064 (Australia); Food Safety Research Institute, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Kookana, Rai S. [CSIRO Land and Water, Adelaide Laboratory, PMB2, Glen Osmond SA 5064 (Australia)

    2007-12-15

    Triclocarban and triclosan are two antimicrobial agents widely used in many personal care products. Their biodegradation behaviour in soil was investigated by laboratory degradation experiments and environmental fate modelling. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses showed that triclocarban and triclosan had a tendency to partition into soil or sediment in the environment. Fate modelling suggests that either triclocarban or triclosan 'does not degrade fast' with its primary biodegradation half-life of 'weeks' and ultimate biodegradation half-life of 'months'. Laboratory experiments showed that triclocarban and triclosan were degraded in the aerobic soil with half-life of 108 days and 18 days, respectively. No negative effect of these two antimicrobial agents on soil microbial activity was observed in the aerobic soil samples during the experiments. But these two compounds persisted in the anaerobic soil within 70 days of the experimental period. - Triclocarban and triclosan can be degraded by microbial processes in aerobic soil, but will persist in anaerobic soil.

  15. Aerobic degradation of N-methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA by Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357 isolated from soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlurrahman Khan

    Full Text Available N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source, was isolated from soil microcosms. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of the samples obtained from growth and resting cell studies showed the formation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA, 4-aminophenol (4-AP, and 1, 2, 4-benzenetriol (BT as major metabolic intermediates in the MNA degradation pathway. Enzymatic assay carried out on cell-free lysates of MNA grown cells confirmed N-demethylation reaction is the first step of MNA degradation with the formation of 4-NA and formaldehyde products. Flavin-dependent transformation of 4-NA to 4-AP in cell extracts demonstrated that the second step of MNA degradation is a monooxygenation. Furthermore, conversion of 4-AP to BT by MNA grown cells indicates the involvement of oxidative deamination (release of NH2 substituent reaction in third step of MNA degradation. Subsequent degradation of BT occurs by the action of benzenetriol 1, 2-dioxygenase as reported for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. This is the first report on aerobic degradation of MNA by a single bacterium along with elucidation of metabolic pathway.

  16. Aerobic Microbial Skin Flora in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaa M. Milyani

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The aerobic microbial skin flora of 40 healthy subjects living in Jeddah city (Saudi Arabia was determined. Two age groups: children and adults; including males and females were investigated. Seven sites were studied: forehead, axilla, chest, groin, leg, toe web and anterior nares. The skin was sampled by rubbing the chosen site with a surfactant substance (Tween 80 moistened cotton swab which was dipped back in the surfactant container and the resulted suspension was agitated for one minute. Thirty three microbial species were isolated from the seven sites of the study group, in which Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter lwoffii, corynebacterium species and Staphylococcus (Staph. aureus dominated among children (30% each. The most other prevalent isolates recovered were Alkaligenes species, Bacillus species, Chryseomonas luteola, Staph. epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staph. hominis (27.5% each. Organisms including Candida albicans, Enterobacter agglomerans, Escherichia coli, Flavobacterium meningosepticum, Klebsiella oxytoca, Micrococcus luteus, Micrococcus roseus, Micrococcus varians, Micrococcus species, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas paucimobilis, Pseudomonas fluorescence, Pseudomonas species, Staph. capitis, Staph. cohnii, Staph. saprophyticus, Staph. simulans, Staph. warneri, Staph. xylosus, viridans-type streptococcus and yeasts were also found in different percentage. Higher isolation rates of Acinetobacter lwoffii, Staph. aureus, Alkaligenes species, Corynebacterium species, Chryseomonas luteola, Enterobacter agglomerans, Staph. epidermidis and other coagulase negative Staphylococci were noted in children from the seven sites. However, Chryseomonas luteola, and Pseudomonas species, were found only in the groin area among males. Otherwise, no significant differences were recorded in the isolation rates from each site separately in relation to age and sex. The role of the isolated microorganisms

  17. Acetogenic microbial degradation of vinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    Under methanogenic conditions, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) resulted in significant (14 ?? 3% maximum recovery) but transient recovery of radioactivity as 14C-acetate. Subsequently, 14C- acetate was degraded to 14CH4 and 14CO2 (18 ?? 2% and 54 ?? 3% final recoveries, respectively). In contrast, under 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES) amended conditions, 14C-acetate recovery remained high (27 ?? 1% maximum recovery) throughout the study, no 14CH4 was produced, and the final recovery of 14CO2 was only 35 ?? 4%. These results demonstrate that oxidative acetogenesis may be an important mechanism for anaerobic VC biodegradation. Moreover, these results (1) demonstrate that microbial degradation of VC to CH4 and CO2 may involve oxidative acetogenesis followed by acetotrophic methanogenesis and (2) suggest that oxidative acetogenesis may be the initial step in the net oxidation of VC to CO2 reported previously under Fe(III)-reducing, SO4-reducing, and humic acids- reducing conditions.Under methanogenic conditions, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) resulted in significant (14 ?? 3% maximum recovery) but transient recovery of radioactivity as 14C-acetate. Subsequently, 14C-acetate was degraded to 14CH4 and 14CO2 (18 ?? 2% and 54 ?? 3% final recoveries respectively). In contrast, under 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES) amended conditions, 14C-acetate recovery remained high (27 ?? 1% maximum recovery) throughout the study, no 14CH4 was produced, and the final recovery of 14CO2 was only 35 ?? 4%. These results demonstrate that oxidative acetogenesis may be an important mechanism for anaerobic VC biodegradation. Moreover, these results (1) demonstrate that microbial degradation of VC to CH4 and CO2 may involve oxidative acetogenesis followed by acetotrophic methanogenesis and (2) suggest that oxidative acetogenesis may be the initial step in the net oxidation of VC to CO2 reported previously under Fe(III)-reducing, SO4-reducing, and

  18. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  19. Microbial Degradation of Aniline by Bacterial Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LONG WANG; ZE-YU MAO; WEI-ZHONG WU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of microbial degradation of aniline by a stable bacterial consortium. Methods The bacterial consortium was isolated from activated sludge treating chemical wastewater using aniline as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen by enrichment and isolation technique. The biomass was measured as optical density (OD) at 510 nm using a spectrophotometer. Aniline concentrations were determined by spectrophotometer. The intermediates of aniline degradation were identified by GC/MS method. Results The bacterial consortium could grow at a range of aniline concentrations between 50 and 500 mg/L. The optimal pH and temperature for aniline degradation were determined to be 7.0 and 30, respectively. The presence of NH4NO3 as an additional nitrogen source (100-500 mg/L) had no adverse effect on bacterial growth and aniline degradation. The presence of heavy metal ions, such as Co2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+ had an inhibitory effect on aniline degradation. Conclusions The isolated bacterial consortium candegrade aniline up to 500 mg/L effectively and tolerate some heavy metal ions that commonly exist in chemical wastewater. It has a potential to be applied in the practical treatment of aniline-containingwastewater.

  20. Effect of contaminant concentration on aerobic microbial mineralization of DCE and VC in stream-bed sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Discharge of DCE and VC to an aerobic surface water system simultaneously represents a significant environmental concern and, potentially, a non-engineered opportunity for efficient contaminant bioremediation. The potential for bioremediation, however, depends on the ability of the stream-bed microbial community to efficiently and completely degrade DCE and VC over a range of contaminant concentrations. The purposes of the studies reported here were to assess the potential for aerobic DCE and VC mineralization by stream-bed microorganisms and to evaluate the effects of DCE and VC concentrations on the apparent rates of aerobic mineralization. Bed-sediment microorganisms indigenous to a creek, where DCE-contaminated groundwater continuously discharges, demonstrated rapid mineralization of DCE and VC under aerobic conditions. Over 8 days, the recovery of [1,2-14C]DCE radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 17% to 100%, and the recovery of [1,2- 14C]VC radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 45% to 100%. Rates of DCE and VC mineralization increased significantly with increasing contaminant concentration, and the response of apparent mineralization rates to changes in DCE and VC concentrations was adequately described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics.Discharge of DCE and VC to an aerobic surface water system simultaneously represents a significant environmental concern and, potentially, a non-engineered opportunity for efficient contaminant bioremediation. The potential for bioremediation, however, depends on the ability of the stream-bed microbial community to efficiently and completely degrade DCE and VC over a range of contaminant concentrations. The purposes of the studies reported here were to assess the potential for aerobic DCE and VC mineralization by stream-bed microorganisms and to evaluate the effects of DCE and VC concentrations on the apparent rates of aerobic mineralization. Bed-sediment microorganisms indigenous to a creek, where DCE-contaminated groundwater

  1. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  2. The degradability of biodegradable plastics in aerobic and anaerobic waste landfill model reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Tomonori; Sugano, Wataru; Nakanishi, Akane; Tateda, Masafumi; Ike, Michihiko; Fujita, Masanori

    2004-01-01

    Degradabilities of four kinds of commercial biodegradable plastics (BPs), polyhydroxybutyrate and hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) plastic, polycaprolactone plastic (PCL), blend of starch and polyvinyl alcohol (SPVA) plastic and cellulose acetate (CA) plastic were investigated in waste landfill model reactors that were operated as anaerobically and aerobically. The application of forced aeration to the landfill reactor for supplying aerobic condition could potentially stimulate polymer-degrading microorganisms. However, the individual degradation behavior of BPs under the aerobic condition was completely different. PCL, a chemically synthesized BP, showed film breakage under the both conditions, which may have contributed to a reduction in the waste volume regardless of aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Effective degradation of PHBV plastic was observed in the aerobic condition, though insufficient degradation was observed in the anaerobic condition. But the aeration did not contribute much to accelerate the volume reduction of SPVA plastic and CA plastic. It could be said that the recalcitrant portions of the plastics such as polyvinyl alcohol in SPVA plastic and the highly substituted CA in CA plastic prevented the BP from degradation. These results indicated existence of the great variations in the degradability of BPs in aerobic and anaerobic waste landfills, and suggest that suitable technologies for managing the waste landfill must be combined with utilization of BPs in order to enhance the reduction of waste volume in landfill sites.

  3. Microbial transformation of 8:2 fluorotelomer acrylate and methacrylate in aerobic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Laurel A; Lee, Linda S; Russell, Mark H; Nies, Loring F; Turco, Ronald F

    2015-06-01

    Biotransformation of fluorotelomer (FT) compounds, such as 8:2 FT alcohol (FTOH) is now recognized to be a source of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) as well as other perfluoroalkyl acids. In this study, microbially mediated hydrolysis of FT industrial intermediates 8:2 FT acrylate (8:2 FTAC) and 8:2 FT methacrylate (8:2 FTMAC) was evaluated in aerobic soils for up to 105d. At designated times, triplicate microcosms were sacrificed by sampling the headspace for volatile FTOHs followed by sequential extraction of soil for the parent monomers as well as transient and terminal degradation products. Both FTAC and FTMAC were hydrolyzed at the ester linkage as evidenced by 8:2 FTOH production. 8:2 FTAC and FTMAC degraded rapidly with half-lives ⩽5d and 15d, respectively. Maximum 8:2 FTOH levels were 6-13mol% within 3-6d. Consistent with the known biotransformation pathway of 8:2 FTOH, FT carboxylic acids and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids were subsequently generated including up to 10.3mol% of PFOA (105d). A total mass balance (parent plus metabolites) of 50-75mol% was observed on the last sampling day. 7:2 sFTOH, a direct precursor to PFOA, unexpectedly increased throughout the incubation period. The likely, but unconfirmed, concomitant production of acrylic acids was proposed as altering expected degradation patterns. Biotransformation of 8:2 FTAC, 8:2 FTMAC, and previously reported 8:2 FT-stearate for the same soils revealed the effect of the non-fluorinated terminus group linked to the FT chain on the electronic differences that affect microbially-mediated ester cleavage rates.

  4. Microbial Degradation of Organic Wastes at Low Temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Ramana

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial degradation of organic wastes mainly comprising animal and human wastes, is drastically reduced at extreme low temperatures. For the biodegradation of these wastes, technological inputs are required from disciplines like microbiology, biochemistry, molecular biology, digester modelling and heat transfer at extreme low temperature climates. Various steps in the process of biodegradation have to be studied to formulate an effective organic waste disposal method. Anaerobic digestion of organic wastes is preferred over aerobic waste treatment method, since it yields biogas as a by-product, which in turn can be utilised for heating the digester contents to increase its efficiency. Furthermore, one of the possibilities that can be explored is the utilisation of high rate anaerobic digesters which maintain temperature by means of artificial heating. It is either met by non-conventional energy sources, such as solar and wind energy, or by expending liquid fuels. In addition, insulation of the digester with polymeric materials and immobilisation of slow growing bacterial population may enhance the digester performance to a great extent. In spite of several developments, inoculum adaptation is considered to be one of the essential steps for low temperature anaerobic digestion to obtain methane as a by-product. With advancements in recombinant DNA technology, it may be possible to increase the efficiency of various microbial population that take part in the anaerobic digestion. However, till date, the options available for low temperature biodegradation are digester insulation, inoculum adaptation, and use of high rate/second-generation digesters.

  5. Microbially influenced degradation of concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.

    1998-03-01

    Steel reinforced concrete is the most widely used construction material in the world. The economic costs of repair or replacement of environmentally damaged concrete structures is astronomical. For example, half of the concrete bridges in the Federal Department of Transportation highway system are in need of major repairs. Microbially influenced degradation of concrete (MID) is one of the recognized degradative processes known to adversely affect concrete integrity. It is not possible to assign a specific percent of effect to any of these processes. However, MID has been shown to be as aggressive as any of the physical/chemical phenomena. In addition, the possibility exists that there is a synergism which results in cumulative effects from all the processes. Three groups of bacteria are known to promote MID. Of these, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are the most aggressive. Much is known about the nutritional needs of these bacteria. However, there has not been a biological linkage established between the presence of environmental, polluting sulfur sources and the degradation of concrete structures. It has been shown that the environmental pollutants sulfur dioxide and sulfite can be utilized by active SOB for the biological production of sulfuric acid. Therefore, it is not a reach of reality to assume that SOB exposed to these pollutants could have a major impact on the degradation of concrete structures. But, until the environment sulfur loop is closed it will not be possible to calculate how important SOB activity is in initiating and promoting damage.

  6. The lack of microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal-rich soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achten, C.; Cheng, S.B.; Straub, K.L.; Hofmann, T. [University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-02-02

    Analytical techniques used to assess the environmental risk of contamination from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) typically consider only abiotic sample parameters. Supercritical fluid extraction and sorption enthalpy experiments previously suggested slow desorption rates for PAH compounds in two coal-contaminated floodplain soils. In this study, the actual PAH availability for aerobic soil microorganisms was tested in two series of soil-slurry experiments. The experimental conditions supported microbial degradation of phenanthrene if it was weakly sorbed onto silica gel. Native coals and coal-derived particles in two soils effectively acted as very strong sorbents and prevented microbial PAH degradation. The long history of PAH exposure and degree of coal contamination apparently had no influence on the capability of the microbial soil community to overcome constraints of PAH availability. Within the context of the experimental conditions and the compounds chosen, our results confirm that coal-bound PAHs are not bioavailable and hence of low environmental concern.

  7. Physiological and functional diversity of phenol degraders isolated from phenol-grown aerobic granules: Phenol degradation kinetics and trichloroethylene co-metabolic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic granule is a novel form of microbial aggregate capable of degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. Aerobic granules have been formed on phenol as the growth substrate, and used to co-metabolically degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), a synthetic solvent not supporting aerobic microbial growth. Granule formation process, rate limiting factors and the comprehensive toxic effects of phenol and TCE had been systematically studied. To further explore their potential at the level of microbial population and functions, phenol degraders were isolated and purified from mature granules in this study. Phenol and TCE degradation kinetics of 15 strains were determined, together with their TCE transformation capacities and other physiological characteristics. Isolation in the presence of phenol and TCE exerted stress on microbial populations, but the procedure was able to preserve their diversity. Wide variation was found with the isolates' kinetic behaviors, with the parameters often spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Haldane kinetics described phenol degradation well, and the isolates exhibited actual maximum phenol-dependent oxygen utilization rates of 9-449 mg DO g DW(-1) h(-1), in phenol concentration range of 4.8-406 mg L(-1). Both Michaelis-Menten and Haldane types were observed for TCE transformation, with the actual maximum rate of 1.04-21.1 mg TCE g DW(-1) h(-1) occurring between TCE concentrations of 0.42-4.90 mg L(-1). The TCE transformation capacities and growth yields on phenol ranged from 20-115 mg TCE g DW(-1) and 0.46-1.22 g DW g phenol(-1), respectively, resulting in TCE transformation yields of 10-70 mg TCE g phenol(-1). Contact angles of the isolates were between 34° and 82°, suggesting both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cell surface. The diversity in the isolates is a great advantage, as it enables granules to be versatile and adaptive under different operational conditions.

  8. Effect of Elevated Salt Concentrations on the Aerobic Granular Sludge Process: Linking Microbial Activity with Microbial Community Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassin, J.P.; Pronk, M.; Muyzer, G.; Kleerebezem, R.; Dezotti, M.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The long- and short-term effects of salt on biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal processes were studied in an aerobic granular sludge reactor. The microbial community structure was investigated by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on 16S rRNA and amoA genes. PCR products obtai

  9. Bioaugmentation and enhanced formation of microbial granules used in aerobic wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, V.; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Tay, S.T.L.; Tay, Joo-Hwa [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-04-15

    Microbial aggregates of an aerobic granular sludge can be used for the treatment of industrial or municipal wastewater, but their formation from a microbial activated sludge requires several weeks. Therefore, the aim of this research was the selection of microbial cultures to shorten the granule-forming period from several weeks to a few days. An enrichment culture with the ability to accelerate granulation was obtained by repeating the selection and batch cultivation of fast-settling microbial aggregates isolated from the aerobic granular sludge. Bacterial cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain B and Pseudomonas veronii strain F, with self-aggregation indexes of 65 and 51%, respectively, and a coaggregation index of 58%, were isolated from the enrichment culture. A mixture of these strains with the activated sludge was used as an inocolum in an experimental sequencing batch reactor to start up an aerobic granulation process. Aerobic granules with a mean diameter of 446{+-}76 {mu}m were formed in an experiment after 8 days of cultivation, but microbial granules were absent in controls. Considering biosafety issues, K. pneumoniae strain B was excluded from further studies, but P. veronii strain F was selected for larger-scale testing. (orig.)

  10. Bioaugmentation and enhanced formation of microbial granules used in aerobic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Tay, Stephen Tiong-Lee; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2006-04-01

    Microbial aggregates of an aerobic granular sludge can be used for the treatment of industrial or municipal wastewater, but their formation from a microbial activated sludge requires several weeks. Therefore, the aim of this research was the selection of microbial cultures to shorten the granule-forming period from several weeks to a few days. An enrichment culture with the ability to accelerate granulation was obtained by repeating the selection and batch cultivation of fast-settling microbial aggregates isolated from the aerobic granular sludge. Bacterial cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain B and Pseudomonas veronii strain F, with self-aggregation indexes of 65 and 51%, respectively, and a coaggregation index of 58%, were isolated from the enrichment culture. A mixture of these strains with the activated sludge was used as an inoculum in an experimental sequencing batch reactor to start up an aerobic granulation process. Aerobic granules with a mean diameter of 446+/-76 microm were formed in an experiment after 8 days of cultivation, but microbial granules were absent in controls. Considering biosafety issues, K. pneumoniae strain B was excluded from further studies, but P. veronii strain F was selected for larger-scale testing.

  11. Degradation of municipal solid waste in simulated landfill bioreactors under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, Radoslaw; Krzystek, Liliana; Ledakowicz, Stanislaw

    2015-09-01

    In this study the municipal solid waste degradation processes in simulated landfill bioreactors under aerobic and anaerobic conditions is investigated. The effect of waste aeration on the dynamics of the aerobic degradation processes in lysimeters as well as during anaerobic processes after completion of aeration is presented. The results are compared with the anaerobic degradation process to determine the stabilization stage of waste in both experimental modes. The experiments in aerobic lysimeters were carried out at small aeration rate (4.41⋅10(-3)lmin(-1)kg(-1)) and for two recirculation rates (24.9 and 1.58lm(-3)d(-1)). The change of leachate and formed gases composition showed that the application of even a small aeration rate favored the degradation of organic matter. The amount of CO2 and CH4 released from anaerobic lysimeter was about 5 times lower than that from the aerobic lysimeters. Better stabilization of the waste was obtained in the aerobic lysimeter with small recirculation, from which the amount of CO2 produced was larger by about 19% in comparison with that from the aerobic lysimeter with large leachate recirculation.

  12. Isolation and Characteristics of a Microbial Consortium for Effectively Degrading Phenanthrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Xu Hongke; Guo Shaohui

    2007-01-01

    A microbial consortium (named W4) capable of aerobic biodegradation of solid phenanthrene as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment from petroleum-contaminated soil in the Henan oilfield,China. The strains of the consortium were identified as Sphingomonas cloacae, Rhizobium sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter xylosoxidans respectively by means of genetic methods. The major metabolites of phenanthrene were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The biodegradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 7 days of growth was greater than 99%. The degradation of phenanthrene was compared between individual predominant strains and the microbial consortium in different treatment processes. The microbial consortium showed a significant improvement of phenanthrene degradation rates in either static or shaking culture. The degradation percentage of phenanthrene by the consortium W4 decreased to some degree when C 16 coexisted, however it was hardly affected by C30. Furthermore, the ability of consortium W4 to remediate oil sludge from the Dagang oil refinery was studied by composting; and it was found that the consortium W4 could obviously remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and paraffinic hydrocarbons. All the results indicated that the microbial consortium W4 had a promising application in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments and could be potentially used in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

  13. Aerobic degradation potential of the herbicides mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone in groundwater from chalk aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Suzi; Hybel, Anne-Marie; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup;

    2011-01-01

    The aerobic degradation potential of mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone was studied at concentration of 1 μg/L in laboratory batch experiments with groundwater from chalk aquifers. Within the incubation period of 129 days, 14C-mecoprop concentration decreased to 60-80% in the microcosms with gro......The aerobic degradation potential of mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone was studied at concentration of 1 μg/L in laboratory batch experiments with groundwater from chalk aquifers. Within the incubation period of 129 days, 14C-mecoprop concentration decreased to 60-80% in the microcosms...

  14. Microbial degradation of pyridine using Pseudomonas sp. and isolation of plasmid responsible for degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S Venkata; Sistla, Srinivas; Guru, R Kumar; Prasad, K Krishna; Kumar, C Suresh; Ramakrishna, S V; Sarma, P N

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas (PI2) capable of degrading pyridine was isolated from the mixed population of the activated sludge unit which was being used for treating complex effluents, the strain was characterized. Aerobic degradation of pyridine was studied with the isolated strain and the growth parameters were evaluated. Pyridine degradation was further conformed by chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The process parameters like biomass growth and dissolved oxygen consumption were monitored during pyridine degradation. In order to conform with the plasmid capability to degrade pyridine, the requisite plasmid was isolated and transferred to DH 5alpha Escherichia coli. The subsequent biodegradation studies revealed the ability of the transformed plasmid capability to degrade the pyridine.

  15. Enhanced aerobic degradation of 4-chlorophenol with iron-nickel nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenjuan; Mu, Yi; Wang, Bingning; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the bimetallic iron-nickel nanoparticles (nZVIN) possessed an enhanced performance in comparison with nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) on aerobic degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). The 4-CP degradation rate constant in the aerobic nZVIN process (nZVIN/Air) was 5 times that in the classic nZVI counterpart system (nZVI/Air). Both reactive oxygen species measurement and inhibition experimental results suggested that hydroxyl radicals were the major active species contributed to aerobic 4-CP degradation with nZVI, on contrast, superoxide radicals predominated the 4-CP degradation in the nZVIN/Air process. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis indicated the intermediates of the nZVI/Air system were p-benzoquinone and hydroquinone, which were resulted from the bond cleavage between the chlorine and carbon atom in the benzene ring by hydroxyl radicals. However, the primary intermediates of 4-CP found in the nZVIN/Air system were phenol via the direct dechlorination by superoxide radicals, accompanying with the formation of chloride ions. On the base of experimental results, a superoxide radicals mediated enhancing mechanism was proposed for the aerobic degradation of 4-CP in the nZVIN/Air system. This study provides new insight into the role of bimetallic nickel on enhancing removal of organic pollutants with nZVI.

  16. The impact of nanoparticles on aerobic degradation of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici Guvenc, Senem; Alan, Burcu; Adar, Elanur; Bilgili, Mehmet Sinan

    2017-04-01

    The amount of nanoparticles released from industrial and consumer products has increased rapidly in the last decade. These products may enter landfills directly or indirectly after the end of their useful life. In order to determine the impact of TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles on aerobic landfilling processes, municipal solid waste was loaded to three pilot-scale aerobic landfill bioreactors (80 cm diameter and 350 cm height) and exposed to TiO2 (AT) and Ag (AA) nanoparticles at total concentrations of 100 mg kg(-1) of solid waste. Aerobic landfill bioreactors were operated under the conditions about 0.03 L min(-1) kg(-1) aeration rate for 250 days, during which the leachate, solid waste, and gas characteristics were measured. The results indicate that there was no significant difference in the leachate characteristics, gas constituents, solid quality parameters, and temperature variations, which are the most important indicators of landfill operations, and overall aerobic degradation performance between the reactors containing TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles, and control (AC) reactor. The data also indicate that the pH levels, ionic strength, and the complex formation capacity of nanoparticles with Cl(-) ions can reduce the toxicity effects of nanoparticles on aerobic degradation processes. The results suggest that TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles at concentrations of 100 mg kg(-1) of solid waste do not have significant impacts on aerobic biological processes and waste management systems.

  17. Aerobic biofilters with small synthetic grains for demostric wastewater treatment: kinetics, efficiency and microbial deviersity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacheva, M.; Moeller-Chavez, G.; Hornelas-Orozco, Y.; Bustos, C.

    2009-07-01

    The aerobic biofilters with submerged packaed bed are able to retain a large biomass quantity, which makes them compact and suitable for samll wastewater treatment plants. The characteristics of the packed bed determine the structure of the formed biofilms, the operation mode and the effectiveness. The objective of this work was to compare the biofilm kinetics and the microbial diversity in three aerobic biofilters packed with grains 3.0-4.5 mm) made of high and of low density polyethylene (HDPE and LDPE), and of polypropyline (PP). The experimental work was carried out using three 20 L reactors, operated in downflow mode. (Author)

  18. Degradation of alkenones by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria: Selective or not ?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rontani, J-F.; Harji, R.; Guasco, S.; Prahl, F.G.; Volkman, J.K.; Bhosle, N.B.; Bonin, P.

    of alkenones by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria: selective or not? Jean-François Rontani a *, Ranjita Harji a,b , Sophie Guasco a , Fredrick G. Prahl c , John K. Volkman d , Narayan B. Bhosle b , Patricia Bonin a a Laboratoire de Microbiologie de..., Corvallis, OR 97331-5503, US. d CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia * Corresponding author. Tel.: +33-4-91-82-96-51; fax: +33-4-91-82-96-41. E-mail address: jean-francois.rontani@com.univmed.fr (J...

  19. Microbial electricity generation enhances decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonggang; Xu, Meiying; He, Zhili; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guoping; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-01-01

    Due to environmental persistence and biotoxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), it is urgent to develop potential technologies to remediate PBDEs. Introducing electrodes for microbial electricity generation to stimulate the anaerobic degradation of organic pollutants is highly promising for bioremediation. However, it is still not clear whether the degradation of PBDEs could be promoted by this strategy. In this study, we hypothesized that the degradation of PBDEs (e.g., BDE-209) would be enhanced under microbial electricity generation condition. The functional compositions and structures of microbial communities in closed-circuit microbial fuel cell (c-MFC) and open-circuit microbial fuel cell (o-MFC) systems for BDE-209 degradation were detected by a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 4.0, and linked with PBDE degradations. The results indicated that distinctly different microbial community structures were formed between c-MFCs and o-MFCs, and that lower concentrations of BDE-209 and the resulting lower brominated PBDE products were detected in c-MFCs after 70-day performance. The diversity and abundance of a variety of functional genes in c-MFCs were significantly higher than those in o-MFCs. Most genes involved in chlorinated solvent reductive dechlorination, hydroxylation, methoxylation and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in c-MFCs and significantly positively correlated with the removal of PBDEs. Various other microbial functional genes for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycling, as well as energy transformation process, were also significantly increased in c-MFCs. Together, these results suggest that PBDE degradation could be enhanced by introducing the electrodes for microbial electricity generation and by specifically stimulating microbial functional genes.

  20. Microbial electricity generation enhances decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209 degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Yang

    Full Text Available Due to environmental persistence and biotoxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, it is urgent to develop potential technologies to remediate PBDEs. Introducing electrodes for microbial electricity generation to stimulate the anaerobic degradation of organic pollutants is highly promising for bioremediation. However, it is still not clear whether the degradation of PBDEs could be promoted by this strategy. In this study, we hypothesized that the degradation of PBDEs (e.g., BDE-209 would be enhanced under microbial electricity generation condition. The functional compositions and structures of microbial communities in closed-circuit microbial fuel cell (c-MFC and open-circuit microbial fuel cell (o-MFC systems for BDE-209 degradation were detected by a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 4.0, and linked with PBDE degradations. The results indicated that distinctly different microbial community structures were formed between c-MFCs and o-MFCs, and that lower concentrations of BDE-209 and the resulting lower brominated PBDE products were detected in c-MFCs after 70-day performance. The diversity and abundance of a variety of functional genes in c-MFCs were significantly higher than those in o-MFCs. Most genes involved in chlorinated solvent reductive dechlorination, hydroxylation, methoxylation and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in c-MFCs and significantly positively correlated with the removal of PBDEs. Various other microbial functional genes for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycling, as well as energy transformation process, were also significantly increased in c-MFCs. Together, these results suggest that PBDE degradation could be enhanced by introducing the electrodes for microbial electricity generation and by specifically stimulating microbial functional genes.

  1. Kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin; Xu Hongke; An Mingquan; Yan Guiwen

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium W4 isolated from Henan Oilfield were investigated. The degradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 6 days of incubation was higher than 95% under the condition of 37 ℃ and 120 r/min by this microbial consortium. The degradation of phenanthrene could be fitted to a first-order kinetic model with the half-life of 1.25 days. The optimum conditions for degradation of phenanthrene by consortium W4 were as follows: temperature about 37 ℃, pH from 6.0 to 7.0 and salinity about 8.0 g/L.It was concluded that microbial consortium W4 might degrade phenanthrene via both salicylic acid and o-phthalic acid pathways by analyzing products with GC-MS.

  2. Variability of Biological Degradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an Aerobic Aquifer Determined by Laboratory Batch Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    The biological aerobic degradation of 7 aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, o-xylene, p-dichlorobenzene, o-dichlorobenzene, naphthalene and biphenyl) was studied for 149 days in replicate laboratory batch experiments with groundwater and sediment from 8 localities representing a 15 m × 30 m...

  3. Recent advances in microbial raw starch degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyan; Zhao, Pingjuan; Ge, Xiangyang; Xia, Yongjun; Hao, Zhikui; Liu, Jianwen; Peng, Ming

    2010-02-01

    Raw starch degrading enzymes (RSDE) refer to enzymes that can directly degrade raw starch granules below the gelatinization temperature of starch. These promising enzymes can significantly reduce energy and simplify the process in starch industry. RSDE are ubiquitous and produced by plants, animals, and microorganisms. However, microbial sources are the most preferred one for large-scale production. During the past few decades, RSDE have been studied extensively. This paper reviews the recent development in the production, purification, properties, and application of microbial RSDE. This is the first review on microbial RSDE to date.

  4. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Harb, Moustapha

    2016-07-09

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower.

  5. Chromium Isotope Behaviour During Aerobic Microbial Reduction Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Amor, K.; Porcelli, D.; Thompson, I.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial activity is a very important, and possibly even the dominant, reduction mechanism for many metals in natural water systems. Isotope fractionations during microbial metal reduction can reflect one major mechanism in metal cycling in the environment, and isotopic signatures can be used to identify and quantify reduction processes during biogeochemical cycling in the present environment as well as in the past. There are many Cr (VI)-reducing bacteria that have been discovered and isolated from the environment, and Cr isotopes were found to be fractionated during microbial reduction processes. In this study, Cr reduction experiments have been undertaken to determine the conditions under which Cr is reduced and the corresponding isotope signals that are generated. The experiments have been done with a facultative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300, and several parameters that have potential impact on reduction mechanisms have been investigated. Electron donors are important for bacteria growth and metabolism. One factor that can control the rate of Cr reduction is the nature of the electron donor. The results show that using citrate as an electron donor can stimulate bacteria reduction activity to a large extent; the reduction rate is much higher (15.10 mgˑL-1hour-1) compared with experiments using glucose (6.65 mgˑL-1ˑhour-1), acetate (4.88 mgˑL-1hour-1) or propionate (4.85 mgˑL-1hour-1) as electron donors. Groups with higher electron donor concentrations have higher reduction rates. Chromium is toxic, and when increasing Cr concentrations in the medium, the bacteria reduction rate is also higher, which reflects bacteria adapting to the toxic environment. In the natural environment, under different pH conditions, bacteria may metabolise in different ways. In our experiments with pH, bacteria performed better in reducing Cr (VI) when pH = 8, and there are no significant differences between groups with pH = 4 or pH = 6. To investigate this further, Cr

  6. Determining potential for microbial atrazine degradation in agricultural drainage ditches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Heather L; Khalid, Sheza; Jackson, Colin R; Moore, Matthew T

    2013-01-01

    Passage of agricultural runoff through vegetated drainage ditches has been shown to reduce the amount of pesticides, such as atrazine, exiting out of agricultural watersheds. Previous studies have found that microbial communities in soil from fields treated with atrazine display enhanced rates of atrazine degradation. However, no studies have examined the potential for atrazine degradation in ditches used to drain these lands. The purpose of the current study was to determine the potential of the drainage ditch soil microbial community for atrazine degradation. Soil samples were collected from fields and adjacent drainage ditches and from nonagricultural land with no previous exposure to atrazine. Polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated widespread presence of atrazine degradation genes in fields and ditches. Potential for degradation was determined by following the decrease of atrazine in spiked soil samples over a 28-d incubation period. Greater than 95% of atrazine was degraded in field and ditch soils, whereas only 68.5 ± 1.3% was degraded in the nonagricultural control. Comparison with autoclaved soil samples indicated the primary mechanism of atrazine degradation in agricultural soils was microbially mediated, whereas its breakdown in nonagricultural soil appeared to be the byproduct of abiotic processes. Therefore, microbial communities in drainage ditch sediments have the potential to play a role in atrazine removal from agricultural runoff by breaking down atrazine deposited in sediments and limiting the amount of this herbicide carried into downstream ecosystems.

  7. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene Mark;

    2015-01-01

    denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off...... suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein....

  8. Microbial degradation of chloroethenes in groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.

    The chloroethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are among the most common contaminants detected in groundwater systems. As recently as 1980, the consensus was that chloroethene compounds were not significantly biodegradable in groundwater. Consequently, efforts to remediate chloroethene-contaminated groundwater were limited to largely unsuccessful pump-and-treat attempts. Subsequent investigation revealed that under reducing conditions, aquifer microorganisms can reductively dechlorinate PCE and TCE to the less chlorinated daughter products dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Although recent laboratory studies conducted with halorespiring microorganisms suggest that complete reduction to ethene is possible, in the majority of groundwater systems reductive dechlorination apparently stops at DCE or VC. However, recent investigations conducted with aquifer and stream-bed sediments have demonstrated that microbial oxidation of these reduced daughter products can be significant under anaerobic redox conditions. The combination of reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE under anaerobic conditions followed by anaerobic microbial oxidation of DCE and VC provides a possible microbial pathway for complete degradation of chloroethene contaminants in groundwater systems. Résumé Les chloroéthanes, tétrachloroéthane (PCE) et trichloroéthane (TCE) sont parmi les polluants les plus communs trouvés dans les aquifères. Depuis les années 1980, on considère que les chloroéthanes ne sont pas significativement biodégradables dans les aquifères. Par conséquent, les efforts pour dépolluer les nappes contaminées par des chloroéthanes se sont limités à des tentatives de pompage-traitement globalement sans succès. Des travaux ultérieurs ont montré que dans des conditions réductrices, des micro-organismes présents dans les aquifères peuvent, par réduction, dégrader les PCE et TCE en composés moins chlorés, comme le dichlor

  9. Microbial PAH-Degradation in Soil: Degradation Pathways and Contributing Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu-Xiang; CHENG Shu-Pei; ZHU Cheng-Jun; SUN Shi-Lei

    2006-01-01

    Adverse effects on the environment and high persistence in the microbial degradation and environmental fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are motivating interest. Many soil microorganisms can degrade PAHs and use various metabolic pathways to do so. However, both the physio-chemical characteristics of compounds as well as the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils can drastically influence the degradation capacity of naturally occurring microorganisms for field bioremediation. Modern biological techniques have been widely used to promote the efficiency of microbial PAH-degradation and make the biodegradation metabolic pathways more clear. In this review microbial degradation of PAHs in soil is discussed, with emphasis placed on the main degradation pathways and the environmental factors affecting biodegradation.

  10. Aerobic Microbial Community of Insectary Population of Phlebotomus papatasi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseh Maleki-Ravasan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbes particularly bacteria presenting in the gut of haematophagous insects may have an important role in the epidemiology of human infectious disease.The microbial flora of gut and surrounding environmental of a laboratory strain of Phlebotomus papatasi, the main vector of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ZCL in the old world, was investigated. Biochemical reactions and 16s rDNA sequencing of the isolated bacteria against 24 sugars and amino acids were used for bacteria species identification. Common mycological media used for fungi identification as well.Most isolates belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae, a large, heterogeneous group of gram-negative rods whose natural habitat is the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Enterobacteriaceae groups included Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Kluyvera, Leminorella, Pantoea, Proteus, Providencia, Rahnella, Serratia, Shigella, Tatumella, and Yersinia and non Enterobacteriaceae groups included Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas. The most prevalent isolates were Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris. These saprophytic and swarming motile bacteria were isolated from all immature, pupae, and mature fed or unfed male or female sand flies as well as from larval and adult food sources. Five fungi species were also isolated from sand flies, their food sources and colonization materials where Candida sp. was common in all mentioned sources.Midgut microbiota are increasingly seen as an important factor for modulating vector competence in insect vectors so their possible effects of the mirobiota on the biology of P. papatasi and their roles in the sandfly-Leishmania interaction are discussed.

  11. Electrical stimulation of microbial PCB degradation in sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan Lan; Payne, Rayford B; Sowers, Kevin R; May, Harold D

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been precluded in part by the lack of a cost-effective method to stimulate microbial degradation in situ. A common limitation is the lack of an effective method of providing electron donors and acceptors to promote in situ PCB biodegradation. Application of an electric potential to soil/sediment could be an effective means of providing electron-donors/-acceptors to PCB dechlorinating and degrading microorganisms. In this study, electrical stimulation of microbial PCB dechlorination/degradation was examined in sediment maintained under simulated in situ conditions. Voltage was applied to open microcosms filled with PCB-impacted (Aroclor 1242) freshwater sediment from a Superfund site (Fox River, WI). The effect of applied low voltages (1.5-3.0 V) on the microbial transformation of PCBs was determined with: 1) spiked PCBs, and 2) indigenous weathered PCBs. The results indicate that both oxidative and reductive microbial transformation of the spiked PCBs was stimulated but oxidation was dominant and most effective with higher voltage. Chlorobenzoates were produced as oxidation metabolites of the spiked PCBs, but increasing voltage enhanced chlorobenzoate consumption, indicating that overall degradation was enhanced. In the case of weathered PCBs, the total concentration decreased 40-60% in microcosms exposed to electric current while no significant decrease of PCB concentration was observed in control reactors (0 V or sterilized). Single congener analysis of the weathered PCBs showed significant loss of di- to penta-chlorinated congeners, indicating that microbial activity was not limited to anaerobic dechlorination of only higher chlorinated congeners. Degradation was most apparent with the application of only 1.5 V where anodic O(2) was not generated, indicating a mechanism of degradation independent of electrolytic O(2). Low voltage stimulation of the microbial degradation of weathered PCBs observed in this

  12. Degradation of 1-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) urea by nanoscale zerovalent iron under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haiying; Hou, Shaogang; Xie, Guohong; Yao, Ziwei; Zhou, Qingxiang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of present study was to investigate the applicability of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) on the degradation of 1-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) urea (CCU) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The experimental results showed that NZVI could effectively degrade CCU, but the removal efficiencies were different under these two different conditions. The best removal efficiencies for CCU were 90.2 and 75.8% under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The highly oxidative hydroxyl radicals and reductively hydrogen would account for the rapid degradation of CCU under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The experimental results also showed that surfactant Tween 20 significantly inhibited the degradation of CCU under aerobic conditions. However it markedly enhanced the degradation of CCU under anaerobic condition.

  13. Microbial flora studies in thermophilic aerobic sludge treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnleitner, B.; Fiechter, A.

    1985-01-01

    The active biomass in thermophilic aerated sewage sludge was analyzed during a period of more than two years under the following aspects: the viable cell counts of neutrophilic thermophiles (when determined at the actual sludge temperature) varied up to five orders of magnitude during the observation period: there were always acidophilic and alkalophilic thermophiles present, however, at lower concentrations. The thermal distribution of microorganisms was always very extremely broad (eury-thermal), ranging from psychrophiles to bacteria capable of growth around 80 degrees C. The percentage of thermophiles able to degrade polymers was usually high, occasionally up to 100%. Stability of thermophilic populations was high, even after drastic changes of cultural parameters, i.e., either temperature, mean hydraulic retention time, or aeration rate. A representative subset of thermophilic isolates was characterized using mainly classical microbiological and biochemical techniques. At least 95% of the thermophiles were classified as Bacillus stearothermophilus. The populations did not produce antimicrobial compounds in detectable amounts nor was an unusual resistance to antibiotics found. All thermophilic isolates did grow very rapidly on simple media even under oxygen limited conditions.

  14. Recent studies in microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Zhereppa Fathepure

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many hypersaline environments are often contaminated with petroleum compounds. Among these, oil and natural gas production sites all over the world and hundreds of kilometers of coastlines in the more arid regions of Gulf countries are of major concern due to the extent and magnitude of contamination. Because conventional microbiological processes do not function well at elevated salinities, bioremediation of hypersaline environments can only be accomplished using high salt-tolerant microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum compounds. In the last two decades, there have been many reports on the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in moderate to high salinity environments. Numerous microorganisms belonging to the domain Bacteria and Archaea have been isolated and their phylogeny and metabolic capacity to degrade a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in varying salinities have been demonstrated. This article focuses on our growing understanding of bacteria and archaea responsible for the degradation of hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions in moderate to high salinity conditions. Even though organisms belonging to various genera have been shown to degrade hydrocarbons, members of the genera Halomonas Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Haloferax, Haloarcula, and Halobacterium dominate the published literature. Despite rapid advances in understanding microbial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions, not much is known about organisms that carry out similar processes in anaerobic conditions. Also, information on molecular mechanisms and pathways of hydrocarbon degradation in high salinity is scarce and only recently there have been a few reports describing genes, enzymes and breakdown steps for some hydrocarbons. These limited studies have clearly revealed that degradation of oxygenated and non-oxygenated hydrocarbons by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms occur by pathways similar to those found in non-halophiles.

  15. Kinetic Modelling of Pesticidal Degradation and Microbial Growth in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUDUO-SEN; WANGZONG-SHENG; 等

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses such models for the degradation kinetics of pesticides in soil as the model expressing the degradation rate as a function of two varables:the pesticide concentration and the number of pesticide degrading microorganisms,the model expressing the pesticide concentration as explicit or implicit function of time ,and the model exprssing the pesticide loss rate constants as functions of temperature,These models may interpret the degradation curves with an inflection point.A Kinetic model describing the growth processes of microbial populations in a closed system is reported as well.

  16. Microbial assisted High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arya J; Sekhar, Vini C; Bhaskar, Thallada; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-08-01

    The efficacy of newly isolated Pseudomonas and Bacillus strains to degrade brominated High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) was investigated. Viability of these cultures while using e-plastic as sole carbon source was validated through Triphenyl Tetrazolium Chloride (TTC). Four days incubation of HIPS emulsion with Bacillus spp. showed 94% reduction in turbidity and was 97% with Pseudomonas spp. Confirmation of degradation was concluded by HPLC, NMR, FTIR, TGA and weight loss analysis. NMR spectra of the degraded film revealed the formation of aliphatic carbon chain with bromine and its release. FTIR analysis of the samples showed a reduction in CH, CO and CN groups. Surface changes in the brominated HIPS film was visualized through SEM analysis. Degradation with Bacillus spp showed a weight loss of 23% (w/w) of HIPS film in 30days.

  17. Microbial community analysis of an aerobic nitrifying-denitrifying MBR treating ABS resin wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Tanong, Kulchaya; Xu, Jia; Shon, Hokyong

    2011-05-01

    A two-stage aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) system for treating acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) resin wastewater was carried out in this study to evaluate the system performance on nitrification. The results showed that nitrification of the aerobic MBR system was significant and the highest TKN removal of approximately 90% was obtained at hydraulic retention time (HRT) 18 h. In addition, the result of nitrogen mass balance revealed that the percentage of TN removal due to denitrification was in the range of 8.7-19.8%. Microbial community analysis based on 16s rDNA molecular approach indicated that the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) group in the system was a β-class ammonia oxidizer which was identified as uncultured sludge bacterium (AF234732). A heterotrophic aerobic denitrifier identified as Thauera mechernichensis was found in the system. The results indicated that a sole aerobic MBR system for simultaneous removals of carbon and nitrogen can be designed and operated for neglect with an anaerobic unit.

  18. Bioreactor microbial ecosystems for thiocyanate and cyanide degradation unravelled with genome-resolved metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Rose S; van Zyl, A Wynand; van Hille, Robert P; Thomas, Brian C; Harrison, Susan T L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-12-01

    Gold ore processing uses cyanide (CN(-) ), which often results in large volumes of thiocyanate- (SCN(-) ) contaminated wastewater requiring treatment. Microbial communities can degrade SCN(-) and CN(-) , but little is known about their membership and metabolic potential. Microbial-based remediation strategies will benefit from an ecological understanding of organisms involved in the breakdown of SCN(-) and CN(-) into sulfur, carbon and nitrogen compounds. We performed metagenomic analysis of samples from two laboratory-scale bioreactors used to study SCN(-) and CN(-) degradation. Community analysis revealed the dominance of Thiobacillus spp., whose genomes harbour a previously unreported operon for SCN(-) degradation. Genome-based metabolic predictions suggest that a large portion of each bioreactor community is autotrophic, relying not on molasses in reactor feed but using energy gained from oxidation of sulfur compounds produced during SCN(-) degradation. Heterotrophs, including a bacterium from a previously uncharacterized phylum, compose a smaller portion of the reactor community. Predation by phage and eukaryotes is predicted to affect community dynamics. Genes for ammonium oxidation and denitrification were detected, indicating the potential for nitrogen removal, as required for complete remediation of wastewater. These findings suggest optimization strategies for reactor design, such as improved aerobic/anaerobic partitioning and elimination of organic carbon from reactor feed.

  19. Dynamic Changes of Microbial Community for Degradation of Lignocellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wenzhe; LIU Shuang; WANG Chunying; ZHENG Guoxiang

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic changes of a microbial community for lignocellulose degradation were explored in details.Community composition and development were investigated by the means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE),and results showed that the microbial community was constituted of 14 kinds of bacteria and presented the fluctuation in some degrees with fermentation.Furthmore,the result of cluster analysis of DGGE pattern was accordant with growth curve,and the degradation process was divided into three stages: initial stage(0-12 h),intermediate stage(24-144 h)and end stage(144-216 h).

  20. Principles of microbial PAH-degradation in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Anders R.; Wick, Lukas Y.; Harms, Hauke

    2005-01-01

    Interest in the biodegradation mechanisms and environmental fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is motivated by their ubiquitous distribution, their low bioavailability and high persistence in soil, and their potentially deleterious effect on human health. Due to high hydrophobicity and solid-water distribution ratios, PAHs tend to interact with non-aqueous phases and soil organic matter and, as a consequence, become potentially unavailable for microbial degradation since bacteria are known to degrade chemicals only when they are dissolved in water. As the aqueous solubility of PAHs decreases almost logarithmically with increasing molecular mass, high-molecular weight PAHs ranging in size from five to seven rings are of special environmental concern. Whereas several reviews have focussed on metabolic and ecological aspects of PAH degradation, this review discusses the microbial PAH-degradation with special emphasis on both biological and physico-chemical factors influencing the biodegradation of poorly available PAHs.

  1. Electrical Stimulation of Microbial PCB Degradation in Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Chan Lan; Payne, Rayford B.; Sowers, Kevin R.; May, Harold D.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been precluded in part by the lack of a cost-effective method to stimulate microbial degradation in situ. A common limitation is the lack of an effective method of providing electron donors and acceptors to promote in situ PCB biodegradation. Application of an electric potential to soil/sediment could be an effective means of providing electron-donors/-acceptors to PCB dechlorinating and degrading microorganisms. In this study, electrical...

  2. The degradation characteristics of microbial biomass in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Adrian; Simpson, Andre J.; Mcnally, David J.; Moran, Brian W.; McCaul, Margaret V.; Hart, Kris; Paull, Brett; Kelleher, Brian P.

    2011-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass is a primary source of soil organic carbon (SOC) and therefore plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycling. However, little is known about the fate and transformations of microbial biomass in soil. Here we employ HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy to monitor 13C and 15N labeled soil microbial biomass and leachate degradation over time. As expected, there is a rapid loss of carbohydrate structures. However, diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveals that macromolecular carbohydrates are more resistant to degradation and are found in the leachate. Aromatic components survive as dissolved species in the leachate while aliphatic components persist in both the biomass and leachate. Dissolved protein and peptidoglycan accumulate in the leachate and recalcitrant amide nitrogen and lipoprotein persists in both the degraded biomass and leachate. Cross-peaks that appear in 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR spectra after degradation suggest that specific peptides are either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of unknown structures. The overall degradation pathways reported here are similar to that of decomposing plant material degraded under similar conditions suggesting that the difference between recalcitrant carbon from different sources is negligible after decomposition.

  3. Anaerobic microbial LCFA degradation in bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, D.Z.; Pereira, M.A.; Alves, J.I.; Smidt, H.; Stams, A.J.M.; Alves, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent results obtained on long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) anaerobic degradation. Two LCFA were used as model substrates: oleate, a mono-unsaturated LCFA, and palmitate, a saturated LCFA, both abundant in LCFA-rich wastewaters. 16S rRNA gene analysis of sludge samples submitted to c

  4. Microbial degradation of propoxur in turfgrass soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, L T; Nkedi-Kizza, P; Cisar, J L; Snyder, G H

    1992-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the degradation rates in turfgrass soil over a 12-month period after a single field application of propoxur and to isolate microorganisms from the soil capable of degrading the insecticide. Soil samples were collected from a turfgrass experimental site near Fort Lauderdale, FL one week before the field application of propoxur, and over a 12-month period after the field application. Mineralization rates in surface (0-15 cm depth) and subsurface (15-30 cm depth) soil samples collected before the field application were low. Mineralization in surface and subsurface samples collected 1, 6 and 8 months after the field application was much higher than for corresponding samples collected before the field application. Mineralization in the subsurface samples collected 12 months after the field application had reverted back to the similar rate for the corresponding sample collected before field application. Half-life values (t1/2) for propoxur showed similar trends to the results of mineralization. After a single application of propoxur, degradation in turfgrass soil was enhanced. Such enhancement lasted less than 12 months for the subsurface, but more than 12 months for the surface. A strain of Arthrobacter sp. capable of degrading propoxur was isolated from the soil.

  5. Microbial degradation of MTBE in reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waul, Christopher Kevin; Arvin, Erik; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2007-01-01

    , toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, may reduce the removal rates of MTBE, or prevent its removal in reactors. With mathematical modelling, the long startup time required for some MTBE degrading reactors could be predicted. Long startup times of up to 200 days were due to the low maximum growth rate...

  6. Aerobic degradation of trichloroethylene by co-metabolism using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-05-22

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26×10⁷ cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline.

  7. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26 × 107 cell/mL, initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE/mg (biomass and 5.1 μg (TCE/mg (phenol, respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%. When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively. This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline.

  8. Organic contaminants in soil, desorption kinetics and microbial degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlebaum, W.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of organic contaminants in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g.) soil washing or soil venting) depends on the desorption kinetics of these contaminants from the soil matrix. When the organic contaminants desorb very slow from the soil matri

  9. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting.

  10. Initial microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are very hazardous environmental pollutants because of their mutagenic, carcinogenic and toxic effects on living systems. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the ability and efficiency of selected bacterial isolates obtained from oil-contaminated areas to biodegrade PAHs. The potential of the bacteria to biodegrade various aromatic hydrocarbons was assessed using the 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol assay. Further biodegradation of PAHs was monitored by gravimetric and gas-chromatographic analysis. Among the eight bacterial isolates, identified on the basis of 16S rDNA sequences, two isolates, Planomicrobium sp. RNP01 and Rhodococcus sp. RNP05, had the ability to grow on and utilize almost all examined hydrocarbons. Those isolates were further examined for biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene, as single substrates, and as a mixture, in vitro for ten days. After three days, both isolates degraded a significant amount phenanthrene, which has a simpler chemical structure than pyrene. Planomicrobium sp.RNP01 commenced biodegradation of pyrene in the PAH mixture only after it had almost completly degraded phenanthrene. The isolated and characterized bacteria, Planomicrobium sp. RNP01 and Rhodococcus sp. RNP05, have shown high bioremediation potential and are likely candidates to be used for degradation of highly toxic PAHs in contaminated areas. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43004

  11. Microbial Activity and Silica Degradation in Rice Straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Esther Jin-kyung

    Abundantly available agricultural residues like rice straw have the potential to be feedstocks for bioethanol production. Developing optimized conditions for rice straw deconstruction is a key step toward utilizing the biomass to its full potential. One challenge associated with conversion of rice straw to bioenergy is its high silica content as high silica erodes machinery. Another obstacle is the availability of enzymes that hydrolyze polymers in rice straw under industrially relevant conditions. Microbial communities that colonize compost may be a source of enzymes for bioconversion of lignocellulose to products because composting systems operate under thermophilic and high solids conditions that have been shown to be commercially relevant. Compost microbial communities enriched on rice straw could provide insight into a more targeted source of enzymes for the breakdown of rice straw polysaccharides and silica. Because rice straw is low in nitrogen it is important to understand the impact of nitrogen concentrations on the production of enzyme activity by the microbial community. This study aims to address this issue by developing a method to measure microbial silica-degrading activity and measure the effect of nitrogen amendment to rice straw on microbial activity and extracted enzyme activity during a high-solids, thermophilic incubation. An assay was developed to measure silica-degrading enzyme or silicase activity. This process included identifying methods of enzyme extraction from rice straw, identifying a model substrate for the assay, and optimizing measurement techniques. Rice straw incubations were conducted with five different levels of nitrogen added to the biomass. Microbial activity was measured by respiration and enzyme activity. A microbial community analysis was performed to understand the shift in community structure with different treatments. With increased levels of nitrogen, respiration and cellulose and hemicellulose degrading activity

  12. Rate limiting factors in trichloroethylene co-metabolic degradation by phenol-grown aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2014-04-01

    The potential of aerobic granular sludge in co-metabolic removal of recalcitrant substances was evaluated using trichloroethylene (TCE) as the model compound. Aerobic granules cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor with phenol as the growth substrate exhibited TCE and phenol degradation activities lower than previously reported values. Depletion of reducing energy and diffusion limitation within the granules were investigated as the possible rate limiting factors. Sodium formate and citrate were supplied to the granules in batch studies as external electron sources. No significant enhancing effect was observed on the instant TCE transformation rates, but 10 mM formate could improve the ultimate transformation capacity by 26 %. Possible diffusion barrier was studied by sieving the biomass into five size fractions, and determining their specific TCE and phenol degradation rates and capacities. Biomass in the larger size fractions generally showed lower activities. Large granules of >700 μm diameter exhibited only 22 % of the flocs' TCE transformation capacity and 35 % of its phenol dependent SOUR, indicating the possible occurrence of diffusion limitation in larger biomass. However, the highest specific TCE transformation rate was observed with the fraction that mostly consisted of small granules (150-300 μm), suggesting an optimal size range while applying aerobic granules in TCE co-metabolic removal.

  13. Microbial degradation of poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Castellà, J; Lafuente, R; Urmeneta, J; Goodwin, S; Guerrero, R

    1994-01-01

    The search for new materials that are not hazardous to the environment has become a major issue in our society, engaged as it is in the attainment of sustainable development. Poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA), produced exclusively by prokaryotes, can be used as thermoplastics and are fully biodegradable and innocuous to the environment. Biodegradability testing has quantified the capacity of microorganisms to degrade such new chemical compounds, particularly polyhydroxyalkanoates. Standardized tests may also discover new microorganisms and environmental conditions that accelerate biodegradation. We evaluate various techniques used to assess the biodegradability of PHA, and which may also be applied to test other kinds of polymers.

  14. The microbial degradation of azo dyes: minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengalroyen, M D; Dabbs, E R

    2013-03-01

    The removal of dyes in wastewater treatment plants still involves physical or chemical processes. Yet numerous studies currently exist on degradation based on the use of microbes-which is a well-studied field. However progress in the use of biological methods to deal with this environmentally noxious waste is currently lacking. This review focuses on the largest dye class, that is azo dyes and their biodegradation. We summarize the bacteria identified thus far which have been implicated in dye decolorization and discuss the enzymes involved and mechanisms by which these colorants are broken down.

  15. Microbial degradation and utilization of cassava peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofuya, C O; Nwajiuba, C J

    1990-06-01

    Cassava peel was readily degraded and utilized by a strain ofRhizopus growing in a solid-state fermentation. Growth was maximal at 45°C and was proportional to the degree of hydrolysis of the peel. The yield of biomass, as weight of dry mycellum from the reducing sugars of the peel, was 51%. After 72 h fermentation, the peel contained 76% moisture, 6% cellulose, 7% hemicellulose and 0.4% ash and the protein content had increased from 5.6% to 16%. These results suggest a possible economic value of cassava peel in the production of fungal biomass and feedstock.

  16. Kinetics of microbial degradation of deicing chemicals in percolated porous media - the modeling perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, Markus; Lissner, Heidi; Totsche, Kai

    2013-04-01

    A quantitative knowledge of the fate of deicing chemicals in the subsurface can be provided by analysis of laboratory and field experiments with numerical simulation models. In the present study, experimental data of microbial degradation of the deicing chemical propylene glycol (PG) under flow conditions in soil columns and field lysimeters were simulated to analyze the process conditions of degradation and to obtain the according parameters. Results from the column experiment were evaluated applying different scenarios of an advection-dispersion model using HYDRUS-1D. To reconstruct the data, different competing degradation models were included, i.e., zero order, first order and inclusion of a growing and decaying biomass. The general breakthrough behavior of propylene glycol in soil columns can be simulated well using a coupled model of solute transport and degradation with growth and decay of biomass. The susceptibility of the model to non-unique solutions was investigated using systematical forward and inverse simulations. We found that the model tends to equifinal solutions under certain conditions. Complex experimental boundary conditions can help to avoid this. Under field conditions, the situation is far more complex than in the laboratory. Studying the fate of PG with undisturbed lysimeters we found that aerobic and anaerobic degradation occurs simultaneously. We attribute this to the physical structure and the aggregated nature of the undisturbed soil material . This results in the presence of spatially disjoint oxidative and reductive regions of microbial activity and requires, but is not fully reflected by a dual porosity model. Currently, the numerical simulation of this system is in progress, considering several flow and transport models. A stochastic global search algorithm (DREAM-ZS) is used in conjuction with HYDRUS-1D to avoid local minima in the inverse simulations. The study shows the current limitations and potentials of modeling degradation

  17. Evaluation of integrated anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactor for degradation of azo dye methyl orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, V; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian

    2013-09-01

    This study was to investigate the mineralization of wastewater containing methyl orange (MO) in integrated anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactor with coconut fiber as bio-material. Different aeration periods (3h in phase 1 and 2; 3, 6 and 15 h in phase 3; 24 h in phase 4 and 5) in aerobic chamber were studied with different MO concentration 50, 100, 200, 200 and 300 mg/L as influent from phase 1-5. The color removals estimated from the standard curve of dye versus optical density at its maximum absorption wavelength were 97%, 96%, 97%, 97%, and 96% and COD removals were 75%, 72%, 63%, 81%, and 73% in phase 1-5, respectively. The MO decolorization and COD degradation followed first-order kinetic model and second-order kinetic model, respectively. GC-MS analysis indicated the symmetrical cleavage of azo bond and the reduction in aromatic peak ensured the partial mineralization of MO.

  18. Physiology, biochemistry and possible applications of microbial caffeine degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N; Bhavya, B; Ashok, Nandhini

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine, a purine alkaloid is a constituent of widely consumed beverages. The scientific evidence which has proved the harm of this alkaloid has paved the way for innumerable research in the area of caffeine degradation. In addition to this, the fact that the by-products of the coffee and tea industry pollute the environment has called for the need of decaffeinating coffee and tea industry's by-products. Though physical and chemical methods for decaffeination are available, the lack of specificity for removal of caffeine in these techniques and their non-eco-friendly nature has opened the area of microbial and enzymatic degradation of caffeine. Another important application of microbial caffeine degradation apart from its advantages like specificity, eco-friendliness and cost-effectiveness is the fact that this process will enable the production of industrially and medically useful components of the caffeine degradation pathway like theobromine and theophylline. This is a comprehensive review which mainly focuses on caffeine degradation, large-scale degradation of the same and its applications in the industrial world.

  19. Microbial degradation of a recalcitrant pesticide: chlordecone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Chaussonnerie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlordecone (Kepone® is a synthetic organochlorine insecticide (C10Cl10O used worldwide mostly during the 1970s and 1980s. Its intensive application in the French West Indies to control the banana black weevil Cosmopolites sordidus led to a massive environmental pollution. Persistence of chlordecone in soils and water for numerous decades even centuries causes global public health and socio-economic concerns. In order to investigate the biodegradability of chlordecone, microbial enrichment cultures from soils contaminated by chlordecone or other organochlorines and from sludge of a wastewater treatment plant have been conducted. Different experimental procedures including original microcosms were carried out anaerobically over long periods of time. GC-MS monitoring resulted in the detection of chlorinated derivatives in several cultures, consistent with chlordecone biotransformation. More interestingly, disappearance of chlordecone (50 µg/mL in two bacterial consortia was concomitant with the accumulation of a major metabolite of formula C9Cl5H3 (named B1 as well as two minor metabolites C10Cl9HO (named A1 and C9Cl4H4 (named B3. Finally, we report the isolation and the complete genomic sequences of two new Citrobacter isolates, closely related to Citrobacter amalonaticus, and that were capable of reproducing chlordecone transformation. Further characterization of these Citrobacter strains should yield deeper insights into the mechanisms involved in this transformation process.

  20. Microbial degradation of pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benotti, Mark J. [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Brownawell, Bruce J. [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States)], E-mail: bruce.brownawell@sunysb.edu

    2009-03-15

    Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal surface water samples. Antipyrine, carbamazepine, cotinine, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim were the most refractory (half-lives, t{sub 1/2} = 35 to >100 days), making them excellent candidates for wastewater tracers. Nicotine, acetaminophen, and fluoxetine were labile across all treatments (t{sub 1/2} = 0.68-11 days). Caffeine, diltiazem, and nifedipine were also and relatively labile in all but one of the treatments (t{sub 1/2} = 3.5-13 days). Microbial degradation of caffeine was further confirmed by production {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The fastest decay of non-refractory compounds was always observed in more sewage-affected Jamaica Bay waters. Degradation rates for the majority of these pharmaceuticals are much slower than reported rates for small biomolecules, such as glucose and amino acids. Batch sorption experiments indicate that removal of these soluble pharmaceuticals from the water column to sediments is a relatively insignificant removal process in these receiving waters. - Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 structurally variable pharmaceuticals in wastewater-impacted estuarine and coastal seawater.

  1. Degradation of [(14)C]carfentrazone-ethyl under aerobic aquatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmarakby, S A; Supplee, D; Cook, R

    2001-11-01

    Carfentrazone-ethyl (CF-E) is an aryl triazolinone reduced-risk herbicide for use on corn, wheat, and soybean. As part of the assessment of its metabolic fate, the aerobic aquatic metabolism of [(14)C]CF-E at a concentration of 0.22 microg/g was investigated. Two separate aquatic sediments (silty clay loam and clay loam soils, flooded with water) were used in the study. At each of eight samplings throughout the 30-day study, the distribution of radioactivity between surface water, sediment, and volatile fractions was assessed. At zero time, the majority of the applied radioactivity was contained in the water layer (83-90%), declining to 70-80% after 30 days. This was coupled with an increase in the percent radioactivity in the soil layer from 4-6% at day 0 to 13-19% after 30 days. Nonextractable soil residues and volatile degradation products were formed in negligible amounts. Analysis of the incubation extracts from either aquatic sediment indicated a rapid conversion (90% of the applied radioactivity were formed. Identification of these degradation products was initially achieved through chromatographic comparison with reference synthetic standards and subsequently confirmed using LC-MS analysis. A degradation pathway for CF-E under aerobic aquatic conditions is proposed.

  2. AromaDeg, a novel database for phylogenomics of aerobic bacterial degradation of aromatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Márcia; Jauregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Junca, Howard; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2014-01-01

    Understanding prokaryotic transformation of recalcitrant pollutants and the in-situ metabolic nets require the integration of massive amounts of biological data. Decades of biochemical studies together with novel next-generation sequencing data have exponentially increased information on aerobic aromatic degradation pathways. However, the majority of protein sequences in public databases have not been experimentally characterized and homology-based methods are still the most routinely used approach to assign protein function, allowing the propagation of misannotations. AromaDeg is a web-based resource targeting aerobic degradation of aromatics that comprises recently updated (September 2013) and manually curated databases constructed based on a phylogenomic approach. Grounded in phylogenetic analyses of protein sequences of key catabolic protein families and of proteins of documented function, AromaDeg allows query and data mining of novel genomic, metagenomic or metatranscriptomic data sets. Essentially, each query sequence that match a given protein family of AromaDeg is associated to a specific cluster of a given phylogenetic tree and further function annotation and/or substrate specificity may be inferred from the neighboring cluster members with experimentally validated function. This allows a detailed characterization of individual protein superfamilies as well as high-throughput functional classifications. Thus, AromaDeg addresses the deficiencies of homology-based protein function prediction, combining phylogenetic tree construction and integration of experimental data to obtain more accurate annotations of new biological data related to aerobic aromatic biodegradation pathways. We pursue in future the expansion of AromaDeg to other enzyme families involved in aromatic degradation and its regular update. Database URL: http://aromadeg.siona.helmholtz-hzi.de

  3. Engineering microbial surfaces to degrade lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace L; Anderson, Timothy D; Clubb, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Renewable lignocellulosic plant biomass is a promising feedstock from which to produce biofuels, chemicals, and materials. One approach to cost-effectively exploit this resource is to use consolidating bioprocessing (CBP) microbes that directly convert lignocellulose into valuable end products. Because many promising CBP-enabling microbes are non-cellulolytic, recent work has sought to engineer them to display multi-cellulase containing minicellulosomes that hydrolyze biomass more efficiently than isolated enzymes. In this review, we discuss progress in engineering the surfaces of the model microorganisms: Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We compare the distinct approaches used to display cellulases and minicellulosomes, as well as their surface enzyme densities and cellulolytic activities. Thus far, minicellulosomes have only been grafted onto the surfaces of B. subtilis and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that the absence of an outer membrane in fungi and Gram-positive bacteria may make their surfaces better suited for displaying the elaborate multi-enzyme complexes needed to efficiently degrade lignocellulose. PMID:24430239

  4. [Degradation of benzothiazole in electro-assisted microbial reactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Miao; Ding, Jie; Liu, Xian-Shu; Cheng, Wang-Bin

    2014-11-01

    The oxidative degradation of benzothiazole (BTH) in a single-chamber electro-assisted microbial reactor was investigated. The effects of applied voltage and COD/BTH ratio on the performance of degrading benzothiazole were studied. The research showed that BTH was oxidized to 2-hydroxy-benzothiazole (OHBT), then thiazole ring scission, and BTH translated into 2-methylsulfonylaniline eventually. The degrading of benzothiazole was in conformity with the pseudo first-order kinetic model, and the pseudo first-order kinetic constant can be increased by raising the applied voltage and co-metabolism. When the applied voltage was 0.7 V and COD/BTH ratio was 30, the degradation rate was 96% in 48 h, achieving the detoxification of BTH, and that is advantageous to the biochemical treatment.

  5. Microbial deterioration and degradation of Polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mohan

    2010-12-01

    -bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}  Polymeric materials due to its structural versatility are widely used in aerospace applications, aviation and space industries. As they are potential source of carbon and energy for heterotrophic microorganisms including bacteria and fungi in several ways its biodegradation affect these industries. The information on degradability can provide fundamental information facilitating design and life-time analysis of materials. Literature survey shows that polymers which are susceptible to biofilm formation includes paints, adhesives, plastics, rubbers, sealants, FRPCMs, lubricating materials, fuels etc. Even though the understanding of polymer degradation has been advanced in recent years the subject is still inadequately addressed because of the lack of information available. The review focuses on polymer biodeterioration and biodegradation and its mechanisms, the types of microorganisms involved, the reactions of enzymes of importance in the biodegradation of polymers, consequences, of biodegradation, the factors involved in biodegradation of polymers and its prevention and the tests used to evaluate it.

  6. Physiological and phylogenetic characterization of a stable chlorate-reducing benzene-degrading microbial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelink, S.A.B.; Tan, N.C.G.; Broeke, ten H.; Doesburg, van W.C.J.; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Gerritse, J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    stable anoxic enrichment culture was obtained that degraded benzene with chlorate as an electron acceptor. The benzene degradation rate was 1.65 mM benzene per day, which is similar to reported aerobic benzene degradation rates but 20¿1650 times higher than reported for anaerobic benzene degradation

  7. Study of 4-t-octylphenol degradation and microbial community in granular sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors have investigated the effects of various factors on both aerobic and anaerobic degradation of 4-t-octylphenol (4-t-OP) in granular sludge. In comparison, the aerobic degradation rate was much higher than that of anaerobic degradation. The optimal pH values for 4-t-OP degradation in granular sludge were 9 and 7 under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. And the degradation rate decreased with an increase in the initial 4-t-OP concentration. Addition of yeast extract or homologous compounds such as phenol also enhanced the 4-t-OP degradation, especially under the aerobic condition. To investigate the bacterial community in this study, the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was applied, based on the primers, for the 16S rDNA V3 region of bacteria. γ-proteobacteria and bacillus were identified as the major species of sludge.

  8. Physicochemical and Microbial Caracteristics Performency in Wastewater Treated Under Aerobic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma B. Rajeb

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The current work study the efficiency of biological wastewater treatment by an aerobic reactor which could be used in small agglomerations. RBC reduced physicochemical and microbiological load of wastewater but values remain above Tunisian standard. Approach: Experiments were conducted on a sand filled PVC column fed with wastewater treated by Rotating Biological Contactor (RBC at a pulsed rhythm of 8 sequences per day. For performances study process, physicochemical and bacterial analyses effluent at inlet and outlet of column were realized. Results: The results showed that through filter mass (D10 = 0.55 mm, D60 = 1.3 mm and coefficient uniformity = 2.36 96% of suspended solids, 99% of NH4 +-N (during first phase, 92% of COD, 91% of BOD5 and 46% of phosphorus are retained by surface filtration. The microbial abatement results is E. coli. The microbial water quality is slightly higher than Tunisian standards. The removal of microbial indicators in the considered reactor depends on the depth of the filter and negatively correlated with NO3 --N (r = -0.99, with E. coli at 3rd OPD. Conclusion/Recommendation: Results confirmed that the reactor tested is performed as an advanced treatment system for DBO, COD, SS, NH4 +-N and NO3 --N. Despite that 96% of SS efficiency reduction, clogging is not achieved quickly that due to biofilm detachment phenomena. The removal of microbial indicators in the considered reactor depends on the depth of the filter and negatively correlated with NO3 --N. Disinfection performances for the considered reactor reduce microbial load, however chlore, ozone or UV disinfection should be considered.

  9. Fungal degradation of pesticides - construction of microbial consortia for bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard-Jensen, Lea

    in groundwater contamination. New technologies are therefore needed for cleaning up contaminated soil and water resources. This PhD was part of the project entitled Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) where the overall aim is to develop new technologies for bioremediation...... of pesticide contaminated soil and water. The objectives of this PhD were to investigate fungal degradation of pesticides and following to construct microbial consortia for bioremediation. In Manuscript I the fungal degradation of the phenylurea herbicide diuron was studied. Isolates of soil fungi of the genus...... be a result of co-operative catabolism or physical interactions between the organisms improving growth and/or distribution of fungi and bacteria. The bacterial strains applied were Sphingomonas sp. SRS2, Variovorax sp. SRS16 and Arthrobacter globiformis D47 and the fungal strains were Mortierella sp. LEJ702...

  10. Microbial degradation of xenobiotic, aromatic pollutants in humic water.

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, P.; Okla, L; Tranvik, L.

    1988-01-01

    The microbial degradation of a number of 14C-labeled, recalcitrant, aromatic pollutants, including trichloroguaiacol and di-, tri-, and pentachlorophenol, was investigated in aquatic model systems in the laboratory. Natural, mixed cultures of microorganisms in the water from a brown-water lake with a high content of humic compounds mineralized all of the tested substances to a higher degree than did microorganisms in the water from a clear-water lake. Dichlorophenol was the most rapidly degra...

  11. Microbial Hydrocarbon and ToxicPollutant Degradation Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, Dietrich [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Janabi, Mustafa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); O' Neil, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Budinger, Thomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-08-16

    The goal of this project is to determine optimum conditions for bacterial oxidation of hydrocarbons and long-chain alkanes that are representative of petroleum contamination of the environment. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of concern because of their toxicity, low volatility, and resistance to microbial degradation, especially under anaerobic conditions. The uniqueness of our approach is to use carbon-11 in lieu of the traditional use of carbon-14.

  12. Soil microbial response to photo-degraded C60 fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Timothy D; Clavijo, Andrea P; Zhao, Yingcan; Jafvert, Chad T; Turco, Ronald F; Filley, Timothy R

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that while unfunctionalized carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) exhibit very low decomposition rates in soils, even minor surface functionalization (e.g., as a result of photochemical weathering) may accelerate microbial decay. We present results from a C60 fullerene-soil incubation study designed to investigate the potential links between photochemical and microbial degradation of photo-irradiated C60. Irradiating aqueous (13)C-labeled C60 with solar-wavelength light resulted in a complex mixture of intermediate products with decreased aromaticity. Although addition of irradiated C60 to soil microcosms had little effect on net soil respiration, excess (13)C in the respired CO2 demonstrates that photo-irradiating C60 enhanced its degradation in soil, with ∼ 0.78% of 60 day photo-irradiated C60 mineralized. Community analysis by DGGE found that soil microbial community structure was altered and depended on the photo-treatment duration. These findings demonstrate how abiotic and biotic transformation processes can couple to influence degradation of CNMs in the natural environment.

  13. Particulate organics degradation and sludge minimization in aerobic, complete SRT bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanatidou, Elisavet; Samiotis, Georgios; Trikoilidou, Eleni; Tsikritzis, Lazaros

    2016-05-01

    The study evaluates the assumption that in activated sludge processes and under specific operating conditions, the considered unbiodegradable particulate organic fractions of influent (XU) organic solids and biomass decay residues (cell debris, XE) are degraded. The evaluation was performed by comparing sludge observed yield (Yobs) evolution in two full scale, complete solids retention time (SRT), aerobic bioreactors, to the predictions of two activated sludge models. The results showed that in steady state operating conditions of complete solids retention AS processes very low solids accumulation occur. In these conditions, solids accumulation is slightly affected by kinetic coefficients and significantly affected by XU and XE degradation rates. High endogenous residues degradation rate values of 0.05 d(-1) and 0.02 d(-1) were estimated for the two bioreactors, resulting in low solids accumulation, calculated at 1.6 tons and 3.59 tons per year respectively, of which 1.37 and 0.87 tons were non volatile suspended solids. Depending on WWTP operating conditions the endogenous residues degradation rate is the limiting factor of solids accumulation and consequently for particulate organics degradation.

  14. Microbial degradation and impact of Bracken toxin ptaquiloside on microbial communities in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, Pernille; Brandt, Kristian Koefoed; Rasmussen, Lars Holm

    2007-01-01

    ), but not in the NZ soil (weak acid loamy Entisol). In the DK soil PTA turnover was predominantly due to microbial degradation (biodegradation); chemical hydrolysis was occurring mainly in the uppermost A horizon where pH was very low (3.4). Microbial activity (basal respiration) and growth ([3H]leucine incorporation...... assay) increased after PTA exposure, indicating that the Bracken toxin served as a C substrate for the organotrophic microorganisms. On the other hand, there was no apparent impact of PTA on community size as measured by substrate-induced respiration or composition as indicated by community......-level physiological profiles. Our results demonstrate that PTA stimulates microbial activity and that microorganisms play a predominant role for rapid PTA degradation in Bracken-impacted soils....

  15. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Suzi; Hybel, Anne-Marie; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential...... in microcosms using groundwater and sandy aquifer materials. To maintain a certain oxygen concentration this level was measured from the outside of the bottles with a fibre oxygen meter using oxygen-sensitive luminescent sensor foil mounted inside the microcosm, to which supplementary oxygen was added...... to the oxidation of organic matter and other reduced species such as Fe2+, S2- and Mn in sediment before the biodegradation of herbicides takes place. This study suggests that oxygen enhancement around a drinking water abstraction field could stimulate the bioremediation of diffuse source contamination. © 2013 ....

  16. Cultivation and characters of aerobic granules for pentachlorophenol (PCP) degradation under microaerobic condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Hui-xia; CHEN Yuan-cai; CHEN Zhong-hao; CHEN Rong

    2005-01-01

    Cultivation of aerobic granular sludge for pentachlorophenol (PCP) degradation under microaerobic condition ( DO concentration was controlled at 0.2-0.7 mg/L) was studied in this paper. Anaerobic granules were selected as inoculum. The changes of appearance were observed and the variations of SVI, VSS/TSS, PN/PS and the size of sludge were measured during cultivating. The capabilities for degradation of PCP, AOX and CODcr were also studied. Observations on mature granules were carried out by scanning electron microscope, and the results indicated bacillus was dominant on the surface of granules while in the inner of granules both bacillus and coccus were the dominant microorganisms. K, Na, Fe, Ca, Mg, Ni, Co, Mn, Cu and Zn were detected in the granules by element analysis.

  17. Microbial and hydrodynamic properties of aerobic granules in a sequencing batch reactor treating landfill leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-jie WEI; Min JI; Guo-yi LI; Fei-fei QIN

    2012-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) seeded with activated sludge was established for landfill leachate treatment.Small bio-aggregates began to appear after 40-d operation,and gradually changed to mature aerobic granules,with a mean size of 0.36-0.60 mm.Their sludge volume index at 5 min (SVI5 min),mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS),and wet density were around 35 ml/g,3.4 g/L,and 1.062 g/cm3,respectively.The settling velocities of the granules in distilled water ranged from 0.3 to 1.3 cm/s,which were faster than those in landfill leachate with a salt content of 1.4% (w/v),and also slightly faster than those predicted by Stokes' law for porous but impermeable particles.Microbial community evolution during the granulation process and stages under different nitrogen loading rates (NLRs) were monitored and analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE),cloning,and sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) fragments.Results revealed that some primary and dominant communities in inoculating activated sludge died out gradually; while a few common bacteria,inhabiting soils,municipal wastewater,or activated sludge systems,dominated in the SBR system throughout.In addition,some other dominant species,associated with the aerobic granulation process,were thought to play a significant role in the formation and growth of aerobic granular sludge.During the stable operation time under low NLR,a few species were present in abundance,and may have been responsible for the high organic removal efficiency at this time.

  18. The Effect of Microbial Inoculants Applied at Ensiling on Sorghum Silage Characteristics and Aerobic Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Wu-tai; Ashbell G; Hen Y; Weinberg Z G

    2002-01-01

    Whole crop forage sorghum (Saccharatum) cultivar FS5 was harvested at the soft dough stage of maturity. The sorghum was chopped to approximately 2 cm pieces and ensiled under laboratory conditions in 1.5 L Weck glass jars. At ensiling, it was treated with two commercial microbial inoculants: inoculant A and inoculant B. The inoculants were applied at 2 × 105 colony forming units g- 1 DM. Silage with no additives served as a control. Three jars per treatment were opened on days 2, 4, 8, 15 and 60 post-ensiling to study fermentation dynamics. After 60 days of ensiling, the silages were analyzed and subjected to an aerobic stability test lasting 5 days. Results showed that both inoculants caused a more rapid rate of pH decline and a higher amount of lactic acid production. Silages treated with each inoculant produced a little more CO2 and resulted in more glucose loss as compared with the control. Addition of inoculants did not influence ( P > 0.05) the ash and crude protein contents, but tended to decrease the concentration of acetic acid (P < 0.05), butyric acid (P < 0.01) and propionic acid ( P < 0.01 ), and increase the lactic acid concentration ( P < 0.01 ). Silages treated with inoculant A possess the more DM loss, and the higher yeast counts upon aerobic exposure. Silage treated with inoculant B had the most DM (P < 0.05), lactic acid contents (P < 0.01 ), the least acetic acid content (P < 0.05). Inoculant B reduced the ADF (P < 0.01), ADL and NDF ( P < 0.05) contents. It was concluded that lactic bacteria inoculants may improve the fermentation but might impair the aerobic stability for sorghum ensilage.

  19. Effects of hexavalent chromium on performance and microbial community of an aerobic granular sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zichao; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian; Jin, Chunji; Zhao, Yangguo; Yang, Shiying; Guo, Liang; Wang, Sen

    2015-03-01

    The performance and microbial community of an aerobic granular sequencing batch reactor (GSBR) were investigated at different hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) concentrations. The COD and NH4 (+)-N removal efficiencies decreased with the increase in Cr(VI) concentration from 0 to 30 mg/L. The specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR) decreased from 34.86 to 12.18 mg/(g mixed liquor suspended sludge (MLSS)·h) with the increase in Cr(VI) concentration from 0 to 30 mg/L. The specific ammonium oxidation rate (SAOR), specific nitrite oxidation rate (SNOR), and specific nitrate reduction rate (SNRR) decreased with the increase in Cr(VI) concentration, whereas the SNRR was always higher than the sum of SAOR and SNOR at 0-30 mg/L Cr(VI). The scanning electron micrographs (SEM) showed some undefined particles on the surface of filamentous bacteria that might be the chelation of chromium and macromolecular organics at 30 mg/L Cr(VI). The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles revealed that some microorganisms adapting to high Cr(VI) concentration gradually became the predominant bacteria, while others without Cr(VI)-tolerance capacity tended to deplete or weaken. Some bacteria could tolerate the toxicity of high Cr(VI) concentration in the aerobic GSBR, such as Propionibacteriaceae bacterium, Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Micropruina glycogenica.

  20. The influence of bacterial inoculants on the microbial ecology of aerobic spoilage of barley silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, G D; Yanke, L J; Kawchuk, L M; McAllister, T A

    1999-01-01

    The aerobic decomposition of barley silage treated with two inoculants (LacA and LacB) containing mixtures of Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecium was investigated over a 28-day period. Initially, yeast and bacterial populations were larger in silage inoculated with LacA than in silage treated with LacB or water alone (control). Differences in the succession of yeasts in silage treated with LacA were observed relative to the other two treatments. From silage treatment with LacA, Issatchenkia orientalis was the most prevalent yeast taxon over all of the sample times, and the filamentous fungus Microascus brevicaulis was also frequently isolated at later sample dates (> or = 14 days). In contrast, Saccharomyces exiguus was the most prominent yeast recovered from silage treated with LacB and water alone on days 2 and 4, although it was supplanted by I. orientalis at later sample times. Successional trends of bacteria were similar for all three treatments. Lactobacillus spp. were initially the most prevalent bacteria isolated, followed by Bacillus spp. (primarily Bacillus pumilus). However, the onset of Bacillus spp. prominence was faster in LacA silage, and Klebsiella planticola was frequently recovered at later sample times (> or = 14 days). More filamentous fungi were recovered from LacA silage on media containing carboxylmethylcellulose, pectin, or xylan. The most commonly isolated taxa were Absidia sp., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Byssochlamys nivea, Monascus ruber, Penicillium brevicompactum, Pseudoallescheria boydii, and M. brevicaulis. The results of this study indicated that the two bacterial inoculants incorporated into barley at the time of ensilage affected the microbial ecology of silage decomposition following exposure to air. However, neither of the microbial inoculants effectively delayed aerobic spoilage of barley silage, and the rate of decomposition of silage treated with one of the inoculants (LacA) was actually enhanced.

  1. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr

    1996-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Information has been presented by a number of researchers, which indicated that those tests may be inappropriate for examining microbial degradation of cement-solidified LLW. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program was to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that would be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluation of the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. The procedures that have been developed in this work are presented and discussed. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites were employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this final report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides developed during this study are presented.

  2. Treatment of colour industry wastewaters with concomitant bioelectricity production in a sequential stacked mono-chamber microbial fuel cells-aerobic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Eustace; Keshavarz, Taj; Kyazze, Godfrey; Fonseka, Keerthi

    2016-01-01

    The scalability of any microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based system is of vital importance if it is to be utilized for potential field applications. In this study, an integrated MFC-aerobic bioreactor system was investigated for its scalability with the purpose of treating a simulated dye wastewater and industrial wastewaters originated from textile dyebaths and leather tanning. The influent containing real wastewater was fed into the reactor in continuous mode at ambient temperature. Three MFC units were integrated to act in unison as a single module for wastewater treatment and a continuously stirred aerobic bioreactor operating downstream to the MFC module was installed in order to ensure more complete degradation of colouring agents found in the wastewater. Total colour removal in the final effluent exceeded 90% in all experiments where both synthetic (AO-7 containing) and real wastewater were used as the influent feed. The chemical oxygen demand reduction also exceeded 80% in all experiments under the same conditions. The MFC modules connected in parallel configuration allowed obtaining higher current densities than that can be obtained from a single MFC unit. The maximum current density of the MFC stack reached 1150 mA m(-2) when connected in a parallel configuration. The outcome of this work implies that suitably up-scaled MFC-aerobic integrated bioprocesses could be used for colour industry wastewater treatment under industrially relevant conditions with possible prospects of bioelectricity generation.

  3. Effects of microbial inhibitors on anaerobic degradation of DDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.S.; Chiu, T.C.; Yen, J.H. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan)

    2004-09-15

    Chlorinated insecticide DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane] was extensively used for controlling pests in the agricultural field and human-being living environments in the past several decades. Due to the chemical stability, DDT was extremely persistent and recalcitrant in soils and sediments and it was banned by nations. Microorganisms usually play important roles in reducing organochlorine compounds in the environments. Under low-oxygen conditions, microbial dechlorination is thought as the onset of highly chlorinated compounds. Methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria participate in microbial dechlorination under anaerobic condition has been reported. In this study, a mixed anaerobic culture enabling to dechlorinate DDT was obtained from river sediment in Taiwan. In order to understand the effect of these microorganisms on DDT dechlorination, microbial inhibitors BESA (2-bromoethanesulfonate) and molybdate, for inhibiting methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria, respectively, were chosen to investigate the interaction between specific microbial communities and their degradation activities. Besides, a molecular technique, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), based on analyzing the 16S rDNA of bacteria, was used for monitoring the bacterial community structure in this study.

  4. Biodegradability of biodegradable/degradable plastic materials under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohee, R; Unmar, G D; Mudhoo, A; Khadoo, P

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted on two types of plastic materials, Mater-Bi Novamont (MB) and Environmental Product Inc. (EPI), to assess their biodegradability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. For aerobic conditions, organic fractions of municipal solid wastes were composted. For the anaerobic process, anaerobic inoculum from a wastewater treatment plant was used. Cellulose filter papers (CFP) were used as a positive control for both mediums. The composting process was monitored in terms of temperature, moisture and volatile solids and the biodegradation of the samples were monitored in terms of mass loss. Monitoring results showed a biodegradation of 27.1% on a dry basis for MB plastic within a period of 72 days of composting. Biodegradability under an anaerobic environment was monitored in terms of biogas production. A cumulative methane gas production of 245 ml was obtained for MB, which showed good degradation as compared to CFP (246.8 ml). However, EPI plastic showed a cumulative methane value of 7.6 ml for a period of 32 days, which was close to the blank (4.0 ml). The EPI plastic did not biodegrade under either condition. The cumulative carbon dioxide evolution after 32 days was as follows: CFP 4.406 cm3, MB 2.198 cm3 and EPI 1.328 cm3. The cumulative level of CO2 varying with time fitted sigmoid type curves with R2 values of 0.996, 0.996 and 0.995 for CFP, MB and EPI, respectively.

  5. Modeling microbial ethanol production by E. coli under aerobic/anaerobic conditions: applicability to real postmortem cases and to postmortem blood derived microbial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumba, Vassiliki A; Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy; Vougiouklakis, Theodore

    2013-10-10

    The mathematical modeling of the microbial ethanol production under strict anaerobic experimental conditions for some bacterial species has been proposed by our research group as the first approximation to the quantification of the microbial ethanol production in cases where other alcohols were produced simultaneously with ethanol. The present study aims to: (i) study the microbial ethanol production by Escherichia coli under controlled aerobic/anaerobic conditions; (ii) model the correlation between the microbial produced ethanol and the other higher alcohols; and (iii) test their applicability in: (a) real postmortem cases that had positive BACs (>0.10 g/L) and co-detection of higher alcohols and 1-butanol during the original ethanol analysis and (b) postmortem blood derived microbial cultures under aerobic/anaerobic controlled experimental conditions. The statistical evaluation of the results revealed that the formulated models were presumably correlated to 1-propanol and 1-butanol which were recognized as the most significant descriptors of the modeling process. The significance of 1-propanol and 1-butanol as descriptors was so powerful that they could be used as the only independent variables to create a simple and satisfactory model. The current models showed a potential for application to estimate microbial ethanol - within an acceptable standard error - in various tested cases where ethanol and other alcohols have been produced from different microbes.

  6. Biodegradable plastic agricultural mulches and key features of microbial degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodhagen, Marion; Peyron, Mark; Miles, Carol; Inglis, Debra Ann

    2015-02-01

    The development of biodegradable plastic mulch films for use in agriculture has been ongoing for decades. These films consist of mixtures of polymers with various additives. As a result, their physical and chemical properties differ from those of the pure polymers often used for in vitro enzymatic and microbial degradation studies, raising questions about the biodegradation capability of mulch films. Currently, standards exist for the biodegradation of plastics in composting conditions but not in soil. Biodegradation in soil or compost depends on a complex synergy of biological and abiotic degradative processes. This review discusses the physicochemical and structural properties of biodegradable plastic mulches, examines their potential for on-site decomposition in light of site-to-site variance due to environmental and biological conditions, and considers the potential for long-term effects on agroecosystem sustainability and functionality.

  7. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, S.; Hybel, A.-M.; Bjerg, P.L.; Albrechtsen, H.-J., E-mail: hana@env.dtu.dk

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential for the herbicides. In the presence of oxygen {sup 14}C-labelled bentazone and mecoprop were removed significantly from the two monitoring wells' groundwater samples. Oxygen was added to microcosms in order to investigate whether different oxygen concentrations stimulate the biodegradation of the three herbicides in microcosms using groundwater and sandy aquifer materials. To maintain a certain oxygen concentration this level was measured from the outside of the bottles with a fibre oxygen meter using oxygen-sensitive luminescent sensor foil mounted inside the microcosm, to which supplementary oxygen was added. The highest oxygen concentrations (corresponding to 4–11 mg L{sup −1}) stimulated degradation (a 14–27% increase for mecoprop, 3–9% for dichlorprop and 15–20% for bentazone) over an experimental period of 200 days. Oxygen was required to biodegrade the herbicides, since no degradation was observed under anaerobic conditions. This is the first time bentazone degradation has been observed in aquifer material at low oxygen concentrations (2 mg L{sup −1}). The sediment had substantial oxygen consumption (0.92–1.45 O{sub 2} g{sup -1} dw over 200 days) and oxygen was depleted rapidly in most incubations soon after its addition, which might be due to the oxidation of organic matter and other reduced species such as Fe{sup 2+}, S{sup 2−} and Mn in sediment before the biodegradation of herbicides takes place. This study suggests that oxygen enhancement around a drinking water abstraction field could stimulate the bioremediation of diffuse source contamination. - Highlights: • Addition of different oxygen concentrations stimulated degradation of

  8. Modeling Aerobic Carbon Source Degradation Processes using Titrimetric Data and Combined Respirometric-Titrimetric Data: Experimental Data and Model Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Petersen, B.; Nopens, I.;

    2002-01-01

    vessel and a closed non-aerated respiration chamber for monitoring the oxygen uptake rate related to substrate degradation. The respirometer is combined with a titrimetric unit that keeps the pH of the activated sludge sample at a constant value by addition of acid and/or base. The experimental data......Experimental data are presented that resulted from aerobic batch degradation experiments in activated sludge with simple carbon sources (acetate and dextrose) as substrates. Data collection was done using combined respirometric-titrimetric measurements. The respirometer consists of an open aerated...... clearly showed that the activated sludge bacteria react with consumption or production of protons during aerobic degradation of the two carbon sources under study. Thus, the cumulative amount of added acid and/or base could serve as a complementary information source on the degradation processes...

  9. Microbial Dynamics during Aerobic Exposure of Corn Silage Stored under Oxygen Barrier or Polyethylene Films▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Paola; Tabacco, Ernesto; Cocolin, Luca; Borreani, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the effects of sealing forage corn with a new oxygen barrier film with those obtained by using a conventional polyethylene film. This comparison was made during both ensilage and subsequent exposure of silage to air and included chemical, microbiological, and molecular (DNA and RNA) assessments. The forage was inoculated with a mixture of Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Enterococcus faecium and ensiled in polyethylene (PE) and oxygen barrier (OB) plastic bags. The oxygen permeability of the PE and OB films was 1,480 and 70 cm3 m−2 per 24 h at 23°C, respectively. The silages were sampled after 110 days of ensilage and after 2, 5, 7, 9, and 14 days of air exposure and analyzed for fermentation characteristics, conventional microbial enumeration, and bacterial and fungal community fingerprinting via PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-DGGE. The yeast counts in the PE and OB silages were 3.12 and 1.17 log10 CFU g−1, respectively, with corresponding aerobic stabilities of 65 and 152 h. Acetobacter pasteurianus was present at both the DNA and RNA levels in the PE silage samples after 2 days of air exposure, whereas it was found only after 7 days in the OB silages. RT-PCR-DGGE revealed the activity of Aspergillus fumigatus in the PE samples from the day 7 of air exposure, whereas it appeared only after 14 days in the OB silages. It has been shown that the use of an oxygen barrier film can ensure a longer shelf life of silage after aerobic exposure. PMID:21821764

  10. Microbial dynamics during aerobic exposure of corn silage stored under oxygen barrier or polyethylene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Paola; Tabacco, Ernesto; Cocolin, Luca; Borreani, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the effects of sealing forage corn with a new oxygen barrier film with those obtained by using a conventional polyethylene film. This comparison was made during both ensilage and subsequent exposure of silage to air and included chemical, microbiological, and molecular (DNA and RNA) assessments. The forage was inoculated with a mixture of Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Enterococcus faecium and ensiled in polyethylene (PE) and oxygen barrier (OB) plastic bags. The oxygen permeability of the PE and OB films was 1,480 and 70 cm³ m⁻² per 24 h at 23°C, respectively. The silages were sampled after 110 days of ensilage and after 2, 5, 7, 9, and 14 days of air exposure and analyzed for fermentation characteristics, conventional microbial enumeration, and bacterial and fungal community fingerprinting via PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-DGGE. The yeast counts in the PE and OB silages were 3.12 and 1.17 log₁₀ CFU g⁻¹, respectively, with corresponding aerobic stabilities of 65 and 152 h. Acetobacter pasteurianus was present at both the DNA and RNA levels in the PE silage samples after 2 days of air exposure, whereas it was found only after 7 days in the OB silages. RT-PCR-DGGE revealed the activity of Aspergillus fumigatus in the PE samples from the day 7 of air exposure, whereas it appeared only after 14 days in the OB silages. It has been shown that the use of an oxygen barrier film can ensure a longer shelf life of silage after aerobic exposure.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of aerobic freshwater and marine enrichment cultures efficient in hydrocarbon degradation: effect of profiling method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Y.J.; Stephen, J.R.; Richter, A.P.; Venosa, A.D.; Bruggemann, J.; MacNaughton, S.J.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Haines, J.R.; Kline, E.; White, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Aerobically grown enrichment cultures derived from hydrocarbon- contaminated seawater and freshwater sediments were generated by growth on crude oil as sole carbon source. Both cultures displayed a high rate of degradation for a wide range of hydrocarbon compounds. The bacterial species composition

  12. Microbial degradation of sulfentrazone in a Brazilian rhodic hapludox soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila O. Martinez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulfentrazone is amongst the most widely used herbicides for treating the main crops in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, but few studies are available on the biotransformation of this compound in Brazilian soils. Soil samples of Rhodic Hapludox soil were supplemented with sulfentrazone (0.7 µg active ingredient (a.i. g-1 soil and maintained at 27ºC. The soil moisture content was corrected to 30, 70 or 100 % water holding capacity (WHC and maintained constant until the end of the experimental period. Herbicide-free soil samples were used as controls. Another experiment was carried out using soil samples maintained at a constant moisture content of 70% WHC, supplemented or otherwise with the herbicide, and submitted to different temperatures of 15, 30 and 40º C. In both experiments, aliquots were removed after various incubation periods for the quantitative analysis of sulfentrazone residues by gas chromatography. Herbicide-degrading microorganisms were isolated and identified. After 120 days a significant effect on herbicide degradation was observed for the factor of temperature, degradation being higher at 30 and 40º C. A half-life of 91.6 days was estimated at 27º C and 70 % WHC. The soil moisture content did not significantly affect sulfentrazone degradation and the microorganisms identified as potential sulfentrazone degraders were Nocardia brasiliensis and Penicillium sp. The present study enhanced the prospects for future studies on the bio-prospecting for microbial populations related to the degradation of sulfentrazone, and may also contribute to the development of strategies for the bioremediation of sulfentrazone-polluted soils.

  13. Microbial degradation of 4-monobrominated diphenyl ether with anaerobic sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Yang-hsin, E-mail: yhs@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chou, Hsi-Ling [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 407, Taiwan, ROC (China); Peng, Yu-Huei [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDE-3 was degraded with two anaerobes in different rates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glucose addition augment the debromination efficiencies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen gas was detected and relative microbes were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extra-carbon source enhanced degradation partial due to H{sub 2}-generation bacteria. - Abstract: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardant additives for many plastic and electronic products. Owing to their ubiquitous distribution in the environment, multiple toxicity to humans, and increasing accumulation in the environment, the fate of PBDEs is of serious concern for public safety. In this study, the degradation of 4-monobrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-3) in anaerobic sludge and the effect of carbon source addition were investigated. BDE-3 can be degraded by two different anaerobic sludge samples. The by-products, diphenyl ether (DE) and bromide ions, were monitored, indicating the reaction of debromination within these anaerobic samples. Co-metabolism with glucose facilitated BDE-3 biodegradation in terms of kinetics and efficiency in the Jhongsing sludge. Through the pattern of amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments in denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), the composition of the microbial community was analyzed. Most of the predominant microbes were novel species. The fragments enriched in BDE-3-degrading anaerobic sludge samples are presumably Clostridium sp. This enrichment coincides with the H{sub 2} gas generation and the facilitation of debromination during the degradation process. Findings of this study provide better understanding of the biodegradation of brominated DEs and can facilitate the prediction of the fate of PBDEs in the environment.

  14. Effect of nitrogen supplementation on aerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate by consortia of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehinde I. Temitope Eniola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Untreated detergent bearing wastes discharged into the environment are sources of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS. Detergent wastes usually do not contain nitrogen or contain very low amounts. Biostimulation by introducing limiting nutrient element can be useful in biotreatment of such waste. The effect of inorganic and organic nitrogen supplements on aerobic degradation of LAS by LAS-utilizing bacteria was examined. Phosphate-buffered LAS mineral media were prepared and supplemented with different nitrogen sources: NPK fertilizer (inorganic and urea fertilizer (organic. Individual and various consortia of pure cultures of Alcaligenes odorans, Citrobacter diversus, Micrococcus luteus and Pseudomonas putida, previously isolated from a detergent effluent polluted stream, were used. Biodegradation of LAS was monitored in terms of half-life (t½ of the surfactant. The rates of biodegradation by the consortia can be ranked as: 4-membered (t½=8-12 days >3-membered (t½=8-13 days >2-membered consortia (t½=10-15 days >individuals (t½=9-16 days. The inorganic nitrogen source enhanced utilization of the surfactant, while organic nitrogen supplementation generally slowed degradation of the surfactant. In undertaking biotreatment of detergent bearing effluent, inorganic nitrogen should be used as biostimulant.

  15. Microbial monitoring and most-probable number of microbes in soils capable of degrading aircraft deicing fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biró, B.; Horváth, N.; Domonkos, M.; French, H. K.

    2012-04-01

    Intensive use of propylene glycol (PG) and potassium formate-(PF) based aircraft de-icing fluids (ADF) are sources of pollution in Northern airports for soil and groundwater. When the contaminated snow melts in the spring, the de-icing chemicals can infiltrate the sandy soil rapidly. The pollutants are known to be degradable by soil microbes, biodegradation however might vary temporally and spatially. Non-invasive monitoring tools are mainly used to outline areas affected by contaminants and to monitor the flow and transport processes. Field sampling and laboratory measurements are required to examine microbial differences in soils, and the activity of PG degraders. The objective of our work was to map this variability using techniques, such as the countable, colony-forming (CFU) aerobic and anaerobic microbial components (bacteria and fungi) in soils and their catabolic enzymatic activity, measured by fluorescein-diacetate (FDA) analysis. Ratio of potential PG degraders was studied by the most probable number (MPN) method. Soil samples from the Gardermoen Airport (Oslo, Norway) were collected during spring 2010, vertically at 0-110 cm below ground level, and horizontally at about 0-154 cm distance from the runway in 5 steps each. A 10-fold soil solution was done in basal medium at 10.000 ppm ADF, added to 96-wells microplates. Growth was tested after incubation at 22 °C for 2 and 4 weeks by iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT). Cochran table was applied to calculate the MPN values of PG degraders. There were an increasing abundance and activity of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and fungi found further away from the highly contaminated runway, indicating toxic effects in this area. Also, below the 40cm soil layer a reduced microbial activity could be seen. The most probable number of microbes capable to degrade ADF correlates well with the CFU numbers and the measured FDA enzymatic activity of the soils. Near the most contaminated runway, 3% of the total

  16. Effect of wastewater COD/N ratio on aerobic nitrifying sludge granulation and microbial population shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wu; Chengyao Peng; Yongzhen Peng; Lingyun Li; Shuying Wang; Yong Ma

    2012-01-01

    The effect of COD/N ratio on the granulation process and microbial population succession was investigated.Four identical sequencing batch reactors,R1,R2,R3 and R4,were operated with various initial COD/N ratios ranging from 0/200 to 800/200 (m/n).Ethanol was fed as the source of COD.Aerobic granules were successfully cultivated in R2 and R3,operating with the COD/N ratio of 200/200 and 400/200,respectively.Scanning electron microscope observations indicated that short rod-shaped and spherical bacteria were dominant in R2,while granules produced in R3 were surrounded with a large amount of filamentous bacteria.The average specific nitritation rate in R2 and R3 were 0.019 and 0.008 mg N/(mg MLVSS.hr),respectively.Fluorescence in situ hybridization results demonstrated that nitrifying bacteria population was enriched remarkably in R2.It indicated that nitrification ability and nitrifying bacteria population were enriched remarkably at low COD/N ratio.However,no granules were formed in R1and R4 which might attribute to either limited or excessive extracellular polymeric substances production.This study contributed to a better understanding of the role of COD/N ratio in nitrifying sludge granulation.

  17. A novel biosensor for p-nitrophenol based on an aerobic anode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengjun; Niu, Yongyan; Zhao, Shuai; Khan, Aman; Ling, Zhenmin; Chen, Yong; Liu, Pu; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-11-15

    P-nitrophenol is one of the most common contaminants in chemical industrial wastewater, and in situ real-time monitoring of PNP cannot be achieved by conventional analytical techniques. Here, a two-chamber microbial fuel cell with an aerobic anode chamber was tested as a biosensor for in situ real-time monitoring of PNP. Pseudomonas monteilii LZU-3, which was used as the biological recognition element, can form a biofilm on the anode electrode using PNP as a sole substrate. The optimal operation parameters of the biosensor were as follows: external resistance 1000Ω, pH 7.8, temperature 30°C, and maximum PNP concentration 50mgL(-1). Under these conditions, the maximum voltages showed a linear relationship with PNP concentrations ranging from 15±5 to 44±4.5mgL(-1). Furthermore, we developed a novel portable device for in situ real-time monitoring of PNP. When the device was applied to measure PNP in wastewater containing various additional aromatic compounds and metal ions, the performance of the biosensor was not affected and the correlation between the maximum voltages and the PNP concentrations ranging from 9±4mgL(-1) to 36 ± 5mgL(-1) was conserved. The results demonstrated that the MFC biosensor provides a rapid and cost-efficient analytical method for real-time monitoring of toxic and recalcitrant pollutants in environmental samples.

  18. Enhanced phosphorus recovery and biofilm microbial community changes in an alternating anaerobic/aerobic biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qing; Ong, Say Kee; Xie, Xuehui; Li, Fang; Zhu, Yanbin; Wang, Feng Rui; Yang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    The operation of an alternating anaerobic/aerobic biofilter (AABF), treating synthetic wastewater, was modified to enhance recovery of phosphorus (P). The AABF was periodically fed with an additional carbon source during the anaerobic phase to force the release of biofilm-sequestered P which was then harvested and recovered. A maximum of 48% of the total influent P was found to be released in the solution for recovery. Upon implementation of periodic P bio-sequestering and P harvesting, the predominant bacterial communities changed from β-Proteobacteria to γ-Proteobacteria groups. The genus Pseudomonas of γ-Proteobacteria was found to enrich greatly with 98% dominance. Dense intracellular poly-P granules were found within the cells of the biofilm, confirming the presence of P accumulating organisms (PAOs). Periodic addition of a carbon source to the AABF coupled with intracellular P reduction during the anaerobic phase most probably exerted environmental stress in the selection of Pseudomonas PAOs over PAOs of other phylogenic types. Results of the study provided operational information on the selection of certain microbial communities for P removal and recovery. This information can be used to further advance P recovery in biofilm systems such as the AABFs.

  19. Composition and pathogenic potential of a microbial bioremediation product used for crude oil degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayabali, Azam F.; Coleman, Gordon; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Nguyen, Kathy C.; Zhang, Yan; Shwed, Philip

    2017-01-01

    A microbial bioremediation product (MBP) used for large-scale oil degradation was investigated for microbial constituents and possible pathogenicity. Aerobic growth on various media yielded >108 colonies mL-1. Full-length 16S rDNA sequencing and fatty acid profiling from morphologically distinct colonies revealed ≥13 distinct genera. Full-length 16S rDNA library sequencing, by either Sanger or long-read PacBio technology, suggested that up to 21% of the MBP was composed of Arcobacter. Other high abundance microbial constituents (>6%) included the genera Proteus, Enterococcus, Dysgonomonas and several genera in the order Bacteroidales. The MBP was most susceptible to ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, gentamicin, and meropenam. MBP exposure of human HT29 and A549 cells caused significant cytotoxicity, and bacterial growth and adherence. An acellular MBP filtrate was also cytotoxic to HT29, but not A549. Both MBP and filtrate exposures elevated the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8. In endotracheal murine exposures, bacterial pulmonary clearance was complete after one-week. Elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, and chemokines KC and MCP-1 occurred between 2h and 48h post-exposure, followed by restoration to baseline levels at 96h. Cytokine/chemokine signalling was accompanied by elevated blood neutrophils and monocytes at 4h and 48h, respectively. Peripheral acute phase response markers were maximal at 24h. All indicators examined returned to baseline values by 168h. In contrast to HT29, but similar to A549 observations, MBP filtrate did not induce significant murine effects with the indicators examined. The results demonstrated the potentially complex nature of MBPs and transient immunological effects during exposure. Products containing microbes should be scrutinized for pathogenic components and subjected to characterisation and quality validation prior to commercial release. PMID:28178315

  20. Treatment of anthraquinone dye wastewater by hydrolytic acidification-aerobic process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian; WU Min; Li Dan

    2004-01-01

    Experiment on microbial degradation with two kinds of biological process, hydrolytic acidification-aerobic process and aerobic process was conducted to treat the anthraquinone dye wastewater with CODCr concentration of 400 mg/L and chroma 800. The experimental result demonstrated that the hydrolytic-aerobic process could raise the biodegradability of anthraquinone dye wastewater effectively. The effluent CODCr can reach 120-170 mg/L and chroma 150 which is superior to that from simple aerobic process.

  1. Molecular analysis of phenol-degrading microbial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasiev, Jordan; Gerginova, Maria; Yemendzhiev, Hyusein; Peneva, Nadejda; Alexieva, Zlatka

    2008-01-01

    In an attempt to estimate the occurrence of phenol hydroxylase-related gene sequences we performed a dot blot hybridization assay with DNA from phenol utilizing Trichosporon cutaneum R57 strain NBIMCC 2414 and microbial isolates from different wastewaters. The used oligonucletides were homologous to the 5'-end of TORPHD locus (NCBI)-coding phenol hydroxylase in Trichosporon cutaneum ATCC 46490 and to the 5'-end of TORCCMLE locus (NCBI)-coding cis,cis-muconate-lactonizing enzyme in Trichosporon cutaneum ATCC 58094. Two microbial strains, Escherichia coli JM 109 and Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356, incapable to degrade phenol were used as negative controls. We established the presence of hybridization with both used oligonucleotide probes in T. cutaneum R57 and T. cutaneum ATCC 46490 yeast strains. The experiments implemented with microbial isolates obtained from three industrialized areas in Bulgaria showed that 7 of them may carry sequences hybridizing with a phenol hydroxylase oligonucleotide probe. A subsequent hybridization test for the cis,cis-muconate-lactonizing enzyme showed that only 3 of them displayed a positive signal. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 and Escherichia coli JM 109 strains' DNA used as negative controls in the experiments did not reveal any sequence similarity to the both applied oligonucleotides. The partial nucleotide sequences of 16S rDNAs of the isolated strains C1 and K1 obtained as PCR products were determined and sequenced. A comparison of these nucleotide sequences with similar sequences in NCBI Data Bank indicated that both C1 and K1 strains are closely related to the genera Acinetobacter and Burkholderia.

  2. Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-06

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic

  3. Trichloroethylene aerobic cometabolism by suspended and immobilized butane-growing microbial consortia: a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascari, Dario; Zanaroli, Giulio; Bucchi, Giacomo; Rosato, Antonella; Tavanaie, Nasrin; Fraraccio, Serena; Pinelli, Davide; Fava, Fabio

    2013-09-01

    A kinetic study of butane uptake and trichloroethylene (TCE) aerobic cometabolism was conducted by two suspended-cell (15 and 30°C) and two attached-cell (15 and 30°C) consortia obtained from the indigenous biomass of a TCE-contaminated aquifer. The shift from suspended to attached cells resulted in an increase of butane (15 and 30°C) and TCE (15°C) biodegradation rates, and a significant decrease of butane inhibition on TCE biodegradation. The TCE 15°C maximum specific biodegradation rate was equal to 0.011 mg(TCE ) mg(protein)(-1) d(-1) with suspended cells and 0.021 mg(TCE) mg(protein)(-1) d(-1) with attached cells. The type of mutual butane/TCE inhibition depended on temperature and biomass conditions. On the basis of a continuous-flow simulation, a packed-bed PFR inoculated with the 15 or 30°C attached-cell consortium could attain a 99.96% conversion of the studied site's average TCE concentration with a 0.4-0.5-day hydraulic residence time, with a low effect of temperature on the TCE degradation performances.

  4. Bioremediation via in situ microbial degradation of organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of soil and natural waters by organic pollutants is a global problem. The major organic pollutants of point sources are mineral oil, fuel components, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Research from the last two decades discovered that most of these compounds are biodegradable under anoxic conditions. This has led to the rise of bioremediation strategies based on the in situ biodegradation of pollutants. Monitored natural attenuation is a concept by which a contaminated site is remediated by natural biodegradation; to evaluate such processes, a combination of chemical and microbiological methods are usually used. Compound specific stable isotope analysis emerged as a key method for detecting and quantifying in situ biodegradation. Natural attenuation processes can be initiated or accelerated by manipulating the environmental conditions to become favorable for indigenous pollutant degrading microbial communities or by adding externally breeded specific pollutant degrading microorganisms; these techniques are referred to as enhanced natural attenuation. Xenobiotic micropollutants, such as pesticides or pharmaceuticals, contaminate diffusively large areas in low concentrations; the biodegradation pattern of such contaminations are not yet understood.

  5. Microbial Degradation of Chlorogenic Acid by a Sphingomonas sp. Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuping; Wang, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xueling; Zhang, Zhan; Yang, Zongcan; Nie, Cong; Tang, Hongzhi

    2016-08-01

    In order to elucidate the metabolism of chlorogenic acid by environmental microbes, a strain of Sphingomonas sp. isolated from tobacco leaves was cultured under various conditions, and chlorogenic acid degradation and its metabolites were investigated. The strain converting chlorogenic acid was newly isolated and identified as a Sphingomonas sp. strain by 16S rRNA sequencing. The optimal conditions for growth and chlorogenic acid degradation were 37 °C and pH 7.0 with supplementation of 1.5 g/l (NH4)2SO4 as the nitrogen source and 2 g/l chlorogenic acid as the sole carbon source. The maximum chlorogenic acid tolerating capability for the strain was 5 g/l. The main metabolites were identified as caffeic acid, shikimic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The analysis reveals the biotransformation mechanism of chlorogenic acid in microbial cells isolated from the environment.

  6. Continuous exposure of pesticides in an aquifer changes microbial biomass, diversity and degradation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, J. R.; Johnsen, K.; Aamand, J.;

    2000-01-01

    We studied in situ effects of pesticide exposure on microbial degradation potential and community structure of aquifer sediments. Sediment samples pre-exposed to pesticides were significantly different to non-exposed control samples. Pre-exposed sediment showed an increased degradation potential...... towards phenoxyalcanoic acid herbicides as well as impact on microbial diversity was observed. Furthermore, bacterial biomass was changed, e.g. increased numbers of phenoxyalcanoic acid degraders in pesticide exposed sediment....

  7. In situ exposure to low herbicide concentrations affects microbial population composition and catabolic gene frequency in an aerobic shallow aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, J.R.; Tuxen, Nina; Johnsen, Kaare

    2003-01-01

    and were analyzed for the presence of general microbial populations, Pseudomonas bacteria, and specific phenoxy acid degraders. Both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were applied. The abundance of microbial phenoxy acid degraders (10(0) to 10(4) g(-1) sediment) was determined by most...... measured by either PCR or plating on selective agar media was higher in sediments subjected to high levels of phenoxy acid. Furthermore, high numbers of CFU compared to direct counting of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained cells in the microscope suggested an increased culturability of the indigenous...... of the aquifer. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism measurements demonstrated the presence of different populations of tfd genes, suggesting that the in situ herbicide degradation was caused by the activity of a heterogeneous population of phenoxy acid degraders. The number of Pseudomonas bacteria...

  8. Effects of bioreactor retention time on aerobic microbial decomposition of CELSS crop residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, R. F.; Finger, B. W.; Alazraki, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    The focus of resource recovery research at the KSC-CELSS Breadboard Project has been the evaluation of microbiologically mediated biodegradation of crop residues by manipulation of bioreactor process and environmental variables. We will present results from over 3 years of studies that used laboratory- and breadboard-scale (8 and 120 L working volumes, respectively) aerobic, fed-batch, continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) for recovery of carbon and minerals from breadboard grown wheat and white potato residues. The paper will focus on the effects of a key process variable--bioreactor retention time--on response variables indicative of bioreactor performance. The goal is to determine the shortest retention time that is feasible for processing CELSS crop residues, thereby reducing bioreactor volume and weight requirements. Pushing the lower limits of bioreactor retention times will provide useful data for engineers who need to compare biological and physicochemical components. Bioreactor retention times were manipulated to range between 0.25 and 48 days. Results indicate that increases in retention time lead to a 4-fold increase in crop residue biodegradation, as measured by both dry weight losses and CO_2 production. A similar overall trend was also observed for crop residue fiber (cellulose and hemicellulose), with a noticeable jump in cellulose degradation between the 5.3 day and 10.7 day retention times. Water-soluble organic compounds (measured as soluble TOC) were appreciably reduced by more than 4-fold at all retention times tested. Results from a study of even shorter retention times (down to 0.25 days), in progress, will also be presented.

  9. Impact of Land Degradation on Soil Microbial Biomass and Activity in Northeast Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. S. NUNES; A. S. F. ARAUJO; L. A. P. L. NUNES; L. M. LIMA; R. F. V. CARNEIRO; A. A. C. SALVIANO; S. M. TSAI

    2012-01-01

    Land degradation causes great changes in the soil biological properties.The process of degradation may decrease soil microbial biomass and consequently decrease soil microbial activity.The study was conducted out during 2009 and 2010 at the four sites of land under native vegetation (NV),moderately degraded land (LDL),highly degraded land (HDL) and land under restoration for four years (RL) to evaluate changes in soil microbial biomass and activity in lands with different degradation levels in comparison with both land under native vegetation and land under restoration in Northeast Brazil.Soil samples were collected at 0-10 cm depth.Soil organic carbon (SOC),soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN),soil respiration (SR),and hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and dehydrogenase (DHA) activities were analyzed.After two years of evaluation,soil MBC,MBN,FDA and DHA had higher values in the NV,followed by the RL.The decreases of soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities in the degraded lands were approximately 8-10 times as large as those found in the NV.However,after land restoration,the MBC and MBN increased approximately 5-fold and 2-fold,respectively,compared with the HDL.The results showed that land degradation produced a strong decrease in soil microbial biomass.However,land restoration may promote short- and long-term increases in soil microbial biomass.

  10. Cultivating microbial dark matter in benzene-degrading methanogenic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fei; Devine, Cheryl E; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    The microbes responsible for anaerobic benzene biodegradation remain poorly characterized. In this study, we identified and quantified microbial populations in a series of 16 distinct methanogenic, benzene-degrading enrichment cultures using a combination of traditional 16S rRNA clone libraries (four cultures), pyrotag 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing (11 cultures), metagenome sequencing (1 culture) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR; 12 cultures). An operational taxonomic unit (OTU) from the Deltaproteobacteria designated ORM2 that is only 84% to 86% similar to Syntrophus or Desulfobacterium spp. was consistently identified in all enrichment cultures, and typically comprised more than half of the bacterial sequences. In addition to ORM2, a sequence belonging to Parcubacteria (candidate division OD1) identified from the metagenome data was the only other OTU common to all the cultures surveyed. Culture transfers (1% and 0.1%) were made in the presence and absence of benzene, and the abundance of ORM2, OD1 and other OTUs was tracked over 415 days using qPCR. ORM2 sequence abundance increased only when benzene was present, while the abundance of OD1 and other OTUs increased even in the absence of benzene. Deltaproteobacterium ORM2 is unequivocally the benzene-metabolizing population. This study also hints at laboratory cultivation conditions for a member of the widely distributed yet uncultivated Parcubacteria (OD1).

  11. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF SEVEN AMIDES BY SUSPENDED BACTERIAL POPULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial transformation rate constants were determined for seven amides in natural pond water. A second-order mathematical rate expression served as the model for describing the microbial transformation. Also investigated was the relationship between the infrared spectra and the...

  12. Comparing activated sludge and aerobic granules as microbial inocula for phenol biodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, S.T.L.; Moy, B.Y.P.; Maszenan, A.M.; Tay, J.H. [Environmental Engineering Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore)

    2005-06-01

    Activated sludge and acetate-fed granules were used as microbial inocula to start up two sequencing batch reactors (R1, R2) for phenol biodegradation. The reactors were operated in 4-h cycles at a phenol loading of 1.8 kg m{sup -3} day{sup -1}. The biomass in R1 failed to remove phenol and completely washed out after 4 days. R2 experienced initial difficulty in removing phenol, but the biomass acclimated quickly and effluent phenol concentrations declined to 0.3 mg l{sup -1} from day 3. The acetate-fed granules were covered with bacterial rods, but filamentous bacteria with sheaths, presumably to shield against toxicity, quickly emerged as the dominant morphotype upon phenol exposure. Bacterial adaptation to phenol also took the form of modifications in enzyme activity and increased production of extracellular polymers. 16S rRNA gene fingerprints revealed a slight decrease in bacterial diversity from day 0 to day 3 in R1, prior to process failure. In R2, a clear shift in community structure was observed as the seed evolved into phenol-degrading granules without losing species-richness. The results highlight the effectiveness of granules over activated sludge as seed for reactors treating toxic wastewaters. (orig.)

  13. Removal of pharmaceuticals from synthetic wastewater in an aerobic granular sludge membrane bioreactor and determination of the bioreactor microbial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Chun; Shen, Ji-Min; Chen, Zhong-Lin; Zhao, Xia; Xu, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Five types of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) substances were selected as pollutants in this study. The effects of the removal of these pollutants and the microbial succession process in a granular sludge membrane bioreactor (GMBR) were investigated. Results showed that wastewater containing PPCPs influenced the performance of granular sludge. The removal of the five PPCPs from the GMBR had different effects. The removal rates of prednisolone, norfloxacin and naproxen reached 98.5, 87.8 and 84 %, respectively. The degradation effect in the GMBR system was relatively lower for sulphamethoxazole and ibuprofen, with removal efficiency rates of 79.8 and 63.3 %, respectively. Furthermore, the microbial community structure and diversity variation of the GMBR were analysed via high-throughput sequencing technology. The results indicated the structural and functional succession of the microbial community based on the GMBR process. The results indicate the key features of bacteria with an important role in drug degradation.

  14. Evaluation of Biostimulation and Bioaugmentation To Stimulate Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5,-triazine Degradation in an Aerobic Groundwater Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Mandy M; King, Aaron S; Rule, Rebecca A; Fuller, Mark E; Hatzinger, Paul B; Condee, Charles W; Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Jung, Carina M; Istok, Jack D

    2016-07-19

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5,-triazine (RDX) is a toxic and mobile groundwater contaminant common to military sites. This study compared in situ RDX degradation rates following bioaugmentation with Gordonia sp. strain KTR9 (henceforth KTR9) to rates under biostimulation conditions in an RDX-contaminated aquifer in Umatilla, OR. Bioaugmentation was achieved by injecting site groundwater (6000 L) amended with KTR9 cells (10(8) cells mL(-1)) and low carbon substrate concentrations (15 mM fructose) carbon substrate concentrations in an effort to stimulate aerobic or anaerobic microbial activity, respectively. Single-well push-pull tests were conducted to measure RDX degradation rates for each treatment. Average rate coefficients were 1.2 day(-1) for bioaugmentation and 0.7 day(-1) for high carbon biostimulation; rate coefficients for low carbon biostimulation were not significantly different from zero (p values ≥0.060). Our results suggest that bioaugmentation with KTR9 is a feasible strategy for in situ biodegradation of RDX and, at this site, is capable of achieving RDX concentration reductions comparable to those obtained by high carbon biostimulation while requiring ~97% less fructose. Bioaugmentation has potential to minimize substrate quantities and associated costs, as well as secondary groundwater quality impacts associated with anaerobic biostimulation processes (e.g., hydrogen sulfide, methane production) during full-scale RDX remediation.

  15. Degradation of organic pollutants in sewage sludge by aerobic-thermophilic sludge treatment. Final report; Abbau organischer Schadstoffe im Klaerschlamm durch aerob-thermophile Schlammbehandlung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prechtl, S.

    1999-07-01

    A process for reduction of organic polllutants in sewage sludge was to be developed and optimized. The organic fraction of the solid matter in sewage sludge containes more than 300 different pollutant. Apart from the substances classified in the Sewage Sludge Ordinance (dioxins/furans, PCB), there are others that have been considered relevant as well but for which no sufficient data base is available. The research project investigated whether aerobic-thermophilic treatment (AT) would improve the sewage sludge quality with regard to phthalates (di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, DEHP), PAH and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP, a degradation product of nonionic tensides). Pollutants were analzyed by HPLC and GC/MS. The concentration of DEHP and 4-NP was reduced by 70% resp. 50% in laboratory experiments with doped sludges and by 61% resp. 53% in undoped sludges. In semi-industrial tests, a 14% reduction was achieved for DEHP and a 68% reduction for 4-NP. In the case of pyrene, the degradation was up to 57% in the laboratory experiments and 22% in semi-industrial tests. A combined process of short-term anaerobic digestion and AT resulted in a 60% reduction in the case of DEHP. Up to anthracene, PAH were reduced as well. In the case of higher-condensed PAH (basic load in the ppb range) there was no clear result. In the case of 4-NP, the degradation effect was counterbalanced by the formation of new 4-NP from alkylphenol ethoxylates in both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The results prove the correlation between sewage sludge hygienisation and the time of residue in the reactor system. No enterobacteriaceae were found after a treatment of 96 h, both in the semi-industrial and the laboratory reactors. In activated sludge, a phenol-degrading mixed bacteria culture could be isolated which was also capable of degrading 4-NP in thermophilic conditions. [German] Das Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens war die Entwicklung/Optimierung eines Verfahrens zur Reduktion organischer Schadstoffe im

  16. Methods of lab silos sealing and fermentation characteristics and aerobic stability of sugarcane silage treated with microbial additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Ortiz Novinski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental assay evaluated the effect of lab silo sealing methods on the ensilage of the sugarcane, with or without microbial additives (Lactobacillus plantarum and Propionibacterium acidipropionici. Twenty-liter plastic buckets were used as experimental silos, which were sealed with either a polyethylene sheet (silo cover with a mesh size of 200 µm or an appropriate plastic lid equipped with Bunsen valve. Silos were stored for 30, 60, or 90 days. Fermentative losses, chemical composition, organic acids, ethanol and aerobic stability were evaluated. The sealing method employed did not influence most of evaluated variables, showing a small decrease of effluent production in silos covered with polyethylene sheet. The microbial additive did not avoid dry matter (DM fermentative losses in sugarcane silages (216 g kg-1, nor affected aerobic stability (44.6 hours. The levels of neutral and acid detergent fiber of fresh sugarcane increased after ensiling due to DM losses as gases and effluent. The ethanol content of silages was not influenced by treatments (mean 146 g kg-1 of DM. The sealing methods of experimental silos were not affected by the evaluated variables; polyethylene sheet and plastic lid show the same performance on the fermentative model and both methods represent well the conditions of large scale farm silos.

  17. [Degradation of cassava residue by the cellulose degradation composite microbial system MC1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Wang, Xiao-Fen; Zhu, Wan-Bin; Cheng, Xu; Cui, Zong-Jun

    2008-03-01

    The lignocelluloses of cassava residue are good biomass resources. They are mainly used to produce feeds and alcohol. It is a promising approach to utilize them to produce methane. But it is difficult to use cassava residue for producing methane because of its dispersive solid matter and much water. A cellulose degradation composite microbial system MC1 was applied to degrade cassava residue discarded from cassava starch manufactory, and the composition of the lignocelluloses and the soluble ingredients of cassava residue were analyzed. After 18 days' cultivation, the total weight of the cassava residue was reduced by 47.3%, the cellulose, hemi-cellulose and lignin of the cassava residue were reduced by 22.7%, 90.4% and 11.3%, respectively, and 85% of the whole weight relief was made by MC1 within 6 days. The soluble ingredients of the cassava residue were increased from the incipient 18% to 33% in the third day which was the peak value in the process. The total amount of the volatile products, analyzed by GC-MS, came to a maximum in the sixth day. Twelve kinds of volatile products in the fermentation broth were determined, in which ethanol, acetic acid, 1, 2-ethanediol, butanoic acid and glycerine were the major compounds, and they can be utilized by methanogenic organism directly or be changed into compounds that can be utilized by methanogens organism directly. Accordingly, it is very hopeful to use MC1 to degrade cassava residue as a method of prefermentation in methane fermentation.

  18. Comprehensive microbial analysis of combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process treating high-strength food wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon; Kim, Mi-Sun; Sommer, Sven G

    2015-04-15

    A combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process was used to treat high-strength food wastewater in this study. During the experimental period, most of solid residue from the mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R1) was separated by centrifugation and introduced into the thermophilic aerobic reactor (R2) for further digestion. Then, thermophilic aerobically-digested sludge was reintroduced into R1 to enhance reactor performance. The combined process was operated with two different Runs: Run I with hydraulic retention time (HRT) = 40 d (corresponding OLR = 3.5 kg COD/m(3) d) and Run II with HRT = 20 d (corresponding OLR = 7 kg COD/m(3)). For a comparison, a single-stage mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R3) was operated concurrently with same OLRs and HRTs as the combined process. During the overall digestion, all reactors showed high stability without pH control. The combined process demonstrated significantly higher organic matter removal efficiencies (over 90%) of TS, VS and COD and methane production than did R3. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) results indicated that higher populations of both bacteria and archaea were maintained in R1 than in R3. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed relatively high abundance of phylum Actinobacteria in both R1 and R2, and a predominance of phyla Synergistetes and Firmicutes in R3 during Run II. Furthermore, R1 and R2 shared genera (Prevotella, Aminobacterium, Geobacillus and Unclassified Actinobacteria), which suggests synergy between mesophilic anaerobic digestion and thermophilic aerobic digestion. For archaea, in R1 methanogenic archaea shifted from genus Methanosaeta to Methanosarcina, whereas genera Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium and Methanoculleus were predominant in R3. The results demonstrated dynamics of key microbial populations that were highly consistent with an enhanced reactor performance of the combined process.

  19. Methanogenic degradation of (amino)aromatic compounds by anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linkova, Y.V.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of a range of aromatic substrates by anaerobic microbial communities was studied. Active methanogenic microbial communities decomposing aminoaromatic acids and azo dyes into CH4 and CO2 were isolated. Products of primary conversion were found to be 2-hydroxybenzyl and benzyl alcohols gra

  20. Ascorbic acid enhanced activation of oxygen by ferrous iron: A case of aerobic degradation of rhodamine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaojing; Shen, Wenjuan; Huang, Xiaopeng; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-05-05

    Molecular oxygen activation by ferrous ions (Fe(II)) in aqueous solution could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) with high oxidation potential via reaction between Fe(II) and oxygen molecules (Fe(II)/air), however, ROS yielded in the Fe(II)/air process is insufficient for removal of organic pollutants due to the irreversible ferric ions (Fe(III)) accumulation. In this study, we demonstrate that ascorbic acid (AA) could enhance ROS generation via oxygen activation by ferrous irons (AA/Fe(II)/air) and thus improve the degradation of rhodamine (RhB) significantly. It was found that the first-order aerobic degradation rate of RhB in the AA/Fe(II)/air process in the presence of ascorbic acid is more than 4 times that of the Fe(II)/Air system without adding ascorbic acid. The presence of ascorbic acid could relieve the accumulation of Fe(III) by reductive accelerating the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles, as well as lower the redox potential of Fe(III)/Fe(II) through chelating effect, leading to enhanced ROS generation for promoting RhB degradation. This study not only sheds light on the effect of ascorbic acid on aerobic Fe(II) oxidation, but also provides a green method for effective remediation of organic pollutants.

  1. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediment of Tama River in Tokyo urban area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, Akiko; Hosomi, Masaaki; Murakami, Akihiko [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Chemical Engineering Dept., Tokyo (Japan); Sakakibara, Koji [Hitachi Zosen Co., Konohana, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons, i.e., hexadecane (HEX), phenanthrene (PHE), and anthracene (ANT), were determined in estuarine sediment of the Tama River in urban Tokyo, followed by estimating their respective degradation potential. While in a sediment slurry, the aerobic biodegradation rates of these petroleum hydrocarbons ranged from 40 to 70 {mu}g.g{sup -1} dry sediment:day{sup -1}. The anaerobic biodegradation rate of HEX was found to be 5 -8 {mu}g.g{sup -1} dry sediment.day{sup -1}, whereas that of PHE and ANT could not be detected following a 2-month incubation. Aerobic degradation of HEX was not affected by coexistence with either PHE or ANT, nor by the salinity level. The number of HEX-, PHE-, or ANT-utilizing bacteria ranged from 5 - 10% of the total number of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. We calculated their biodegradation potentials using the biomass of naturally existing petroleum hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria present in the sampled sediment, with results for HEX, PHE, and ANT being 1.0 -3.5, 4.2 x 10{sup -2}, and 1.2 x 10{sup -2} -9.4 x 10{sup -1} {mu}g.g{sup -1} dry sediment day{sup -1}, respectively. In the aerobic tidal sediment of the Tama River, the purification potentials of HEX, PHE, and ANT were assessed to be approximately equal to their accumulation potentials occurring at the normal water level. (Author)

  2. The Effects of Bacterial Inoculants on the Fermentation, Aerobic Stability and Rumen Degradability Characteristics of Wheat Silages

    OpenAIRE

    SUCU, Ekin; FİLYA, İsmail

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants on the fermentation, aerobic stability and in situ rumen degradability characteristics of wheat silages. Wheat was harvested at the early dough stage. Inoculant-1188 (Pioneer®, USA) and Sil-All (Alltech, UK) were used as LAB inoculants. Inoculants were applied to silages at 1.5 x 106 cfu/g levels. Wheat material was ensiled in 1.5-l special anaerobic jars, equipped with a lid enabling gas release on...

  3. Microbial decolorization of reactive black-5 in a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic reactor using acclimatized activated textile sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sagarika; Dafale, Nishant; Rao, Nageswara Neti

    2006-10-01

    A two-stage anaerobic-aerobic treatment process based on mixed culture of bacteria isolated from textile dye effluent was used to degrade reactive black 5 dye (RB-5). The anaerobic step was studied in more detail by varying the dye concentration from 100 to 3000 mg l(-1). The results showed that major decolorization was achieved during the anaerobic process. The time required for decolorization by > 90% increased as the concentration of the dye increased. It was also found that maintaining dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration below 0.5 mg l(-1 )and addition of a co-substrate viz., glucose, facilitates anaerobic decolorization reaction remarkably. An attempt was made to identify the metabolites formed in anaerobic process by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV-VIS spectrophotometry. A plate assay was performed for the detection of dominant decolorizing bacteria. Only a few bacterial colonies with high clearing zones (decolorization zones) were found. The results showed that under anaerobic condition RB-5 molecules were reduced and aromatic amines were generated. The aromatic amine metabolite was partly removed in subsequent aerobic bio-treatment. It was possible to achieve more than 90% decolorization and approximately 46% reduction in amine metabolite concentration through two-stage anaerobic-aerobic treatment after a reaction period of 2 days.

  4. Redox effects on the microbial degradation of refractory organic matter in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Clare E.; Alleau, Yvan; Bauer, James E.; Delaney, Jennifer; Girguis, Peter R.; Schrader, Paul S.; Stecher, Hilmar A.

    2013-11-01

    enrichment of Deltaproteobacteria on the sediment-hosted anodes over time. Many Deltaproteobacteria are capable of using electrodes as terminal electron acceptors to completely oxidize organic substrates. Notably, Deltaproteobacteria were not measurably enriched in the sediments adjacent to anodes, suggesting that - in these experiments - electron-shuttling bacterial networks did not radiate out away from the electrodes, affecting millimeters or centimeters of sediment. Rather, microbial phylotypes allied to the Clostridia appeared to dominate in the sediment amongst all treatments, and likely played essential roles in converting complex dissolved and particulate sources of OM to simple fermentation products. Thus, we advance that the rate at which fermentation products are generated and migrate to oxidation fronts is what limits the remineralization of OM in many subsurface sediments removed from molecular oxygen. This is a diagenetic scenario that is consistent with the discharging behavior of redox oscillating sediment MFCs. It is also compatible with hypotheses that molecular O2 - and not just the resulting elevated redox potential - may be required to effectively catalyze the degradation of refractory OM. Such decomposition reactions have been suggested to depend on substrate interactions with highly reactive oxygen-containing radicals and/or with specialized extracellular enzymes produced by aerobic prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells.

  5. About the order in aerobic heterotrophic microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    The organizational structure of communities of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria was studied by means of physiological and molecular typing of the members of arbitrary samples of isolates, ASsI. The isolate sample assay (ISA) was applied to three different hydrocarbon-polluted sites: a dry windrow pile

  6. Ideonella sakaiensis sp. nov., isolated from a microbial consortium that degrades poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Takehana, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Oda, Kohei

    2016-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium, designed strain 201-F6T, was isolated from a microbial consortium that degrades poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) collected in Sakai city, Japan, and was characterized on the basis of a polyphasic taxonomic study. The cells were motile with a polar flagellum. The strain contained cytochrome oxidase and catalase. It grew within the pH range 5.5-9.0 (optimally at pH 7-7.5) and at 15-42 ºC (optimally at 30-37 ºC). The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone with eight isoprene units (Q-8). C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo, C18 :1ω7c and C12 : 0 2-OH were the predominant cellular fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 70.4 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain 201-F6T was affiliated to the genus Ideonella, and was closely related to Ideonella dechloratans LMG 28178T (97.7 %) and Ideonella azotifigens JCM 15503T (96.6 %). Strain 201-F6T could be clearly distinguished from the related species of the genus Ideonella by its physiological and biochemical characteristics as well as by its phylogenetic position and DNA-DNA relatedness. Therefore, the strain represents a novel species of the genus Ideonella, for which the name Ideonella sakaiensis sp. nov. (type strain 201-F6T=NBRC 110686T=TISTR 2288T) is proposed.

  7. Microbial taxa and functional genes shift in degraded soil with bacterial wilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongchun; Wang, Rui; Chen, Shu; Qi, Gaofu; He, Zhili; Zhao, Xiuyun

    2017-01-01

    Soil degradation is a serious global problem, but little is known about how soil microbial communities respond to soil degradation as well as their feedback to ecosystem functioning. In this study, we found the microbial community composition, structure and functional potential significantly altered in the degraded soils with bacterial wilt (termed as degraded soils). Compared with healthy soils, OTU richness of beneficial microorganisms were significantly decreased, but OTU richness of pathogenic microorganisms were significantly increased in the degraded soils. Functional gene array (GeoChip 5.0) analysis showed the functional metabolic potential of genes involved in stress, virulence, sulfur cycle, metal resistance, degradation of plant cell wall was significantly increased in the degraded soils. Increased functional metabolic potential of these genes may be related to the acidification and severe plant disease of degraded soils. Biological activity of degraded soils was obviously decreased with weakened soil enzyme activities when compared to the healthy soils. Soil pH and enzyme activities were negatively correlated with the abundance of genes involved in sulfur cycle, virulence, and stress responses. This study provides new insights into our understanding of soil microbial community responses to soil degradation. PMID:28051173

  8. Effects of microbial inoculants on corn silage fermentation, microbial contents, aerobic stability, and milk production under field conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Bastian; Sloth, Karen Helle; Højberg, Ole

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of 2 corn silage inoculation strategies (homofermentative vs. heterofermentative inoculation) under field conditions and to monitor responses in silage variables over the feeding season from January to August. Thirty-nine commercial dairy farms...... sufficiently from the epiphytic flora on whole-crop corn to affect fermentation in standard qualities of corn silage. Heterofermentative inoculation increased aerobic stability and numerous fermentation variables. None of the treatments affected milk production, and more-stable corn silage seemed to have...

  9. Aerobic cometabolic degradation of chlorinated ethenes in a two step system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, EM; Mocoroa, J; deKoning, W; Vlieg, JETV; Ganzeveld, KJ; Beenackers, AACM; Janssen, DB

    1997-01-01

    Many of the chlorinated ethenes (CEs) can aerobically only be converted by cometabolism, a process in which the organism converts the contaminant that it cannot use for growth as a result of the nonspecificity of one of its enzymes. For bioremediation systems, the methanotroph Methylosinus trichospo

  10. Modeling Aerobic Carbon Source Degradation Processes using Titrimetric Data and Combined Respirometric-Titrimetric Data: Structural and Practical Identifiability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Petersen, B.; Dochain, D.;

    2002-01-01

    The structural and practical identifiability of a model for description of respirometric-titrimetric data derived from aerobic batch substrate degradation experiments of a CxHyOz carbon source with activated sludge was evaluated. The model processes needed to describe titrimetric data included...... difference in timing between pH effect and oxygen consumption. Finally, the biomass yield YH and the nitrogen content of the biomass i(xB) could be estimated from combined respirometric-titrimetric data obtained with addition of a known amount of carbon source. YH can also be estimated from r(O) data when...... considerably more for dextrose than for acetate degradation models. Noteworthy is the finding that the half-saturation substrate concentrations can be different depending on whether they are estimated from respirometric or titrimetric data. Moreover, this difference appears to be dependent on the carbon source...

  11. Laboratory simulation of the successive aerobic and anaerobic degradation of oil products in oil-contaminated high-moor peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolpeshta, I. I.; Trofimov, S. Ya.; Erkenova, M. I.; Sokolova, T. A.; Stepanov, A. L.; Lysak, L. V.; Lobanenkov, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    A model experiment has been performed on the successive aerobic and anaerobic degradation of oil products in samples of oil-contaminated peat sampled from a pine-subshrub-sphagnum bog near the Sutormin oilfield pipeline in the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district. During the incubation of oil-contaminated peat with lime and mineral fertilizers under complete flooding, favorable conditions are created for the aerobic oxidation of oil products at the beginning of the experiment and, as the redox potential decreases, for the anaerobic degradation of oil products conjugated with the reduction of N5+ and S+6 and methanogenesis. From the experimental data on the dynamics of the pH; Eh; and the NO{3/-}, NO{2/-}, and SO{4/2-} concentrations in the liquid phase of the samples, it has been found that denitrifiers significantly contributed to the biodegradation of oil products under the experimental conditions. After the end of the experiment, the content of oil products in the contaminated samples decreased by 21-26%.

  12. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye using anaerobic/aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) and photochemical membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sheng-Jie, E-mail: sjyou@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering and R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200 Chung Pei Road, Chungli 32023, Taiwan (China); Damodar, Rahul A. [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering and R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200 Chung Pei Road, Chungli 32023, Taiwan (China); Hou, Sheng-Chon [Department of Civil Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200 Chung Pei Road, Chungli 32023, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    Three different types of advance treatment methods were evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5). The performance of two stage anaerobic SBR-aerobic MBR, anaerobic MBR with immobilized and suspended biocells and an integrated membrane photocatalytic reactor (MPR) using slurry UV/TiO{sub 2} system were investigated. The results suggest that, nearly 99.9% color removal and 80-95% organic COD and TOC removal can be achieved using different reactor systems. Considering the Taiwan EPA effluent standard discharge criteria for COD/TOC, the degree of treatment achieved by combining the anaerobic-aerobic system was found to be acceptable. Anew, Bacilluscereus, high color removal bacterium was isolated from Anaerobic SBR. Furthermore, when this immobilized into PVA-calcium alginate pellets, and suspended in the anaerobic MBR was able to achieve high removal efficiencies, similar to the suspended biocells system. However, the immobilized cell Anaerobic MBR was found to be more advantageous, due to lower fouling rates in the membrane unit. Results from slurry type MPR system showed that this system was capable of mineralizing RB5 dyes with faster degradation rate as compared to other systems. The reactor was also able to separate the catalyst effectively and perform efficiently without much loss of catalyst activity.

  13. Effects of the feeding ratio of food waste on fed-batch aerobic composting and its microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Pan, Songqing; Zhang, Zhaoji; Lin, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yuzhen; Chen, Shaohua

    2017-01-01

    To determine the suitable feeding ratio for fed-batch aerobic composting, four fermenters were operated by adding 0%, 5%, 10% or 15% of food waste every day. The results showed that the 5% and 10% treatments were able to maintain continuous thermophilic conditions, while the 15% treatment performed badly in regard to composting temperature, which was probably due to the negative effects of excessive moisture on microbial activity. As composting proceeded, both the 5% and the 10% treatments reached maturity and achieved weight losses of approximately 65%. High-throughput sequencing results indicated that Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were the dominant phyla of the community structure. The communities sampled at the thermophilic phases had high similarity and relatively low diversity, while species diversity increased in the maturity phase. This study was devoted to optimizing the fed-batch composting process and assessing bacterial communities, both of which were supplied as a reference for practical application.

  14. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zemin; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xi-Chang; Liu, Weiping; Yang, Fangxing

    2015-09-15

    To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days' incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to -29.14 ± 0.22‰ and -29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = -1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  15. Bacterial degradation of benzoate: cross-regulation between aerobic and anaerobic pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We have studied for the first time the transcriptional regulatory circuit that controls the expression of the box genes encoding the aerobic hybrid pathway used to assimilate benzoate via coenzyme A (CoA) derivatives in bacteria. The promoters responsible for the expression of the box cluster in the β-proteobacterium Azoarcus sp., their cognate transcriptional repressor, the BoxR protein, and the inducer molecule (benzoyl-CoA) have been characterized. The BoxR protein shows a significant sequ...

  16. Mechanism and kinetics of organic matter degradation based on particle structure variation during pig manure aerobic composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jinyi; Huang, Guangqun; Huang, Jing; Zeng, Jianfei; Han, Lujia

    2015-07-15

    Characterization of the dynamic structure of composting particles may facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms of organic matter degradation during pig manure-wheat straw aerobic composting. In this study, changes in the size, shape, pores, chemical compositions, and crystal structures of pig manure particles during composting were investigated. The results showed that the median diameter (D50) decreased exponentially, while the particle aspect ratio and sphericity were unchanged, suggesting that particles were degraded uniformly along different radial directions. Pores had a mean diameter of 15-30 μm and were elliptical. The particle porosity increased linearly mainly because of hemicellulose degradation. Furthermore, the influence of particle structure variation on the first order rate constant (k) of organic matter degradation was corrected, which may facilitate the optimization of operation conditions. The k value was proportional to the reciprocal of D50 according to the specific surface area of particles, and it decreased with increased porosity due to the stabilized chemical compositions and crystal structures of particles. However, the applicability of these data to other composting materials should be verified.

  17. Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Characterization of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikilili, P. V.; Chirwa, E. M. N.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was studied. Naphthalene was used as a model compound to represent these compounds. Low initial concentrations of naphthalene in a range of 30-60 mg/L were completely degraded after incubation for 15 hrs by consortia from a landfill soil while consortia from minewater took more that 29 hrs to reach complete degradation.

  18. Deciphering the genetic determinants for aerobic nicotinic acid degradation: the nic cluster from Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, José I; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Rychlewski, Leszek; García, José L; Díaz, Eduardo

    2008-08-12

    The aerobic catabolism of nicotinic acid (NA) is considered a model system for degradation of N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds, some of which are major environmental pollutants; however, the complete set of genes as well as the structural-functional relationships of most of the enzymes involved in this process are still unknown. We have characterized a gene cluster (nic genes) from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 responsible for the aerobic NA degradation in this bacterium and when expressed in heterologous hosts. The biochemistry of the NA degradation through the formation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine and maleamic acid has been revisited, and some gene products become the prototype of new types of enzymes with unprecedented molecular architectures. Thus, the initial hydroxylation of NA is catalyzed by a two-component hydroxylase (NicAB) that constitutes the first member of the xanthine dehydrogenase family whose electron transport chain to molecular oxygen includes a cytochrome c domain. The Fe(2+)-dependent dioxygenase (NicX) converts 2,5-dihydroxypyridine into N-formylmaleamic acid, and it becomes the founding member of a new family of extradiol ring-cleavage dioxygenases. Further conversion of N-formylmaleamic acid to formic and maleamic acid is catalyzed by the NicD protein, the only deformylase described so far whose catalytic triad is similar to that of some members of the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold superfamily. This work allows exploration of the existence of orthologous gene clusters in saprophytic bacteria and some pathogens, where they might stimulate studies on their role in virulence, and it provides a framework to develop new biotechnological processes for detoxification/biotransformation of N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds.

  19. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon degradation in a petroleum-contaminated soil and microbial population and activity determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Manli; Li, Wei; Dick, Warren A; Ye, Xiqiong; Chen, Kaili; Kost, David; Chen, Liming

    2017-02-01

    Bioremediation of hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-polluted soil is carried out by various microorganisms. However, little information is available for the relationships between hydrocarbon degradation rates in petroleum-contaminated soil and microbial population and activity in laboratory assay. In a microcosm study, degradation rate and efficiency of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), alkanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in a petroleum-contaminated soil were determined using an infrared photometer oil content analyzer and a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Also, the populations of TPH, alkane, and PAH degraders were enumerated by a modified most probable number (MPN) procedure, and the hydrocarbon degrading activities of these degraders were determined by the Biolog (MT2) MicroPlates assay. Results showed linear correlations between the TPH and alkane degradation rates and the population and activity increases of TPH and alkane degraders, but no correlation was observed between the PAH degradation rates and the PAH population and activity increases. Petroleum hydrocarbon degrading microbial population measured by MPN was significantly correlated with metabolic activity in the Biolog assay. The results suggest that the MPN procedure and the Biolog assay are efficient methods for assessing the rates of TPH and alkane, but not PAH, bioremediation in oil-contaminated soil in laboratory.

  20. Microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizosphere: potential application to biological remediation of waste sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, B T; Anderson, T A

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that vegetation may be used to actively promote microbial restoration of chemically contaminated soils was tested by using rhizosphere and nonvegetated soils collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated field site. Biomass determinations, disappearance of TCE from the headspace of spiked soil slurries, and mineralization of [14C]TCE to 14CO2 all showed that microbial activity is greater in rhizosphere soils and that TCE degradation occurs faster in the rhizosphere tha...

  1. Determining potential for microbial atrazine degradation in agricultural drainage ditches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passage of agricultural runoff through vegetated drainage ditches has been shown to reduce the amount of pesticides, such as atrazine, exiting agricultural watersheds. Previous studies found that microbial communities in soil from fields treated with atrazine display enhanced rates of atrazine degr...

  2. Performance of microbial phytases for gastric inositol phosphate degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Nyffenegger, Christian; Meyer, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial phytases catalyze dephosphorylation of phytic acid, thereby potentially releasing chelated iron and improving human iron absorption from cereal-based diets. For this catalysis to take place in vivo, the phytase must be robust to low pH and proteolysis in the gastric ventricle. This stud...

  3. Metaproteomics reveals major microbial players and their biodegradation functions in a large-scale aerobic composting plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongming; Li, Mingxiao; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Yue; Wei, Zimin; Song, Caihong; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-11-01

    Composting is an appropriate management alternative for municipal solid waste; however, our knowledge about the microbial regulation of this process is still scare. We employed metaproteomics to elucidate the main biodegradation pathways in municipal solid waste composting system across the main phases in a large-scale composting plant. The investigation of microbial succession revealed that Bacillales, Actinobacteria and Saccharomyces increased significantly with respect to abundance in composting process. The key microbiologic population for cellulose degradation in different composting stages was different. Fungi were found to be the main producers of cellulase in earlier phase. However, the cellulolytic fungal communities were gradually replaced by a purely bacterial one in active phase, which did not support the concept that the thermophilic fungi are active through the thermophilic phase. The effective decomposition of cellulose required the synergy between bacteria and fungi in the curing phase.

  4. Aerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by a Proteobacteria strain in a closed culture system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Wei-hong; CHEN Jian-meng; LU Zheng; CHEN Dong-zhi; CHEN Xiao

    2007-01-01

    The contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in underground waters has become a widely concerned problem all over the world. In this study, a novel closed culture system with oxygen supplied by H2O2 was introduced for MTBE aerobic biodegradation. After 7 d, almost all MTBE was degraded by a pure culture, a member of β-Proteobacteria named as PM1, in a closed system with oxygen supply, while only 40% MTBE was degraded in one without oxygen supply. Dissolved oxygen (DO) levels of the broth in closed systems respectively with and without H2O2 were about 5-6 and 4 mg/L. Higher DO may improve the activity of monooxygemase, which is the key enzyme of metabolic pathway from MTBE to tert-butyl alcohol and finally to CO2, and may result in the increase of the degrading activity of PM1 cell. The purge and trap GC-MS result of the broth in closed systems showed that tert-butyl alcohol,isopronol and acetone were the main intermediate products.

  5. Influence of earthworm activity on microbial communities related with the degradation of persistent pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Lee, Iwa; Verweij, Rudo A; Morais, Paula V; Van Velzen, Martin J M; Sousa, José Paulo; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2012-04-01

    Earthworms may promote the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, but the mechanism through which they exert such influence is still unknown. To determine if the stimulation of PAH degradation by earthworms is related to changes in microbial communities, a microcosm experiment was conducted consisting of columns with natural uncontaminated soil covered with PAH-contaminated dredge sediment. Columns without and with low and high Eisenia andrei densities were prepared. Organic matter and PAH content, microbial biomass, and dehydrogenase activity (DHA) were measured in soil and sediment over time. Biolog Ecoplate™ and polymerase chain reaction using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were used to evaluate changes in metabolic and structural diversity of the microbial community, respectively. Earthworm activity promoted PAH degradation in soil, which was significant for biphenyl, benzo[a]pyrene, and benzo[e]pyrene. Microbial biomass and DHA activity generally did not change over the experiment. Earthworm activity did change microbial community structure, but this did not affect its functioning in terms of carbon substrate consumption. Results suggest no relationship between changes in the microbial community by earthworm activity and increased PAH disappearance. The role of shifts in soil microbial community structure induced by earthworms in PAH removal needs further investigation.

  6. Enhanced degradation of isoproturon in soils: sustainability of inoculated, microbial herbicide degraders, and adaptation of native microbes

    OpenAIRE

    Kiesel, Carola Angelika

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of a microbial consortium attached to carrier material and capable to mineralize the herbicide Isoproturon (IPU) was investigated as an in situ remediation approach for agricultural soils. It was examined how long increased IPU mineralization was maintained in inoculated soil. Further, the properties of the introduced consortium and its degradation capabilities were determined. It was also investigated to what extent microbes in non-inoculated soils can adapt to accelerated I...

  7. Phenol-degrading anode biofilm with high coulombic efficiency in graphite electrodes microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Zhiling; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhou, Xue; Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Katayama, Arata

    2017-03-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC), with graphite electrodes as both the anode and cathode, was operated with a soil-free anaerobic consortium for phenol degradation. This phenol-degrading MFC showed high efficiency with a current density of 120 mA/m(2) and a coulombic efficiency of 22.7%, despite the lack of a platinum catalyst cathode and inoculation of sediment/soil. Removal of planktonic bacteria by renewing the anaerobic medium did not decrease the performance, suggesting that the phenol-degrading MFC was not maintained by the planktonic bacteria but by the microorganisms in the anode biofilm. Cyclic voltammetry analysis of the anode biofilm showed distinct oxidation and reduction peaks. Analysis of the microbial community structure of the anode biofilm and the planktonic bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that Geobacter sp. was the phenol degrader in the anode biofilm and was responsible for current generation.

  8. Growth kinetics of an indigenous mixed microbial consortium during phenol degradation in a batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Pichiah; Pakshirajan, K; Saha, Prabirkumar

    2008-01-01

    Biodegradation of phenol by a mixed microbial culture, isolated from a sewage treatment plant, was investigated in batch shake flasks. A minimum concentration of 100 and a maximum of 800 mg 1(-1) of phenol in the media were adapted in the degradation study. The phenol degradation rate varied largely and was less than 10 mg l(-1)h(-1) at both extremes of the initial concentrations in the media. The degradation rate was maximum 15.7 mg l(-1)h(-1) at 400 mg l(-1) phenol. The culture followed substrate inhibition kinetics and the specific growth rate were fitted to Haldane and Han-Levenspiel models. Between the two models the Han-Levenspiel was found to be a better fit with a root mean square error of 0.0211. The biokinetics constants estimated using these models showed good potential of the mixed microbial culture in phenol degradation.

  9. Aerobic degradation of nitrobenzene by immobilization of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunli; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Qu, Baocheng; Wang, Jing; Lu, Hong; Zhao, Hongxia

    2009-08-30

    Rhodotorula mucilaginosa Z1 capable of degrading nitrobenzene was immobilized in polyurethane foam. The nitrobenzene-degrading capacity of immobilized cells was compared to free cells in batches in shaken culture. Effects of pH and temperature on the nitrobenzene degradation showed that polyurethane-immobilized Z1 had higher tolerances toward acid, alkali, and heat than those of free cells. Kinetic studies revealed that higher concentrations of nitrobenzene were better tolerated and more quickly degraded by polyurethane-immobilized Z1 than by free cells. Moreover, the ability of polyurethane-immobilized Z1 to resist nitrobenzene shock load was enhanced. Experiments on the nitrobenzene degradation in different concentrations of NaCl and in the presence of phenol or aniline demonstrated that polyurethane-immobilized Z1 exhibited higher tolerance toward salinity and toxic chemicals than those of free cells. Immobilization therefore could be a promising method for treating nitrobenzene industrial wastewater. This is the first report on the degradation of nitrobenzene by a polyurethane-immobilized yeast strain.

  10. Microbial activity and bacterial community structure during degradation of microcystins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, K.; Lyck, Susanne; Winding, A.

    2002-01-01

    Degradation of realistic microcystin concentrations in lake water with indigenous bacteria was studied in laboratory and field experiments following inoculation with lysed toxic algal material containing microcystin primarily from Microcystis sp. or purified commercial microcystin-LR to microcosms...... initial degradation rates occurred in 2 out of 7 cases, Microcystin was almost eliminated from the water after around 8 d. Results from concomitant measurements of bacterial abundance and net production showed an elevated bacterial activity within 1 to 2 d after the inoculation with algal lysates...... experiments were analysed by polymerase chain reaction-density gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of 16S rDNA, which showed that the indigenous bacterial community responded quickly to the addition of lysates. Our study confirms that bacteria can efficiently degrade microcystins in natural waters...

  11. Cometabolic microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the presence of toluene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Hong; LI Xin-Gang; XU Shi-Min1

    2004-01-01

    Trichloroethylene(TCE), a common groundwater pollutant, was cometabolized by microorganisms in the presence of toluene as a growth substrate. The effect of concentrations of toluene and TCE and temperature on biodegradation was discussed. Acclimated microorganisms degraded TCE after a lag period of 5 to 22 h depending on toluene concentrations. Approximately 60%, 90% and 64% of TCE were degraded at toluene to TCE concentration ratios of 23:1, 115:1 and 230:1, respectively. At a TCE concentration of 1.46 μg/ml, 80% of TCE and 98.4% of toluene were removed. But less degradation of TCE and toluene was observed when TCE concentration was above 48.8 μg/ml. The lag time of TCE decreased and the TCE biodegradation rates increased with the increase of temperature.

  12. Exploration and comparison of inborn capacity of aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for microbial electrical current production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses numerous advantageous biological features, such as being robust, easily handled, mostly non-pathogenic and having high catabolic rates, etc., which can be considered as merits for being used as a promising biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. Previous studies have developed efficient MFC configurations to convert metabolic electron shuttles, such as cytoplasmic NADH, into usable electric current. However, no studies have elucidated the maximum potential of S. cerevisiae for current output and the underlying metabolic pathways, resulting from the interaction of thousands of reactions inside the cell during MFC operation. To address these two key issues, this study used in silico metabolic engineering techniques, flux balance analysis (FBA), and flux variability analysis with target flux minimization (FATMIN), to model the metabolic perturbation of S. cerevisiae under the MFC-energy extraction. The FBA results showed that, in the cytoplasmic NADH-dependent mediated electron transfer (MET) mode, S. cerevisiae had a potential to produce currents at up to 5.781 A/gDW for the anaerobic and 6.193 A/gDW for the aerobic environments. The FATMIN results showed that the aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms are resilient, relying on six and five contributing reactions respectively for high current production. Two reactions, catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD) (EC 1.4.1.3) and methylene tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (NAD) (EC 1.5.1.5), were shared in both current-production modes and contributed to over 80% of the identified maximum current outputs. It is also shown that the NADH regeneration was much less energy costly than biomass production rate. Taken together, our finding suggests that S. cerevisiae should receive more research effort for MFC electricity production. PMID:23969939

  13. Field degradation of aminopyralid and clopyralid and microbial community response to application in Alaskan soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomco, Patrick L; Duddleston, Khrystyne N; Schultz, Emily Jo; Hagedorn, Birgit; Stevenson, Timothy J; Seefeldt, Steven S

    2016-02-01

    High-latitude regions experience unique conditions that affect the degradation rate of agrochemicals in the environment. In the present study, data collected from 2 field sites in Alaska, USA (Palmer and Delta) were used to generate a kinetic model for aminopyralid and clopyralid degradation and to describe the microbial community response to herbicide exposure. Field plots were sprayed with herbicides and sampled over the summer of 2013. Quantification was performed via liquid chromatrography/tandem mass spectrometry, and microbial diversity was assessed via next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) genes. Both compounds degraded rapidly via pseudo-first-order degradation kinetics between 0 d and 28 d (t1/2  = 9.1-23.0 d), and then degradation slowed thereafter through 90 d. Aminopyralid concentration was 0.048 μg/g to 0.120 μg/g at 90 d post application, whereas clopyralid degraded rapidly at the Palmer site but was recovered in Delta soil at a concentraction of 0.046 μg/g. Microbial community diversity was moderately impacted by herbicide treatment, with the effect more pronounced at Delta. These data predict reductions in crop yield when sensitive plants (potatoes, tomatoes, marigolds, etc.) are rotated onto treated fields. Agricultural operations in high-latitude regions, both commercial and residential, rely heavily on cultivation of such crops and care must be taken when rotating.

  14. Processes of microbial pesticide degradation in rapid sand filters for treatment of drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    concentrations of 0.04-2.4 μg/L. The pesticides were removed from the water in microcosms with filter sand from all three investigated sand filters. Within the experimental periode of six to 13 days, 65-85% of the bentazone, 86-93% of the glyphosate, 97-99% of the p-nitrophenol was removed from the water phase......Aerobic rapid sand filters for treatment of groundwater at waterworks were investigated for the ability to remove pesticides. The potential, kinetics and mechanisms of microbial pesticide removal was investigated in microcosms consisting of filter sand, treated water and pesticides in initial...

  15. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Zhang, Xi-Chang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liu, Weiping [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Alpha-cypermethrin (α-CP) can be degraded by microorganisms in soil. • Biodegradation of α-CP resulted in carbon isotope fractionation. • A relationship was found between carbon isotope ratios and concentrations of α-CP. • An enrichment factor ϵ of α-CP was determined as −1.87‰. • CSIA is applicable to assess biodegradation of α-CP. - Abstract: To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days’ incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to −29.14 ± 0.22‰ and −29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = −1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  16. Cooperation in carbon source degradation shapes spatial self-organization of microbial consortia on hydrated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecon, Robin; Or, Dani

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that natural microbial communities exhibit a high level of spatial organization at the micrometric scale that facilitate ecological interactions and support biogeochemical cycles. Microbial patterns are difficult to study definitively in natural environments due to complex biodiversity, observability and variable physicochemical factors. Here, we examine how trophic dependencies give rise to self-organized spatial patterns of a well-defined bacterial consortium grown on hydrated surfaces. The model consortium consisted of two Pseudomonas putida mutant strains that can fully degrade the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene. We demonstrated that obligate cooperation in toluene degradation (cooperative mutualism) favored convergence of 1:1 partner ratio and strong intermixing at the microscale (10–100 μm). In contrast, competition for benzoate, a compound degraded independently by both strains, led to distinct segregation patterns. Emergence of a persistent spatial pattern has been predicted for surface attached microbial activity in liquid films that mediate diffusive exchanges while permitting limited cell movement (colony expansion). This study of a simple microbial consortium offers mechanistic glimpses into the rules governing the assembly and functioning of complex sessile communities, and points to general principles of spatial organization with potential applications for natural and engineered microbial systems. PMID:28262696

  17. Hydrolysis and degradation of filtrated organic particulates in a biofilm reactor under anoxic and aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janning, K.F.; Mesterton, K.; Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    carbon to the bulk liquid was observed as an indication of hydrolysis taking place. The second experiment was designed as a series of on-line OUR batch experiments in a biofilm reactor with recirculation, in order to investigate further the degradation of particulate organic matter. After the biofilm had...... been starved in order to remove the original organic matter, particulate organic matter was added and the degradation kinetics recorded. The initial removal rate was high, r(A.O2) = 2.1 g O-2/(m(2)d) though fast declining towards endogenous respiration. The respiration ratio between removed oxygen...... and produced carbon dioxide was declining from 1.3 to 1.0 g O-2/g CO2 during the degradation of organic particulates. The respiration ratio during endogenous respiration was determined to be 0.7 g O-2/g CO2 indicating a thorough mineralisation of biomass. (C) 1997 IAWQ. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd....

  18. Microbial dynamics in anaerobic enrichment cultures degrading di-n-butyl phthalic acid ester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trably, Eric; Batstone, Damien J.; Christensen, Nina

    2008-01-01

    in enrichment cultures degrading phthalic acid esters under methanogenic conditions. A selection pressure was applied by adding DBP at 10 and 200 mg L(-1) in semi-continuous anaerobic reactors. The microbial dynamics were monitored using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). While only limited abiotic...

  19. Effect of humic acids on electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Pentose and humic acids (HA) are the main components of hydrolysates, the liquid fraction produced during thermohydrolysis of lignocellulosic material. Electricity generation integrated with xylose (typical pentose) degradation as well as the effect of HA on electricity production in microbial fu...

  20. Microbial phytase and liquid feeding increase phytate degradation in the gastrointestinal tract of growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Karoline; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative degradation of inositol phosphates (InsP6 to InsP2) in the stomach and small intestine as influenced by microbial phytase and fermented liquid feeding was compared by combining the results from two experiments. Six pigs (49 kg) were fitted with gastric cannulas ( Exp. 1 ) and 3 p...

  1. Microbial community analysis in a combined anaerobic and aerobic digestion system for treatment of cellulosic ethanol production wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lili; Yu, Yanling; Zhu, Zebing; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Haiman; Ambuchi, John J; Feng, Yujie

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the microbial diversity established in a combined system composed of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor, and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for treatment of cellulosic ethanol production wastewater. Excellent wastewater treatment performance was obtained in the combined system, which showed a high chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 95.8% and completely eliminated most complex organics revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed differences in the microbial community structures of the three reactors. Further identification of the microbial populations suggested that the presence of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in CSTR played an active role in the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The most diverse microorganisms with analogous distribution patterns of different layers were observed in the EGSB reactor, and bacteria affiliated with Firmicutes, Synergistetes, and Thermotogae were associated with production of acetate and carbon dioxide/hydrogen, while all acetoclastic methanogens identified belonged to Methanosaetaceae. Overall, microorganisms associated with the ability to degrade cellulose, hemicellulose, and other biomass-derived organic carbons were observed in the combined system. The results presented herein will facilitate the development of an improved cellulosic ethanol production wastewater treatment system.

  2. Methyltert-butyl Ether (MTBE Degradation by a Microbial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Mortazavi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE is added to reformulated gasoline to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act directives. Widespread use of MTBE in gasoline has resulted in groundwater contamination. Because of its undesirable effects on drinking water and ecologically harmful effects, MTBE removal has become a public health and environmental concern. In this study, we have isolated a mixed bacterial culture which is capable of degrading the MTBE as a sole carbon and energy source. This consortium was developed from mixed urban and petrochemical activated sludge after 4 month's enrichment. Enrichment was conducted in batch reactor, fitted with a screw cap and butyl rubber septum. MTBE concentration was measured in head space by gas chromatography. Degradation was determined by MTBE removal. MTBE biodegradation was depended to Dissolved Oxygen (DO concentration and not affected by the changes in concentration of trace element solution or other stimulator Substances. Degradation rates were nearly 1.478 mg MTBE h-1 g-1 (wet biomass and didn't change with MTBE concentration (up 500 mg L-1.

  3. Isolation and genetic identification of PAH degrading bacteria from a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, M Carmen; González, Natalia; Bautista, L Fernando; Sanz, Raquel; Simarro, Raquel; Sánchez, Irene; Sanz, José L

    2009-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH; naphthalene, anthracene and phenanthrene) degrading microbial consortium C2PL05 was obtained from a sandy soil chronically exposed to petroleum products, collected from a petrochemical complex in Puertollano (Ciudad Real, Spain). The consortium C2PL05 was highly efficient degrading completely naphthalene, phenanthrene and anthracene in around 18 days of cultivation. The toxicity (Microtox method) generated by the PAH and by the intermediate metabolites was reduced to levels close to non-toxic in almost 40 days of cultivation. The identified bacteria from the contaminated soil belonged to gamma-proteobacteria and could be include in Enterobacter and Pseudomonas genus. DGGE analysis revealed uncultured Stenotrophomonas ribotypes as a possible PAH degrader in the microbial consortium. The present work shows the potential use of these microorganisms and the total consortium for the bioremediation of PAH polluted areas since the biodegradation of these chemicals takes place along with a significant decrease in toxicity.

  4. Microbial degradation of chlorinated compounds. Application of specialized bacteria in the treatment of contaminated soil and waste water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhuis, Roelof

    1992-01-01

    The development of (aerobic) treatment technologies for polluted environments and waste streams will require an understanding of the microbial potential and the ecophysiology of the most suitable organisms. Therefore, we have studied physiological pathways and some kinetic aspects of the biotransfor

  5. Effects of heat shocks on microbial community structure and microbial activity of a methanogenic enrichment degrading benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, R; Narihiro, T; Nobu, M K; Liu, W-T

    2016-11-01

    In anaerobic digesters, temperature fluctuation could lead to process instability and failure. It is still not well understood how digester microbiota as a whole respond to heat shock, and what specific organisms are vulnerable to perturbation or responsible for process recovery after perturbation. To address these questions, a mesophilic benzoate-degrading methanogenic culture enriched from digester was subjected to different levels of heat shock. Three types of methane production profiles after perturbation were observed in comparison to the control: uninhibited, inhibited with later recovery, and inhibited without recovery. These responses were correlated with the microbial community compositions based on the analyses of 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the primary benzoate-degrading syntroph was highly affected by heat shock, and its abundance and activity were both crucial to the restoration of benzoate degradation after heat shock. In contrast, methanogens were stable regardless whether methane production was inhibited. Populations related to 'Candidatus Cloacimonetes' and Firmicutes showed stimulated growth. These observations indicated distinct physiological traits and ecological niches associated with individual microbial groups. The results obtained after exposure to heat shock can be critical to more comprehensive characterization of digester ecology under perturbations.

  6. Aerobic TCE degradation by encapsulated toluene-oxidizing bacteria, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungjin; Bae, Wookeun; Hwang, Jungmin; Park, Jaewoo

    2010-01-01

    The degradation rates of toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE) by Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus spp. that were encapsulated in polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers were evaluated in comparison with the results of exposure to suspended cultures. PEG monomers were polymerized together with TCE-degrading microorganisms, such that the cells were encapsulated in and protected by the matrices of the PEG polymers. TCE concentrations were varied from 0.1 to 1.5 mg/L. In the suspended cultures of P. putida, the TCE removal rate decreased as the initial TCE concentration increased, revealing TCE toxicity or a limitation of reducing power, or both. When the cells were encapsulated, an initial lag period of about 10-20 h was observed for toluene degradation. Once acclimated, the encapsulated P. putida cultures were more tolerant to TCE at an experimental range of 0.6-1.0 mg/L and gave higher transfer efficiencies (mass TCE transformed/mass toluene utilized). When the TCE concentration was low (e.g., 0.1 mg/L) the removal of TCE per unit mass of cells (specific removal) was significantly lower, probably due to a diffusion limitation into the PEG pellet. Encapsulated Bacillus spp. were able to degrade TCE cometabolically. The encapsulated Bacillus spp. gave significantly higher values than did P. putida in the specific removal and the transfer efficiency, particularly at relatively high TCE concentration of approximately 1.0±0.5 mg/L. The transfer efficiency by encapsulated Bacillus spp. in this study was 0.27 mgTCE/mgToluene, which was one to two orders of magnitude greater than the reported values.

  7. Aerobic degradation of ibuprofen in batch and continuous reactors by an indigenous bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, María Susana; Fuentes Abril, Nancy Piedad; Martinefski, Manuela; Trípodi, Valeria; Papalia, Mariana; Rádice, Marcela; Gutkind, Gabriel; Gallego, Alfredo; Korol, Sonia Edith

    2016-10-01

    Water from six points from the Riachuelo-Matanza basin was analyzed in order to assess ibuprofen biodegradability. In four of them biodegradation of ibuprofen was proved and degrading bacterial communities were isolated. Biodegradation in each point could not be correlated with sewage pollution. The indigenous bacterial community isolated from the point localized in the La Noria Bridge showed the highest degradative capacity and was selected to perform batch and continuous degradation assays. The partial 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the community consisted of Comamonas aquatica and Bacillus sp. In batch assays the community was capable of degrading 100 mg L(-1) of ibuprofen in 33 h, with a specific growth rate (μ) of 0.21 h(-1). The removal of the compound, as determined by High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), exceeded 99% of the initial concentration, with a 92.3% removal of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). In a down-flow fixed-bed continuous reactor, the community shows a removal efficiency of 95.9% of ibuprofen and 92.3% of COD for an average inlet concentration of 110.4 mg. The reactor was kept in operation for 70 days. The maximal removal rate for the compound was 17.4 g m(-3) d(-1). Scanning electron microscopy was employed to observe biofilm development in the reactor. The ability of the isolated indigenous community can be exploited to improve the treatment of wastewaters containing ibuprofen.

  8. Microbial Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminants: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjana Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major environmental problems today is hydrocarbon contamination resulting from the activities related to the petrochemical industry. Accidental releases of petroleum products are of particular concern in the environment. Hydrocarbon components have been known to belong to the family of carcinogens and neurotoxic organic pollutants. Currently accepted disposal methods of incineration or burial insecure landfills can become prohibitively expensive when amounts of contaminants are large. Mechanical and chemical methods generally used to remove hydrocarbons from contaminated sites have limited effectiveness and can be expensive. Bioremediation is the promising technology for the treatment of these contaminated sites since it is cost-effective and will lead to complete mineralization. Bioremediation functions basically on biodegradation, which may refer to complete mineralization of organic contaminants into carbon dioxide, water, inorganic compounds, and cell protein or transformation of complex organic contaminants to other simpler organic compounds by biological agents like microorganisms. Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. This paper presents an updated overview of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by microorganisms under different ecosystems.

  9. Toxicity assessment and microbial degradation of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswari, N; Muthukrishnan, J; Gunasekaran, P

    2006-08-01

    Toxic effluents containing azo dyes are discharged from various industries and they adversely affect water resources, soil fertility, aquatic organisms and ecosystem integrity. They pose toxicity (lethal effect, genotoxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity) to aquatic organisms (fish, algae, bacteria, etc.) as well as animals. They are not readily degradable under natural conditions and are typically not removed from waste water by conventional waste water treatment systems. Benzidine based dyes have long been recognized as a human urinary bladder carcinogen and tumorigenic in a variety of laboratory animals. Several microorganisms have been found to decolourize, transform and even to completely mineralize azo dyes. A mixed culture of two Pseudomonas strains efficiently degraded mixture of 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CBA) and phenol/cresols. Azoreductases of different microorganisms are useful for the development of biodegradation systems as they catalyze reductive cleavage of azo groups (-N=N-) under mild conditions. In this review, toxic impacts of dyeing factory effluents on plants, fishes, and environment, and plausible bioremediation strategies for removal of azo dyes have been discussed.

  10. Ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE)-degrading microbial communities in enrichments from polluted environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Digabel, Yoann; Demanèche, Sandrine; Benoit, Yves; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Vogel, Timothy M

    2014-08-30

    The ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) degradation capacity and phylogenetic composition of five aerobic enrichment cultures with ETBE as the sole carbon and energy source were studied. In all cases, ETBE was entirely degraded to biomass and CO2. Clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene were prepared from each enrichment. The analyses of the DNA sequences obtained showed different taxonomic compositions with a majority of Proteobacteria in three cases. The two other enrichments have different microbiota with an abundance of Acidobacteria in one case, whereas the microbiota in the second was more diverse (majority of Actinobacteria, Chlorobi and Gemmatimonadetes). Actinobacteria were detected in all five enrichments. Several bacterial strains were isolated from the enrichments and five were capable of degrading ETBE and/or tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), a degradation intermediate. The five included three Rhodococcus sp. (IFP 2040, IFP 2041, IFP 2043), one Betaproteobacteria (IFP 2047) belonging to the Rubrivivax/Leptothrix/Ideonella branch, and one Pseudonocardia sp. (IFP 2050). Quantification of these five strains and two other strains, Rhodococcus sp. IFP 2042 and Bradyrhizobium sp. IFP2049, which had been previously isolated from one of the enrichments was carried out on the different enrichments based on quantitative PCR with specific 16S rRNA gene primers and the results were consistent with the hypothesized role of Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in the degradation of ETBE and the possible role of Bradyrhizobium strains in the degradation of TBA.

  11. Construction of PAH-degrading mixed microbial consortia by induced selection in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, German; Absalón, Ángel E; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Ángel; Fernandez, Francisco J; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2017-04-01

    Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils through the biostimulation and bioaugmentation processes can be a strategy for the clean-up of oil spills and environmental accidents. In this work, an induced microbial selection method using PAH-polluted soils was successfully used to construct two microbial consortia exhibiting high degradation levels of low and high molecular weight PAHs. Six fungal and seven bacterial native strains were used to construct mixed consortia with the ability to tolerate high amounts of phenanthrene (Phe), pyrene (Pyr) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and utilize these compounds as a sole carbon source. In addition, we used two engineered PAH-degrading fungal strains producing heterologous ligninolytic enzymes. After a previous selection using microbial antagonism tests, the selection was performed in microcosm systems and monitored using PCR-DGGE, CO2 evolution and PAH quantitation. The resulting consortia (i.e., C1 and C2) were able to degrade up to 92% of Phe, 64% of Pyr and 65% of BaP out of 1000 mg kg(-1) of a mixture of Phe, Pyr and BaP (1:1:1) after a two-week incubation. The results indicate that constructed microbial consortia have high potential for soil bioremediation by bioaugmentation and biostimulation and may be effective for the treatment of sites polluted with PAHs due to their elevated tolerance to aromatic compounds, their capacity to utilize them as energy source.

  12. Alternative primer sets for PCR detection of genotypes involved in bacterial aerobic BTEX degradation : Distribution of the genes in BTEX degrading isolates and in subsurface soils of a BTEX contaminated industrial site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, B; Junca, H; Vosahlova, J; Lindner, A; Ruegg, [No Value; Bucheli-Witschel, M; Faber, F; Egli, T; Mau, M; Schlomann, M; Brennerova, M; Brenner, [No Value; Pieper, DH; Top, EM; Dejonghe, W; Bastiaens, L; Springael, D

    2006-01-01

    Eight new primer sets were designed for PCR detection of (i) mono-oxygenase and dioxygenase gene sequences involved in initial attack of bacterial aerobic BTEX degradation and of (ii) catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene sequences responsible for metacleavage of the aromatic ring. The new primer sets allow

  13. Riverine Dissolved Organic Matter Degradation Modeled Through Microbial Incubations of Vascular Plant Leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfmann, J.; Hernes, P.; Chuang, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains as much carbon as is in the atmosphere, provides the main link between terrestrial and marine carbon reservoirs, and fuels the microbial food web. The fate and removal of DOM is a result of several complex conditions and processes, including photodegradation, sorption/desorption, dominant vascular plant sources, and microbial abundance. In order to better constrain factors affecting microbial degradation, laboratory incubations were performed using Sacramento River water for microbial inoculums and vascular plant leachates. Four vascular plant sources were chosen based on their dominance in the Sacramento River Valley: gymnosperm needles from Pinus sabiniana (foothill pine), angiosperm dicot leaves from Quercus douglassi (blue oak), angiosperm monocot mixed annual grasses, and angiosperm monocot mixed Schoenoplectus acutus (tule) and Typha spp. (cattails). Three concentrations of microbial inoculum were used for each plant material, ranging from 0.2% to 10%. Degradation was monitored as a function of time using dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV-Vis absorbance, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM), and was compared across vascular plant type and inoculum concentration.

  14. Atrazine degradation by aerobic microorganisms isolated from the rhizosphere of sweet flag (Acorus calamus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marecik, Roman; Króliczak, Paweł; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Białas, Wojciech; Olejnik, Anna; Cyplik, Paweł

    2008-04-01

    In presented study the capability of microorganisms isolated from the rhizosphere of sweet flag (Acorus calamus) to the atrazine degradation was assessed. Following isolation of the microorganisms counts of psychrophilic bacteria, mesophilic bacteria and fungi were determined. Isolated microorganisms were screened in terms of their ability to decompose a triazine herbicide, atrazine. Our results demonstrate that within the rhizosphere of sweet flag there were 3.8x10(7) cfu of psychrophilic bacteria, 1.8x10(7) cfu of mesophilic bacteria, and 6x10(5) cfu of fungi per 1 g of dry root mass. These microorganisms were represented by more than 20 different strains, and at the first step these strains were grown for 5 days in the presence of atrazine at a concentration of 5 mg/l. In terms of the effect of this trial culture, the bacteria reduced the level of atrazine by an average of about 2-20%, but the average level of reduction by fungi was in the range 18-60%. The most active strains involved in atrazine reduction were then selected and identified. These strains were classified as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus megaterium, Rahnella aquatilis (three strains), Umbelopsis isabellina, Volutella ciliata and Botrytis cinerea. Culturing of the microorganisms for a longer time resulted in high atrazine degradation level. The highest degradation level was observed at atrazine concentrations of 5 mg/l for S. maltophilia (83.5% after 15 days of culture) and for Botrytis sp. (82% after 21 days of culture). Our results indicate that microorganisms of the sweet flag rhizosphere can play an important role in the bioremediation of atrazine-contaminated sites.

  15. Microbial Degradation of Propylene Glycol - Modelling Approach of a Batch Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, Annette; Fernandez, Perrine; Bakken, Lars; Bloem, Esther; French, Helen

    2016-04-01

    De-icing chemicals are applied in large amounts at airports during winter conditions to keep the runways and aircrafts ice-free. At Gardermoen airport, Norway, most of the applied chemicals can be captured, but about 10 to 20 % infiltrate into the soil along the runways and during take-off. While the commonly used propylene glycol (PG) is easily degradable by local microbial communities, its biological oxygen demand is high, anoxic zones can develop and soluble Fe+2 and Mn+2 ions eventually can reach the groundwater. The objectives of the presented study are to quantify the mechanisms, which control the order of reduction processes in an unsaturated sandy soil, and to test whether measured redox potentials can help to determine underlying biogeochemical reactions. To investigate the mechanisms of microbial degradation, the water phase of soil samples from Gardermoen Airport was replaced by deionized water with 10 mMol PG or 10 mMol glutamate and the samples were incubated at 10°C for about two weeks. The gas phase was sampled and analyzed automatically every three hours. Microbial degradation of the substrate (PG or glutamate) was modelled following a Monod kinetics using the FME (Flexible Modelling Environment) package of R (Project for Statistical Computing). The model was calibrated against measurements of O2 depletion and CO2 production. The initial concentrations of O2, CO2 and PG or glutamate are known and microbial yields and stoichiometric constants can be calculated from the measurements. Parameter values for the initial microbial population size, maximum microbial growth rate, the half saturation constant, and microbial degradation and respiration rates were fitted using the FME package. The model accounts for carbon from the substrate (PG or glutamate) incorporated into the biomass. Results are promising, but because of the large number of parameters needed to fit a Monod kinetics it is challenging to accurately model a whole redox sequence. The

  16. Microbial litter degradation across a land-use gradient of Danish streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jes; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter

    functions. In consequence, it is highly important to address and characterise relations between stream functions and anthropogenic stress. In streams, fungi and bacteria are key organism groups in the decomposition and conversion of riparian plant litter into more palatable food resources...... on microbial litter degradation in the field. The results clearly emphasise the importance of considering microbial litter breakdown as endpoint when evaluating the effects of anthropogenic stressors in streams. Agricultural pesticides could have the potential to alter the entire flux of energy through...

  17. Microbial degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-butyl alcohol in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Torsten C.; Schirmer, Mario; Weiß, Holger; Haderlein, Stefan B.

    2004-06-01

    The fate of fuel oxygenates such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in the subsurface is governed by their degradability under various redox conditions. The key intermediate in degradation of MTBE and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) is tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) which was often found as accumulating intermediate or dead-end product in lab studies using microcosms or isolated cell suspensions. This review discusses in detail the thermodynamics of the degradation processes utilizing various terminal electron acceptors, and the aerobic degradation pathways of MTBE and TBA. It summarizes the present knowledge on MTBE and TBA degradation gained from either microcosm or pure culture studies and emphasizes the potential of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) for identification and quantification of degradation processes of slowly biodegradable pollutants such as MTBE and TBA. Microcosm studies demonstrated that MTBE and TBA may be biodegradable under oxic and nearly all anoxic conditions, although results of various studies are often contradictory, which suggests that site-specific conditions are important parameters. So far, TBA degradation has not been shown under methanogenic conditions and it is currently widely accepted that TBA is a recalcitrant dead-end product of MTBE under these conditions. Reliable in situ degradation rates for MTBE and TBA under various geochemical conditions are not yet available. Furthermore, degradation pathways under anoxic conditions have not yet been elucidated. All pure cultures capable of MTBE or TBA degradation isolated so far use oxygen as terminal electron acceptor. In general, compared with hydrocarbons present in gasoline, fuel oxygenates biodegrade much slower, if at all. The presence of MTBE and related compounds in groundwater therefore frequently limits the use of in situ biodegradation as remediation option at gasoline-contaminated sites. Though degradation of MTBE and TBA in field studies has been reported under oxic

  18. Spoilage of light (PSE-like) and dark turkey meat under aerobic or modified atmosphere package: microbial indicators and their relationship with total volatile basic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, M J; Ferreira, M C; Barreto, A S

    2008-01-01

    1. The aim of this work was to evaluate the shelf life of turkey meat from different colour categories (Pale, Soft and Exudative (PSE)-like), intermediate and dark), packaged under aerobic or modified atmosphere (MAP) conditions; also to establish a relationship between microbial quality and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), evaluating its capacity for shelf life determination. 2. Breasts were selected according to luminance (L*) and pH(24): L >/= 51 and pH 5.8 for dark colour. Sliced meat was packaged under aerobic or MAP conditions with 50% N(2) and 50% CO(2), then stored in the dark at 0 +/- 1 degrees C for periods of 12 or 25 d. Meat under aerobic conditions was evaluated for microbiological characteristics and TVB-N on d 0, 5 and 12. This evaluation was extended to include d 19 and 25 when samples were under MAP conditions. 3. The dark meat group after 12 d of storage in aerobiosis presented significantly higher plate counts of aerobic mesophilic, psychrotrophic micro-organisms and higher TVB-N than other meat colour categories. The shelf life of turkey meat under MAP was one week longer for intermediate and light colour meat (20 d) than for dark meat. TVB-N values of 20 to 30 mg NH(3)/100 g turkey meat correspond to advanced spoilage stages. We proposed 14 mg NH(3)/100 g as the limit of freshness acceptability for turkey meat. 4. TVB-N was an indicator of turkey meat microbial spoilage but was not a suitable early predictor for microbial spoilage and in particular for turkey meat stored under MAP conditions because counts of micro-organisms were moderately correlated (Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae) with this index, as they were inhibited by MAP gas mixture and storage temperature used in the present study.

  19. Microbial degradation of poly(amino acid)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obst, Martin; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Natural poly(amino acid)s are a group of poly(ionic) molecules (ionomers) with various biological functions and putative technical applications and play, therefore, an important role both in nature and in human life. Because of their biocompatibility and their synthesis from renewable resources, poly(amino acid)s may be employed for many different purposes covering a broad spectrum of medical, pharmaceutical, and personal care applications as well as the domains of agriculture and of environmental applications. Biodegradability is one important advantage of naturally occurring poly(amino acid)s over many synthetic polymers. The intention of this review is to give an overview about the enzyme systems catalyzing the initial steps in poly(amino acid) degradation. The focus is on the naturally occurring poly(amino acid)s cyanophycin, poly(epsilon-L-lysine) and poly(gamma-glutamic acid); but biodegradation of structurally related synthetic polyamides such as poly(aspartic acid) and nylons, which are known from various technical applications, is also included.

  20. Microbial degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons on organoclay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-11-01

    The role of organoclays in hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/oil microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clays used for this study were Na-montmorillonite and saponite. These two clays were treated with didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce organoclays which were used in this study. The study indicated that clays with high cation exchange capacity (CEC) such as Na-montmorillonite produced an organomontmorillonite that was inhibitory to biodegradation of the crude oil hydrocarbons. Extensive hydrophobic interaction between the organic phase of the organoclay and the crude oil hydrocarbons is suggested to render the hydrocarbons unavailable for biodegradation. However, untreated Na-montmorillonite was stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbons and is believed to have done so because of its high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients making it easy for the microbes to access the nutrients. This study indicates that unlike unmodified montmorillonites, organomontmorillonite may not serve any useful purpose in the bioremediation of crude oil spill sites where hydrocarbon removal by biodegradation is desired within a rapid time period.

  1. Cometabolic degradation of chloramphenicol via a meta-cleavage pathway in a microbial fuel cell and its microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Zhang, Yanyan; Li, Daping

    2017-04-01

    The performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) in terms of degradation of chloramphenicol (CAP) was investigated. Approximately 84% of 50mg/L CAP was degraded within 12h in the MFC. A significant interaction of pH, temperature, and initial CAP concentration was found on removal of CAP, and a maximum degradation rate of 96.53% could theoretically be achieved at 31.48°C, a pH of 7.12, and an initial CAP concentration of 106.37mg/L. Moreover, CAP was further degraded through a ring-cleavage pathway. The antibacterial activity of CAP towards Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was largely eliminated by MFC treatment. High-throughput sequencing analysis indicated that Azonexus, Comamonas, Nitrososphaera, Chryseobacterium, Azoarcus, Rhodococcus, and Dysgonomonas were the predominant genera in the MFC anode biofilm. In conclusion, the MFC shows potential for the treatment of antibiotic residue-containing wastewater due to its high rates of CAP removal and energy recovery.

  2. Modeling the kinetics of microbial degradation of deicing chemicals in porous media under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, Markus; Jaesche, Philipp; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2012-09-01

    A quantitative knowledge of the fate of deicing chemicals in the subsurface can be provided by joint analysis of lab experiments with numerical simulation models. In the present study, published experimental data of microbial degradation of the deicing chemical propylene glycol (PG) under flow conditions in soil columns were simulated inversely to receive the parameters of degradation. We evaluated different scenarios of an advection-dispersion model including different terms for degradation, such as zero order, first order and inclusion of a growing and decaying biomass for their ability to explain the data. The general break-through behavior of propylene glycol in soil columns can be simulated well using a coupled model of solute transport and degradation with growth and decay of biomass. The susceptibility of the model to non-unique solutions was investigated using systematical forward and inverse simulations. We found that the model tends to equifinal solutions under certain conditions.

  3. Microbial degradation of Paclitaxel using Citrobacter amalonaticus Rashtia isolated from pharmaceutical wastewater: kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Hojjatolah; Grakoee, Seyed Reza; Rakhshaee, Roohan

    2016-08-01

    Paclitaxel is a highly toxic anticancer agent which is used in a wide range against ovarian, breast, lung, and prostate cancers. Paclitaxel is manufactured recently in the north of Iran which may lead to the introduction of the drug into the environment via pharmaceutical wastewater. To our knowledge, Paclitaxel degradation is currently performed using physicochemical methods and biological degradation of Paclitaxel has not been reported. In this study, a Paclitaxel degrading bacterium was isolated from pharmaceutical wastewater for the first time. The bacterium was identified using biochemical and molecular assays and its Paclitaxel degradation potential was evaluated using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic study of Paclitaxel degradation at different experimental conditions was performed. A Citrobacter species named as C. amalonaticus Rashtia able to degrade and utilize Paclitaxel as the sole carbon source was isolated. The isolated strain tolerated high level concentration of Paclitaxel (0.4 mg/mL) in liquid culture media and was able to degrade spillage-level concentrations of the drug (0.01-0.1 mg/mL) with 87-93 % efficacy under aerobic condition. Kinetic and thermodynamic study at different pHs (4.0, 7.0 and 10.0) and temperatures (285, 295 and 310 K) revealed that Paclitaxel degradation is a non-spontaneous process and the highest rate constant was observed in the basic condition and at the highest temperature. The ΔG values at 285, 295 and 310 K were determined 103.3, 105.9 and 109.9 kJ/mol, respectively. In addition, The ΔH and activation energy (Ea) of the process were determined +28.7 kJ/mol and +30.87 kJ/mol, respectively.

  4. Biodegradation of malachite green by Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1 under aerobic condition: characteristics, degradation products, enzyme analysis and phytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lin-Na; Wang, Sheng; Li, Gang; Wang, Bing; Jia, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yu-Hua; Chen, Yun-Long

    2011-03-01

    Malachite green (MG), a widely-used and recalcitrant dye, has been confirmed to be carcinogenic and mutagenic against many organisms. The main objective of this study is to investigate the capability of Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1 to decolorize MG, and to explore the possible mechanism. The results showed that this strain demonstrated high decolorizing capability (90.3-97.2%) at high concentrations of MG (100-1,000 mg/l) under shaking condition within 24 h. In static conditions, lower but still effective decolorization (78.9-84.3%) was achieved. The optimal pH and temperature for the decolorization was pH 6.6 and 28-30°C, respectively. Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) (1 mM) were observed to significantly enhance the decolorization. The intermediates of the MG degradation under aerobic condition identified by UV-visible, GC-MS and LC-MS analysis included malachite green carbinol, (dimethyl amino-phenyl)-phenyl-methanone, N,N-dimethylaniline, (methyl amino-phenyl)-phenyl-methanone, (amino phenyl)-phenyl methanone and di-benzyl methane. The enzyme analysis indicated that Mn-peroxidase, NADH-DCIP and MG reductase were involved in the biodegradation of MG. Moreover, phytotoxicity of MG and detoxification for MG by the strain were observed. Therefore, this strain could be potentially used for bioremediation of MG.

  5. Degradation of corn stalk by the composite microbial system of MC1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The composite microbial system of MC1 was used to degrade corn stalk in order to determine properties of the degraded products as well as bacterial composition of MC1. Results indicated that the pH of the fermentation broth was typical of lignocellulose degradatioin by MC1, decreasing in the early phase and increasing in later stages of the degradation. The microbial biomass peaked on the day 3 after degradation. The MC1 effeciently degraded the corn stalk by nearly 70% during which its cellulose content decreased by 71.2%, hemicellulose by 76.5% and lignin by 24.6%. The content of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) in the fermentation broth increased progressively during the first three days, and decreased thereafter, suggesting an accumulation of WSC in the early phase of the degradation process. Total levels of various volatile products peaked in the third day after degradation , and 7 types of volatile products were detected in the fermentation broth. These were ethanol, acetic acid, 1,2-ethanediol, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, 3-methyl-butanoic acid and glycerine. Six major compounds were quantitatively analysed and the contents of each compound were ethanol (0.584 g/L), acetic acid (0.735 g/L), 1,2-ethanediol (0.772 g/L), propanoic acid (0.026 g/L), butanoic acid (0.018 g/L) and glycerine (4.203 g/L). Characterization of bacterial cells collected from the culture solution, based on 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE analysis of DNAs, showed that the composition of bacterial community in MC1 coincided basically with observations from previous studies. This indicated that the structure of MC1 is very stable during degradation of different lignocellulose materials.

  6. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Ambuchi, John J.; He, Weihua; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m−2. Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which process 79.1 ± 5.6% of soluble protein and 86.6 ± 2.2% of soluble carbohydrates were degraded by anaerobic digestion in the CMZ and short-chain volatile fatty acids were further decomposed and generated current in the MEZ. Co-existence of fermentative bacteria (Clostridium and Bacteroides, 19.7% and 5.0%), acetogenic bacteria (Syntrophobacter, 20.8%), methanogenic archaea (Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium, 40.3% and 38.4%) and exoelectrogens (Geobacter, 12.4%) as well as a clear spatial distribution and syntrophic interaction among them contributed to the cascade degradation process in CSMER. The CSMER shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application due to high pre-hydrolysis and acidification rate, high energy recovery and low capital cost. PMID:27270788

  7. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Ambuchi, John J; He, Weihua; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2016-06-07

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m(-2). Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which process 79.1 ± 5.6% of soluble protein and 86.6 ± 2.2% of soluble carbohydrates were degraded by anaerobic digestion in the CMZ and short-chain volatile fatty acids were further decomposed and generated current in the MEZ. Co-existence of fermentative bacteria (Clostridium and Bacteroides, 19.7% and 5.0%), acetogenic bacteria (Syntrophobacter, 20.8%), methanogenic archaea (Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium, 40.3% and 38.4%) and exoelectrogens (Geobacter, 12.4%) as well as a clear spatial distribution and syntrophic interaction among them contributed to the cascade degradation process in CSMER. The CSMER shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application due to high pre-hydrolysis and acidification rate, high energy recovery and low capital cost.

  8. Effects of soil organic matter on the development of the microbial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.; Zhang, N.; Xue, M.; Lu, S.T. [Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Tao, S., E-mail: taos@urban.pku.edu.c [Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The microbial activity in soils was a critical factor governing the degradation of organic micro-pollutants. The present study was conducted to analyze the effects of soil organic matter on the development of degradation potentials for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Most of the degradation kinetics for PAHs by the indigenous microorganisms developed in soils can be fitted with the Logistic growth models. The microbial activities were relatively lower in the soils with the lowest and highest organic matter content, which were likely due to the nutrition limit and PAH sequestration. The microbial activities developed in humic acid (HA) were much higher than those developed in humin, which was demonstrated to be able to sequester organic pollutants stronger. The results suggested that the nutrition support and sequestration were the two major mechanisms, that soil organic matter influenced the development of microbial PAHs degradation potentials. - Research highlights: PAH degradation kinetics obey Logistic model. Degradation potentials depend on soil organic carbon content. Humin inhibits the development of PAH degradation activity. Nutrition support and sequestration regulate microbial degradation capacity. - Soil organic matter regulated PAH degradation potentials through nutrition support and sequestration.

  9. Historical and recent achievements in the field of microbial degradation of natural and synthetic rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yikmis, Meral; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    This review intends to provide an overview of historical and recent achievements in studies of microbial degradation of natural and synthetic rubber. The main scientific focus is on the key enzymes latex-clearing protein (Lcp) from the Gram-positive Streptomyces sp. strain K30 and rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from the Gram-negative Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y, which has been hitherto the only known rubber-degrading bacterium that does not belong to the actinomycetes. We also emphasize the importance of knowledge of biodegradation in industrial and environmental biotechnology for waste natural rubber disposal.

  10. Microbial degradation of street dust polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in microcosms simulating diffuse pollution of urban soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anders R; de Lipthay, Julia R; Sørensen, Søren J

    2006-01-01

    Diffuse pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of topsoil in urban regions has caused increasing concerns in recent years. We simulated diffuse pollution of soil in microcosms by spiking sandy topsoil (A-horizon) and coarse, mineral subsoil (C-horizon) with street dust (PM63...... for the persistence and low bioaccessibility of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in diffusely polluted soil.......) isolated from municipal street sweepings from central Copenhagen. The microbial communities adapted to PAH degradation in microcosms spiked with street dust in both A-horizon and C-horizon soils, in spite of low PAH-concentrations. The increased potential for PAH degradation was demonstrated on several...

  11. The Denitrification Characteristics and Microbial Community in the Cathode of an MFC with Aerobic Denitrification at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianqiang; Wu, Jinna; Li, Xiaoling; Wang, Sha; Hu, Bo; Ding, Xiaoqian

    2017-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have attracted much attention due to their ability to generate electricity while treating wastewater. The performance of a double-chamber MFC with simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) in the cathode for treating synthetic high concentration ammonia wastewater was investigated at different dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and high temperatures. The results showed that electrode denitrification and traditional heterotrophic denitrification co-existed in the cathode chamber. Electrode denitrification by aerobic denitrification bacterium (ADB) is beneficial for achieving a higher voltage of the MFC at high DO concentrations (3.0–4.2 mg/L), while traditional heterotrophic denitrification is conducive to higher total nitrogen (TN) removal at low DO (0.5–1.0 mg/L) concentrations. Under high DO conditions, the nitrous oxide production and TN removal efficiency were higher with a 50 Ω external resistance than with a 100 Ω resistance, which demonstrated that electrode denitrification by ADB occurred in the cathode of the MFC. Sufficient electrons were inferred to be provided by the electrode to allow ADB survival at low carbon:nitrogen ratios (≤0.3). Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) results showed that increasing the DO resulted in a change of the predominant species from thermophilic autotrophic nitrifiers and facultative heterotrophic denitrifiers at low DO concentrations to thermophilic ADB at high DO concentrations. The predominant phylum changed from Firmicutes to Proteobacteria, and the predominant class changed from Bacilli to Alpha, Beta, and Gamma Proteobacteria. PMID:28154554

  12. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics'era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Duran, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment's complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature), nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment's reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying "omics" approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon degradation. In addition, we

  13. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics’era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana eCravo-Laureau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment’s complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature, nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment’s reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying ‘omics’ approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon

  14. Toxicity of zero-valent iron nanoparticles to a trichloroethylene-degrading groundwater microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabetakis, Kara M; Niño de Guzmán, Gabriela T; Torrents, Alba; Yarwood, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The microbiological impact of zero-valent iron used in the remediation of groundwater was investigated by exposing a trichloroethylene-degrading anaerobic microbial community to two types of iron nanoparticles. Changes in total bacterial and archaeal population numbers were analyzed using qPCR and were compared to results from a blank and negative control to assess for microbial toxicity. Additionally, the results were compared to those of samples exposed to silver nanoparticles and iron filings in an attempt to discern the source of toxicity. Statistical analysis revealed that the three different iron treatments were equally toxic to the total bacteria and archaea populations, as compared with the controls. Conversely, the silver nanoparticles had a limited statistical impact when compared to the controls and increased the microbial populations in some instances. Therefore, the findings suggest that zero-valent iron toxicity does not result from a unique nanoparticle-based effect.

  15. Response of aerobic granular sludge to the long-term presence to nanosilver in sequencing batch reactors: reactor performance, sludge property, microbial activity and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiangchun; Cen, Yan; Lu, Fang; Gu, Lingyun; Ma, Jingyun

    2015-02-15

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) raises concerns about their potential toxic effects on the environment. Granular shape sludge is a special type of microbial aggregate. The response of aerobic granular sludge (AGS) to the long-term presence of Ag NPs has not been well studied. In this study, AGS was exposed to 5 and 50mg/L Ag NPs in sequence batch reactors (SBRs) for 69 days, and its response was evaluated based on the sludge properties, microbial activity and community, and reactor performance. The results showed that Ag NPs caused inhibition to microbial activities of AGS from Day 35. At the end of 69 days of Ag NPs exposure, the microbial activity of AGS was significantly inhibited in terms of inhibitions of the ammonia oxidizing rate (33.0%), respiration rate (17.7% and 45.6%) and denitrification rate (6.8%), as well as decreases in the ammonia mono-oxygenase and nitrate reductase activities. During the long-term exposure, the AGS maintained its granular shape and large granule size (approximately 900 μm); the microbial community of AGS slightly changed, but the dominant microbial population remained. Overall, the AGS tolerated the toxicity of Ag NPs well, but a long-term exposure may produce chronic toxicity to the AGS, which is concerning.

  16. Microbial degradation of n-hexadecane in mineral salt medium as mediated by degradative enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shweta; Singh, S N

    2012-05-01

    In the present study, n-hexadecane degradation in MSM was investigated by three bacteria identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa PSA5, Rhodococcus sp. NJ2 and Ochrobactrum intermedium P2, isolated from petroleum sludge. During 10 days of incubation, n-hexadecane was degraded to 99% by P. aeruginosa PSA5, 95% by Rhodococcus sp. NJ2 and 92% by O. intermedium P2. During degradation process, the induction of catabolic enzymes alkane hydroxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase and lipase were also examined. Among these enzymes, the highest activities of alkane hydroxylase (185 μmol mg(-1) protein) and alcohol dehydrogenase (75.78 μmol mg(-1) protein) were recorded in Rhodococcus sp. NJ2 while lipase activity was highly induced in P. aeruginosa PSA5 (48.71 μmol mg(-1) protein). Besides, accumulation of n-hexadecane in inclusion bodies was found to be maximum 60.8 g l(-1) in P. aeruginosa PSA5, followed by Rhodococcus sp. NJ2 (56.1 g l(-1)) and the least (51.6 g l(-1)) was found in O. intermedium P2. Biosurfactant production by bacterial strains was indicated by the reduction in surface tension and induction of cell surface hydrophobicity and pseudosolubilization which facilitated n-hexadecane degradation.

  17. In situ rumen degradation of amino acids from different feeds corrected for microbial contamination

    OpenAIRE

    González, Javier; Centeno, Carmen; Lamrani, Farida; Rodríguez, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Variations of the amino acid profile produced by rumen actions were established for fish meal (FM), corn grain (CG), corn gluten feed (GF), dehydrated beet pulp (DBP), and lucerne hay (LH), using the nylon bag technique. The effects of degradation of soluble or insoluble proteins were measured by rumen incubations at 0 h (washout value) and 16 h, respectively. Rumen incubations were performed on four cannulated wethers and the microbial contamination of incubated resid...

  18. Effect of particle size and microbial phytase on phytate degradation in incubated maize and soybean meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ton Nu, Mai Anh; Blaabjerg, Karoline; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of screen size (1, 2 and 3 mm) and microbial phytase (0 and 1000 FTU/kg as-fed) on phytate degradation in maize (100% maize), soybean meal (100% SBM) and maize–SBM (75% maize and 25% SBM) incubated in water for 0, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h at 38°C...

  19. Characterization of two diesel fuel degrading microbial consortia enriched from a non acclimated, complex source of microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varese Giovanna C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bioremediation of soils impacted by diesel fuels is very often limited by the lack of indigenous microflora with the required broad substrate specificity. In such cases, the soil inoculation with cultures with the desired catabolic capabilities (bioaugmentation is an essential option. The use of consortia of microorganisms obtained from rich sources of microbes (e.g., sludges, composts, manure via enrichment (i.e., serial growth transfers on the polluting hydrocarbons would provide bioremediation enhancements more robust and reproducible than those achieved with specialized pure cultures or tailored combinations (co-cultures of them, together with none or minor risks of soil loading with unrelated or pathogenic allocthonous microorganisms. Results In this work, two microbial consortia, i.e., ENZ-G1 and ENZ-G2, were enriched from ENZYVEBA (a complex commercial source of microorganisms on Diesel (G1 and HiQ Diesel (G2, respectively, and characterized in terms of microbial composition and hydrocarbon biodegradation capability and specificity. ENZ-G1 and ENZ-G2 exhibited a comparable and remarkable biodegradation capability and specificity towards n-C10 to n-C24 linear paraffins by removing about 90% of 1 g l-1 of diesel fuel applied after 10 days of aerobic shaken flask batch culture incubation at 30°C. Cultivation dependent and independent approaches evidenced that both consortia consist of bacteria belonging to the genera Chryseobacterium, Acinetobacter, Psudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Alcaligenes and Gordonia along with the fungus Trametes gibbosa. However, only the fungus was found to grow and remarkably biodegrade G1 and G2 hydrocarbons under the same conditions. The biodegradation activity and specificity and the microbial composition of ENZ-G1 and ENZ-G2 did not significantly change after cryopreservation and storage at -20°C for several months. Conclusions ENZ-G1 and ENZ-G2 are very similar highly enriched consortia

  20. Degradation of organic pollutants in a photoelectrocatalytic system enhanced by a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Jie; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Li, Wen-Wei; Lin, Zhi-Qi; Zeng, Raymond J; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-07-15

    Photocatalytic oxidation mediated by TiO(2) is a promising oxidation process for degradation of organic pollutants, but suffers from the decreased photocatalytic efficiency attributed to the recombination of photogenerated electrons and holes. Thus, a cost-effective supply of external electrons is an effective way to elevate the photocatalytic efficiency. Here we report a novel bioelectrochemical system to effectively reduce p-nitrophenol as a model organic pollutant with utilization of the energy derived from a microbial fuel cell. In such a system, there is a synergetic effect between the electrochemical and photocatalytic oxidation processes. Kinetic analysis shows that the system exhibits a more rapid p-nitrophenol degradation at a rate two times the sum of rates by the individual photocatalytic and electrochemical methods. The system performance is influenced by both external resistor and electrolyte concentration. Either a lower external resistor or a lower electrolyte concentration results in a higher p-nitrophenol degradation rate. This system has a potential for the effective degradation of refractory organic pollutants and provides a new way for utilization of the energy generated from conversion of organic wastes by microbial fuel cells.

  1. Integrative computational approach for genome-based study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorapreeda, Tayvich; Thammarongtham, Chinae; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2016-07-01

    Lipid-degrading or lipolytic enzymes have gained enormous attention in academic and industrial sectors. Several efforts are underway to discover new lipase enzymes from a variety of microorganisms with particular catalytic properties to be used for extensive applications. In addition, various tools and strategies have been implemented to unravel the functional relevance of the versatile lipid-degrading enzymes for special purposes. This review highlights the study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes through an integrative computational approach. The identification of putative lipase genes from microbial genomes and metagenomic libraries using homology-based mining is discussed, with an emphasis on sequence analysis of conserved motifs and enzyme topology. Molecular modelling of three-dimensional structure on the basis of sequence similarity is shown to be a potential approach for exploring the structural and functional relationships of candidate lipase enzymes. The perspectives on a discriminative framework of cutting-edge tools and technologies, including bioinformatics, computational biology, functional genomics and functional proteomics, intended to facilitate rapid progress in understanding lipolysis mechanism and to discover novel lipid-degrading enzymes of microorganisms are discussed.

  2. The effect of Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus plantarum on the fermentation, aerobic stability, and ruminal degradability of low dry matter corn and sorghum silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filya, I

    2003-11-01

    The effect of Lactobacillus buchneri, alone or in combination with Lactobacillus plantarum, on the fermentation, aerobic stability, and ruminal degradability of low dry matter corn and sorghum silages was studied under laboratory conditions. The inoculants were applied at 1 x 10(6) cfu/g. Silages with no additives served as control. After treatment, the chopped forages were ensiled in 1.5-L anaerobic jars. Three jars per treatment were sampled on d 2, 4, 8, 15, and 90. After 90 d of storage, the silages were subjected to an aerobic stability test lasting 5 d, in which CO2 production, as well as chemical and microbiological parameters, was measured to determine the extent of aerobic deterioration. At the end of the ensiling period (d 90), the L. buchneri- and L. buchneri + L. plantarum-inoculated silages had significantly higher levels of acetic acid than the control and L. plantarum-inoculated silages. Therefore, yeast activity was impaired in the L. buchneri- and L. buchneri + L. plantarum-inoculated silages. As a result, L. buchneri, alone or in combination with L. plantarum, improved aerobic stability of the low dry matter corn and sorghum silages. The combination of L. buchneri and L. plantarum reduced ammonia N concentrations and fermentation losses in the silages compared with L. buchneri alone. However, L. buchneri, L. plantarum, and a combination of L. buchneri + L. plantarum did not effect in situ rumen dry matter, organic matters, or neutral detergent fiber degradability of the silages. The L. buchneri was very effective in protecting the low dry matter corn and sorghum silages exposed to air under laboratory conditions. The use of L. buchneri, alone or in combination with L. plantarum, as a silage inoculant can improve the aerobic stability of low dry matter corn and sorghum silages by inhibition of yeast activity.

  3. Mass dependent stable isotope fractionation of mercury during mer mediated microbial degradation of monomethylmercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritee, K.; Barkay, Tamar; Blum, Joel D.

    2009-03-01

    Controlling bioaccumulation of toxic monomethylmercury (MMHg) in aquatic food chains requires differentiation between biotic and abiotic pathways that lead to its production and degradation. Recent mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements of natural samples suggest that Hg isotope ratios can be a powerful proxy for tracing dominant Hg transforming pathways in aquatic ecosystems. Specifically, it has been shown that photo-degradation of MMHg causes both mass dependent (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) of Hg isotopes. Because the extent of MDF and MIF observed in natural samples (e.g., fish, soil and sediments) can potentially be used to determine the relative importance of pathways leading to MMHg accumulation, it is important to determine the potential role of microbial pathways in contributing to the fractionation, especially MIF, observed in these samples. This study reports the extent of fractionation of Hg stable isotopes during degradation of MMHg to volatile elemental Hg and methane via the microbial Hg resistance ( mer) pathway in Escherichia coli carrying a mercury resistance ( mer) genetic system on a multi-copy plasmid. During experimental microbial degradation of MMHg, MMHg remaining in reactors became progressively heavier (increasing δ202Hg) with time and underwent mass dependent Rayleigh fractionation with a fractionation factor α202/198 = 1.0004 ± 0.0002 (2SD). However, MIF was not observed in any of the microbial MMHg degradation experiments indicating that the isotopic signature left by mer mediated MMHg degradation is significantly different from fractionation observed during DOC mediated photo-degradation of MMHg. Additionally, a clear suppression of Hg isotope fractionation, both during reduction of Hg(II) and degradation of MMHg, was observed when the cell densities increased, possibly due to a reduction in substrate bioavailability. We propose a multi-step framework for understanding the extent of fractionation seen in our MMHg

  4. Modeling microbial degradation of propylene glycol: electron acceptors and their related redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, Annette; Fernandez, Perrine M.; Bloem, Esther; Meeussen, Johannes C. L.; French, Helen K.

    2014-05-01

    De-icing chemicals are applied in large amounts at airports during winter conditions to keep the runways and aircrafts ice-free. The commonly used propylene glycol (PG) is easily degradable by local microbial communities, but anoxic zones develop and soluble Fe+2 and Mn+2 ions can reach the groundwater. To enhance microbial induced remediation and reduce the release of iron and manganese, it was proposed to add NO3- together with PG. However, experiments conducted in the unsaturated zone at Gardermoen airport, Norway, revealed that manganese and iron were preferred over NO3- as electron acceptor [1]. The objectives of this study are to quantify mechanisms which control the order of reduction processes in an unsaturated sandy soil, and to test whether measured redox potentials can help to determine underlying biogeochemical reactions. We are modelling the microbial degradation of PG using Monod kinetics described for the chemical equilibrium tool ORCHESTRA [2], following an approach of [1]. The model is calibrated against gas measurements of CO2, NO2 and N2 released from batch experiments performed under controlled conditions. Fe+2 and Mn+2 were measured for the start and end of the experiment, as well as bulk resistivity, pH and electrical conductivity. With the calibrated model we are working towards a tool to quantify microbial induced redox reactions under different soil water saturations to account for seasonal water fluxes especially during snowmelt. [1] Schotanus, D., Meeussen, J.C.L., Lissner, H., van der Ploeg, M.J., Wehrer, M., Totsche, K.U., van der Zee, S.E.A.T.M., 2013. Transport and degradation of propylene glycol in the vadose zone: model development and sensitivity analysis. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. [2] Meeussen, J.C.L., 2003. ORCHESTRA: An Object-Oriented Framework for Implementing Chemical Equilibrium Models. Environ. Sci. Technol. 37, 1175-1182.

  5. Current state of knowledge in microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debajyoti Ghosal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs include a group of organic priority pollutants of critical environmental and public health concern due to their toxic, genotoxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties and their ubiquitous occurrence as well as recalcitrance. The increased awareness of their various adverse effects on ecosystem and human health has led to a dramatic increase in research aimed towards removing PAHs from the environment. PAHs may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical oxidation, although transformation by microorganisms is the major neutralization process of PAH-contaminated sites in an ecologically accepted manner. Microbial degradation of PAHs depends on various environmental conditions, such as nutrients, number and kind of the microorganisms, nature as well as chemical property of the PAH being degraded. A wide variety of bacterial, fungal and algal species have the potential to degrade/transform PAHs, among which bacteria and fungi mediated degradation has been studied most extensively. In last few decades microbial community analysis, biochemical pathway for PAHs degradation, gene organization, enzyme system, genetic regulation for PAH degradation have been explored in great detail. Although, xenobiotic-degrading microorganisms have incredible potential to restore contaminated environments inexpensively yet effectively, but new advancements are required to make such microbes effective and more powerful in removing those compounds, which were once thought to be recalcitrant. Recent analytical chemistry and genetic engineering tools might help to improve the efficiency of degradation of PAHs by microorganisms, and minimize uncertainties of successful bioremediation. However, appropriate implementation of the potential of naturally occurring microorganisms for field bioremediation could be considerably enhanced by optimizing certain factors such as bioavailability, adsorption and mass transfer of

  6. Current State of Knowledge in Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Shreya; Dutta, Tapan K; Ahn, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) include a group of organic priority pollutants of critical environmental and public health concern due to their toxic, genotoxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties and their ubiquitous occurrence as well as recalcitrance. The increased awareness of their various adverse effects on ecosystem and human health has led to a dramatic increase in research aimed toward removing PAHs from the environment. PAHs may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical oxidation, although transformation by microorganisms is the major neutralization process of PAH-contaminated sites in an ecologically accepted manner. Microbial degradation of PAHs depends on various environmental conditions, such as nutrients, number and kind of the microorganisms, nature as well as chemical property of the PAH being degraded. A wide variety of bacterial, fungal and algal species have the potential to degrade/transform PAHs, among which bacteria and fungi mediated degradation has been studied most extensively. In last few decades microbial community analysis, biochemical pathway for PAHs degradation, gene organization, enzyme system, genetic regulation for PAH degradation have been explored in great detail. Although, xenobiotic-degrading microorganisms have incredible potential to restore contaminated environments inexpensively yet effectively, but new advancements are required to make such microbes effective and more powerful in removing those compounds, which were once thought to be recalcitrant. Recent analytical chemistry and genetic engineering tools might help to improve the efficiency of degradation of PAHs by microorganisms, and minimize uncertainties of successful bioremediation. However, appropriate implementation of the potential of naturally occurring microorganisms for field bioremediation could be considerably enhanced by optimizing certain factors such as bioavailability, adsorption and mass transfer of PAHs. The main

  7. Current State of Knowledge in Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Shreya; Dutta, Tapan K.; Ahn, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) include a group of organic priority pollutants of critical environmental and public health concern due to their toxic, genotoxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties and their ubiquitous occurrence as well as recalcitrance. The increased awareness of their various adverse effects on ecosystem and human health has led to a dramatic increase in research aimed toward removing PAHs from the environment. PAHs may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical oxidation, although transformation by microorganisms is the major neutralization process of PAH-contaminated sites in an ecologically accepted manner. Microbial degradation of PAHs depends on various environmental conditions, such as nutrients, number and kind of the microorganisms, nature as well as chemical property of the PAH being degraded. A wide variety of bacterial, fungal and algal species have the potential to degrade/transform PAHs, among which bacteria and fungi mediated degradation has been studied most extensively. In last few decades microbial community analysis, biochemical pathway for PAHs degradation, gene organization, enzyme system, genetic regulation for PAH degradation have been explored in great detail. Although, xenobiotic-degrading microorganisms have incredible potential to restore contaminated environments inexpensively yet effectively, but new advancements are required to make such microbes effective and more powerful in removing those compounds, which were once thought to be recalcitrant. Recent analytical chemistry and genetic engineering tools might help to improve the efficiency of degradation of PAHs by microorganisms, and minimize uncertainties of successful bioremediation. However, appropriate implementation of the potential of naturally occurring microorganisms for field bioremediation could be considerably enhanced by optimizing certain factors such as bioavailability, adsorption and mass transfer of PAHs. The main

  8. Microbial degradation of street dust polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in microcosms simulating diffuse pollution of urban soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Anders R; de Lipthay, Julia R; Sørensen, Søren J; Ekelund, Flemming; Christensen, Peter; Andersen, Ole; Karlson, Ulrich; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2006-03-01

    Diffuse pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of topsoil in urban regions has caused increasing concerns in recent years. We simulated diffuse pollution of soil in microcosms by spiking sandy topsoil (A-horizon) and coarse, mineral subsoil (C-horizon) with street dust (PM63) isolated from municipal street sweepings from central Copenhagen. The microbial communities adapted to PAH degradation in microcosms spiked with street dust in both A-horizon and C-horizon soils, in spite of low PAH-concentrations. The increased potential for PAH degradation was demonstrated on several levels: by slowly diminishing PAH-concentrations, increased mineralization of 14C-PAHs, increasing numbers of PAH degraders and increased prevalence of nah and pdo1 PAH degradation genes, i.e. the microbial communities quickly adapted to PAH degradation. Three- and 4-ring PAHs from the street dust were biodegraded to some extent (10-20%), but 5- and 6-ring PAHs were not biodegraded in spite of frequent soil mixing and high PAH degradation potentials. In addition to biodegradation, leaching of 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs from the A-horizon to the C-horizon seems to reduce PAH-levels in surface soil. Over time, levels of 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs in surface soil may reach equilibrium between input and the combination of biodegradation and leaching. However, levels of the environmentally critical 5- and 6-ring PAHs will probably continue to rise. We presume that sorption to black carbon particles is responsible for the persistence and low bioaccessibility of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in diffusely polluted soil.

  9. Spoilage of light (PSE-like) and dark turkey meat under aerobic or modified atmosphere package: microbial indicators and their relationship with total volatile basic nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Fraqueza, Maria João Ramos; Ferreira, Marilia Catarina; Barreto, António Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Abstract 1. The aim of this work was to evaluate the shelf life of turkey meat from different colour categories (light (PSE-like), intermediate and dark), packaged under aerobic or modified atmosphere (MAP) conditions; also to establish a relationship between microbial quality and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), evaluating its capacity for shelf life determination. Breasts were selected according to Luminance (L*) and pH24: L ? 51 and pH < 5.8 for light colour, 43 < L < 51 f...

  10. Microbial degradation and fate in the environment of methyl tert-butyl ether and related fuel oxygenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayolle, F; Vandecasteele, J P; Monot, F

    2001-08-01

    Oxygenates, mainly methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), are commonly added to gasoline to enhance octane index and improve combustion efficiency. Other oxygenates used as gasoline additives are ethers such as ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME), and alcohols such as tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). As a result of its wide use, MTBE has been detected, mainly in the USA, in groundwater and surface waters, and is a cause of concern because of its possible health effects and other undesirable consequences. MTBE is a water-soluble and mobile compound that generates long pollution plumes in aquifers impacted by gasoline releases from leaking tanks. Field observations concur in estimating that, because of recalcitrance to biodegradation, natural attenuation is slow (half-life of at least 2 years). However, quite significant advances have been made in recent years concerning the microbiology of the degradation of MTBE and other oxygenated gasoline additives. The recalcitrance of these compounds results from the presence in their structure of an ether bond and of a tertiary carbon structure. For the most part, only aerobic microbial degradation systems have been reported so far. Consortia capable of mineralizing MTBE have been selected. Multiple instances of the cometabolism of MTBE with pure strains or with microflorae, growing on n-alkanes, isoalkanes, cyclohexane or ethers (diethyl ether, ETBE), have been described. MTBE was converted into TBA in all cases and was sometimes further degraded, but it was not used as a carbon source by the pure strains. However, mineralization of MTBE and TBA by several pure bacterial strains using these compounds as sole carbon and energy source has recently been reported. The pathways of metabolism of MTBE involve the initial attack by a monooxygenase. In several cases, the enzyme was characterized as a cytochrome P-450. After oxygenation, the release of a C -unit as formaldehyde or formate leads to the production of TBA

  11. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Volume 1, Annual report for FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. Because of apparent ease of use and normal structural integrity, cement has been widely used as a binder to solidify LLW. However, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. This report reviews laboratory efforts that are being developed to address the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms are being employed that are capable of metabolically converting organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this report. Sufficient data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW has been developed during the course of this study. These data support the continued development of appropriate tests necessary to determine the resistance of cement-solidified LLW to microbially induced degradation that could impact the stability of the waste form. They also justify the continued effort of enumeration of the conditions necessary to support the microbiological growth and population expansion.

  12. Stabilization of microbial biomass in soils: Implications for SOM formation and xenobiotics degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltner, A.; Kindler, R.; Achtenhagen, J.; Nowak, K.; Girardi, C.; Kästner, M.

    2012-04-01

    specific molecular architecture controls carbon mineralization and balance. The process is also involved in the fate of environmental contaminants in soil. This has been demonstrated by studies on the biodegradation of isotope labeled 2,4-D, MCPA and ibuprofen in soil where we quantified the contribution of microbial biomass residues to nonextractable residues (NER) in soil. The high amount of label found in biomolecules (fatty acids, amino acids) indicated that virtually all of the NER was made up by microbial biomass residues. We therefore conclude that stabilization of cell wall residues plays an important role in both SOM formation and pollutant degradation in soil.

  13. Effects of organic loading rates on reactor performance and microbial community changes during thermophilic aerobic digestion process of high-strength food wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Lee, Jae Won; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the applicability of single-stage thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) process treating high-strength food wastewater (FWW), TAD process was operated at four organic loading rates (OLRs) from 9.2 to 37.2 kg COD/m(3)d. The effects of OLRs on microbial community changes were also examined. The highest volumetric removal rate (13.3 kg COD/m(3)d) and the highest thermo-stable protease activity (0.95 unit/mL) were detected at OLR=18.6 kg COD/m(3)d. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles and quantitative PCR (qPCR) results showed significant microbial community shifts in response to changes in OLR. In particular, DGGE and phylogenetic analysis demonstrate that the presence of Bacillus sp. (phylum of Firmicutes) was strongly correlated with efficient removal of organic particulates from high-strength food wastewater.

  14. Quantitative Molecular Assay for Fingerprinting Microbial Communities of Wastewater and Estrogen-Degrading Consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang-Ping; Ahuja, Rajiv; Sayler, Gary; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative fingerprinting method, called the real-time terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (real-time-t-RFLP) assay, was developed for simultaneous determination of microbial diversity and abundance within a complex community. The real-time-t-RFLP assay was developed by incorporating the quantitative feature of real-time PCR and the fingerprinting feature of t-RFLP analysis. The assay was validated by using a model microbial community containing three pure strains, an Escherichia coli strain (gram negative), a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain (gram negative), and a Bacillus thuringiensis strain (gram positive). Subsequently, the real-time-t-RFLP assay was applied to and proven to be useful for environmental samples; the richness and abundance of species in microbial communities (expressed as the number of 16S rRNA gene copies of each ribotype per milliliter) of wastewater and estrogen-degrading consortia (enriched with 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, or estrone) were successfully characterized. The results of this study strongly suggested that the real-time-t-RFLP assay can be a powerful molecular tool for gaining insight into microbial communities in various engineered systems and natural habitats. PMID:15746346

  15. Microbial dynamics during azo dye degradation in a UASB reactor supplied with yeast extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Q. Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to investigate the microbial dynamics during the anaerobic treatment of the azo dye blue HRFL in bench scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB reactor operated at ambient temperature. Sludge samples were collected under distinct operational phases, when the reactor were stable (low variation of color removal, to assess the effect of glucose and yeast extract as source of carbon and redox mediators, respectively. Reactors performance was evaluated based on COD (chemical oxygen demand and color removal. The microbial dynamics were investigated by PCR-DGGE (Polimerase Chain Reaction - Denaturing Gradient of Gel Electrophoresis technique by comparing the 16S rDNA profiles among samples. The results suggest that the composition of microorganisms changed from the beginning to the end of the reactor operation, probably in response to the presence of azo dye and/or its degradation byproducts. Despite the highest efficiency of color removal was observed in the presence of 500 mg/L of yeast extract (up to 93%, there were no differences regarding the microbial profiles that could indicate a microbial selection by the yeast extract addition. On the other hand Methosarcina barkeri was detected only in the end of operation when the best efficiencies on color removal occurred. Nevertheless the biomass selection observed in the last stages of UASB operation is probably a result of the washout of the sludge in response of accumulation of aromatic amines which led to tolerant and very active biomass that contributed to high efficiencies on color removal.

  16. Relationship between phenol degradation efficiency and microbial community structure in an anaerobic SBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, F; Cabrol, L; Carballa, M; Donoso-Bravo, A; Cruz, L; Ruiz-Filippi, G; Chamy, R; Lema, J M

    2013-11-01

    Phenol is a common wastewater contaminant from various industrial processes, including petrochemical refineries and chemical compounds production. Due to its toxicity to microbial activity, it can affect the efficiency of biological wastewater treatment processes. In this study, the efficiency of an Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor (ASBR) fed with increasing phenol concentrations (from 120 to 1200 mg L(-1)) was assessed and the relationship between phenol degradation capacity and the microbial community structure was evaluated. Up to a feeding concentration of 800 mg L(-1), the initial degradation rate steadily increased with phenol concentration (up to 180 mg L(-1) d(-1)) and the elimination capacity remained relatively constant around 27 mg phenol removed∙gVSS(-1) d(-1). Operation at higher concentrations (1200 mg L(-1)) resulted in a still efficient but slower process: the elimination capacity and the initial degradation rate decreased to, respectively, 11 mg phenol removed∙gVSS(-1) d(-1) and 154 mg L(-1) d(-1). As revealed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, the increase of phenol concentration induced level-dependent structural modifications of the community composition which suggest an adaptation process. The increase of phenol concentration from 120 to 800 mg L(-1) had little effect on the community structure, while it involved drastic structural changes when increasing from 800 to 1200 mg L(-1), including a strong community structure shift, suggesting the specialization of the community through the emergence and selection of most adapted phylotypes. The thresholds of structural and functional disturbances were similar, suggesting the correlation of degradation performance and community structure. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) confirmed that the ASBR functional performance was essentially driven by specific community traits. Under the highest feeding concentration, the most abundant ribotype probably involved in

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Methyl Parathion-degrading Bacteria Based on Microbial Sensor Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GENG Fang-fang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Methyl parathion (MP, a kind of typical organophosphates pesticides (OPs, is widely used as agricultural insecticides. However, due to their neurotoxic effects on humans, the elimination of OPs has become increasingly important. Microbial sensors are consisted of biological components and transducers. Owing to their attractive advantages including low cost, easy of miniaturization and excellent selectivity, they have been widely used for environmental analysis. In this paper, four novel bacterial strains capable of utilizing methyl parathion as the sole carbon source were isolated from pesticide contaminated soils. These four isolates were identified based on morphological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis, and their capability of degrading methyl parathion were investigated by high performance liquid chromatography. The highest degrading efficiency strain was selected for further study of degrading mechanism. The results indicated that degradation rate of these four strains were all over 78% after incubation at 30 ℃, pH 7.0 for 7 d with the original concentration of methyl parathion 50 mg·L-1. The highest degradation rate was up to 100%. 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain MP-6 was affiliated into the genus klebsiella. The LC-MS results indicated that methyl parathion was hydrolyzed to dimethyl thiophosphoric acid and p-nitrophenol by MP-6. A little of p-nitrophenol molecules could be further metabolized to 4-nitrocatechol and 1, 2, 4-benzenetrio. The results indicated that based on detecting the potential signal of intermediate product p-nitrophenol, the strain MP-6 could be used to construct microbial sensors for determination of organophosphorus pesticides in environment.

  18. Screening of a microbial consortium with efifcient corn stover degradation ability at low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinggeer; WANG Zhen; GAO Ju-lin; YU Xiao-fang; ZHANG Bao-lin; WANG Zhi-gang; Borjigin Naoganchaolu; HU Shu-ping; SUN Ji-ying; XIE Min

    2016-01-01

    To speed up the degradation of corn stover directly returned to soil at low temperature, the corn stover-degrading micro-bial consortium GF-20, acclimated to biological decomposition in the frigid region, was successfuly constructed under a long-term limiting substrate. To evaluate its potential in accelerating the decomposition of un-pretreated corn stover, the decomposing property, fermentation dynamic and the microbial diversity were analyzed. GF-20 degraded corn stover by 32% after 15-day fermentation at 10°C. Peak activities of iflter paperlyase (FPA), β-glucosidases (CB), endoglucanases (Cx), and celobiohydrolases (C1) were 1.15, 1.67, 1.73, and 1.42 U mL–1, appearing at the 6th, 3rd, 11th, and 9th d, respec-tively. The pH averaged at 6.73–8.42, and the optical density (OD) value peaked at 1.87 at the 120 h of the degradation process. Celulase, hemicelulase and lignin in corn stover were persistently degraded by 44.85, 43.85 and 25.29% at the end of incubation. Result of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) proifles demonstrated that GF-20 had a stable component structure under switching the temperature and pH. The composition of the GF-20 was also analyzed by constructing bacterial 16S rDNA clone library and fungal 18SrDNA-PCR-DGGE. Twenty-two bacterial clones and four fungal bands were detected and identiifed dominant bacteria represented byCelvibrio mixtussubsp.,Azospira oryzae, Arcobacter delfuyi, andClostridium populeti and the fungi were mainly identiifed as related toTrichosporonsp.

  19. Adaptability of microbial inoculators and their contribution to degradation of mineral oil and PAHs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Five dominant bacteria strains(Acetobacter sp., Alcaligenes sp., Micrococcus sp., Arthrobacter sp. and Bacillus sp.) and five fungi strains (Cephalosporium sp. I, Cephalosporium sp. Ⅱ, Aspergillus sp. Ⅰ, Aspergillus sp. Ⅱ and Fusarium sp.) isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil were used to assess the potential capability of mineral oil and PAH enhanced degradation separately and jointly using the batch liquid medium cultivation with diesel oil spiked at 1000 mg/L. The experiment was performed on a reciprocal shaker in the darkness at 25℃ to 30℃ for 100 d. The dynamic variation in the activity of microbial inoculators in each treatment and the degradation of the target pollutants during the period of experiment were monitored. Results showed a more rapid biodegradation of mineral oil and PAHs at the beginning of the experiment (about 20 d) by dominant bacteria, fungi and their mixture than that of the indigenous microorganisms, however, thereafter an opposite trend was exhibited that the removal ratio by indigenous microorganisms was superior to any other dominant treatments and the tendency lasted till the end of the experiment, indicating the limited competitive capability of dominant microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, and the natural selection of indigenous microorganisms for use in the removal of the contaminants. At the end of the experiment, the removal ratio of mineral oil ranged from 56.8 % to 79.2 % and PAHs ranged from 96.8 % to 99.1% in each treatment by microbial inoculators.

  20. Ruminal degradation kinetic of Brachiaria brizantha silages with different microbial additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odimári Pricila Pires do Prado

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the carbohydrate fractions and estimate ruminal fermentation kinetics parameters of silages Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu with the inclusion of two microbial additives: Additive LPPP Pasture (Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus and additive BSLPPA Pasture (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus acidilactici. The experimental design was completely randomized with three different silages and three replications per silage. The silos were opened after 34 days of fermentation and then sent for laboratory analysis. For the fractionation of carbohydrates were determined total carbohydrates (TC, non-fiber carbohydrates (NFC, fractions A + B1 (fractions of fast and average ruminal degradation, B2 fraction (fraction slowly degraded in the rumen and fraction C (carbohydrates no digestible in the rumen. The gas production data were fitted to a logistic model bicompartimental. There was no difference in the values of the variables of fiber degradation (FC kinetic and no-fiber carbohydrates (NFC of the silages. However, silages Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu with use of additives LPPP and BSLPPA had higher fractions of digestible carbohydrates, reducing total carbohydrates and low indigestible fiber fraction of carbohydrates. Thus, the two microbial additives improved the nutritional value of silage Marandu-grass.

  1. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation potential of Gulf of Mexico coastal microbial communities after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Kappell

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH blowout resulted in oil transport, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs to the Gulf of Mexico shoreline. The microbial communities of these shorelines are thought to be responsible for the intrinsic degradation of PAHs. To investigate the Gulf Coast beach microbial community response to hydrocarbon exposure, we examined the functional gene diversity, bacterial community composition, and PAH degradation capacity of a heavily oiled and non-oiled beach following the oil exposure. With a non-expression functional gene microarray targeting 539 gene families, we detected 28,748 coding sequences. Of these sequences, 10% were uniquely associated with the severely oil-contaminated beach and 6.0% with the non-oiled beach. There was little variation in the functional genes detected between the two beaches; however the relative abundance of functional genes involved in oil degradation pathways, including PAHs, were greater in the oiled beach. The microbial PAH degradation potentials of both beaches, were tested in mesocosms. Mesocosms were constructed in glass columns using sands with native microbial communities, circulated with artificial sea water and challenged with a mixture of PAHs. The low-molecular weight PAHs, fluorene and naphthalene, showed rapid depletion in all mesocosms while the high-molecular weight benzo[α]pyrene was not degraded by either microbial community. Both the heavily oiled and the non-impacted coastal communities showed little variation in their biodegradation ability for low molecular weight PAHs. Massively-parallel sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from mesocosm DNA showed that known PAH degraders and genera frequently associated with oil hydrocarbon degradation represented a major portion of the bacterial community. The observed similar response by microbial communities from beaches with a different recent history of oil exposure suggests that Gulf Coast beach communities are primed for PAH

  2. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation potential of Gulf of Mexico native coastal microbial communities after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappell, Anthony D; Wei, Yin; Newton, Ryan J; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; McLellan, Sandra L; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2014-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout resulted in oil transport, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the Gulf of Mexico shoreline. The microbial communities of these shorelines are thought to be responsible for the intrinsic degradation of PAHs. To investigate the Gulf Coast beach microbial community response to hydrocarbon exposure, we examined the functional gene diversity, bacterial community composition, and PAH degradation capacity of a heavily oiled and non-oiled beach following the oil exposure. With a non-expression functional gene microarray targeting 539 gene families, we detected 28,748 coding sequences. Of these sequences, 10% were uniquely associated with the severely oil-contaminated beach and 6.0% with the non-oiled beach. There was little variation in the functional genes detected between the two beaches; however the relative abundance of functional genes involved in oil degradation pathways, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were greater in the oiled beach. The microbial PAH degradation potentials of both beaches, were tested in mesocosms. Mesocosms were constructed in glass columns using sands with native microbial communities, circulated with artificial sea water and challenged with a mixture of PAHs. The low-molecular weight PAHs, fluorene and naphthalene, showed rapid depletion in all mesocosms while the high-molecular weight benzo[α]pyrene was not degraded by either microbial community. Both the heavily oiled and the non-impacted coastal communities showed little variation in their biodegradation ability for low molecular weight PAHs. Massively-parallel sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from mesocosm DNA showed that known PAH degraders and genera frequently associated with oil hydrocarbon degradation represented a major portion of the bacterial community. The observed similar response by microbial communities from beaches with a different recent history of oil exposure suggests that Gulf Coast beach communities are

  3. Atrazine and terbutryn degradation in deposits from groundwater environment within the boreal region in Lahti, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talja, K Marja; Kaukonen, Sanna; Kilpi-Koski, Johanna; Malin, Ismo; Kairesalo, Timo; Romantschuk, Martin; Tuominen, Jari; Kontro, Merja H

    2008-12-24

    The degradation of pesticides atrazine and terbutryn was investigated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the northern boreal region subsurface deposits and sterilized controls from the depths of 6.3-21.0 m below the surface and 1.2-16.9 m below the groundwater table. During 1.3-1.7 years of laboratory incubation, atrazine degradation under aerobic conditions varied from rapid (half-live 38 days) to no degradation. Anaerobically, atrazine half-lives were 430-829 days. Organic matter, nitrogen, and lead in deposits correlated positively with the atrazine concentration in groundwater. Aerobic and anaerobic terbutryn half-lives were 193-644 and 266-400 days, respectively. Microbial aerobic atrazine and terbutryn degradation was confirmed in the deep deposits near the water table. Under aerobic conditions, the high amounts of Cr, Mn, Ni, and Zn in deposits decreased the chemical degradation of terbutryn.

  4. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Finke, Niko; Larsen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates—Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high...... of carbon degradation diverged, with an additional 43%, 32%, 33%, and 8% of Isochrysis, Iso-Ex, Spirulina, and Spir-Ex carbon respired to CO2 over the next 750 h of incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, the soluble, carbohydrate-rich extracts did not prove to be more labile substrates than the whole cells from...... which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the initial burst...

  5. Preparation, characterization, and microbial degradation of specifically radiolabeled [C]lignocelluloses from marine and freshwater macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, R; Maccubbin, A E; Hodson, R E

    1984-02-01

    Specifically radiolabeled [C-lignin]lignocelluloses were prepared from the aquatic macrophytes Spartina alterniflora, Juncus roemerianus, Rhizophora mangle, and Carex walteriana by using [C]phenylalanine, [C]tyrosine, and [C]cinnamic acid as precursors. Specifically radiolabeled [C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses were prepared by using [C]glucose as precursor. The rates of microbial degradation varied among [C-lignin]lignocelluloses labeled with different lignin precursors within the same plant species. To determine the causes of these differential rates, [C-lignin]lignocelluloses were thoroughly characterized for the distribution of radioactivity in nonlignin contaminants and within the lignin macromolecule. In herbaceous plants, significant amounts (8 to 24%) of radioactivity from [C]phenylalanine and [C]tyrosine were found associated with protein, although very little (3%) radioactivity from [C]cinnamic acid was associated with protein. Microbial degradation of radiolabeled protein resulted in overestimation of lignin degradation rates in lignocelluloses derived from herbaceous aquatic plants. Other differences in degradation rates among [C-lignin]lignocelluloses from the same plant species were attributable to differences in the amount of label being associated with ester-linked subunits of peripheral lignin. After acid hydrolysis of [C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses, radioactivity was detected in several sugars, although most of the radioactivity was distributed between glucose and xylose. After 576 h of incubation with salt marsh sediments, 38% of the polysaccharide component and between 6 and 16% of the lignin component (depending on the precursor) of J. roemerianus lignocellulose was mineralized to CO(2); during the same incubation period, 30% of the polysaccharide component and between 12 and 18% of the lignin component of S. alterniflora lignocellulose was mineralized.

  6. Decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye, reactive blue 59 by aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Yogesh M; Nemade, Harshal N; Markad, Vijay L; Adav, Sunil S; Patole, Milind S; Kodam, Kisan M

    2012-01-01

    The present study deals with development of aerobic granules from textile wastewater sludge and challenged with different concentration of reactive blue 59 (RB59) to test their dye degradation potential. The granules efficiently degraded reactive blue 59 and also sustained higher dye loading of up to 5.0 g l(-1). The significant induction of enzymes azoreductase and cytochrome P-450 indicated their prominent role in the dye degradation while genotoxicity studies demonstrated that the biotransformed product of the dye as non-toxic. The microbial community of the textile dyes degrading aerobic sludge granules analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), revealed significantly diverse dye degrading microbial community belonging to alpha-, beta-, and gamma-proteobacteria.

  7. Comprehensive microbial analysis of combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process treating high-strength food wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2015-01-01

    A combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process was used to treat high-strength food wastewater in this study. During the experimental period, most of solid residue from the mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R1) was separated by centrifugation and introduced into the thermophilic aerobic...... reactor (R2) for further digestion. Then, thermophilic aerobically-digested sludge was reintroduced into R1 to enhance reactor performance. The combined process was operated with two different Runs: Run I with hydraulic retention time (HRT)=40d (corresponding OLR=3.5kgCOD/m3 d) and Run II with HRT=20d...... (corresponding OLR=7kgCOD/m3). For a comparison, a single-stage mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R3) was operated concurrently with same OLRs and HRTs as the combined process. During the overall digestion, all reactors showed high stability without pH control. The combined process demonstrated significantly higher...

  8. Microbial community structure and diversity in an integrated system of anaerobic-aerobic reactors and a constructed wetland for the treatment of tannery wastewater in Modjo, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adey Feleke Desta

    Full Text Available A culture-independent approach was used to elucidate the microbial diversity and structure in the anaerobic-aerobic reactors integrated with a constructed wetland for the treatment of tannery wastewater in Modjo town, Ethiopia. The system has been running with removal efficiencies ranging from 94%-96% for COD, 91%-100% for SO4(2- and S(2-, 92%-94% for BOD, 56%-82% for total Nitrogen and 2%-90% for NH3-N. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed and microbial community assemblies were determined by analysis of a total of 801 unique clone sequences from all the sites. Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU--based analysis of the sequences revealed highly diverse communities in each of the reactors and the constructed wetland. A total of 32 phylotypes were identified with the dominant members affiliated to Clostridia (33%, Betaproteobacteria (10%, Bacteroidia (10%, Deltaproteobacteria (9% and Gammaproteobacteria (6%. Sequences affiliated to the class Clostridia were the most abundant across all sites. The 801 sequences were assigned to 255 OTUs, of which 3 OTUs were shared among the clone libraries from all sites. The shared OTUs comprised 80 sequences belonging to Clostridiales Family XIII Incertae Sedis, Bacteroidetes and unclassified bacterial group. Significantly different communities were harbored by the anaerobic, aerobic and rhizosphere sites of the constructed wetland. Numerous representative genera of the dominant bacterial classes obtained from the different sample sites of the integrated system have been implicated in the removal of various carbon- containing pollutants of natural and synthetic origins. To our knowledge, this is the first report of microbial community structure in tannery wastewater treatment plant from Ethiopia.

  9. Application of high OLR-fed aerobic granules for the treatment of low-strength wastewater: Performance, granule morphology and microbial community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyun Ma; Xiangchun Quan; Huai Li

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic granules,pre-cultivated at the organic loading rate (OLR) of 3.0 kg COD/(m3·day),were used to treat low-strength wastewater in two sequencing batch reactors at low OLRs of 1.2 and 0.6 kg COD/(m3·day),respectively.Reactor performance,evolution of granule morphology,structure and microbial community at low OLRs under long-term operation (130 days) were investigated.Results showed that low OLRs did not cause significant damage to granule structure as a dominant granule morphology with size over 540 μm was maintained throughout the operation.Aerobic granules at sizes of about 750 μm were finally obtained at the low OLRs.The granule reactors operated at low OLRs demonstrated effective COD and ammonia removals (above 90%),smaller granule sizes and less biomass.The contents of extracellular polymeric substances in the granules were decreased while the ratios of exopolysaccharide/exoprotein were increased (above 1.0).The granules cultivated at the low OLRs showed a smoother surface and more compact structure than the seeded granules.A significant shift in microbial community was observed but the microbial diversity remained relatively stable.Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy observation showed that the live cells were spread throughout the whole granule,while the dead cells were mainly concentrated in the outer layer of the granule,and the proteins,polysaccharides and lipids were mainly located in the central regime of the granule.In conclusion,granules cultivated at high OLRs show potential for treating low-strength organic wastewater steadily under long-term operation.

  10. Degradation of chlorpyrifos in laboratory soil and its impact on soil microbial functional diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Hua; YU Yunlong; CHU Xiaoqiang; WANG Xiuguo; YANG Xiaoe; YU Jingquan

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of chlorpyrifos at different concentrations in soil and its impact on soil microbial functional diversity were investigated under laboratory conditions. The degradation half-lives of chlorpyrifos at levels of 4, 8, and 12 mg/kg in soil were calculated to be 14.3, 16.7, and 18.0 d, respectively. The Biolog study showed that average well color development (AWCD) in soils was significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited by chlorpyrifos within the first two weeks and thereafter recovered to the similar level as the control. A similar variation in the diversity indices (Simpson index 1/D and McIntosh index U) in chlorpyrifos-treated soils was observed, no significant difference in the Shannon-Wiener index H' was found in these soils. With increasing chlorpyrifos concentration, the half-lives of chlorpyrifos were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) extended and its inhibitory effects on soil microorganisms were aggravated. It is concluded that chlorpyrifos residues in soil had a temporary or short-term inhibitory effect on soil microbial functional diversity.

  11. Effect of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation and soil microbial activities in tropical rice soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, N N; Jena, M

    2016-02-01

    Impact of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation, microbial biomass carbon, and enzymatic activities in rice soil was investigated. Rice (variety Naveen, Indica type) was grown under four conditions, namely, chambered control, elevated CO2 (550 ppm), elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in open-top chambers and open field. Chlorpyriphos was sprayed at 500 g a.i. ha(-1) at maximum tillering stage. Chlorpyriphos degraded rapidly from rice soils, and 88.4% of initially applied chlorpyriphos was lost from the rice soil maintained under elevated CO2 (700 ppm) by day 5 of spray, whereas the loss was 80.7% from open field rice soil. Half-life values of chlorpyriphos under different conditions ranged from 2.4 to 1.7 days with minimum half-life recorded with two elevated CO2 treatments. Increased CO2 concentration led to increase in temperature (1.2 to 1.8 °C) that played a critical role in chlorpyriphos persistence. Microbial biomass carbon and soil enzymatic activities specifically, dehydrogenase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, urease, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase responded positively to elevated CO2 concentrations. Generally, the enzyme activities were highly correlated with each other. Irrespective of the level of CO2, short-term negative influence of chlorpyriphos was observed on soil enzymes till day 7 of spray. Knowledge obtained from this study highlights that the elevated CO2 may negatively influence persistence of pesticide but will have positive effects on soil enzyme activities.

  12. Microbial degradation of chitin waste for production of chitosanase and food related bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, S; Chand, S; Tripathi, P

    2014-01-01

    Ecological samples rich in microbial diversity like cow dung, legume rhizosphere, fish waste and garden soil were used for isolation of chitosan-degrading microorganisms. Selected isolates were used for production of chitosanase and food related bioactive compounds by conversion of biowaste. Production of glucosamine (Gln), N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), chitooligosaccharides (COS), antioxidants, antibacterial compounds and prebiotics was carried out by microbial fermentation of biowaste. The highest chitosanase activity (8 U/mL) was observed in Aspergillus sp. isolated from fish market waste and it could produce Gln and NAG while Streptomyces sp. isolated from garden soil was able to produce COS along with Gln and NAG. Radical scavenging activity was observed in culture supernatants of 35% of studied isolates, and 20% isolates secreted compounds which showed positive effect on growth of Bifidobacterium. Antibacterial compounds were produced by 40% of selected isolates and culture supernatants of two microbial isolates, Streptomyces zaomyceticus C6 and one of garden soil isolates, were effective against both gram positive and negative bacteria.

  13. Polyphenols as enzyme inhibitors in different degraded peat soils: Implication for microbial metabolism in rewetted peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Dominik; Roth, Cyril; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Fenner, Nathalie; Reuter, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Recently, more than 30,000 ha of drained minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) in NE Germany were rewetted to restore their ecological functions. Due to an extended drainage history, a re-establishment of their original state is not expected in the short-term. Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, ammonium and phosphate have been measured in the soil porewater of the upper degraded peat layers of rewetted fens at levels of one to three orders higher than the values in pristine systems; an indicator of increased microbial activity in the upper degraded soil layers. On the other hand there is evidence that the substrate availability within the degraded peat layer is lowered since the organic matter has formerly been subject to intense decomposition over the decades of drainage and intense agricultural use of the areas. Previously however, it was suggested that inhibition of hydrolytic enzymes by polyphenolic substances is suspended during aeration of peat soils mainly due to the decomposition of the inhibiting polyphenols by oxidising enzymes such as phenol oxidase. Accordingly we hypothesised a lack of enzyme inhibiting polyphenols in degraded peat soils of rewetted fens compared to less decomposed peat of more natural fens. We collected both peat samples at the soil surface (0-20 cm) and fresh roots of dominating vascular plants and mosses (as peat parent material) from five formerly drained rewetted sites and five more natural sites of NE Germany and NW Poland. Less decomposed peat and living roots were used to obtain an internal standard for polyphenol analysis and to run enzyme inhibition tests. For all samples we determined the total phenolic contents and in addition we distinguished between the contents of hydrolysable and condensed tannic substances. From a methodical perspective the advantage of internal standards compared to the commercially available standards cyanidin chloride and tannic acid became apparent. Quantification with cyanidin or

  14. Microbial degradation of plant leachate alters lignin phenols and trihalomethane precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Brian A.; Hernes, Peter J.; Saraceno, John Franco; Spencer, Robert G.M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of vascular plant-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems has been studied, the role of leached DOC as precursors of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment is not well known. Here we measured the propensity of leachates from four crops and four aquatic macrophytes to form trihalomethanes (THMs)—a regulated class of DBPs—before and after 21 d of microbial degradation. We also measured lignin phenol content and specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) to test the assumption that aromatic compounds from vascular plants are resistant to microbial degradation and readily form DBPs. Leaching solubilized 9 to 26% of total plant carbon, which formed 1.93 to 6.72 mmol THM mol C-1 However, leachate DOC concentrations decreased by 85 to 92% over the 21-d incubation, with a concomitant decrease of 67 to 92% in total THM formation potential. Carbon-normalized THM yields in the residual DOC pool increased by 2.5 times on average, consistent with the preferential uptake of nonprecursor material. Lignin phenol concentrations decreased by 64 to 96% over 21 d, but a lack of correlation between lignin content and THM yields or SUVA254 suggested that lignin-derived compounds are not the source of increased THM precursor yields in the residual DOC pool. Our results indicate that microbial carbon utilization alters THM precursors in ecosystems with direct plant leaching, but more work is needed to identify the specific dissolved organic matter components with a greater propensity to form DBPs and affect watershed management, drinking water quality, and human health.

  15. Microbial degradation of plant leachate alters lignin phenols and trihalomethane precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Brian A; Hernes, Peter J; Saraceno, JohnFranco; Spencer, Robert G M; Bergamaschi, Brian A

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of vascular plant-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems has been studied, the role of leached DOC as precursors of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment is not well known. Here we measured the propensity of leachates from four crops and four aquatic macrophytes to form trihalomethanes (THMs)-a regulated class of DBPs-before and after 21 d of microbial degradation. We also measured lignin phenol content and specific UV absorbance (SUVA(254)) to test the assumption that aromatic compounds from vascular plants are resistant to microbial degradation and readily form DBPs. Leaching solubilized 9 to 26% of total plant carbon, which formed 1.93 to 6.72 mmol THM mol C(-1). However, leachate DOC concentrations decreased by 85 to 92% over the 21-d incubation, with a concomitant decrease of 67 to 92% in total THM formation potential. Carbon-normalized THM yields in the residual DOC pool increased by 2.5 times on average, consistent with the preferential uptake of nonprecursor material. Lignin phenol concentrations decreased by 64 to 96% over 21 d, but a lack of correlation between lignin content and THM yields or SUVA(254) suggested that lignin-derived compounds are not the source of increased THM precursor yields in the residual DOC pool. Our results indicate that microbial carbon utilization alters THM precursors in ecosystems with direct plant leaching, but more work is needed to identify the specific dissolved organic matter components with a greater propensity to form DBPs and affect watershed management, drinking water quality, and human health.

  16. Microbial degradation of acenapthene and napthalene under denitrification conditions in soil--water systems: Annual report, October 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihelcic, J.R.; Luthy, R.G.

    1987-10-01

    This study examined the microbial degradation of acenaphthene and naphthalene under denitrification conditions at soil-to-water ratios of 1:25 and 1:50 with soil containing approximately 10/sup 5/ denitrifying organisms per gram of soil. Under nitrate-excess conditions, both acenaphthene and naphthalene were degraded microbially from initial aqueous-phase concentrations of about one and several mg/l, respectively, to nondetectable levels (<0.01 mg/l) in time periods less than 9 weeks. Acclimation periods of 12 to 36 days were observed prior to the onset of microbial degradation in tests with soil not previously exposed to PAH, while acclimation periods were absent in tests with soil reserved from prior PAH degradation tests. It was judged that the apparent acclimation period resulted from the time for a small population of organisms capable of PAH degradation to attain sufficient densities to exhibit detectable PAH reduction. About 0.9 percent of the naturally occurring soil organic carbon could be mineralized under denitrification conditions, and this accounted for the greater proportion of the nitrate depletion. The mineralization of the labile fraction of the soil organic carbon via microbial denitrification occurred without an observed acclimation period, and was rapid compared to PAH degradation. Under nitrate-limiting conditions the PAH compounds were stable owing to the depletion of nitrate via the more rapid process of soil organic carbon mineralization. The microbial degradation of the PAH compound depends on the interrelationships between: the desorption kinetics and the reversibility of desorption of sorbed compound from the soil, the concentration of PAH-degrading microorganisms, and the competing reaction for nitrate utilization via mineralization of the labile fraction of naturally occurring soil organic carbon. 44 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 using aerobic moving bed biofilm process: enhanced removal of aromatic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupaie, E Hosseini; Moghaddam, M R Alavi; Hashemi, S H

    2011-11-15

    The application of aerobic moving bed biofilm process as post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 was investigated in this study. The main objective of this work was to enhance removal of anaerobically formed the dye aromatic metabolites. Three separate sequential treatment systems were operated with different initial dye concentrations of 100, 500 and 1000 mg/L. Each treatment system consisted of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (An-SBR) followed by an aerobic moving bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (MB-SBBR). Up to 98% of the dye decolorization and more than 80% of the COD removal occurred anaerobically. The obtained results suggested no significant difference in COD removal as well as the dye decolorization efficiency using three An-SBRs receiving different initial dye concentrations. Monitoring the dye metabolites through HPLC suggested that more than 80% of anaerobically formed 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate was completely removed in the aerobic biofilm reactors. Based on COD analysis results, at least 65-72% of the dye total metabolites were mineralized during the applied treatment systems. According to the measured biofilm mass and also based on respiration-inhibition test results, increasing the initial dye concentration inhibited the growth and final mass of the attached-growth biofilm in MB-SBBRs.

  18. Influence of rhizosphere microbial ecophysiological parameters from different plant species on butachlor degradation in a riparian soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changming; Wang, Mengmeng; Li, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes in riparian zones regulate contaminant movement to receiving waters and often mitigate the impact of upland sources of contaminants on water quality. However, little research has been reported on the microbial process and degradation potential of herbicide in a riparian soil. Field sampling and incubation experiments were conducted to investigate differences in microbial parameters and butachlor degradation in the riparian soil from four plant communities in Chongming Island, China. The results suggested that the rhizosphere soil had significantly higher total organic C and water-soluble organic C relative to the nonrhizosphere soil. Differences in rhizosphere microbial community size and physiological parameters among vegetation types were significant. The rhizosphere soil from the mixed community of Phragmites australis and Acorus calamus had the highest microbial biomass and biochemical activity, followed by A. calamus, P. australis and Zizania aquatica. Microbial ATP, dehydrogenase activity (DHA), and basal soil respiration (BSR) in the rhizosphere of the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus were 58, 72, and 62% higher, respectively, than in the pure P. australis community. Compared with the rhizosphere soil of the pure plant communities, the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus displayed a significantly greater degradation rate of butachlor in the rhizosphere soil. Residual butachlor concentrations in rhizosphere soil of the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus and were 48, 63, and 68% lower than three pure plant communities, respectively. Butachlor degradation rates were positively correlated to microbial ATP, DHA, and BSR, indicating that these microbial parameters may be useful in assessing butachlor degradation potential in the riparian soil.

  19. Identification of microbial populations driving biopolymer degradation in acidic peatlands by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia A; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Kim, Yongkyu; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2016-10-01

    Northern peatlands play a crucial role in the global carbon balance, serving as a persistent sink for atmospheric CO2 and a global carbon store. Their most extensive type, Sphagnum-dominated acidic peatlands, is inhabited by microorganisms with poorly understood degradation capabilities. Here, we applied a combination of barcoded pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes and Illumina RNA-Seq of total RNA (metatranscriptomics) to identify microbial populations and enzymes involved in degrading the major components of Sphagnum-derived litter and exoskeletons of peat-inhabiting arthropods: cellulose, xylan, pectin and chitin. Biopolymer addition to peat induced a threefold to fivefold increase in bacterial cell numbers. Functional community profiles of assembled mRNA differed between experimental treatments. In particular, pectin and xylan triggered increased transcript abundance of genes involved in energy metabolism and central carbon metabolism, such as glycolysis and TCA cycle. Concurrently, the substrate-induced activity of bacteria on these two biopolymers stimulated grazing of peat-inhabiting protozoa. Alveolata (ciliates) was the most responsive protozoa group as confirmed by analysis of both SSU rRNA genes and SSU rRNA. A stimulation of alphaproteobacterial methanotrophs on pectin was consistently shown by rRNA and mRNA data. Most likely, their significant enrichment was due to the utilization of methanol released during the degradation of pectin. Analysis of SSU rRNA and total mRNA revealed a specific response of Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria to chitin and pectin, respectively. Relatives of Telmatobacter bradus were most responsive among the Acidobacteria, while the actinobacterial response was primarily affiliated with Frankiales and Propionibacteriales. The expression of a wide repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) corresponded well to the detection of a highly diverse peat-inhabiting microbial community, which is dominated by yet uncultivated

  20. Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Hydrocarbons: From Enzymatic Reactions to the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, Ralf; Boll, Matthias; Heider, Johann; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Buckel, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Golding, Bernard T; Gunsalus, Robert P; Kroneck, Peter M H; Krüger, Martin; Lueders, Tillmann; Martins, Berta M; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Schink, Bernhard; Seifert, Jana; Szaleniec, Maciej; Treude, Tina; Ullmann, G Matthias; Vogt, Carsten; von Bergen, Martin; Wilkes, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant in anoxic environments and pose biochemical challenges to their anaerobic degradation by microorganisms. Within the framework of the Priority Program 1319, investigations funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft on the anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons ranged from isolation and enrichment of hitherto unknown hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microorganisms, discovery of novel reactions, detailed studies of enzyme mechanisms and structures to process-oriented in situ studies. Selected highlights from this program are collected in this synopsis, with more detailed information provided by theme-focused reviews of the special topic issue on 'Anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons' [this issue, pp. 1-244]. The interdisciplinary character of the program, involving microbiologists, biochemists, organic chemists and environmental scientists, is best exemplified by the studies on alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases. Here, research topics ranged from in-depth mechanistic studies of archetypical toluene-activating benzylsuccinate synthase, substrate-specific phylogenetic clustering of alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases (toluene plus xylenes, p-cymene, p-cresol, 2-methylnaphthalene, n-alkanes), stereochemical and co-metabolic insights into n-alkane-activating (methylalkyl)succinate synthases to the discovery of bacterial groups previously unknown to possess alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases by means of functional gene markers and in situ field studies enabled by state-of-the-art stable isotope probing and fractionation approaches. Other topics are Mo-cofactor-dependent dehydrogenases performing O2-independent hydroxylation of hydrocarbons and alkyl side chains (ethylbenzene, p-cymene, cholesterol, n-hexadecane), degradation of p-alkylated benzoates and toluenes, glycyl radical-bearing 4-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase, novel types of carboxylation reactions (for acetophenone, acetone, and potentially also benzene and

  1. Effects of carbon sources on the enrichment of halophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate-storing mixed microbial culture in an aerobic dynamic feeding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Lu, Peng-Fei; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production serves as a substitute for petroleum-based plastics. Enriching mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) with the capacity to store PHA is a key precursor for low-cost PHA production. This study investigated the impact of carbon types on enrichment outcomes. Three MMCs were separately fed by acetate sodium, glucose, and starch as an enriching carbon source, and were exposed to long-term aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) periods. The PHA production capacity, kinetics and stoichiometry of the enrichments, the PHA composition, and the microbial diversity and community composition were explored to determine carbon and enrichment correlations. After 350-cycle enriching periods under feast-famine (F-F) regimes, the MMCs enriched by acetate sodium and glucose contained a maximum PHA content of 64.7% and 60.5% cell dry weight (CDW). The starch-enriched MMC only had 27.3% CDW of PHA. High-throughput sequencing revealed that non-PHA bacteria survived alongside PHA storing bacteria, even under severe F-F selective pressure. Genus of Pseudomonas and Stappia were the possible PHA accumulating bacteria in acetate-enriched MMC. Genus of Oceanicella, Piscicoccus and Vibrio were found as PHA accumulating bacteria in glucose-enriched MMC. Vibrio genus was the only PHA accumulating bacteria in starch-enriched MMC. The community diversity and composition were regulated by the substrate types.

  2. Bar-coded pyrosequencing reveals the responses of PBDE-degrading microbial communities to electron donor amendments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiying Xu

    Full Text Available Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs can be reductively degraded by microorganisms under anaerobic conditions. However, little is known about the effect of electron donors on microbial communities involved in PBDEs degradation. Here we employed 454 Titanium pyrosequencing to examine the phylogenetic diversity, composition, structure and dynamics of microbial communities from microcosms under the conditions of different electron donor amendments. The community structures in each of the five alternate electron donor enrichments were significantly shifted in comparison with those of the control microcosm. Commonly existing OTUs between the treatment and control consortia increased from 5 to 17 and more than 50% of OTUs increased around 13.7 to 186 times at least in one of the microcosms after 90-days enrichment. Although the microbial communities at different taxonomic levels were significantly changed by different environmental variable groups in redundancy analysis, significant correlations were observed between the microbial communities and PBDE congener profiles. The lesser-brominated PBDE congeners, tri-BDE congener (BDE-32 and hexa-BDE, were identified as the key factors shaping the microbial community structures at OTU level. Some rare populations, including the known dechlorinating bacterium, Dehalobacter, showed significant positive-correlation with the amounts of PBDE congeners in the consortia. The same results were also observed on some unclassified bacteria. These results suggest that PBDEs-degrading microbial communities can be successfully enriched, and their structures and compositions can be manipulated through adjusting the environmental parameters.

  3. Anodic Fenton process assisted by a microbial fuel cell for enhanced degradation of organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-Wei; Sun, Xue-Fei; Li, Dao-Bo; Li, Wen-Wei; Huang, Yu-Xi; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-09-15

    The electro-Fenton process is efficient for degradation of organic pollutants, but it suffers from the high operating costs due to the need of power investment. Here, a new anodic Fenton system is developed for energy-saving and efficient treatment of organic pollutants by incorporating microbial fuel cell (MFC) into an anodic Fenton process. This system is composed of an anodic Fenton reactor and a two-chamber air-cathode MFC. The power generated from a two-chamber MFC is used to drive the anodic Fenton process for Acid Orange 7 (AO7) degradation through accelerating in situ generation of Fe(2+) from sacrificial iron. The kinetic results show that the MFC-assisted anodic Fenton process system had a significantly higher pseudo-first-order rate constant than those for the chemical Fenton methods. The electrochemical analysis reveals that AO7 did not hinder the corrosion of iron. The anodic Fenton process was influenced by the MFC performance. It was also found that increasing dissolved oxygen in the cathode improved the MFC power density, which in turn enhanced the AO7 degradation rate. These clearly demonstrate that the anodic Fenton process could be integrated with MFC to develop a self-sustained system for cost-effective and energy-saving electrochemical wastewater treatment.

  4. Effect of electric intensity on the microbial degradation of petroleum pollutants in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Guo, Shuhai; Wu, Bo; Li, Fengmei; Niu, Zhixin

    2010-01-01

    Electro-bioremediation is an innovative method to remedy organic-polluted soil. However, the principle of electrokinetic technology enhancing the function of microbes, especially the relationship of electric intensity and biodegradation efficiency, is poorly investigated. Petroleum was employed as a target organic pollutant at a level of 50 g/kg (mass of petroleum/mass of dry soil). A direct current power supply was used for tests with a constant direct current electric voltage (1.0 V/cm). The petroleum concentrations were measured at 3275-3285 nm after extraction using hexane, the group composition of crude oil was analyzed by column chromatography. The water content of soil was kept 25% (m/m). The results indicated the degradation process was divided into two periods: from day 1 to day 40, from day 41 to day 100. The treatment of soil with an appropriate electric field led the bacteria to have a persistent effect in the whole period of 100 days. The highest biodegradation efficiency of 45.5% was obtained after treatment with electric current and bacteria. The electric-bioremediation had a positive effect on alkane degradation. The degradation rate of alkane was 1.6 times higher in the soil exposed to electric current than that treated with bacteria for 100 days. A proper direct current could stimulate the microbial activities and accelerate the biodegradation of petroleum. There was a positive correlation between the electric intensities and the petroleum bioremediation efficiencies with a coefficient of 0.9599.

  5. Kinetics of substrate degradation and electricity generation in anodic denitrification microbial fuel cell (AD-MFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiqiang; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Hui; Chen, Tingting; Xie, Zuofu; Cai, Jing; Abbas, Ghulam

    2013-12-01

    Effect of substrate concentration on substrate degradation and electricity generation in anodic denitrification microbial fuel cell (AD-MFC) was investigated over a broad range of substrate concentrations. Substrate degradation rates and power generation could be promoted with increasing substrate concentration in a certain range, but both of them would be inhibited at high substrate concentrations. Maximum denitrification rate of 1.26 ± 0.01 kg NO(-)-N/m(3)d and maximum output voltage of 1016.75 ± 4.74 mV could be achieved when initial NO3(-)-N concentration was 1999.95 ± 2.86 mg/L. Based on Han-Levenspiel model, kinetics of substrate degradation and power generation in the AD-MFC were established. According to the kinetic model, the half-saturation coefficient and the critical inhibitory concentration for nitrate were more than 200 and 4300 mg/L, respectively. The results demonstrated that AD-MFC was capable of treating nitrate-containing wastewater and generating electricity simultaneously, and tolerant to high strength nitrate-containing wastewater.

  6. Oil sands to the rescue: oil sand microbial communities can degrade recalcitrant alkyl phenyl alkanoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, Corinne [University of Essex (Canada)], email: cwhitby@essex.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    Almost half of all global oil reserves are found as biodegraded heavy oils found in vast tar sand deposits located in North and South America and these account for 47% of Canadian oil production. Oil sand extraction generates large amounts of toxic waste water, known as oil sand process waters (OSPW), that are stored in large tailing ponds that contain toxic compounds like naphthenic acids (NAs). The presence of NAs creates problems like toxicity, corrosion, and the formation of calcium napthenate deposits which block pipelines and other infrastructure and need to be removed. This paper presents oil sand microbial communities that can degrade these NAs. The approach is to apply new aliphatic and aromatic NAs as substrates to supplement and identify NA degrading microbes and also to identify the metabolites produced and explain NA degradation pathways and the functional genes involved. The chemistry and the processes involved are explained. From the results, it is suggested that pure cultures of P. putida KT2440 be used against NAs.

  7. Microbial colonization and degradation of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic bags in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauendorf, Alice; Krause, Stefan; Bigalke, Nikolaus K; Gorb, Elena V; Gorb, Stanislav N; Haeckel, Matthias; Wahl, Martin; Treude, Tina

    2016-02-15

    To date, the longevity of plastic litter at the sea floor is poorly constrained. The present study compares colonization and biodegradation of plastic bags by aerobic and anaerobic benthic microbes in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments. Samples of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic carrier bags were incubated in natural oxic and anoxic sediments from Eckernförde Bay (Western Baltic Sea) for 98 days. Analyses included (1) microbial colonization rates on the bags, (2) examination of the surface structure, wettability, and chemistry, and (3) mass loss of the samples during incubation. On average, biodegradable plastic bags were colonized five times higher by aerobic and eight times higher by anaerobic microbes than polyethylene bags. Both types of bags showed no sign of biodegradation during this study. Therefore, marine sediment in temperate coastal zones may represent a long-term sink for plastic litter and also supposedly compostable material.

  8. Post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 using aerobic moving bed biofilm process: Enhanced removal of aromatic amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini Koupaie, E., E-mail: ehssan.hosseini.k@gmail.com [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Ave., Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alavi Moghaddam, M.R., E-mail: alavim@yahoo.com [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Ave., Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, S.H., E-mail: h_hashemi@sbu.ac.ir [Environmental Science Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Biofilm process was applied as post-treatment of anaerobically degraded an azo dye. {yields} More than 65% of the dye total metabolites was completely mineralized. {yields} Based on HPLC analysis, more than 80% of 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate was removed. {yields} Inhibition of biofilm growth was increased with increasing the initial dye concentration. {yields} Considerable porous morphology was observed in the SEM photographs of the biofilm. - Abstract: The application of aerobic moving bed biofilm process as post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 was investigated in this study. The main objective of this work was to enhance removal of anaerobically formed the dye aromatic metabolites. Three separate sequential treatment systems were operated with different initial dye concentrations of 100, 500 and 1000 mg/L. Each treatment system consisted of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (An-SBR) followed by an aerobic moving bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (MB-SBBR). Up to 98% of the dye decolorization and more than 80% of the COD removal occurred anaerobically. The obtained results suggested no significant difference in COD removal as well as the dye decolorization efficiency using three An-SBRs receiving different initial dye concentrations. Monitoring the dye metabolites through HPLC suggested that more than 80% of anaerobically formed 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate was completely removed in the aerobic biofilm reactors. Based on COD analysis results, at least 65-72% of the dye total metabolites were mineralized during the applied treatment systems. According to the measured biofilm mass and also based on respiration-inhibition test results, increasing the initial dye concentration inhibited the growth and final mass of the attached-growth biofilm in MB-SBBRs.

  9. Degradation of toluene by a mixed population of archetypal aerobes, microaerophiles, and denitrifiers: laboratory sand column experiment and multispecies biofilm model formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Su; Jaffé, Peter R

    2008-02-01

    An experiment was conducted in a saturated sand column with three bacterial strains that have different growth characteristics on toluene, Pseudomonas putida F1 which degrades toluene only under aerobic conditions, Thauera aromatica T1 which degrades toluene only under denitrifying conditions, and Ralstonia pickettii PKO1 has a facultative nature and can perform nitrate-enhanced biodegradation of toluene under hypoxic conditions (DO <2 mg/L). Steady-state concentration profiles showed that oxygen and nitrate appeared to be utilized simultaneously, regardless of the dissolved oxygen concentration and the results from fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that PKO1 maintained stable cells numbers throughout the column, even when the pore water oxygen concentration was high. Since PKO1's growth rate under aerobic condition is much lower than that of F1, except under hypoxic conditions, these observations were not anticipated. Therefore these observations require a mechanistic explanation that can account for localized low oxygen concentrations under aerobic conditions. To simulate the observed dynamics, a multispecies biofilm model was implemented. This model formulation assumes the formation of a thin biofilm that is composed of the three bacterial strains. The individual strains grow in response to the substrate and electron acceptor flux from bulk fluid into the biofilm. The model was implemented such that internal changes in bacterial composition and substrate concentration can be simulated over time and space. The model simulations from oxic to denitrifying conditions compared well to the experimental profiles of the chemical species and the bacterial strains, indicating the importance of accounting for the biological activity of individual strains in biofilms that span different redox conditions.

  10. Effects of carbon amendment on in situ atrazine degradation and total microbial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngigi, Anastasiah N; Getenga, Zachary M; Dörfler, Ulrike; Boga, Hamadi I; Kuria, Benson; Ndalut, Paul; Schroll, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This study elucidates the effects of carbon amendment on metabolic degradation of atrazine (6-chloro-N(2)-ethyl-N(4)-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and total microbial biomass in soil. Degradation of (14)C-ring-labelled atrazine was monitored in laboratory incubations of soils supplemented with 0, 10, 100 and 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose concentrations. An experiment to determine the effect of carbon amendment on total microbial biomass and soil respiration was carried out with different concentrations of sucrose and non-labelled atrazine. The soils were incubated at a constant temperature and constant soil moisture at water potential of -15 kPa and a soil density of 1.3 g cm(-3). Mineralization of (14)C-ring-labelled atrazine was monitored continuously over a period of 59 d in the first experiment. The CO(2) production was monitored for 62 d in the second experiment and microbial biomass determined at the end of the incubation period. The addition of 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose reduced atrazine mineralization to 43.5% compared to 51.7% of the applied amount for the treatment without sucrose. The addition of 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose modified the transformation products to 1.08 μg g(-1) deisopropylatrazine (DIA), 0.32 μg g(-1) desethylatrazine (DEA) and 0.18 μg g(-1) deisopropyl-2-hydroxyatrazine (OH-DIA). Treatment without sucrose resulted in formation of 0.64 μg g(-1) hydroxyatrazine (HA), 0.28 μg g(-1) DIA and 0.20 μg g(-1) OH-DIA. Atrazine dealkylation was enhanced in treatments with 100 and 1000 μg g(-1) of sucrose added. HA metabolite was formed in the control (no sucrose) and in the presence of 10 μg g(-1) of sucrose, whereas DEA was only detected in treatment with 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose. Results indicate that total microbial biomass increased significantly (P < 0.001) with the addition of 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose.

  11. Fate of organo-mineral particles in streams: Microbial degradation by streamwater & biofilm assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W. R.; Raich, M.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Inland waters are of global biogeochemical importance. They receive carbon inputs of ~ 4.8 Pg C/ y of which, 12 % is buried, 18 % transported to the oceans, and 70 % supports aquatic secondary production. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of organic matter (OM) in these systems are poorly defined. One aspect of this is the formation of organo-mineral complexes in aquatic systems and their potential as a route for OM transport and burial vs. their use as carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources within aquatic systems. Organo-mineral particles form by sorption of dissolved OM to freshly eroded mineral surfaces and may contribute to ecosystem-scale particulate OM fluxes. We experimentally tested the availability of mineral-sorbed OM as a C & N source for streamwater microbial assemblages and streambed biofilms. Organo-mineral particles were constructed in vitro by sorption of 13C:15N-labelled amino acids to hydrated kaolin particles, and microbial degradation of these particles compared with equivalent doses of 13C:15N-labelled free amino acids. Experiments were conducted in 120 ml mesocosms over 7 days using biofilms and water sampled from the Oberer Seebach stream (Austria). Each incubation experienced a 16:8 light:dark regime, with metabolism monitored via changes in oxygen concentrations between photoperiods. The relative fate of the organo-mineral particles was quantified by tracing the mineralization of the 13C and 15N labels and their incorporation into microbial biomass. Here we present the initial results of 13C-label mineralization, incorporation and retention within dissolved organic carbon pool. The results indicate that 514 (× 219) μmol/ mmol of the 13:15N labeled free amino acids were mineralized over the 7-day incubations. By contrast, 186 (× 97) μmol/ mmol of the mineral-sorbed amino acids were mineralized over a similar period. Thus, organo-mineral complexation reduced amino acid mineralization by ~ 60 %, with no differences observed

  12. Effects of Different Microbial Inoculants on Aerobic Composting of Corn Stalk%不同微生物菌剂对玉米秸秆好氧堆肥效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯致; 李杰; 张国斌; 李雯琳; 贾豪语; 刘赵帆; 郁继华

    2013-01-01

    This study was committed to screen out the suitable corn stalk single fermentation mi-crobial inoculants on the northwest desert region of non-cultivated land in an aerobic composting test. Three representative microbial inoculants (microbial inoculant 1 is mainly consisted of cellulose fungus and degraded starch bacillus;microbial inoculant 2 is mainly consisted of Bacillus subtilis,Strepto-myces tendae,Streptomyces albogriseolus,Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma reesei;microbial inoculant 3 is mainly consisted of dozens microorganisms and bio-enzyme) were selected to do the com-post experiment on corn stalk,not adding inoculants for the control check. The stacking temperature, moisture content,pH,germination seed index and other factors were surveyed and analyzed during the composting. The results show that adding microbial inoculants can effectively speed up the fermentation. The effects are better than that without addition.The temperatures of adding microbial inoculant 1 and microbial inoculant 3 treatments are relatively higher,which rose to 55 °C after 2 days.High tempera-ture lasted for 27 and 33 days,respectively.In the microbial inoculant 2 treatment,high temperature had short duration.The seed germination index was over 80% after 30 d,when treated by microbial inoculant 1 and microbial inoculant 3,while the CK needed 40 d.The total organic carbon contents of various treatments showed a downward trend,when fermentation was implemented. Treatment of micro-bial inoculant 3 had the fastest speed for organic carbon degradation.The pH values of all treatments were within the scope suitable for matured compost.We can summarize that the effect of microbial in-oculant 3 is the best,microbial inoculant 1 is second and microbial inoculant 2 is worst.%  为了筛选适合西北非耕地荒漠区玉米秸秆单一发酵的微生物菌剂,以不添加菌剂为对照,研究了3种微生物菌剂(菌剂1主要由纤维素菌和降解淀

  13. Microbial community structure in a thermophilic aerobic digester used as a sludge pretreatment process for the mesophilic anaerobic digestion and the enhancement of methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Park, Sang Kyu; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-10-01

    An effective two-stage sewage sludge digestion process, consisting of thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) followed by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD), was developed for efficient sludge reduction and methane production. Using TAD as a biological pretreatment, the total volatile suspended solid reduction (VSSR) and methane production rate (MPR) in the MAD reactor were significantly improved. According to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, the results indicated that the dominant bacteria species such as Ureibacillus thermophiles and Bacterium thermus in TAD were major routes for enhancing soluble organic matter. TAD pretreatment using a relatively short SRT of 1 day showed highly increased soluble organic products and positively affected an increment of bacteria populations which performed interrelated microbial metabolisms with methanogenic species in the MAD; consequently, a quantitative real-time PCR indicated greatly increased Methanosarcinales (acetate-utilizing methanogens) in the MAD, resulting in enhanced methane production.

  14. The Analysis of a Microbial Community in the UV/O3-Anaerobic/Aerobic Integrated Process for Petrochemical Nanofiltration Concentrate (NFC Treatment by 454-Pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wei

    Full Text Available In this study, high-throughput pyrosequencing was applied on the analysis of the microbial community of activated sludge and biofilm in a lab-scale UV/O3- anaerobic/aerobic (A/O integrated process for the treatment of petrochemical nanofiltration concentrate (NFC wastewater. NFC is a type of saline wastewater with low biodegradability. From the anaerobic activated sludge (Sample A and aerobic biofilm (Sample O, 59,748 and 51,231 valid sequence reads were obtained, respectively. The dominant phylotypes related to the metabolism of organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH biodegradation, assimilation of carbon from benzene, and the biodegradation of nitrogenous organic compounds were detected as genus Clostridium, genera Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas, class Betaproteobacteria, and genus Hyphomicrobium. Furthermore, the nitrite-oxidising bacteria Nitrospira, nitrite-reducing and sulphate-oxidising bacteria (NR-SRB Thioalkalivibrio were also detected. In the last twenty operational days, the total Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD and Total Organic Carbon (TOC removal efficiencies on average were 64.93% and 62.06%, respectively. The removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen and Total Nitrogen (TN on average were 90.51% and 75.11% during the entire treatment process.

  15. Biomarkers of Microbial Metabolism for Monitoring in-situ Anaerobic PAH Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L.; Phelps, C.; Battistelli, J.

    2002-12-01

    Monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic compounds found in petroleum and its products are subject to biodegradation in the absence of oxygen. These anaerobic pathways reveal novel mechanism of microbial transformation through a series of metabolites and intermediates which are unique to the anaerobic degradation process. The presence of these compounds in-situ, then conceptually can serve as indicators that anaerobic degradation is taking place. We have laboratory studies and field samples which support this concept for BTX and PAH compounds. Environments in which these anaerobic degradation processes have been observed include freshwater and estuarine sediments, groundwater from impacted aquifers at a former manufactured gas plant and gasoline station, and a creosote-contaminated aquifer. Analytical protocols were developed to detect nanomolar concentrations from soil slurries and groundwater samples and microcosm studies verified their formation from field samples and use as biomarkers of activity. Recent studies on the mechanisms of anaerobic naphthalene and methylnaphthalene metabolism have identified several unusual compounds that can serve as biomarkers for monitoring in situ PAH biodegradation. For naphthalene these include 2-naphthoic acid (2-NA), tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid (TH-2-NA), hexahydro-2-naphthoic acid (HH-2-NA) and methylnaphthoic acid (MNA) generated by sulfate-reducing bacteria degrading naphthalene or methylnaphthalene. Groundwater samples were analyzed from wells distributed throughout an anaerobic, creosote-contaminated aquifer and also from a leaking underground storage site. Samples were extracted, derivatized and analyzed by GC/MS. The concentration of 2-NA at each monitoring well was quantified and correlated to the zones of naphthalene contamination. Taken together with measurements of the aquifer's physical characteristics, these biomarker data can be used to describe the extent of naphthalene biodegradation at these site.

  16. Relationship Between Vegetation Restoration and Soil Microbial Characteristics in Degraded Karst Regions: A Case StudyABSTRACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yuan; YU Li-Fei; MANG Jin-Chi; YU Yuan-Chun; D.L.DEANGELIS

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of vegetation restoration on degraded karst regions has been a research focus of soil science and ecology for the last decade. In an attempt to preferably interpret the soil microbiological characteristic variation associated with vegetation restoration and further to explore the role of soil microbiology in vegetation restoration mechanisin of degraded karst regions, we measured microbial biomass C and basal respiration in soils during vegetation restoration in Zhenfeng County of southwestern Guizhou Province,China. The community level physiological profiles (CLPP) of the soil microbial community to were estimated determine if vegetation changes were accompanied by changes in functioning of soil microbial communities. The results showed that soil microbial biomass C and microbial quotient (microbial biomass C/organic C) tended to increase with vegetation restoration, being in the order arboreal community stage > shrubby community stage > herbaceous community stage > bare land stage. Similar trend was found in the change of basal respiration (BR). The metabolic quotient (thc ratio of basal respiration to microbial biomass, qCO2) decreased with vegetation restoration, and remained at a constantly low level in the arboreal community stage. Analyses of the CLPP data indicated that vegetation restoration tended to result in higher average well color development, substrate richness, and functional diversity.Average utilization of specific substrate guilds was highest in the arboreal community stage. Principle component analysis of the CLPP data further indicated that the arboreal community stage was distinctly different from the other three stages. In conclusion,vegetation restoration improved soil microbial biomass C, respiration, and utilization of carbon sources, and decreased qCO2, thus creating better soil conditions, which in turn could promote the restoration of vegetation on degraded karst regions.

  17. The degradation of phytate by microbial and wheat phytases is dependent on the phytate matrix and the phytase origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brejnholt, Sarah M; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Glitsoe, Vibe

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phytases increase utilization of phytate phosphorus in feed. Since wheat is rich in endogenous phytase activity it was examined whether wheat phytases could improve phytate degradation compared to microbial phytases. Moreover, it was investigated whether enzymatic degradation of phytate...... is influenced by the matrix surrounding it. Phytate degradation was defined as the decrease in the sum of InsP6 + InsP5. RESULTS: Endogenous wheat phytase effectively degraded wheat InsP6 + InsP5 at pH 4 and pH 5, while this was not true for a recombinant wheat phytase or phytase extracted from wheat bran. Only...... microbial phytases were able to degrade InsP6 + InsP5 in the entire pH range from 3 to 5, which is relevant for feed applications. A microbial phytase was efficient towards InsP6 + InsP5 in different phytate samples, whereas the ability to degrade InsP6 + InsP5 in the different phytate samples ranged from...

  18. Isotope Fractionation of Toluene: A Perspective to Characterise Microbial In Situ Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Richnow

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept to assess in situ biodegradation of organic contaminants in aquifers is presented. The alteration of the carbon isotope composition of contaminants along the groundwater flow path indicates microbial degradation processes and can be used as an indicator for in situ biodegradation. The Rayleigh equation was applied to calculate the percentage of the in situ biodegradation (B[%] using the change in the isotopic composition of contaminants (Rt/R0 along the ground water flow path and a kinetic carbon isotope fractionation factor (αC derived from defined biodegradation experiments in the laboratory. When the groundwater hydrology is known and a representative source concentration (C0 for a groundwater flow path can be determined, the extent of in situ biodegradation can be quantified.

  19. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnosti, C.; Finke, N.; Larsen, O.; Ghobrial, S.

    2005-05-01

    Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates— Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high molecular weight carbohydrate-rich extracts of these cells (Spir-Ex and Iso-Ex)—were added to sediments collected from Svalbard. The sediments were homogenized, incubated anaerobically in gas-tight bags at 0°C, and enzyme activities, fermentation, and terminal respiration were monitored over a 1134 h time course. All substrate additions yielded a fraction (8%-13%) of carbon that was metabolized to CO 2 over the first 384 h of incubation. The timecourse of VFA (volatile fatty acid) production and consumption, as well as the suite of VFAs produced, was similar for all substrates. After this phase, pathways of carbon degradation diverged, with an additional 43%, 32%, 33%, and 8% of Isochrysis, Iso-Ex, Spirulina, and Spir-Ex carbon respired to CO 2 over the next 750 h of incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, the soluble, carbohydrate-rich extracts did not prove to be more labile substrates than the whole cells from which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO 2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the initial burst of activity that it fueled, its soluble nature, and its relatively high (50%) carbohydrate content. The microbial community in these cold anoxic sediments clearly has the capacity to react rapidly to carbon input; extent and timecourse of remineralization of added carbon is similar to observations made at much higher temperatures in temperate sediments. The extent of carbon remineralization from these specific substrates, however, would not likely have been predicted

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) anaerobic degradation in marine sediments: microcosm study and role of autochthonous microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, Bruna; Ubaldi, Carla; Grenni, Paola; Caracciolo, Anna Barra; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) biodegradation was followed for 1 year in microcosms containing marine sediments collected from Mar Piccolo (Taranto, Italy) chronically contaminated by this class of hazardous compounds. The microcosms were performed under strictly anaerobic conditions with or without the addition of Dehalococcoides mccartyi, the main microorganism known to degrade PCBs through the anaerobic reductive dechlorination process. Thirty PCB congeners were monitored during the experiments revealing that the biodegradation occurred in all microcosms with a decrease in hepta-, hexa-, and penta-chlorobiphenyls (CBs) and a parallel increase in low chlorinated PCBs (tri-CBs and tetra-CBs). The concentrations of the most representative congeners detected in the original sediment, such as 245-245-CB and 2345-245-CB, and of the mixture 2356-34-CB+234-245-CB, decreased by 32.5, 23.8, and 46.7 %, respectively, after only 70 days of anaerobic incubation without any bioaugmentation treatment. Additionally, the structure and population dynamics of the microbial key players involved in the biodegradative process and of the entire mixed microbial community were accurately defined by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) in both the original sediment and during the operation of the microcosm. The reductive dehalogenase genes of D. mccartyi, specifically involved in PCB dechlorination, were also quantified using real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results demonstrated that the autochthonous microbial community living in the marine sediment, including D. mccartyi (6.32E+06 16S rRNA gene copy numbers g(-1) sediment), was able to efficiently sustain the biodegradation of PCBs when controlled anaerobic conditions were imposed.

  1. Active Microbial Methane Production and Organic Matter Degradation in a Devonian Black Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, A. M.; Petsch, S. T.; Nuesslein, K.; McIntosh, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Microorganisms employ many novel strategies to derive energy and obtain nutrients, and in doing so alter the chemistry of their environments in ways that are significant for formation and transformation of geologic materials. One such strategy is natural gas generation in sedimentary basins. Previous research has shown that stable isotopic signatures of CH4, CO2 and H2O in formation waters of gas-producing black shales indicate a microbial origin for several economically viable natural gas reserves. However, these signatures leave several intriguing issues unaddressed, including the identity of the organisms and their metabolic roles and impacts on mineral, isotopic and biomarker signatures. We hypothesize that the extreme reducing conditions required for sedimentary basin methanogenesis are simply the end product of a cascade of microbial processes, initiated by anaerobic respiration of shale organic matter through NO3, SO4 and/or Fe(III) reduction, secondary processing of anaerobe biomass by fermentative organisms yielding volatile fatty acids and H2, and ultimately CO2 reduction and/or acetate fermentation to produce CH4. This research holds importance for the several aspects of the geochemical carbon cycle. It describes anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation leading to methanogenesis in a sedimentary basin; in many instances this activity has generated economically viable reserves of natural gas. It also provides a benchmark detailing how post-depositional microbial activity in rocks may confound and overprint ancient biosignatures. Interpretation of past environmental conditions depends on molecular and isotopic signatures contained in ancient sedimentary rocks, separated from signatures of metabolically similar modern microbiota living in sedimentary basins. In addition, this research sheds light on an unrecognized and thus unconstrained source of reduced gases to Earth's atmosphere, important for understanding the rates and controls on carbon cycling through

  2. The Detoxification and Degradation of Benzothiazole from the Wastewater in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianshu; Ding, Jie; Ren, Nanqi; Tong, Qingyue; Zhang, Luyan

    2016-12-20

    In this study, the high-production-volume chemical benzothiazole (BTH) from synthetic water was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates of simple organic acids using an up-flow internal circulation microbial electrolysis reactor (UICMER) under the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 h. The bioelectrochemical system was operated at 25 ± 2 °C and continuous-flow mode. The BTH loading rate varied during experiments from 20 g·m(-3)·day(-1) to 110 g·m(-3)·day(-1). BTH and soluble COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal efficiency reached 80% to 90% under all BTH loading rates. Bioluminescence based Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that toxicity was largely decreased compared to the BTH wastewater influent and effluent of two control experiments. The results indicated that MEC (Microbial Electrolysis Cell) was useful and reliable for improving BTH wastewater treatment efficiency, enabling the microbiological reactor to more easily respond to the requirements of higher loading rate, which is meaningful for economic and efficient operation in future scale-up.

  3. The Detoxification and Degradation of Benzothiazole from the Wastewater in Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianshu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the high-production-volume chemical benzothiazole (BTH from synthetic water was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates of simple organic acids using an up-flow internal circulation microbial electrolysis reactor (UICMER under the hydraulic retention time (HRT of 24 h. The bioelectrochemical system was operated at 25 ± 2 °C and continuous-flow mode. The BTH loading rate varied during experiments from 20 g·m−3·day−1 to 110 g·m−3·day−1. BTH and soluble COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand removal efficiency reached 80% to 90% under all BTH loading rates. Bioluminescence based Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that toxicity was largely decreased compared to the BTH wastewater influent and effluent of two control experiments. The results indicated that MEC (Microbial Electrolysis Cell was useful and reliable for improving BTH wastewater treatment efficiency, enabling the microbiological reactor to more easily respond to the requirements of higher loading rate, which is meaningful for economic and efficient operation in future scale-up.

  4. The Detoxification and Degradation of Benzothiazole from the Wastewater in Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianshu; Ding, Jie; Ren, Nanqi; Tong, Qingyue; Zhang, Luyan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the high-production-volume chemical benzothiazole (BTH) from synthetic water was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates of simple organic acids using an up-flow internal circulation microbial electrolysis reactor (UICMER) under the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 h. The bioelectrochemical system was operated at 25 ± 2 °C and continuous-flow mode. The BTH loading rate varied during experiments from 20 g·m−3·day−1 to 110 g·m−3·day−1. BTH and soluble COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal efficiency reached 80% to 90% under all BTH loading rates. Bioluminescence based Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that toxicity was largely decreased compared to the BTH wastewater influent and effluent of two control experiments. The results indicated that MEC (Microbial Electrolysis Cell) was useful and reliable for improving BTH wastewater treatment efficiency, enabling the microbiological reactor to more easily respond to the requirements of higher loading rate, which is meaningful for economic and efficient operation in future scale-up. PMID:27999421

  5. Aerobic decolorization and degradation of Acid Orange G (AOG) by suspended growing cells and immobilized cells of a yeast strain Candida tropicalis TL-F1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang; Li, Hua; Ning, Shuxiang; Hao, Jia

    2014-10-01

    In this study, aerobic decolorization and degradation of azo dye Acid Orange G (AOG) by both suspended growing cells and immobilized cells of a yeast strain Candida tropicalis TL-F1 were studied. The effects of different parameters on decolorization of AOG by both growing suspended and immobilized strain TL-F1 were investigated. Furthermore, a possible decolorization mechanism of AOG was proposed through analyzing metabolic intermediates using UV-vis and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) methods. Strain TL-F1 could decolorize AOG in both liquid and solid mediums through degradation. The optimal conditions for decolorization with suspended growing cells of strain TL-F1 were as follows: 6-10 g/L sucrose, 5-7 g/L urea, ≥6 % (v/v) inoculation size, ≥160 rpm, 35-40 °C, and pH 5.0-6.0; and those for immobilized cells, the conditions were as follows: 4-6 g/L glucose, 0.2-0.4 g/L urea, 6-10 g/L (wet cell pellets) inoculation size, ≥160 rpm, 35-40 °C, and pH 5.0-7.0. Results of UV-vis scanning spectra suggested that AOG was decolorized through biodegradation, and the possible pathway was proposed through the results of HPLC-MS analysis and related literature. This is a systematic research on aerobic decolorization and degradation of AOG by both suspended and immobilized cells of a C. tropicalis strain.

  6. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Microbial Contributions to Stable Soil OC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.; Egerton-Warburton, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal OC can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2 month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. Additionally, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes were among the dominant fungal species involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycetes. At the end of the 2 month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibit varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16 and C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue, others maintaining steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (e.g. C18), and some increasing in concentration throughout the degradation (e.g. C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties, including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker distributions, and OC turnover times.

  7. The determination of the real nano-scale sizes of bacteria in chernozem during microbial succession by means of hatching of a soil in aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbacheva, M.

    2012-04-01

    M.A. Gorbacheva,L.M. Polyanskaya The Faculty of Soil Science, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow,119991,Russia In recent years there's been particular attention paid to the smallest life's forms- bacteria which size can be measured in nanometer. These are the forms of bacteria with diameter of 5-200 nm. Theoretical calculations based on the content of the minimum number of DNA, enzyme, lipids in and ribosome in cells indicates impossibility of existence of a living cells within diameter less than 300 nm. It is theoretically possible for a living cell to exist within possible diameter of approximately 140 nm. Using a fluorescence microscope there's been indicated in a number of samples from lakes, rivers, soil, snow and rain water that 200 nm is the smallest diameter of a living cell. Supposingly, such a small size of bacteria in soil is determined by natural conditions which limit their development by nutritious substances and stress-factors. Rejuvenescence of nanobacteria under unfavourable natural conditions and stress-factors is studied in laboratory environment. The object of the current study has become the samples of typical arable chernozem of the Central Chernozem State Biosphere Reserve in Kursk. The detailed morphological description of the soil profile and its basic analytical characteristics are widely represented in scientific publications. The soil is characterized by a high carbon content which makes up 3,96% ,3,8% , and 2,9% for the upper layers of the A horizon, and 0,79% for the layer of the B horizon. A microbial succession was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by means of experiments with microcosms in upper A horizons and B horizon of a chernozem. The final aim is to identify the cells size of bacteria in aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions in chernozem during the microbial succession, by dampening and application of chitin by means of «cascade filtration» method. The study of the microcosms is important for

  8. [Electricity generation and contaminants degradation performances of a microbial fuel cell fed with Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Xiu-Ping; Xu, Nan; Ni, Jin-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The electricity generation performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) utilizing Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater was studied with an H-shape reactor. Indexes including pH, conductivity, oxidation peak potential and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the anolyte were monitored to investigate the contaminants degradation performance of the MFC during the electricity generation process, besides, contaminant ingredients in anodic influent and effluent were analyzed by GC-MS and IR spectra as well. The maximum power density of the MFC could achieve 118.1 mW/m2 and the internal resistance was about 480 omega. Connected with a 1 000 omega external resistance, the output potential was about 0.4 V. Fed with 5 mL Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater, the electricity generation lasted about 133 h and the coulombic efficiency was about 3.93%. At the end of electricity generation cycle, COD decreased by 90.1% while NH4(+) -N decreased by 66.8%. Furfural compounds, phenols and some other complicated organics could be decomposed and utilized in the electricity generation process, and the residual contaminants in effluent included some long-chain fatty acids, esters, ethers, and esters with benzene ring, cycloalkanes, cycloolefins, etc. The results indicate that MFC, which can degrade and utilize the organic contaminants in Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater simultaneously, provides a new approach for resource recovery treatment of Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater.

  9. Traditional herbal medicines: potential degradation of sterols and sterolins by microbial contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Govender

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants with a high content of sterols and sterolins, such as Bulbine natalensis (rooiwortel and Hypoxis hemerocallidea (African potato, are commonly and inappropriately used in South Africa for the treatment of HIV/AIDS due to the inaccessibility of antiretroviral drugs. This study investigated the presence of active compounds, such as sterols and sterolins, in the herbal medicines. The research was carried out in the Nelson Mandela Metropole area. The effect of microbial contaminants isolated from the medicines on sterols and sterolins of rooiwortel extracts was assessed. Sterols and sterolins were detected in rooiwortel, raw African potatoes and one ready-made mixture. Co-incubation of rooiwortel with bacteria (Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas putida and fungi (Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp. and Mucor spp. that were isolated from these samples increased the rate of degradation of sterols and sterolins over time, with slower degradation at 4°C than at 28°C.

  10. Structural effects of ionic liquids on microalgal growth inhibition and microbial degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thi Phuong Thuy; Cho, Chul-Woong; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated structural effects of various ionic liquids (ILs) on microalgal growth inhibition and microbial biodegradability. For this, we tested pyridinium- and pyrrolidinium-based ILs with various alkyl chain lengths and bromide anion, and compared the toxicological effects with log EC50 values of imidazolium-based IL with the same alkyl chains and anion from literature. Comparing determined EC50 values of cationic moieties with the same alkyl chain length, pyridinium-based ILs were found to be slightly more toxic towards the freshwater green alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, than a series of pyrrolidinium and imidazolium except to 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide. Concerning the biodegradation study of 12 ILs using the activated sludge microorganisms, the results showed that the pyridinium derivatives except to 1-propyl-3-methylpyridinium cation were degraded. Whereas in case of imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based compounds, only n-hexyl and n-octyl substituted cations were fully degraded but no significant biodegradation was observed for the short chains (three and four alkyl chains).

  11. 水解单宁的微生物降解%Microbial Degradation of Hydrolysable Tannins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明姝; 姚开; 贾冬英; 何强

    2006-01-01

    单宁为高等植物的次生代谢产物,是相对分子质量为300到3 000的多酚类化合物,主要分为水解单宁和缩合单宁两大类.根据水解单宁结构特性的差异,又将其分为棓单宁和鞣花单宁.自然界中的某些微生物具有忍耐单宁的特性,甚至可以将单宁降解成具有一定生理或药理活性的小分子单宁或其衍生物.由于缩合单宁的分子结构复杂,对其微生物降解的研究远不及水解单宁深入.本文综述了近年来关于细菌和真菌降解棓单宁和鞣花单宁的研究情况,阐述了其降解机理,提出了微生物降解单宁需要解决的问题,可为单宁生物降解的进一步研究提供参考.%Tannins are water-soluble polyphenolic secondary metabolites of higher plants with the molar mass from 300 to 3 000 . Hydrolysable and condensed tannins are the two major classes of tannins. There are two groups of hydrolysable tannins: gallotannins and ellagitannins on the basis of structural characteristics. In nature, some microbes are resistant to tannins, even capable of degrading tannins into low-molar-mass tannins and lots of derivatives which have marked biological and pharmacological activities. Gallotannins can be degraded more easily than ellagitannins which have complicated structures with the further coupling C-C bond. However, some bacteria and fungi from the ellagitannin-rich soil, leaves and tannery liquors can hydrolyze ellagitannins. Because of the complicated structures of the further coupling C-C bonds, both complex tannins and condensed tannins are harder to be degraded than gallotannins and ellagitannins in both aerobic and anaerobic environments. This review could provide much references for the further researches on biodegradation of tannins.

  12. Effects of rapid temperature rising on nitrogen removal and microbial community variation of anoxic/aerobic process for ABS resin wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huilong; Song, Yudong; Zhou, Yuexi; Yang, Liwei; Zhao, Yaqian

    2017-02-01

    ABS resin wastewater is a high-temperature nitrogenous organic wastewater. It can be successfully treated with anoxic/aerobic (A/O) process. In this study, the effect of temperature on nitrogen removal and microbial community after quick temperature rise (QTR) was investigated. It was indicated that QTR from 25 to 30 °C facilitated the microbial growth and achieved a similar effluent quality as that at 25 °C. QTR from 25 to 35 °C or 40 °C resulted in higher effluent concentration of chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP). Illumina MiSeq pyrosequencing analysis illustrated that the richness and diversity of the bacterial community was decreased as the temperature was increased. The percentage of many functional groups was changed significantly. QTR from 25 to 40 °C also resulted in the inhibition of ammonia oxidation rate and high concentration of free ammonia, which then inhibited the growth of NOB (Nitrospira), and thus resulted in nitrite accumulation. The high temperature above 35 °C promoted the growth of a denitrifying bacterial genus, Denitratisoma, which might increase N2O production during the denitrification process.

  13. In situ and laboratory determined first-order degradation rate constants of specific organic compounds in an aerobic aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.H.; Bjerg, P.L.; Nielsen, P.;

    1996-01-01

    experiments. First-order degradation rate constants for aromatic and phenolic hydrocarbons ranged between 0.01 and 0.9 day(-1). Local variations in first-order degradation rates and variations between rate constants determined by ISM and LBM were generally with in a factor of 5, but no systematic differences...

  14. Integrated Anaerobic-Aerobic Biodegradation of Multiple Contaminants Including Chlorinated Ethylenes, Benzene, Toluene, and Dichloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Miho; Zhang, Ming; Toyota, Koki

    2017-01-01

    Complete bioremediation of soils containing multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) remains a challenge. To explore the possibility of complete bioremediation through integrated anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation, laboratory feasibility tests followed by alternate anaerobic-aerobic and aerobic-anaerobic biodegradation tests were performed. Chlorinated ethylenes, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC), and dichloromethane (DCM) were used for anaerobic biodegradation, whereas benzene, toluene, and DCM were used for aerobic biodegradation tests. Microbial communities involved in the biodegradation tests were analyzed to characterize the major bacteria that may contribute to biodegradation. The results demonstrated that integrated anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation was capable of completely degrading the seven VOCs with initial concentration of each VOC less than 30 mg/L. Benzene and toluene were degraded within 8 days, and DCM was degraded within 20 to 27 days under aerobic conditions when initial oxygen concentrations in the headspaces of test bottles were set to 5.3% and 21.0%. Dehalococcoides sp., generally considered sensitive to oxygen, survived aerobic conditions for 28 days and was activated during the subsequent anaerobic biodegradation. However, degradation of cis-DCE was suppressed after oxygen exposure for more than 201 days, suggesting the loss of viability of Dehalococcoides sp., as they are the only known anaerobic bacteria that can completely biodegrade chlorinated ethylenes to ethylene. Anaerobic degradation of DCM following previous aerobic degradation was complete, and yet-unknown microbes may be involved in the process. The findings may provide a scientific and practical basis for the complete bioremediation of multiple contaminants in situ and a subject for further exploration.

  15. Dynamic changes in microbial community structure and function in phenol-degrading microcosms inoculated with cells from a contaminated aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David R; Scholes, Julie D; Thornton, Steven F; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Banwart, Steven A; Rolfe, Stephen A

    2010-02-01

    Contamination of aquifers by organic pollutants threatens groundwater supplies and the environment. In situ biodegradation of organic pollutants by microbial communities is important for the remediation of contaminated sites, but our understanding of the relationship between microbial development and pollutant biodegradation is poor. A particular challenge is understanding the in situ status of microorganisms attached to solid surfaces, but not accessible via conventional sampling of groundwater. We have developed novel flow-through microcosms and examined dynamic changes in microbial community structure and function in a phenol-degrading system. Inoculation of these microcosms with a complex microbial community from a plume in a phenol-contaminated aquifer led to the initial establishment of a population dominated by a few species, most attached to the solid substratum. Initially, phenol biodegradation was incomplete, but as the microbial community structure became more complex, phenol biodegradation was more extensive and complete. These results were replicated between independent microcosms, indicating a deterministic succession of species. This work demonstrates the importance of examining community dynamics when assessing the potential for microbial biodegradation of organic pollutants. It provides a novel system in which such measurements can be made readily and reproducibly to study the temporal development and spatial succession of microbial communities during biodegradation of organic pollutants at interfaces within such environments.

  16. Extensions to modeling aerobic carbon degradation using combined respirometric-titrimetric measurements in view of activated sludge model calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Gürkan; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2007-08-01

    Recently a model was introduced to interpret the respirometric (OUR) -titrimetric (Hp) data obtained from aerobic oxidation of different carbon sources in view of calibration of Activated Sludge Model No.1 (ASM1). The model requires, among others, the carbon dioxide transfer rate (CTR) to be relatively constant during aerobic experiments. As CTR is an inherently nonlinear process, this assumption may not hold for certain experimental conditions. Hence, we extended the model to describe the nonlinear CTR behavior. A simple calibration procedure of the CO2 model was developed only using titrimetric data. The identifiable parameter subset of this model when using titrimetric data only contained the first equilibrium constant of the CO2 dissociation, pK1, the initial aqueous CO2 concentration, C(Tinit) and the nitrogen content of biomass, i(NBM). The extended model was then successfully applied to interpret typical data obtained from respirometric-titrimetric measurements with a nonlinear CO2 stripping process. The parameter estimation results using titrimetric data were consistent with the results estimated using respirometric data (OUR) alone or combined OUR and Hp data, thereby supporting the validity of the dynamic CO2 model and its calibration approach. The increased range of applicability and accurate utilization of the titrimetric data are expected to contribute particularly to the improvement of calibration of ASM models using batch experiments.

  17. Applications of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in the fields of biological degradation of contaminants and biological wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Jovcic, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    In the work here presented four distinctly different problems were investigated. The first problem was an investigation into the degradation of Dichloroethylene (DCE) and 1,1-bis (p-Chlorophenyl)-2-dichloroethylene (DDE) utilising pure bacterial cultures. The second investigation dealt with the degradation of DDE and polychlorinated Biphenyl’s (PCB’s) utilising anaerobic sediments and soils from New Zealand. The third investigation worked on the Granulation of anaerobic River-sediments in Upf...

  18. Process of rice straw degradation and dynamic trend of pH by the microbial community MC1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-bin; WANG Wei-dong; YANG Hong-yan; WANG Xiao-fen; GAO Li-juan; CUI Zong-jun

    2006-01-01

    The process of the rice straw degradation in the fermentor with aeration at 290 ml/h was studied. The results of dissolved oxygen (DO) indicated that the optimum DO during cellulose degradation by microbial community MC1 ranged from 0.01 to 0.12mg/L. The change model of pH values was as follows: irrespective of the initial pH of the medium, pH values decreased rapidly to approximate 6.0 after being inoculated within 48 h when cellulose was strongly degraded, and then increased slowly to 8.0-9.0 until cellulose was degraded completely. During the degradation process, 15 kinds of organic compounds were checked out by GC-MS.Most of them were organic acids. Quantity analysis was carried out, and the maximum content compound was ethyl acetate which reached 13.56 g/L on the day 4. The cellulose degradation quantity and ratio analyses showed that less quantity (under batch fermentation conditions) and longer interval (under semi-fermentation conditions) of rice straw added to fermentation system were contributed to matching the change model of pH, and increasing the quantity and ratio of rice straw degradation during cellulose degrading process. The highest degradation ratio was observed under the condition of rice straw added one time every five days (under semi-fermentation conditions).

  19. Triclosan affects the microbial community in simulated sewage-drain-field soil and slows down xenobiotic degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenningsen, Hanne [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Solvgade 83H, DK-1307 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Henriksen, Trine [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Prieme, Anders [Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Solvgade 83H, DK-1307 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Johnsen, Anders R., E-mail: arj@geus.dk [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark)

    2011-06-15

    Effects of the common antibacterial agent triclosan on microbial communities and degradation of domestic xenobiotics were studied in simulated sewage-drain-field soil. Cultivable microbial populations decreased 22-fold in the presence of 4 mg kg{sup -1} of triclosan, and triclosan-resistant Pseudomonas strains were strongly enriched. Exposure to triclosan also changed the general metabolic profile (Ecoplate substrate profiling) and the general profile (T-RFLP) of the microbial community. Triclosan degradation was slow at all concentrations tested (0.33-81 mg kg{sup -1}) during 50-days of incubation. Mineralization experiments ({sup 14}C-tracers) and chemical analyses (LC-MS/MS) showed that the persistence of a linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) and a common analgesic (ibuprofen) increased with increasing triclosan concentrations (0.16-100 mg kg{sup -1}). The largest effect was seen for LAS mineralization which was severely reduced by 0.16 mg kg{sup -1} of triclosan. Our findings indicate that environmentally realistic concentrations of triclosan may affect the efficiency of biodegradation in percolation systems. - Highlights: > Triclosan may enter the soil environment through sewage. > Triclosan impacts the microbial community in sewage-drain-field soil. > Triclosan-resistant pseudomonads are strongly enriched. > Degradation of co-occurring LAS and ibuprofen is reduced. - Environmentally realistic triclosan concentrations in percolation systems may reduce the biodegradation of other xenobiotics and select for triclosan-resistant bacteria.

  20. Responses of butachlor degradation and microbial properties in a riparian soil to the cultivation of three different plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changming; Wang, Mengmeng; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the biodegradation dynamics and related microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition in a riparian soil planted with different plants such as Phragmites australis, Zizania aquatica, and Acorus calamus. The results showed that there were significant differences in microbial degradation dynamics of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils among the three riparian plants. A. calamus displays a significantly higher degradation efficiency of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils, as compared with Z. aquatica and P. australis. Half-life time of butachlor degradation in the rhizospheric soils of P. australis, Z. aquatica, and A. calamus were 7.5, 9.8 and 5.4 days, respectively. Residual butachlor concentration in A. calamus rhizosphere soil was 35.2% and 21.7% lower than that in Z. aquatica and P. australis rhizosphere soils, respectively, indicating that A. calamus showed a greater improvement effect on biodegradation of butachlor in rhizosphere soils than the other two riparian plant. In general, microbial biomass and biochemical activities in rhizosphere soils were depressed by butachlor addition, despite the riparian plant types. However, rhizospheric soil microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition significantly (P butachlor addition and can be used as a suitable riparian plant for detoxifying and remediating butachlor contamination from agricultural nonpoint pollution.

  1. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Busk

    Full Text Available The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls.

  2. Effect of fly ash amendment on metolachlor and atrazine degradation and microbial activity in two soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Neera; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-08-01

    The study reports the effect of Inderprastha (IP) and Badarpur (BP) fly ashes on degradation of metolachlor and atrazine in Inceptisol and Alfisol soils. Metolachlor dissipated at faster rate in Alfisol (t1/2 8.2-8.6 days) than in Inceptisol (t1/2 13.2-14.3 days). The fly ashes enhanced the persistence of metolachlor in both the soils; however, the extent of effect was more in Inceptisol (t1/2 16.6-33.8 days) than Alfisol (t1/2 8.4-12 days) and effect increased with fly ash dose. 2-Ethyl-6-methylacetanilide was detected as the only metabolite of metolachlor. Atrazine was more persistent in flooded soils (t1/2 10.8-20.3 days) than nonflooded soils (t1/2 3.7-12.6 days) and fly ash increased its persistence, but effect was more pronounced in the flooded Inceptisol (t1/2 23.7-31 days) and nonflooded Alfisol (t1/2 6.3-10.1 days). Increased herbicide sorption in the fly ash-amended soils might have contributed to the increased pesticide persistence. The IP fly ash inhibited microbial biomass carbon at 5 % amendment levels in both the soils, while BP fly ash slightly increased microbial biomass carbon (MBC) content. Dehydrogenase activity was inhibited by both fly ashes in both the soils with maximum inhibition observed in the IP fly ash-amended Alfisol. No significant effect of fly ash amendment was observed on the fluorescein diacetate activity.

  3. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud eDechesne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays nonrandom spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage, while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modelling and experimental systems that do not include soil’s full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil.

  4. Responses of butachlor degradation and microbial properties in a riparian soil to the cultivation of three different plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changming Yang; Mengmeng Wang; Haiyan Chen; Jianhua Li

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the biodegradation dynamics and related microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition in a riparian soil planted with different plants such as Phragmites australis,Zizaaia aquatica,and Acorus calamus.The results showed that there were significant differences in microbial degradation dynamics of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils among the three riparian plants.A.calamus displays a significantly higher degradation efficiency of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils,as compared with Z aquatica and P.australis.Half-life time of butachlor degradation in the rhizospheric soils of P.australis,Z.aquatica,and A.calamus were 7.5,9.8 and 5.4 days,respectively.Residual butachlor concentration in A.calamus rhizosphere soil was 35.2% and 21.7% lower than that in Z.aquatica and P.australis rhizosphere soils,respectively,indicating that A.calamus showed a greater improvement effect on biodegradation of butachlor in rhizosphere soils than the other two riparian plant.In general,microbial biomass and biochemical activities in rhizosphere soils were depressed by butachlor addition,despite the riparian plant types.However,rhizospheric soil microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition significantly (P < 0.05) differed between riparian plant species.Compared to Z.aquatica and P.australis,A.calamus showed significantly larger microbial number,higher enzyme activities and soil respiration rates in the rhizosphere soils.The results indicated that A.calamus have a better alleviative effect on inhibition of microbial growth due to butachlor addition and can be used as a suitable riparian plant for detoxifying and remediating butaehlor contamination from agricultural nonpoint pollution.

  5. Strain-resolved microbial community proteomics reveals simultaneous aerobic and anaerobic function during gastrointestinal tract colonization of a preterm infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon eBrooks

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While there has been growing interest in the gut microbiome in recent years, it remains unclear whether closely related species and strains have similar or distinct functional roles and if organisms capable of both aerobic and anaerobic growth do so simultaneously. To investigate these questions, we implemented a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins in fecal samples collected on days of life 13-21 from an infant born at 28 weeks gestation. No prior studies have coupled strain-resolved community metagenomics to proteomics for such a purpose. Sequences were manually curated to resolve the genomes of two strains of Citrobacter that were present during the later stage of colonization. Proteome extracts from fecal samples were processed via a nano-2D-LC-MS/MS and peptides were identified based on information predicted from the genome sequences for the dominant organisms, Serratia and the two Citrobacter strains. These organisms are facultative anaerobes, and proteomic information indicates the utilization of both aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms throughout the time series. This may indicate growth in distinct niches within the gastrointestinal tract. We uncovered differences in the physiology of coexisting Citrobacter strains, including differences in motility and chemotaxis functions. Additionally, for both Citrobacter strains we resolved a community-essential role in vitamin metabolism and a predominant role in propionate production. Finally, in this case study we detected differences between genome abundance and activity levels for the dominant populations. This underlines the value in layering proteomic information over genetic potential.

  6. Development of a predictive model for the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population on pomegranate marinated chicken breast fillets under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytou, Anastasia; Panagou, Efstathios Z; Nychas, George-John E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a model to describe the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population of chicken breast fillets marinated in pomegranate juice under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions. Moreover, the effect of pomegranate juice on the extension of the shelf life of the product was investigated. Samples (10 g) of chicken breast fillets were immersed in marinades containing pomegranate juice for 3 h at 4 °C following storage under aerobic conditions at 4, 10, and 15 °C for 10 days. Total Viable Counts (TVC), Pseudomonas spp and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were enumerated, in parallel with sensory assessment (odor and overall appearance) of marinated and non-marinated samples. The Baranyi model was fitted to the growth data of TVC to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μmax) that was further modeled as a function of temperature using a square root-type model. The validation of the model was conducted under dynamic temperature conditions based on two fluctuating temperature scenarios with periodic changes from 6 to 13 °C. The shelf life was determined both mathematically and with sensory assessment and its temperature dependence was modeled by an Arrhenius type equation. Results showed that the μmax of TVC of marinated samples was significantly lower compared to control samples regardless temperature, while under dynamic temperature conditions the model satisfactorily predicted the growth of TVC in both control and marinated samples. The shelf-life of marinated samples was significantly extended compared to the control (5 days extension at 4 °C). The calculated activation energies (Ea), 82 and 52 kJ/mol for control and marinated samples, respectively, indicated higher temperature dependence of the shelf life of control samples compared to marinated ones. The present results indicated that pomegranate juice could be used as an alternative ingredient in marinades to prolong the shelf life of chicken.

  7. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant 'seed bank'.

  8. Prolonged aerobic degradation of shredded and pre-composted municipal solid waste: report from a 21-year study of leachate quality characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisey, Elise; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the degree of long-term waste maturation at a closed landfill (Etueffont, France) over a period of 21 years (1989-2010) through analysis of the physicochemical characteristics of leachates as well as biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and metal content in waste. The results show that the leachates, generated in two different sections (older and newer) of the landfill, have low organic, mineral, and metallic loads, as the wastes were mainly of household origin from a rural area where sorting and composting were required. Based on pH and BOD/COD assessments, leachate monitoring in the landfill's newer section showed a rapid decrease in the pollution load over time and an early onset of methanogenic conditions. The closing of the older of the two sections contributed to a significant decline for the majority of parameters, attributable to degradation and leaching. A gradual decreasing trend was observed after waste placement had ceased in the older section, indicating that degradation continued and the waste mass had not yet fully stabilized. At the end of monitoring, leachates from the two landfill linings contained typical old leachates in the maturation period, with a pH ≥ 7 and a low BOD/COD ratio indicating a low level of waste biodegradability. Age actually contributes to a gradual removal of organic, inorganic, and metallic wastes, but it is not the only driving factor behind advanced degradation. The lack of compaction and cover immediately after deposit extended the aerobic degradation phase, significantly reducing the amount of organic matter. In addition, waste shredding improved water infiltration into the waste mass, hastening removal of polluting components through percolation.

  9. Rapid degradation of sulphamethoxazole and the further transformation of 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Liu, Yulei; Ma, Jun; Zhao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Sulphamethoxazole (SMX) is extensively used in humans and livestock, but its appearance in natural water raises environmental concerns. This study demonstrated that SMX and its degradation product, 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole (3A5MI), could be effectively degraded in microbial fuel cell (MFC) reactors. Approximately 85% of 20 ppm SMX was degraded within 12 h, and this was a more rapid biodegradation rate than has been previously shown in the literature. In addition, 3A5MI, a toxic chemical that forms in the SMX degradation process, can be further mineralized. The degradation products of SMX were detected by mass spectrometry, and three speculated by-products were confirmed with chemical standards. It was observed that nitrogen atoms of SMX were progressively eliminated during the degradation process, which may relate with the degradation of SMX and 3A5MI. An antibacterial activity test showed that the biotoxicity of SMX towards Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Escherichia coli DH5α was greatly reduced after MFC treatment. Moreover, the ATP level of the MFC microbe was nearly threefold higher than that in open-circuit controls, which may be related to the rapid degradation of SMX in MFCs. This study can facilitate further investigations about the biodegradation of SMX.

  10. Enhanced degradation of azo dye by a stacked microbial fuel cell-biofilm electrode reactor coupled system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xian; Wang, Hui; Li, Xiao-Qi; Fang, Zhou; Li, Xian-Ning

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC)-biofilm electrode reactor (BER) coupled system was established for degradation of the azo dye Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B. In this system, electrical energy generated by the MFC degrades the azo dye in the BER without the need for an external power supply, and the effluent from the BER was used as the inflow for the MFC, with further degradation. The results indicated that the X-3B removal efficiency was 29.87% higher using this coupled system than in a control group. Moreover, a method was developed to prevent voltage reversal in stacked MFCs. Current was the key factor influencing removal efficiency in the BER. The X-3B degradation pathway and the types and transfer processes of intermediate products were further explored in our system coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  11. Formulation of economical microbial feed using degraded chicken feathers by a novel Streptomyces sp: mitigation of environmental pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayapradha Ramakrishnan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A new Streptomyces sp. IF 5 was isolated from the feather dumped soil and found to have a tremendous keratinase activity. The strain enabled the degradation of the chicken feathers very effectively in 60 h. The 16S rRNA sequence of 1474 bp long was submitted to the National centre for Biotechnological information. The keratinolytic activity in the culture medium was 1181 U/ml. The release and analyses of sulphydryl groups in the culture medium evident the degradation activity by the Streptomyces sp. IF 5. The idea of the present study was to use the degraded chicken feathers as the substrate for the growth and cultivation of microorganisms. We have designed a very economical culture medium that includes the usage of some basal salts alone and degraded chicken feathers (10 g/l. The results of the specific growth rate of the tested microbes confirm the usage of the new designed medium for microbial culturing.

  12. Formulation of economical microbial feed using degraded chicken feathers by a novel Streptomyces sp: mitigation of environmental pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Jayapradha; Balakrishnan, Hariram; Raja, Selvaraj Thirupathi Kumara; Sundararamakrishnan, Natarajan; Renganathan, Sadagoban; Radha, Venkatesh Nagarajan

    2011-01-01

    A new Streptomyces sp. IF 5 was isolated from the feather dumped soil and found to have a tremendous keratinase activity. The strain enabled the degradation of the chicken feathers very effectively in 60 h. The 16S rRNA sequence of 1474 bp long was submitted to the National centre for Biotechnological information. The keratinolytic activity in the culture medium was 1181 U/ml. The release and analyses of sulphydryl groups in the culture medium evident the degradation activity by the Streptomyces sp. IF 5. The idea of the present study was to use the degraded chicken feathers as the substrate for the growth and cultivation of microorganisms. We have designed a very economical culture medium that includes the usage of some basal salts alone and degraded chicken feathers (10 g/l). The results of the specific growth rate of the tested microbes confirm the usage of the new designed medium for microbial culturing. PMID:24031698

  13. [Power generation from glucose and nitrobenzene degradation using the microbial fuel cell].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Liu, Guang-Li; Zhang, Ren-Duo; Luo, Yong; Zhang, Cui-Ping; Li, Ming-Chen; Quan, Xiang-Chun

    2010-11-01

    By constructing a dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC), experiments were carried out using an initial glucose concentration of 1 000 mg/L with different nitrobenzene (NB) concentrations (0, 50, 150 and 250 mg/L) as the MFC's fuel. Results showed that with an external resistance of 1 000 omega, the initial glucose concentration of 1 000 mg/L and the initial NB concentrations of 0, 50, 150, 250 mg/L, the operation periods were 55.7, 51.6, 45.9 and 32.2 h, respectively, the maximum voltage outputs were 670, 597, 507, and 489 mV, the maximum volumetric power densities were 28.57, 20.42, 9.29, and 8.47 W/m3, and the electric charges were 65.10, 43.50, 35.48, and 30.32 C. The MFC could use the NB and glucose mixtures as fuel and generated stable electricity outputs. The degradation rates of NB in the MFC in all cases reached up to 100% and COD removals in the MFC were 87% - 98%. However, the electricity generation was negligible when using 250 mg/L NB as the sole fuel. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles demonstrated that the presence of NB resulted in changes of the dominant bacterial species on the electrodes.

  14. Microbial utilization of lignin: available biotechnologies for its degradation and valorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, Martín A; Kurina-Sanz, Marcela

    2016-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biomasses, either from non-edible plants or from agricultural residues, stock biomacromolecules that can be processed to produce both energy and bioproducts. Therefore, they become major candidates to replace petroleum as the main source of energy. However, to shift the fossil-based economy to a bio-based one, it is imperative to develop robust biotechnologies to efficiently convert lignocellulosic streams in power and platform chemicals. Although most of the biomass processing facilities use celluloses and hemicelluloses to produce bioethanol and paper, there is no consolidated bioprocess to produce valuable compounds out of lignin at industrial scale available currently. Usually, lignin is burned to provide heat or it remains as a by-product in different streams, thus arising environmental concerns. In this way, the biorefinery concept is not extended to completion. Due to Nature offers an arsenal of biotechnological tools through microorganisms to accomplish lignin valorization or degradation, an increasing number of projects dealing with these tasks have been described recently. In this review, outstanding reports over the last 6 years are described, comprising the microbial utilization of lignin to produce a variety of valuable compounds as well as to diminish its ecological impact. Furthermore, perspectives on these topics are given.

  15. Microbial Biomass and Activity in Geomorphic Features in Forested and Urban Restored and Degraded Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geomorphic spatial heterogeneity affects sediment denitrification, an anaerobic microbial process that results in the loss of nitrogen (N), and other anaerobic microbial processes such as methanogenesis in urban streams. We measured sediment denitrification potential (DEA), metha...

  16. Solid-, solution-, and gas-state NMR monitoring of ¹³C-cellulose degradation in an anaerobic microbial ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazawa, Akira; Iikura, Tomohiro; Shino, Amiu; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-07-29

    Anaerobic digestion of biomacromolecules in various microbial ecosystems is influenced by the variations in types, qualities, and quantities of chemical components. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing the degradation of solids to gases in anaerobic digestion processes. Here we describe a characterization strategy using NMR spectroscopy for targeting the input solid insoluble biomass, catabolized soluble metabolites, and produced gases. ¹³C-labeled cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was added as a substrate to stirred tank reactors and gradually degraded for 120 h. The time-course variations in structural heterogeneity of cellulose catabolism were determined using solid-state NMR, and soluble metabolites produced by cellulose degradation were monitored using solution-state NMR. In particular, cooperative changes between the solid NMR signal and ¹³C-¹³C/¹³C-¹²C isotopomers in the microbial degradation of ¹³C-cellulose were revealed by a correlation heat map. The triple phase NMR measurements demonstrated that cellulose was anaerobically degraded, fermented, and converted to methane gas from organic acids such as acetic acid and butyric acid.

  17. Solid-, Solution-, and Gas-state NMR Monitoring of 13C-Cellulose Degradation in an Anaerobic Microbial Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Date

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion of biomacromolecules in various microbial ecosystems is influenced by the variations in types, qualities, and quantities of chemical components. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing the degradation of solids to gases in anaerobic digestion processes. Here we describe a characterization strategy using NMR spectroscopy for targeting the input solid insoluble biomass, catabolized soluble metabolites, and produced gases. 13C-labeled cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was added as a substrate to stirred tank reactors and gradually degraded for 120 h. The time-course variations in structural heterogeneity of cellulose catabolism were determined using solid-state NMR, and soluble metabolites produced by cellulose degradation were monitored using solution-state NMR. In particular, cooperative changes between the solid NMR signal and 13C-13C/13C-12C isotopomers in the microbial degradation of 13C-cellulose were revealed by a correlation heat map. The triple phase NMR measurements demonstrated that cellulose was anaerobically degraded, fermented, and converted to methane gas from organic acids such as acetic acid and butyric acid.

  18. Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms Rid A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    KUHL, M.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1992-01-01

    The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO4(2-) reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100-mu-m) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured......, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H2S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O2 in a narrow reaction zone, and no H2S escaped to the overlying...... water. Turnover times of H2S and O2 in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H2S oxidation. Anaerobic H2S oxidation with NO3- could be induced by addition of nitrate to the medium. Total sulfate reduction rates increased when the availability of SO4(2-) or organic substrate...

  19. Microorganism Degradation Efficiency in BOD Analysis Formulating a Specific Microbial Consortium in a Pulp and Paper Mill Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Ordaz-Díaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulp and paper mills are a major source of pollution, generating huge amounts of intensely colored effluent that goes to the receiving end of a wastewater treatment plant. The biochemical oxygen demand test (BOD5 relies heavily on the microorganism metabolic capability added to the test as seeding material. The seeding material in the testing is obtained from sewage sampling or from commercial sources. Specific organic pollutants that are present in paper and pulp mill effluent can only be degraded by specific microbes; therefore, common sewage or synthetic seed may lead to erroneous BOD5 estimations. In this study, specific microbial species were selected to evaluate their degradation efficiency, both individually and in combination. The microorganisms selected in the formulated seed exhibit BOD5 in a reproducible and synergistic manner. The formulation of this specific microbial consortium can be used to develop bioremediation strategies.

  20. Investigation into the potential toxicity of zero-valent iron nanoparticles to a trichloroethylene-degrading groundwater microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabetakis, Kara M.

    The microbiological impact of zero-valent iron remediation of groundwater was investigated by exposing a trichloroethylene-degrading anaerobic microbial community to bare and coated iron nanoparticles. Changes in population numbers and metabolic activity were analyzed using qPCR and were compared to those of a blank, negative, and positive control to assess for microbial toxicity. Additionally, these results were compared to those of samples exposed to an equal concentration of iron filings in an attempt to discern the source of toxicity. Statistical analysis revealed that the three iron treatments were equally toxic to total Bacteria and Archaea populations, as compared with the controls. Therefore, toxicity appears to result either from the release of iron ions and the generation of reactive oxygen species, or from alteration of the redox system and the disruption of microbial metabolisms. There does not appear to be a unique nanoparticle-based toxicity.

  1. Preparation, Characterization, and Microbial Degradation of Specifically Radiolabeled [14C]Lignocelluloses from Marine and Freshwater Macrophytes †

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Specifically radiolabeled [14C-lignin]lignocelluloses were prepared from the aquatic macrophytes Spartina alterniflora, Juncus roemerianus, Rhizophora mangle, and Carex walteriana by using [14C]phenylalanine, [14C]tyrosine, and [14C]cinnamic acid as precursors. Specifically radiolabeled [14C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses were prepared by using [14C]glucose as precursor. The rates of microbial degradation varied among [14C-lignin]lignocelluloses labeled with different lignin precursors within...

  2. [Effects of Oil Pollutants on the Performance of Marine Benthonic Microbial Fuel Cells and Its Acceleration of Degradation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yao; Fu, Yu-bin; Liang, Sheng-kang; Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhao-hui

    2015-08-01

    Degradation of oil pollutants under the sea is slow for its oxygen-free environment which has caused long-term harm to ocean environment. This paper attempts to accelerate the degradation of the sea oil pollutants through electro catalysis by using the principle of marine benthonic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs). The influence of oil pollutants on the battery performance is innovatively explored by comparing the marine benthonic microbial fuel cells ( BMFCs-A) containing oil and oil-free microbial fuel cells (BMFCs-B). The acceleration effect of BMFCs is investigated by the comparison between the oil-degrading rate and the number of heterotrophic bacteria of the BMFCs-A and BMFCs-B on their anodes. The results show that the exchange current densities in the anode of the BMFCs-A and BMFCs-B are 1. 37 x 10(-2) A x m(-2) and 1.50 x 10(-3) A x m(-2) respectively and the maximum output power densities are 105.79 mW x m(-2) and 83.60 mW x m(-2) respectively. The exchange current densities have increased 9 times and the maximum output power density increased 1. 27 times. The anti-polarization ability of BMFCs-A is improved. The heterotrophic bacteria numbers of BMFCs-A and BMFCs-C on their anodes are (66 +/- 3.61) x 10(7) CFU x g(-1) and (7.3 +/- 2.08) x 10(7) CFU x g(-1) respectively and the former total number has increased 8 times, which accelerates the oil-degrading rate. The degrading rate of the oil in the BMFCs-A is 18.7 times higher than that in its natural conditions. The BMFCs can improve its electrochemical performance, meanwhile, the degradation of oil pollutants can also be accelerated. A new model of the marine benthonic microbial fuel cells on its acceleration of oil degradation is proposed in this article.

  3. Microbial degradation of a metal organic biocide in soils; Mikrobieller Abbau eines im Holzschutz verwendeten metallorganischen Biozids im Boden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobs, Desiree

    2010-06-17

    The soil microbial community is able to degrade wood and variety of chemical wood-preservatives (WP) to generate energy by producing CO{sub 2} and as nutrition source to establish biomass. This work is focused on the characterisation of the microbial degradation of metal-organic WP including Copper-HDO (Cu-HDO) as biocide via {sup 13}C tracer experiments. Investigations with sterilized and non-sterilized soul incubated with Cu-HDO demonstrated that degradation of Cu-HDO was accelerated by the presence of the soil microbial community. Leaching of treated wood into the surrounding soil is characterized by low Cu-HDO concentrations (5 {mu}g - 20 {mu}g). Measurements of such biocide-concentrations by HPLC over time showed that Cu-HDO was degraded within a few days of soil incubation. Cu-HDO solely was degraded faster in soil compared to Cu-HDO as part of a WP. Presence of Cu-HDO significantly decreased the overall soil respiration compared to samples without Cu-HDO. Detailed information of the microbial metabolic pathways was achieved by comparison of {sup 12}C and {sup 13}C enriched Cu-HDO experiments and thereafter SIP-PLFA analysis. Monitoring of the {delta}{sup 13}C in PLFAs revealed that the carbon derived from the biocide was integrated nearly exclusively into the abundant PLFAs affiliated to gram negative bacteria. PLFAs indicative for fungi and other eukaryotic organism could be found only in low relative abundances and without {delta}{sup 13}C enrichment. This result suggests that eukaryotes were not involved in utilization of Copper-HADO based carbon. To characterise the impact of the co-biocide HDO on the microbial community the composition of the microbial community present at the surface of Copper-HDO, Copper-Amine treated specimens as well as of untreated specimens in soil contact was investigated. The bacterial community structure was characterized by the T-RFLP fingerprinting technique whereas the eukaryotic community structure was analyzed by the SSCP

  4. Effects of Cd(II) and Cu(II) on microbial characteristics in 2-chlorophenol-degradation anaerobic bioreactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Aiqun; CHEN Hao; CHEN Ling; DAI Yalei; ZHAO Jianfu

    2008-01-01

    The effects of Cd2+ and CU2+ at 300 mg/L on anaerobic microbial communities that degrade 2.cholorophenol(2-CP) were examined. Based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of 16S rDNA, bacterial community diversity and archaeal community structure were analyzed with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and cloning,respectively.Degradation capabilities of the anaerobic microbial community were drastically abated and the degradation efficiency of 2-CP was reduced to 60%after shock by Cu2+ and Cd2+, respectively.The bacterial community structure was disturbed and the biodiversity Was reduced after shock by Cu2+ and Cdz+ for 3 d.Some new metal-resistant microbes which could cope with the new condition appeared.The sequence analysis showed that there existed common Archaea species in control sludge and systems when treated with Cu2+ and Cd2+, such as Methanothrix soehngenii,Methanosaeta concilii,uncultured euryarchaeote, and so on.Both the abundance and diversity of archaeal species were altered with addition of Cd2+ and Cu2+ at high concentration.AIthough the abundance of the predominant archaeal species decreased wim Cd2+ and Cu2+ addition for 3 d.tIley recovered to some extent after 10 d.The diversity of archaeal species Was remarkably reduced after recovery for 10 d and the shift in archaeal composition seemed to be irreversible.The 2-CP-degradation anaerobic system was more sensitive to Cu2+ than Cd2+.

  5. Accelerated azo dye degradation and concurrent hydrogen production in the single-chamber photocatalytic microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanping; Zhang, Renduo; Yu, Zebin; Huang, Lirong; Liu, Yuxin; Zhou, Zili

    2017-01-01

    The single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell constructed with a TiO2-coated photocathode, termed photocatalytic microbial electrolysis cell (PMEC), was developed to accelerate methyl orange (MO) degradation and concurrent hydrogen (H2) recovery under UV irradiation. Results showed that faster MO decolorization rates were achieved from the PMEC compared with those without UV irradiation or with open circuit. With increase of MO concentrations (acetate as co-substrate) from 50 to 300mg/L at an applied voltage of 0.8V, decolorization efficiencies decreased from 98% to 76% within 12h, and cyclic H2 production declined from 113 to 68mL. As the possible mechanism of MO degradation, bioelectrochemical reduction, co-metabolism reduction, and photocatalysis were involved; and degradation intermediates (mainly sulfanilic acid and N,N-dimethylaniline) were further degraded by OH generated from photocatalysis. This makes MO mineralization be possible in the single-chamber PMEC. Hence, the PMEC is a promising system for dyeing wastewater treatment and simultaneous H2 production.

  6. Ultrasonically enhanced delivery and degradation of PAHs in a polymer-liquid partitioning system by a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaza, Pedro A; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2009-09-01

    The current study examined the effects of ultrasonic irradiation on mass transfer and degradation of PAHs, by an enriched consortium, when delivered from polymeric matrices. Rates of release into methanol under sonicated conditions, relative to unmixed cases, for phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene were increased approximately fivefold, when delivered from Desmopan 9370 A (polyurethane). Similar effects were observed in Hytrel and Kraton D4150 K polymers as well as recycled Bridgestone tires. Enhancements were also displayed as shifts to higher release equilibria under sonicated conditions, relative to non-sonicated cases, agreeing with current knowledge in sonochemistry and attributed to cavitation. Ultrasonic effects on microbial activity were also investigated and cell damage was found to be non- permanent with consortium re-growth being observed after sonic deactivation. Finally, the lumped effect of sonication on degradation of phenanthrene delivered from Desmopan was examined under the absence and presence of sonication. Rates of degradation were found to be increased by a factor of four demonstrating the possibility of using ultrasonic irradiation for improved mass transport in solid-liquid systems. Cellular inactivation effects were not evident, and this was attributed to the attenuation of sonic energy arising from the presence of solid polymer materials in the medium. The findings of the study demonstrate that sonication can be used to improve mass transport of poorly soluble compounds in microbial degradations, and alleviate limiting steps of soil remediation processes proposed in previous research.

  7. Microbial degradation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS), an e-plastic with decabromodiphenyl oxide and antimony trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Mohan, Arya J; Nair, Nimisha R; Bhaskar, Thallada; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-11-15

    Accumulation of electronic waste has increased catastrophically and out of that various plastic resins constitute one of the leading thrown out materials in the electronic machinery. Enrichment medium, containing high impact polystyrene (HIPS) with decabromodiphenyl oxide and antimony trioxide as sole carbon source, was used to isolate microbial cultures. The viability of these cultures in the e-plastic containing mineral medium was further confirmed by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction test. Four cultures were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Enterobacter sp., Citrobacter sedlakii, Alcaligenes sp. and Brevundimonas diminuta. Biodegradation experiments were carried out in flask level and gelatin supplementation (0.1% w/v) along with HIPS had increased the degradation rate to a maximum of 12.4% (w/w) within 30days. This is the first report for this kind of material. The comparison of FTIR, NMR, and TGA analysis of original and degraded e-plastic films revealed structural changes under microbial treatment. Polystyrene degradation intermediates in the culture supernatant were also detected using HPLC analysis. The gravity of biodegradation was validated by morphological changes under scanning electron microscope. All isolates displayed depolymerase activity to substantiate enzymatic degradation of e-plastic.

  8. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo

    2014-01-01

    . In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important...... feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases...

  9. A study on significant microbial interaction leading to decolorization and degradation of textile dye Rubine 3GP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phugare, Swapnil S; Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2011-10-01

    The present study evaluates an obligatory interaction between the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCIM 3312 and the bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain BCH3 for the biodegradation of the dye Rubin 3GP (R3GP). No significant degradation of R3GP was observed either by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCIM 3312 or by Pseudomonas sp. strain BCH3, when both the cultures were tested individually under their respective optimum medium conditions. However, when both of them were allowed to intermingle with each other, R3GP was found to be degraded within 72 h, with a steady increase in β -1,3-glucanase, chitinase and protease activity in the culture supernatant; indicating the possible role of Pseudomonas sp. strain BCH3 in cell wall lysis of S. cerevisiae NCIM 3312. The present study elucidates a rare microbial interaction where the bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain BCH3 utilizes lysed yeast cells as the sole source of nutrients for its own growth and subsequently performs decolorization and degradation of R3GP. Enzymatic status showed involvement of various oxidoreductive enzymes like lignin peroxidase, laccase, DCIP reductase and azo reductase, indicating their role in decolorization and degradation of R3GP. Degradation was confirmed using HPLC, FTIR analysis and the biochemical pathway of degradation was elucidated by using GC-MS analysis.

  10. Effects of degradable protein and non-fibre carbohydrates on microbial growth and fermentation in the rumen simulating fermenter (Rusitec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang H. Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A rumen simulation technique (Rusitec apparatus with eight 800 ml fermentation vessels was used to investigate the effects of rumen degradable protein (RDP level and non-fibre carbohydrate (NFC type on ruminal fermentation, microbial growth, and populations of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria. Treatments consisted of two NFC types (starch and pectin supplemented with 0 g/d (low RDP or 1.56 g/d (high RDP sodium caseinate. Apparent disappearance of dry matter and organic matter was greater for pectin than for starch treatment (P<0.01 with low or high RDP. A NFC × RDP interaction was observed for neutral detergent fibre disappearance (P=0.01, which was lower for pectin than for starch only under low RDP conditions. Compared with starch, pectin treatment increased the copy numbers of Ruminococcus albus (P≤0.01 and Ruminococcus flavefaciens (P≤0.09, the molar proportion of acetate (P<0.01, the acetate:propionate ratio (P<0.01, and methane production (P<0.01, but reduced the propionate proportion (P<0.01. Increasing dietary RDP increased the production of total VFA (P=0.01, methane (P<0.01, ammonia N (P<0.01, and microbial N (P<0.01. Significant NFC × RDP interaction and interaction tendency were observed for ammonia N production (P=0.01 and daily N flow of total microorganisms (P=0.07, which did not differ under low RDP conditions, but pectin produced greater microbial N and less ammonia N than starch with increased RDP. Results showed NFC type, RDP level, and their interaction affected ruminal fermentation and microbial growth, and under sufficient ruminal degradable N pectin had greater advantage in microbial N synthesis than starch in vitro.

  11. System and method for preparing near-surface heavy oil for extraction using microbial degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busche, Frederick D.; Rollins, John B.; Noyes, Harold J.; Bush, James G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method for enhancing the recovery of heavy oil in an oil extraction environment by feeding nutrients to a preferred microbial species (bacteria and/or fungi). A method is described that includes the steps of: sampling and identifying microbial species that reside in the oil extraction environment; collecting fluid property data from the oil extraction environment; collecting nutrient data from the oil extraction environment; identifying a preferred microbial species from the oil extraction environment that can transform the heavy oil into a lighter oil; identifying a nutrient from the oil extraction environment that promotes a proliferation of the preferred microbial species; and introducing the nutrient into the oil extraction environment.

  12. 复合菌剂对白酒丢糟高温好氧堆肥的影响%Effects of Complex Microbial Inoculants on High-temperature Aerobic Composting of Waste Spent Grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王和玉; 江友峰; 胡旭; 袁颉; 汪地强; 王莉; 王岩; 郭夏丽

    2015-01-01

    将具有高效纤维素降解能力和氨化作用的复合菌剂接种到以白酒丢糟为主要原料的堆肥中,通过测定堆积发酵过程各种发酵参数和成分变化,以研究复合菌剂对白酒丢糟高温好氧堆肥的影响。结果表明,在堆肥过程中,接菌堆体比对照(CK)提前2 d进入高温期,且高温期持续时间较对照长。堆肥结束,接菌堆体NH4+-N含量和总氮损失率分别比CK低28.3%、4.1%,而NO3--N含量、有机氮和总氮含量分别比CK高出22.2%、6.6%和7.9%。接菌处理的纤维素降解率、腐殖化指数(HI)和发芽指数(GI)分别比CK高18.7%、113.5%和8.6%。复合菌剂的添加促进了白酒丢糟堆肥化的进行,有效地提高了有机肥的品质。%In the experiments, complex microbial inoculants made up of ammonifying bacteria and cellulose degradation fungi were applied in compost (mainly composed of waste spent grains). The effects of complex microbial inoculants on high-temperature aerobic composting of waste spent grains were investigated by the measurement of the fermenting parameter of the composts. The results showed that, in the process of composting, a faster increase of temperature in the compost with inoculants (53.5 ℃in 5 days) than in CK pile without inoculants (50 ℃in 7 days) was observed;at the end of composting, the content of NH4+-N and nitrogen loss in inoculants group was 28.3%and 4.1%lower than that in CK group, but the content of NO3--N, Org-N and TN in inoculants group were 22.2%, 6.6%, and 7.9%higher than that in CK group;cellulose degradation rate in inoculants group increased by 18.7%compared with that in CK group, in addition, humification index and germi-nation index in inoculants group were 113.5%and 8.6%higher than that in CK group. In conclusion, the addition of complex microbial inocu-lants could accelerate the composting of waste spent grains and improve the quality of organic fertilizer.

  13. Research Progress on Microbial Degradation of Degradable Plastics%可降解塑料的微生物降解研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛海龙; 白俊岩; 姜虎生; 王战勇

    2014-01-01

    With the widespread using of plastic materials,plastics have caused huge environmental pollution and pressure of waste disposal. Using biodegradation plastics to replace traditional plastics is one of the most important ways to solve the problem. Biodegradation of degradable plastics is completed by microorganisms and their degrading enzymes. This article provides an overview of current research on microbial degradation and makes certain that the im-portance of microorganisms in biodegradable plastics degradation.%塑料材料的广泛使用给环境带了巨大的污染和处理压力,使用可降解塑料替代传统塑料是解决这一问题的重要途径。可降解塑料的生物降解是由相应的微生物和降解酶来完成的。综述了目前常见的生物降解塑料的微生物降解研究和进展情况,明确了微生物在可降解塑料生物降解中的重要性。

  14. Two-stage anaerobic and post-aerobic mesophilic digestion of sewage sludge: Analysis of process performance and hygienization potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Levantesi, Caterina

    2016-03-01

    Sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion has been demonstrated to be effective for enhanced sludge stabilization, in terms of increased solid reduction and improvement of sludge dewaterability. In this study, we propose a modified version of the sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion process by operating the aerobic step under mesophilic conditions (T=37 °C), in order to improve the aerobic degradation kinetics of soluble and particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD). Process performance has been assessed in terms of "classical parameters" such as volatile solids (VS) removal, biogas production, COD removal, nitrogen species, and polysaccharide and protein fate. The aerobic step was operated under intermittent aeration to achieve nitrogen removal. Aerobic mesophilic conditions consistently increased VS removal, providing 32% additional removal vs. 20% at 20 °C. Similar results were obtained for nitrogen removal, increasing from 64% up to 99% at the higher temperature. Improved sludge dewaterability was also observed with a capillary suction time decrease of ~50% during the mesophilic aerobic step. This finding may be attributable to the decreased protein content in the aerobic digested sludge. The post-aerobic digestion exerted a positive effect on the reduction of microbial indicators while no consistent improvement of hygienization related to the increased temperature was observed. The techno-economic analysis of the proposed digestion layout showed a net cost saving for sludge disposal estimated in the range of 28-35% in comparison to the single-phase anaerobic digestion.

  15. Effects of Different Types of Sludge on Soil Microbial Properties: A Field Experiment on Degraded Mediterranean Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.TARRAS(O)N; G.OJEDA; O.ORTIZ; J.M.ALCA(N)IZ

    2010-01-01

    T The recycling of suitable organic wastes can enhance soil fertility via effects on soil physical, chemical and biological properties. To compare the effects of digested (DS), thermally dried (TDS) and composted dewatered (CDS) sewage sludge on soil microbiological properties, an experiment was conducted at field sites for more than one year (401 d) when applied to two Mediterranean degraded soils (loam and loamy sand soils). All three types of sewage sludge had a significant effect on measured parameters. In a short time, the plots of both loamy sand and loam soils amended with TDS showed the highest microbial basal respiration (loam soil: P < 0.01; loamy sand soil: P < 0.001) and carbon mineralization coefficient (loam soil: P < 0.01; loamy sand soil: P < 0.001). Furthermore, on loamy sand soil, the plots amended with TDS showed the highest microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) (P < 0.05). This study revealed that the addition of sludge caused transient non-equilibrium effects on almost all soil microbial properties. However, there were no differences one year later because the remaining organic carbon was stable and quite similar in all treatments. These results may have practical implications for the rehabilitation of degraded soils.

  16. Metataxonomic profiling and prediction of functional behaviour of wheat straw degrading microbial consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez Avella, Diego; Dini Andreote, Francisco; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mixed microbial cultures, in which bacteria and fungi interact, have been proposed as an efficient way to deconstruct plant waste. The characterization of specific microbial consortia could be the starting point for novel biotechnological applications related to the efficient conversion

  17. DDE remediation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John E; Ou, Li-Tse; All-Agely, Abid

    2008-01-01

    DDT and its metabolites, DDD and DDE, have been shown to be recalcitrant to degradation. The parent compound, DDT, was used extensively worldwide starting in 1939 and was banned in the United States in 1973. The daughter compound, DDE, may result from aerobic degradation, abiotic dehydrochlorination, or photochemical decomposition. DDE has also occurred as a contaminant in commercial-grade DDT. The p,p'-DDE isomer is more biologically active than the o,p-DDE, with a reported half-life of -5.7 years. However, when DDT was repeatedly applied to the soil, the DDE concentration may remain unchanged for more than 20 yr. Remediation of DDE-contaminated soil and water may be done by several techniques. Phytoremediation involves translocating DDT, DDD, and DDE from the soil into the plant, although some aquatic species (duckweed > elodea > parrot feather) can transform DDT into predominantly DDD with some DDE being formed. Of all the plants that can uptake DDE, Cucurbita pepo has been the most extensively studied, with translocation values approaching "hyperaccumulation" levels. Soil moisture, temperature, and plant density have all been documented as important factors in the uptake of DDE by Cucurbita pepo. Uptake may also be influenced positively by amendments such as biosurfactants, mycorrhizal inoculants, and low molecular weight organic acids (e.g., citric and oxalic acids). DDE microbial degradation by dehalogenases, dioxygenases, and hydrolases occurs under the proper conditions. Although several aerobic degradation pathways have been proposed, none has been fully verified. Very few aerobic pure cultures are capable of fully degrading DDE to CO2. Cometabolism of DDE by Pseudomonas sp., Alicaligens sp., and Terrabacter sp. grown on biphenyl has been reported; however, not all bacterial species that produce biphenyl dioxygenase degraded DDE. Arsenic and copper inhibit DDE degradation by aerobic microorganisms. Similarly, metal chelates such as EDTA inhibit the

  18. Identification of Comamonas testosteroni as an androgen degrader in sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lung; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fu-Chun; Ismail, Wael; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Shih, Chao-Jen; Wu, Yu-Ching; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported the masculinization of freshwater wildlife exposed to androgens in polluted rivers. Microbial degradation is a crucial mechanism for eliminating steroid hormones from contaminated ecosystems. The aerobic degradation of testosterone was observed in various bacterial isolates. However, the ecophysiological relevance of androgen-degrading microorganisms in the environment is unclear. Here, we investigated the biochemical mechanisms and corresponding microorganisms of androgen degradation in aerobic sewage. Sewage samples collected from the Dihua Sewage Treatment Plant (Taipei, Taiwan) were aerobically incubated with testosterone (1 mM). Androgen metabolite analysis revealed that bacteria adopt the 9, 10-seco pathway to degrade testosterone. A metagenomic analysis indicated the apparent enrichment of Comamonas spp. (mainly C. testosteroni) and Pseudomonas spp. in sewage incubated with testosterone. We used the degenerate primers derived from the meta-cleavage dioxygenase gene (tesB) of various proteobacteria to track this essential catabolic gene in the sewage. The amplified sequences showed the highest similarity (87–96%) to tesB of C. testosteroni. Using quantitative PCR, we detected a remarkable increase of the 16S rRNA and catabolic genes of C. testosteroni in the testosterone-treated sewage. Together, our data suggest that C. testosteroni, the model microorganism for aerobic testosterone degradation, plays a role in androgen biodegradation in aerobic sewage. PMID:27734937

  19. Variable effects of labile carbon on the carbon use of different microbial groups in black slate degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Anne-Gret; Trumbore, Susan; Xu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dachung; Kothe, Erika; Gleixner, Gerd

    2011-05-01

    Weathering of ancient organic matter contributes significantly to biogeochemical carbon cycles over geological times. The principle role of microorganisms in this process is well recognized. However, information is lacking on the contribution of individual groups of microorganisms and on the effect of labile carbon sources to the degradation process. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the degradation process using a column experiment. Investigations were performed on low metamorphic black slates. All columns contained freshly crushed, sieved (0.63-2 mm), not autoclaved black slates. Two columns were inoculated with the lignite-degrading fungus Schizophyllum commune and received a culture medium containing 13C labeled glucose, two columns received only this culture medium and two control columns received only water. The total mass balance was calculated from all carbon added to the slate and the CO 2 and DOC losses. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were extracted to investigate microbial communities. We used both the compound specific 14C and 13C signal of the PLFA to quantify carbon uptake from black slates and the glucose of the culture medium, respectively. The total carbon loss in these columns exceeded the amount of added carbon by approximately 60%, indicating that black slate carbon has been used. PLFA associated with Gram-positive bacteria dominated the indigenous community and took up 22% of carbon from black slate carbon, whereas PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria used only 8% of carbon from the slates. PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi were both mostly activated by the glucose addition. The added Schizophyllum did not establish well in the columns and was overgrown by the indigenous microbial community. Our results suggest that especially Gram-positive bacteria are able to live on and degrade black slate material. They also benefit from easy degradable carbon from the nutrient broth. In

  20. Degradation of Cry1Ab Protein Within Transgenic Bt Maize Tissue by Composite Microbial System of MC1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Yao; Gu Wan-rong; Ye Le-fu; Chen Dong-sheng; Li Jing; Wei Shi

    2014-01-01

    Environmental safety issues involved in transgenic plants have become the concern of researchers, practitioners and policy makers in recent years. Potential differences between Bt maize (ND1324 and ND2353 expressing the insecticidal Cry1Ab protein) and near-isogenic non-Bt varieties (ND1392 and ND223) in their influence on the composite microbial system of MC1 during the fermentation process were studied during 2011-2012. Cry1Ab protein in Bt maize residues didn't affect characteristics of lignocellulose degradation by MC1, pH of fermentation broth decreasing at initial stage and increasing at later stage of degradation. The quality of various volatile products in fermentation broth showed that no significant difference of residues fermentation existed between Bt maize and non-Bt maize. During the fermentation MC1 efficiently degraded maize residues by 83%-88%, and cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin content decreased by 70%-72%, 72%-75% and 30%-37%, respectively. Besides that, no consistent difference was found between Bt and non-Bt maize residues lignocellulose degradation by MC1 during the fermentation process. MC1 degraded 88%-89% Cry1Ab protein in Bt maize residues, and in the fermentation broth of MC1 and bacteria of MC1 Cry1Ab protein was not detected. DGGE profile analyses revealed that the microbial community drastically changed during 1-3 days and became stable until the 9th day. Though the dominant strains at different fermentation stages had significantly changed, no difference on the dominant strains was observed between Bt and non-Bt maize at different stages. Our study indicated that Cry1Ab protein did not influence the growth characteristic of MC1.

  1. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) in fluidized bed reactor by microbial consortia in different support materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Lorena Lima; Costa, Rachel Biancalana; Okada, Dagoberto Yukio; Vich, Daniele Vital; Duarte, Iolanda Cristina Silveira; Silva, Edson Luiz; Varesche, Maria Bernadete Amâncio

    2010-07-01

    Four anaerobic fluidized bed reactors filled with activated carbon (R1), expanded clay (R2), glass beads (R3) and sand (R4) were tested for anaerobic degradation of LAS. All reactors were inoculated with sludge from a UASB reactor treating swine wastewater and were fed with a synthetic substrate supplemented with approximately 20 mg l(-1) of LAS, on average. To 560 mg l(-1) COD influent, the maximum COD and LAS removal efficiencies were mean values of 97+/-2% and 99+/-2%, respectively, to all reactors demonstrating the potential applicability of this reactor configuration for treating LAS. The reactors were kept at 30 degrees C and operated with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 18h. The use of glass beads and sand appear attractive because they favor the development of biofilms capable of supporting LAS degradation. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of samples from reactors R3 and R4 revealed that these reactors gave rise to broad microbial diversity, with microorganisms belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, indicating the role of microbial consortia in degrading the surfactant LAS.

  2. Alkanindiges illinoisensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately hydrocarbonoclastic, aerobic squalane-degrading bacterium isolated from oilfield soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Bill W; Sullivan, Wendy R; Kayser, Kevin J; Derr, K D; Aldrich, Henry C; Paterek, J Robert

    2003-09-01

    An alkane-degrading bacterium, designated GTI MVAB Hex1(T), was isolated from chronically crude oil-contaminated soil from an oilfield in southern Illinois. The isolate grew very weakly or not at all in minimal or rich media without hydrocarbons. Straight-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and heptadecane, greatly stimulated growth; shorter-chain (squalane. The latter of these was most intriguing, as catabolism of squalane has hitherto been reported only for Mycobacterium species. Although unable to utilize mono- or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as sole carbon sources, the isolate did show slight fluorene-mineralizing capability in Luria-Bertani medium, which was partially repressed by hexadecane. In contrast, hexadecane supplementation greatly increased mineralization of (14)C-dodecane, which was not a growth substrate. Further testing emphasized the isolate's extremely narrow substrate range, as only Tween 40 and Tween 80 supported significant growth. Microscopic examination (by scanning and transmission electron microscopy) revealed a slightly polymorphic coccoidal to bacillar morphology, with hydrocarbon-grown cells tending to be more elongated. When grown with hexadecane, GTI MVAB Hex1(T) accumulated a large number of electron-transparent intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies. These were also prevalent during growth in the presence of squalane. Smaller inclusion bodies were observed occasionally with pristane supplementation; they were, however, absent during growth on crude oil. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence data and range of growth substrates, classification of this isolate as the type strain of Alkanindiges illinoisensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed, which is most closely related (approx. 94 % sequence similarity) to Acinetobacter junii.

  3. Assessment of the effects of microbially influenced degradation on a massive concrete structure. Final report, Report 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D. [Biodegradation Systems, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-07-08

    There is a need to estimate the effect of environmental conditions on construction materials to be used in the repository at Yucca Mountain. Previous reports from this project have demonstrated that it is important to develop an understanding of microbially influenced degradation (MID) development and its influence on massive concrete structures. Further, it has been shown that the most effective way to obtain quantitative data on the effects of MID on the structural integrity of repository concrete is to study manmade, analog structures known to be susceptible to MID. The cooling tower shell located at the Ohaaki Power Station near Wairakei, New Zealand is such a structure.

  4. Quantitative Molecular Assay for Fingerprinting Microbial Communities of Wastewater and Estrogen-Degrading Consortia

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chang-Ping; Ahuja, Rajiv; Sayler, Gary; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative fingerprinting method, called the real-time terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (real-time-t-RFLP) assay, was developed for simultaneous determination of microbial diversity and abundance within a complex community. The real-time-t-RFLP assay was developed by incorporating the quantitative feature of real-time PCR and the fingerprinting feature of t-RFLP analysis. The assay was validated by using a model microbial community containing three pure strains, an Escher...

  5. [Infrared Spectrum Studies of Hydrocarbon Generation and Structure Evolution of Peat Samples During Pyrolysis and Microbial Degradation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuan; Ju, Yi-wen; Wei, Chong-tao; Wang, Chao-yong; Li, Xiao-shi

    2015-03-01

    Hydrocarbon generation and structural evolution would be occurred in the process of from coal-forming material (i. e. peat sample) transforming to the coal. While Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) have a special advantages in analyzing molecular structure of samples. For understanding the characteristics of hydrocarbon generation and structural evolution of coal-forming material during the process of pyrolysis and microbial degradation, based on the physical simulation experiments of closed pyrolysis and anaerobic microbial degradation, the generation potential of thermogenic gas and biogenic gas were studied in this paper, and characteristics of molecular structure evolution and its mechanism was analyzed by FTIR technology. Results show that cumulative gas yields of hydrocarbon gases (mainly for methane) increased with experiment temperature. The gas yield of non-hydrocarbon gas (mainly for CO2) exhibited two peaks at 250 and 375 degrees C. The degradation ability of anaerobe on coal samples weakened with the maturity increasing and there was no gas generation on the pyrolysis samples with maturity from 1.6% to 1.8%. After pyrolysis, the content of hydroxyl in peat sample decreased first and then increased with the pyrolysis temperature increasing. The content of aldehyde carbonyl, methylene and phosphate reduced. The content of aromatic esters decreased with nonlinear. The bone of S-O in stretching vibration appeared after 350 degrees C and its content increased with temperature. This shows that the sulfocompound restrains the activity of methanogenic bacteria. After degradation by anaerobe, the relative content of hydroxyl, aldehyde carbonyl, aromatic esters, methylene and phosphate in peat sample dropped significantly. It is shown that the intermolecular force between these groups weakened.

  6. Impact of soil matric potential on the fine-scale spatial distribution and activity of specific microbial degrader communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monard, Cécile; Mchergui, Chokri; Nunan, Naoise; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Vieublé-Gonod, Laure

    2012-09-01

    The impact of the soil matric potential on the relationship between the relative abundance of degraders and their activity and on the spatial distribution of both at fine scales was determined to understand the role of environmental conditions in the degradation of organic substrates. The mineralization of (13) C-glucose and (13) C-2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was measured at different matric potentials (-0.001, -0.01 and -0.316 MPa) in 6 × 6 × 6 mm(3) cubes excised from soil cores. At the end of the incubation, total bacterial and 2,4-D degrader abundances were determined by quantifying the 16S rRNA and the tfdA genes, respectively. The mineralization of 2,4-D was more sensitive to changes in matric potential than was that of glucose. The amount and spatial structure of 2,4-D mineralization decreased with matric potential, whilst the spatial variability increased. On the other hand, the spatial variation of glucose mineralization was less affected by changes in matric potential. The relationship between the relative abundance of 2,4-D degraders and 2,4-D mineralization was significantly affected by matric potential: the relative abundance of tfdA needed to be higher to reach a given level of 2,4-D mineralization in dryer than in moister conditions. The data show how microbial interactions with their microhabitat can have an impact on soil processes at larger scales.

  7. Characterization of methane production and microbial community shifts during waste activated sludge degradation in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Zhou, Aijuan; Jia, Jianna; Liang, Qing; Liu, Qian; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nanqi

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cell (MECs) were investigated as a promising technology to manage waste activated sludge (WAS) reduction and bio-methane generation. The effect of WAS concentration on the MECs performance was discussed. At the optimal concentration of 15gCOD/L, maximum methane yield of MECs fed with alkaline pretreated WAS (A-WAS) were achieved with the value of 77.13±2.52LCH4/kg-COD on Day 3, which had been improved by 1.5-fold compared with MECs fed with raw WAS (R-WAS), while that was negligible in open circuit controls. Efficient sludge reduction was also obtained in terms of TCOD, total protein, TSS and VSS removal. Pyrosequencing revealed the dominance of exoelectrogen Geobacter and hydrogen-producing bacteria Petrimonas in MECs fed with WAS. Methanocorpusculum with the capacity of methane generation using CO2 and H2 also showed overwhelming dominance (96.01%). The large proportions of Petrimonas and Methanocorpusculum indicated the occurrence of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis in our methane-producing MECs.

  8. Microbial surfactant mediated degradation of anthracene in aqueous phase by marine Bacillus licheniformis MTCC 5514

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreethar Swaathy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study emphasizes the biosurfactant mediated anthracene degradation by a marine alkaliphile Bacillus licheniformis (MTCC 5514. The isolate, MTCC 5514 degraded >95% of 300 ppm anthracene in an aqueous medium within 22 days and the degradation percentage reduced significantly when the concentration of anthracene increased to above 500 ppm. Naphthalene, naphthalene 2-methyl, phthalic acid and benzene acetic acid are the products of degradation identified based on thin layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography and mass analyses. It has been observed that the degradation is initiated by the biosurfactant of the isolate for solubilization through micellation and then the alkali pH and intra/extra cellular degradative enzymes accomplish the degradation process. Encoding of genes responsible for biosurfactant production (licA3 as well as catabolic reactions (C23O made with suitable primers designed. The study concludes in situ production of biosurfactant mediates the degradation of anthracene by B. licheniformis.

  9. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by aerobic bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, Resmi C; Abraham, T Emilia

    2004-08-01

    An aerobic bacterial consortium consisting of two isolated strains (BF1, BF2) and a strain of Pseudomonas putida (MTCC1194) was developed for the aerobic degradation of a mixture of textile azodyes and individual azodyes at alkaline pH (9-10.5) and salinity (0.9-3.68 g/l) at ambient temperature (28 +/- 2 degrees C). The degradation efficiency of the strains in different media (mineral media and in the Simulated textile effluent (STE)) and at different dye concentrations were studied. The presence of a H2O2 independent oxidase-laccase (26.5 IU/ml) was found in the culture filtrate of the organism BF2. The analysis of the degraded products by TLC and HPLC, after the microbial treatment of the dyes showed the absence of amines and the presence of low molecular weight oxidative degradation products. The enzymes present in the crude supernatant was found to be reusable for the dye degradation.

  10. Effects of ZnO nanoparticle exposure on wastewater treatment and soluble microbial products (SMPs) in an anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong Qing; Eng, Chin Yee; Stuckey, David C; Zhou, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on the performance of an anoxic-aerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR), and the characterization of the soluble microbial products (SMPs) produced in the presence of ZnO NPs was evaluated. Continuous operation over 144 days showed that ZnO NPs at concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L exerted a negative impact on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen removal, although ZnO NPs were efficiently removed in the MBR (>92%). 10 and 50 mg/L ZnO NPs decreased COD removal substantially from 93.1± 0.6% to 90.1± 0.8% (ZnO NPs, the decreased in NH4N removal was 8.1% and 21.1%, respectively. Exposure to 1, 10 and 50 mg/L ZnO NPs increased SMP concentrations by 12.8%, 42.4% and 51.5%, respecti. High performance size exclusion chromatograph (HP-SEC) analysis revealed that the presence of ZnO NPs caused a significant increase in high-molecular weight (MW) (583 kDa) SMPs at 1 and 10 mg/L ZnO NP concentration. A substantial decrease in the concentration of high-MW compounds in the MBR effluent was observed at the end of the experiment. Excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence contours revealed that SMPs were dominated by amino acid-, tryptophan protein-, polyaromatic-, and polycarboxylate-type substances. The presence of ZnO NPs enhanced the production of amino acid-like (7.5-25.1%) and tryptophan protein-like compounds (31.7-38.1%), compared to the control (6.0-20.2% for amino acid-like compounds; and 28.5-36.7% for tryptophan protein-like compounds). In contrast, the fulvic and humic acid-like compounds decreased with exposure to ZnO NPs. This work may help better understanding the effect of nanoparticle exposure on wastewater treatment performance and SMP characteristics.

  11. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, N.; Aamand, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we criti...

  12. Linkages between benthic microbial and feshwater insect communities in degraded peatland ditches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whatley, M.H.; van Loon, E.E.; Cerli, C.; Vonk, J.A.; van der Geest, H.G.; Admiraal, W.

    2014-01-01

    Many wetlands are heavily modified and identifying the environmental drivers of indicator groups like aquatic insects is complicated by multiple stressors and co-varying environmental factors. Yet, incorporating data from other biological groups, such as microbial communities, potentially reveals wh

  13. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 g yr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 g m-2 yr-1 (1.45 x 10-3 and 1.51 x 10-3 gal. ft.-2 yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  14. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, Matthew A.; Baehr, Arthur L.

    1996-07-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 gyr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 gm-2yr-1 (1.45×10-3 and 1.51×10-3 gal.ft.-2yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  15. Identification of Metabolic Intermediates in Microbial Degradation of Chrysene by Armillaria sp. F022

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hadibarata

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To degrade chrysene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, Armillaria sp. F022, a fungus collected from a soil, was used. Maximal degradation (77% was obtained when Armillaria sp. F022 was incubated in cultures agitated at 120 rpm for 30 days, as compared to just 41% degradation in stationary culture. Furthermore, the degradation of chrysene was affected by the addition of surfactants. The mechanism of degradation was determined through identification of the intermediates. Several enzymes (manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, laccase, 1,2-dioxygenase and 2,3-dioxygenase produced by Armillaria sp. F022 were detected in the culture. The highest level of activity was shown by 1,2-dioxygenase after 20 days (143.6 U l-1. Theseligninolytic and dioxygenase enzymes played an important role in the oxidation of chrysene. Chrysene was indeed degraded by Armillaria sp. F022 through several intermediates, chrysenequinone, 2-((1E,3E-4-carboxy-3-hydroxybuta-1,3-dien-1-yl-1-naphthoic acid , 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, and gentisic acid.Keywords : Biodegradation, Chrysene, Metabolites, Armillaria sp. F022

  16. Microbial 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene degradation: could we learn from (bio)chemistry for bioremediation and vice versa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenuit, Ben A; Agathos, Spiros N

    2010-11-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is released in nature from manufacturing or demilitarization facilities but also after munitions firing/detonation or leakage from explosive remnants of war. Due to its toxicity and recalcitrance, life cycle of TNT-containing products and bioremediation are critical issues. As TNT is a strongly electron-deficient aromatic with a positive molecular quadrupole moment and three electrophilic nitro groups, its environmental fate is contingent upon specific sorptive electron donor-acceptor interactions and nucleophilic, reductive (bio)transformations. The microbial degradation of TNT is governed by cometabolism and therefore depends on the growth substrate(s) available in contaminated environments. Long considered an ecotoxicological safety endpoint, the immobilization of TNT metabolites derived from nitro moiety reduction in soil is controversial because they preferentially bind to the dissolved soil organic matter which can be released into surface and groundwaters. The ever-growing biochemical knowledge of TNT degradation has made bioaugmentation and phytoremediation attractive alternatives. While the discovery and engineering of microorganisms with novel/improved degradative abilities are very challenging, the deciphering of the physiological roles of promiscuous enzymes involved in TNT biodegradation, such as type II hydride transferases of the Old Yellow Enzyme family, opens new perspectives for bioremediation. Finally, transgenic plants have enabled effective phytoremediation at the field scale, which is emerging as the preferable in situ option to rehabilitate TNT-contaminated sites.

  17. Bioprospecting metagenomics of a microbial community on cotton degradation: Mining for new glycoside hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoxiu; Liu, Pei; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Wei; Wang, Xuedong; Wei, Dongzhi; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-20

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHases) of higher performance are immediately needed for efficient degradation of plant biomass into fermentable sugars in industrial processes. The current study represents functional characterization of the enzymatic repertoire involved in crude cotton biomass degradation. Physical contact between cells and substrate is necessary for efficient hydrolysis of cellulose. Cytophagales, which plays a major role in cotton biomass decomposition, was identified as a prevalent community member by 16S rRNA analysis. From the metagenome data, 2058 GHase homologs were identified, of which sixteen were successfully expressed in E. coli. Four enzymes showed activities on p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside, four showed activities on p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside, two had activities against p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucuronide, one showed activity on laminarin, three had activities against p-nitrophenyl-N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminide, one had activity towards carboxymethyl cellulose, and one towards p-nitrophenyl-β-d-mannopyranoside. Metagenomics provides a good resource for mining novel biomass degrading enzymes. The sixteen GHases that were cloned may have potential application for biomass conversion and bioproduct production. Functional characterization of the enzymatic repertoire in cotton biomass degradation and analysis of the GHases provide insight into the composition and interaction of enzymes and pathways of plant biomass degradation.

  18. Microbial degradation of pesticides in rapid sand filters for treatment of drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    to remove pesticides from the water phase and pesticides are detected in 24% of the active Danish waterworks wells. This study aimed at investigating the potential of microbial pesticide removal in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment. Removal of the pesticides MCPP, bentazone, glyphosate...... of pesticides in the water decreased – MCPP decreased to 42-85%, bentazone to 15-35%, glyphosate to 7-14% and p-nitrophenol 1-3% – from the initial concentration over a period of 6-13 days. The largest microbial removal was observed at Sjælsø waterworks Plant II, where the pesticides were partially mineralised......In Denmark drinking water supply is based on groundwater which is treated by aeration followed by filtration in rapid sand filters. Unfortunately pesticide contamination of the groundwater poses a threat to the water supply, since the simple treatment process at the waterworks is not considered...

  19. Rapid Evaluation of Power Degradation in Series Connection of Single Feeding Microsized Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-07-08

    We have developed a sustainable, single feeding, microsized, air-cathode and membrane-free microbial fuel cells with a volume of 40 mu L each, which we have used for rapid evaluation of power generation and viability of a series array of three cells seeking higher voltage levels. Contrary to expectations, the achieved power density was modest (45 mWm(-3)), limited due to non-uniformities in assembly and the single-channel feeding system.

  20. Assessment of microbial populations in methyl ethyl ketone degrading biofilters by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Moe, W M

    2004-05-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified genes coding for 16S rRNA was used to assess differences in bacterial community structure as a function of spatial location along the height of two biofilters used to treat a model waste gas stream containing methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). One of the laboratory-scale biofilters was operated as a conventional continuous-flow biofilter (CFB) and the other was operated as a sequencing batch biofilter (SBB). Both biofilters, inoculated with an identical starting culture and operated over a period lasting more than 300 days, received the same influent MEK concentration and same mass of MEK on a daily basis. The systems differed, however, in terms of the fraction of time during which contaminated air was supplied and the overall operating strategy employed. DGGE analysis indicated that microbial community structures differed as a function of height in each of the biofilters. The DGGE banding patterns also differed between the two biofilters, suggesting that operating strategies imposed on the biofilters imparted a sufficiently large selective pressure to influence microbial community structures. This may explain, in part, the superior performance of the SBB over the CFB during model transient loading conditions, and it may open new possibilities for purposely manipulating the microbial populations in biofilters treating gas-phase contaminants in a manner that leads to more favorable treatment performance.

  1. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, J A; Alexander, M; Zika, R G

    1989-11-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of [2-C]glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A(330). Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid.

  2. Current Status on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Microbial Degradation of Nicotine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Gurusamy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation is one of the most promising methods to clean up polluted environments using highly efficient potent microbes. Microbes with specific enzymes and biochemical pathways are capable of degrading the tobacco alkaloids including highly toxic heterocyclic compound, nicotine. After the metabolic conversion, these nicotinophilic microbes use nicotine as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source for their growth. Various nicotine degradation pathways such as demethylation pathway in fungi, pyridine pathway in Gram-positive bacteria, pyrrolidine pathway, and variant of pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways in Gram-negative bacteria have been reported. In this review, we discussed the nicotine-degrading pathways of microbes and their enzymes and biotechnological applications of nicotine intermediate metabolites.

  3. Isothermal titration calorimetry - a new method for the quantification of microbial degradation of trace pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana, F; Buchholz, F; Harms, H; Yong, Z; Yao, J; Maskow, T

    2010-07-01

    The environmental fate and, in particular, biodegradation rates of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC) are of high interest due to the ubiquity, persistence, and potential health effects of these compounds. HOC tend to interact with bioreactor materials and sampling devices and are frequently volatile, so that conventionally derived degradation parameters are often biased. We report on the development and validation of a novel calorimetric approach that serves to gain real time information on the kinetics and the physiology of HOC bioconversion in aqueous systems while overcoming weaknesses of conventional biodegradation experiments. Soil bacteria Mycobacterium frederiksbergense LB501T, Rhodococcus erythropolis K2-3 and Pseudomonas putida G7 were exposed to pulsed titrations of dissolved anthracene, 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)butyric acid or naphthalene, respectively, and the thermal responses were monitored. The combinations of strains and pollutants were selected as examples for complete and partial biodegradation and complete degradation with storage product formation, respectively. Heat production signals were interpreted thermodynamically and in terms of Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The half-saturation constant k(D) and the degradation rate r(D)(Max) were derived. Comparison with conventional methods shows the suitability to extract kinetic degradation parameters of organic trace pollutants from simple ITC experiments, while thermodynamic interpretation provided further information about the metabolic fate of HOC compounds.

  4. Does microbial cm-scale heterogeneity impact pesticide degradation in and leaching from loamy agricultural soils?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Binning, Philip John; Aamand, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    The potential for pesticide degradation varies greatly at the cm-scale in agricultural soil. Three dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate how such small-scale spatial heterogeneity may affect the leaching of the biodegradable pesticide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MC...

  5. Simulating microbial degradation of organic matter in a simple porous system using the 3-D diffusion based model MOSAIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monga, O.; Garnier, P.; Pot, V.; Coucheney, E.; Nunan, N.; Otten, W.; Chenu, C.

    2013-10-01

    This paper deals with the simulation of microbial degradation in soil within pore space at microscopic scale. Pore space was described using sphere network coming from a geometrical modeling algorithm. The biological model was improved regarding previous work in order to include transformation of dissolved organic compounds and diffusion processes. Our model was tested using experimental results of a simple substrate decomposition (Fructose) within a simple media (the sand). Diverse microbial communities were inoculated. Separated incubations in microcosms were carried out using 5 different bacterial communities at 2 different water potentials of -10 cm and -100 cm of water. We calibrated the biological parameters by means of experimental data obtained at high water content and we tested the model without any parameters change at low water content. Same as for experimental data, our simulation results showed the decrease in water content involved the decrease of mineralisation. The model was able to simulate the decrease of connectivity between substrate and microorganism due the decrease of water content.

  6. Metagenome reveals potential microbial degradation of hydrocarbon coupled with sulfate reduction in an oil-immersed chimney from Guaymas Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eHe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys contain a high diversity of microorganisms, yet the metabolic activity and the ecological functions of the microbial communities remain largely unexplored. In this study, a metagenomic approach was applied to characterize the metabolic potential in a Guaymas hydrothermal vent chimney and to conduct comparative genomic analysis among a variety of environments with sequenced metagenomes. Complete clustering of functional gene categories with a comparative metagenomic approach showed that this Guaymas chimney metagenome was clustered most closely with a chimney metagenome from Juan de Fuca. All chimney samples were enriched with genes involved in recombination and repair, chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, highlighting their roles in coping with the fluctuating extreme deep-sea environments. A high proportion of transposases was observed in all the metagenomes from deep-sea chimneys, supporting the previous hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer may be common in the deep-sea vent chimney biosphere. In the Guaymas chimney metagenome, thermophilic sulfate reducing microorganisms including bacteria and archaea were found predominant, and genes coding for the degradation of refractory organic compounds such as cellulose, lipid, pullullan, as well as a few hydrocarbons including toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene were identified. Therefore, this oil-immersed chimney supported a thermophilic microbial community capable of oxidizing a range of hydrocarbons that served as electron donors for sulphate reduction under anaerobic conditions.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and microbial community shifts during co-composting of creosote-treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covino, Stefano; Fabianová, Tereza; Křesinová, Zdena; Čvančarová, Monika; Burianová, Eva; Filipová, Alena; Vořísková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    The feasibility of decontaminating creosote-treated wood (CTW) by co-composting with agricultural wastes was investigated using two bulking agents, grass cuttings (GC) and broiler litter (BL), each employed at a 1:1 ratio with the matrix. The initial concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in CTW (26,500 mg kg(-1)) was reduced to 3 and 19% after 240 d in GC and BL compost, respectively. PAH degradation exceeded the predicted bioaccesible threshold, estimated through sequential supercritical CO2 extraction, together with significant detoxification, assessed by contact tests using Vibrio fisheri and Hordeum vulgare. GC composting was characterized by high microbial biomass growth in the early phases, as suggested by phospholipid fatty acid analyses. Based on the 454-pyrosequencing results, fungi (mostly Saccharomycetales) constituted an important portion of the microbial community, and bacteria were characterized by rapid shifts (from Firmicutes (Bacilli) and Actinobacteria to Proteobacteria). However, during BL composting, larger amounts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic PLFA markers were observed during the cooling and maturation phases, which were dominated by Proteobacteria and fungi belonging to the Ascomycota and those putatively related to the Glomeromycota. This work reports the first in-depth analysis of the chemical and microbiological processes that occur during the co-composting of a PAH-contaminated matrix.

  8. Microbial oil-degradation under mild hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa): which pathways are impacted in piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria?

    KAUST Repository

    Scoma, Alberto

    2016-03-29

    Oil spills represent an overwhelming carbon input to the marine environment that immediately impacts the sea surface ecosystem. Microbial communities degrading the oil fraction that eventually sinks to the seafloor must also deal with hydrostatic pressure, which linearly increases with depth. Piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are ideal candidates to elucidate impaired pathways following oil spills at low depth. In the present paper, we tested two strains of the ubiquitous Alcanivorax genus, namely A. jadensis KS_339 and A. dieselolei KS_293, which is known to rapidly grow after oil spills. Strains were subjected to atmospheric and mild pressure (0.1, 5 and 10 MPa, corresponding to a depth of 0, 500 and 1000 m, respectively) providing n-dodecane as sole carbon source. Pressures equal to 5 and 10 MPa significantly lowered growth yields of both strains. However, in strain KS_293 grown at 10 MPa CO2 production per cell was not affected, cell integrity was preserved and PO43− uptake increased. Analysis of its transcriptome revealed that 95% of its genes were downregulated. Increased transcription involved protein synthesis, energy generation and respiration pathways. Interplay between these factors may play a key role in shaping the structure of microbial communities developed after oil spills at low depth and limit their bioremediation potential.

  9. Simulating microbial degradation of organic matter in a simple porous system using the 3-D diffusion based model MOSAIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Monga

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the simulation of microbial degradation in soil within pore space at microscopic scale. Pore space was described using sphere network coming from a geometrical modeling algorithm. The biological model was improved regarding previous work in order to include transformation of dissolved organic compounds and diffusion processes. Our model was tested using experimental results of a simple substrate decomposition (Fructose within a simple media (the sand. Diverse microbial communities were inoculated. Separated incubations in microcosms were carried out using 5 different bacterial communities at 2 different water potentials of −10 cm and −100 cm of water. We calibrated the biological parameters by means of experimental data obtained at high water content and we tested the model without any parameters change at low water content. Same as for experimental data, our simulation results showed the decrease in water content involved the decrease of mineralisation. The model was able to simulate the decrease of connectivity between substrate and microorganism due the decrease of water content.

  10. New concepts of microbial treatment processes for the nitrogen removal: effect of protein and amino acids degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Alejandro; Calderón, Kadiya; González-López, Jesús

    2016-05-01

    High concentrations of proteins and amino acids can be found in wastewater and wastewater stream produced in anaerobic digesters, having shown that amino acids could persist over different managements for nitrogen removal affecting the nitrogen removal processes. Nitrogen removal is completely necessary because of their implications and the significant adverse environmental impact of ammonium such as eutrophication and toxicity to aquatic life on the receiving bodies. In the last decade, the treatment of effluents with high ammonium concentration through anammox-based bioprocesses has been enhanced because these biotechnologies are cheaper and more environmentally friendly than conventional technologies. However, it has been shown that the presence of important amounts of proteins and amino acids in the effluents seriously affects the microbial autotrophic consortia leading to important losses in terms of ammonium oxidation efficiency. Particularly the presence of sulfur amino acids such as methionine and cysteine has been reported to drastically decrease the autotrophic denitrification processes as well as affect the microbial community structure promoting the decline of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in favor of other phylotypes. In this context we discuss that new biotechnological processes that improve the degradation of protein and amino acids must be considered as a priority to increase the performance of the autotrophic denitrification biotechnologies.

  11. Microbial oil-degradation under mild hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa): which pathways are impacted in piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Barbato, Marta; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Mapelli, Francesca; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara; Boon, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Oil spills represent an overwhelming carbon input to the marine environment that immediately impacts the sea surface ecosystem. Microbial communities degrading the oil fraction that eventually sinks to the seafloor must also deal with hydrostatic pressure, which linearly increases with depth. Piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are ideal candidates to elucidate impaired pathways following oil spills at low depth. In the present paper, we tested two strains of the ubiquitous Alcanivorax genus, namely A. jadensis KS_339 and A. dieselolei KS_293, which is known to rapidly grow after oil spills. Strains were subjected to atmospheric and mild pressure (0.1, 5 and 10 MPa, corresponding to a depth of 0, 500 and 1000 m, respectively) providing n-dodecane as sole carbon source. Pressures equal to 5 and 10 MPa significantly lowered growth yields of both strains. However, in strain KS_293 grown at 10 MPa CO2 production per cell was not affected, cell integrity was preserved and PO43- uptake increased. Analysis of its transcriptome revealed that 95% of its genes were downregulated. Increased transcription involved protein synthesis, energy generation and respiration pathways. Interplay between these factors may play a key role in shaping the structure of microbial communities developed after oil spills at low depth and limit their bioremediation potential.

  12. Bioelectricity generation and dewatered sludge degradation in microbial capacitive desalination cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanyu; Zhao, Qingliang; Na, Xiaolin; Zheng, Zhen; Jiang, Junqiu; Wei, Liangliang; Zhang, Jun

    2016-05-18

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a new approach for the synergy in bioelectricity generation, desalination and organic waste treatment without additional power input. However, current MDC systems cause salt accumulation in anodic wastewater and sludge. A microbial capacitive desalination cell (MCDC) with dewatered sludge as anodic substrate was developed to address the salt migration problem and improve the sludge recycling value by special designed-membrane assemblies, which consisted of cation exchange membranes (CEMs), layers of activated carbon cloth (ACC), and nickel foam. Experimental results indicated that the maximum power output of 2.06 W/m(3) with open circuit voltage (OCV) of 0.942 V was produced in 42 days. When initial NaCl concentration was 2 g/L, the desalinization rate was about 15.5 mg/(L·h) in the first 24 h, indicating that the MCDC reactor was suitable to desalinize the low concentration salt solution rapidly. The conductivity of the anodic substrate decreased during the 42-day operation; the CEM/ACC/Ni assemblies could effectively restrict the salt accumulation in MCDC anode and promote dewatered sludge effective use by optimizing the dewatered sludge properties, such as organic matter, C/N, pH value, and electric conductivity (EC).

  13. Aerobic granulation strategy for bioaugmentation of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treating high strength pyridine wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Yan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Xin [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Suzhou Institute of Architectural Design Co., Ltd, Suzhou 215021, Jiangsu Province (China); Jiang, Xinbai; Wu, Shijing [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Shen, Jinyou, E-mail: shenjinyou@mail.njust.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Lu, Lude [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Lianjun, E-mail: wanglj@mail.njust.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-09-15

    Abstract: Aerobic granules were successfully cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), using a single bacterial strain Rhizobium sp. NJUST18 as the inoculum. NJUST18 presented as both a good pyridine degrader and an efficient autoaggregator. Stable granules with diameter of 0.5–1 mm, sludge volume index of 25.6 ± 3.6 mL g{sup −1} and settling velocity of 37.2 ± 2.7 m h{sup −1}, were formed in SBR following 120-day cultivation. These granules exhibited excellent pyridine degradation performance, with maximum volumetric degradation rate (V{sub max}) varied between 1164.5 mg L{sup −1} h{sup −1} and 1867.4 mg L{sup −1} h{sup −1}. High-throughput sequencing analysis exhibited a large shift in microbial community structure, since the SBR was operated under open condition. Paracoccus and Comamonas were found to be the most predominant species in the aerobic granule system after the system had stabilized. The initially inoculated Rhizobium sp. lost its dominance during aerobic granulation. However, the inoculation of Rhizobium sp. played a key role in the start-up process of this bioaugmentation system. This study demonstrated that, in addition to the hydraulic selection pressure during settling and effluent discharge, the selection of aggregating bacterial inocula is equally important for the formation of the aerobic granule.

  14. Selection and screening of microbial consortia for efficient and ecofriendly degradation of plastic garbage collected from urban and rural areas of Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Megha, M; Kini, Meghna Niranjan; Mukund, Kamath Manali; Rizvi, Alya; Vasist, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to massive accumulation of plastic garbage all over India. The persistence of plastic in soil and aquatic environment has become ecological threat to the metropolitan city such as Bangalore, India. Present study investigates an ecofriendly, efficient and cost-effective approach for plastic waste management by the screening of novel microbial consortia which are capable of degrading plastic polymers. Plastic-contaminated soil and water samples were collected from six hot spots of urban and rural areas of Bangalore. The plastic-degrading bacteria were enriched, and degradation ability was determined by zone of clearance method. The percentage of polymer degradation was initially monitored by weight loss method, and the main isolates were characterized by standard microbiology protocols. These isolates were used to form microbial consortia, and the degradation efficiency of the consortia was compared with individual isolate and known strains obtained from the Microbial Type Culture Collection (MTCC) and Gene Bank, India. One of the main enzymes responsible for polymer degradation was identified, and the biodegradation mechanism was hypothesized by bioinformatics studies. From this study, it is evident that the bacteria utilized the plastic polymer as a sole source of carbon and showed 20-50% weight reduction over a period of 120 days. The two main bacteria responsible for the degradation were microbiologically characterized to be Pseudomonas spp. These bacteria could grow optimally at 37 °C in pH 9.0 and showed 35-40% of plastic weight reduction over 120 days. These isolates were showed better degradation ability than known strains from MTCC. The current study further revealed that the microbial consortia formulated by combining Psuedomonas spp. showed 40 plastic weight reduction over a period of 90 days. Further, extracellular lipase, one of the main enzymes responsible for polymer degradation, was identified. The

  15. Aspirated pits in wetwood and micromorphology of microbial degradation in subalpine fir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yaoli; CAI Liping; XU Yongji

    2006-01-01

    Differentiating from normal wood,pit membranes in wetwood of subalpine fir contain bacteria of water drop shape or orbicular shape,and flaky shape,as observed using Scanning Electronic Microscope.Not only are ray parenchyma cells in wetwood partially degraded but also margo strands in pit membranes are somewhat degraded by bacterial activities.Most of the bordered-pit membranes in normal wood are unaspirated in green conditions and the proportions of aspirated pits in earlywood and latewood account for only 6.8% and 13.4%,respectively.Nevertheless,most of the bordered-pit membranes in wetwood are aspirated in green conditions and the proportions of aspirated pits account for 77.7% and 72.1%,respectively.The problem of hard-to-dry for subalpine fir could be reasoned from the considerable amount of aspirated pit membranes in wetwood.

  16. Comparative study on the rumen microbial populations, hydrolytic enzyme activities and dry matter degradability between different species of ruminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yea Hwang; Ok, Ji Un; Lee, Shin Ja; Ha, Jong Kyu; Lee, Sung Sill

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study among Korean native cow (Hanwoo), Holstein dairy cow, Korean native goat and crossbred sheep on the population and marker concentration of ruminal microbes, the activities of carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase), xylanase and amylase, and in situ dry matter (DM) degradability were conducted. Twelve ruminally cannulated animals, three of each species, were used. Animals were fed the same diet containing 40% formula feed and 60% rice straw at the level of 2.5% of body weight. Total viable microbial populations in the rumen fluid were significantly (P < 0.01) greater for bacteria and fungi in goat than those of Holstein. The protozoan population among ruminant species was the reverse from that of bacteria. The concentrations of 2,6-diaminopimelic acid and chitin as markers for bacteria and fungi in the rumen fluid, respectively, were highest in goat, which is in accordance with the above population data. The concentration of aminoethylphosphonic acid as marker of protozoa was highest in Hanwoo and lowest in sheep (P < 0.01). Goat had the highest (P < 0.01) activities of all the enzymes investigated among ruminants. In situ effective degradation of the DM of rice straw was approximately 19% higher in the rumen of goat compared with other animals.

  17. Aminopeptidase activity by spoilage bacteria and its relationship to microbial load and sensory attributes of poultry legs during aerobic cold storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Franco, José Alfredo; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2010-02-01

    The shelf life of poultry legs stored aerobically and the possible role of the aminopeptidase activity of gram-negative bacteria (p-nitroaniline test) as a predictor of poultry spoilage were evaluated on the basis of microbiological and sensory parameters. Chicken legs (n = 30) obtained immediately after evisceration in a local poultry processing plant were kept under aerobic refrigeration (4 +/- 1 degrees C) for 7 days. Microbiological (counts of aerobic bacteria and psychrotrophs) and sensory (odor, color, and general acceptability on a hedonic scale of 1 to 9) parameters and aminopeptidase activity (absorbance at 390 nm [A(390)]) determinations were performed after 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days of storage. Aerobic plate counts of 7 log CFU/g and a score of 6 for general acceptability were used as indicators of the end point of shelf life. Strong correlations (r > or = 0.76; P counts, hedonic scores, and A(390) values. Samples were judged as unacceptable (shelf-life end point) after 2 and 4 days on the basis of sensory and microbiological analyses, respectively. A(390) values of 0.52 and 0.89 (corresponding to p-nitroaniline concentrations of 6.25 and 10.7 microg/ml, respectively) are proposed as the upper limits for acceptability on the basis of sensory and microbiological determinations, respectively. However, these recommendations are based on a small set of samples, and their general application is yet to be verified.

  18. Communal action of microbial cultures for Red HE3B degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, P S; Phugare, S S; Jadhav, S B; Jadhav, J P

    2010-09-15

    The consortium PMB11 consisting of three bacterial species, originally isolated from dye contaminated soil was identified as Bacillus odysseyi SUK3, Morganella morganii SUK5 and Proteus sp. SUK7. The consortium possessed the ability to decolorize various textile dyes as well as mixtures of dyes. PMB11 could decolorize Red HE3B (50 mg l(-1)) with 99% of decolorization within 12 h in nutrient broth, while in mineral medium it could decolorize up to 97% within 24h. Induction in the activities of various oxidative and reductive enzymes indicates the involvement of these enzymes in decolorization. Biodegradation of the dye was monitored using UV-vis spectroscopy, HPLC and FTIR analysis. The Red HE3B degradation pathway was proposed by GC-MS analysis. Various metabolites formed after the degradation were identified as 2,5-diaminobenzene 6-aminotriazine, aniline 2-sulfate, aniline 3-sulfate, 2-amino 5-chlorotriazine and naphthalene. Phytotoxicity studies revealed that metabolites formed after degradation were significantly less toxic in nature.

  19. Improved fuel cell and electrode designs for producing electricity from microbial degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Doo Hyun; Zeikus, J Gregory

    2003-02-05

    A new one-compartment fuel cell was composed of a rubber bunged bottle with a center-inserted anode and a window-mounted cathode containing an internal, proton-permeable porcelain layer. This fuel cell design was less expensive and more practical than the conventional two-compartment system, which requires aeration and a ferricyanide solution in the cathode compartment. Three new electrodes containing bound electron mediators including a Mn(4+)-graphite anode, a neutral red (NR) covalently linked woven graphite anode, and an Fe(3+)-graphite cathode were developed that greatly enhanced electrical energy production (i.e., microbial electron transfer) over conventional graphite electrodes. The potentials of these electrodes measured by cyclic voltametry at pH 7.0 were (in volts): +0.493 (Fe(3+)-graphite); +0.15 (Mn(4+)-graphite); and -0.53 (NR-woven graphite). The maximal electrical productivities obtained with sewage sludge as the biocatalyst and using a Mn(4+)-graphite anode and a Fe(3+)-graphite cathode were 14 mA current, 0.45 V potential, 1,750 mA/m(2) current density, and 788 mW/m(2) of power density. With Escherichia coli as the biocatalyst and using a Mn(4+)-graphite anode and a Fe(3+)-graphite cathode, the maximal electrical productivities obtained were 2.6 mA current, 0.28 V potential, 325 mA/m(2) current density, and 91 mW/m(2) of power density. These results show that the amount of electrical energy produced by microbial fuel cells can be increased 1,000-fold by incorporating electron mediators into graphite electrodes. These results also imply that sewage sludge may contain unique electrophilic microbes that transfer electrons more readily than E. coli and that microbial fuel cells using the new Mn(4+)-graphite anode and Fe(3+)-graphite cathode may have commercial utility for producing low amounts of electrical power needed in remote locations.

  20. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils.

  1. Process of microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the downstream of the Tamagawa river. Tamagawa karyuiki ni okeru sekiyukei tanka suiso no biseibutsu bunkai katei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morito, M. (Sumitomo 3M Co., Kanagawa (Japan)); Okada, M.; Murakami, A. (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1990-12-10

    The process of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was investigated in the downstream of the Tamagawa river. Petroleum hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane, octylbenzene, and 1-methylnaphtalene were observed to be rapidly degraded by microorganisms in the water sampled from the surface of the river after a period of lag time. The longer lag time was observed in order of hexadecane degraded without the lag time after they were acclimated by these hydrocarbons, but the rates was not be promoted by physical and chemical emulsification. It was suggested that petroleum hydrocarbons were degraded not in physical and chemical process in which the hydrocarbons were emulsified by microbial extracellular products, microfinded and enhanced contact area or frequency to microbes, but in biochemical process in which the microorganisms gained the ability of petroleum hydrocarbons degradation, that is, induction of production of a degrading enzyme. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Anaerobic lactic acid degradation during ensilage of whole crop maize inoculated with lactobacillus buchneri inhibits yeast growth and improves aerobic stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driehuis; Elferink; Spoelstra

    1999-10-01

    Aerobic deterioration of silages is initiated by (facultative) aerobic micro-organisms, usually yeasts, that oxidize the preserving organic acids. In this study, a Lactobacillus buchneri strain isolated from maize silage was evaluated for its potential as a bacterial inoculant that enhances aerobic stability of silages. In four experiments, chopped whole crop maize (30-43% dry matter (DM)) was inoculated with Lact. buchneri and ensiled in laboratory silos. Uninoculated silages served as controls. Analysis of silages treated with Lact. buchneri at levels of 103-106 cfu g-1 after about 3 months of anaerobic storage showedthat acetic acid and 1-propanol contents increased with inoculum levels above 104 cfu g-1,whereas lactic acid decreased. Propionic acid, silage pH and DM loss increased withinoculum levels above 105 cfu g-1. Time course experiments with maize inoculated with Lact. buchneri at 4 x 104-2 x 105 cfu g-1 showed that up to 7-14 d after ensiling, Lact. buchneri had no effect on silage characteristics. Thereafter, the lactic acid content of the inoculated silages declined and, simultaneously, acetic acid and, to a lesser extent, propionic acid and 1-propanol, accumulated. Inoculation reduced survival of yeasts during the anaerobic storage phase and inhibited yeast growth when the silage was exposed to O2, resulting in a substantial improvement in aerobic stability. The results indicate that the use of Lact. buchneri as a silage inoculant can enhance aerobic stability by inhibition of yeasts. The ability of the organism to ferment lactic acid to acetic acid appears to be an important underlying principle of this effect.

  3. Degradation of microbial fluorescence biosignatures by solar ultraviolet radiation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Patel, Manish R.

    2014-04-01

    Recent and proposed robotic missions to Mars are equipped with implements to expose or excavate fresh material from beneath the immediate surface. Once brought into the open, any organic molecules or potential biosignatures of present or past life will be exposed to the unfiltered solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and face photolytic degradation over short time courses. The key question, then, is what is the window of opportunity for detection of recently exposed samples during robotic operations? Detection of autofluorescence has been proposed as a simple method for surveying or triaging samples for organic molecules. Using a Mars simulation chamber we conduct UV exposures on thin frozen layers of two model microorganisms, the radiation-resistant polyextremophile Deinococcus radiodurans and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) are generated of the full fluorescence response to quantify the change in signal of different cellular fluorophores over Martian equivalent time. Fluorescence of Deinococcus cells, protected by a high concentration of carotenoid pigments, was found to be relatively stable over 32 h of Martian UV irradiation, with around 90% of the initial signal remaining. By comparison, fluorescence from protein-bound tryptophan in Synechocystis is much more sensitive to UV photodegradation, declining to 50% after 64 h exposure. The signal most readily degraded by UV irradiation is fluorescence of the photosynthetic pigments - diminished to only 35% after 64 h. This sensitivity may be expected as the biological function of chlorophyll and phycocyanin is to optimize the harvesting of light energy and so they are readily photobleached. A significant increase in a ~450 nm emission feature is interpreted as accumulation of fluorescent cellular degradation products from photolysis. Accounting for diurnal variation in Martian sunlight, this study calculates that frozen cellular biosignatures would remain detectable by

  4. Morphological observation and microbial population dynamics in anaerobic polyurethane foam biofilm degrading gelatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports on a preliminary study of anaerobic degradation of gelatin with emphasis on the development of the proteolytic biofilm in polyurethane foam matrices in differential reactors. The evolution of the biofilm was observed during 22 days by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analyses. Three distinct immobilization patterns could be observed in the polyurethane foam: cell aggregates entrapped in matrix pores, thin biofilms attached to inner polyurethane foam surfaces and individual cells that have adhered to the support. Rods, cocci and vibrios were observed as the predominant morphologies of bacterial cells. Methane was produced mainly by hydrogenothrophic reactions during the operation of the reactors.

  5. Recent progress on application of UV excilamps for degradation of organic pollutants and microbial inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matafonova, Galina; Batoev, Valeriy

    2012-10-01

    Excilamps as modern mercury-free sources of narrow-band UV radiation represent an attractive alternative in environmental applications. This review focuses on recent studies on the water and surface decontamination with excilamps by means of direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes. To date, direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as UV/H(2)O(2), UV/Fenton and UV/O(3) have been applied for degradation of organic compounds (mainly, phenols, dyes and herbicides) in model aqueous solutions. Special emphasis is placed on studies combining UV irradiation (as a pre-treatment or post-treatment step) with biological treatment. In this review, the efficiencies of direct UV, UV/H(2)O(2) and UV/TiO(2) processes for inactivation of a variety of pathogenic microorganisms in water and on surfaces are discussed. The analysis of the literature shows that more works need to be done on scaling up the processes, degradation/mineralization of target pollutant(s) in real effluents and evaluation of energy requirements.

  6. Genomic organisation, activity and distribution analysis of the microbial putrescine oxidase degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alexander; Barnes, Nicole; Speight, Robert; Keane, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    The catalytic action of putrescine specific amine oxidases acting in tandem with 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase is explored as a degradative pathway in Rhodococcus opacus. By limiting the nitrogen source, increased catalytic activity was induced leading to a coordinated response in the oxidative deamination of putrescine to 4-aminobutyraldehyde and subsequent dehydrogenation to 4-aminobutyrate. Isolating the dehydrogenase by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration revealed that the enzyme acts principally on linear aliphatic aldehydes possessing an amino moiety. Michaelis-Menten kinetic analysis delivered a Michaelis constant (K(M)=0.014 mM) and maximum rate (Vmax=11.2 μmol/min/mg) for the conversion of 4-aminobutyraldehyde to 4-aminobutyrate. The dehydrogenase identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis (E value=0.031, 23% coverage) belongs to a functionally related genomic cluster that includes the amine oxidase, suggesting their association in a directed cell response. Key regulatory, stress and transport encoding genes have been identified, along with candidate dehydrogenases and transaminases for the further conversion of 4-aminobutyrate to succinate. Genomic analysis has revealed highly similar metabolic gene clustering among members of Actinobacteria, providing insight into putrescine degradation notably among Micrococcaceae, Rhodococci and Corynebacterium by a pathway that was previously uncharacterised in bacteria.

  7. Microbial Degradation of Cellular Kinases Impairs Innate Immune Signaling and Paracrine TNFα Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Kenneth; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2016-10-04

    The NFκB and MAPK signaling pathways are critical components of innate immunity that orchestrate appropriate immune responses to control and eradicate pathogens. Their activation results in the induction of proinflammatory mediators, such as TNFα a potent bioactive molecule commonly secreted by recruited inflammatory cells, allowing for paracrine signaling at the site of an infection. In this study we identified a novel mechanism by which the opportunistic pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis dampens innate immune responses by disruption of kinase signaling and degradation of inflammatory mediators. The intracellular immune kinases RIPK1, TAK1, and AKT were selectively degraded by the P. gingivalis lysine-specific gingipain (Kgp) in human endothelial cells, which correlated with dysregulated innate immune signaling. Kgp was also observed to attenuate endothelial responsiveness to TNFα, resulting in a reduction in signal flux through AKT, ERK and NFκB pathways, as well as a decrease in downstream proinflammatory mRNA induction of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. A deficiency in Kgp activity negated decreases to host cell kinase protein levels and responsiveness to TNFα. Given the essential role of kinase signaling in immune responses, these findings highlight a unique mechanism of pathogen-induced immune dysregulation through inhibition of cell activation, paracrine signaling, and dampened cellular proinflammatory responses.

  8. Degradation of chlorpyrifos alone and in combination with chlorothalonil and their effects on soil microbial populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Xiaoqiang; FANG Hua; PAN Xuedong; WANG Xiao; SHAN Min; FENG Bo; YU Yunlong

    2008-01-01

    In practice, pesticides are usually applied simultaneously or one after another for crop protection, and this type of pesticide application often leads to a combined contamination of pesticide residues in the soil environment. A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the influence of chlorothalonil on chlorpyrifos degradation and its effects on soil bacterial, fungal, and actinomycete populations. Under the experimental conditions here, the half-lives of chlorpyrifos alone, and in combination with chlorothalonil, at the recommended and double dosages, were measured to be 3.24, 2.77, and 2.63 d, respectively. Chlorpyrifos degradation was not significantly altered by its combination with chlorothalonil. However, the inhibitory effect of chlorpyrifos on soil microorganisms was increased by its combination with chlorothalonil, and the increase was related to the levels of chlorothalonil added. Compared to those in the controls, the populations of bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes were significantly reduced by 44.1%, 61.1%, and 72.8%, respectively, on the first day after treatment (DAT) by chlorpyrifos alone. With the addition of chlorothalonil, the inhibition was increased to 55.2%, 79.3%, and 85.8% at the recommended dosage, and 86.0%, 94.1%, and 90.8% at the double dosage, at one DAT, respectively. The results suggested that combined effects should be taken into account to assess the actual impacts of pesticide applications.

  9. Optimization for Microbial Degradation of Dibenzothiophene by Pseudomonas sp. LKY-5 Using Response Surface Methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lin; Zhao Chaocheng; Liu Qiyou; Zhang Yunbo; Liu Chunshuang; Xue Jianliang

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the degradation of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was investigated by using Pseudomonas sp. LKY-5 isolated from oil contaminated soil. The response surface methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken design (BBD) was applied for evaluating the interactive effects of four independent variables including substrate concentration, tempera-ture, pH and agitation rate on the DBT removal response. A total of 29 experiments for four factors at three levels were conducted in present study. A second-order regression model was then developed, and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) illustrated that the proposed quadratic model could be utilized to navigate the design space. The value of determination coefif-cient (R2=0.953 4) indicated a satisfactory agreement between the quadratic model and the experimental data. It was found that DBT removal was more signiifcantly affected (P<0.000 1) by substrate concentration compared with other three parameters. An 100%degradation of DBT could be obtained by Pseudomonas sp. LKY-5 at a substrate concentration of 100 mg/L.

  10. Deep Sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an Epibiotic Sponge on Cold-Seep Tubeworms, Reveals Methylotrophic, Thiotrophic, and Putative Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Associations

    KAUST Repository

    Arellano, Shawn M.

    2012-10-11

    The encrusting sponge Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila (Poecilosclerida: Myxillidae) is an epibiont on vestimentiferan tubeworms at hydrocarbon seeps on the upper Louisiana slope of the Gulf of Mexico. It has long been suggested that this sponge harbors methylotrophic bacteria due to its low δ13C value and high methanol dehydrogenase activity, yet the full community of microbial associations in M. methanophila remained uncharacterized. In this study, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes representing the microbial community in M. methanophila collected from two hydrocarbon-seep sites (GC234 and Bush Hill) using both Sanger sequencing and next-generation 454 pyrosequencing technologies. Additionally, we compared the microbial community in M. methanophila to that of the biofilm collected from the associated tubeworm. Our results revealed that the microbial diversity in the sponges from both sites was low but the community structure was largely similar, showing a high proportion of methylotrophic bacteria of the genus Methylohalomonas and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria of the genera Cycloclasticus and Neptunomonas. Furthermore, the sponge microbial clone library revealed the dominance of thioautotrophic gammaproteobacterial symbionts in M. methanophila. In contrast, the biofilm communities on the tubeworms were more diverse and dominated by the chemoorganotrophic Moritella at GC234 and methylotrophic Methylomonas and Methylohalomonas at Bush Hill. Overall, our study provides evidence to support previous suggestion that M. methanophila harbors methylotrophic symbionts and also reveals the association of PAH-degrading and thioautotrophic microbes in the sponge. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  11. 微生物复合接种剂对牛粪好氧堆肥的影响%Effects of Composite Microbial Inoculant on Aerobic Composting Cattle Dung

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付瑞敏; 蔺芳

    2011-01-01

    [Objective ] The effects of composite microbial inoculant on aerobic composting cattle dung were studied to provide theoretical guidance of disposing high-fiber waste such as cattle dung effectively. [ Method]The experiments were set up three treatments for aerobic compost text with cattle dung including no-inoculant( C) , inoculantion of microbial group with 0. 5 g/kg (T1 ) , inoculantion of microbial group with 1 g/kg (T2). 4 indicators such as temperature, water content, pH and C/N ratio were investigated. [ Result]Compared to the control group, the two composts with microbial inoculant could warm up more quickly and hold a longer lime with high temperature( >50 ℃). Meanwhile, their water content was lower, both their pH and nitrogen content were higher,and their C/N ratio was all less than 20. [ Conclusion] By adding the composite microhial inoculant, it could effectively accelerate the composting process and shorten the composting period.%[目的]研究微生物接种剂对牛粪好氧堆肥的影响,为有效处理鲜牛粪等高纤维废弃物提供理论指导.[方法]以牛粪为堆肥原料进行好氧堆肥试验.试验设3个处理:不添加接种菌剂(C)、添加接种量为0.5 g/kg的复合微生物菌剂(T1)、添加接种量为1 g/kg的复合微生物菌剂(T2).对堆肥过程中的温度、含水率、pH和C/N比4个指标进行跟踪测定.[结果]与对照相比,添加微生物菌剂的2个堆体升温较快且高温(>50℃)维持时间较久,含水量较低,pH较高,全氮含量较高,C/N比均降至20以下.[结论]添加微生物菌剂可有效加快堆肥进程,缩短堆肥周期.

  12. Degradation of atrazine by microbial consortium in an anaerobic submerged biological filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Simin; Baghapour, Mohammad Ali; Derakhshan, Zahra; Faramarzian, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) (ATZ) is one of the components of S-triazine. Due to its certain characteristics, ATZ causes pollution in various ecosystems and has been of concern for its probable carcinogenic effects on humans. Researchers have used chemical and physical methods for removing ATZ from the environment. Although these methods are quick, they have not been capable of complete mineralization. Therefore, researchers are looking for methods with lower energy consumption and cost and higher efficiency. In this study, biodegradation of ATZ by microbial consortium was evaluated in the aquatic environment. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of ATZ removal from aqueous environments by using an anaerobic submerged biological filter in four concentration levels of atrazine and three hydraulic retention times. The maximum efficiencies of ATZ and soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) were 51.1 and 45.6%, respectively. There was no accumulation of ATZ in the biofilm and the loss of ATZ in the control reactor was negligible. This shows that ATZ removal in this system was due to biodegradation. Furthermore, the results of modeling showed that the Stover-Kincannon model had desirable fitness (R² > 99%) in loading ATZ in this biofilter.

  13. Examination of protein degradation in continuous flow, microbial electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Yates, Matthew D; Zaybak, Zehra; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    Cellulose fermentation wastewaters (FWWs) contain short chain volatile fatty acids and alcohols, but they also have high concentrations of proteins. Hydrogen gas production from FWW was examined using continuous flow microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), with a focus on fate of the protein. H2 production rates were 0.49±0.05 m(3)/m(3)-d for the FWW, compared to 0.63±0.02 m(3)/m(3)-d using a synthetic wastewater containing only acetate (applied potential of 0.9 V). Total organic matter removal was 76±6% for the FWW, compared to 87±5% for acetate. The MEC effluent became relatively enriched in protein (69%) compared to that in the original FWW (19%). Protein was completely removed using higher applied voltages (1.0 or 1.2 V), but current generation was erratic due to more positive anode potentials (-113±38 mV, Eap=1.2V; -338±38 mV, 1.0 V; -0.426±4 mV, 0.9V). Bacteria on the anodes with FWW were primarily Deltaproteobacteria, while Archaea were predominantly Methanobacterium.

  14. Microbial degradation of fluorinated drugs: biochemical pathways, impacts on the environment and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cormac D

    2016-03-01

    Since the discovery over 60 years ago of fluorocortisone's biological properties (9-α-Fluoro derivatives of cortisone and hydrocortisone; Fried J and Sabo EF, J Am Chem Soc 76: 1455-1456, 1954), the number of fluorinated drugs has steadily increased. With the improvement in synthetic methodologies, this trend is likely to continue and will lead to the introduction of new fluorinated substituents into pharmaceutical compounds. Although the biotransformation of organofluorine compounds by microorganisms has been well studied, specific investigations on fluorinated drugs are relatively few, despite the increase in the number and variety of fluorinated drugs that are available. The strength of the carbon-fluorine bond conveys stability to fluorinated drugs; thus, they are likely to be recalcitrant in the environment or may be partially metabolized to a more toxic metabolite. This review examines the research done on microbial biotransformation and biodegradation of fluorinated drugs and highlights the importance of understanding how microorganisms interact with this class of compound from environmental, clinical and biotechnological perspectives.

  15. Examination of protein degradation in continuous flow, microbial electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Cellulose fermentation wastewaters (FWWs) contain short chain volatile fatty acids and alcohols, but they also have high concentrations of proteins. Hydrogen gas production from FWW was examined using continuous flow microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), with a focus on fate of the protein. H2 production rates were 0.49±0.05m3/m3-d for the FWW, compared to 0.63±0.02m3/m3-d using a synthetic wastewater containing only acetate (applied potential of 0.9V). Total organic matter removal was 76±6% for the FWW, compared to 87±5% for acetate. The MEC effluent became relatively enriched in protein (69%) compared to that in the original FWW (19%). Protein was completely removed using higher applied voltages (1.0 or 1.2V), but current generation was erratic due to more positive anode potentials (-113±38mV, Eap=1.2V; -338±38mV, 1.0V; -0.426±4mV, 0.9V). Bacteria on the anodes with FWW were primarily Deltaproteobacteria, while Archaea were predominantly Methanobacterium.

  16. Effect of steam explosion and microbial fermentation on cellulose and lignin degradation of corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juan; Cheng, Wei; Yin, Qingqiang; Zuo, Ruiyu; Song, Andong; Zheng, Qiuhong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Junxi

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase nutrient values of corn stover, effects of steam explosion (2.5 MPa, 200 s) and Aspergillus oryzae (A. oryzae) fermentation on cellulose and lignin degradation were studied. The results showed the contents of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin in the exploded corn stover were 8.47%, 50.45% and 36.65% lower than that in the untreated one, respectively (Pcorn stover (EFCS) were decreased by 24.36% and 69.90%, compared with the untreated one (Pcorn stover. The activities of enzymes in EFCS were increased. The metabolic experiment showed that about 8% EFCS could be used to replace corn meal in broiler diets, which made EFCS become animal feedstuff possible.

  17. Effect of donor animals and their diet on in vitro nutrient degradation and microbial protein synthesis using grass and corn silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguhn, J; Zuber, T; Rodehutscord, M

    2013-06-01

    Two nonlactating cows and two wether sheep, all fitted with a permanent cannula into the rumen, were fed either hay plus concentrate, grass silage or corn silage to study the effect of the donor animal and its diet on in vitro fermentation and microbial protein synthesis. Rumen inoculum was obtained before the morning feeding. Grass silage or corn silage was incubated in a semi-continuous rumen simulation system for 14 days. Four replicated vessels were used per treatment. Degradation of crude nutrients and detergent fibre fractions as well as microbial protein synthesis and the production of volatile fatty acids were studied. Additionally, total gas and methane production was measured with a standard in vitro gas test. Gas production and methane concentration was higher when the inoculum used was from sheep than that from cows. The donor animal also affected the degradation of organic matter and ether extract as well as the amount of propionate and butyrate, and the acetate-to-propionate ratio. The effect of the diet fed to the donor animal on fermentation was much greater than the effect of the donor animal itself. Feeding hay plus concentrate resulted in higher gas production and degradation of acid detergent fibre, but in lower degradation of ether extract and reduced microbial protein synthesis. Additionally, the pattern of volatile fatty acids changed significantly when the diet of the donor animals was hay plus concentrate or one of the silages. These results show that in vitro fermentation and microbial protein synthesis is different when based on inoculum from either cattle or sheep. The diet fed to the donor animal is more important than the animal species and is probably mediated by an adjusted microbial activity. With regard to standardized feed evaluations, these results further support the need to harmonize in vitro approaches used in different laboratories.

  18. Microbial degradation of crude oil on the sea surface by adding nutrient microcapsules. Eiyo ennaiho microcapsule no tenka ni yoru kaimen deno genyu no biseibutsu bunkai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, Akiko; Okada, Mitsumasa; Murakami, Akihiko (Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Tech., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-10

    Microbial degradation of spilled crude oil on the sea surface has been studied. It was found that the concentration of nutrient was a large rate-determining factor in microbial degradation of oil, consequently microbial degradation can be enhanced by adding nutrient. While, a nutrient microcapsule was developed so as to keep a certain concentration of nutrient on the sea surface, and the biodegradation capacity and the dosing condition were investigated through experiments. In the up-and-down shaking apparats modeled on sea surface, crude oils were degraded by a marine bacteria. The percentages of total oil removal were 18-22% in the sea water, on the other hand, by dose of the nutrient microcapsules they were enhanced to 43-56%. On the biodegradation of 5g of crude oil, the oil removal was amounted roughly to maximum when 116mg of the microcapsule per vessel (11.6% to crude oil) was added 5 times every 4 days, and the dosage effect was not increased even if more nutrient microcapsules were added. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Metagenomic profiling reveals lignocellulose degrading system in a microbial community associated with a wood-feeding beetle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin D Scully

    Full Text Available The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophoraglabripennis is an invasive, wood-boring pest that thrives in the heartwood of deciduous tree species. A large impediment faced by A. glabripennis as it feeds on woody tissue is lignin, a highly recalcitrant biopolymer that reduces access to sugars and other nutrients locked in cellulose and hemicellulose. We previously demonstrated that lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose are actively deconstructed in the beetle gut and that the gut harbors an assemblage of microbes hypothesized to make significant contributions to these processes. While lignin degrading mechanisms have been well characterized in pure cultures of white rot basidiomycetes, little is known about such processes in microbial communities associated with wood-feeding insects. The goals of this study were to develop a taxonomic and functional profile of a gut community derived from an invasive population of larval A. glabripennis collected from infested host trees and to identify genes that could be relevant for the digestion of woody tissue and nutrient acquisition. To accomplish this goal, we taxonomically and functionally characterized the A. glabripennis midgut microbiota through amplicon and shotgun metagenome sequencing and conducted a large-scale comparison with the metagenomes from a variety of other herbivore-associated communities. This analysis distinguished the A. glabripennis larval gut metagenome from the gut communities of other herbivores, including previously sequenced termite hindgut metagenomes. Genes encoding enzymes were identified in the A. glabripennis gut metagenome that could have key roles in woody tissue digestion including candidate lignin degrading genes (laccases, dye-decolorizing peroxidases, novel peroxidases and β-etherases, 36 families of glycoside hydrolases (such as cellulases and xylanases, and genes that could facilitate nutrient recovery, essential nutrient synthesis, and detoxification. This community

  20. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  1. Bioremediation of PAH-contamined soils: Consequences on formation and degradation of polar-polycyclic aromatic compounds and microbial community abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biache, Coralie; Ouali, Salma; Cébron, Aurélie; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Colombano, Stéfan; Faure, Pierre

    2017-05-05

    A bioslurry batch experiment was carried out over five months on three polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) contaminated soils to study the PAC (PAH and polar-PAC) behavior during soil incubation and to evaluate the impact of PAC contamination on the abundance of microbial communities and functional PAH-degrading populations. Organic matter characteristics and reactivity, assessed through solvent extractable organic matter and PAC contents, and soil organic matter mineralization were monitored during 5 months. Total bacteria and fungi, and PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase genes were quantified. Results showed that PAHs and polar-PACs were degraded with different degradation dynamics. Differences in degradation rates were observed among the three soils depending on PAH distribution and availability. Overall, low molecular weight compounds were preferentially degraded. Degradation selectivity between isomers and structurally similar compounds was observed which could be used to check the efficiency of bioremediation processes. Bacterial communities were dominant over fungi and were most likely responsible for PAC degradation. Abundance of PAH-degrading bacteria increased during incubations, but their proportion in the bacterial communities tended to decrease. The accumulation of some oxygenated-PACs during the bioslurry experiment underlines the necessity to monitor these compounds during application of remediation treatment on PAH contaminated soils.

  2. Simulating microbial degradation of organic matter in a simple porous system using the 3-D diffusion-based model MOSAIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monga, O.; Garnier, P.; Pot, V.; Coucheney, E.; Nunan, N.; Otten, W.; Chenu, C.

    2014-04-01

    This paper deals with the simulation of microbial degradation of organic matter in soil within the pore space at a microscopic scale. Pore space was analysed with micro-computed tomography and described using a sphere network coming from a geometrical modelling algorithm. The biological model was improved regarding previous work in order to include the transformation of dissolved organic compounds and diffusion processes. We tested our model using experimental results of a simple substrate decomposition experiment (fructose) within a simple medium (sand) in the presence of different bacterial strains. Separate incubations were carried out in microcosms using five different bacterial communities at two different water potentials of -10 and -100 cm of water. We calibrated the biological parameters by means of experimental data obtained at high water content, and we tested the model without changing any parameters at low water content. Same as for the experimental data, our simulation results showed that the decrease in water content caused a decrease of mineralization rate. The model was able to simulate the decrease of connectivity between substrate and microorganism due the decrease of water content.

  3. Response of Syntrophic Propionate Degradation to pH Decrease and Microbial Community Shifts in an UASB Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liguo; Ban, Qiaoying; Li, Jianzheng; Jha, Ajay Kumar

    2016-08-28

    The effect of pH on propionate degradation in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor containing propionate as a sole carbon source was studied. Under influent propionate of 2,000 mg/l and 35ºC, propionate removal at pH 7.5-6.8 was above 93.6%. Propionate conversion was significantly inhibited with stepwise pH decrease from pH 6.8 to 6.5, 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, 4.5, and then to 4.0. After long-term operation, the propionate removal at pH 6.5-4.5 maintained an efficiency of 88.5%-70.1%, whereas propionate was hardly decomposed at pH 4.0. Microbial composition analysis showed that propionate-oxidizing bacteria from the genera Pelotomaculum and Smithella likely existed in this system. They were significantly reduced at pH ≤5.5. The methanogens in this UASB reactor belonged to four genera: Methanobacterium, Methanospirillum, Methanofollis, and Methanosaeta. Most detectable hydrogenotrophic methanogens were able to grow at low pH conditions (pH 6.0-4.0), but the acetotrophic methanogens were reduced as pH decreased. These results indicated that propionate-oxidizing bacteria and acetotrophic methanogens were more sensitive to low pH (5.5-4.0) than hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

  4. Microbial analyses of cement and grouting additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbeck, L.; Jaegevall, S.; Paeaejaervi, A.; Rabe, L.; Edlund, J.; Eriksson, S. [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    During sampling in the ONKALO tunnel in 2006, heavy growth of a slimy material was observed in connection with grouting. It was suggested to be microbial growth on organic additives leaching from the grout. Two sampling campaigns resulted in the isolation of several aerobic bacterial strains. Some of these strains were used in biodegradation studies of three solid cement powders, eight liquid grout additives, and six plastic drainage materials. Degradation was also studied using ONKALO groundwaters as inoculums. The isolated strains were most closely related to hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms. The biodegradation of seven of the products was tested using microorganisms isolated from the ONKALO slime in 2006; none of these strains could degrade the tested products. When ONKALO drillhole groundwaters were used as inoculums in the degradation studies, it was demonstrated that Structuro 111X, Mighty 150, and Super-Parmix supported growth of the groundwater microorganisms. Structuro 111X is a polycarboxylate condensate while Mighty 150 and Super-Parmix are condensates with formaldehyde and naphthalene. Some of the isolated microorganisms belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, many strains of which can degrade organic molecules. None of the plastic drainage materials supported growth during the degradation studies. Microorganisms were present in two of the liquid products when delivered, GroutAid and Super-Parmix. The potential of the organic compounds in grout additives to be degraded by microorganisms, increasing the risk of biofilm formation and complexing compound production, must be considered. Microbial growth will also increase the possibility of hydrogen sulphide formation. (orig.)

  5. [Influence of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. Growth on the Microbial Community and Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degradation in Petroleum Contaminated Saline-alkali Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Hai-hua; Cui, Bing-jian; Wu, Shang-hua; Bai, Zhi-hui; Huang, Zhan-bin

    2015-09-01

    In order to explore the effect of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. growth on the structure characteristics of the microbial community and the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in the petroleum-contaminated saline-alkali soil, Microbial biomass and species in the rhizosphere soils of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. in the contaminated saline soil were studied with the technology of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis. The results showed that comparing to CK soils without Mirabilis jalapa Linn., the ratio of PLFAs species varied were 71. 4%, 69. 2% and 33. 3% in the spring, summer and autumn season, respectively. In addition, there was distinct difference of the biomasses of the microbial community between the CK and rhizosphere soils and among the difference seasons of growth of Mirabilis jalapa Linn.. Compare to CK soil, the degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was increased by 47. 6%, 28. 3%, and 18. 9% in spring, summer, and autumn rhizosphere soils, respectively. Correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between TPH degradation and the soil microbial community. 77. 8% of the total soil microbial PLFAs species showed positive correlation to the TPH degradation (the correlation coefficient r > 0), among which, 55. 6% of PLFAs species showed high positive correlation(the correlation coefficient was r≥0. 8). In addition, the relative content of SAT and MONO had high correlation with TPH degradation in the CK sample soils, the corelation coefficient were 0. 92 and 0. 60 respectively; However, the percent of positive correlation was 42. 1% in the rhizosphere soils with 21. 1% of them had high positive correlation. The relative content of TBSAT, MONO and CYCLO had moderate or low correlation in rhizosphere soils, and the correlation coefficient were 0. 56, 0. 50, and 0. 07 respectively. Our study showed that the growth of mirabilis Mirabilis jalapa Linn. had a higher influence on the species and biomass of microbial community in the

  6. Importance of Unattached Bacteria and Bacteria Attached to Sediment in Determining Potentials for Degradation of Xenobiotic Organic Contaminants in an Aerobic Aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund;

    1992-01-01

    , was attached to the groundwater sediment (18 x 106 to 25 x 106 cells per g [dry weight]), and only a minor part was unattached in the groundwater (0.6 x 106 to 5.5 x 106 cells per ml). Experiments involving aquifer sediment suspensions showed identical degradation potentials in the laboratory and in the field...... for studying the degradation potential for xenobiotic organic contaminants should contain sediment to obtain the highest numbers of bacteria as well as the broadest and most stable degradation. When only the fine (silt- and clay-size) particles of the sediment were used, nearly the same advantages were gained...

  7. Potential for Microbial Degradation of cis-Dichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride in Streambed Sediment at the U.S. Department of Energy, Kansas City Plant, Missouri, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of carbon-14 (14C) radiotracer-based microcosm experiments was conducted to assess the mechanisms and products of degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) in streambed sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy, Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. The focus of the investigation was the potential for biotic and abiotic cis-DCE and VC degradation in surficial and underlying hyporheic sediment from the Blue River and its tributaries, Indian Creek and Boone Creek. Substantial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE and [1,2-14C] VC to 14C-carbon dioxide (14CO2) was observed in all viable surficial sediment microcosms prepared under oxic conditions. No significant accumulation of reductive dechlorination products was observed under these oxic incubation conditions. The results indicate that microbial mineralization processes involving direct oxidation or co-metabolic oxidation are the primary mechanisms of cis-DCE and VC biodegradation in oxic stream sediment at the Kansas City Plant. Substantial mineralization of [1,2-14C] VC also was observed in all viable surficial sediment microcosms incubated in the absence of detectable oxygen (dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 25 micrograms per liter). In general, the accumulation of mineralization products (14CO2 and 14C-methane [14CH4]) predominated with only trace-level detection of the reductive dechlorination product, 14C-ethene. In contrast, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE by reductive dechlorination or mineralization was not significant in the absence of detectable oxygen. The potential for [1,2-14C] VC biodegradation also was significant in sediments from the deeper hyporheic zones under oxic conditions and in the absence of detectable oxygen. In this study, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE was not significant in hyporheic sediment treatments under either oxygen condition. Taken together, the results indicate that microbial mineralization processes in

  8. Effect of microbial phytase on phytate P degradation and apparent digestibility of total P and Ca throughout the gastrointestinal tract of the growing pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherfurd, S M; Chung, T K; Moughan, P J

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a dietary microbial phytase on mineral digestibility throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of the growing pig was studied. Thirty-two entire male pigs (~22 kg BW) were allocated equally to 4 corn-soybean meal diets. One diet was adequate in total P and Ca, the second diet was deficient in total P and Ca (low-P diet), and the third and fourth diets were the low-P diet with microbial phytase added at 1,107 U/kg or 2,215 U/kg, respectively. Titanium dioxide (3 g/kg) was included in the diets as an indigestible marker. The pigs were fed their respective diets for 42 d. Fecal samples were collected from d 38 to 41 and stomach chyme, terminal jejunal, and terminal ileal digesta samples were collected after euthanasia on d 42. Phytate P degradability and apparent total P and Ca digestibility were determined at the gastric, jejunal, ileal, and total tract levels. Phytate P degradation and apparent total P and Ca digestibility were not significantly different between the 2 microbial phytase inclusion levels. Across both microbial phytase-low-P diets, phytase supplementation increased (P phytase-supplemented, low-P (26% units greater) diets. The latter result was not reflected by the apparent total P digestibility estimate, which was not significantly different between the ileal and total tract levels for both the unsupplemented and phytase-supplemented, low-P diets. Consequently, there appeared to be considerable phytate degradation in the hindgut, presumably due to the action of hindgut microbes, but the phytate P released in the hindgut did not appear to be absorbed. Apparent Ca digestibility was not significantly different among jejunal, ileal, and total tract levels for any of the dietary treatments, but apparent Ca digestibility was greater (P phytase-supplemented diets compared with the unsupplemented diets. Overall, dietary microbial phytase supplementation led to greater phytate degradation to the end of the jejunum. Because the phytate P

  9. Methane oxidation in a crude oil contaminated aquifer: Delineation of aerobic reactions at the plume fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Blowes, D.W.; Kirshtein, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution direct-push profiling over short vertical distances was used to investigate CH4 attenuation in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. The contaminant plume was delineated using dissolved gases, redox sensitive components, major ions, carbon isotope ratios in CH4 and CO2, and the presence of methanotrophic bacteria. Sharp redox gradients were observed near the water table. Shifts in ??13CCH4 from an average of - 57.6??? (?? 1.7???) in the methanogenic zone to - 39.6??? (?? 8.7???) at 105 m downgradient, strongly suggest CH4 attenuation through microbially mediated degradation. In the downgradient zone the aerobic/anaerobic transition is up to 0.5 m below the water table suggesting that transport of O2 across the water table is leading to aerobic degradation of CH4 at this interface. Dissolved N2 concentrations that exceeded those expected for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere indicated bubble entrapment followed by preferential stripping of O2 through aerobic degradation of CH4 or other hydrocarbons. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to distinguish between areas of significant bubble entrapment and areas where other processes such as the infiltration of O 2 rich recharge water were important O2 transport mechanisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pore-scale insights to the rate of organic carbon degradation and biofilm formation under variable hydro-biogeochemical conditions in soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Yan, Z.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes that control microbial growth, organic carbon degradation, and CO2 production and migration are fundamentally occur at the pore scale. In this presentation, we will describe our recent results of a pore-scale simulation research to investigate: 1) how moisture content and distribution affects oxygen delivery, organic carbon availability, and microbial activities that regulate the rate of organic carbon degradation and CO2 production in aerobic systems; and 2) how pore-scale reactive transport processes affect local microbial growth, biofilm formation, and overall rate of microbial reactions in anoxic systems. The results revealed that there is an optimal moisture content for aerobic bacterial respiration and CO2 production. When moisture is below the optimal value, organic carbon availability limits its degradation due to diffusion and osmotic stress to bacterial reactivity; and when moisture is above the optimal value, oxygen delivery limits microbial respiration. The optimal moisture condition is, however, a function of soil texture and physical heterogeneity, bioavailable soil organic carbon, and microbial community function. In anoxic and saturated system, simulation results show that biofilm preferentially forms in concave areas around sand particles and macro aggregates where cross-directional fluxes of organic carbon and electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate) favor microbial growth and attachment. The results provide important insights to the establishment of constitutive relationships between the macroscopic rates of soil organic carbon degradation and moisture content, and to the development of biogeochemical reactive transport models that incorporate biofilm structures and physio-chemical heterogeneity in soils and sediments.

  11. Anaerobic nonylphenol ethoxylate degradation coupled to nitrate reduction in a modified biodegradability batch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppi, Lorena I; Hardmeier, Ivo; Babay, Paola A; Itria, Raúl F; Erijman, Leonardo

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this work was to elucidate the role of nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor on the biodegradation of NPEO. We have characterized the products of NPEO degradation by mixed microbial communities in anaerobic batch tests by means of HPLC, (1)H NMR and GC-MS. Anaerobic degradation of NPEO was strictly dependent on the presence of nitrate. Within seven days of anoxic incubation, NP2EO appeared as the major degradation product. After 21 days, NP was the main species detected, and was not degraded further even after 35 days. Nitrate concentration decreased in parallel with NPEO de-ethoxylation. A transient accumulation of nitrite was observed within the time period in which NP formation reached its maximum production. The observed generation of nonylphenol coupled to nitrate reduction suggests that the microbial consortium possessed an alternate pathway for the degradation of NPEO, which was not accessible under aerobic conditions.

  12. Adsorption and degradation of five selected antibiotics in agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min; Chu, L M

    2016-03-01

    Large quantities of antibiotics are being added to agricultural fields worldwide through the application of wastewater, manures and biosolids, resulting in antibiotic contamination and elevated environmental risks in terrestrial environments. Most studies on the environmental fate of antibiotics focus on aquatic environments or wastewater treatment plants. Little is known about the behavior of antibiotics at environmentally relevant concentrations in agricultural soil. In this study we evaluated the adsorption and degradation of five different antibiotics (tetracycline, sulfamethazine, norfloxacin, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol) in sterilized and non-sterilized agricultural soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Adsorption was highest for tetracycline (Kd, 1093 L/kg), while that for sulfamethazine was negligible (Kd, 1.365 L/kg). All five antibiotics were susceptible to microbial degradation under aerobic conditions, with half-lives ranging from 2.9 to 43.3 d in non-sterilized soil and 40.8 to 86.6 d in sterilized soil. Degradation occurred at a higher rate under aerobic conditions but was relatively persistent under anaerobic conditions. For all the antibiotics, a higher initial concentration was found to slow down degradation and prolong persistence in soil. The degradation behavior of the antibiotics varied in relation to their physicochemical properties as well as the microbial activities and aeration of the recipient soil. The poor adsorption and relative persistence of sulfamethazine under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions suggest that it may pose a higher risk to groundwater quality. An equation was proposed to predict the fate of antibiotics in soil under different field conditions, and assess their risks to the environment.

  13. A Three-Component Microbial Consortium from Deep-Sea Salt-Saturated Anoxic Lake Thetis Links Anaerobic Glycine Betaine Degradation with Methanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta La Cono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities inhabiting the deep-sea salt-saturated anoxic lakes of the Eastern Mediterranean operate under harsh physical-chemical conditions that are incompatible with the lifestyle of common marine microorganisms. Here, we investigated a stable three-component microbial consortium obtained from the brine of the recently discovered deep-sea salt-saturated Lake Thetis. The trophic network of this consortium, established at salinities up to 240, relies on fermentative decomposition of common osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB. Similarly to known extreme halophilic anaerobic GB-degrading enrichments, the initial step of GB degradation starts with its reductive cleavage to trimethylamine and acetate, carried out by the fermenting member of the Thetis enrichment, Halobacteroides lacunaris TB21. In contrast to acetate, which cannot be easily oxidized in salt-saturated anoxic environments, trimethylamine represents an advantageous C1-substrate for methylotrophic methanogenic member of the Thetis enrichment, Methanohalophilus sp. TA21. This second member of the consortium likely produces hydrogen via methylotrophic modification of reductive acetyl-CoA pathway because the initial anaerobic GB cleavage reaction requires the consumption of reducing equivalents. Ecophysiological role of the third member of the Thetis consortium, Halanaerobium sp. TB24, which lacks the capability of either GB or trimethylamine degradation, remains yet to be elucidated. As it is true for cultivated members of family Halanaerobiaceae, the isolate TB24 can obtain energy primarily by fermenting simple sugars and producing hydrogen as one of the end products. Hence, by consuming of TB21 and TA21 metabolites, Halanaerobium sp. TB24 can be an additional provider of reducing equivalents required for reductive degradation of GB. Description of the Thetis GB-degrading consortium indicated that anaerobic degradation of osmoregulatory molecules may play important role in the

  14. Relationships between chemical oxygen demand (COD) components and toxicity in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor/aerobic completely stirred reactor system treating Kemicetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponza, Delia Teresa; Demirden, Pinar

    2010-04-15

    In this study the interactions between toxicity removals and Kemicetine, COD removals, intermediate products of Kemicetine and COD components (CODs originating from slowly degradable organics, readily degradable organics, inert microbial products and from the inert compounds) were investigated in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system with a real pharmaceutical wastewater. The total COD and Kemicetine removal efficiencies were 98% and 100%, respectively, in the sequential ABR/CSTR systems. 2-Amino-1 (p-nitrophenil)-1,3 propanediol, l-p-amino phenyl, p-amino phenol and phenol were detected in the ABR as the main readily degradable inter-metabolites. In the anaerobic ABR reactor, the Kemicetin was converted to corresponding inter-metabolites and a substantial part of the COD was removed. In the aerobic CSTR reactor the inter-metabolites produced in the anaerobic reactor were completely removed and the COD remaining from the anerobic reactor was biodegraded. It was found that the COD originating from the readily degradable organics did not limit the anaerobic degradation process, while the CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and from the inert microbial products significantly decreased the anaerobic ABR reactor performance. The acute toxicity test results indicated that the toxicity decreased from the influent to the effluent of the aerobic CSTR reactor. The ANOVA test statistics showed that there was a strong linear correlation between acute toxicity, CODs originating from the slowly degradable organics and inert microbial products. A weak correlation between acute toxicity and CODs originating from the inert compounds was detected.

  15. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchman, David L. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  16. Microbial Studies Supporting Implementation of In Situ Bioremediation at TAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Joan Marie; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Rae, Catherine; Ely, R. L.

    2000-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is evaluating in situ bioremediation of contaminated groundwater at its Test Area North Facility. To determine feasibility, microcosm and bioreactor studies were conducted to ascertain the ability of indigenous microbes to convert trichloroethene and dichloroethene to non-hazardous byproducts under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and to measure the kinetics of microbial reactions associated with the degradation process. Microcosms were established from core samples and groundwater obtained from within the contaminant plume. These microcosms were amended with nutrients, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, to identify electron donors capable of stimulating the degradation process. Results of the anaerobic microcosm studies showed that lactate, acetate and propionate amendments stimulated indigenous cell growth and functioned as effective substrates for reductive degradation of chloroethenes. Bioreactors inoculated with cultures from these anaerobic microcosms were operated under a batch mode for 42 days then converted to a fed-batch mode and operated at a 53-day hydraulic residence time. It was demonstrated that indigenous microbes capable of complete anaerobic reductive dechlorination are present in the subject well. It was also demonstrated that aerobic microbes capable of oxidizing chlorinated compounds produced by anaerobic reductive dechlorination are present. Kinetic data suggest that controlling the type and concentration of electron donors can increase trichlorethene conversion rates. In the event that complete mineralization of trichlorethene does not occur following stimulation, and anaerobic/aerobic treatment scheme is feasible.

  17. Microbial and metabolic profiling reveal strong influence of water table and land-use patterns on classification of degraded tropical peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S.; Lee, W. A.; Hooijer, A.; Reuben, S.; Sudiana, I. M.; Idris, A.; Swarup, S.

    2014-04-01

    Tropical peatlands from southeast Asia are undergoing extensive drainage, deforestation and degradation for agriculture and human settlement purposes. This is resulting in biomass loss and subsidence of peat from its oxidation. Molecular profiling approaches were used to understand the relative influences of different land-use patterns, hydrological and physicochemical parameters on the state of degraded tropical peatlands. As microbial communities play a critical role in biogeochemical cascades in the functioning of peatlands, we used microbial and metabolic profiles as surrogates of community structure and functions, respectively. Profiles were generated from 230 bacterial 16 S rDNA fragments and 145 metabolic markers of 46 samples from 10 sites, including those from above and below water table in a contiguous area of 48 km2 covering five land-use types. These were degraded forest, degraded land, oil palm plantation, mixed crop plantation and settlements. Bacterial profiles were most influenced by variations in water table and land-use patterns, followed by age of drainage and peat thickness in that order. Bacterial profiling revealed differences in sites, based on the duration and frequency of water table fluctuations and on oxygen availability. Mixed crop plantations had the most diverse bacterial and metabolic profiles. Metabolic profiling, being closely associated with biogeochemical functions, could distinguish communities not only based on land-use types but also their geographic locations, thus providing a finer resolution than bacterial profiles. Agricultural inputs, such as nitrates, were highly associated with bacterial community structure of oil palm plantations, whereas phosphates and dissolved organic carbon influenced those from mixed crop plantations and settlements. Our results provide a basis for adopting molecular marker-based approaches to classify peatlands and determine relative importance of factors that influence peat functioning. Our

  18. Research progress on microbial degradation of nicosulfuron%烟嘧磺隆的微生物降解研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵卫松; 邱立红; 郭庆港; 李社增; 马平

    2016-01-01

    烟嘧磺隆属磺酰脲类除草剂,因其对玉米安全,对一年生和多年生禾本科杂草及部分阔叶杂草、莎草科杂草高效而在玉米田广泛应用,但其在土壤中的残留则易对后茬敏感作物产生药害。微生物对烟嘧磺隆的降解有望成为修复污染土壤的有效措施。文章从烟嘧磺隆的使用及危害,可降解烟嘧磺隆的微生物种类及降解特性、降解途径、降解酶及其编码基因等方面进行了综述。目前有关烟嘧磺隆微生物降解的研究多集中于其降解菌的筛选、降解特性及降解途径等方面,对于其微生物降解过程中起关键作用的酶和基因方面的研究仍较少,因此未来的研究趋势将主要体现在降解复合菌系的培养、降解微生物的环境生态学、降解基因以及降解酶制剂等方面。%Nicosulfuron is a herbicide of sulfonylurea group, which has been widely used in corn fields due to its high herbicidal activity for control of annual and perennial grasses, certain broadleaved and cyperaceous weeds. However, residues of nicosulfuron in soil can cause phytotoxicity to sensitive succeeding crops. Degradation of nicosulfuron by microorganisms would be an effective method for bioremediation of polluted soil. The usage and hazard of nicosulfuron, microorganism species that can degrade nicosulfuron as well as the degradation characteristics, degradation pathways, degradation enzyme and its encoding gene were reviewed. So far most of the researches have been focused on screening of the nicosulfuron-degrading microorganisms, degradation characteristics, degradation pathways, etc.. Study on the degradation enzyme and its encoding gene in nicosulfuron-degrading microorganisms were limited. It was suggested that the development trends of research would be mainly the cultivation of composite microbial system, environmental ecology of degrading microorganisms, degrading gene and formulation of degradation

  19. Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and {sup 14}C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the {sup 14}C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

  20. Research progress in the microbial degradation of azo dyes%微生物降解偶氮染料的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢婧; 余志晟; 张洪勋

    2013-01-01

    偶氮染料广泛应用于纺织印染、造纸印刷等行业,产生的染料废水严重污染环境.近年来,利用微生物(细菌、真菌、藻类)对偶氮染料进行脱色降解的研究报道很多.介绍了最近几年染料废水脱色降解研究中涉及到的微生物,并探讨了相关微生物对偶氮染料的脱色降解作用及其机理,旨在为运用微生物对偶氮染料废水进行脱色处理和降解研究提供参考和依据.%Azo dyes are widely used in textile dying,paper printing and other industries.The release of dye wastewater causes serious environmental pollution.In recent years,there has been an intensive research on microbial decolorization of dye wastewater,including bacteria,fungi,algae,etc.The function and mechanism of microbial decolorization and degradation of azo dyes based on the newest progress in the decolorization using microorganisms are discussed,so as to provide some reference and bases for the studies on microbial decolorization and degradation of azo dyes wastewater.

  1. Impact of continuous and intermittent supply of electric assistance on high-strength 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) degradation in electro-microbial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhanping; Zhang, Minghui; Zhang, Jingli; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-07-01

    The high-strength 2,4-DCP, which exists in two states: dissolved and colloidal, was studied by a continuously electro-microbial system (CEMS) and an intermittently electro-microbial system (IEMS). The hydrolysis rate of colloidal 2,4-DCP in the IEMS without electric assistance was much higher than that in the CEMS. However, the degradation rate of the dissolved 2,4-DCP and the dissolved intermediates (2-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol) in the IEMS without electric assistance were much lower than that in the CEMS. By adjusting the intermittent operation mode, the degradation time of 2,4-DCP was shortened greatly. Microbial characteristics in the CEMS and the IEMS were different. The correlation analysis for the main factors affecting the hydrolysis was performed by SPSS, and it was found that the correlation coefficient (rp) was -0.912 for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content, 0.823 for zeta potential and 0.632 for relative hydrophobicity, respectively.

  2. Integrated ‘omics analysis for studying the microbial community response to a pH perturbation of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaro, Amy A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Konopka, Allan; Callister, Stephen J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated ‘omics have been used on pure cultures and co-cultures, yet they have not been applied to complex microbial communities to examine questions of perturbation response. In this study, we used integrated ‘omics to measure the perturbation response of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor community fed with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). We predicted that a pH decrease by addition of a pulse of acid would reduce microbial community diversity and temporarily reduce reactor function such as cellulose degradation. However, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing results revealed increased alpha diversity in the microbial community after the perturbation, and a persistence of the dominant community members over the duration of the experiment. Proteomics results showed a decrease in activity of proteins associated with Fibrobacter succinogenes two days after the perturbation followed by increased protein abundances six days after the perturbation. The decrease in cellulolytic activity suggested by the proteomics was confirmed by the accumulation of Avicel in the reactor. Metabolomics showed a pattern similar to that of the proteome, with amino acid production decreasing two days after the perturbation and increasing after six days. This study demonstrated that community ‘omics data provides valuable information about the interactions and function of anaerobic cellulolytic community members after a perturbation.

  3. Microbial Degradation of Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-30

    either 2.42g Tris-base (Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis,MO) and 0.2M NaOH to adjust to pH 7.16 or 4.74g of Trizma -maleate and100 ml 0.2 M HCl to adjust to pH...phosphate, and the results are presented in Table 1. During the 4-day incubation period in tris- buffered phosphate-free medium, a 6-7 fold increase in...alkaline conditions, whereas the PO-X bond is cleaved under acidic conditions. The resultant structure in each case is P-OH. Using tris- buffered salts

  4. What Is Aerobic Dancing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than 24 million people participate in aerobics. Aerobic dance has blossomed into a sport for all to have fun while losing weight and keeping in shape. There are varied forms of aerobics including low-impact, swim and other water aerobics is popular. Dance is still the predominant form and may be ...

  5. Extracellular Electron Transfer from Aerobic Bacteria to Au-Loaded TiO2 Semiconductor without Light: A New Bacteria-Killing Mechanism Other than Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance or Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guomin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Ang; Hao, Qi; Jin, Weihong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Wan; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K

    2016-09-21

    Titania loaded with noble metal nanoparticles exhibits enhanced photocatalytic killing of bacteria under light illumination due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) property. It has been shown recently that loading with Au or Ag can also endow TiO2 with the antibacterial ability in the absence of light. In this work, the antibacterial mechanism of Au-loaded TiO2 nanotubes (Au@TiO2-NT) in the dark environment is studied, and a novel type of extracellular electron transfer (EET) between the bacteria and the surface of the materials is observed to cause bacteria death. Although the EET-induced bacteria current is similar to the LSPR-related photocurrent, the former takes place without light, and no reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during the process. The EET is also different from that commonly attributed to microbial fuel cells (MFC) because it is dominated mainly by the materials' surface, but not the bacteria, and the environment is aerobic. EET on the Au@TiO2-NT surface kills Staphylococcus aureus, but if it is combined with special MFC bacteria, the efficiency of MFC may be improved significantly.

  6. Exploring the functional diversity of the supraglacial environment: Microbial degradation of the pesticide 2,4-D on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibal, M.; Bælum, J.; Holben, W. E.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The surface of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) harbours a diverse community of heterotrophic microorganisms. Organic compounds of anthropogenic origin, including pesticides, are deposited on the GrIS; however, the fate of these compounds in the ice is currently unknown. In this study we determine the potential of the microbial community from the surface of the GrIS to mineralise the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). It is one of the most easily degraded compounds among the phenoxyacetic acid pesticides, and the ability to mineralise 2,4-D has been found to be widespread in microbial communities around the globe. Functional genes involved in the degradation pathway have also been characterised. Thus, 2,4-D represents a very suitable model compound to use in order to gain an insight into pollutant degradation dynamics in the rapidly changing Arctic region. We collected surface ice cores on the GrIS and incubated them for up to 529 days in microcosms simulating in situ conditions. We measured mineralisation of side-chain- and ring-labelled 14C-2,4-D in the samples and performed quantitative PCR targeting the tfdA gene, encoding an enzyme catalysing the first step in the degradation pathway of 2,4-D, in the DNA extracted from the ice after the experiments. We show that the microbial community on the surface of the GrIS is of low diversity, but contains microbes capable of degrading 2,4-D. The low diversity of the community and the similarity of the detected clones to those from other icy environment clones suggest that the bacterial community on the GrIS is selected from a pool of propagules deposited on the surface of the ice sheet, based on the level of adaptation to the conditions in the surface ice. The 2,4-D degraders are likely present in very low numbers, and they can mineralise 2,4-D at a rate of up to 1 nmol per m2 per day, equivalent to ~26 ng C m-2 d-1. We contend that the surface of the GrIS should not be considered to be a mere reservoir of

  7. Detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Yota; Hori, Yoshimi; Kudou, Motonori; Ishii, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    The toxic fermentation inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates raise serious problems for the microbial production of fuels and chemicals. Furfural is considered to be one of the most toxic compounds among these inhibitors. Here, we describe the detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic culture conditions, furfuryl alcohol and 2-furoic acid were produced as detoxification products of furfural. The ratio of the products varied depending on the initial furfural concentration. Neither furfuryl alcohol nor 2-furoic acid showed any toxic effect on cell growth, and both compounds were determined to be the end products of furfural degradation. Interestingly, unlike under aerobic conditions, most of the furfural was converted to furfuryl alcohol under anaerobic conditions, without affecting the glucose consumption rate. Both the NADH/NAD(+) and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio decreased in the accordance with furfural concentration under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These results indicate the presence of a single or multiple endogenous enzymes with broad and high affinity for furfural and co-factors in C. glutamicum ATCC13032.

  8. Effects of permafrost thaw on carbon emissions under aerobic and anaerobic environments in the Great Hing'an Mountains, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Changchun; Wang, Xianwei; Miao, Yuqing; Wang, Jiaoyue; Mao, Rong; Song, Yanyu

    2014-07-15

    The carbon (C) pool of permafrost peatland is very important for the global C cycle. Little is known about how permafrost thaw could influence C emissions in the Great Hing'an Mountains of China. Through aerobic and anaerobic incubation experiments, we studied the effects of permafrost thaw on CH4 and CO2 emissions. The rates of CH4 and CO2 emissions were measured at -10, 0 and 10°C. Although there were still C emissions below 0°C, rates of CH4 and CO2 emissions significantly increased with permafrost thaw under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The C release under aerobic conditions was greater than under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that permafrost thaw and resulting soil environment change should be important influences on C emissions. However, CH4 stored in permafrost soils could affect accurate estimation of CH4 emissions from microbial degradation. Calculated Q10 values in the permafrost soils were significantly higher than values in active-layer soils under aerobic conditions. Our results highlight that permafrost soils have greater potential decomposability than soils of the active layer, and such carbon decomposition would be more responsive to the aerobic environment.

  9. Microbial utilization of the industrial wastewater pollutants 2-ethylhexylthioglycolic acid and iso-octylthioglycolic acid by aerobic gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toups, Mario; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2010-04-01

    Industrial wastewater from the production of sulfur containing esters and the resulting products of this synthesis, 2-ethylhexylthioglycolic acid (EHTG) and iso-octylthioglycolic acid (IOTG), were deployed in this study to enrich novel bacterial strains, since no wastewater and EHTG or IOTG degrading microorganisms were hitherto described or available. In addition, nothing is known about the biodegradation of these thiochemicals. The effect of this specific wastewater on the growth behaviour of microorganisms was investigated using three well-known Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, and Ralstonia eutropha). Concentrations of 5% (v/v) wastewater in complex media completely inhibited growth of these three bacterial strains. Six bacterial strains were successfully isolated, characterized and identified by sequencing their 16S rRNA genes. Two isolates referred to as Achromobacter sp. strain MT-E3 and Pseudomonas sp. strain MT-I1 used EHTG or IOTG, respectively, as well as the wastewater as sole source of carbon and energy for weak growth. More notably, both isolates removed these sulfur containing esters in remarkable amounts from the cultures supernatant. One further isolate was referred to as Klebsiella sp. strain 58 and exhibited an unusual high tolerance against the wastewater's toxicity without utilizing the contaminative compounds. If cultivated with gluconic acid as additional carbon source, the strain grew even in presence of more than 40% (v/v) wastewater. Three other isolates belonging to the genera Bordetella and Pseudomonas tolerated these organic sulfur compounds but showed no degradation abilities.

  10. Degradation of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and accumulation of vinyl chloride in wetland sediment microcosms and in situ porewater: Biogeochemical controls and associations with microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, M.M.; Voytek, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The biodegradation pathways of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA) and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (112TCA) and the associated microbial communities in anaerobic wetland sediments were evaluated using concurrent geochemical and genetic analyses over time in laboratory microcosm experiments. Experimental results were compared to in situ porewater data in the wetland to better understand the factors controlling daughter product distributions in a chlorinated solvent plume discharging to a freshwater tidal wetland at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Microcosms constructed with wetland sediment from two sites showed little difference in the initial degradation steps of TeCA, which included simultaneous hydrogenolysis to 112TCA and dichloroelimination to 1,2-dichloroethene (12DCE). The microcosms from the two sites showed a substantial difference, however, in the relative dominance of subsequent dichloroelimination of 112TCA. A greater dominance of 112TCA dichloroelimination in microcosms constructed with sediment that was initially iron-reducing and subsequently simultaneously iron-reducing and methanogenic caused approximately twice as much vinyl chloride (VC) production as microcosms constructed with sediment that was methanogenic only throughout the incubation. The microcosms with higher VC production also showed substantially more rapid VC degradation. Field measurements of redox-sensitive constituents, TeCA, and its anaerobic degradation products along flowpaths in the wetland porewater also showed greater production and degradation of VC with concurrent methanogenesis and iron reduction. Molecular fingerprinting indicated that bacterial species [represented by a peak at a fragment size of 198 base pairs (bp) by MnlI digest] are associated with VC production from 112TCA dichloroelimination, whereas methanogens (190 and 307 bp) from the Methanococcales or Methanobacteriales family are associated with VC production from 12DCE hydrogenolysis. Acetate-utilizing methanogens

  11. 多溴联苯醚好氧生物降解研究%Aerobic Microbial Degradation of Polybrominated Diphenyi Ethers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁娟; 周娟; 姜玮颖; 高士祥

    2008-01-01

    研究了好氧真菌白腐菌对4,4′-二溴联苯醚(BDE15)和十溴联苯醚(BDE209)的降解,并考察了不同浓度Tween 80和β环糊精的加入对BDE15和BDE209表观溶解度和生物降解的影响.结果表明,白腐菌对BDE209和BDE15均有显著降解作用,培养10 d后,BDE209的降解率达到43.0%,降解了约69.7μg,BDE15则由150μg降至4.8 μg,扣除其挥发损失,降解率达62.5%.低浓度Tween 80(≤700 mg/L)和j9-环糊精对白腐菌降解BDE209均有明显的促进作用,而高浓度的Tween 80(900 mg/L)则会抑制白腐菌生长,从而抑制其降解作用.Tween 80和β-环糊精(500 ms/L)对BDE15的降解均有一定抑制作用.Tween 80和β-环糊精对BDE209降解的促进作用主要是由于其对BDE209的增溶作用,对BDE15的抑制作用可能是由于Tween 80胶束和β-环糊精空腔对BDE15的包裹降低了水中可直接利用的自由态BDE15,影响了降解速度.

  12. Spacial characteristics of pyrene degradation and soil microbial activity with the distance from the ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) root surface in a multi-interlayer rhizobox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaomei; Liao, Min; Fang, Shu; Peng, Ying; Yang, Jing; Chai, Juanjuan

    2012-04-30

    To investigate rhizosphere effects on the biodegradation of pyrene with the distance away from root surface in the rhizosphere of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), a glasshouse experiment was conducted using a multi-interlayer rhizobox where ryegrass were grown in a soil spiked with pyrene. The largest and most rapid dissipation of pyrene in planted soil appeared at 2 mm zone from the root zone. The pyrene degradation gradient followed the order: near-rhizosphere>root compartment>far-rhizosphere soil zones. In contrast, there was no difference in pyrene concentration with distance in the unplanted soil. Dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass carbon (C(mic)) and the activities of both soil polyphenol oxidase and dehydrogenase were to some extent coincident with the degradation of pyrene with distance away from the root compartment in planted soils, which indicated the changes of soil microorganisms in different soil zones of rhizosphere were mainly responsible for the observed pyrene degradation. The largest C(mic) and activities of both soil polyphenol oxidase and dehydrogenase also occurred in near-rhizosphere, especially in 2mm zone from the root surface. The above results suggest that the effect of root proximity is important in the degradation of pyrene in ryegrass growing soil.

  13. 不同结构好氧/厌氧潜流人工湿地微生物群落代谢特性%Characteristics of microbial community metabolism in aerobic/anaerobic subsurface flow constructed wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵艳; 李锋民; 王昊云; 李扬; 王震宇

    2012-01-01

    Four different structures of aerobic/anaerobic subsurface flow constructed wetland had different purification efficiencies for COD and N.To investigate the characteristics of the microbial community metabolism and its relationship with water purification,carbon source analysis,principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used on the average well color development(AWCD) values obtained from the Biolog Ecoplate.The results showed that the degree of microbial utilization of carbohydrate and its derivatives,amino acids and its derivatives were significantly higher than that of fatty acid,lipid,metabolic intermediate and secondary metabolites.The degree of microbial utilization of four kinds of carbon sources in the sampling site(the sampling site which proceeded anaerobic reaction) in the group of OBAAO(aerobic-buffer-anaerobic anoxic-aerobic) aeration were the lowest,and it had significant difference with that of the other sampling sites(p0.05).The results of principal component analysis and cluster analysis indicated that the microbial community of the sampling site 3.3 in the group of OBAAO aeration had high difference from those of the other 3 sampling sites which were preceding anaerobic reaction.The group of OBAAO aeration extending the length of anaerobic stage provided the anaerobic environment for microorganisms.However,because of the lack of carbon source as energy,the microbial activity was inhibited.The microbial utilization degrees in sampling site 4.3(the sampling site which proceeded anaerobic reaction) in the group of OBAAO aeration multiple spot influent had certain advantage.The group of OBAAO aeration multiple spot influent,by adding influent and extending the length of anaerobic stage,effectively promoted the strength of denitrification,and increased the removal efficiency of nitrogen within horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.%4种不同结构的好氧/厌氧多级串联潜流人工湿地对COD和氮的去

  14. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons: catabolic genes, microbial communities, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Sebastián; Méndez, Valentina; Aguila, Patricia; Seeger, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Bioremediation is an environmental sustainable and cost-effective technology for the cleanup of hydrocarbon-polluted soils and coasts. In spite of that longer times are usually required compared with physicochemical strategies, complete degradation of the pollutant can be achieved, and no further confinement of polluted matrix is needed. Microbial aerobic degradation is achieved by the incorporation of molecular oxygen into the inert hydrocarbon molecule and funneling intermediates into central catabolic pathways. Several families of alkane monooxygenases and ring hydroxylating dioxygenases are distributed mainly among Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Fungi strains. Catabolic routes, regulatory networks, and tolerance/resistance mechanisms have been characterized in model hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria to understand and optimize their metabolic capabilities, providing the basis to enhance microbial fitness in order to improve hydrocarbon removal. However, microbial communities taken as a whole play a key role in hydrocarbon pollution events. Microbial community dynamics during biodegradation is crucial for understanding how they respond and adapt to pollution and remediation. Several strategies have been applied worldwide for the recovery of sites contaminated with persistent organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and petroleum derivatives. Common strategies include controlling environmental variables (e.g., oxygen availability, hydrocarbon solubility, nutrient balance) and managing hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, in order to overcome the rate-limiting factors that slow down hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  15. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    Rev, 54 (1990) 305-315. 12 Fedorak P M & Westlake D W S, Microbial degradation of aromatics and saturates in Prudhoe Bay crude oil as determined by glass capillary gas chromatography, Can J Microbiol, (1981) 432-443. 13 Atlas R M, Microbial... degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons: An environmental perspective, Microbiol Rev, 45 (1981) 180-209. 14 Atlas R M, Microbial hydrocarbon degradation- Bioremediation of oil spills, J Chem Tech Biotechnol, 52 (1991) 149-156 15 Venkateswaran K, Iwabuchi T...

  16. Identification of chlorinated solvents degradation zones in clay till by high resolution chemical, microbial and compound specific isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Bælum, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in clay till was investigated at a contaminated site (Vadsby, Denmark) by high resolution sampling of intact cores combined with groundwater sampling. Over decades of contamination, bioactive zones with degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,...

  17. Conversion of Uric Acid into Ammonium in Oil-Degrading Marine Microbial Communities: a Possible Role of Halomonads

    KAUST Repository

    Gertler, Christoph

    2015-04-29

    Uric acid is a promising hydrophobic nitrogen source for biostimulation of microbial activities in oil-impacted marine environments. This study investigated metabolic processes and microbial community changes in a series of microcosms using sediment from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea amended with ammonium and uric acid. Respiration, emulsification, ammonium and protein concentration measurements suggested a rapid production of ammonium from uric acid accompanied by the development of microbial communities containing hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria after 3 weeks of incubation. About 80 % of uric acid was converted to ammonium within the first few days of the experiment. Microbial population dynamics were investigated by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Illumina sequencing as well as by culture-based techniques. Resulting data indicated that strains related to Halomonas spp. converted uric acid into ammonium, which stimulated growth of microbial consortia dominated by Alcanivorax spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Several strains of Halomonas spp. were isolated on uric acid as the sole carbon source showed location specificity. These results point towards a possible role of halomonads in the conversion of uric acid to ammonium utilized by hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  18. Total Phosphate Influences the Rate of Hydrocarbon Degradation but Phosphate Mineralogy Shapes Microbial Community Composition in Cold-Region Calcareous Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Steven D; Chen, Tingting; Phillips, Courtney; Hamilton, Jordan; Hilger, David; Chartrand, Blaine; Grosskleg, Jay; Bradshaw, Kris; Carlson, Trevor; Peak, Derek

    2016-05-17

    Managing phosphorus bioaccessibility is critical for the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in calcareous soils. This paper explores how soil mineralogy interacts with a novel biostimulatory solution to both control phosphorus bioavailability and influence bioremediation. Two large bore infiltrators (1 m diameter) were installed at a PHC contaminated site and continuously supplied with a solution containing nutrients and an electron acceptor. Soils from eight contaminated sites were prepared and pretreated, analyzed pretrial, spiked with diesel, placed into nylon bags into the infiltrators, and removed after 3 months. From XAS, we learned that three principal phosphate phases had formed: adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. All measures of biodegradation in the samples (in situ degradation estimates, mineralization assays, culturable bacteria, catabolic genes) varied depending upon the soil's phosphate speciation. Notably, adsorbed phosphate increased anaerobic phenanthrene degradation and bzdN catabolic gene prevalence. The dominant mineralogical constraints on community composition were the relative amounts of adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. Overall, this study finds that total phosphate influences microbial community phenotypes whereas relative percentages of phosphate minerals influences microbial community genotype composition.

  19. Detecting volatile compounds from Kraft lignin degradation in the headspace of microbial cultures by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Andrew; Malek, Lada; Dekker, Robert F H; Ross, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) was used to quantify methanol and other volatile compounds in the headspace of one bacterial and 12 fungal lignin-degrading microbial cultures. Cultures were grown in 250 mL Erlenmeyer flasks capped with aluminum foil containing 40 mL of nutrient media using Kraft lignin (0.3% w/v) as the sole carbon source. Analysis was done using SIFT-MS with H3O(+) and NO(+) precursors. Product ions were identified with multiple ion mode (MIM). Full scan (FS) mode was used to identify other compounds of interest. Absidia cylindrospora, Ischnoderma resinosum and Pholiota aurivella increased headspace methanol concentration by 136 ppb, 1196 ppb and 278 ppb, respectively, while Flammulina velutipes and Laetiporus sulphureus decreased concentration below ambient levels. F. velutipes and L. sulphureus were found to produce products of methanol oxidation (formaldehyde and formic acid) and were likely metabolizing methanol. Some additional unidentified compounds generated by the fungal cultures are intriguing and will require further study. SIFT-MS can be used to quantify methanol and other volatile compounds in the headspace of microbial cultures and has the potential to be a rapid, sensitive, non-invasive tool useful in elucidating the mechanisms of lignin degradative pathways.

  20. Constraints of propylene glycol degradation at low temperatures and saturated flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissner, Heidi; Wehrer, Markus; Reinicke, Martin; Horváth, Nikoletta; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2015-02-01

    During snowmelt, the infiltration of large amounts of propylene glycol (PG), the major compound of many aircraft deicing fluids, affects redox processes and poses a contamination risk for the groundwater. To gain a better understanding about the degradation of PG and the associated biogeochemical processes under these conditions, we conducted saturated soil column experiments at 4 °C. During two successive PG pulses, we monitored the effect of the runway deicer formate (FO) and changing redox conditions on PG degradation. Furthermore, we applied first-order and simplified Monod kinetics to describe PG and FO transport. The transport of 50 mg l(-1) PG showed three stages of microbial degradation, which were defined as lag phase, aerobic phase, and anaerobic phase. During the second pulse, lag effects diminished due to the already accomplished microbial adaption, and the initial degradation rate of PG increased. Degradation of PG was most efficient during aerobic conditions (aerobic phase), while the subsequent drop of the redox potential down to -300 mV decreased the degradation rate (anaerobic phase). Formate addition decreased the overall degradation of PG by 50 and 15 % during the first and second pulse, illustrating the inhibitory effect of FO on PG degradation. The concurrent increase of Fe(III), organic carbon, and the turbidity in the column effluent after PG and FO application suggest the combined export of Fe adsorbed to fragments of detached biofilm. Neither the first-order nor the simplified