WorldWideScience

Sample records for aerobic methane release

  1. Effects of temperature, ultraviolet radiation and pectin methyl esterase on aerobic methane release from plant material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Øbro, J.;

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effects of different irradiance types on aerobic methane (CH4) efflux rates from terrestrial plant material. Furthermore, the role of the enzyme pectin methyl esterase (PME) on CH4 efflux potential was also examined. Different types of plant tissue and purified pectin were...... exponentially on temperature and linearly on UV-B irradiance. UV-B had a greater stimulating effect than UV-A, while visible light had no effect on emission rates. PME was found to substantially reduce the potential for aerobic CH4 emissions upon demethylation of pectin....

  2. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  3. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Oswald

    Full Text Available Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere.

  4. Environmental control on aerobic methane oxidation in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Lea; Maltby, Johanna; Engbersen, Nadine; Zopfi, Jakob; Bange, Hermann; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Kock, Annette; Lehmann, Moritz; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are produced in anoxic sediments of continental margins and may be liberated to the overlying water column, where some of it is consumed by aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) in the water column is consequently the final sink for methane before its release to the atmosphere, where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas. In the context of the ocean's contribution to atmospheric methane, coastal seas are particularly important accounting >75% of global methane emission from marine systems. Coastal oceans are highly dynamic, in particular with regard to the variability of methane and oxygen concentrations as well as temperature and salinity, all of which are potential key environmental factors controlling MOx. To determine important environmental controls on the activity of MOBs in coastal seas, we conducted a two-year time-series study with measurements of physicochemical water column parameters, MOx activity and the composition of the MOB community in a coastal inlet in the Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck Time Series Station, Eckernförde Bay - E-Bay). In addition, we investigated the influence of temperature and oxygen on MOx during controlled laboratory experiments. In E-Bay, hypoxia developed in bottom waters towards the end of the stratification period. Constant methane liberation from sediments resulted in bottom water methane accumulations and supersaturation (with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium) in surface waters. Here, we will discuss the factors impacting MOx the most, which were (i) perturbations of the water column (ii) temperature and (iii) oxygen concentration. (i) Perturbations of the water column caused by storm events or seasonal mixing led to a decrease in MOx, probably caused by replacement of stagnant water with a high standing stock of MOB by 'new' waters with a lower abundance of methanotrophs. b) An increase in temperature generally led to higher MOx rates. c) Even though methane was

  5. Lipid Biomarkers Indicating Aerobic Methanotrophy at Ancient Marine Methane- Seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgel, D.; Peckmann, J.

    2007-12-01

    The inventory of lipid biomarkers of a number of ancient methane-seep limestones has been studied over the last decade. The molecular fingerprints of the chemosynthesis-based microbial communities tend to be extremely well-preserved in these limestones. The key process at seeps is the anaerobic oxidation of methane, performed by consortia of sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanotrophic archaea. Compounds preserved within modern and ancient seep settings comprise C-13-depleted lipid biomarkers. Besides the occurrence of C-13- depleted isoprenoids (archaea) and n-alkyl-chains (bacteria), C-13-depleted hopanoids have been reported in seep limestones. Here, lipid biomarker data are presented from three ancient methane-seep limestones embedded in Miocene and Campanian strata. These examples provide strong evidence that methane was not solely oxidized by an anaerobic process. In a Miocene limestone, 3-beta-methylated hopanoids were found (delta C-13: -100 per mil). Most likely, 3-beta-methylated hopanepolyols, prevailing in aerobic methanotrophs were the precursor lipids. In another Miocene limestone, a series of C-13-depleted 4-methylated steranes (lanostanes; -80 to -70 per mil) is derived from aerobic methanotrophs. Lanosterol is the most likely precursor of lanostanes, known to be produced by aerobic methanotrophs, some of which are outstanding among bacteria in having the capacity to produce steroids. In a Campanian seep limestone a suite of conspicuous secohexahydrobenzohopanes (-110 to -107 per mil) is found. These hopanoids probably represent early degradation products of seep-endemic aerobic methanotrophs. This interpretation is supported by the presence of "regular" hopanoids that can be discriminated from the unusual secohexahydrobenzohopanes by only moderately low delta C-13 values (-49 to -42 per mil). Structural and carbon isotope data reveal that aerobic methanotrophy is more common at ancient methane- seeps than previously noticed. Our data indicate that

  6. Aerobic Methane Oxidation in Alaskan Lakes Along a Latitudinal Transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cruz, K. C.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Anthony, P.; Thalasso, F.

    2013-12-01

    Karla Martinez-Cruz* **, Armando Sepulveda-Jauregui*, Katey M. Walter Anthony*, Peter Anthony*, and Frederic Thalasso**. * Water and Environmental Research Center, Institute of Northern Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska. ** Biotechnology and Bioengineering Department, Cinvestav, Mexico city, D. F., Mexico. Methane (CH4) is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, after carbon dioxide and water vapor. Boreal lakes play an important role in the current global warming by contributing as much as 6% of global atmospheric CH4 sources annually. On the other hand, aerobic methane oxidation (methanotrophy) in lake water is a fundamental process in global methane cycling that reduces the amount of CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Several environmental factors affect aerobic methane oxidation in the water column both directly and indirectly, including concentration of CH4 and O2, temperature and carbon budgets of lakes. We analyzed the potential of aerobic methane oxidation (PMO) rates in incubations of water collected from 30 Alaskan lakes along a north-south transect during winter and summer 2011. Our findings showed an effect of CH4 and O2 concentrations, temperature and yedoma thawing permafrost on PMO activity in the lake water. The highest PMO rates were observed in summer by lakes situated on thawing yedoma permafrost, most of them located in the interior of Alaska. We also estimated that 60-80% of all CH4 produced in Alaskan lakes could be taken up by methanotrophs in the lake water column, showing the significant influence of aerobic methane oxidation of boreal lakes to the global CH4 budget.

  7. Aerobic methane production from organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigano, I.

    2010-01-01

    Methane, together with H2O, CO2 and N2O, is an important greenhouse gas in th e Earth’s atmosphere playing a key role in the radiative budget. It has be en known for decades that the production of the reduced compound CH4 is possible almost exclusively in anoxic environments per opera of one of the most importan t class of microorganisms which form the Archaea reign. Methane can be produced also from incomplete combustion of organic material. The generation of CH4 in an oxygenated environment under near-ambient conditions is a new discovery made in 2006 by Keppler et. al where surprisingly they measured emissions of this green house gas from plants incubated in chambers with air containing 20% of oxygen. A lthough the estimates on a global scale are still object of an intensive debate, the results presented in this thesis clearly show the existence of methane prod uction under oxic conditions for non living plant material. Temperature and UV l ight are key factors that drive the generation of CH4 from plant matter in a wel l oxygenated environment.

  8. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this

  9. Microbiology and potential applications of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Mengdong; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Weixiang; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) is an important link between the global methane and nitrogen cycles. This mini-review updates discoveries regarding aerobic methanotrophs and denitrifiers, as a prelude to spotlight the microbial mechanism and the potential applications of AME-D. Until recently, AME-D was thought to be accomplished by a microbial consortium where denitrifying bacteria utilize carbon intermediates, which are excreted by aerobic methanotrophs, as energy and carbon sources. Potential carbon intermediates include methanol, citrate and acetate. This mini-review presents microbial thermodynamic estimations and postulates that methanol is the ideal electron donor for denitrification, and may serve as a trophic link between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. More excitingly, new discoveries have revealed that AME-D is not only confined to the conventional synergism between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. Specifically, an obligate aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas denitrificans FJG1, has been demonstrated to couple partial denitrification with methane oxidation, under hypoxia conditions, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. This finding not only substantially advances the understanding of AME-D mechanism, but also implies an important but unknown role of aerobic methanotrophs in global climate change through their influence on both the methane and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems. Hence, further investigation on AME-D microbiology and mechanism is essential to better understand global climate issues and to develop niche biotechnological solutions. This mini-review also presents traditional microbial techniques, such as pure cultivation and stable isotope probing, and powerful microbial techniques, such as (meta-) genomics and (meta-) transcriptomics, for deciphering linked methane oxidation and denitrification. Although AME-D has immense potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater, drinking

  10. Dark aerobic methane emission associated to leaf factors of two Acacia and five Eucalyptus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Makoto; Watanabe, Yoko; Kim, Yong Suk; Koike, Takayoshi

    2012-07-01

    We sought the biological factors determining variations in the methane emission rates from leaves of different plant species under aerobic conditions. Accordingly, we studied relations between the methane emission rate and leaf traits of two Acacia and five Eucalyptus species. We grew seedlings of each species in a glasshouse and measured the methane emission rate of the detached leaves under dark conditions at 30 °C. At the same time we measured the leaf mass per area (LMA), water content, and concentrations of carbon and nitrogen. There was no correlation between the leaf nitrogen concentration and the methane emission rate. This is consistent with previous findings that enzymatic processes do not influence methane emission. We found a significant negative correlation between LMA and the methane emission rate. Our results suggest that leaf structure is primarily responsible for differences in the rates of aerobic methane emission from leaves of different species.

  11. Geographic and seasonal variation of dissolved methane and aerobic methane oxidation in Alaskan lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cruz, K.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Anthony, K. Walter; Thalasso, F.

    2015-08-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria play an important role oxidizing a significant fraction of methane (CH4) produced in lakes. Aerobic CH4 oxidation depends mainly on lake CH4 and oxygen (O2) concentrations, in such a manner that higher MO rates are usually found at the oxic/anoxic interface, where both molecules are present. MO also depends on temperature, and via methanogenesis, on organic carbon input to lakes, including from thawing permafrost in thermokarst (thaw)-affected lakes. Given the large variability in these environmental factors, CH4 oxidation is expected to be subject to large seasonal and geographic variations, which have been scarcely reported in the literature. In the present study, we measured CH4 oxidation rates in 30 Alaskan lakes along a north-south latitudinal transect during winter and summer with a new field laser spectroscopy method. Additionally, we measured dissolved CH4 and O2 concentrations. We found that in the winter, aerobic CH4 oxidation was mainly controlled by the dissolved O2 concentration, while in the summer it was controlled primarily by the CH4 concentration, which was scarce compared to dissolved O2. The permafrost environment of the lakes was identified as another key factor. Thermokarst (thaw) lakes formed in yedoma-type permafrost had significantly higher CH4 oxidation rates compared to other thermokarst and non-thermokarst lakes formed in non-yedoma permafrost environments. As thermokarst lakes formed in yedoma-type permafrost have been identified to receive large quantities of terrestrial organic carbon from thaw and subsidence of the surrounding landscape into the lake, confirming the strong coupling between terrestrial and aquatic habitats and its influence on CH4 cycling.

  12. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in slurries prepared from Searsville Lake soil, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soils enriched in methanotrophs. This result leads us to surmise that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was low, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs. This was borne out by patterns of O2 and CO2 production during experiments with lake soil, growth media, and pure cultures of dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria. We observed that O2 release during incubation of D. agitata CKB with 10 mM ClO4- or ClO3- was decoupled from metabolism. More O2 was released during incubations without added acetate than with 10 mM acetate and an even greater amount of O2 was released during incubation with heat-killed cells. This suggests a chemical mechanism of O2 production during reaction with ClO4- and ClO3-. Hence, perchlorate reducing bacteria need not be present to facilitate O2 release from the surface of Mars, in support of recent interpretations of Viking LR and GEx experiments.

  13. A genomic view of methane oxidation by aerobic bacteria and anaerobic archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Vorholt, Julia A.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Recent sequencing of the genome and proteomic analysis of a model aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has revealed a highly versatile metabolic potential. In parallel, environmental genomics has provided glimpses into anaerobic methane oxidation by certain archaea, further supporting the hypothesis of reverse methanogenesis.

  14. Methane production in aerobic oligotrophic surface water in the central Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Damm

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A methane surplus relative to the atmospheric equilibrium is a frequently observed feature of ocean surface water. Despite the common fact that biological processes are responsible for its origin, the formation of methane in aerobic surface water is still poorly understood. We report on methane production in the central Arctic Ocean, which was exclusively detected in Pacific derived water but not nearby in Atlantic derived water. The two water masses are distinguished by their different nitrate to phosphate ratios. We show that methane production occurs if nitrate is depleted but phosphate is available as a P source. Apparently the low N:P ratio enhances the ability of bacteria to compete for phosphate while the phytoplankton metabolite dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP is utilized as a C source. This was verified by experimentally induced methane production in DMSP spiked Arctic sea water. Accordingly we propose that methylated compounds may serve as precursors for methane and thermodynamic calculations show that methylotrophic methanogenesis can provide energy in aerobic environments.

  15. Effects of exogenous aerobic bacteria on methane production and biodegradation of municipal solid waste in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Sai; Liu, Lei; Xue, Qiang; Yuan, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    Landfill is the most common and efficient ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and the landfill biogas, mostly methane, is currently utilized to generate electricity and heat. The aim of this work is to study the effects and the role of exogenous aerobic bacteria mixture (EABM) on methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors. The results showed that the addition of EABM could effectively enhance hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes of MSW degradation, resulting in 63.95% reduction of volatile solid (VS), the highest methane production rate (89.83Lkg(-1) organic matter) ever recorded and a threefold increase in accumulative methane production (362.9L) than the control (127.1L). In addition, it is demonstrated that white-rot fungi (WRF) might further promote the methane production through highly decomposing lignin, but the lower pH value in leachate and longer acidogenesis duration may cause methane production reduced. The data demonstrated that methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors could be significantly enhanced by EABM via enhanced hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes, and the results are of great economic importance for the future design and management of landfill. PMID:26601890

  16. Biogeochemical modelling of anaerobic vs. aerobic methane oxidation in a meromictic crater lake (Lake Pavin, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its concentration in the atmosphere has increased over the past decades. Methane produced by methanogenic Archae can be consumed through aerobic and anaerobic oxidation pathways. In anoxic conditions found in freshwater environments such as meromictic lakes, CH4 oxidation pathways involving different terminal electron acceptors such as NO3-, SO42-, and oxides of Fe and Mn are thermodynamically possible. In this study, a reactive transport model was developed to assess the relative significance of the different pathways of CH4 consumption in the water column of Lake Pavin. In most cases, the model reproduced experimental data collected from the field from June 2006 to June 2007. Although the model and the field measurements suggest that anaerobic CH4 oxidation may contribute to CH4 consumption in the water column of Lake Pavin, aerobic oxidation remains the major sink of CH4 in this lake.

  17. Tracing organic compounds in aerobically altered methane-derived carbonate pipes (Gulf of Cadiz, SW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merinero, Raúl; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Menor-Salván, César; Lunar, Rosario; Martínez-Frías, Jesús

    2012-07-01

    The primary geochemical process at methane seeps is anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), performed by methanotrophic archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The molecular fingerprints (biomarkers) of these chemosynthetic microorganisms can be preserved in carbonates formed through AOM. However, thermal maturity and aerobic degradation can change the original preserved compounds, making it difficult to establish the relation between AOM and carbonate precipitation. Here we report a study of amino acid and lipid abundances in carbonate matrices of aerobically altered pipes recovered from the seafloor of the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula). This area is characterized by a complex tectonic regime that supports numerous cold seeps. Studies so far have not determined whether the precipitation of carbonate pipes in the Gulf of Cadiz is a purely chemical process or whether microbial communities are involved. Samples from this site show signs of exposure to oxygenated waters and of aerobic alteration, such as oxidation of authigenic iron sulfides. In addition, the degradation index, calculated from the relative abundance of preserved amino acids, indicates aerobic degradation of organic matter. Although crocetane was the only lipid identified from methanotrophic archaea, the organic compounds detected (n-alkanes, regular isoprenoids and alcohols) are compatible with an origin from AOM coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) and subsequent aerobic degradation. We establish a relation among AOM, BSR and pipe formation in the Gulf of Cadiz through three types of analysis: (1) stable carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate minerals; (2) carbonate microfabrics; and (3) mineralogical composition. Our results suggest that carbonate pipes may form through a process similar to the precipitation of vast amounts of carbonate pavements often found at cold seeps. Our approach suggests that some organic compound patterns, in combination with additional

  18. Physical injury stimulates aerobic methane emissions from terrestrial plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.-P. Wang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical injury is common in terrestrial plants as a result of grazing, harvesting, trampling, and extreme weather events. Previous studies demonstrated enhanced emission of non-microbial CH4 under aerobic conditions from plant tissues when they were exposed to increasing UV radiation and temperature. Since physical injury is also a form of environmental stress, we sought to determine whether it would also affect CH4 emissions from plants. Physical injury (cutting stimulated CH4 emission from fresh twigs of Artemisia species under aerobic conditions. More cutting resulted in more CH4 emissions. Hypoxia also enhanced CH4 emission from both uncut and cut Artemisia frigida twigs. Physical injury typically results in cell wall degradation, which may either stimulate formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS or decrease scavenging of them. Increased ROS activity might explain increased CH4 emission in response to physical injury and other forms of stress. There were significant differences in CH4 emissions among 10 species of Artemisia, with some species emitting no detectable CH4 under any circumstances. Consequently, CH4 emissions may be species-dependent and therefore difficult to estimate in nature based on total plant biomass. Our results and those of previous studies suggest that a variety of environmental stresses stimulate CH4 emission from a wide variety of plant species. Global change processes, including climate change, depletion of stratospheric ozone, increasing ground-level ozone, spread of plant pests, and land-use changes, could cause more stress in plants on a global scale, potentially stimulating more CH4 emission globally.

  19. Physical injury stimulates aerobic methane emissions from terrestrial plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.-P. Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical injury is common in terrestrial plants as a result of grazing, trampling, and extreme weather events. Previous studies demonstrated enhanced emission of non-microbial CH4 under aerobic conditions from plant tissues when they were exposed to increasing UV radiation and temperature. Since physical injury is also a form of environmental stress, we sought to determine whether it would also affect CH4 emissions from plants. Physical injury (cutting stimulated CH4 emission from fresh twigs of Artemisiaspecies under aerobic conditions. More cutting resulted in more CH4 emissions. Hypoxia also enhanced CH4 emission from both uncut and cut Artemisia frigida twigs. Physical injury typically results in cell wall degradation, which may either stimulate formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS or decrease scavenging of them. Increased ROS activity might explain increased CH4 emission in response to physical injury and other forms of stress. There were significant differences in CH4 emissions among 10 species of Artemisia, with some species emitting no detectable CH4 under any circumstances. Consequently, CH4 emissions may be species-dependent and therefore difficult to estimate in nature based on total plant biomass. Our results and those of previous studies suggest that a variety environmental stresses stimulate CH4 emission from a wide variety of plant species. Global change processes, including climate change, depletion of stratospheric ozone, increasing ground-level ozone, spread of plant pests, and land-use changes, could cause more stress in plants on a global scale, potentially stimulating more CH4 emission globally.

  20. Strong release of methane on Mars in northern summer 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Michael J; Villanueva, Geronimo L; Novak, Robert E; Hewagama, Tilak; Bonev, Boncho P; Disanti, Michael A; Mandell, Avi M; Smith, Michael D

    2009-02-20

    Living systems produce more than 90% of Earth's atmospheric methane; the balance is of geochemical origin. On Mars, methane could be a signature of either origin. Using high-dispersion infrared spectrometers at three ground-based telescopes, we measured methane and water vapor simultaneously on Mars over several longitude intervals in northern early and late summer in 2003 and near the vernal equinox in 2006. When present, methane occurred in extended plumes, and the maxima of latitudinal profiles imply that the methane was released from discrete regions. In northern midsummer, the principal plume contained approximately 19,000 metric tons of methane, and the estimated source strength (>/=0.6 kilogram per second) was comparable to that of the massive hydrocarbon seep at Coal Oil Point in Santa Barbara, California. PMID:19150811

  1. Field assessment of semi-aerobic condition and the methane correction factor for the semi-aerobic landfills provided by IPCC guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sangjae [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Anwoo [Korea Environment Corporation, 42 Hwangyeong-ro, Seo-gu, Incheon 404-170 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seung-Muk [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Young, E-mail: jaeykim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2}% are proposed as indices to evaluate semi-aerobic landfills. • A landfill which CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} > 1.0 is difficult to be categorized as semi-aerobic landfill. • Field conditions should be carefully investigated to determine landfill types. • The MCF default value for semi-aerobic landfills underestimates the methane emissions. - Abstract: According to IPCC guidelines, a semi-aerobic landfill site produces one-half of the amount of CH{sub 4} produced by an equally-sized anaerobic landfill site. Therefore categorizing the landfill type is important on greenhouse gas inventories. In order to assess semi-aerobic condition in the sites and the MCF value for semi-aerobic landfill, landfill gas has been measured from vent pipes in five semi-aerobically designed landfills in South Korea. All of the five sites satisfied requirements of semi-aerobic landfills in 2006 IPCC guidelines. However, the ends of leachate collection pipes which are main entrance of air in the semi-aerobic landfill were closed in all five sites. The CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio in landfill gas, indicator of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, ranged from 1.08 to 1.46 which is higher than the values (0.3–1.0) reported for semi-aerobic landfill sites and is rather close to those (1.0–2.0) for anaerobic landfill sites. The low CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2}% in landfill gas implied air intrusion into the landfill. However, there was no evidence that air intrusion has caused by semi-aerobic design and operation. Therefore, the landfills investigated in this study are difficult to be classified as semi-aerobic landfills. Also MCF of 0.5 may significantly underestimate methane emissions compared to other researches. According to the carbon mass balance analyses, the higher MCF needs to be proposed for semi-aerobic landfills. Consequently, methane emission estimate should be based on field evaluation for the semi-aerobically designed landfills.

  2. Assessment of the radio 3H-CH4 tracer technique to measure aerobic methane oxidation in the water column

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bussmann, I.; Matoušů, Anna; Osudar, R.; Mau, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 6 (2015), s. 312-327. ISSN 1541-5856 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00243S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : methane * aerobic methane oxidation * methods * radiotracer Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 2.254, year: 2014

  3. Effect of selected monoterpenes on methane oxidation, denitrification, and aerobic metabolism by bacteria in pure culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, J A; Ekins, A; Richards, S R; Knowles, R

    1998-02-01

    Selected monoterpenes inhibited methane oxidation by methanotrophs (Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, Methylobacter luteus), denitrification by environmental isolates, and aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophic pure cultures. Inhibition occurred to various extents and was transient. Complete inhibition of methane oxidation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b with 1.1 mM (-)-alpha-pinene lasted for more than 2 days with a culture of optical density of 0.05 before activity resumed. Inhibition was greater under conditions under which particulate methane monooxygenase was expressed. No apparent consumption or conversion of monoterpenes by methanotrophs was detected by gas chromatography, and the reason that transient inhibition occurs is not clear. Aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophs was much less sensitive than methanotrophy was; Escherichia coli (optical density, 0.01), for example, was not affected by up to 7.3 mM (-)-alpha-pinene. The degree of inhibition was monoterpene and species dependent. Denitrification by isolates from a polluted sediment was not inhibited by 3.7 mM (-)-alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, or beta-myrcene, whereas 50 to 100% inhibition was observed for isolates from a temperate swamp soil. The inhibitory effect of monoterpenes on methane oxidation was greatest with unsaturated, cyclic hydrocarbon forms [e.g., (-)-alpha-pinene, (S)-(-)-limonene, (R)-(+)-limonene, and gamma-terpinene]. Lower levels of inhibition occurred with oxide and alcohol derivatives [(R)-(+)-limonene oxide, alpha-pinene oxide, linalool, alpha-terpineol] and a noncyclic hydrocarbon (beta-myrcene). Isomers of pinene inhibited activity to different extents. Given their natural sources, monoterpenes may be significant factors affecting bacterial activities in nature. PMID:9464387

  4. The effect of widespread early aerobic marine ecosystems on methane cycling and the Great Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daines, Stuart J.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    The balance of evidence suggests that oxygenic photosynthesis had evolved by 3.0-2.7 Ga, several hundred million years prior to the Great Oxidation ≈2.4 Ga. Previous work has shown that if oxygenic photosynthesis spread globally prior to the Great Oxidation, this could have supported widespread aerobic ecosystems in the surface ocean, without oxidising the atmosphere. Here we use a suite of models to explore the implications for carbon cycling and the Great Oxidation. We find that recycling of oxygen and carbon within early aerobic marine ecosystems would have restricted the balanced fluxes of methane and oxygen escaping from the ocean, lowering the atmospheric concentration of methane in the Great Oxidation transition and its aftermath. This in turn would have minimised any bi-stability of atmospheric oxygen, by weakening a stabilising feedback on oxygen from hydrogen escape to space. The result would have been a more reversible and probably episodic rise of oxygen at the Great Oxidation transition, consistent with existing geochemical evidence. The resulting drop in methane levels to ≈10 ppm is consistent with climate cooling at the time but adds to the puzzle of what kept the rest of the Proterozoic warm. A key test of the scenario of abundant methanotrophy in oxygen oases before the Great Oxidation is its predicted effects on the organic carbon isotope (δ13Corg) record. Our open ocean general circulation model predicts δC13org ≈ - 30 to -45‰ consistent with most data from 2.65 to 2.45 Ga. However, values of δC13org ≈ - 50 ‰ require an extreme scenario such as concentrated methanotroph production where shelf-slope upwelling of methane-rich water met oxic shelf water.

  5. Stable carbon isotopes of invertebrate remains : do they reveal past methane release from lakes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hardenbroek-van Ammerstol, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    Lakes are a source of methane, an important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. In order to understand increasing methane emissions in the present, it is important to study the variations of methane release during past periods of climate change. However, records of methane release from lakes over time

  6. Molecular characterization of a microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification under micro-aerobic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jingjing; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Liang; Ju, Xi; Wu, Weixiang; Chen, Yingxu

    2013-01-01

    Methane can be used as an alternative carbon source in biological denitrification because it is nontoxic, widely available and relatively inexpensive. A microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (MOD) was enriched with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions. The 16S rRNA gene combined with pmoA phylogeny of methanotrophs and nirK phylogeny of denitrifiers were analysed to reveal the dominant microbial populations and functi...

  7. Stable carbon isotopes of invertebrate remains: do they reveal past methane release from lakes?

    OpenAIRE

    van Hardenbroek-van Ammerstol, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Lakes are a source of methane, an important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. In order to understand increasing methane emissions in the present, it is important to study the variations of methane release during past periods of climate change. However, records of methane release from lakes over time scales longer than a few years are extremely rare. In this thesis a method is explored to reconstruct past methane availability in lakes based on the stable carbon isotope composition (delta 13C) ...

  8. Dams release methane even in temperate zoned; Les barrages emettent aussi du methane en zones temperees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemarchand, F.

    2010-12-15

    The Wohlen lake (near Bern) is a retaining dam built 90 years ago that has undergone a campaign to measure the quantity of methane released. The campaign lasted 1 year and the result was unexpected: 0.15 g/m{sup 2}*day which one of the highest release rates in temperate zones. This result is all the more stunning since water stays only 2 days in average in the reservoir and that the drowned area is not important. In fact the river Aar that feeds the lake is loaded with organic matter coming from humane activities: agriculture and 3 sewage plants. This organic matter decays in the lake releasing methane. (A.C.)

  9. Variability in aerobic methane oxidation over the past 1.2 Myrs recorded in microbial biomarker signatures from Congo fan sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Helen M.; Handley, Luke; Spencer-Jones, Charlotte L.; Dinga, Bienvenu Jean; Schefuß, Enno; Mann, Paul J.; Poulsen, John R.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Wabakanghanzi, Jose N.; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Methane (CH4) is a strong greenhouse gas known to have perturbed global climate in the past, especially when released in large quantities over short time periods from continental or marine sources. It is therefore crucial to understand and, if possible, quantify the individual and combined response of these variable methane sources to natural climate variability. However, past changes in the stability of greenhouse gas reservoirs remain uncertain and poorly constrained by geological evidence. Here, we present a record from the Congo fan of a highly specific bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) biomarker for aerobic methane oxidation (AMO), 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol), that identifies discrete periods of increased AMO as far back as 1.2 Ma. Fluctuations in the concentration of aminopentol, and other 35-aminoBHPs, follow a pattern that correlates with late Quaternary glacial-interglacial climate cycles, with highest concentrations during warm periods. We discuss possible sources of aminopentol, and the methane consumed by the precursor methanotrophs, within the context of the Congo River setting, including supply of methane oxidation markers from terrestrial watersheds and/or marine sources (gas hydrate and/or deep subsurface gas reservoir). Compound-specific carbon isotope values of -30‰ to -40‰ for BHPs in ODP 1075 and strong similarities between the BHP signature of the core and surface sediments from the Congo estuary and floodplain wetlands from the interior of the Congo River Basin, support a methanotrophic and likely terrigenous origin of the 35-aminoBHPs found in the fan sediments. This new evidence supports a causal connection between marine sediment BHP records of tropical deep sea fans and wetland settings in the feeding river catchments, and thus tropical continental hydrology. Further research is needed to better constrain the different sources and pathways of methane emission. However, this study identifies the large potential

  10. Temperature-induced increase in methane release from peat bogs: a mesocosm experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F van Winden

    Full Text Available Peat bogs are primarily situated at mid to high latitudes and future climatic change projections indicate that these areas may become increasingly wetter and warmer. Methane emissions from peat bogs are reduced by symbiotic methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs. Higher temperatures and increasing water levels will enhance methane production, but also methane oxidation. To unravel the temperature effect on methane and carbon cycling, a set of mesocosm experiments were executed, where intact peat cores containing actively growing Sphagnum were incubated at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C. After two months of incubation, methane flux measurements indicated that, at increasing temperatures, methanotrophs are not able to fully compensate for the increasing methane production by methanogens. Net methane fluxes showed a strong temperature-dependence, with higher methane fluxes at higher temperatures. After removal of Sphagnum, methane fluxes were higher, increasing with increasing temperature. This indicates that the methanotrophs associated with Sphagnum plants play an important role in limiting the net methane flux from peat. Methanotrophs appear to consume almost all methane transported through diffusion between 5 and 15°C. Still, even though methane consumption increased with increasing temperature, the higher fluxes from the methane producing microbes could not be balanced by methanotrophic activity. The efficiency of the Sphagnum-methanotroph consortium as a filter for methane escape thus decreases with increasing temperature. Whereas 98% of the produced methane is retained at 5°C, this drops to approximately 50% at 25°C. This implies that warming at the mid to high latitudes may be enhanced through increased methane release from peat bogs.

  11. Semi-aerobic fermentation as a novel pre-treatment to obtain VFA and increase methane yield from primary sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, M; Astals, S; Clarke, W P; Jensen, P D

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing trend to consider organic wastes as potential sources of renewable energy and value-add products. Fermentation products have emerged as attractive value-add option due to relative easy production and broad application range. However, pre-fermentation and extraction of soluble products may impact down-stream treatment processes, particularly energy recovery by anaerobic digestion. This paper investigates primary sludge pre-fermentation at different temperatures (20, 37, 55, and 70°C), treatment times (12, 24, 48, and 72h), and oxygen availability (semi-aerobic, anaerobic); and its impact on anaerobic digestion. Pre-fermentation at 20 and 37°C succeeded for VFA production with acetate and propionate being major products. Pre-fermentation at 37, 55, and 70°C resulted in higher solubilisation yield but it reduced sludge methane potential by 20%. Under semi-aerobic conditions, pre-fermentation allowed both VFA recovery (43gCODVFAkg(-1)VS) and improved methane potential. The latter phenomenon was linked to fungi that colonised the sludge top layer during pre-fermentation. PMID:26551651

  12. Gas hydrate destabilization and methane release events in the Krishna-Godavari Basin, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joshi, R.K.; Mazumdar, A.; Peketi, A.; Ramamurty, P.B.; Naik, B.G.; Kocherla, M.; Carvalho, M.A.; Mahalakshmi, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramana, M.V.

    foraminifera to 13C depleted bicarbonate ion produced via     aerobic/ anaerobic oxidation of methane in water column/ sediment-water interface, a significant number of publications attribute the 13C depletion to diagenetic alteration of non.... Res. Lett. 35, L09307. Hardy, R., Tucker, M., 1988. X-ray powder diffraction of sediments. Techniques in Sedimentology, edited by, M. Tucker, pp 191-228, Blackwell Scientific Publication, Oxford, U.K. Harrison, B.K., Zhang, H., Berelson, W...

  13. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurten, T.; Zhou, L.; Makkonen, R.;

    2011-01-01

    contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4) levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is......The release of vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere as a result of clathrate destabilization is a potential mechanism for rapid amplification of global warming. Previous studies have calculated the enhanced warming based mainly on the radiative effect of the methane itself, with smaller...... forcing that is comparable in magnitude to the long-wave radiative forcing ("enhanced greenhouse effect") of the added methane. Together, the indirect CH4-O-3 and CH4-OHaerosol forcings could more than double the warming effect of large methane increases. Our findings may help explain the anomalously...

  14. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The release of vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere as a result of clathrate destabilization is a potential mechanism for rapid amplification of global warming. Previous studies have calculated the enhanced warming based mainly on the radiative effect of the methane itself, with smaller contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4 levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is predicted to significantly decrease hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations, while moderately increasing ozone (O3. These changes lead to a 70 % increase in the atmospheric lifetime of methane, and an 18 % decrease in global mean cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC. The CDNC change causes a radiative forcing that is comparable in magnitude to the longwave radiative forcing ("enhanced greenhouse effect" of the added methane. Together, the indirect CH4-O3 and CH4-OH-aerosol forcings could more than double the warming effect of large methane increases. Our findings may help explain the anomalously large temperature changes associated with historic methane releases.

  15. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The release of vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere as a result of clathrate destabilization is a potential mechanism for rapid amplification of global warming. Previous studies have calculated the enhanced warming based mainly on the radiative effect of the methane itself, with smaller contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4 levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is predicted to significantly decrease hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations, while moderately increasing ozone (O3. These changes lead to a 70% increase in the atmospheric lifetime of methane, and an 18% decrease in global mean cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC. The CDNC change causes a radiative forcing that is comparable in magnitude to the longwave radiative forcing ("enhanced greenhouse effect" of the added methane. Together, the indirect CH4-O3 and CH4-OH-aerosol forcings could more than double the warming effect of large methane increases. Our findings may help explain the anomalously large temperature changes associated with historic methane releases.

  16. Estimating methane releases from natural gas production and transmission in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedikov, J. V.; Akopova (Vniigaz), G. S.; Gladkaja (Vniigaz), N. G.; Piotrovskij (Tyumentransgaz), A. S.; Markellov (Volgotransgaz), V. A.; Salichov (Yamburggazdabuicha), S. S.; Kaesler, H.; Ramm, A.; Müller von Blumencron, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    Methane releases from the RAO Gazprom gas production and transmission facilities in Russia were determined in an extensive measurement program carried out in 1996 and 1997. Subsequently, the measurements were extrapolated to the Russian scale. The results show that methane releases from gas transmission are less than 1% of throughput. Methane loss from gas production in northwestern Siberia appears to be relatively small, generally less than 0.1%. The largest methane emissions result from venting during maintenance and repairs, leaks from valves on transmission lines, and from compressor stations. The measurements show that, in the case of leaks, a limited number of major ones accounts for most of the methane releases. Methane emissions expressed as a percentage of the gas volume produced or transported are (rounded figures): production and processing 0.1%, pipelines 0.2%, compressor stations 0.7%, so that the total release by production and transmission in Russia amounts to about 1.0%, i.e. ˜5.4×10 9 m 3/a (˜4 Tg/a). This is consistent with our previous preliminary estimates, indicating that maximum emissions are 1.5-1.8%/a. However, this is generally lower than most other estimates and speculations.

  17. Methane oxidation in a crude oil contaminated aquifer: Delineation of aerobic reactions at the plume fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Blowes, D.W.; Kirshtein, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution direct-push profiling over short vertical distances was used to investigate CH4 attenuation in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. The contaminant plume was delineated using dissolved gases, redox sensitive components, major ions, carbon isotope ratios in CH4 and CO2, and the presence of methanotrophic bacteria. Sharp redox gradients were observed near the water table. Shifts in ??13CCH4 from an average of - 57.6??? (?? 1.7???) in the methanogenic zone to - 39.6??? (?? 8.7???) at 105 m downgradient, strongly suggest CH4 attenuation through microbially mediated degradation. In the downgradient zone the aerobic/anaerobic transition is up to 0.5 m below the water table suggesting that transport of O2 across the water table is leading to aerobic degradation of CH4 at this interface. Dissolved N2 concentrations that exceeded those expected for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere indicated bubble entrapment followed by preferential stripping of O2 through aerobic degradation of CH4 or other hydrocarbons. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to distinguish between areas of significant bubble entrapment and areas where other processes such as the infiltration of O 2 rich recharge water were important O2 transport mechanisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Methane release from sediment seeps to the atmosphere is counteracted by highly active Methylococcaceae in the water column of deep oligotrophic Lake Constance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, Maren; Bussmann, Ingeborg; Tichy, Lucas; Deutzmann, Jörg; Schink, Bernhard; Pester, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Methane emissions from freshwater environments contribute substantially to global warming but are under strong control of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria. Recently discovered methane seeps (pockmarks) in freshwater lake sediments have the potential to bypass this control by their strong outgassing activity. Whether this is counteracted by pelagic methanotrophs is not well understood yet. We used a (3)H-CH4-radiotracer technique and pmoA-based molecular approaches to assess the activity, abundance and community structure of pelagic methanotrophs above active pockmarks in deep oligotrophic Lake Constance. Above profundal pockmarks, methane oxidation rates (up to 458 nmol CH4 l(-1) d(-1)) exceeded those of the surrounding water column by two orders of magnitude and coincided with maximum methanotroph abundances of 0.6% of the microbial community. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a dominance of members of the Methylococcaceae in the water column of both, pockmark and reference sites, with most of the retrieved sequences being associated with a water-column specific clade. Communities at pockmark and reference locations also differed in parts, which was likely caused by entrainment of sediment-hosted methanotrophs at pockmark sites. Our results show that the release of seep-derived methane to the atmosphere is counteracted by a distinct methanotrophic community with a pronounced activity throughout bottom waters. PMID:27267930

  19. In Situ Mass Spectrometry in Marine Science: Distribution and Fate of Methane Released from Submarine Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Gentz, Torben; Schlüter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The use of an improved in situ mass spectrometer (UWMS, Inspectr200-200) to answer key questions in marine science is presented. Key benefits of using this technique in aquatic systems is the high sampling frequency and quantification of major and trace gases in situ, online and real time. Methane (CH4) is the most abundant organic compound in the atmosphere and its influence on global climate is the subject of current scientific discussion. One source of atmospheric methane is the release...

  20. Observations of the release of non-methane hydrocarbons from fractured shale

    OpenAIRE

    Sommariva, Roberto; Blake, Robert S.; Cuss, Robert J.; Cordell, Rebecca L.; Harrington, Jon F.; White, Iain R.; Monks, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The organic content of shale has become of commercial interest as a source of hydrocarbons, owing to the development of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”). While the main focus is on the extraction of methane, shale also contains significant amounts of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). We describe the first real-time observations of the release of NMHCs from a fractured shale. Samples from the Bowland-Hodder formation (England) were analyzed under different conditions using mass spectrometry, ...

  1. Reversing methanogenesis to capture methane for liquid biofuel precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Soo, Valerie W. C.; McAnulty, Michael J; Tripathi, Arti; Zhu, Fayin; Zhang, Limin; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Smith, Philip B.; Agrawal, Saumya; Nazem-Bokaee, Hadi; Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Salis, Howard M.; James G. Ferry; Maranas, Costas D.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Thomas K. Wood

    2016-01-01

    Background Energy from remote methane reserves is transformative; however, unintended release of this potent greenhouse gas makes it imperative to convert methane efficiently into more readily transported biofuels. No pure microbial culture that grows on methane anaerobically has been isolated, despite that methane capture through anaerobic processes is more efficient than aerobic ones. Results Here we engineered the archaeal methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans to grow anaerobically on meth...

  2. Preliminary results from sulfur hexafluoride and deuterated methane releases of December 10, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-laboratory experiments were performed at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) during December 1975. Of all the experiments, the one involving the sulfur hexafluoride and deuterated methane on December 10 was the most extensive. This experiment tested the LLL-ARAC system and the relative effectiveness of several different tracers for atmospheric transport and diffusion studies. The goals of this test were: to determine whether sulfur hexafluoride, krypton-85, and deuterated methane tracers [methane-20 (12C2H4) and methane-21 (13C2H4)] give comparable results when they are released and sampled simultaneously; to study the transport and dispersion of the plume out to 100 km from the point source; to gain experience in release, sample processing, and analyzing these tracers; and to exercise the LLL-ARAC system. The comparisons of the relative effectiveness of the deuterated methane and sulfur hexafluoride as tracers indicated that the methane concentrations were a factor of 4 below the sulfur hexafluoride concentrations when normalized to consistent units. The 85Kr results differed from the other two tracers as a result of a difference time sequence of release

  3. Planktonic and sediment-associated aerobic methanotrophs in two seep systems along the North American margin

    OpenAIRE

    Tavormina, Patricia L; Ussler, William; Orphan, Victoria J

    2008-01-01

    Methane vents are of significant geochemical and ecological importance. Notable progress has been made towards understanding anaerobic methane oxidation in marine sediments, however, the diversity and distribution of aerobic methanotrophs in the water column are poorly characterized. Both environments play an essential role in regulating methane release from the oceans to the atmosphere. In this study, the diversity of particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) and 16S rRNA genes from two metha...

  4. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  5. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  6. Compositional and functional stability of aerobic methane consuming communities in drained and rewetted peat meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sascha; Niklaus, Pascal A; Badwan Morcillo, Sara; Meima Franke, Marion; Lüke, Claudia; Reim, Andreas; Bodelier, Paul L E

    2015-11-01

    The restoration of peatlands is an important strategy to counteract subsidence and loss of biodiversity. However, responses of important microbial soil processes are poorly understood. We assessed functioning, diversity and spatial organization of methanotrophic communities in drained and rewetted peat meadows with different water table management and agricultural practice. Results show that the methanotrophic diversity was similar between drained and rewetted sites with a remarkable dominance of the genus Methylocystis. Enzyme kinetics depicted no major differences, indicating flexibility in the methane (CH4) concentrations that can be used by the methanotrophic community. Short-term flooding led to temporary elevated CH4 emission but to neither major changes in abundances of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) nor major changes in CH4 consumption kinetics in drained agriculturally used peat meadows. Radiolabeling and autoradiographic imaging of intact soil cores revealed a markedly different spatial arrangement of the CH4 consuming zone in cores exposed to near-atmospheric and elevated CH4. The observed spatial patterns of CH4 consumption in drained peat meadows with and without short-term flooding highlighted the spatial complexity and responsiveness of the CH4 consuming zone upon environmental change. The methanotrophic microbial community is not generally altered and harbors MOB that can cover a large range of CH4 concentrations offered due to water-table fluctuations, effectively mitigating CH4 emissions. PMID:26449384

  7. Central release of nitric oxide mediates antinociception induced by aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, G S; Duarte, I D; Perez, A C

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a soluble gas that participates in important functions of the central nervous system, such as cognitive function, maintenance of synaptic plasticity for the control of sleep, appetite, body temperature, neurosecretion, and antinociception. Furthermore, during exercise large amounts of NO are released that contribute to maintaining body homeostasis. Besides NO production, physical exercise has been shown to induce antinociception. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception. In both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests, central [intrathecal (it) and intracerebroventricular (icv)] pretreatment with inhibitors of the NO/cGMP/KATP pathway (L-NOArg, ODQ, and glybenclamide) prevented the antinociceptive effect induced by aerobic exercise (AE). Furthermore, pretreatment (it, icv) with specific NO synthase inhibitors (L-NIO, aminoguanidine, and L-NPA) also prevented this effect. Supporting the hypothesis of the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception, nitrite levels in the cerebrospinal fluid increased immediately after AE. Therefore, the present study suggests that, during exercise, the NO released centrally induced antinociception. PMID:25517916

  8. Central release of nitric oxide mediates antinociception induced by aerobic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Galdino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a soluble gas that participates in important functions of the central nervous system, such as cognitive function, maintenance of synaptic plasticity for the control of sleep, appetite, body temperature, neurosecretion, and antinociception. Furthermore, during exercise large amounts of NO are released that contribute to maintaining body homeostasis. Besides NO production, physical exercise has been shown to induce antinociception. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception. In both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests, central [intrathecal (it and intracerebroventricular (icv] pretreatment with inhibitors of the NO/cGMP/KATP pathway (L-NOArg, ODQ, and glybenclamide prevented the antinociceptive effect induced by aerobic exercise (AE. Furthermore, pretreatment (it, icv with specific NO synthase inhibitors (L-NIO, aminoguanidine, and L-NPA also prevented this effect. Supporting the hypothesis of the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception, nitrite levels in the cerebrospinal fluid increased immediately after AE. Therefore, the present study suggests that, during exercise, the NO released centrally induced antinociception.

  9. Microbial community structure in a thermophilic aerobic digester used as a sludge pretreatment process for the mesophilic anaerobic digestion and the enhancement of methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Park, Sang Kyu; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-10-01

    An effective two-stage sewage sludge digestion process, consisting of thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) followed by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD), was developed for efficient sludge reduction and methane production. Using TAD as a biological pretreatment, the total volatile suspended solid reduction (VSSR) and methane production rate (MPR) in the MAD reactor were significantly improved. According to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, the results indicated that the dominant bacteria species such as Ureibacillus thermophiles and Bacterium thermus in TAD were major routes for enhancing soluble organic matter. TAD pretreatment using a relatively short SRT of 1 day showed highly increased soluble organic products and positively affected an increment of bacteria populations which performed interrelated microbial metabolisms with methanogenic species in the MAD; consequently, a quantitative real-time PCR indicated greatly increased Methanosarcinales (acetate-utilizing methanogens) in the MAD, resulting in enhanced methane production. PMID:23419990

  10. Quantification of methane fluxes from industrial sites using a combination of a tracer release method and a Gaussian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ars, S.; Broquet, G.; Yver-Kwok, C.; Wu, L.; Bousquet, P.; Roustan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations keep on increasing in the atmosphere since industrial revolution. Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic GHG after carbon dioxide (CO2). Its sources and sinks are nowadays well identified however their relative contributions remain uncertain. The industries and the waste treatment emit an important part of the anthropogenic methane that is difficult to quantify because the sources are fugitive and discontinuous. A better estimation of methane emissions could help industries to adapt their mitigation's politic and encourage them to install methane recovery systems in order to reduce their emissions while saving money. Different methods exist to quantify methane emissions. Among them is the tracer release method consisting in releasing a tracer gas near the methane source at a well-known rate and measuring both their concentrations in the emission plume. The methane rate is calculated using the ratio of methane and tracer concentrations and the emission rate of the tracer. A good estimation of the methane emissions requires a good differentiation between the methane actually emitted by the site and the methane from the background concentration level, but also a good knowledge of the sources distribution over the site. For this purpose, a Gaussian plume model is used in addition to the tracer release method to assess the emission rates calculated. In a first step, the data obtained for the tracer during a field campaign are used to tune the model. Different model's parameterizations have been tested to find the best representation of the atmospheric dispersion conditions. Once these parameters are set, methane emissions are estimated thanks to the methane concentrations measured and a Bayesian inversion. This enables to adjust the position and the emission rate of the different methane sources of the site and remove the methane background concentration.

  11. Biopolymer and Cation Release in Aerobic and Anaerobic Digestion and the Consequent Impact on Sludge Dewatering and Conditioning Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rust, Mary Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Sludge dewatering and chemical conditioning requirements were examined from the perspective of biopolymer and cation release from activated sludge flocs. Both aerobic and anaerobic digestion processes were considered from two different activated sludge sources at a temperature of 20° C. Polymer demand and specific resistance to filtration increased with an increase in total soluble biopolymer concentration for all temperature ranges. In anaerobic digestion,...

  12. Observations of the release of non-methane hydrocarbons from fractured shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommariva, Roberto; Blake, Robert S; Cuss, Robert J; Cordell, Rebecca L; Harrington, Jon F; White, Iain R; Monks, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    The organic content of shale has become of commercial interest as a source of hydrocarbons, owing to the development of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking"). While the main focus is on the extraction of methane, shale also contains significant amounts of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). We describe the first real-time observations of the release of NMHCs from a fractured shale. Samples from the Bowland-Hodder formation (England) were analyzed under different conditions using mass spectrometry, with the objective of understanding the dynamic process of gas release upon fracturing of the shale. A wide range of NMHCs (alkanes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, and bicyclic hydrocarbons) are released at parts per million or parts per billion level with temperature- and humidity-dependent release rates, which can be rationalized in terms of the physicochemical characteristics of different hydrocarbon classes. Our results indicate that higher energy inputs (i.e., temperatures) significantly increase the amount of NMHCs released from shale, while humidity tends to suppress it; additionally, a large fraction of the gas is released within the first hour after the shale has been fractured. These findings suggest that other hydrocarbons of commercial interest may be extracted from shale and open the possibility to optimize the "fracking" process, improving gas yields and reducing environmental impacts. PMID:24978099

  13. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchman, David L. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  14. Methane release from pingo-like features across the South Kara Sea shelf, an area of thawing offshore permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Pavel; Portnov, Alexey; Mienert, Jurgen; Semenov, Peter; Ilatovskaya, Polina

    2015-08-01

    The Holocene marine transgression starting at ~19 ka flooded the Arctic shelves driving extensive thawing of terrestrial permafrost. It thereby promoted methanogenesis within sediments, the dissociation of gas hydrates, and the release of formerly trapped gas, with the accumulation in pressure of released methane eventually triggering blowouts through weakened zones in the overlying and thinned permafrost. Here we present a range of geophysical and chemical scenarios for the formation of pingo-like formations (PLFs) leading to potential blowouts. Specifically, we report on methane anomalies from the South Kara Sea shelf focusing on two PLFs imaged from high-resolution seismic records. A variety of geochemical methods are applied to study concentrations and types of gas, its character, and genesis. PLF 1 demonstrates ubiquitously low-methane concentrations (14.2-55.3 ppm) that are likely due to partly unfrozen sediments with an ice-saturated internal core reaching close to the seafloor. In contrast, PLF 2 reveals anomalously high-methane concentrations of >120,000 ppm where frozen sediments are completely absent. The methane in all recovered samples is of microbial and not of thermogenic origin from deep hydrocarbon sources. However, the relatively low organic matter content (0.52-1.69%) of seafloor sediments restricts extensive in situ methane production. As a consequence, we hypothesize that the high-methane concentrations at PLF 2 are due to microbial methane production and migration from a deeper source.

  15. A silica-immobilized pt2+catalyst for the selective, aerobic oxidation of methane via an electron-transfer chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengjian An; Xiulian Pan; Xiumei Liu; Xiuwen Han; Xinhe Bao

    2008-01-01

    The combination of Pt2+, benzoquinone and NaNO2 forms an electron-transfer chain, which leads to the oxidation of methane by O2 in CF3COOH aqueous solution. The overall turnover number per hour (TOF) of methane at 120 ℃ is 0.5 h-1, however, only about one fourth (23%) of methane is converted to the desired product of methanol in the formation of CF3COOCH3. The over-oxidation of methane to CO2, over the catalyst with the Pt2+ species immobilized via 2,2'-bipyridyl as a ligand on the silica substrate, is depressed distinctly. Under the same conditions, the conversion to methanol dominates, and no CO2 is observed, on account of the over-oxidation of methane, as confirmed by the isotope experiment.

  16. Distribution and fate of methane released from submarine sources - Results of measurements using an improved in situ mass spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Gentz, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is the most frequent organic compound in the atmosphere and its influence on the global climate is subject of currently conducted scientific discussion. Despite its limited content in the atmosphere (1787 ppbv in 2003), it contributes to ~15 % of the global warming as a result of its 20 to 40 times higher global warming potential compared to carbon dioxide (CO2) on a 100 year timescale. One source of atmospheric methane is the release of biogenic and/or thermogeni...

  17. Ammonium-dependent regulation of aerobic methane-consuming bacteria in landfill cover soil by leachate irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Lü; Pinjing He; Min Guo; Na Yang; Liming Shao

    2012-01-01

    The impacts of landfill leachate irrigation on methane oxidation activities and methane-consuming bacteria populations were studied by incubation of landfill cover soils with leachate and (NH4)2SO4 solution at different ammonium concentrations.The community structures and abundances of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were examined by PCRDGGE and real-time PCR.Compared with the pure (NH4)2SO4 solution,leachate addition was found to have a positive effect on methane oxidation activity.In terms of the irrigation amount,ammonium in leachate was responsible for the actual inhibition of leachate.The extent of inhibitory effect mainly depended on its ammonium concentration.The suppression of the predominant methaneconsuming bacteria,type Ⅰ MOB,was responsible for the decreased methane oxidation activity by ammonium inhibition.Methaneconsuming bacteria responded diversely in abundance to ammonium.The abundance of type Ⅰ MOB decreased by fivefold; type Ⅱ MOB showed stimulation response of fivefold magnification upon the first addition but lessened to be lower than the original level after the second addition; the amount of AOB was stimulated to increase for 20-30 times gradually.Accumulated nitrate from nitrification strengthened the ammonium inhibition on type Ⅰ and type Ⅱ MOB,as a result,repetitive irrigation was unfavorable for methane oxidation.

  18. Methane emission estimates using chamber and tracer release experiments for a municipal waste water treatment plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yver Kwok, C. E.; Müller, D.; Caldow, C.; Lebègue, B.; Mønster, J. G.; Rella, C. W.; Scheutz, C.; Schmidt, M.; Ramonet, M.; Warneke, T.; Broquet, G.; Ciais, P.

    2015-07-01

    This study presents two methods for estimating methane emissions from a waste water treatment plant (WWTP) along with results from a measurement campaign at a WWTP in Valence, France. These methods, chamber measurements and tracer release, rely on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy instruments. We show that the tracer release method is suitable for quantifying facility- and some process-scale emissions, while the chamber measurements provide insight into individual process emissions. Uncertainties for the two methods are described and discussed. Applying the methods to CH4 emissions of the WWTP, we confirm that the open basins are not a major source of CH4 on the WWTP (about 10 % of the total emissions), but that the pretreatment and sludge treatment are the main emitters. Overall, the waste water treatment plant is representative of an average French WWTP.

  19. On the phenomenon of the fast release of energy in irradiated solid methane. Application of the thermal explosion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general idea of the phenomenon of fast releasing energy stored in irradiated solid methane is provided. Temperature instability of the matter in question is analyzed around the classic theory of homogeneous chemical reactions and of thermal explosion as it was used to apply in cold neutron sources designing. Stability criteria derived by different methods for uniform temperature are demonstrated to vary in a numerical factor by several times. The author pioneers derivation of approximate criteria for a slug of methane of complex shape and for the case of the non-uniform temperature distribution as well. (author). 11 refs., 1 fig

  20. Central release of nitric oxide mediates antinociception induced by aerobic exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Galdino, G.S.; Duarte, I D; Perez, A C

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a soluble gas that participates in important functions of the central nervous system, such as cognitive function, maintenance of synaptic plasticity for the control of sleep, appetite, body temperature, neurosecretion, and antinociception. Furthermore, during exercise large amounts of NO are released that contribute to maintaining body homeostasis. Besides NO production, physical exercise has been shown to induce antinociception. Thus, the present study aimed to investiga...

  1. Biogas and methane production in an aerobic reactor; Produccion de biogas y metano en un reactor anaerobio UASB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Borges, E.; Mendez Novelo, R.; Magana Pietra, A.

    1998-06-01

    On the basis of the results obtained during the evaluation of an anaerobic digester in treating pig farm sewage, mathematical models were constructed predicting the system`s efficiency in producing biogas from such waste, and the methane content of this gas, as a function of the influent`s hydraulic retention time(HRT) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The experimental device consisted of a UASB reactor at the bottom and a high-rate sedimentator at the top with a total operational volume of 534 litres. The results obtained to establish the critical operating parameters are reported. The production of biogas was 259 1/m``3 and methane 217 1/m``3 with an HRT of 1.3 days when a load of 3.1 kg-COD/m``3 day was applied. The mathematical models presented analyses biogas production as a variable response and the influents` HRT and COD as independent variables to assess the efficiency of the system. (Author) 13 refs.

  2. Controls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapstein, Sara J.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, Anthony; Harden, Jennifer W.; Czimczik, C.I.; Xu, Xiaomei; Chanton, J.P.; Waddington, James Michael

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost thaw in peat plateaus leads to the flooding of surface soils and the formation of collapse scar bogs, which have the potential to be large emitters of methane (CH4) from surface peat as well as deeper, previously frozen, permafrost carbon (C). We used a network of bubble traps, permanently installed 20 cm and 60 cm beneath the moss surface, to examine controls on ebullition from three collapse bogs in interior Alaska. Overall, ebullition was dominated by episodic events that were associated with changes in atmospheric pressure, and ebullition was mainly a surface process regulated by both seasonal ice dynamics and plant phenology. The majority (>90%) of ebullition occurred in surface peat layers, with little bubble production in deeper peat. During periods of peak plant biomass, bubbles contained acetate-derived CH4 dominated (>90%) by modern C fixed from the atmosphere following permafrost thaw. Post-senescence, the contribution of CH4 derived from thawing permafrost C was more variable and accounted for up to 22% (on average 7%), in the most recently thawed site. Thus, the formation of thermokarst features resulting from permafrost thaw in peatlands stimulates ebullition and CH4 release both by creating flooded surface conditions conducive to CH4 production and bubbling as well as by exposing thawing permafrost C to mineralization.

  3. Non-microbial methane formation in oxic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jugold

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Methane plays an important role as a radiatively and chemically active gas in our atmosphere. Until recently, sources of atmospheric methane in the biosphere have been attributed to strictly anaerobic microbial processes during degradation of organic matter. However, a large fraction of methane produced in the anoxic soil layers does not reach the atmosphere due to methanotrophic consumption in the overlaying oxic soil. Although methane fluxes from aerobic soils have been observed, an alternative source other than methanogenesis has not been identified thus far.

    Here we provide evidence for non-microbial methane formation in soils under oxic conditions. We found that soils release methane upon heating and other environmental factors like ultraviolet irradiation, and drying-rewetting cycles. We suggest that chemical formation of methane during degradation of soil organic matter may represent the missing soil source that is needed to fully understand the methane cycle in aerobic soils. Although the emission fluxes are relatively low when compared to those from wetlands, they may be important in warm and wet regions subjected to ultraviolet radiation. We suggest that this methane source is highly sensitive to global change.

  4. Seasonal methane accumulation and release from a gas emission site in the central North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, S.; Gentz, T.; Körber, J.-H.; Torres, M. E.; Römer, M.; Sahling, H.; Wintersteller, P.; Martinez, R.; Schlüter, M.; Helmke, E.

    2015-09-01

    We investigated dissolved methane distributions along a 6 km transect crossing active seep sites at 40 m water depth in the central North Sea. These investigations were done under conditions of thermal stratification in summer (July 2013) and homogenous water column in winter (January 2014). Dissolved methane accumulated below the seasonal thermocline in summer with a median concentration of 390 nM, whereas during winter, methane concentrations were typically much lower (median concentration of 22 nM). High-resolution methane analysis using an underwater mass-spectrometer confirmed our summer results and was used to document prevailing stratification over the tidal cycle. We contrast estimates of methane oxidation rates (from 0.1 to 4.0 nM day-1) using the traditional approach scaled to methane concentrations with microbial turnover time values and suggest that the scaling to concentration may obscure the ecosystem microbial activity when comparing systems with different methane concentrations. Our measured and averaged rate constants (k') were on the order of 0.01 day-1, equivalent to a turnover time of 100 days, even when summer stratification led to enhanced methane concentrations in the bottom water. Consistent with these observations, we could not detect known methanotrophs and pmoA genes in water samples collected during both seasons. Estimated methane fluxes indicate that horizontal transport is the dominant process dispersing the methane plume. During periods of high wind speed (winter), more methane is lost to the atmosphere than oxidized in the water. Microbial oxidation seems of minor importance throughout the year.

  5. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurten, T.; Zhou, L.; Makkonen, R.;

    2011-01-01

    contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4) levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is...

  6. Release of Methane from Bering Sea Sediments During the Last Glacial Period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mea Cook; Lloyd Keigwin

    2007-11-30

    Several lines of evidence suggest that during times of elevated methane flux the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) was positioned near the sediment-water interface. We studied two cores (from 700 m and 1457 m water depth) from the Umnak Plateau region. Anomalously low d13C and high d18O in benthic and planktonic foraminifera in these cores are the consequence of diagenetic overgrowths of authigenic carbonates. There are multiple layers of authigenic-carbonate-rich sediment in these cores, and the stable isotope compositions of the carbonates are consistent with those formed during anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The carbonate-rich layers are associated with biomarkers produced by methane-oxidizing archaea, archaeol and glyceryl dibiphytanyl glyceryl tetraether (GDGT). The d13C of the archaeol and certain GDGTs are isotopically depleted. These carbonate- and AOM-biomarker-rich layers were emplaced in the SMTZ during episodes when there was a high flux of methane or methane-rich fluids upward in the sediment column. The sediment methane in the Umnak Plateau region appears to have been very dynamic during the glacial period, and interacted with the ocean-atmosphere system at millennial time scales. The upper-most carbonate-rich layers are in radiocarbon-dated sediment deposited during interstitials 2 and 3, 28-20 ka, and may be associated with the climate warming during this time.

  7. Global climate change linkage with episodic methane release even in the western north Pacific in the last glacial period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The remarkable similarity of late Quaternary atmospheric methane and temperature variations recorded in ice cores suggests that methane has played a significant role in millennial-scale climatic oscillations, especially Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) interstadial. Variations in the size and distribution of marine-sedimentary reservoirs of methane on the continental margins throughout the world's oceans are thought to be one of the important factors controlling the global methane cycle. Marine sediments can act as hosts to gas hydrates under appropriate conditions of high pressure and/or low temperature, and sufficient organic carbon; on the other hand, they show a significant sensitivity to small perturbations in the physical and chemical conditions within the reservoir. During the Last Glacial, direct and indirect evidence accumulated from geochemical data suggests that methane episodically released from hydrate trapped in the seafloor sediments. Recently, Kennett and coworkers interpreted δ13C variations of planktonic and benthic foraminifera found in Last Glacial sediments in the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) as evidence for periodic releases of methane, arising from the dissociation of methane hydrate, and its subsequent oxidation in bottom- and/or surface-water environments. This result provided the basis for the 'Clathrate Gun Hypothesis', which highlights the potential role of methane hydrate in Quaternary variations in atmospheric methane concentrations. According to recent observations of anomalous bottom-simulating reflections(BSR), the northwest Pacific marginal sediments around Japan main islands bear large abundances of methane hydrate. In this study, the piston cores from the continental slope sediments in the Oyashio current region, which recently is found to bear immense amounts of methane hydrate, have been investigated about planktonic and benthic foraminiferal carbon isotope records during the past 34 cal. kyr BP. Moreover, in order to investigate

  8. Quantifying methane emission from fugitive sources by combining tracer release and downwind measurements – A sensitivity analysis based on multiple field surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter; Rella, Chris W.; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Using a dual species methane/acetylene instrument based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), the dynamic plume tracer dispersion method for quantifying the emission rate of methane was successfully tested in four measurement campaigns: (1) controlled methane and trace gas release with different...... instrument can measure methane plumes more than 1.2km away from small sources (about 5kgh−1) in urban areas with a measurement frequency allowing plume crossing at normal driving speed. The method can be used for quantification of total methane emissions from diffuse area sources down to 1kg per hour and can...... plume concentrations of tracer gas and methane gives the most reliable results for measurements at various distances to the source, compared to the ratio of the highest concentration in the plume, the direct concentration ratio and using a Gaussian plume model. Under suitable weather and road conditions...

  9. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.; Ambus, Per

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature...

  10. Impacts of an ethanol-blended fuel release on groundwater and fate of produced methane: simulation of field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasa, Ehsan; Bekins, Barbara A.; Mackay, Douglas M.; de Sieyes, Nicholas R.; Wilson, John T.; Feris, Kevin P.; Wood, Isaac A.; Scow, Kate M.

    2013-01-01

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10 (10% ethanol and 90% conventional gasoline), two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol (With-Ethanol Lane) for 283 days. We developed a reactive transport model to understand processes controlling the fate of ethanol and BToX. The model was calibrated to the extensive field dataset and accounted for concentrations of sulfate, iron, acetate, and methane along with iron-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, fermentative bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. The benzene plume was about 4.5 times longer in the With-Ethanol Lane than in the No-Ethanol Lane. Matching this different behavior in the two lanes required inhibiting benzene degradation in the presence of ethanol. Inclusion of iron reduction with negligible growth of iron-reducers was required to reproduce the observed constant degradation rate of benzene. Modeling suggested that vertical dispersion and diffusion of sulfate from an adjacent aquitard were important sources of sulfate in the aquifer. Matching of methane data required incorporating initial fermentation of ethanol to acetate, methane loss by outgassing, and methane oxidation coupled to sulfate and iron reduction. Simulation of microbial growth using dual Monod kinetics, and including inhibition by more favorable electron acceptors, generally resulted in reasonable yields for microbial growth of 0.01-0.05.

  11. Impacts of an ethanol-blended fuel release on groundwater and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasa, Ehsan; Bekins, Barbara A; Mackay, Douglas M; de Sieyes, Nicholas R; Wilson, John T; Feris, Kevin P; Wood, Isaac A; Scow, Kate M

    2013-08-01

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10 (10% ethanol and 90% conventional gasoline), two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol (With-Ethanol Lane) for 283 days. We developed a reactive transport model to understand processes controlling the fate of ethanol and BToX. The model was calibrated to the extensive field dataset and accounted for concentrations of sulfate, iron, acetate, and methane along with iron-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, fermentative bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. The benzene plume was about 4.5 times longer in the With-Ethanol Lane than in the No-Ethanol Lane. Matching this different behavior in the two lanes required inhibiting benzene degradation in the presence of ethanol. Inclusion of iron reduction with negligible growth of iron-reducers was required to reproduce the observed constant degradation rate of benzene. Modeling suggested that vertical dispersion and diffusion of sulfate from an adjacent aquitard were important sources of sulfate in the aquifer. Matching of methane data required incorporating initial fermentation of ethanol to acetate, methane loss by outgassing, and methane oxidation coupled to sulfate and iron reduction. Simulation of microbial growth using dual Monod kinetics, and including inhibition by more favorable electron acceptors, generally resulted in reasonable yields for microbial growth of 0.01-0.05. PMID:24678130

  12. Methane release from millipedes and other soil invertebrates in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šustr, Vladimír; Šimek, Miloslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 8 (2009), s. 1684-1688. ISSN 0038-0717 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : invertebrates * diplopoda * methane production Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.978, year: 2009

  13. Impacts of a massive release of methane and hydrogen sulfide on oxygen and ozone during the late Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiho, Kunio; Koga, Seizi

    2013-08-01

    The largest mass extinction of animals and plants in both the ocean and on land occurred in the late Permian (252 Ma), largely coinciding with the largest flood basalt volcanism event in Siberia and an oceanic anoxic/euxinic event. We investigated the impacts of a massive release of methane (CH4) from the Siberian igneous province and the ocean and/or hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from the euxinic ocean on oxygen and ozone using photochemical model calculations. Our calculations indicated that an approximate of 14% decrease in atmospheric O2 levels would have occurred in the case of a large combined CH4 and H2S flux to the atmosphere, whereas an approximate of 8 to 10% decrease would have occurred from the CH4 flux and oxidation of all H2S in the ocean. The slight decrease in atmospheric O2 levels may have contributed to the extinction event. We demonstrate for the first time that a massive release of CH4 from the Siberian igneous province and a coincident massive release of CH4 and H2S did not cause ozone collapse. A collapse of stratospheric ozone leading to an increase in UV is not supported by the maximum model input levels for CH4 and H2S. These conclusions on O2 and O3 are correspondent to every H2S release percentages from the ocean to the atmosphere.

  14. Seawater methane flux, methane oxidation rates, and methane sources on the Central US Beaufort Sea Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.; Pack-Woo, M.; Xu, X.; Ruppel, C. D.; Casso, M.; Worley, C.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that some shallow-water circum-Arctic Ocean continental shelves (e.g., the Laptev Sea) are releasing substantial methane to the atmosphere. A number of processes -- including microbial degradation of organic matter in shallow sediments or in deeper sediments that were only recently thawed from permafrost, the dissociation of gas hydrates that formed in association with permafrost, and leakage from deeper thermogenic reservoirs -- may contribute to these methane fluxes. In August 2012, the USGS Gas Hydrates Project, with sponsorship from the DOE Methane Hydrates R&D Program, conducted a cross-shelf survey of greenhouse gas fluxes, carbon isotopic signatures of methane and CO2, and methane oxidation rates on the Central US Beaufort Sea continental shelf. IODP drilling has been proposed for a shelf-to-upper continental slope transect on this part of the Alaskan Beaufort passive margin to unravel the history of late Pleistocene to contemporary climate warming and sea level rise. The work presented here complements a 2012 USGS multichannel seismic program intended as IODP site survey. The flux, isotopic, and oxidation rate surveys sampled nearshore areas still underlain by subsea permafrost, a location where relict gas hydrate previously associated with permafrost may still exist and extend across the shelf to where present-day methane release is likely dominated by microbial methane generated in situ. The new geochemical data were acquired using dedicated cavity ringdown spectrometers (CRDS) for the atmospheric and sea surface measurements. The seawater CRDS also characterized the carbon isotopic signature of the CO2 and CH4 in real-time. Oxidation rate measurements were carried out using the low level 14C-CH4 (LL 14C) tracer method. Continuous measurements of surface air and surface seawater methane and carbon dioxide concentration, in conjunction with relevant meteorological and water chemistry data, permit us to calculate sea

  15. Non-microbial methane formation in oxic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jugold

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Methane plays an important role as a radiatively and chemically active gas in our atmosphere. Until recently, sources of atmospheric methane in the biosphere have been attributed to strictly anaerobic microbial processes during degradation of organic matter. However, a large fraction of methane produced in the anoxic soil layers does not reach the atmosphere due to methanotrophic consumption in the overlaying oxic soil. Although methane fluxes from aerobic soils have been observed an alternative source other than methanogenesis has not been identified thus far.

    Here we provide evidence for non-microbial methane formation in soils under oxic conditions. We found that soils release methane upon heating and other environmental factors like ultraviolet irradiation, and drying-rewetting cycles. We suggest that chemical formation of methane during degradation of soil organic matter may represent the missing soil source that is needed to fully understand the complete methane cycle within the pedosphere. Although the emission fluxes are relatively low when compared to those from wetlands, they may be important in warm and wet regions subjected to ultraviolet radiation. We suggest that this methane source is highly sensitive to global change.

  16. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.;

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature......, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Further, we analyze rates of measured emission of aerobically produced CH4 in pectin and in plant tissues from different studies and argue that pectin is very far from the sole contributing precursor. Hence, scaling up of aerobic CH4 emission needs to take...... the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  17. Non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures based on a biological kinetic model of aerobic enzymatic methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, Vasily A; Rytov, Sergey V; Shim, Natalia; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures during methane oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus sporium strain 5 (NCIMB 11126) and Methylocaldum gracile strain 14 L (NCIMB 11912) under copper-rich (8.9 µM Cu(2+)), copper-limited (0.3 µM Cu(2+)) or copper-regular (1.1 µM Cu(2+)) conditions has been described mathematically. The model was calibrated by experimental data of methane quantities and carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane measured previously in laboratory microcosms reported by Feisthauer et al. [ 1 ] M. gracile initially oxidizes methane by a particulate methane monooxygenase and assimilates formaldehyde via the ribulose monophosphate pathway, whereas M. sporium expresses a soluble methane monooxygenase under copper-limited conditions and uses the serine pathway for carbon assimilation. The model shows that during methane solubilization dominant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs. An increase of biomass due to growth of methanotrophs causes an increase of particulate or soluble monooxygenase that, in turn, decreases soluble methane concentration intensifying methane solubilization. The specific maximum rate of methane oxidation υm was proved to be equal to 4.0 and 1.3 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. sporium under copper-rich and copper-limited conditions, respectively, and 0.5 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. gracile. The model shows that methane oxidation cannot be described by traditional first-order kinetics. The kinetic isotope fractionation ceases when methane concentrations decrease close to the threshold value. Applicability of the non-linear model was confirmed by dynamics of carbon isotope signature for carbon dioxide that was depleted and later enriched in (13)C. Contrasting to the common Rayleigh linear graph, the dynamic curves allow identifying inappropriate isotope data due to inaccurate substrate concentration analyses. The non-linear model pretty adequately described experimental

  18. Estudos sobre a oxidação aeróbia do metano na cobertura de três aterros sanitários no Brasil Studies on the aerobic methane oxidation at three sanitary landfills covers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Echevenguá Teixeira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A oxidação biológica e aeróbia do metano em materiais de cobertura de aterros de resíduos sólidos urbanos é uma das alternativas para se minimizarem as emissões dos gases de efeito estufa. Este artigo tem como objetivo avaliar a oxidação biológica do metano em material de cobertura de três aterros brasileiros (dois municipais e uma célula experimental. O trabalho consistiu na coleta de amostras dos solos, as quais foram caracterizadas através de ensaios geotécnicos e microbiológicos. Em laboratório, avaliou-se o consumo de metano de uma amostra de cada aterro. Os resultados revelaram a presença de bactérias metanotróficas e consumo de metano em laboratório, o que sugere que exista uma relação inversa entre o grau de saturação no momento da coleta e o número de bactérias metanotróficas.The biological and aerobic oxidation of methane within the soil cover of municipal solid waste landfills is one an alternative to minimize emissions of greenhouse effect gases. This study aims at assess the biological oxidation of methane within the final cover of three landfills in Brazil (two municipal ones and one experimental cell. The soil samples obtained from the landfill cover were characterized by geotechnical and microbiological tests. In the laboratory the consumption of methane from each sample were evaluated. The results revealed the presence of methanotrophic bacteria and consumption of methane in the laboratory was observed, which also suggest that there is an inverse relation between the degree of saturation at the time of sampling and the number of methanotrophic bacteria.

  19. Methane flux in potential hydrate-bearing sediments offshore southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-Chen; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Chuang, Pei-Chuan; Hong, Wei-Li; Chen, Hsuan-Wen; Lin, Saulwood; Lin, Li-Hung; Mastumoto, Ryo; Hiruta, Akihiro; Sun, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Pei-Ling; Yang, Tau; Jiang, Shao-yong; Wang, Yun-shuen; Chung, San-Hsiung; Chen, Cheng-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Methane in interstitial water of hydrate-bearing marine sediments ascends with buoyant fluids and is discharged into seawater, exerting profound impacts on ocean biogeochemistry and greenhouse effects. Quantifying the exact magnitude of methane transport across different geochemical transitions in different geological settings would provide bases to better constrain global methane discharge to seawater and to assess physio-chemical contexts imposed on microbial methane production and consumption and carbon sequestration in marine environments. Using sediments collected from different geological settings offshore southwestern Taiwan through decadal exploration on gas hydrates, this study analyzed gas and aqueous geochemistry and calculated methane fluxes across different compartments. Three geochemical transitions, including sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ), shallow sediments, and sediment-seawater interface were specifically focused for the flux calculation. The results combined with previous published data showed that methane fluxes at three interfaces of 2.71×10‑3 to 3.52×10‑1, 5.28×10‑7 to 1.08×100, and 1.34×10‑6 to 3.17×100 mmol m‑2 d‑1, respectively. The ranges of fluxes suggest that more than 90 % of methane originating from depth was consumed by anaerobic methanotrophy at the SMTZ, and further >90% of the remnant methane was removed by aerobic methanotrophy prior to reaching the sediment-seawater interface. Exceptions are sites at cold seeps where the percentage of methane released into seawater can reach more than 80% of methane at depth. Most sites with such high methane fluxes are located at active margin where thrusts and diapirism are well developed. Carbon mass balance method was applied for the calculation of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organotrophic sulfate reduction rates at SMTZ. Results indicated that AOM rates were comparable with fluxes deduced from concentration gradients for most sites. At least 60% of

  20. Economic impacts of carbon dioxide and methane released from thawing permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Chris; Schaefer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the global average. If greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase at current rates, this warming will lead to the widespread thawing of permafrost and the release of hundreds of billions of tonnes of CO2 and billions of tonnes of CH4 into the atmosphere. So far there have been no estimates of the possible extra economic impacts from permafrost emissions of CO2 and CH4. Here we use the default PAGE09 integrated assessment model to show the range of possible global economic impacts if this CO2 and CH4 is released into the atmosphere on top of the anthropogenic emissions from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change scenario A1B (ref. ) and three other scenarios. Under the A1B scenario, CO2 and CH4 released from permafrost increases the mean net present value of the impacts of climate change by US$43 trillion, or about 13% (5-95% range: US$3-166 trillion), proportional to the increase in total emissions due to thawing permafrost. The extra impacts of the permafrost CO2 and CH4 are sufficiently high to justify urgent action to minimize the scale of the release.

  1. Microbial methane oxidation in the Arctic Ocean offshore Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Lea I.; Graves, Carolyn; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2013-04-01

    Large amounts of methane are released from ocean sediments, most importantly at cold seep environments. Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in the ocean water column consume a significant fraction of this biogenic methane, preventing its emission to the atmosphere. The understanding of key environmental factors controlling the efficiency of this biological methane-filter is still incomplete. In order to elucidate possible environmental constraints on methane turnover in the ocean, we investigated the temporal and spatial variation of aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) rates at active cold seeps at water depths between 150 and 400 m, located off the coast of Svalbard. In the study area, methane concentrations were consistently elevated in bottom waters (up to 825 nM) and decreased towards the sea surface. Highest MOx rates of up to 3.1 nM/day were typically observed at ~30 m above the sea floor. Despite the constant supply of methane substrate, MOx rates displayed a high temporal variability. Comparison of the distribution of MOx rates and water temperature revealed consistent spatio-temporal patterns suggesting an oceanographic control on the magnitude of MOx: Cool Arctic bottom waters containing a comparably large standing stock of methanotrophic bacteria are episodically displaced by the warmer W-Spitsbergen current, which meanders along the Svalbard continental margin and is depleted in methanotrophic biomass. As a consequence, methane is injected into warmer water masses containing fewer methanotrophs, and overall methane oxidation is reduced. While the primary cause for the observed discrepancy in methanotrophic activity between the different water masses is still uncertain, our preliminary data indicate that MOx fluctuations in the ocean water column above the Svalbard cold seeps are modulated by ocean circulation patterns and the associated differential supply of bacterial stock.

  2. Ice core measurements of 14CH4 show no evidence of methane release from methane hydrates or old permafrost carbon during a large warming event 11,600 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Vasilii; Severinghaus, Jeffrey; Smith, Andrew; Riedel, Katja; Brook, Edward; Schaefer, Hinrich; Baggenstos, Daniel; Harth, Christina; Hua, Quan; Buizert, Christo; Schilt, Adrian; Fain, Xavier; Mitchell, Logan; Bauska, Thomas; Orsi, Anais

    2015-04-01

    Thawing permafrost and marine methane hydrate destabilization in the Arctic and elsewhere have been proposed as large sources of methane to the atmosphere in the future warming world. To evaluate this hypothesis it is useful to ask whether such methane releases happened during past warming events. The two major abrupt warming events of the last deglaciation, Oldest Dryas - Bølling (OD-B, ≈ 14,500 years ago) and Younger Dryas - Preboreal (YD-PB; ≈11,600 years ago), were associated with large (up to 50%) increases in atmospheric methane (CH4) concentrations. The sources of these large warming-driven CH4 increases remain incompletely understood, with possible contributions from tropical and boreal wetlands, thawing permafrost as well as marine CH4 hydrates. We present new measurements of 14C of paleoatmospheric CH4 over the YD-PB transition from ancient ice outcropping at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica. 14C can unambiguously identify CH4 emissions from "old carbon" sources, such as permafrost and CH4 hydrates. The only prior study of paleoatmospheric 14CH4 (from Greenland ice) suggested that wetlands were the main driver of the YD-PB CH4 increase, but the results were weakened by an unexpected and poorly understood 14CH4 component from in situ cosmogenic production directly in near-surface ice. In this new study, we have been able to accurately characterize and correct for the cosmogenic 14CH4 component. All samples from before, during and after the abrupt warming and associated CH4 increase yielded 14CH4 values that are consistent with 14C of atmospheric CO2 at that time, indicating a purely contemporaneous methane source. These new measurements rule out the possibility of large CH4 releases to the atmosphere from methane hydrates or old permafrost carbon in response to the large and rapid YD-PB warming. To the extent that the characteristics of the YD-PB warming are comparable to those of the current anthropogenic warming, our measurements suggest that large future

  3. Reservoir water level drawdown as a novel, substantial, and manageable control on methane release to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J.; Deemer, B. R.; Birchfield, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoirs constitute a globally important source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Although it is reasonably well-established that hydrostatic and barometric pressure can influence rates of CH4 release from lake and tidal sediments, the relationship between water-level manipulation and CH4 release from man-made impoundments has not been quantified or characterized. Furthermore, cross-system controls on CH4 production and release to the atmosphere have not been established. We collected CH4 emission (diffusion and ebullition) data for 8 reservoirs in the U.S. Pacific Northwest that are subject to a range of trophic conditions and water level management regimes. Our aim was to: (1) characterize CH4 emissions from these systems, and (2) quantify effects of water level management and eutrophication on CH4 fluxes. Results indicate very high fluxes, in some cases the highest reported reservoir emission rates, and a strong correspondence between lake level reduction and CH4 emissions, including quantitatively important bursts of CH4 bubbling. In one reservoir, drawdown-associated CH4 fluxes accounted for over 25% of annual CH4 emissions in a period of just 16 days (4% of the year). Average CH4 ebullition rates in a reservoir managed for hydropower peaking were nearly three-fold higher than in a paired upstream reservoir managed to maintain a constant water level (528 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 and 187 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 respectively). Highest gas fluxes were observed during the water level drawdown component of the hydropower peaking cycle (14.3 g CH4 m-2 d-1). In addition we observe a strong, positive relationship between eutrophication (as indicated by surface Chl a concentrations) and CH4 production (r2 = 0.88; Pcontrolling nutrient loading may reduce greenhouse gas fluxes from surface waters to the atmosphere.

  4. Influence of thermophilic aerobic digestion as a sludge pre-treatment and solids retention time of mesophilic anaerobic digestion on the methane production, sludge digestion and microbial communities in a sequential digestion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Cho, Hyun Uk; Park, Sang Kyu; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the changes in sludge reduction, methane production and microbial community structures in a process involving two-stage thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) and mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) under different solid retention times (SRTs) between 10 and 40 days were investigated. The TAD reactor (RTAD) was operated with a 1-day SRT and the MAD reactor (RMAD) was operated at three different SRTs: 39, 19 and 9 days. For a comparison, control MAD (RCONTROL) was operated at three different SRTs of 40, 20 and 10 days. Our results reveal that the sequential TAD-MAD process has about 42% higher methane production rate (MPR) and 15% higher TCOD removal than those of RCONTROL when the SRT decreased from 40 to 20 days. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR results indicate that RMAD maintained a more diverse bacteria and archaea population compared to RCONTROL, due to the application of the biological TAD pre-treatment process. In RTAD, Ureibacillus thermophiles and Bacterium thermus were the major contributors to the increase in soluble organic matter. In contrast, Methanosaeta concilii, a strictly aceticlastic methanogen, showed the highest population during the operation of overall SRTs in RMAD. Interestingly, as the SRT decreased to 20 days, syntrophic VFA oxidizing bacteria, Clostridium ultunense sp., and a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanobacterium beijingense were detected in RMAD and RCONTROL. Meanwhile, the proportion of archaea to total microbe in RMAD and RCONTROL shows highest values of 10.5 and 6.5% at 20-d SRT operation, respectively. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the increased COD removal and methane production at different SRTs in RMAD might be attributed to the increased synergism among microbial species by improving the hydrolysis of the rate limiting step in sludge with the help of the biological TAD pre-treatment. PMID:23871253

  5. [Impact of Salinity on Leachate Treatment and N2O Releases from Semi-aerobic Aged-refuse Bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-hua; Sun, Ying-jie; Liu, Zi-liang; Ma, Qiang; Yang, Qiang

    2016-02-15

    Semi-aerobic Aged-refuse Bioreactor (SAARB) has a good effect on nitrogen removal in leachate, but a strong greenhouse gas (N2O) was generated during the nitrification and denitrification process. The effect of salinity (7-30 g x L(-1)) on the leachate treatment and the N2O production from SAARB system was investigated. Experimental results showed that salinity ranging from 7 to 30 g x L(-1) had no significant effect on COD removal, and the removal efficiency was always more than 85%. On the contrary, it had a strong influence on the removal of nitrogen. The removal efficiencies of NH4+ -N and TN decreased from 98. 23% and 91.48% at 7 g x L(-1) salt to 31.75% and 34.24% at 30 g x L(-1) salt, respectively. Moreover, there was significant nitrite (NO2- -N) accumulation in the presence of 30 g x L(-1) salt. Meanwhile, salinity had different inhibition strength on nitrification and denitrification bacteria, and the order of inhibition strength was as follows: nitrification bacteria > denitrification bacteria. In addition, the N2O production increased with salinity concentration, and the highest N2O accumulation (1397 microg +/- 369.88 microg) was observed with addition of 30 g x L(-1) salt, which accounted for 8.87%o of the total nitrogen removal. Meanwhile, it was 6-117 times higher in the presence of 30 g x L(-1) salt than that in low salinity conditions (7-20 g x L(-1)). And the peak time of the N2O production showed a delayed trend. These results indicated that salinity recirculation in leachate had a negative effect on the nitrogen removal and N2O production. Overall, salinity seemed to be a key parameter during leachate recirculation. PMID:27363172

  6. Methane release from warming-induced hydrate dissociation in the West Svalbard continental margin: Timing, rates, and geological controls

    OpenAIRE

    Thatcher, K. E.; G. K. Westbrook; Sarkar, S; Minshull, T.A.

    2013-01-01

    Hundreds of plumes of methane bubbles, first observed in 2008, emanate from an area of the seabed off West Svalbard that has become 1 degrees C warmer over the past 30 years. The distribution of the plumes, lying close to and upslope from the present upper limit of the methane hydrate stability zone, indicates that methane in the plumes could come from warming-induced hydrate dissociation, a process commonly invoked as contributing to rapid climate change. We used numerical modeling to invest...

  7. Investigating the Hydro-geochemical Impact of Fugitive Methane on Groundwater: The Borden Aquifer Controlled Release Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, A. G.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Mayer, K. U.; Mayer, B.; Ryan, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shale gas development by hydraulic fracturing is believed by many to have the potential to transform the world's energy economy. The propensity of this technique to cause significant environmental impact is strongly contested and lacks evidence. Fugitive methane (CH4), potentially mobilized during well drilling, the complex extraction process and/or leaking well seals over time is arguably the greatest concern. Advanced understanding of CH4 mobility and fate in the subsurface is needed in order to assess risks, design suitable monitoring systems and gain public trust. Currently knowledge on subsurface CH4 mobilization and migration at scales relevant to shale gas development is lacking. Consequently a shallow aquifer controlled CH4 release experiment is being conducted at the Borden aquifer research facility (an unconfined, unconsolidated silicate sand aquifer) in Ontario, Canada. During the experiment, 100 m3 of gas phase CH4 was injected into the saturated zone over approximately 60 days through 2 inclined sparging wells (4.5 and 9 m depth) at rates relevant to natural gas well casing vent flows. The gas mobility and fate is being comprehensively monitored temporally and spatially in both the saturated and unsaturated zones considering; aqueous chemistry (including stable isotopes), soil gas characterization, surface efflux, geophysics (GPR and ERT), real time sensors (total dissolved gas pressure, soil moisture content, CH4 and CO2), mineralogical and microbiological characterization before, during and after injection. An overview of this unique study will be given including experimental design, monitoring system configuration and preliminary results. This multidisciplinary study will provide important insights regarding the mechanisms and rates for shallow CH4 migration, attenuation and water quality impacts that will inform baseline groundwater monitoring programs and retrospective forensic studies.

  8. Quantifying methane emission from fugitive sources by combining tracer release and downwind measurements - a sensitivity analysis based on multiple field surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, Jacob G; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter; Rella, Chris W; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-08-01

    Using a dual species methane/acetylene instrument based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), the dynamic plume tracer dispersion method for quantifying the emission rate of methane was successfully tested in four measurement campaigns: (1) controlled methane and trace gas release with different trace gas configurations, (2) landfill with unknown emission source locations, (3) landfill with closely located emission sources, and (4) comparing with an Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) instrument using multiple trace gasses for source separation. The new real-time, high precision instrument can measure methane plumes more than 1.2 km away from small sources (about 5 kg h(-1)) in urban areas with a measurement frequency allowing plume crossing at normal driving speed. The method can be used for quantification of total methane emissions from diffuse area sources down to 1 kg per hour and can be used to quantify individual sources with the right choice of wind direction and road distance. The placement of the trace gas is important for obtaining correct quantification and uncertainty of up to 36% can be incurred when the trace gas is not co-located with the methane source. Measurements made at greater distances are less sensitive to errors in trace gas placement and model calculations showed an uncertainty of less than 5% in both urban and open-country for placing the trace gas 100 m from the source, when measurements were done more than 3 km away. Using the ratio of the integrated plume concentrations of tracer gas and methane gives the most reliable results for measurements at various distances to the source, compared to the ratio of the highest concentration in the plume, the direct concentration ratio and using a Gaussian plume model. Under suitable weather and road conditions, the CRDS system can quantify the emission from different sources located close to each other using only one kind of trace gas due to the high time resolution, while the FTIR

  9. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced. PMID:26647577

  10. Carbon isotope (δ13C excursions suggest times of major methane release during the last 14 ka in Fram Strait, the deep-water gateway to the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Consolaro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present results from a sediment core collected from a pockmark field on the Vestnesa Ridge (∼80° N in the eastern Fram Strait. This is the only deep-water gateway to the Arctic, and one of the northernmost marine gas hydrate provinces in the world. Eight 14C AMS dating reveals a detailed chronology for the last 14 ka BP. The δ13C record measured on the benthic foraminiferal species Cassidulina neoteretis shows two distinct intervals with negative values, as low as −4.37‰ in the Bølling–Allerød interstadials and as low as −3.41‰ in the early Holocene. After cleaning procedure designed to remove all authigenic carbonate coatings on benthic foraminiferal tests, the 13C values are still negative (as low as −2.75‰. We have interpreted these negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs to record past methane release events, resulting from the incorporation of 13C-depleted carbon from methane emissions into the benthic foraminiferal shells. The CIEs during the Bølling–Allerød interstadials and the early Holocene relate to periods of ocean warming, sea level rise and increased concentrations of methane (CH4 in the atmosphere. CIEs with similar timing have been reported from other areas in the North Atlantic suggesting a regional event. The trigger mechanisms for such regional events remain to be determined. We speculate that sea-level rise and seabed loading due to high sediment supply in combination with increased seismic activity as a result of rapid deglaciation may have triggered the escape of significant amounts of methane to the seafloor and the water column above.

  11. Monitoring Production of Methane and Carbon Dioxide and Consumption of Oxygen at Spills of Gasoline at UST Release Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane is rarely measured at fuel spill sites, and most commonly the measurements are made on samples of ground water. Many ground water monitoring wells are intentionally screened across the water table. This was done to allow them to sample free product. However, if there is s...

  12. 永冻土内甲烷的释放与全球变暖的关系%Relations within the permafrost methane release and global warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳秋; 唐金荣

    2015-01-01

    Permafrost is widely distributed in the polar latitudes and shelf sea areas.Gas hydrates in permafrost are the most clean alternative sources of energy in the 21st century.Natural gas resource in gas hydrate is dozens of times of the conventional gas resource,showing a broad prospect of development and utilization.However,scientists have found that a large number of methane gases were released from thawing permafrost in the arctic land and the subsea,as the global temperature rise.On the one hand,a large amount of methane emissions to the atmosphere could worsen the global warming trend.On the other hand,the release of methane from the subsea permafrost could reduce natural gas hydrate resources gradually, aggravating the global energy crisis.Therefore,the methane releases from the permafrost in land and subsea have been increasingly paid attention to researchers around the world as well as various marine countries.%永冻土广泛分布在极地高纬度地区和陆架海底区域,赋存其中的天然气水合物是21世纪最清洁的替代能源,所包含的天然气资源量是全球常规天然气资源量的几十倍,具有广阔的开发利用前景。但是科学家陆续发现,随着全球温度的上升,北极陆域和海域中的永冻土开始融化,造成大量的甲烷气体从永冻土中释放出来。大量甲烷排放到大气中不仅可能加剧全球气候变暖的趋势,而且海底永冻土中甲烷的释放可能导致天然气水合物资源量逐渐减少,从而加重全球能源危机。因此,陆域和海域永久冻土带甲烷的释放日益引起世界各国研究者以及各海洋国家的高度重视。

  13. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of sour

  14. A large thermogenic-methane release event in the SW Barents Sea, during the Last Glacial Maximum. Indications from numerical modelling and seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anka, Z.; Rodrigues, E.; di Primio, R.; Ostanin, I.; Stoddart, D.; Horsfield, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Barents Sea, located in the Norwegian Artic area, has undergone a series of tectonic, paleoceanographic and paleo-climatic events during the Cenozoic, which most likely have caused the redistribution and leakage of hydrocarbons accumulations (Ohm et al., 2008). (Dimakis et al., 1998). Present-day under-filled accumulations are known to have leaked in the past providing a source of hydrocarbons, mostly thermogenic methane. However, the timing, extent and driving factors for this event are largely unconstrained. We built a 3D basin model of the Hammerfest Basin in the SW Barents Sea, in order to quantify the masses of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons generated, accumulated and eventually leaked from the reservoirs during the evolution of the basin. Particular emphasis was placed on analysing the fate of leaked volumes within the dynamics of Plio-Quaternary glacial cycles and formation or destabilization of gas hydrate deposits. The model was calibrated with maturity and temperature well data and reconstructs, with large degree of accuracy, the composition and volume of the hydrocarbons, particularly the gaseous phase present in the main reservoirs. Our results predict the development of overpressures in the reservoirs due to the ice loading of the basin during the glacial periods. Pressure fluctuations derived from cyclic loading-unloading during the glacial-interglacial periods reached up to 5 MPa. The under-filled nature of the present-day accumulations would result from leakage events during the episodes of glacial retreat, in the transition from glacial to interglacial periods. Considerations of the gas hydrate stability conditions in the basin during the time span between 1.00Ma and ≈11,500 years indicate that the leaking thermogenic methane was probably trapped as gas hydrate deposits during the glacial events and then released at once upon hydrate destabilisation during the Last Glacial Maximun (LGM). These results are supported by the presence of km

  15. Novel microbial communities of the Haakon Mosby mud volcano and their role as a methane sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Helge; Lösekann, Tina; de Beer, Dirk; Elvert, Marcus; Nadalig, Thierry; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Sauter, Eberhard J; Schlüter, Michael; Klages, Michael; Foucher, Jean Paul; Boetius, Antje

    2006-10-19

    Mud volcanism is an important natural source of the greenhouse gas methane to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Recent investigations show that the number of active submarine mud volcanoes might be much higher than anticipated (for example, see refs 3-5), and that gas emitted from deep-sea seeps might reach the upper mixed ocean. Unfortunately, global methane emission from active submarine mud volcanoes cannot be quantified because their number and gas release are unknown. It is also unclear how efficiently methane-oxidizing microorganisms remove methane. Here we investigate the methane-emitting Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV, Barents Sea, 72 degrees N, 14 degrees 44' E; 1,250 m water depth) to provide quantitative estimates of the in situ composition, distribution and activity of methanotrophs in relation to gas emission. The HMMV hosts three key communities: aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (Methylococcales), anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2) thriving below siboglinid tubeworms, and a previously undescribed clade of archaea (ANME-3) associated with bacterial mats. We found that the upward flow of sulphate- and oxygen-free mud volcano fluids restricts the availability of these electron acceptors for methane oxidation, and hence the habitat range of methanotrophs. This mechanism limits the capacity of the microbial methane filter at active marine mud volcanoes to <40% of the total flux. PMID:17051217

  16. Methane bioattenuation and implications for explosion risk reduction along the groundwater to soil surface pathway above a plume of dissolved ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Rixey, William G; DeVaull, George E; Stafford, Brent P; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2012-06-01

    Fuel ethanol releases can stimulate methanogenesis in impacted aquifers, which could pose an explosion risk if methane migrates into enclosed spaces where ignitable conditions exist. To assess this potential risk, a flux chamber was emplaced on a pilot-scale aquifer exposed to continuous release (21 months) of an ethanol solution (10% v:v) that was introduced 22.5 cm below the water table. Despite methane concentrations within the ethanol plume reaching saturated levels (20-23 mg/L), the maximum methane concentration reaching the chamber (21 ppm(v)) was far below the lower explosion limit in air (50,000 ppm(v)). The low concentrations of methane observed in the chamber are attributed to methanotrophic activity, which was highest in the capillary fringe. This was indicated by methane degradation assays in microcosms prepared with soil samples from different depths, as well as by PCR measurements of pmoA, which is a widely used functional gene biomarker for methanotrophs. Simulations with the analytical vapor intrusion model "Biovapor" corroborated the low explosion risk associated with ethanol fuel releases under more generic conditions. Model simulations also indicated that depending on site-specific conditions, methane oxidation in the unsaturated zone could deplete the available oxygen and hinder aerobic benzene biodegradation, thus increasing benzene vapor intrusion potential. Overall, this study shows the importance of methanotrophic activity near the water table to attenuate methane generated from dissolved ethanol plumes and reduce its potential to migrate and accumulate at the surface. PMID:22568485

  17. Terrestrial plant methane production and emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Further, we analyze rates of measured emission of aerobically produced CH4 in pectin and in plant tissues from different studies and argue that pectin is very far from the sole......In this minireview, we evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants and plant. Clearly, despite much uncertainty and skepticism, we conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce...... aerobic CH4 into a global budget is inadequate. Thus it is too early to draw the line under the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  18. Impacts of an ethanol-blended fuel release on groundwater and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10, two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol...

  19. Impacts of ethanol-blended fuels release on groundwater aquifers and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10, two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol...

  20. Leaf surface wax is a source of plant methane formation under UV radiation and in the presence of oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Rolsted, M. M. M.;

    2014-01-01

    The terrestrial vegetation is a source of UV radiation-induced aerobic methane (CH4) release to the atmosphere. Hitherto pectin, a plant structural component, has been considered as the most likely precursor for this CH4 release. However, most of the leaf pectin is situated below the surface wax...... layer, and UV transmittance of the cuticle differs among plant species. In some species, the cuticle effectively absorbs and/or reflects UV radiation. Thus, pectin may not necessarily contribute substantially to the UV radiation-induced CH4 emission measured at surface level in all species. Here, we...

  1. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-09-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes. PMID:25679533

  2. Impacts of an ethanol-blended fuel release on groundwater and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations

    OpenAIRE

    Rasa, Ehsan; Bekins, Barbara A.; Mackay, Douglas M.; de Sieyes, Nicholas R.; Wilson, John T.; Feris, Kevin P.; Wood, Isaac A.; Scow, Kate M.

    2013-01-01

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10 (10% ethanol and 90% conventional gasoline), two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol (With-Ethanol Lane) for 283 days. We developed a reactive transport model to understand processes controlling the fate of ethanol and BToX. The model was calibrated to the ...

  3. Technical Note: Disturbance of soil structure can lead to release of methane entrapped in glacier forefield soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Nauer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of sources and sinks of atmospheric CH4 are needed to understand the global CH4 cycle and climate-change mitigation options. Glaciated environments might play a critical role due to potential feedbacks with global glacial meltdown. In an emerging glacier forefield, an ecological shift occurs from an anoxic, potentially methanogenic subglacial sediment to an oxic proglacial soil, in which soil-microbial consumption of atmospheric CH4 is initiated. The development of this change in CH4 turnover can be quantified by soil-gas profile analysis. We found evidence for CH4 entrapped in glacier forefield soils when comparing two methods for the collection of soil-gas samples: a modified steel rod (SR designed for one-time sampling and rapid screening (samples collected ~ 1 min after hammering the SR into the soil, and a novel multi-level sampler (MLS for repetitive sampling through a previously installed access tube (samples collected weeks after access-tube installation. In glacier forefields on siliceous bedrock, sub-atmospheric CH4 concentrations were observed with both methods. Conversely, elevated soil-CH4 concentrations were observed in calcareous glacier forefields, but only in samples collected with the SR, while MLS samples all showed sub-atmospheric CH4 concentrations. Time-series SR soil-gas sampling (additional samples collected 2, 3, 5, and 7 min after hammering confirmed the transient nature of the elevated soil-CH4 concentrations, which were decreasing from ~ 100 μL L−1 towards background levels within minutes. This hints towards the existence of entrapped CH4 in calcareous glacier forefield soil that can be released when sampling soil-gas with the SR. Laboratory experiments with miniature soil cores collected from two glacier forefields confirmed CH4 entrapment in these soils. Treatment by sonication and acidification resulted in a massive release of CH4 from calcareous cores (on average 0.3–1.8 μg CH4 (g d.w.−1

  4. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine...

  5. The influence of preliminary aerobic treatment on the efficacy of waste stabilisation under leachate recirculation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Suchowska-Kisielewicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the changes in the chemical composition of leachate and the concentrations and quantity of methane production in each individual decomposition phases, determined for untreated and after aerobic treatment of waste stabilised in anaerobic reactors with and without leachate recirculation. The research results demonstrate that leachate recirculation intensifies the decomposition of both aerobically treated and untreated waste. The methane production in the reactor with untreated, stabilised waste with recirculation was 28% higher; and in the reactor with aerobically treated waste, the methane production was 24% higher than in the reactors without recirculation. An important finding of the study is that aerobic treatment of waste prior to landfilling effectively reduces the quantity of pollutant emissions in leachate and biogas from waste and increases the availability for methane micro-organisms of organic substrates from difficult-to-decompose organic substances.

  6. Improving aerobic stability and biogas production of maize silage using silage additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Christiane; Idler, Christine; Heiermann, Monika

    2015-12-01

    The effects of air stress during storage, exposure to air at feed-out, and treatment with silage additives to enhance aerobic stability on methane production from maize silage were investigated at laboratory scale. Up to 17% of the methane potential of maize without additive was lost during seven days exposure to air on feed-out. Air stress during storage reduced aerobic stability and further increased methane losses. A chemical additive containing salts of benzoate and propionate, and inoculants containing heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria were effective to increase aerobic stability and resulted in up to 29% higher methane yields after exposure to air. Exclusion of air to the best possible extent and high aerobic stabilities should be primary objectives when ensiling biogas feedstocks. PMID:26348286

  7. Aerobic exercise (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerobic exercise gets the heart working to pump blood through the heart more quickly and with more force than ... must be oxygenated more quickly, which quickens respiration. Aerobic exercise strengthens the heart and boosts healthy cholesterol ...

  8. Regulation of Methane Oxidation in a Freshwater Wetland by Water Table Changes and Anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslev, Peter; King, Gary M.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of water table fluctuations and anoxia on methane emission and methane oxidation were studied in a freshwater marsh. Seasonal aerobic methane oxidation rates varied between 15% and 76% of the potential diffusive methane flux (diffusive flux in the absence of aerobic oxidation). On an annual basis, approximately 43% of the methane diffusing into the oxic zone was oxidized before reaching the atmosphere. The highest methane oxidation was observed when the water table was below the peat surface. This was confirmed in laboratory experiments where short-term decreases in water table levels increased methane oxidation but also net methane emission. Although methane emission was generally not observed during the winter, stems of soft rush (Juncus effusus) emitted methane when the marsh was ice covered. Indigenous methanotrophic bacteria from the wetiand studied were relatively anoxia tolerant. Surface peat incubated under anoxic conditions maintained 30% of the initial methane oxidation capacity after 32 days of anoxia. Methanotrophs from anoxic peat initiated aerobic methane oxidation relatively quickly after oxygen addition (1-7 hours). These results were supported by culture experiments with the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This organism maintained a greater capacity for aerobic methane oxidation when starved under anoxic compared to oxic conditions. Anoxic incubation of M. trichosporium OB3b in the presence of sulfide (2 mM) and a low redox potential (-110 mV) did not decrease the capacity for methane oxidation relative to anoxic cultures incubated without sulfide. The results suggest that aerobic methane oxidation was a major regulator of seasonal methane emission front the investigated wetland. The observed water table fluctuations affected net methane oxidation presumably due to associated changes in oxygen gradients. However, changes from oxic to anoxic conditions in situ had relatively little effect on survival of the methanotrophic

  9. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  10. Aerobic Methanotrophs in Natural and Agricultural Soils of European Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Kravchenko; Andrey Yurkov; Anna Kizilova

    2013-01-01

    Human activities such as land management and global warming have great impact on the environment. Among changes associated with the global warming, rising methane emission is a serious concern. Therefore, we assessed methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight soil types (both unmanaged and agricultural) distributed across the European part of Russia. Using a culture-independent approach targeting pmoA gene, we provide the first baseline data on the di...

  11. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  12. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste. At...

  13. Methane sources and production in the northern Cascadia margin gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Kaneko, M.; Heuer, V.B.; Coffin, R.B.; Whiticar, M.

    2009-01-01

    The oceanographic and tectonic conditions of accretionary margins are well-suited for several potential processes governing methane generation, storage and release. To identify the relevant methane evolution pathways in the northern Cascadia accretionary margin, a four-site transect was drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311. The ??13C values of methane range from a minimum value of - 82.2??? on an uplifted ridge of accreted sediment near the deformation front (Site U1326, 1829 mbsl, meters below sea level) to a maximum value of - 39.5??? at the most landward location within an area of steep canyons near the shelf edge (Site U1329, 946 mbsl). An interpretation based solely on methane isotope values might conclude the 13C-enrichment of methane indicates a transition from microbially- to thermogenically-sourced methane. However, the co-existing CO2 exhibits a similar trend of 13C-enrichment along the transect with values ranging from - 22.5??? to +25.7???. The magnitude of the carbon isotope separation between methane and CO2 (??c = 63.8 ?? 5.8) is consistent with isotope fractionation during microbially mediated carbonate reduction. These results, in conjunction with a transect-wide gaseous hydrocarbon content composed of > 99.8% (by volume) methane and uniform ??DCH4 values (- 172??? ?? 8) that are distinct from thermogenic methane at a seep located 60 km from the Expedition 311 transect, suggest microbial CO2 reduction is the predominant methane source at all investigated sites. The magnitude of the intra-site downhole 13C-enrichment of CO2 within the accreted ridge (Site U1326) and a slope basin nearest the deformation front (Site U1325, 2195 mbsl) is ~ 5???. At the mid-slope site (Site U1327, 1304 mbsl) the downhole 13C-enrichment of the CO2 is ~ 25??? and increases to ~ 40??? at the near-shelf edge Site U1329. This isotope fractionation pattern is indicative of more extensive diagenetic alteration at sites with greater 13C

  14. Isolation and characterization of organisms growing with methane only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 20 obligate methane utilizing bacteria were isolated from local soil following shake flask enrichment and continuous subculture technique isolation of methanotrophs proved to the difficult and slow. All isolates were gram negative, strictly aerobic, use methane as their sole carbon and energy source, unable to grow on nutrient media and can use nitrate as N source. Some isolates were motile. Few were able to utilize methanol. All the tested soil samples contained methane utilizing organisms. (author)

  15. [Research progress in microbial methane oxidation coupled to denitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Yuan, Meng-Dong; Liu, Jing-Jing; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2013-12-01

    Methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is an essential bond to connect carbon- and nitrogen cycling. To deeply research this process will improve our understanding on the biochemical cycling of global carbon and nitrogen. As an exogenous gaseous carbon source of denitrification, methane can both regulate the balance of atmospheric methane to effectively mitigate the greenhouse effect caused by methane, and reduce the cost of exogenous carbon source input in traditional wastewater denitrification treatment process. As a result, great attention has being paid to the mechanical study of the process. This paper mainly discussed the two types of methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, i. e., aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) and anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (ANME-D), with the focus on the microbiological coupling mechanisms and related affecting factors. The existing problems in the engineering application of methane oxidation coupled to denitrification were pointed out, and the application prospects were approached. PMID:24697087

  16. Response of the Black Sea methane budget to massive short-term submarine inputs of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmale, O.; Haeckel, M.; McGinnis, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    -water mud volcanoes or submarine landslides at intermediate water depths) on the water column methane distribution and the resulting methane emission to the atmosphere. Our non-steady state simulations predict that these inputs will be effectively buffered by intense microbial methane consumption and that...... the upward flux of methane is strongly hampered by the pronounced density stratification of the Black Sea water column. For instance, an assumed input of methane of 179 Tg CH(4) d(-1) (equivalent to the amount of methane released by 1000 mud volcano eruptions) at a water depth of 700m will only...

  17. Acid-Tolerant Moderately Thermophilic Methanotrophs of the Class Gammaproteobacteria Isolated From Tropical Topsoil with Methane Seeps

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Tajul; Torsvik, Vigdis; Larsen, Øivind; Bodrossy, Levente; Øvreås, Lise; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial tropical methane seep habitats are important ecosystems in the methane cycle. Methane oxidizing bacteria play a key role in these ecosystems as they reduce methane emissions to the atmosphere. Here, we describe the isolation and initial characterization of two novel moderately thermophilic and acid-tolerant obligate methanotrophs, assigned BFH1 and BFH2 recovered from a tropical methane seep topsoil habitat. The new isolates were strictly aerobic, non-motile, coccus-shaped and uti...

  18. Release of volatile organic compounds from food wastes during the aerobic decomposition%食品垃圾好氧降解过程中挥发性有机物(VOCs)排放特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴婷; 王新明

    2012-01-01

    The production and composition of 117 volatile organic compounds(VOCs) were studied during the aerobic decomposition of food wastes(FW) and four biodegradable organic plant wastes,including orange,lettuce,potato and tomato wastes,under controlled aerobic conditions in laboratory.Total yields of VOCs from FW during the treatment process reached 951.80 mg · kg^-1,among which organic sulfurs,oxygenated chemicals and terpenes dominated and shared 43.1%,53.3% and 2.1% of total VOCs released,respectively.Total production of VOCs from orange,lettuce,potato and tomato wastes during the incubation were 12736.72 mg · kg^-1,118.67 mg · kg^-1,57.40 mg · kg^-1 and 228.08 mg · kg^-1,respectively,with the dominance of oxygenated chemicals and terpenes.Oxygenated chemicals shared 13.5%,80.9%,85.9% and 79.5% of total VOCs released from orange,lettuce,potato and tomato wastes,while terpenes accounted for 86.5%,16.6%,8.2% and 15.6% of total VOCs emitted from the four biodegradable organic plant wastes,respectively.%采用实验室模拟方法,研究了混合食品垃圾(FW)及以橙子、生菜、土豆和西红柿为代表的4种植物性易降解有机垃圾组分好氧降解过程中排放出来的117种挥发性有机物(VOCs)的排放量和组成特征.结果表明,混合食品垃圾好氧降解过程中VOCs总排放量为951.80mg·kg^-1,主要为有机硫、含氧化合物和萜烯,分别占VOCs总排放量的43.1%、53.3%和2.1%.橙子、生菜、土豆和西红柿4种植物性易降解有机垃圾好氧降解过程中VOCs的总排放量分别为12736.72、118.67、57.40和228.08mg·kg^-1,主要成分均为含氧化合物和萜烯;含氧化合物分别占橙子、生菜、土豆和西红柿4种植物性易降解有机垃圾VOCs总排放量的13.5%、80.9%、85.9%和79.5%,萜烯分别占4种植物性易降解有机垃圾VOCs总排放量的86.5%、16.6%、8.2%和15.6%.

  19. Methane oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction under hypoxia by the Gammaproteobacterium Methylomonas denitrificans, sp. nov. type strain FJG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kits, K Dimitri; Klotz, Martin G; Stein, Lisa Y

    2015-09-01

    Obligate methanotrophs belonging to the Phyla Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia require oxygen for respiration and methane oxidation; nevertheless, aerobic methanotrophs are abundant and active in low oxygen environments. While genomes of some aerobic methanotrophs encode putative nitrogen oxide reductases, it is not understood whether these metabolic modules are used for NOx detoxification, denitrification or other purposes. Here we demonstrate using microsensor measurements that a gammaproteobacterial methanotroph Methylomonas denitrificans sp. nov. strain FJG1(T) couples methane oxidation to nitrate reduction under oxygen limitation, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. Illumina RNA-Seq data revealed differential expression of genes encoding a denitrification pathway previously unknown to methanotrophs as well as the pxmABC operon in M. denitrificans sp. nov. strain FJG1(T) in response to hypoxia. Physiological and transcriptome data indicate that genetic inventory encoding the denitrification pathway is upregulated only upon availability of nitrate under oxygen limitation. In addition, quantitation of ATP levels demonstrates that the denitrification pathway employs inventory such as nitrate reductase NarGH serving M. denitrificans sp. nov. strain FJG1(T) to conserve energy during oxygen limitation. This study unravelled an unexpected metabolic flexibility of aerobic methanotrophs, thereby assigning these bacteria a new role at the metabolic intersection of the carbon and nitrogen cycles. PMID:25580993

  20. Methane Oxidation in Termite Hindguts: Absence of Evidence and Evidence of Absence▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pester, Michael; Tholen, Anne; Friedrich, Michael W.; Brune, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    A steep oxygen gradient and the presence of methane render the hindgut internal periphery of termites a potential habitat for aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria. However, methane emissions of various termites increased, if at all, only slightly when termites were exposed to an anoxic (nitrogen) atmosphere, and 14CH4 added to the air headspace over live termites was not converted to 14CO2. Evidence for the absence of methane oxidation in living termites was corroborated by the failure to detec...

  1. Activity and Diversity of Methanotrophic Bacteria at Methane Seeps in Eastern Lake Constance Sediments ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Deutzmann, Jörg; Wörner, Susanne; Schink, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The activity and community structure of aerobic methanotrophic communities were investigated at methane seeps (pockmarks) in the littoral and profundal zones of an oligotrophic freshwater lake (Lake Constance, Germany). Measurements of potential methane oxidation rates showed that sediments inside littoral pockmarks are hot spots of methane oxidation. Potential methane oxidation rates at littoral pockmark sites exceeded the rates of the surrounding sediment by 2 orders of magnitude. Terminal ...

  2. Efficiency of the Benthic Microbial Methane Filter under Varying Fluid Fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Steeb, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Marine sediments all over the world bear methane, generated from organic matter and deposited at the seafloor. By diffusion or ascending fluids the methane is transported to the sediment surface and emitted into the oceans and further into the atmosphere, where it acts as greenhouse gas. However, most of the methane is anaerobically or aerobically oxidized by microbes in the upper sediments and in the water column. One of the most important methane oxidizing processes is the anae...

  3. Efficiency of the Benthic Microbial Methane Filter under Varying Fluid Fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Steeb, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Marine sediments all over the world bear methane, generated from organic matter and deposited at the seafloor. By diffusion or ascending fluids the methane is transported to the sediment surface and emitted into the oceans and further into the atmosphere, where it acts as greenhouse gas. However, most of the methane is anaerobically or aerobically oxidized by microbes in the upper sediments and in the water column. One of the most important methane oxidizing processes is the anaerobic oxidati...

  4. Submarine methane seepage in the Paleo Dnepr Area and Sorokin Trough and its influence on the Black Sea methane budget

    OpenAIRE

    Schmale, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Methane is a greenhouse gas that exerts a significant influence on the radiation budget and thereby the earth’s climate. Geological sources of methane, especially submarine, are particularly relevant in this regard because they emit significant quantities of methane into the atmosphere. However, it is difficult to estimate the magnitude of the global geological source because the extent of these methane-releasing areas and the processes, which influence the methane cycle, are not yet well und...

  5. 用营养缓释型生物填料强化好氧水处理过程%BIOMASS CARRIER WITH SLOW RELEASE OF NUTRIENTS FOR ENHANCED AEROBIC PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海景; 程江; 肖立军; 皮丕辉; 文秀芳; 杨卓如

    2008-01-01

    The conventional polyethylene (PE) biofilm carrier was modified by additives of hydroxyapatite (HAP), starch, bagasse, activated carbon and magnetic powder, for improving its hydrophilicity and providing nutrients for attached microbes in aerobic treatment of toxic wastewater. The slow release rate of nutrients may be controlled by the amount of bagasse and activated carbon supplemented in the carrier. The contact angle of the modified polyethylene surface decreased from 80° (with respect to polyethylene itself) to 59°, and the period of biofilm formation on the modified carrier with acclimated sludge reduced from 7 days (on PE carrier without additives) to 4 days. The results also showed that the biological degradation of phenol was enhanced by use of biofilm carriers supplemented with additives for slow release of nutrients. The biodegradation process was reduced from 19 h to 13 h for complete removal of 127.5 mg/L phenol from synthetic wastewater by using the modified carrier. The strength performance assay demonstrated that the modified carrier was suitable for long operation in practical application.%在普通聚乙烯生物填料中添加适量的羟基磷灰石(HAP)、淀粉、蔗渣、活性炭和磁粉,形成营养缓释型生物填料(改性填料),研究了所改性填料的表面结构、润湿性能、营养缓释性能和挂膜性能.结果表明,改性聚乙烯填料较普通聚乙烯填料水接触角减小26%,具有较好的营养缓释性能,挂膜时间缩短了3 d;好氧生物处理中完全去除125.5 mg/L的酚,采用普通聚乙烯填料需19 h,而采用改性填料只需13 h,填料改性后的机械强度符合长期使用要求.

  6. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence G. Miller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate or via chlorite (ClO2- dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO2- amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO2-. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO2- and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO4- or ClO3- was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs.

  7. What Is Aerobic Dancing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after exercising, see a physician. Common Aerobics Injuries Plantar fasciitis (arch pain) -- Arch pain is often caused by ... rearfoot instability, with excessive pronation, may result in plantar fasciitis. Shoes with proper support in the arch often ...

  8. Sorption of methane and CO2 for enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon dioxide seauestration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basanta Kumar Prusty

    2008-01-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in deep and unmineable coal seams is one of the attractive alternatives to reduce its atmospheric concentration. Injection of CO2 in coal seams may help in enhancing the recovery of coalbed methane. An experimental study has been carried out using coal samples from three different coal seams, to evaluate the enhanced gas recovery and sequestration potential of these coals. The coals were first saturated with methane and then by depressurization some of the adsorbed methane was desorbed. After partial desorption, CO2 was injected into the coals and subsequently they were depressurized again. Desorption of methane after the injections was studied, to investigate the ability of CO2 to displace and enhance the recovery of methane from the coals. The coals exhibited varying behavior of adsorption of CO2 and release of methane. For one coal, the release of methane was enhanced by injection of CO2, suggesting preferential adsorption of CO2 and desorption of methane. For the other two coals, CO2 injection did not produce incremental methane initially, as there was initial resistance to methane release. However with continued CO2 injection, most of the remaining methane was produced. The study suggested that preferential sorption behavior of coal and enhanced gas recovery pattern could not be generalized for all coals.

  9. Methane clathrates in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, Olivier; Holm, Nils G; Bouquet, Alexis; Waite, Jack Hunter; Geppert, Wolf Dietrich; Picaud, Sylvain; Aikawa, Yuri; Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We review the reservoirs of methane clathrates that may exist in the different bodies of the Solar System. Methane was formed in the interstellar medium prior to having been embedded in the protosolar nebula gas phase. This molecule was subsequently trapped in clathrates that formed from crystalline water ice during the cooling of the disk and incorporated in this form in the building blocks of comets, icy bodies, and giant planets. Methane clathrates may play an important role in the evolution of planetary atmospheres. On Earth, the production of methane in clathrates is essentially biological, and these compounds are mostly found in permafrost regions or in the sediments of continental shelves. On Mars, methane would more likely derive from hydrothermal reactions with olivine-rich material. If they do exist, martian methane clathrates would be stable only at depth in the cryosphere and sporadically release some methane into the atmosphere via mechanisms that remain to be determined.

  10. Diversity and Habitat Preferences of Cultivated and Uncultivated Aerobic Methanotrophic Bacteria Evaluated Based on pmoA as Molecular Marker

    OpenAIRE

    Knief, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are characterized by their capability to grow on methane as sole source of carbon and energy. Cultivation-dependent and -independent methods have revealed that this functional guild of bacteria comprises a substantial diversity of organisms. In particular the use of cultivation-independent methods targeting a subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) as functional marker for the detection of aerobic methanotrophs has resulted in thousands of sequences ...

  11. Methane seeps, methane hydrate destabilization, and the late Neoproterozoic postglacial cap carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ganqing; SHI Xiaoying; ZHANG Shihong

    2006-01-01

    Methane hydrates constitute the largest pool of readily exchangeable carbon at the Earth's sedimentary carapace and may destabilize, in some cases catastrophically, during times of global-scale warming and/or sea level changes. Given the extreme cold during Neoproterozoic ice ages, the aftermath of such events is perhaps amongst the most likely intervals in Earth history to witness a methane hydrate destabilization event. The coincidence of localized but widespread methane seep-like structures and textures, methane-derived isotopic signal,low sulfate concentration, marine barites, and a prominent, short-lived carbon isotope excursion (δ13C≤-5‰) from the post-Marinoan cap carbonates (~635 Ma) provides strong evidence for a methane hydrate destabilization event during the late Neoproterozoic postglacial warming and transgression. Methane release from hydrates could cause a positive feedback to global warming and oxidation of methane could result in ocean anoxia and fluctuation of atmospheric oxygen, providing an environmental force for the early animal evolution in the latest Neoproterozoic. The issues that remain to be clarified for this event include the trigger of methane hydrate destabilization, the time of initial methane release, the predicted ocean anoxia event and its relationship with the biological innovation, additional geochemical signals in response to methane release, and the regional and global synchrony of cap carbonate precipitation. The Doushantuo cap carbonate in South China provides one of the best examples of its age for a better understanding of these issues.

  12. Gaseous emissions reduction from aerobic MBT of municipal solid waste

    OpenAIRE

    Zdanevitch, Isabelle; Mallard, Pascal; Bour, Olivier; Briand, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Surface gaseous emissions, composition of soil gas and VOC concentration were determined on a French MBT plant, where the biodegradation process is aerobic. Measurements were performed on both the composting windrows and on the landfill cell which receives the sorting rejects. This allowed the comparison of the global methane and CO2 gases, as well as the characterization of the degradation process on the different parts of the site. The performance of the sorting chain allow to obtain a high...

  13. Aerobic methanotroph diversity in Sanjiang wetland, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Juanli; Zhang, Hongxun; Deng, Yongcui; Wang, Yanfen

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic methanotrophs present in wetlands can serve as a methane filter and thereby significantly reduce methane emissions. Sanjiang wetland is a major methane source and the second largest wetland in China, yet little is known about the characteristics of aerobic methanotrophs in this region. In the present study, we investigated the diversity and abundance of methanotrophs in marsh soils from Sanjiang wetland with three different types of vegetation by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and pmoA gene analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the highest number of pmoA gene copies in marsh soils vegetated with Carex lasiocarpa (10(9) g(-1) dry soil), followed by Carex meyeriana, and the least with Deyeuxia angustifolia (10(8) g(-1) dry soil). Consistent results were obtained using Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing techniques, both indicating the codominance of Methylobacter and Methylocystis species in Sanjiang wetland. Other less abundant methanotrophy, including cultivated Methylomonas and Methylosinus genus, and uncultured clusters such as LP20 and JR-1, were also detected in the wetland. Methanotroph diversity was almost the same in three different vegetation covered soils, suggesting that vegetation types had very little influence on the methanotroph diversity. Our study gives an in-depth insight into the community composition of aerobic methanotrophs in the Sanjiang wetland. PMID:25351140

  14. Agricultural methanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having briefly outlined the interest of the development of methanization of agricultural by-products in the context of struggle against climate change, and noticed that France is only now developing this sector as some other countries already did, this publication describes the methanization process also called anaerobic digestion, which produces a digestate and biogas. Advantages for the agriculture sector are outlined, as well as drawbacks and recommendations (required specific technical abilities, an attention to the use of energetic crops, an improved economic balance which still depends on public subsidies, competition in the field of waste processing). Actions undertaken by the ADEME are briefly evoked

  15. Measurements of the average energy of carbon atoms released from breakup of methane in the main SOL of DIII-D compared with DIVIMP code modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13CH4 , 12CD4 or 12CH4 gases were puffed into the crown (top) of lower single-null divertor plasmas in DIII-D using toroidally symmetric injection, constituting a particularly simple experiment to interpret. The resulting CI (9094.83 A) wavelength profiles were measured with a high resolution spectrometer. For a wide variety of plasma conditions, the shape of the profile was nearly constant, and could be approximately represented by a shifted gaussian distribution, corresponding to a temperature of the C-atoms of <1 eV. DIVIMP code analysis reported here, based on the recent Janev-Reiter database/model for methane breakup, has produced sufficiently close matches to these experimental CI profiles, to provide reasonable confidence that the controlling processes have been included

  16. Measurements of the average energy of carbon atoms released from breakup of methane in the main SOL of DIII-D compared with DIVIMP code modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stangeby, P.C. [University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies, 4925 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ont., M3H 5T6 (Canada)]. E-mail: stangeby@fusion.gat.com; McLean, A.G. [University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies, 4925 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ont., M3H 5T6 (Canada); Elder, J.D. [University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies, 4925 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ont., M3H 5T6 (Canada); Brooks, N.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); West, W.P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Reiter, D. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Forschungszentrum, Juelich GmbH 52425, Juelich (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    {sup 13}CH{sub 4} , {sup 12}CD{sub 4} or {sup 12}CH{sub 4} gases were puffed into the crown (top) of lower single-null divertor plasmas in DIII-D using toroidally symmetric injection, constituting a particularly simple experiment to interpret. The resulting CI (9094.83 A) wavelength profiles were measured with a high resolution spectrometer. For a wide variety of plasma conditions, the shape of the profile was nearly constant, and could be approximately represented by a shifted gaussian distribution, corresponding to a temperature of the C-atoms of <1 eV. DIVIMP code analysis reported here, based on the recent Janev-Reiter database/model for methane breakup, has produced sufficiently close matches to these experimental CI profiles, to provide reasonable confidence that the controlling processes have been included.

  17. Methane oxidizing bacteria at the oxic-anoxic interface : taxon-specific activity and resilience

    OpenAIRE

    Reim, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The methanotrophic bacteria are the only known biological sink for the third most important greenhouse gas methane, performing an important ecosystem function influencing global climate change. In the soil surface layer of water logged soils aerobic methanotrophs thrive at the oxic-anoxic interface attenuating the amount of potentially emitted methane. The highly diverse methanotroph community is shaping the interface characterize...

  18. Survey reveals floral emission of methane on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Along-term field observation by CAS scientists indicates that meadows on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau emit methane,a powerful greenhouse gas, adding weight to the argument that the living plant is a producer of methane under aerobic conditions.

  19. Survey reveals floral emission of methane on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ A long-term field observation by CAS scientists indicates that meadows on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau emit methane,a powerful greenhouse gas,adding weight to the argument that the living plant is a producer of methane under aerobic conditions.

  20. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynt...

  1. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutzmann, Joerg S.; Stief, Peter; Brandes, Josephin;

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as “nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation” (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments......, the close proximity of oxygen- and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular...... techniques in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral...

  2. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture 2000 The natural and unnatural history of methane-oxidizing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Methane gas is produced from many natural and anthropogenic sources. As such, methane gas plays a significant role in the Earth's climate, being 25 times more effective as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. As with nearly all other naturally produced organic molecules on Earth, there are also micro-organisms capable of using methane as their sole source of carbon and energy. The microbes responsible (methanotrophs) are ubiquitous and, for the most part, aerobic. Although anaerobic methanot...

  3. Estimating methane emission and oxidation from two temporary covers on landfilled MBT treated waste

    OpenAIRE

    Bour, Olivier; Zdanevitch, Isabelle; Briand, Mark; Llinas, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Surface gaseous emissions and upper layer waste gas composition were measured on two French MBT plants with aerobic pre-treatment process. The goals were to characterize the gaseous emissions, and to assess the efficiency of the upper layer to oxidize the methane flux coming from the residual organic fraction. The first plant was operated without recovery of organic fraction and with concentration of the fine fraction in a cell. The methane fluxes were high and the oxidized methane fraction w...

  4. Methane seepage along the Hikurangi Margin offshore New Zealand: 6 years of multidisciplinary studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, J.; Bialas, J.; Klaucke, I.; Crutchley, G.; Dale, A.; Linke, P.; Sommer, S.; Bowden, D.; Rowden, A.; de Haas, H.; de Stigter, H.; Faure, K.

    2012-12-01

    Detailed studies in 2006, 2007 and 2011 along the east coast of New Zealand's North Island highlighted the close link of sub-bottom fluid pathways and seafloor expressions of methane seepage such as clam fields, carbonate build-ups, tubeworms, bacterial mats and methane release (Marine Geology 272). Prior to our studies, only accidental observations of hydroacoustic anomalies, recoveries of calyptogena shells and methane-derived carbonate chimneys indicated active seepage. Wide areas of the sub-seafloor show BSR structures, gas migration pathways, gas chimneys and blanking zones, which are closely linked to actual seep sites. Sidescan surveys showed four prominent seep areas at Omakere Ridge in 1120m water depth, three of them perfectly matching the shapes and locations of faults seen in high resolution 3D-seismic surveys. The fourth seep, Bear's Paw, on its western side represents an old seep which developed into a cold water coral habitat. At the actively seeping eastern part, gas hydrates could be retrieved and bubble release was observed hydroacoustically and confirmed by high dissolved methane values (380nM). No strong microbial oxidation effects could be found in δ13C values plotting along a mixing curve between pure seep (-70 ‰PDB) and atmospheric methane (-47 ‰PDB). Lander deployments show a tide-influenced gas discharge with sometimes eruptive bubble release with possible plume development transporting methane-charged water higher up into the water column. Rock Garden, with just above 600m water depth at its top outside the gas hydrate stability zone, hosts two main seep areas. ROV observations at Faure Site document eruptive releases of free gas from decimeter-wide craters at the seafloor. Flux estimates show peak releases of 420ml/min with bubbles up to 9mm in diameter. Concentrations of dissolved methane reach up to 3500nM close to the bottom, but higher concentrations are limited to below 400m of water depth; here, methane is transported towards

  5. Comparison of Two Techniques to Calculate Methane Oxidation rates in Samples Obtained From the Hudson Canyon Seep Field in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonte, M.; Kessler, J. D.; Chepigin, A.; Kellermann, M. Y.; Arrington, E.; Valentine, D. L.; Sylva, S.

    2014-12-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation, or methanotrophy, is the dominant process by which methane is removed from the water column in oceanic environments. Therefore, accurately quantifying methane oxidation rates is crucial when constructing methane budgets on a local or global scale. Here we present a comparison of two techniques used to determine methane oxidation rates based on samples obtained over the Hudson Canyon seep field in the North Atlantic. Traditional methane oxidation rate measurements require inoculation of water samples with isotopically labeled methane and tracking the changes to methane concentrations and isotopes as the samples are incubated. However, the addition of methane above background levels is thought to increase the potential for methane oxidation in the sample. A new technique to calculate methane oxidation rates is based on kinetic isotope models and incorporates direct measurements of methane concentrations, methane 13C isotopes, and water current velocity. Acoustic instrumentation (ADCP) aboard the R/V Endeavor was used to obtain water current velocity data while water samples were collected for methane concentration and isotopic ratio analysis. Methane δ13C measurements allow us to attribute changes in methane concentration to either water dispersion or bacterial methane oxidation. The data obtained from this cruise will tell us a comprehensive story of methane removal processes from this active seep field. The kinetic isotope models will allow us to estimate the total flux of methane from the seep site and calculate methane oxidation rates at different depths and locations away from seafloor plumes.

  6. Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab Z. Abdallah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central rift of the Red Sea contains 25 brine pools with different physicochemical conditions, dictating the diversity and abundance of the microbial community. Three of these pools, the Atlantis II, Kebrit and Discovery Deeps, are uniquely characterized by a high concentration of hydrocarbons. The brine-seawater interface, described as an anoxic-oxic (brine-seawater boundary, is characterized by a high methane concentration, thus favoring aerobic methane oxidation. The current study analyzed the aerobic free–living methane-oxidizing bacterial communities that potentially contribute to methane oxidation at the brine-seawater interfaces of the three aforementioned brine pools, using metagenomic pyrosequencing, 16S rRNA pyrotags and pmoA library constructs. The sequencing of 16S rRNA pyrotags revealed that these interfaces are characterized by high microbial community diversity. Signatures of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria were detected in the Atlantis II Interface (ATII-I and the Kebrit Deep Upper (KB-U and Lower (KB-L brine-seawater interfaces. Through phylogenetic analysis of pmoA, we further demonstrated that the ATII-I aerobic methanotroph community is highly diverse. We propose four ATII-I pmoA clusters. Most importantly, cluster 2 groups with marine methane seep methanotrophs, and cluster 4 represent a unique lineage of an uncultured bacterium with divergent alkane monooxygenases. Moreover, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS based on the ordination of putative enzymes involved in methane metabolism showed that the Kebrit interface layers were distinct from the ATII-I and DD-I brine-seawater interfaces.

  7. Sediment trapping by dams creates methane emission hot spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeck, A.; Delsontro, T.; McGinnis, Daniel F.; Fischer, H.; Flury, Sabine; Schmidt, M.; Fietzek, P.; Lorke, A.

    2013-01-01

    reservoirs or rivers. We show that sediment accumulation correlates with methane production and subsequent ebullitive release rates and may therefore be an excellent proxy for estimating methane emissions from small reservoirs. Our results suggest that sedimentation-driven methane emissions from dammed river......Inland waters transport and transform substantial amounts of carbon and account for similar to 18% of global methane emissions. Large reservoirs with higher areal methane release rates than natural waters contribute significantly to freshwater emissions. However, there are millions of small dams...... worldwide that receive and trap high loads of organic carbon and can therefore potentially emit significant amounts of methane to the atmosphere. We evaluated the effect of damming on methane emissions in a central European impounded river. Direct comparison of riverine and reservoir reaches, where...

  8. On the phenomenon of the fast release of energy in irradiated solid methane: discussion of models considering the local space distribution of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general idea of the phenomenon, so-called 'a burp', is provided. It is concluded that no justified and consistent theory of the burp phenomenon is proposed. The paper expresses criticism on the application of the classic theory of homogeneous chemical reactions and of thermal explosion to analyze burps as it was in common usage up to now. Two hypotheses to explain features burps display are presented instead. Both of them have to do with mechanism of storing and releasing energy accounting for local non-uniformity of temperature end energy deposition. 11 refs., 4 figs

  9. Cryolava flow destabilization of crustal methane clathrate hydrate on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Sotin, Christophe; Choukroun, Mathieu; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2016-08-01

    To date, there has been no conclusive observation of ongoing endogenous volcanic activity on Saturn's moon Titan. However, with time, Titan's atmospheric methane is lost and must be replenished. We have modeled one possible mechanism for the replenishment of Titan's methane loss. Cryolavas can supply enough heat to release large amounts of methane from methane clathrate hydrates (MCH). The volume of methane released is controlled by the flow thickness and its areal extent. The depth of the destabilisation layer is typically ≈30% of the thickness of the lava flow (≈3 m for a 10-m thick flow). For this flow example, a maximum of 372 kg of methane is released per m2 of flow area. Such an event would release methane for nearly a year. One or two events per year covering ∼20 km2 would be sufficient to resupply atmospheric methane. A much larger effusive event covering an area of ≈9000 km2 with flows 200 m thick would release enough methane to sustain current methane concentrations for 10,000 years. The minimum size of "cryo-flows" sufficient to maintain the current atmospheric methane is small enough that their detection with current instruments (e.g., Cassini) could be challenging. We do not suggest that Titan's original atmosphere was generated by this mechanism. It is unlikely that small-scale surface MCH destabilisation is solely responsible for long-term (> a few Myr) sustenance of Titan's atmospheric methane, but rather we present it as a possible contributor to Titan's past and current atmospheric methane.

  10. Release and fate of fluorocarbons in a shredder residue landfill cell: 1. Laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Nedenskov, Jonas; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The shredder residues from automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing products are often disposed in landfills, as recycling technologies for these materials are not common in many countries. Shredder waste contains rigid and soft foams from cushions and insulation panels blown with fluorocarbons. The objective of this study was to use laboratory experiments to estimate fluorocarbon release and attenuation processes in a monofill shredder residue (SR) landfill cell. Waste from the open SR landfill cell at the AV Miljø landfill in Denmark was sampled at three locations. The waste contained 1-3% metal and a relatively low fraction of rigid polyurethane (PUR) foam particles. The PUR waste contained less blowing agent (CFC-11) than predicted from a release model. However, CFC-11 was steadily released in an aerobic bench scale experiment. Anaerobic waste incubation bench tests showed that SRSR produced significant methane (CH(4)), but at rates that were in the low end of the range observed for municipal solid waste. Aerobic and anaerobic batch experiments showed that processes in SRSR potentially can attenuate the fluorocarbons released from the SRSR itself: CFC-11 is degraded under anaerobic conditions with the formation of degradation products, which are being degraded under CH(4) oxidation conditions prevailing in the upper layers of the SR. PMID:20435458

  11. Annular purpura and step aerobics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, S J; Humphreys, F; Buxton, P K

    1994-09-01

    Step aerobic classes are at present one of the most popular forms of exercise undertaken by young adults. To date no dermatological abnormalities have been described in people regularly performing step aerobics. We describe a case in which a healthy young woman developed an extensive pigmented purpuric eruption 4 weeks after commencing regular step aerobic classes. The eruption resolved completely 8 weeks after regular exercise was ceased. PMID:7955503

  12. Methane emission from flooded soils - from microorganisms to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas that is affected by anthropogenic activity. The annual budget of atmospheric methane, which is about 600 million tons, is by more than 75% produced by methanogenic archaea. These archaea are the end-members of a microbial community that degrades organic matter under anaerobic conditions. Flooded rice fields constitute a major source (about 10%) of atmospheric methane. After flooding of soil, anaerobic processes are initiated, finally resulting in the disproportionation of organic matter to carbon dioxide and methane. This process occurs in the bulk soil, on decaying organic debris and in the rhizosphere. The produced methane is mostly ventilated through the plant vascular system into the atmosphere. This system also allows the diffusion of oxygen into the rizosphere, where part of the produced methane is oxidized by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. More than 50% of the methane production is derived from plant photosynthetic products and is formed on the root surface. Methanocellales are an important group of methanogenic archaea colonizing rice roots. Soils lacking this group seem to result in reduced root colonization and methane production. In rice soil methane is produced by two major paths of methanogenesis, the hydrogenotrophic one reducing carbon dioxide to methane, and the aceticlastic one disproportionating acetate to methane and carbon dioxide. Theoretically, at least two third of the methane should be produced by aceticlastic and the rest by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. In nature, however, the exact contribution of the two paths can vary from zero to 100%. Several environmental factors, such as temperature and quality of organic matter affect the path of methane production. The impact of these factors on the composition and activity of the environmental methanogenic microbial community will be discussed.

  13. Aerobic Methanotrophs in Natural and Agricultural Soils of European Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kravchenko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human activities such as land management and global warming have great impact on the environment. Among changes associated with the global warming, rising methane emission is a serious concern. Therefore, we assessed methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight soil types (both unmanaged and agricultural distributed across the European part of Russia. Using a culture-independent approach targeting pmoA gene, we provide the first baseline data on the diversity of methanotrophs inhabiting most typical soil types. The analysis of pmoA clone libraries showed that methanotrophic populations in unmanaged soils are less diverse than in agricultural areas. These clone sequences were placed in three groups of, so far, uncultured methanotrophs: USC-gamma, cluster I, and pmoA/amoA cluster, which are believed to be responsible for atmospheric methane oxidation in upland soils. Agricultural soils harbored methanotrophs related to genera Methylosinus, Methylocystis, Methylomicrobium, Methylobacter, and Methylocaldum. Despite higher numbers of detected molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs, managed soils showed decreased methane oxidation rates as observed in both in situ and laboratory experiments. Our results also suggest that soil restoration may have a positive effect on methane consumption by terrestrial ecosystems.

  14. Analysing the consistency of martian methane observations by investigation of global methane transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, James A.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.

    2015-09-01

    Reports of methane on Mars at different times imply varying spatial distributions. This study examines whether different observations are mutually consistent by using a global circulation model to investigate the time evolution of methane in the atmosphere. Starting from an observed plume of methane, consistent with that reported in 2003 from ground-based telescopes, multiple simulations are analysed to investigate what is required for consistency with an inferred methane signal from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer made 60 sols later. The best agreement between the existing observations is found using continued release from a solitary source over Nili Fossae. While the peaks in methane over the Tharsis Montes, Elysium Mons and Nili Fossae regions are well aligned with the retrievals, an extra peak on the south flank of the Isidis basin is apparent in the model due to the prevailing eastward transport of methane. The absence of this feature could indicate the presence of a fast-acting localised sink of methane. These results show that the spatial and temporal variability of methane on Mars implied by observations could be explained by advection from localised time-dependent sources alongside a currently unknown methane sink. Evidence is presented that a fast trapping mechanism for methane is required. Trapping by a zeolite structure in dust particles is a suggested candidate warranting further investigation; this could provide a fast acting sink as required by this reconstruction.

  15. Aerobic methanotrophy within the pelagic redox-zone of the Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Schmale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Water column samples taken in summer 2008 from the stratified Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea showed a strong gradient in dissolved methane concentrations from high values in the saline deep water (max. 504 nM to low concentrations in the less dense, brackish surface water (about 4 nM. The steep methane-gradient (between 115 and 135 m water depth within the redox-zone, which separates the anoxic deep part from the oxygenated surface water (oxygen concentration 0–0.8 mL L−1, implies a methane consumption rate of 0.28 nM d−1. The process of microbial methane oxidation within this zone was evident by a shift of the stable carbon isotope ratio of methane between the bottom water (δ13C CH4 = −82.4‰ and the redox-zone (δ13C CH4 = −38.7‰. Water column samples between 80 and 119 m were studied to identify the microorganisms responsible for the methane turnover in that depth interval. Notably, methane monooxygenase gene expression analyses for water depths covering the whole redox-zone demonstrated that accordant methanotrophic activity was probably due to only one phylotype of the aerobic type I methanotrophic bacteria. An imprint of these organisms on the particular organic matter was revealed by distinctive lipid biomarkers showing bacteriohopanepolyols and lipid fatty acids characteristic for aerobic type I methanotrophs (e.g., 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol, corroborating their role in aerobic methane oxidation in the redox-zone of the central Baltic Sea.

  16. Aerobic methanotrophy within the pelagic redox-zone of the Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, O.; Blumenberg, M.; Kießlich, K.; Jakobs, G.; Berndmeyer, C.; Labrenz, M.; Thiel, V.; Rehder, G.

    2012-12-01

    Water column samples taken in summer 2008 from the stratified Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea) showed a strong gradient in dissolved methane concentrations from high values in the saline deep water (max. 504 nM) to low concentrations in the less dense, brackish surface water (about 4 nM). The steep methane-gradient (between 115 and 135 m water depth) within the redox-zone, which separates the anoxic deep part from the oxygenated surface water (oxygen concentration 0-0.8 mL L-1), implies a methane consumption rate of 0.28 nM d-1. The process of microbial methane oxidation within this zone was evident by a shift of the stable carbon isotope ratio of methane between the bottom water (δ13C CH4 = -82.4‰ and the redox-zone (δ13C CH4 = -38.7‰. Water column samples between 80 and 119 m were studied to identify the microorganisms responsible for the methane turnover in that depth interval. Notably, methane monooxygenase gene expression analyses for water depths covering the whole redox-zone demonstrated that accordant methanotrophic activity was probably due to only one phylotype of the aerobic type I methanotrophic bacteria. An imprint of these organisms on the particular organic matter was revealed by distinctive lipid biomarkers showing bacteriohopanepolyols and lipid fatty acids characteristic for aerobic type I methanotrophs (e.g., 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol), corroborating their role in aerobic methane oxidation in the redox-zone of the central Baltic Sea.

  17. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  18. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation by Methylomirabilis oxyfera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2012-07-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to nitrite reduction is a recently discovered methane sink of as yet unknown global significance. The bacteria that have been identified to carry out this process, Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera, oxidize methane via the known aerobic pathway involving the monooxygenase reaction. In contrast to aerobic methanotrophs, oxygen is produced intracellularly and used for the activation of methane by a phylogenetically distinct particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here we report the fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen during methane oxidation by an enrichment culture of M. oxyfera bacteria. In two separate batch incubation experiments with different absolute biomass and methane contents, the specific methanotrophic activity was similar and the progressive isotope enrichment identical. Headspace methane was consumed up to 98% with rates showing typical first order reaction kinetics. The enrichment factors determined by Rayleigh equations were -29.2 ± 2.6‰ for δ13C (εC) and -227.6 ± 13.5‰ for δ2H (εH), respectively. These enrichment factors were in the upper range of values reported so far for aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, two-dimensional specific isotope analysis (Λ = ( α H - 1 - 1)/( α C - 1 - 1)) was performed and also the determined Λ value of 9.8 was within the range determined for other aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs. The results showed that in contrast to abiotic processes biological methane oxidation exhibits a narrow range of fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen irrespective of the underlying biochemical mechanisms. This work will therefore facilitate the correct interpretation of isotopic composition of atmospheric methane with implications for modeling of global carbon fluxes.

  19. A methane-driven microbial food web in a wetland rice soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Jun; Frenzel, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Methane oxidation is a key process controlling methane emission from anoxic habitats into the atmosphere. Methanotrophs, responsible for aerobic methane oxidation, do not only oxidize but also assimilate methane. Once assimilated, methane carbon may be utilized by other organisms. Here we report on a microbial food web in a rice field soil driven by methane. A thin layer of water-saturated rice field soil was incubated under opposing gradients of oxygen and (13)C-labelled methane. Bacterial and eukaryotic communities incorporating methane carbon were analysed by RNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning showed that methanotrophs were the most prominent group of bacteria incorporating methane carbon. In addition, a few Myxobacteria-related sequences were obtained from the 'heavy' rRNA fraction. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 18S rRNA detected various groups of protists in the 'heavy' rRNA fraction including naked amoeba (Lobosea and Heterolobosea), ciliates (Colpodea) and flagellates (Cercozoa). Incubation of soil under different methane concentrations in air resulted in the development of distinct protozoan communities. These results suggest that methane carbon is incorporated into non-methanotrophic pro- and microeukaryotes probably via grazing, and that methane oxidation is a shaping force of the microeukaryotic community depending on methane availability. PMID:17991031

  20. Methane Emissions from Icelandic Landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Guðrún Meyvantsdóttir 1982

    2014-01-01

    Landfilling of biodegradable organic waste results in the generation of methane, along with other gases. If the gas is not collected through a recovery system, it will migrate through pores in the landfill cover and be released into the atmosphere, where it contributes to the global greenhouse gas budget. This study presents the first direct measurements of CH4 emissions from Icelandic landfill surface-covers. The main objective was to obtain evidence on the occurrence and scale of CH4 emissi...

  1. Microbial Methane Oxidation Rates in Guandu Wetland of northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling; Lin, Li-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Wetland is one of the major sources of atmospheric methane. The exact magnitude of methane emission is essentially controlled by microbial processes. Besides of methanogenesis, methanotrophy oxidizes methane with the reduction of various electron acceptors under oxic or anoxic conditions. The interplay of these microbial activities determines the final methane flux under different circumstances. In a tidal wetland, the cyclic flooding and recession of tide render oxygen and sulfate the dominant electron acceptors for methane oxidation. However, the details have not been fully examined, especially for the linkage between potential methane oxidation rates and in situ condition. In this study, a sub-tropical wetland in northern Taiwan, Guandu, was chosen to examine the tidal effect on microbial methane regulation. Several sediment cores were retrieved during high tide and low tide period and their geochemical profiles were characterized to demonstrate in situ microbial activities. Incubation experiments were conducted to estimate potential aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation rates in surface and core sediments. Sediment cores collected in high tide and low tide period showed different geochemical characteristics, owning to tidal inundation. Chloride and sulfate concentration were lower during low tide period. A spike of enhanced sulfate at middle depth intervals was sandwiched by two sulfate depleted zones above and underneath. Methane was accumulated significantly with two methane depletion zones nearly mirroring the sulfate spike zone identified. During the high tide period, sulfate decreased slightly with depth with methane production inhibited at shallow depths. However, a methane consumption zone still occurred near the surface. Potential aerobic methane oxidation rates were estimated between 0.7 to 1.1 μmole/g/d, showing no difference between the samples collected at high tide or low tide period. However, a lag phase was widely observed and the lag phase

  2. Reducing Methane Emissions from Cattle Production in Central Queensland

    OpenAIRE

    Rolfe, John

    2002-01-01

    Beef cattle contribute about 7% of national greenhouse gas emissions through the release of methane into the atmosphere. Cattle in northern Australia produce more methane per unit of beef produced because of tropical (C4) grasses and slower average growth rates. In this paper the level of emissions from different herds and some strategies to reduce emissions are modelled. The results indicate that few options exist to reduce methane emissions without reducing beef production. The opportunity ...

  3. Kinetics of aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of chlorinated and brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, João; Frascari, Dario; Pozdniakova, Tatiana; Danko, Anthony S

    2016-05-15

    This review analyses kinetic studies of aerobic cometabolism (AC) of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) from 2001-2015 in order to (i) compare the different kinetic models proposed, (ii) analyse the estimated model parameters with a focus on novel HAHs and the identification of general trends, and (iii) identify further research needs. The results of this analysis show that aerobic cometabolism can degrade a wide range of HAHs, including HAHs that were not previously tested such as chlorinated propanes, highly chlorinated ethanes and brominated methanes and ethanes. The degree of chlorine mineralization was very high for the chlorinated HAHs. Bromine mineralization was not determined for studies with brominated aliphatics. The examined research period led to the identification of novel growth substrates of potentially high interest. Decreasing performance of aerobic cometabolism were found with increasing chlorination, indicating the high potential of aerobic cometabolism in the presence of medium- and low-halogenated HAHs. Further research is needed for the AC of brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons, the potential for biofilm aerobic cometabolism processes, HAH-HAH mutual inhibition and the identification of the enzymes responsible for each aerobic cometabolism process. Lastly, some indications for a possible standardization of future kinetic studies of HAH aerobic cometabolism are provided. PMID:26874310

  4. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  5. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  6. Technical note: Methionine, a precursor of methane in living plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lenhart

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available When terrestrial plants were identified as producers of the greenhouse gas methane, much discussion and debate ensued, not only about their contribution to the global methane budget, but also with regard to the validity of the observation itself. Although the phenomenon has now become more accepted for both living and dead plants, the mechanism of methane formation in living plants remains to be elucidated and its precursor compounds identified. We made use of stable isotope techniques to verify in vivo formation of methane and, in order to identify the carbon precursor, 13C-positionally labelled organic compounds were employed. Here we show that the amino acid L-methionine acts as a methane precursor in living plants. Employing 13C-labelled methionine clearly identified the sulphur-bound methyl group of methionine as a carbon precursor of methane released from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia. Furthermore, when lavender plants were stressed physically, methane release rates and the stable carbon isotope values of the emitted methane greatly increased. Our results provide additional support that plants possess a mechanism for methane production and suggest that methionine might play an important role in the formation of methane in living plants, particularly under stress conditions.

  7. A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandella, B.P.; Varadharajan, C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Ruppel, C.; Juanes, R.

    2011-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the methane generated in organic-rich sediments underlying surface water bodies, including lakes, wetlands, and the ocean. The fraction of the methane that reaches the atmosphere depends critically on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of free-gas venting from the underlying sediments. Here we propose that methane transport in lake sediments is controlled by dynamic conduits, which dilate and release gas as the falling hydrostatic pressure reduces the effective stress below the tensile strength of the sediments. We test our model against a four-month record of hydrostatic load and methane flux in Upper Mystic Lake, Mass., USA, and show that it captures the complex episodicity of methane ebullition. Our quantitative conceptualization opens the door to integrated modeling of methane transport to constrain global methane release from lakes and other shallow-water, organic-rich sediment systems, and to assess its climate feedbacks.

  8. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  9. Investigating observational constraints on the contemporary methane budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteil, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, naturally produced by bio-degradation of organic material (mainly in wetlands), by continuous and eruptive releases from mud volcanoes, and by combustion of organic material in forest and peat fires. Large quantities of methane are also emitted by human

  10. Comparison of Methods to Assess the Fate of Methane in a Landfill-Cover Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, K. E.; Schroth, M. H.; Eugster, W.; Niklaus, P.; Oester, P.; Zeyer, J.

    2008-12-01

    A substantial fraction of the greenhouse gas methane released into the atmosphere is produced in terrestrial environments such as wetlands, rice paddy fields, and landfills. However, the amount of methane that is emitted from these environments is often reduced by microbial methane oxidation, mediated by methanotrophic microorganisms. Methanotrophs are ubiquitous in soils and represent the largest biological sink for methane. We performed a series of field experiments in summer 2008 to compare several state-of- the-art methods to assess the fate of methane in a landfill-cover soil near Liestal (BL), Switzerland. Methods employed included eddy-covariance and field-chamber measurements to quantify net methane flux at the landfill surface. In addition, methane concentrations at the landfill surface were monitored using a portable methane detector. Methane fluxes within the cover soil were estimated from methane-concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements. Additionally, gas push-pull tests were employed for in-situ quantification of methane oxidation in the cover soil. Finally, methane stable-carbon-isotope measurements were conducted to corroborate methane oxidation in the cover soil. Preliminary results indicate that each method provides unique information, and when combined, the data provide detailed insight in the fate of methane in the cover soil. The investigated landfill-cover soil appears to be ordinarily a net sink for methane. However, it can quickly turn into a net source of methane under adverse meteorological conditions.

  11. Low temperature production and exhalation of methane from serpentinized rocks on Earth: a potential analog for methane production on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Etiope, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Ehlmann, B.; Schoell, M.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate, based on terrestrial analogs, the potential flux, origin and isotopic signature of methane (CH4) from serpentinized or serpentinizing rocks on Mars. The Tekirova ophiolites, in Turkey, have been shown to release, either via focused vents or through diffuse microseepage, substantial amounts of CH4 which could be produced via catalyzed abiotic methanation (Sabatier reaction) at low temperatures (

  12. Brain Plasticity and Aerobic Fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Adam G.; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Bandettini, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Regular aerobic exercise has a wide range of positive effects on health and cognition. Exercise has been demonstrated to provide a particularly powerful and replicable method of triggering a wide range of structural changes within both human and animal brains. However, the details and mechanisms of these changes remain poorly understood. This thesis undertakes a comprehensive examination of the relationship between brain plasticity and aerobic exercise. A large, longitudinal experiment ...

  13. Bio-methane. Challenges and technical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the new energy sectors in development, biogas has many benefits: several valorization possibilities (bio-methane, electricity and heat), continuous production, easy storage. In Europe, and particularly in France, the bio-methane market will be in the next years a driver for the improvement of the economic, environmental and social performance of the actors of the value chain of biogas. ENEA releases a report on the current state of the bio-methane market in Europe. This publication mainly describes: An outlook of the market evolution and the corresponding stakes for the actors of this sector, the technical and economic characteristics, maturity level and specificities of each biogas upgrading process, An analysis of the French regulatory framework for bio-methane injection into the grid

  14. Coal-bed methane water effects on dill and essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumping water from coal seams decreases the pressure in the seam and in turn releases trapped methane; this is the most common and economic way of methane extraction. The water that is pumped out is known as coal-bed methane water (CBMW), which is high in sodium and other salts. In past 25 years, th...

  15. Comparison of Aerobic and Anaerobic Biodegradation of Sugarcane Vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, V T; Araújo, T A; Amaral, M C S

    2015-07-01

    Vinasse is the main liquid waste from ethanol production, and it has a considerable pollution potential. Biological treatment is a promising alternative to reduce its organic load. The aim of this study was to analyze the biodegradation of sugarcane juice vinasse in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The content of carbohydrates, proteins and volatile fatty acids was evaluated. Vinasse samples showed a high biodegradability (>96.5 %) and low percentage of inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) (<3.2 %) in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rates of substrate utilization were slightly higher in aerobic reactors, but COD stabilization occurred simultaneously in the anaerobic reactors, confirming its suitability for anaerobic digestion. Inert COD in anaerobic conditions was lower than in aerobic conditions. On the other hand, COD from metabolic products in the anaerobic reactors was higher than in the aerobic ones, indicating an increased release of soluble microbial products (SMPs) by anaerobic microorganisms. The results indicated that carbohydrates were satisfactorily degraded and protein-like substances were the major components remaining after biological degradation of vinasse. PMID:25957273

  16. Is methane released from the forest canopy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Ambus, Per;

    2011-01-01

    , based on lab results, have be conducted with varying results, but until now field measurements based on profile and eddy covariance measurements have failed to show CH4 emissions from forest canopies. To detect CH4 production or consumption in the canopy of a beech stand we connected a CH4 analyzer to a...

  17. Is methane released from the forest canopy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, T.N.; Bruhn, D.; Ambus, P.; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Ibrom, I.; Pilegaard, K.

    2011-01-01

    (4), based on lab results, have be conducted with varying results, but until now field measurements based on profile and eddy covariance measurements have failed to show CH(4) emissions from forest canopies. To detect CH(4) production or consumption in the canopy of a beech stand we connected a CH(4...

  18. Methanation; La methanisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2001-07-01

    This issue of the Apesa newsletter deals with the methanation process and the production of biogas: the co-digestion, a tool for the management of organic effluents; the different steps of the methanation process; the worldwide biogas resources; comparative composition of biogas and natural gas; the processing of evaporation condensates from the paper industry; the processing of wine residuary liquors; the economics of methanation; the methanation process as a pre-process for sludges etc.. (J.S.)

  19. Influence of Distillery Slop on Methane Emission in Rice Paddies

    OpenAIRE

    Tasanee Thitakamol

    2008-01-01

    Methane is a green house gas causing global warming. It is produced naturally during bio-fermentation under suitable anaerobic condition. When rice is grown in the tropics, there is some emission of methane. We studied the emission of methane during rice production in Thailand, in particular the effect of using of distillery slop on the rice fields. Release of methane was measured once a week for 18 weeks from plots using 4 different doses of distillery slop: 0, 125, 250 and 375 m3/hectare, a...

  20. Stimulated Growth of Aerobic Microbes Using Calcium Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shejiang; LI Mujin; JIANG Bin; LI Xingang

    2006-01-01

    With continuous and slow oxygen-release characteristic,calcium peroxide (CaO2) has been a new source of supplying oxygen for aerobic microbes in bioremediation of contaminated groundwater.Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the oxygen-release rate of CaO2 reacting with water,the regulation of high pH,as well as the growth of mixed aerobic microbes in the medium containing CaO2.The results show that the oxygen-release process of CaO2 comprises three phases.In the first phase,dissolved oxygen levels of water increased sharply,and average oxygen-release rates increased as the adding weight of CaO2 increased.However,the rates almost ly.As the necessary components of medium,potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4) and ammonium sulphate ((NH4)2SO4) at a certain ratio could regulate pH caused by CaO2 from 12.1 to the range of 6.5-8.5,which is helpful for microbial growth.In addition,diauxic growth curve observed in the medium containing CaO2 suggested that the growth of mixed aerobic microbes could be stimulated by the addition of CaO2.

  1. Ground and Airborne Methane Measurements Using Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Kawa, Stephan R.; Abshire, James Brice; Dawsey, Martha; Ramanathan, Anand

    2011-01-01

    We report on ground and airborne methane measurements with an active sensing instrument using widely tunable, seeded optical parametric generation (OPG). The technique has been used to measure methane, CO2, water vapor, and other trace gases in the near and mid-infrared spectral regions. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and it is also a potential biogenic marker on Mars and other planetary bodies. Methane in the Earth's atmosphere survives for a shorter time than CO2 but its impact on climate change can be larger than CO2. Carbon and methane emissions from land are expected to increase as permafrost melts exposing millennial-age carbon stocks to respiration (aerobic-CO2 and anaerobic-CH4) and fires. Methane emissions from c1athrates in the Arctic Ocean and on land are also likely to respond to climate warming. However, there is considerable uncertainty in present Arctic flux levels, as well as how fluxes will change with the changing environment. For Mars, methane measurements are of great interest because of its potential as a strong biogenic marker. A remote sensing instrument that can measure day and night over all seasons and latitudes can localize sources of biogenic gas plumes produced by subsurface chemistry or biology, and aid in the search for extra-terrestrial life. In this paper we report on remote sensing measurements of methane using a high peak power, widely tunable optical parametric generator (OPG) operating at 3.3 micrometers and 1.65 micrometers. We have demonstrated detection of methane at 3.3 micrometers and 1650 nanometers in an open path and compared them to accepted standards. We also report on preliminary airborne demonstration of methane measurements at 1.65 micrometers.

  2. The hydrogeochemistry of methane : evidence from English groundwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Darling, W. G.; Gooddy, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in groundwater is usually only noticed when it rises to high concentrations; to date rather little is known about its production or natural ‘baseline’ conditions. Evidence from a range of non-polluted groundwater environments in England, including water supply aquifers, aquicludes and thermal waters, reveals that CH4 is almost always detectable, even in aerobic conditions. Measurements of potable waters from Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic carbonate and sandsto...

  3. Carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric methane in New Zealand and Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of carbon isotope and concentration determinations for methane in air samples collected in New Zealand and Antarctica are presented. The 13C methane data show a seasonal cycle which is attributed to methane released by large scale biomass burning in tropical regions and irregular incursions of air from the northern into the southern hemisphere. Carbon-14 data from Baring Head, New Zealand, are used to infer the current level of 'fossil' methane in the atmosphere. (author). 16 refs, 3 figs

  4. A methane-dependent coccus, with notes on classification and nomenclature of obligate, methane-utilizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J W; Davis, R H

    1966-05-01

    Foster, J. W. (The University of Texas, Austin), and Richard H. Davis. A methane-dependent coccus, with notes on classification and nomenclature of obligate, methane-utilizing bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 91:1924-1931. 1966.-A new coccus-shaped bacterium capable of aerobic growth at the expense of methane or methanol in a mineral salts medium is described. The organism did not grow at the expense of any of the conventional substrates or homologous hydrocarbons tested. It is gram-negative, nonmotile, and thermotolerant. It grows well at 50 C, optimally at 37 C, but does not grow at 55 C. The cells are encapsulated and have a characteristic diplococcoid arrangement. Washed, "resting-cell" suspensions oxidized certain primary alcohols and short-chain alkanes, an example of "nongrowth oxidation." Of the methane-C utilized, 86% was "fixed" in organic form; the remainder was oxidized to CO(2). The guanine-cytosine content of the extracted deoxyribonucleic acid was 62.5%. Obligate methane-utilizing bacteria are considered as "one-carbon" organisms rather than hydrocarbon utilizers. The assimilation pathway in the obligate methane-methanol bacteria is different from that in the facultative methanol utilizers. Nomenclatural problems arising from the use of the prefix "Methano-" to denote both bacteria that oxidize methane and bacteria that produce methane are discussed. The obligate, one-carbon, methane-methanol bacteria are considered as "methyl" utilizers, and the prefix "Methylo-" is suggested as a solution to the problem of generic cognomens. "Methylococcus capsulatus" gen. n., sp. n. is the name proposed for the new methane coccus. PMID:5937247

  5. Low-cost step aerobics system with virtual aerobics trainer

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Alejandro; Barbancho, Isabel; Tardón, Lorenzo J.; Barbancho, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a low-cost step-aerobics instructor simulation system is presented. The proposed system analyses a given song to iden- tify its rhythmic pattern. Subsequently, this rhythmic pattern is used in order to issue a set of steps-aerobics commands to the user, thus simu- lating a training session. The system uses a Wii Balance Board to track exercises performed by users and runs on an Android smartphone. A set of tests were conducted to assess user experience and opin...

  6. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, P. N.; Atreya, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus.

  7. On Aerobic Exercise and Behavioral and Neural Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Caitlin Peplinski; Ami Patel; Kiersten L. Berggren; Kerr, Abigail L.; Swain, Rodney A.; Sikorski, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic exercise promotes rapid and profound alterations in the brain. Depending upon the pattern and duration of exercise, these changes in the brain may extend beyond traditional motor areas to regions and structures normally linked to learning, cognition, and emotion. Exercise-induced alterations may include changes in blood flow, hormone and growth factor release, receptor expression, angiogenesis, apoptosis, neurogenesis, and synaptogenesis. Together, we believe that these changes underl...

  8. Manganese cycling and its implication on methane related processes in the Andaman continental slope sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; Gonsalves, M.J.B.D.; Rajkumar, V.; Sheba, M.

    of aerobic methanotrophs, methanogens and fermenters were thus undertaken which further helps relate the results of in vitro experiments on Mn cycling to the methane related processes. 6 2.4.1. Fermenting bacteria The composition of media..., sparged to give about air: methane in the ratio of 50:50 and clamped to avoid gas leakage. Media plates without methane injection served as controls. The plates were incubated at 28±2 °C and observed at 3-day to 1-week intervals over 3–4 weeks...

  9. Environmental control on anaerobic oxidation of methane in the gassy sediments of Eckernforde Bay (German Baltic)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Kruger, M.; Boetius, A.;

    2005-01-01

    and March. Field rates of AOM and sulfate reduction (SR) were measured with radiotracer methods. Additional parameters were determined that potentially influence AOM, i.e., temperature, salinity, methane, sulfate, and chlorophyll a. Methanogenesis as well as potential rates of AOM and aerobic...... oxidation of methane were measured in vitro. AOM changed seasonally within the upper 20 cm of the sediment, with rates being between 1 and 14 nmol cm(-3) d(-1). Its distribution is suggested to be controlled by oxygen and sulfate penetration, temperature, as well as methane supply, leading to a shallow AOM...

  10. Methane emission from sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-08-15

    Recent studies have shown that sewer systems produce and emit a significant amount of methane. Methanogens produce methane under anaerobic conditions in sewer biofilms and sediments, and the stratification of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria may explain the simultaneous production of methane and sulfide in sewers. No significant methane sinks or methanotrophic activities have been identified in sewers to date. Therefore, most of the methane would be emitted at the interface between sewage and atmosphere in gravity sewers, pumping stations, and inlets of wastewater treatment plants, although oxidation of methane in the aeration basin of a wastewater treatment plant has been reported recently. Online measurements have also revealed highly dynamic temporal and spatial variations in methane production caused by factors such as hydraulic retention time, area-to-volume ratio, temperature, and concentration of organic matter in sewage. Both mechanistic and empirical models have been proposed to predict methane production in sewers. Due to the sensitivity of methanogens to environmental conditions, most of the chemicals effective in controlling sulfide in sewers also suppress or diminish methane production. In this paper, we review the recent studies on methane emission from sewers, including the production mechanisms, quantification, modeling, and mitigation. PMID:25889543

  11. Methanotrophy potential versus methane supply by pore water diffusion in peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. C. Hornibrook

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Low affinity methanotrophic bacteria consume a significant quantity of methane in wetland soils in the vicinity of plant roots and at the oxic-anoxic interface. Estimates of the efficiency of methanotrophy in peat soils vary widely in part because of differences in approaches employed to quantify methane cycling. High resolution profiles of dissolved methane abundance measured during the summer of 2003 were used to quantity rates of upward methane flux in four peatlands situated in Wales, UK. Aerobic incubations of peat from a minerotrophic and an ombrotrophic mire were used to determine depth distributions of kinetic parameters associated with methane oxidation. The capacity for methanotrophy in a 3 cm thick zone immediately beneath the depth of nil methane abundance in pore water was significantly greater than the rate of upward diffusion of methane in all four peatlands. Rates of methane diffusion in pore water at the minerotrophic peatlands were small (<10% compared to surface emissions during June to August. The proportions were notably greater in the ombrotrophic bogs because of their typically low methane emission rates. Methanotrophy appears to consume entirely methane transported by pore water diffusion in the four peatlands with the exception of 4 of the 33 gas profiles sampled. Flux rates to the atmosphere regardless are high because of gas transport through vascular plants, in particular, at the minerotrophic sites. Cumulative rainfall amount 3-days prior to sampling correlated well with the distance between the water table level and the depth of 0 μmol l−1 methane, indicating that precipitation events can impact methane distributions in pore water. Further work is needed to characterise the kinetics of methane oxidation spatially and temporally in different wetland types in order to determine generalized relationships for methanotrophy in peatlands that can be incorporated into process-based models of methane cycling

  12. Methanotrophy potential versus methane supply by pore water diffusion in peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. C. Hornibrook

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Low affinity methanotrophic bacteria consume a significant quantity of methane in wetland soils in the vicinity of plant roots and at the oxic-anoxic interface. Estimates of the efficiency of methanotrophy in peat soils vary widely in part because of differences in approaches employed to quantify methane cycling. High resolution profiles of dissolved methane abundance measured during the summer of 2003 were used to quantify rates of upward methane flux in four peatlands situated in Wales, UK. Aerobic incubations of peat from a minerotrophic and an ombrogenous mire were used to determine depth distributions of kinetic parameters associated with methane oxidation. The capacity for methanotrophy in a 3 cm thick zone immediately beneath the depth of nil methane abundance in pore water was significantly greater than the rate of upward diffusion of methane in all four peatlands. Rates of methane diffusion in pore water at the minerotrophic peatlands were small (<10% compared to surface emissions during June to August. The proportions were notably greater in the ombrogenous bogs because of their typically low methane emission rates. Methanotrophy appears to consume entirely methane transported by pore water diffusion in the four peatlands with the exception of 4 of the 33 gas profiles sampled. Flux rates to the atmosphere regardless are high because of gas transport through vascular flora, in particular, at the minerotrophic sites. Cumulative rainfall amount 3-days prior to sampling correlated well with the distance between the water table level and the depth of 0 μmol l−1 methane, indicating that precipitation events can impact methane distributions in pore water. Further work is needed to characterise the kinetics of methane oxidation spatially and temporally in different wetland types in order to determine generalized relationships for methanotrophy in peatlands that can be incorporated into process-based models of methane

  13. The Application of Methane Clumped Isotope Measurements to Determine the Source of Large Methane Seeps in Alaskan Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Eiler, J. M.; Sessions, A. L.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural methane emissions from the Arctic present an important potential feedback to global warming. Arctic methane emissions may come from either active microbial sources or from deep fossil reservoirs released by the thawing of permafrost and melting of glaciers. It is often difficult to distinguish between and quantify contributions from these methane sources based on stable isotope data. Analyses of methane clumped isotopes (isotopologues with two or more rare isotopes such as 13CH3D) can complement traditional stable isotope-based classifications of methane sources. This is because clumped isotope abundances (for isotopically equilibrated systems) are a function of temperature and can be used to identify pathways of methane generation. Additionally, distinctive effects of mixing on clumped isotope abundances make this analysis valuable for determining the origins of mixed gasses. We find large variability in clumped isotope compositions of methane from seeps in several lakes, including thermokarst lakes, across Alaska. At Lake Sukok in northern Alaska we observe the emission of dominantly thermogenic methane, with a formation temperature of at least 100° C. At several other lakes we find evidence for mixing between thermogenic methane and biogenic methane that forms in low-temperature isotopic equilibrium. For example, at Eyak Lake in southeastern Alaska, analysis of three methane samples results in a distinctive isotopic mixing line between a high-temperature end-member that formed between 100-170° C, and a biogenic end-member that formed in isotopic equilibrium between 0-20° C. In this respect, biogenic methane in these lakes resembles observations from marine gas seeps, oil degradation, and sub-surface aquifers. Interestingly, at Goldstream Lake in interior Alaska, methane with strongly depleted clumped-isotope abundances, indicative of disequilibrium gas formation, is found, similar to observations from methanogen culture experiments.

  14. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bannert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle-overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labeled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1ω7 PLFAs. These lipids were found in Gram-negative microorganisms and anaerobes. The fact that these lipids are also typical for type I methanotrophs, known as aerobic methane oxidizers, might indicate a link between aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation.

  15. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  16. Aerobic exercise in pulmonary rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Brasileiro de Vasconcelos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review on the usefulness of aerobic exercise in pulmonary rehabilitation. This is an exploratory study of literature through the electronic databases Medline, Lilacs, Scielo, Pubmed and Google Scholar, published between 1996 and 2012, conducted during the period February to May 2012 with the following keywords: COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, aerobic exercises, physical training, quality of life. The change in pulmonary function and dysfunction of skeletal muscles that result in exercise intolerance and reduced fitness and may cause social isolation, depression, anxiety and addiction. The training exercise is the most important component of the program of pulmonary rehabilitation where the aerobic training provides consistent results in clinical improvement in levels of exercise tolerance and decreased dyspnea generating more benefits to the body, reducing the chance of cardiovascular disease and improves quality and expectation of life. We demonstrated that the use of aerobic exercise in pulmonary rehabilitation program, allows an improvement of motor skills, decreased muscle fatigue and deconditioning, reducing sedentary lifestyle; however, has little or no effect on the reduction of strength and atrophy muscle.

  17. Atmospheric methane emissions along the western Svalbard margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.; Greinert, J.; Silyakova, A.; Casso, M.; Ruppel, C. D.; Mienert, J.; Lund Myhre, C.; Bunz, S.

    2014-12-01

    Documented warming of intermediate waters by ~1oC over the past 30 years along the western Svalbard margin has been suggested as a driver of climate-change induced dissociation of marine methane hydrate. However, recent evidence suggests methane release from gas hydrate has been occurring for thousands of years near the upper limit of methane hydrate stability and that seasonal changes in bottom water temperature may be more important than longer-term warming of intermediate waters. Nevertheless, this area has been and remains an active area for researching the physical and climate controls of methane release from the seafloor, yet the amount of methane reaching the atmosphere (the ultimate climate driver) in this region is largely unknown. As part of the MOCA project led by the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), water column and atmospheric marine boundary layer methane data were collected in June 2014 aboard the R/V Helmer Hanssenduring a collaboration among CAGE at University of Tromsӧ, NILU, GEOMAR, and the USGS. The results provide a continuous record of surface methane concentration and carbon isotope data from continental slope sites near temperature-sensitive hydrate-bearing seeps along the shelf-break and upper slope, the deep-water pockmarked gas-venting Vestnesa Ridge and a shallow water seep area within the Forlandet moraine complex at the shelf. Surface water methane and associated data used to calculate sea-air fluxes were obtained with the cavity ring-down spectrometer-based USGS Gas Analysis System (USGS-GAS). Only the shallow seep site (~90 m water depth) had appreciable methane in surface waters. We conducted an exhaustive survey of this site, mapping the full extent of the surface methane plume. To provide three-dimensional constraints, we acquired 65 vertical dissolved methane profiles to delineate the vertical and horizontal extent of the subsurface methane plume. Using these data, we assess how effectively shallow arctic seeps

  18. Metagenomics in methane seep detection and studies of the microbial methane sediment filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn Rike, Anne; Håvelsrud, Othilde Elise; Haverkamp, Thomas; Kristensen, Tom; Jakobsen, Kjetill

    2013-04-01

    Metanotrophic prokaryotes with their capacity to oxidize methane to biomass and CO2 contribute considerably in reduction of the global methane emission from oceans. Metagenomic studies of seabed sediments represent a new approach to detect marine methane seeps and to study whether the inhabiting microbial consortium represent a microbial methane filter. We have used next generation high throughput DNA sequencing technology to study microbial consortia and their potential metabolic processes in marine sediment samples from the Håkon Mosby mud volcano (HMMV) in the Barents Sea, the Tonya Seep in the Coal Oil Point area in California and from the pockmarked area at the Troll oil and gas field in the North Sea. Annotation of archaeal reads from the HMMV metagenome resulted in hits to all enzymes supposed to be involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) carried out by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME). The presence of several ANME taxa at HMMV has previously been well described (1). The stratification analysis of the Tonya seep sediment showed that both aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs were present at both layers investigated, although total archaea, ANME-1, ANME-2 and ANME-3 were overabundant in the deepest layer. Several sulphate reducing taxa (possibly syntrophic ANME partners) were detected. The Tonya Seep sediment represent a robust methane filter where presently dominating methanotrophic taxa could be replaced by less abundant methanotrophs should the environmental conditions change (2). In the Troll pockmarked sediments several methanotrophic taxa including ANME-1, ANME-2 and candidate division NC10 were detected although there was an overabundance of autotrophic nitrifiers (e.g. Nitrosopumilis, Nitrococcus, Nitrospira) using CO2 as the carbon source. Methane migrating upwards through the sediments is probably oxidized to CO2 in AOM resulting in an upward CO2 flux. The CO2 entering the seafloor may contribute to maintain the pockmark structure

  19. Methane emissions from California rice paddies with varied treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerone, R. J.; Delwiche, C. C.; Tyler, S. C.; Zimmerman, P. R.

    1992-09-01

    Two field experiments in California rice paddies are reported, one with a single treatment of a research plot and the other with varied treatments in a typical commercial rice field. Small total methane emissions, only 11 g CH4/m2, were measured for the entire growing season in the first experiment. In the second experiment, the addition of exogenous organic matter (rice straw), the presence or absence of vegetation, and the nitrogen fertilizer amounts were examined for their influence on methane emissions. The total methane emission over the growing season varied from 1.2 g CH4/m2 (with no added organic matter) to 58.2 g CH4/m2 (with largest organic matter treatments). Added organic matter was the major factor affecting methane emissions. Vegetation did not greatly affect total methane fluxes, but it did influence the mode and timing of release. Nitrogen fertilizer did not greatly affect the amount of methane emitted, but it influenced slightly the time course of the process. A diurnal effect in methane emission was observed during the early ontogeny of the crop. The variation of methane emission with time during the course of the growing season was very unusual in this experiment; only one peak was observed, and it was early in the season. During the period of largest emissions, δ13C values of the methane were measured to be -55.7 ±1.8‰ in plots with added organic matter.

  20. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  1. Bacterial community composition and abundance in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Bo Yue; Qi Wang; Zechun Huang; Qifei Huang; Zengqiang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The abundance and phylogenetic composition of bacterial community in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfill were compared through real-time polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.In semi-aerobic landfill scenario,the bacterial 16S rRNA copy numbers in leachate had no significant reduction from initial stage to stable period.In the scenario of anaerobic landfill,the largest bacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number was found in leachate at initial stage,but it reduced significantly at stable period.Moreover,methane-oxidizing bacteria population in stable period was lower than that in initial period in both two landfill processes.However,semi-aerobic landfill leachate had more methanotrophic bacteria populations than that in the anaerobic one.Furthermore,according to the sequences and phylogenetic analysis,obvious difference could be detected in bacterial community composition in different scenarios.Proteobacteria and bacteroidetes took up a dominantly higher proportion in semi-aerobic landfill leachate.To summarize up,different landfill methods and its landfill ages had crucial impacts on bacterial abundance and composition in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills.

  2. Effect and behaviour of different substrates in relation to the formation of aerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, M; Abbas, B; Al-Zuhairy, S H K; Kraan, R; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-06-01

    When aerobic granular sludge is applied for industrial wastewater treatment, different soluble substrates can be present. For stable granular sludge formation on volatile fatty acids (e.g. acetate), production of storage polymers under anaerobic feeding conditions has been shown to be important. This prevents direct aerobic growth on readily available chemical oxygen demand (COD), which is thought to result in unstable granule formation. Here, we investigate the impact of acetate, methanol, butanol, propanol, propionaldehyde, and valeraldehyde on granular sludge formation at 35 °C. Methanogenic archaea, growing on methanol, were present in the aerobic granular sludge system. Methanol was completely converted to methane and carbon dioxide by the methanogenic archaeum Methanomethylovorans uponensis during the 1-h anaerobic feeding period, despite the relative high dissolved oxygen concentration (3.5 mg O2 L(-1)) during the subsequent 2-h aeration period. Propionaldehyde and valeraldehyde were fully disproportionated anaerobically into their corresponding carboxylic acids and alcohols. The organic acids produced were converted to storage polymers, while the alcohols (produced and from influent) were absorbed onto the granular sludge matrix and converted aerobically. Our observations show that easy biodegradable substrates not converted anaerobically into storage polymers could lead to unstable granular sludge formation. However, when the easy biodegradable COD is absorbed in the granules and/or when the substrate is converted by relatively slow growing bacteria in the aerobic period, stable granulation can occur. PMID:25616527

  3. Combined alkaline and ultrasonic pretreatment of sludge before aerobic digestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yiying; LI Huan; MAHAR Rasool Bux; WANG Zhiyu; NIE Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline and ultrasonic sludge disintegration can both be used as pretreatments of waste activated sludge (WAS) for improving the subsequent anaerobic or aerobic digestion. The pretreatment has been carried out using different combination of these two methods in this study. The effect was evaluated based on the quantity of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) in the pretreated sludge as well as the degradation of organic matter in the following aerobic digestion. For WAS samples with combined pretreatment, the released COD was in high level than those with ultrasonic or alkaline treatment. When combined with the same ultrasonic treatment, NaOH treatment resulted in more solubilization of WAS than Ca(OH)2. For combined NaOH and ultrasonic treatments with different sequences, the released COD were in the order: simultaneous treatment > ultrasonic treatment following NaOH treatment > NaOH treatment following ultrasonic treatment. For simultaneous treatment, low NaOH dosage (100 g/kg dry solid), short duration (30 min) of NaOH treatment, and low ultrasonic specific energy (7 500 kJ/kg dry solid) were beneficial for sludge disintegration. Using combined NaOH and ultrasonic pretreatment with the optimium parameters, the degradation efficiency of organic matter was increased from 38.0% to 50.7%, which is much higher than with ultrasonic (42.5%) or with NaOH pretreatment (43.5%) in the subsequent aerobic digestion at the same retention time.

  4. Short-term variations of methane concentrations and methanotrophic activity in a coastal inlet (Eckernförde Bay, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Helge; Richner, Dominik; Steinle, Lea; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Urban, Peter; Hoffmann, Jasper; Schmidt, Mark; Treude, Tina; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2015-04-01

    Large quantities of the greenhouse gas methane are produced in anoxic sediments of continental margins and may be liberated into the overlying water column and, potentially, into the atmosphere where it further contributes to global warming. However, a sequence of microbially mediated methane oxidation pathways in sediments and the water column mitigate the contribution of oceans to the atmospheric methane budget. In anoxic sediments, specialised archaea oxidise methane with sulphate in a process that has been termed the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). In addition, aerobic bacteria at the sediment surface and the water column have the potential to consume methane (aerobic oxidation of methane; MOx) that has by passed the benthic, microbial filter. However methane cycling in (aerobic) marine waters is not well constrained. Particularly little is known about spatiotemporal aspects of MOx activity and the underlying key physical, chemical and biological factors. Here we show results from our investigations on methane dynamics on very short time scales of hours to days in the Eckernförde Bay (E-Bay), a costal inlet of the Baltic Sea in northern Germany featuring seasonal bottom water hypoxia/anoxia. In autumn 2014, we observed high spatiotemporal variations in water column methane contents and MOx activity: Anoxic bottom waters in a trough in the northern part of the bay contained extremely high methane concentrations of up to 800 nM, which sharply declined at the midwater redox interface (though methane remained supersaturated with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium throughout the water column at all times). The methane decrease at the redox interface was related to highly active MOx communities consuming methane under microoxic conditions at rates of up 40 nM/d. About 12 hours later, the methane content and the extent of bottom water anoxia was much lower and MOx activity was highly reduced in the northern part but strongly elevated in the southern part of

  5. Utilization of coalbed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, J.B. [Gustavson Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in capturing coalbed methane (CBM gas), which constitutes a valuable source of clean burning energy. It is of importance to study the various potential uses of coalbed methane and to understand the various technologies required, as well as their economics and any institutional constraints. In industrialised countries, the uses of coalbed methane are almost solely dependent on microeconomics; coalbed methane must compete for a market against natural gas and other energy sources - and frequently, coalbed methane is not competitive against other energy sources. In developing countries, on the other hand, particularly where other sources of energy are in short supply, coalbed methane economics yield positive results. Here, constraints to development of CBM utilization are mainly lack of technology and investment capital. Sociological aspects such as attitude and cultural habits, may also have a strong negative influence. This paper outlines the economics of coalbed methane utilization, particularly its competition with natural gas, and touches upon the many different uses to which coalbed methane may be applied. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Methane Hydrates: More Than a Viable Aviation Fuel Feedstock Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Demand for hydrocarbon fuels is steadily increasing, and greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise unabated with the energy demand. Alternate fuels will be coming on line to meet that demand. This report examines the recovering of methane from methane hydrates for fuel to meet this demand rather than permitting its natural release into the environment, which will be detrimental to the planet. Some background on the nature, vast sizes, and stability of sedimentary and permafrost formations of hydrates are discussed. A few examples of the severe problems associated with methane recovery from these hydrates are presented along with the potential impact on the environment and coastal waters. Future availability of methane from hydrates may become an attractive option for aviation fueling, and so future aircraft design associated with methane fueling is considered.

  7. The Andersen aerobic fitness test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aadland, Eivind; Terum, Torkil; Mamen, Asgeir;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High aerobic fitness is consistently associated with a favorable metabolic risk profile in children. Direct measurement of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) is often not feasible, thus indirect tests such as the Andersen test are required in many settings. The present study seeks to...... agreement) were 26.7±125.2 m for test 2 vs. test 1 (p<.001 for mean difference) and 3.9±88.8 m for test 3 vs. test 2 (p = .514 for mean difference). The equation to estimate VO2peak suggested by Andersen et al. (2008) showed a poor fit in the present sample; thus, we suggest a new equation: VO2peak = 23....... Researchers should be aware of the amount of noise in indirect tests that estimate aerobic fitness....

  8. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torsvik, T. [Univ. of Bergen (Norway); Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  9. Methane discharge from a deep-sea submarine mud volcano into the upper water column by gas hydrate-coated methane bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Sauter, Eberhard; Muyakshin, Sergey; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Schluter, Michael; Boetius, Antje; Jerosch, Kerstin; Damm, Ellen; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Klages, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The assessment of climate change factors includes a constraint of methane sources and sinks. Although marine geological Sources are recognized as significant, unfortunately, most submarine sources remain poorly quantified. Beside cold vents and coastal anoxic sediments, the large number of submarine mud volcanoes (SMV) may contribute significantly to the oceanic methane pool. Recent research suggests that methane primarily released diff-usively from deep-sea SMVs is immediately oxidized and, ...

  10. Characterization of methanotrophic bacterial populations in natural and agricultural aerobic soils of the European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kizilova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric methane contributes to about 20% of the total radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, and microbial methane oxidation in upland soils is the only biological sink of methane. Microbial methane oxidation in aerated upland soils is estimated as 15 - 45 Tg yr-1 or 3-9% of the annual sink. Therefore there is need of extensive research to characterize methanotrophic activity in various ecosystems for possible application to reduce atmospheric methane fluxes and to minimize global climate change. The vast majority of known aerobic methanotrophs belongs to the Proteobacteria and placed in the families Methylococcaceae in the Gammaproteobacteria, and Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae in the Alphaproteobacteria. Known exceptions include the phylum Verrucomicrobia and uncultured methanotrophs such as Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' affiliated with the 'NC10' phylum. Plenty of studies of aerobic methane oxidation and key players of the process have been performed on various types of soils, and it was found that Methylocystis spp and uncultivated methanotrophs are abundant in upland soils. Two of the uncultured groups are upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCa) and gammaproteobacteria (USCg), as revealed by cultivation-independent surveys of pmoA diversity. Russia is extremely rich in soil types due to its vast territories, and most of these soils have never been investigated from the aspect of methanotrophy. This study addresses methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight types of natural aerobic soils, four of which also had been under agricultural use. Methane fluxes have been measured by in situ static chamber method and methane oxidation rates in soil samples - by radioisotope tracer (14CH4) technique. Changes in methanotroph diversity and abundance were assessed by cloning and Sanger sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR of pmoA genes. Methanotrophic population of unmanaged soils turned

  11. Acid-tolerant moderately thermophilic methanotrophs of the class Gammaproteobacteria isolated from tropical topsoil with methane seeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajul eIslam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial tropical methane seep habitats are important ecosystems in the methane cycle. Methane oxidizing bacteria play a key role in these ecosystems as they reduce methane emissions to the atmosphere. Here we describe the isolation and initial characterization of two novel moderately thermophilic and acid-tolerant obligate methanotrophs, assigned BFH1 and BFH2 recovered from a tropical methane seep topsoil habitat. The new isolates were strictly aerobic, non-motile, coccus-shaped and utilized methane and methanol as sole carbon and energy source. Isolates grew at pH range 4.2–7.5 (optimal 5.5–6.0 and at a temperature range of 30–60oC (optimal 51–55oC. 16S rRNA gene phylogeny placed them in a well-separated branch forming a cluster together with the genus Methylocaldum as the closest relatives (93.1–94.1% sequence similarity. The genes pmoA, mxaF, and cbbL were detected, but mmoX was absent. Strains BFH1 and BFH2 are, to our knowledge, the first isolated acid-tolerant moderately thermophilic methane oxidizers of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Each strain probably denotes a novel species and they most likely represent a novel genus within the family Methylococcaceae of type I methanotrophs. Furthermore, the isolates increase our knowledge of acid-tolerant aerobic methanotrophs and signify a previously unrecognized biological methane sink in tropical ecosystems.

  12. Acid-Tolerant Moderately Thermophilic Methanotrophs of the Class Gammaproteobacteria Isolated From Tropical Topsoil with Methane Seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tajul; Torsvik, Vigdis; Larsen, Øivind; Bodrossy, Levente; Øvreås, Lise; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial tropical methane seep habitats are important ecosystems in the methane cycle. Methane oxidizing bacteria play a key role in these ecosystems as they reduce methane emissions to the atmosphere. Here, we describe the isolation and initial characterization of two novel moderately thermophilic and acid-tolerant obligate methanotrophs, assigned BFH1 and BFH2 recovered from a tropical methane seep topsoil habitat. The new isolates were strictly aerobic, non-motile, coccus-shaped and utilized methane and methanol as sole carbon and energy source. Isolates grew at pH range 4.2–7.5 (optimal 5.5–6.0) and at a temperature range of 30–60°C (optimal 51–55°C). 16S rRNA gene phylogeny placed them in a well-separated branch forming a cluster together with the genus Methylocaldum as the closest relatives (93.1–94.1% sequence similarity). The genes pmoA, mxaF, and cbbL were detected, but mmoX was absent. Strains BFH1 and BFH2 are, to our knowledge, the first isolated acid-tolerant moderately thermophilic methane oxidizers of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Each strain probably denotes a novel species and they most likely represent a novel genus within the family Methylococcaceae of type I methanotrophs. Furthermore, the isolates increase our knowledge of acid-tolerant aerobic methanotrophs and signify a previously unrecognized biological methane sink in tropical ecosystems. PMID:27379029

  13. Acid-Tolerant Moderately Thermophilic Methanotrophs of the Class Gammaproteobacteria Isolated From Tropical Topsoil with Methane Seeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tajul; Torsvik, Vigdis; Larsen, Øivind; Bodrossy, Levente; Øvreås, Lise; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial tropical methane seep habitats are important ecosystems in the methane cycle. Methane oxidizing bacteria play a key role in these ecosystems as they reduce methane emissions to the atmosphere. Here, we describe the isolation and initial characterization of two novel moderately thermophilic and acid-tolerant obligate methanotrophs, assigned BFH1 and BFH2 recovered from a tropical methane seep topsoil habitat. The new isolates were strictly aerobic, non-motile, coccus-shaped and utilized methane and methanol as sole carbon and energy source. Isolates grew at pH range 4.2-7.5 (optimal 5.5-6.0) and at a temperature range of 30-60°C (optimal 51-55°C). 16S rRNA gene phylogeny placed them in a well-separated branch forming a cluster together with the genus Methylocaldum as the closest relatives (93.1-94.1% sequence similarity). The genes pmoA, mxaF, and cbbL were detected, but mmoX was absent. Strains BFH1 and BFH2 are, to our knowledge, the first isolated acid-tolerant moderately thermophilic methane oxidizers of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Each strain probably denotes a novel species and they most likely represent a novel genus within the family Methylococcaceae of type I methanotrophs. Furthermore, the isolates increase our knowledge of acid-tolerant aerobic methanotrophs and signify a previously unrecognized biological methane sink in tropical ecosystems. PMID:27379029

  14. Investigating observational constraints on the contemporary methane budget

    OpenAIRE

    Monteil, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, naturally produced by bio-degradation of organic material (mainly in wetlands), by continuous and eruptive releases from mud volcanoes, and by combustion of organic material in forest and peat fires. Large quantities of methane are also emitted by human activities, related to agriculture (cattle farming, rice cultivation), waste management (landfills, water treatment plants), and energy production and use (extraction of fossil fuels). As a result ...

  15. Natural emissions of methane from geological seepage in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Etiope, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that geological emissions of methane are an important greenhouse-gas source. Remarkable amounts of methane, estimated in the order of 40-60 Tg yr-1, are naturally released into the atmosphere from the Earth’s crust through faults and fractured rocks. The main source is natural gas, both microbial and thermogenic, produced in hydrocarbon-prone sedimentary basins and injected into the atmosphere through macro-seeps (onshore and offshore mud volcanoes and other seeps...

  16. Methods to determine aerobic endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosquet, Laurent; Léger, Luc; Legros, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Physiological testing of elite athletes requires the correct identification and assessment of sports-specific underlying factors. It is now recognised that performance in long-distance events is determined by maximal oxygen uptake (V(2 max)), energy cost of exercise and the maximal fractional utilisation of V(2 max) in any realised performance or as a corollary a set percentage of V(2 max) that could be endured as long as possible. This later ability is defined as endurance, and more precisely aerobic endurance, since V(2 max) sets the upper limit of aerobic pathway. It should be distinguished from endurance ability or endurance performance, which are synonymous with performance in long-distance events. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess aerobic endurance. They are numerous and can be classified into two categories, namely direct and indirect methods. Direct methods bring together all indices that allow either a complete or a partial representation of the power-duration relationship, while indirect methods revolve around the determination of the so-called anaerobic threshold (AT). With regard to direct methods, performance in a series of tests provides a more complete and presumably more valid description of the power-duration relationship than performance in a single test, even if both approaches are well correlated with each other. However, the question remains open to determine which systems model should be employed among the several available in the literature, and how to use them in the prescription of training intensities. As for indirect methods, there is quantitative accumulation of data supporting the utilisation of the AT to assess aerobic endurance and to prescribe training intensities. However, it appears that: there is no unique intensity corresponding to the AT, since criteria available in the literature provide inconsistent results; and the non-invasive determination of the AT using ventilatory and heart rate

  17. 天然和水热合成针铁矿对有机物厌氧分解释放CH4的影响%Effect of Natural and Hydrothermal Synthetic Goethite on the Release of Methane in the Anaerobic Decomposition Process of Organic Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚敦瑶; 陈天虎; 王进; 周跃飞; 岳正波

    2013-01-01

    The effects of natural goethite ( NGt) and synthetic goethite (SGt) on the release of methane in the anaerobic biochemical system consisted of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria ( DIRB ) and methane-producing bacteria ( MPB ) were investigated through batch tests with sodium acetate as the carbon source. To explore the effects and mechanisms of both mineral materials on the release of methane in the anaerobic decomposition process of organic matter in the presence of DIRB, the main gas components and total organic carbon (TOC) , total inorganic carbon (TIC) , and Fe2+ in the aqueous phase of the experimental process were determined and XRD analyses were conducted for the solid-phase product. Moreover, the minerals were analyzed by specific surface area (BET) , X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence ( XRF). Modified Gompertz equation was used to fit the cumulative methane and carbon dioxide. Results showed that the maximum cumulative production of methane was brought forward by 60-78 days by the addition of goethite and CO, was effectively reduced by 30% - 67% compared with the control samples. SGt was more effective than NGt in promoting the release of CH4 and reducing the CO2 emission. Furthermore, the analysis of the solid product showed that the addition of goethite can fix part of CO, by the formation of siderite.%以乙酸钠为碳源,通过序批式实验研究了天然和水热合成针铁矿对铁还原菌-甲烷菌厌氧微生物生化系统中CH4释放量的影响.通过对实验过程中气体组分、溶液中总有机碳(TOC)、总无机碳(TIC)、Fe2+等主要组分的分析测定和固体产物的X-射线衍射(XRD)分析,结合对矿物的比表面(BET)、XRD、X-射线荧光光谱(XRF)分析表征,探讨了针铁矿在铁还原菌存在下对有机物厌氧消化产CH4的影响和作用机制.利用修正Gompertz方程对累计产CH4和CO2量进行拟合.结果表明,与对照实验组相比,添加针铁矿能使CH4累计释放量提前60

  18. Methane consumption in waters overlying a hydrate-associated mound in the Santa Monica Basin : a project synopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, M.B.; Mau, S.; Valentine, D.L.; Reed, J.H. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Hallam, S.J.; Yang, J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the role of methane hydrates in the global carbon cycle and climate change requires an understanding of methane consumption in hydrate-associated environments. A dual-component microbial biofilter consumes up to 80 per cent of methane produced in the marine environment. Throughout most of the oceans around the world, anaerobic methane oxidation within sediment prevents large quantities of methane from leaving the seafloor. However, in regions of increased methane production, methane is released to the water column. The water column component of the marine biofilter for methane is the largest uncharacterized global sink for methane. This study combined geochemical and molecular biology to develop a quantitative understanding of methane consumption in the marine water column of the Southern California Bight. The paper presented geochemical data demonstrating that the degree of basin enclosure and basin-scale circulation patterns, were first order controls on methane oxidation rates in the Santa Monica Basin (SMB). The paper also presented genetic data showing similarities and differences in methanotrophic communities in distinctive horizons within the SMB water column. It described the study site, sampling, and methods as well as the preliminary findings. A contrast was observed between methane concentration and methane turnover time profiles. It was concluded that although methane concentration is a first-order control on methanotrophic activity, community concentration, dilution and seeding control the broad scale efficacy of methane consumption. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Atmospheric Ozone and Methane in a Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar S. A. Isaksen

    2014-07-01

    . During thawing of permafrost, parts of the organic material that is deposited could be converted to methane. Furthermore, methane stored in deposits under shallow waters in the Arctic have the potential to be released in a future warmer climate with enhanced climate impact on methane, ozone and stratospheric water vapor. Studies performed by several groups show that the transport sectors have the potential for significant impacts on climate-chemistry interactions. There are large uncertainties connected to ozone and methane changes from the transport sector, and to methane release and climate impact during permafrost thawing.

  20. Methane emissions from northern Amazon savanna wetlands and Balbina Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemenes, A.; Belger, L.; Forsberg, B.; Melack, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    To improve estimates of methane emission for the Amazon basin requires information from aquatic environments not represented in the central basin near the Solimoes River, where most of the current data were obtained. We have combined intensive, year-long measurements of methane emission and water levels made in interfluvial wetlands located in the upper Negro basin with calculations of inundation based on a time series of Radarsat synthetic aperature radar images. These grass-dominated savannas emitted methane at an average rate of 18 mg C per m squared per day, a low rate compared to the habitats with floating grasses the occur in the Solimoes floodplains. Reservoirs constructed in the Amazon typically flood forested landscapes and lead to conditions conducive for methane production. The methane is released to the atmosphere from the reservoir and as the water exits the turbines and from the downstream river. Balbina Reservoir near Manaus covers about 2400 km squared along the Uatuma River. Annual averages of measurements of methane emission from the various habitats in the reservoir range from 23 to 64 mg C per m squared per day. Total annual emission from the reservoir is about 58 Gg C. In addition, about 39 Gg C per year are released below the dam, about 50 percent of which is released as the water passes through the turbines. On an annual areal basis, Balbina Reservoir emits 40 Mg C km squared, in contrast to 30 Mg km squared for the Solimoes mainstem floodplain

  1. Methane Emission through Trees in Temperate and Tropical Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangala, S. R.; Gauci, V.; Hornibrook, E. R.; Gowing, D.

    2012-12-01

    Methane produced in wetland soil generally is thought to be emitted by a combination of three key processes: 1) diffusion through water-filled pores, 2) abrupt release of bubbles (ebullition), and 3) via internal spaces within the stems of herbaceous plants adapted to live in waterlogged soils. The capacity for trees to mediate methane emissions has received limited attention despite mesocosm studies of seedlings and saplings demonstrating that wetland trees have a significant capacity to transport soil-produced methane to the atmosphere. Notably ~60% of global wetlands are forested. We present in situ measurements of methane flux from a temperate carr (swamp) composed of alder (Alnus glutinosa) and birch (Betula pubescens) situated in the United Kingdom and a tropical forested peat swamp located in Borneo. The in situ data are complemented by a mesocosm experiment in which methane emissions were measured from alder saplings subjected to two water-regime treatments. In both the in situ and mesocosm studies, emissions from trees are compared to methane flux from the ground surface, the latter occurring via pore water diffusion, ebullition or via the aerenchyma of herbaceous plants. We show that tree stem emissions are controlled by a number of factors including tree species, soil pore-water concentration and stem lenticel density. Our results demonstrate that the omission of tree-mediated methane fluxes from measurement campaigns conducted in forested wetland can significantly underestimate the total ecosystem flux of methane.

  2. Methane emission by camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Marie T; Runge, Ullrich; Lang, Richard A; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total), all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹) when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹). However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg⁻¹ in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg⁻¹ in ruminants). This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels. PMID:24718604

  3. Methanation; La methanisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Methanation is a biological process of degradation of organic matter using a microbial flora. This natural process can be optimized using digesters in order to produce biogas (mainly methane) which is used in cogeneration systems to produce hot water, steam and electric power. Under some particular conditions this biogas can be injected in the natural gas distribution system. This guidebook presents the situation of today's methanation techniques and is based on the analysis of 50 European facilities. It describes the whole biogas and other by-products valorization file and presents some economic aspects of this technique (investment costs). (J.S.)

  4. Methane emissions of differently fed dairy cows and corresponding methane and nitrogen emissions from their manure during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külling, D R; Dohme, Frigga; Menz, H; Sutter, F; Lischer, P; Kreuzer, M

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of supplementing 40 g lauric acid (C12) kg(-1) dry matter (DM) in feed on methane emissions from early-lactating dairy cows and the associated effects on methane, nitrous oxide and ammonia release from the manure during storage. Stearic acid (C18), a fatty acid without assumed methane-suppressing potential in the digestive tract of ruminants, was added at 40 g kg(-1) DM to a control diet. The complete feed consisted of forage and concentrate in a ratio of 1.5:1 (DM basis). The manure was stored for 14 weeks either as complete slurry or, separately, as urine-rich slurry and farmyard manure representing two common storage systems. Methane release of the cows, as measured in respiratory chambers, was lower with C12 by about 20%, but this was mostly resulting from a reduced feed intake and, partly, from a lower rate of fibre digestion. As milk yield declined less than feed intake, methane emission per kg of milk was significantly lower with C12 (11.4 g) than with C18 (14.0 g). Faeces of C12-fed cows had a higher proportion of undigested fibre and accordingly methane release from their manure was higher compared with the manure obtained from the C18-fed cows. Overall, manure-derived methane accounted for 8.2% and 15.4% of total methane after 7 and 14 weeks of storage, respectively. The evolution of methane widely differed between manure types and dietary treatments, with a retarded onset of release in complete slurry particularly in the C12 treatment. Emissions of nitrous oxide were lower in the manures from the C12 treatment. This partially compensated for the higher methane release from the C12 manure with respect to the greenhouse gas potential. The total greenhouse gas potential (cow and manure together) accounted for 8.7 and 10.5 kg equivalents of CO2 cow(-1) d(-1) with C12 and C18, respectively. At unaffected urine-N proportion ammonia and total nitrogen losses from stored manure were lower with C12 than with C18 corresponding

  5. Fugitive coal mine methane emissions at five mining areas in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shi; Han, Jiaye; Wu, Jinyan; Li, Hongjun; Worrall, Rhys; Guo, Hua; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenge

    2011-04-01

    Large quantities (about 28 billion m 3) of methane are released to the atmosphere every year from coal-mining activities around the world. This methane represents not only a significant greenhouse gas that is contributing to global temperature change, but is also a wasted energy resource. China, the largest coal producer in the world, is responsible for over 50% of the total global release of methane-containing ventilation air from coal mines. A mine site investigation methodology was developed for collecting reliable methane emission data from coal mines. Five main coal-mining areas in China were studied and specific data were collected from two mines in each of the five mining groups. Information such as coal and methane reserves, ventilation air released, methane concentration and methane release rates were collected. Future development plans were evaluated and used to estimate potential future emissions. It was determined that most of the methane generated in the five mining areas is currently released to the atmosphere.

  6. Aerobic granular processes: Current research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-06-01

    Aerobic granules are large biological aggregates with compact interiors that can be used in efficient wastewater treatment. This mini-review presents new researches on the development of aerobic granular processes, extended treatments for complicated pollutants, granulation mechanisms and enhancements of granule stability in long-term operation or storage, and the reuse of waste biomass as renewable resources. A discussion on the challenges of, and prospects for, the commercialization of aerobic granular process is provided. PMID:26873285

  7. Methane-derived carbon flow through microbial communities in arctic lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J; Pohlman, John W; Tiedje, James M; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2015-09-01

    Aerobic methane (CH4 ) oxidation mitigates CH4 release and is a significant pathway for carbon and energy flow into aquatic food webs. Arctic lakes are responsible for an increasing proportion of global CH4 emissions, but CH4 assimilation into the aquatic food web in arctic lakes is poorly understood. Using stable isotope probing (SIP) based on phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA-SIP) and DNA (DNA-SIP), we tracked carbon flow quantitatively from CH4 into sediment microorganisms from an arctic lake with an active CH4 seepage. When 0.025 mmol CH4 g(-1) wet sediment was oxidized, approximately 15.8-32.8% of the CH4 -derived carbon had been incorporated into microorganisms. This CH4 -derived carbon equated to up to 5.7% of total primary production estimates for Alaskan arctic lakes. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylomonas, Methylobacter and unclassified Methylococcaceae, were most active at CH4 oxidation in this arctic lake. With increasing distance from the active CH4 seepage, a greater diversity of bacteria incorporated CH4 -derived carbon. Actinomycetes were the most quantitatively important microorganisms involved in secondary feeding on CH4 -derived carbon. These results showed that CH4 flows through methanotrophs into the broader microbial community and that type I methanotrophs, methylotrophs and actinomycetes are important organisms involved in using CH4 -derived carbon in arctic freshwater ecosystems. PMID:25581131

  8. Aerobic Vinyl Chloride Metabolism in Groundwater Microcosms by Methanotrophic and Etheneotrophic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Margaret; Smoler, Donna F; Fogel, Samuel; Mattes, Timothy E

    2016-04-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) is a carcinogen generated in groundwater by reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes. Under aerobic conditions, etheneotrophs oxidize ethene and VC, while VC-assimilators can use VC as their sole source of carbon and energy. Methanotrophs utilize only methane but can oxidize ethene to epoxyethane and VC to chlorooxirane. Microcosms were constructed with groundwater from the Carver site in MA containing these three native microbial types. Methane, ethene, and VC were added to the microcosms singly or as mixtures. In the absence of VC, ethene degraded faster when methane was also present. We hypothesized that methanotroph oxidation of ethene to epoxyethane competed with their use of methane, and that epoxyethane stimulated the activity of starved etheneotrophs by inducing the enzyme alkene monooxygenase. We then developed separate enrichment cultures of Carver methanotrophs and etheneotrophs, and demonstrated that Carver methanotrophs can oxidize ethene to epoxyethane, and that starved Carver etheneotrophs exhibit significantly reduced lag time for ethene utilization when epoxyethane is added. In our groundwater microcosm tests, when all three substrates were present, the rate of VC removal was faster than with either methane or ethene alone, consistent with the idea that methanotrophs stimulate etheneotroph destruction of VC. PMID:26918370

  9. Quantifying Methane Fluxes Simply and Accurately: The Tracer Dilution Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Christopher; Crosson, Eric; Green, Roger; Hater, Gary; Dayton, Dave; Lafleur, Rick; Merrill, Ray; Tan, Sze; Thoma, Eben

    2010-05-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric constituent with a wide variety of sources, both natural and anthropogenic, including wetlands and other water bodies, permafrost, farms, landfills, and areas with significant petrochemical exploration, drilling, transport, or processing, or refining occurs. Despite its importance to the carbon cycle, its significant impact as a greenhouse gas, and its ubiquity in modern life as a source of energy, its sources and sinks in marine and terrestrial ecosystems are only poorly understood. This is largely because high quality, quantitative measurements of methane fluxes in these different environments have not been available, due both to the lack of robust field-deployable instrumentation as well as to the fact that most significant sources of methane extend over large areas (from 10's to 1,000,000's of square meters) and are heterogeneous emitters - i.e., the methane is not emitted evenly over the area in question. Quantifying the total methane emissions from such sources becomes a tremendous challenge, compounded by the fact that atmospheric transport from emission point to detection point can be highly variable. In this presentation we describe a robust, accurate, and easy-to-deploy technique called the tracer dilution method, in which a known gas (such as acetylene, nitrous oxide, or sulfur hexafluoride) is released in the same vicinity of the methane emissions. Measurements of methane and the tracer gas are then made downwind of the release point, in the so-called far-field, where the area of methane emissions cannot be distinguished from a point source (i.e., the two gas plumes are well-mixed). In this regime, the methane emissions are given by the ratio of the two measured concentrations, multiplied by the known tracer emission rate. The challenges associated with atmospheric variability and heterogeneous methane emissions are handled automatically by the transport and dispersion of the tracer. We present detailed methane flux

  10. Enzymatic Oxidation of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirajuddin, S; Rosenzweig, AC

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, proteinprotein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications.

  11. Methane Oxidation and Molecular Characterization of Methanotrophs from a Former Mercury Mine Impoundment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun M. Baesman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5 medium via methane oxidation.

  12. Methane oxidation and molecular characterization of methanotrophs from a former mercury mine impoundment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, Shaun; Miller, Laurence G.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D.; Summons, Roger E.; Welander, Paula V.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation.

  13. A critical review of experimental and predicted methane generation from anaerobic codigestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, T; Brouckaert, C J; Foxon, K M; Buckley, C A

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being considered as a treatment option for an extensive range of waste biomass, due to the potential for energy recovery, in the form of methane production, and lower sludge volumes relative to aerobic treatment processes. Furthermore, when two substrates are codigested (i.e. digested together), added benefits are foreseeable, such as increased methane production and detoxification of toxic compounds via cometabolic degradation pathways. The objectives of this study were to compare experimental and predicted methane production from codigestion literature studies in order to objectively evaluate digester performance. Two predictive methods were used, both assuming methane yields are additive: literature values for digestion of single substrates and a stoichiometric method using model substrates to represent different substrates. Waste sources included in the analysis were primary sewage sludge, waste activated sludge, cow manure, waste paper, grease trap sludge, fat oil and grease and algal sludge. It was found that methane production could approximately be predicted using both methods, with literature methane yields from the same study being the most accurate predictor. One important finding from this study was that the assumption that methane yields are additive is a reasonable one. Furthermore, both predictive methods may be usefully employed as a screening tool to compare methane yields between different types and blends of substrates. PMID:22173424

  14. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy V. Callaghan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM. The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria via ‘reverse methanogenesis’ and is catalyzed by a homologue of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria, wherein the archaeal members catalyze both methane oxidation and sulfate reduction and zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate. The third AOM mechanism is a nitrite-dependent, intra-aerobic pathway described for the denitrifying bacterium, ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ It is hypothesized that AOM proceeds via reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, followed by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen and molecular oxygen. The latter can be used to functionalize the methane via a particulate methane monooxygenase. With respect to non-methane alkanes, there also appears to be novel mechanisms of activation. The most well-described pathway is the addition of non-methane alkanes across the double bond of fumarate to form alkyl-substituted succinates via the putative glycyl radical enzyme, alkylsuccinate synthase (also known as methylalkylsuccinate synthase. Other proposed mechanisms include anaerobic hydroxylation via ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-like enzymes and an ‘intra-aerobic’ denitrification pathway similar to that described for ‘M. oxyfera.’

  15. Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H. [and others

    1993-09-01

    In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

  16. Biogas production enhancement using semi-aerobic pre-aeration in a hybrid bioreactor landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Raffaello; Morello, Luca; Raga, Roberto; Cerminara, Giulia

    2016-09-01

    Landfilling continues to be one of the main methods used in managing Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Although in many countries national legislation aims to reduce this practice as much as possible, landfill is a necessary and unavoidable step in closing the material cycle. The need for innovative waste management techniques to improve landfill management and minimize the adverse environmental impact produced has resulted in an increasing interest in innovative systems capable of accelerating waste stabilization. Landfill bioreactors allow decomposition kinetics to be increased and post-operational phase to be shortened; in particular, hybrid bioreactors combine the benefits afforded by both aerobic and anaerobic processes. Six bioreactor simulators were used in the present study: four managed as hybrid, with an initial semi-aerobic phase and a second anaerobic phase, and two as anaerobic control bioreactors. The main goal of the first aerated phase is to reduce Volatile Fatty Acids (VFA) in order to increase pH and enhance methane production during the anaerobic phase; for this reason, air injection was stopped only when these parameters reached the optimum range for methanogenic bacteria. Biogas and leachate were constantly monitored throughout the entire methanogenic phase with the aim of calibrating a Gompertz Model and evaluating the effects of pre-aeration on subsequent methane production. The results showed that moderate and intermittent pre-aeration produces a positive effect both on methane potential and in the kinetics of reaction. PMID:26531047

  17. Inventory of methane emissions from U.S. cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, H.; Lamb, B.; Johnson, K. A.; Huyler, M.

    2001-01-01

    Many countries, including the United States, are in the process of inventorying greenhouse gas emissions as a prerequisite for designing control strategies. We have developed a measurement-based inventory of methane emissions from cattle in the United States. Methane emission factors were established for the major livestock groups using an internal tracer method. The groups studied included cows, replacement heifers, slaughter cattle, calves, and bulls in the beef sector and cows plus replacement heifers in the dairy industry. Since methane emission is dependent on the quality and quantity of feed, diets were chosen that are representative of the feed regimes utilized by producers in the United States. Regional cattle populations, obtained from U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics, were combined with the methane emission factors to yield regional emission estimates. The methane totals from the five regions were then summed to give a U.S. inventory of cattle emissions for 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998. Annual releases ranged from 6.50 Tg in 1990 to a high of 6.98 Tg in 1996. On a regional scale the North Central region of the United States had the largest methane emissions from livestock followed by the South Central and the West. The beef cow group released the most methane (˜2.5 Tg yr-1) followed by slaughter cattle (˜1.7 Tg yr-1) and dairy cows at about 1.5 Tg yr-1. Methane released by cattle in the United States contributes about 11% of the global cattle source.

  18. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments

    OpenAIRE

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2–6% of the global atmospheric CH4 budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH4 that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sedi...

  19. Effects of increasing temperatures on methane concentrations and methanogenesis during experimental incubation of sediments from oligotrophic and mesotrophic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Andrea; Lyautey, Emilie; Montuelle, Bernard; Casper, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Global warming is expected to raise temperatures in freshwater lakes, which have been acknowledged to contribute up to 10% of the atmospheric methane concentrations. Increasing temperature enhances methane production and oxidation rates, but few studies have considered the balance between both processes at experimentally higher temperatures within lake sediments. The temperature dependence of methane concentrations, methane production rates, and methanogenic (mcrA) and methanotrophic (pmoA) community size was investigated in intact sediment cores incubated with aerobic hypolimnion water at 4, 8, and 12°C over 3 weeks. Sediment cores of 25 cm length were collected at two temperate lakes—Lake Stechlin (Germany; mesotrophic-oligotrophic, maximum depth 69.5 m) and Lake Geneva (France/Switzerland; mesotrophic, maximum depth 310 m). While methane production rates in Lake Stechlin sediments did not change with increasing temperatures, methane concentrations decreased significantly. In contrast, methane production rates increased in 20-25 cm in Lake Geneva sediments with increasing temperatures, but methane concentrations did not differ. Real-time PCR demonstrated the methanogenic and methanotrophic community size remained stable independently of the incubation temperature. Methane concentrations as well as community sizes were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher in Lake Stechlin than in Lake Geneva, while potential methane production rates after 24 h were similar in both lakes, with on average 2.5 and 1.9 nmol g-1 DW h-1, respectively. Our results suggest that at higher temperatures methane oxidation could balance, and even exceed, methane production. This suggests that anaerobic methane oxidation could be involved in the methane balance at a more important rate than previously anticipated.

  20. Timescales of methane seepage on the Norwegian margin following collapse of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crémière, Antoine; Lepland, Aivo; Chand, Shyam; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel J.; Noble, Stephen R.; Martma, Tõnu; Thorsnes, Terje; Sauer, Simone; Brunstad, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Gas hydrates stored on continental shelves are susceptible to dissociation triggered by environmental changes. Knowledge of the timescales of gas hydrate dissociation and subsequent methane release are critical in understanding the impact of marine gas hydrates on the ocean-atmosphere system. Here we report a methane efflux chronology from five sites, at depths of 220-400 m, in the southwest Barents and Norwegian seas where grounded ice sheets led to thickening of the gas hydrate stability zone during the last glaciation. The onset of methane release was coincident with deglaciation-induced pressure release and thinning of the hydrate stability zone. Methane efflux continued for 7-10 kyr, tracking hydrate stability changes controlled by relative sea-level rise, bottom water warming and fluid pathway evolution in response to changing stress fields. The protracted nature of seafloor methane emissions probably attenuated the impact of hydrate dissociation on the climate system.

  1. Timescales of methane seepage on the Norwegian margin following collapse of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crémière, Antoine; Lepland, Aivo; Chand, Shyam; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel J; Noble, Stephen R; Martma, Tõnu; Thorsnes, Terje; Sauer, Simone; Brunstad, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Gas hydrates stored on continental shelves are susceptible to dissociation triggered by environmental changes. Knowledge of the timescales of gas hydrate dissociation and subsequent methane release are critical in understanding the impact of marine gas hydrates on the ocean-atmosphere system. Here we report a methane efflux chronology from five sites, at depths of 220-400 m, in the southwest Barents and Norwegian seas where grounded ice sheets led to thickening of the gas hydrate stability zone during the last glaciation. The onset of methane release was coincident with deglaciation-induced pressure release and thinning of the hydrate stability zone. Methane efflux continued for 7-10 kyr, tracking hydrate stability changes controlled by relative sea-level rise, bottom water warming and fluid pathway evolution in response to changing stress fields. The protracted nature of seafloor methane emissions probably attenuated the impact of hydrate dissociation on the climate system. PMID:27167635

  2. Hypotheses for Near-Surface Exchange of Methane on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Renyu; Bloom, A. Anthony; Gao, Peter; Miller, Charles E.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-07-01

    The Curiosity rover recently detected a background of 0.7 ppb and spikes of 7 ppb of methane on Mars. This in situ measurement reorients our understanding of the Martian environment and its potential for life, as the current theories do not entail any geological source or sink of methane that varies sub-annually. In particular, the 10-fold elevation during the southern winter indicates episodic sources of methane that are yet to be discovered. Here we suggest a near-surface reservoir could explain this variability. Using the temperature and humidity measurements from the rover, we find that perchlorate salts in the regolith deliquesce to form liquid solutions, and deliquescence progresses to deeper subsurface in the season of the methane spikes. We therefore formulate the following three testable hypotheses. The first scenario is that the regolith in Gale Crater adsorbs methane when dry and releases this methane to the atmosphere upon deliquescence. The adsorption energy needs to be 36 kJ/mol to explain the magnitude of the methane spikes, higher than existing laboratory measurements. The second scenario is that microorganisms convert organic matter in the soil to methane when they are in liquid solutions. This scenario does not require regolith adsorption, but entails extant life on Mars. The third scenario is that deep subsurface aquifers produce the bursts of methane. Continued in situ measurements of methane and water, as well as laboratory studies of adsorption and deliquescence, will test these hypotheses and inform the existence of the near-surface reservoir and its exchange with the atmosphere.

  3. Methane Emissions from Upland Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megonigal, Patrick; Pitz, Scott; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Global budgets ascribe 4-10% of atmospheric methane sinks to upland soils and assume that soils are the sole surface for methane exchange between upland forests and the atmosphere. The dogma that upland forests are uniformly atmospheric methane sinks was challenged a decade ago by the discovery of abiotic methane production from plant tissue. Subsequently a variety of relatively cryptic microbial and non-microbial methane sources have been proposed that have the potential to emit methane in upland forests. Despite the accumulating evidence of potential methane sources, there are few data demonstrating actual emissions of methane from a plant surface in an upland forest. We report direct observations of methane emissions from upland tree stems in two temperate forests. Stem methane emissions were observed from several tree species that dominate a forest located on the mid-Atlantic coast of North America (Maryland, USA). Stem emissions occurred throughout the growing season while soils adjacent to the trees simultaneously consumed methane. Scaling fluxes by stem surface area suggested the forest was a net methane source during a wet period in June, and that stem emissions offset 5% of the soil methane sink on an annual basis. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycles in stem methane emission rates, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for gas transport. Similar observations were made in an upland forest in Beijing, China. However, in this case the evidence suggested the methane was not produced in soils, but in the heartwood by microbial or non-microbial processes. These data challenge the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane, and suggest that upland forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Tree emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration.

  4. Methane Gas Emissions - is Older Infrastructure Leakier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, L. P.; Caulton, D.; Zondlo, M. A.; Lane, H.; Lu, J.; Golston, L.; Pan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Large gains in natural gas production from hydraulic fracturing is reinvigorating the US energy economy. It is a clean burning fuel with lower emissions than that of coal or oil. Studies show that methane (CH4) leaks from natural gas infrastructure vary widely. A broader question is whether leak rates of methane might offset the benefits of combustion of natural gas. Excess methane (CH4) is a major greenhouse gas with a radiative forcing constant of 25 times that of CO2 when projected over a 100-year period. An extensive field study of 250 wells in the Marcellus Shale conducted in July 2015 examined the emission rates of this region and identifed super-emitters. Spud production data will provide information as to whether older infrastructure is responsible for more of the emissions. Quantifying the emission rate was determined by extrapolating methane releases at a distance from private well pads using an inverse Gaussian plume model. Wells studied were selected by prevailing winds, distance from public roads, and topographical information using commercial (ARCGIS and Google Earth), non-profit (drillinginfo), and government (State of PA) databases. Data were collected from the mobile sensing lab (CH4, CO2 and H2O sensors), as well as from a stationary tower. Emission rates from well pads will be compared to their original production (spud dates) to evaluate whether infrastructure age and total production correlates with the observed leak rates. Very preliminary results show no statistical correlation between well pad production rates and observed leak rates.

  5. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  6. Aerobic Dancing--A Rhythmic Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Jacki

    Fitness programs now and in the future must offer built-in cardiovascular conditioning, variety, novelty, and change to meet the physical, mental, and emotional needs of our society. Aerobic dancing (dancing designed to train and strengthen the heart, lungs, and vascular system) is one of the first indoor group Aerobic exercise programs designed…

  7. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    OpenAIRE

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss.

  8. Aerobic growth at nanomolar oxygen concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolper, Daniel; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12, chosen for its well-understood biochemistry, rapid growth rate, and low-oxygen-affinity terminal oxidase, grows at oxygen levels of ≤ 3 nM, two to three orders of magnitude lower than previously observed for aerobes. Our study expands both the environmental range and temporal history of...... aerobic organisms....

  9. The Nordic methane project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of NGC's 1992 methane project have been to compile a methane emission estimate with a higher accuracy and degree of documentation than before. Danish Gas Technology Centre has been engaged to draw up the project report and to assist with equipment for the emission measurements. The evaluation and analysis of data regarding the distribution sector have been carried out by Radian, the consultant of the Gas Research Institute (GRI)/environmental Protection Agency (EPA) - Methane Emission Project. Measurements have been made of the discharge rate from identified leaks. All measurement data has been systematized according to type and age of pipe. HNG is one of the distribution companies, which had carried out a measurement programme on the underground distribution network. The transmission companies' contributions to the Nordic project have been logging data for vented and flared gas in the context of operations and maintenance. The operator companies in Norway have finished an extensive environmental programme in which discharges of methane, among other substances, has been determined. Prime emission sources have been identified and reduction measures proposed. The relative natural gas leakage rate is calculated as the leakage rate of the total volume of natural gas in relation to production, transmission, and distribution, respectively. The accuracy of the methane emission estimates for the natural gas production and the distribution networks must be regarded as the best available. The estimated relative precision of the total leakage estimate for the distribution networks is ± 54 per cent based on a 90 per cent of confidence. The methane emission estimate for the transmission networks has some degree of uncertainty, but even a high degree of uncertainty would have a minor influence on the total methane emission estimate. (EG) (19 refs.)

  10. Sources of atmospheric methane from coastal marine wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological methanogenesis in wetlands is believed to be one of the major sources of global tropospheric methane. The present paper reports measurements of methane distribution in the soils, sediments, water and vegetation of coastal marine wetlands. Measurements, carried out in the salt marshes Bay Tree Creek in Virginia and Panacea in northwest Florida, reveal methane concentrations in soils and sediments to vary with depth below the surface and with soil temperature. The fluxes of methane from marsh soils to the atmosphere at the soil-air interface are estimated to range from -0.00067 g CH4/sq m per day (methane sink) to 0.024 g CH4/sq m per day, with an average value of 0.0066 g CH4/sq m per day. Data also demonstrate the important role of tidal waters percolating through marsh soils in removing methane from the soils and releasing it to the atmosphere. The information obtained, together with previous studies, provides a framework for the design of a program based on in situ and remote sensing measurements to study the global methane cycle

  11. Methane concentrations and oxidation in nearshore waters of the Lena River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, S. B.; Samarkin, V.; Shakhova, N. E.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic is warming dramatically, with potentially catastrophic impacts on climate change through rapid mobilization of labile carbon reservoirs sequestered presently in permafrost. Increasingly, Arctic feedbacks are recognized as key contributors to climate change, including cycles associated with the powerful greenhouse gas methane, whose atmospheric concentration has more than doubled since the pre-industrial epoch. Sustained methane release to the atmosphere from thawing Arctic permafrost and delivery to the coastal ocean through groundwater or riverine discharge or expulsion from the seabed is a positive and likely highly significant feedback to climate warming. Microbially-mediated methane oxidation provides a key sink and effective biofilter that can limit methane fluxes from coastal environments to the atmosphere. We examined methane dynamics on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf by determining concentrations and oxidation rates at a series of stations near the Lena River Delta and moving offshore. Methane concentrations and oxidation rates were highly elevated in and near the river mouth compared to offshore waters, except when the offshore waters were impacted by seabed methane seepage. The regulation of methane oxidation in Arctic waters appears two-fold: first, rates are strongly related to methane availability and second, in the presence of methane, nutrient availability strongly regulates methane consumption. Along the Lena river delta, elevated concentrations of both nutrients and methane create ideal conditions to support high rates of pelagic methanotrophy. Offshore, where nutrient concentrations are lower and more limiting, methane oxidation rates are considerably lower. These data suggest that, at present, nearshore waters are fairly efficient methane sinks while in offshore waters, pelagic methanotrophy is inefficient, allowing methane to escape to the atmosphere.

  12. Revisiting factors controlling methane emissions from high-Arctic tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastepanov, M.; Sigsgaard, Charlotte; Tagesson, Håkan Torbern;

    2013-01-01

    known factors controlling methane emission, i.e. temperature and water table position. Late in the growing season CH4 emissions were found to be very similar between the study years (except the extremely dry 2010) despite large differences in climatic factors (temperature and water table). Late......The northern latitudes are experiencing disproportionate warming relative to the mid-latitudes, and there is growing concern about feedbacks between this warming and methane production and release from high-latitude soils. Studies of methane emissions carried out in the Arctic, particularly those......-in periods. The measurements show clear seasonal dynamics in methane emission. The start of the growing season and the increase in CH4 fluxes were strongly related to the date of snowmelt. Within each particular growing season, CH4 fluxes were highly correlated with the soil temperature (R-2 > 0.75), which...

  13. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  14. Transformation yields of chlorinated ethenes by a methanotrophic mixed culture expressing particulate methane monooxygenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, J E; McCarty, P L

    1997-01-01

    Transformation yields for the aerobic cometabolic degradation of five chlorinated ethenes were determined by using a methanotrophic mixed culture expressing particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Transformation yields (expressed as moles of chlorinated ethene degraded per mole of methane consumed) were 0.57, 0.25, 0.058, 0.0019, and 0.00022 for trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (t-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-D...

  15. Identifying active methane-oxidizers in thawed Arctic permafrost by proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Layton, A. C.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The rate of CH4 release from thawing permafrost in the Arctic has been regarded as one of the determining factors on future global climate. It is uncertain how indigenous microorganisms would interact with such changing environmental conditions and hence their impact on the fate of carbon compounds that are sequestered in the cryosol. Multitudinous studies of pristine surface cryosol (top 5 cm) and microcosm experiments have provided growing evidence of effective methanotrophy. Cryosol samples corresponding to active layer were sampled from a sparsely vegetated, ice-wedge polygon at the McGill Arctic Research Station at Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada (N79°24, W90°45) before the onset of annual thaw. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated the occurrence of methanotroph-containing bacterial families as minor components (~5%) in pristine cryosol including Bradyrhizobiaceae, Methylobacteriaceae and Methylocystaceae within alpha-Proteobacteria, and Methylacidiphilaceae within Verrucomicrobia. The potential of methanotrophy is supported by preliminary analysis of metagenome data, which indicated putative methane monooxygenase gene sequences relating to Bradyrhizobium sp. and Pseudonocardia sp. are present. Proteome profiling in general yielded minute traces of proteins, which likely hints at dormant nature of the soil microbial consortia. The lack of specific protein database for permafrost posted additional challenge to protein identification. Only 35 proteins could be identified in the pristine cryosol and of which 60% belonged to Shewanella sp. Most of the identified proteins are known to be involved in energy metabolism or post-translational modification of proteins. Microcosms amended with sodium acetate exhibited a net methane consumption of ~65 ngC-CH4 per gram (fresh weight) of soil over 16 days of aerobic incubation at room temperature. The pH in microcosm materials remained acidic (decreased from initial 4.7 to 4.5). Protein extraction and

  16. Micro-aerobics: when rice plants lose their resistance against oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss, J.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2008-10-01

    Photoacoustic determination of ethane, ethanol and acetaldehyde releases from 14 d old rice seedlings leads to the conclusion that rice seedlings start suffering significant lipid peroxidation under micro-aerobic conditions. To produce micro-aerobic conditions in otherwise normal atmospheres, the oxygen concentration has been reduced to a value between 0.3 and 0.05% (v/v). The defense of the rice seedlings against oxygenic radicals becomes insufficient under these almost anaerobic conditions. The findings presented here are relevant for the clarification of what causes non-survival of rice seedlings under prolonged submergence. Dedicated to Professor Anna Giardini, University of Rome, at her retirement.

  17. Micro-aerobics: when rice plants lose their resistance against oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuss, J; Harren, F J M [Life Science Trace Gas Exchange Facility, Department of Molecular and Laser Physics, University of Nijmegen, Toernooiveld I, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: J.Reuss@science.ru.nl

    2008-10-15

    Photoacoustic determination of ethane, ethanol and acetaldehyde releases from 14 d old rice seedlings leads to the conclusion that rice seedlings start suffering significant lipid peroxidation under micro-aerobic conditions. To produce micro-aerobic conditions in otherwise normal atmospheres, the oxygen concentration has been reduced to a value between 0.3 and 0.05% (v/v). The defense of the rice seedlings against oxygenic radicals becomes insufficient under these almost anaerobic conditions. The findings presented here are relevant for the clarification of what causes non-survival of rice seedlings under prolonged submergence.

  18. Diversity and habitat preferences of cultivated and uncultivated aerobic methanotrophic bacteria evaluated based on pmoA as molecular marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eKnief

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Methane-oxidizing bacteria are characterized by their capability to grow on methane as sole source of carbon and energy. Cultivation-dependent and –independent methods have revealed that this functional guild of bacteria comprises a substantial diversity of organisms. In particular the use of cultivation-independent methods targeting a subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA as functional marker for the detection of aerobic methanotrophs has resulted in thousands of sequences representing unknown methanotrophic bacteria. This limits data interpretation due to restricted information about these uncultured methanotrophs. A few groups of uncultivated methanotrophs are assumed to play important roles in methane oxidation in specific habitats, while the biology behind other sequence clusters remains still largely unknown. The discovery of evolutionary related monooxygenases in non-methanotrophic bacteria and of pmoA paralogs in methanotrophs requires that sequence clusters of uncultivated organisms have to be interpreted with care. This review article describes the present diversity of cultivated and uncultivated aerobic methanotrophic bacteria based on pmoA gene sequence diversity. It summarizes current knowledge about cultivated and major clusters of uncultivated methanotrophic bacteria and evaluates habitat specificity of these bacteria at different levels of taxonomic resolution. Habitat specificity exists for diverse lineages and at different taxonomic levels. Methanotrophic genera such as Methylocystis and Methylocaldum are identified as generalists, but they harbor habitat specific methanotrophs at species level. This finding implies that future studies should consider these diverging preferences at different taxonomic levels when analyzing methanotrophic communities.

  19. Diversity and Habitat Preferences of Cultivated and Uncultivated Aerobic Methanotrophic Bacteria Evaluated Based on pmoA as Molecular Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knief, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are characterized by their capability to grow on methane as sole source of carbon and energy. Cultivation-dependent and -independent methods have revealed that this functional guild of bacteria comprises a substantial diversity of organisms. In particular the use of cultivation-independent methods targeting a subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) as functional marker for the detection of aerobic methanotrophs has resulted in thousands of sequences representing “unknown methanotrophic bacteria.” This limits data interpretation due to restricted information about these uncultured methanotrophs. A few groups of uncultivated methanotrophs are assumed to play important roles in methane oxidation in specific habitats, while the biology behind other sequence clusters remains still largely unknown. The discovery of evolutionary related monooxygenases in non-methanotrophic bacteria and of pmoA paralogs in methanotrophs requires that sequence clusters of uncultivated organisms have to be interpreted with care. This review article describes the present diversity of cultivated and uncultivated aerobic methanotrophic bacteria based on pmoA gene sequence diversity. It summarizes current knowledge about cultivated and major clusters of uncultivated methanotrophic bacteria and evaluates habitat specificity of these bacteria at different levels of taxonomic resolution. Habitat specificity exists for diverse lineages and at different taxonomic levels. Methanotrophic genera such as Methylocystis and Methylocaldum are identified as generalists, but they harbor habitat specific methanotrophs at species level. This finding implies that future studies should consider these diverging preferences at different taxonomic levels when analyzing methanotrophic communities. PMID:26696968

  20. Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Biochemical methane potential decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. ► Net energy produced was 84.3 MWh or 46 kWh per million metric tons (Mg). ► The average removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 96–99%. ► The average removal efficiency of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) was 68–99%. ► The two-stage batch digester proved to be simple to operate and cost-effective. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3 MWh, or 46 kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96–99% and 68–99%, respectively.

  1. A national landfill methane budget for Sweden based on field measurements, and an evaluation of IPCC models

    OpenAIRE

    Börjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey; Adolfsson, Rolf; Galle, Bo; Svensson, Bo H.

    2011-01-01

    Seven Swedish landfills were investigated from 2001 to 2003. On each landfill, a measure of the total methane production was calculated from data on: (1) methane emissions (leakage); (2) methane oxidation and (3) from gas recovery. Methane emissions were determined via a tracer gas (N2O) release-based remote sensing method. N2O and CH4 were measured with an Fourier Transform infrared detector at a distance of more than 1 km downwind from the landfills. Methane oxidation in the landfill cover...

  2. A national landfill methane budget for Sweden based on field measurements, and an evaluation of IPCC models

    OpenAIRE

    Borjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey; Adolfsson, Rolf; Galle, Bo; Svensson, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Seven Swedish landfills were investigated from 2001 to 2003. On each landfill, a measure of the total methane production was calculated from data on: (1) methane emissions (leakage); (2) methane oxidation and (3) from gas recovery. Methane emissions were determined via a tracer gas (N2O) release-based remote sensing method. N2O and CH4 were measured with an Fourier Transform infrared detector at a distance of more than 1 km downwind from the landfills. Methane oxidation in the landfill covers...

  3. Hydrogen production by radio frequency plasma stimulation in methane hydrate at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Putra, Andi Erwin Eka

    2013-01-01

    Methane hydrate, formed by injecting methane into 100 g of shaved ice at a pressure of 7 MPa and reactor temperature of 0 ??C, was decomposed by applying 27.12 MHz radio frequency plasma in order to produce hydrogen. The process involved the stimulation of plasma in the methane hydrate with a variable input power at atmospheric pressure. It was observed that production of CH4 is optimal at a slow rate of CH4 release from the methane hydrate, as analyzed by in light of the steam...

  4. Methane-Oxidizing Enzymes: An Upstream Problem in Biological Gas-to-Liquids Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Thomas J; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2016-08-01

    Biological conversion of natural gas to liquids (Bio-GTL) represents an immense economic opportunity. In nature, aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic archaea are able to selectively oxidize methane using methane monooxygenase (MMO) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) enzymes. Although significant progress has been made toward genetically manipulating these organisms for biotechnological applications, the enzymes themselves are slow, complex, and not recombinantly tractable in traditional industrial hosts. With turnover numbers of 0.16-13 s(-1), these enzymes pose a considerable upstream problem in the biological production of fuels or chemicals from methane. Methane oxidation enzymes will need to be engineered to be faster to enable high volumetric productivities; however, efforts to do so and to engineer simpler enzymes have been minimally successful. Moreover, known methane-oxidizing enzymes have different expression levels, carbon and energy efficiencies, require auxiliary systems for biosynthesis and function, and vary considerably in terms of complexity and reductant requirements. The pros and cons of using each methane-oxidizing enzyme for Bio-GTL are considered in detail. The future for these enzymes is bright, but a renewed focus on studying them will be critical to the successful development of biological processes that utilize methane as a feedstock. PMID:27366961

  5. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Elisabeth; Ingjer, Frank; Bø, Kari

    2011-12-01

    Edvardsen, E, Ingjer, F, and Bø, K. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3479-3485, 2011-This study compared the aerobic capacity during maximal aerobic dance and treadmill running in fit women. Thirteen well-trained female aerobic dance instructors aged 30 ± 8.17 years (mean ± SD) exercised to exhaustion by running on a treadmill for measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max) and peak heart rate (HRpeak). Additionally, all subjects performed aerobic dancing until exhaustion after a choreographed videotaped routine trying to reach the same HRpeak as during maximal running. The p value for statistical significance between running and aerobic dance was set to ≤0.05. The results (mean ± SD) showed a lower VO(2)max in aerobic dance (52.2 ± 4.02 ml·kg·min) compared with treadmill running (55.9 ± 5.03 ml·kg·min) (p = 0.0003). Further, the mean ± SD HRpeak was 182 ± 9.15 b·min in aerobic dance and 192 ± 9.62 b·min in treadmill running, giving no difference in oxygen pulse between the 2 exercise forms (p = 0.32). There was no difference in peak ventilation (aerobic dance: 108 ± 10.81 L·min vs. running: 113 ± 11.49 L·min). In conclusion, aerobic dance does not seem to be able to use the whole aerobic capacity as in running. For well endurance-trained women, this may result in a lower total workload at maximal intensities. Aerobic dance may therefore not be as suitable as running during maximal intensities in well-trained females. PMID:22080322

  6. Synthetic methylotrophy: engineering the production of biofuels and chemicals based on the biology of aerobic methanol utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, William B; Sandoval, Nicholas R; Bennett, Robert K; Fast, Alan G; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic methylotrophy is the development of non-native methylotrophs that can utilize methane and methanol as sole carbon and energy sources or as co-substrates with carbohydrates to produce metabolites as biofuels and chemicals. The availability of methane (from natural gas) and its oxidation product, methanol, has been increasing, while prices have been decreasing, thus rendering them as attractive fermentation substrates. As they are more reduced than most carbohydrates, methane and methanol, as co-substrates, can enhance the yields of biologically produced metabolites. Here we discuss synthetic biology and metabolic engineering strategies based on the native biology of aerobic methylotrophs for developing synthetic strains grown on methanol, with Escherichia coli as the prototype. PMID:25796071

  7. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-07-15

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin structure: H.sub.4SiW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.3PW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.4SiMo.sub.12O.sub.40, or H.sub.3PMo.sub.12O.sub.40, can be when supported on silica.

  8. Low aerobic fitness in Brazilian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Augusto Santos Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: aerobic fitness is considered one of the most important components of health-related physical fitness, with low levels related to increased risk of premature death from all causes, especially cardiovascular diseases. OBJECTIVE: to identify the characteristics of adolescents at higher risk of low levels of aerobic fitness. METHODS: the study included 696 adolescents 15-17 years of age enrolled in public high schools of Florianópolis, southern Brazil. This cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Aerobic fitness was measured using the modified Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test mCAFT. Sociodemographic gender, age, school grade, paternal and maternal schooling, socioeconomic status, and anthropometric variables body weight, height, triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness, sexual maturation, physical activity, sedentary behavior, and eating habits were collected. RESULTS: it was found that 31.5% of adolescents had low aerobic fitness levels, being higher in boys 49.2% compared to girls 20.6%. Moreover, girls with sedentary behavior, overweight and high body fat percentage were the groups most likely to have inadequate aerobic fitness. In males, the groups most likely to have inadequate aerobic fitness were those whose parents studied more than eight years, those with low levels of physical activity, and those with inadequate nutrition and excessive body fat. CONCLUSION: low aerobic fitness levels were present in one third of adolescents and was more prevalent in boys. Lifestyle changes, including replacement of sedentary behaviors by physical and sport activities , may assist in improving the aerobic fitness of Brazilian adolescents.

  9. Temporal resilience and dynamics of anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities to short-term changes in methane partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasek, S.; Tiantian, Y.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.; Wang, F.; Liang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sediments produce tens to hundreds of teragrams of methane annually, which is released from the seabed at thousands of cold seeps distributed globally along continental margins. Around 80-90% of this methane is consumed in shallower sediment layers before reaching the hydrosphere, in a microbially-mediated process known as anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) However, cold seeps appear to exhibit temporal variation in gas flux intensity, and AOM filter efficiency at cold seeps generally decreases with fluid flow rate. To our knowledge, the degree to which temporal heterogeneity in subsurface methane flux stimulates AOM community growth and adaptation to increased methane concentrations has not been investigated. Static high-pressure bioreactors were used to incubate sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) and methanogenic zone sediments underlying a Mediterranean mud volcano gas flare under in situ temperature and pressure at 8 MPa methane. Sulfide production rates of 0.4 μmol/cm3/day in both sediment regimes after 4 months of incubation suggested the resilience of the marine subsurface methane filter may extend well below the SMTZ (40 cm). Similar incubations of SMTZ samples from below a gas flare off Svalbard at saturating (3.8 MPa) and 0.2 MPa methane are being sampled after 1 week, 4 weeks, and 4 months; sulfide production rates of 8-18 nmol/cm3/day were first observed after 4 weeks of incubation. Sediment samples at all specified time points for both sets of incubations were collected for nucleic acid extraction and cell fixation. Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are expected dominant taxa in enriched and non-enriched communities. 16S rDNA community analysis is expected to reveal additional microbial players involved in the short-term adaptation to higher methane partial pressures in the marine subsurface. Increased AOM community activity (RNA/DNA ratio) and copy numbers of methane cycling transcripts (mcr

  10. Aerobic glycolysis during brain activation: adrenergic regulation and influence of norepinephrine on astrocytic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F

    2016-07-01

    Aerobic glycolysis occurs during brain activation and is characterized by preferential up-regulation of glucose utilization compared with oxygen consumption even though oxygen level and delivery are adequate. Aerobic glycolysis is a widespread phenomenon that underlies energetics of diverse brain activities, such as alerting, sensory processing, cognition, memory, and pathophysiological conditions, but specific cellular functions fulfilled by aerobic glycolysis are poorly understood. Evaluation of evidence derived from different disciplines reveals that aerobic glycolysis is a complex, regulated phenomenon that is prevented by propranolol, a non-specific β-adrenoceptor antagonist. The metabolic pathways that contribute to excess utilization of glucose compared with oxygen include glycolysis, the pentose phosphate shunt pathway, the malate-aspartate shuttle, and astrocytic glycogen turnover. Increased lactate production by unidentified cells, and lactate dispersal from activated cells and lactate release from the brain, both facilitated by astrocytes, are major factors underlying aerobic glycolysis in subjects with low blood lactate levels. Astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttling with local oxidation is minor. Blockade of aerobic glycolysis by propranolol implicates adrenergic regulatory processes including adrenal release of epinephrine, signaling to brain via the vagus nerve, and increased norepinephrine release from the locus coeruleus. Norepinephrine has a powerful influence on astrocytic metabolism and glycogen turnover that can stimulate carbohydrate utilization more than oxygen consumption, whereas β-receptor blockade 're-balances' the stoichiometry of oxygen-glucose or -carbohydrate metabolism by suppressing glucose and glycogen utilization more than oxygen consumption. This conceptual framework may be helpful for design of future studies to elucidate functional roles of preferential non-oxidative glucose utilization and glycogen turnover during brain

  11. Methane emissions during storage of different treatments from cattle manure in Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiajun Wang; Chiqing Duan; Yaqin Ji; Yichao Sun

    2010-01-01

    Many studies on methane emissions from animal manure have revealed that animal manure is a major source of methane emissions to the atmosphere that can have negative consequences for people,animals and environment.In general,the release of methane can be influenced by the type of feed taken by animals,temperature,manure characteristics and so on.This study aimed at quantifying and comparing methane release from dairy manure with different piling treatments.Four treatments were designed including manure piling height 30,45,60 cm and adding 6 cm manure every day until the piling height was 60 cm.Static chamber method and gas chromatography were adopted to measure the methane emissions from April to June in 2009.Methane emission rates of all four manure treatments were low in the first week and then increased sharply until reaching the peak values.Subsequently,all the methane emission rates decreased and fluctuated within the steady range till the end of the experiment.Wilcoxon nonparametric tests analysis indicated that methane emission rate was greatly influenced by manure piling height and manner.There were no significant relationships between methane emission rates and the temperatures of ambience and heap.However,regression analysis showed that the quadratic equations were found between emission rates of all treatments and the gas temperature in the barrels.

  12. Bio-tarp alternative daily cover prototypes for methane oxidation atop open landfill cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L; Besnard, Fabien; Bogner, Jean; Hilger, Helene

    2011-05-01

    Final landfill covers are highly engineered to prevent methane release into the atmosphere. However, methane production begins soon after waste placement and is an unaddressed source of emissions. The methane oxidation capacity of methanotrophs embedded in a "bio-tarp" was investigated as a means to mitigate methane release from open landfill cells. The bio-tarp would also serve as an alternative daily cover during routine landfill operation. Evaluations of nine synthetic geotextiles identified two that would likely be suitable bio-tarp components. Pilot tarp prototypes were tested in continuous flow systems simulating landfill gas conditions. Multilayered bio-tarp prototypes consisting of alternating layers of the two geotextiles were found to remove 16% of the methane flowing through the bio-tarp. The addition of landfill cover soil, compost, or shale amendments to the bio-tarp increased the methane removal up to 32%. With evidence of methane removal in a laboratory bioreactor, prototypes were evaluated at a local landfill using flux chambers installed atop intermediate cover at a landfill. The multilayered bio-tarp and amended bio-tarp configurations were all found to decrease landfill methane flux; however, the performance efficacy of bio-tarps was not significantly different from controls without methanotrophs. Because highly variable methane fluxes at the field site likely confounded the test results, repeat field testing is recommended under more controlled flux conditions. PMID:21354776

  13. How "healthful" are aerobics classes? Exploring the health and wellness messages in aerobics classes for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abundo, Michelle Lee

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the health messages communicated by aerobics instructors in aerobics classes for women. A theoretical framework influenced by adult learning theory and feminist pedagogy was used in this qualitative study. Over a 3-month period, the practices of five aerobics instructors working at one nonprofit fitness center and one wellness facility were explored. The methods of data collection were one interview with each aerobics instructor and 14 site visits to conduct participant observations and to retrieve of documents. Despite the nonprofit and wellness-based environment of the exercise facilities in this research, there was still an overemphasis on the physical aspect of aerobics classes. Therefore, the potential wellness-related benefits of aerobics classes for women, especially in environments that identified themselves as promoting wellness, were not fully realized. PMID:17148107

  14. Direct Aromaization of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Marcelin

    1997-01-15

    The thermal decomposition of methane offers significant potential as a means of producing higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of reaction is limited. Work in the literature previous to this project had shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds would significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon or heavier (Clo+) materials. This project studied the effect and optimization of the quenching process as a means of increasing the amount of value added products during the pyrolysis of methane. A reactor was designed to rapidly quench the free-radical combustion reaction so as to maximize the yield of aromatics. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts were studied as a means of lowering the reaction temperature. A lower reaction temperature would have the benefits of more rapid quenching as well as a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. It was the goal of the project to identify promising routes from methane to higher hydrocarbons based on the pyrolysis of methane.

  15. Enzymatic oxidation of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, protein-protein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications. PMID:25806595

  16. Methane emissions from natural wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.L. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States); Burke, R.A. Jr. [Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1993-09-01

    Analyses of air trapped in polar ice cores in conjunction with recent atmospheric measurements, indicate that the atmospheric methane concentration increased by about 250% during the past two or three hundred years (Rasmussen and Khalil, 1984). Because methane is a potent ``greenhouse`` gas, the increasing concentrations are expected to contribute to global warning (Dickinson and Cicerone, 1986). The timing of the methane increase suggests that it is related to the rapid growth of the human population and associated industrialization and agricultural development. The specific causes of the atmospheric methane concentration increase are not well known, but may relate to either increases in methane sources, decreases in the strengths of the sinks, or both.

  17. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia eHeijnen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors.

  18. Physiological responses during aerobic dance of individuals grouped by aerobic capacity and dance experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, D; Ballor, D L

    1991-03-01

    This study examined the effects of aerobic capacity (peak oxygen uptake) and aerobic dance experience on the physiological responses to an aerobic dance routine. The heart rate (HR) and VO2 responses to three levels (intensities) of aerobic dance were measured in 27 women. Experienced aerobic dancers (AD) (mean peak VO2 = 42 ml.kg-1.min-1) were compared to subjects with limited aerobic dance experience of high (HI) (peak VO2 greater than 35 ml.kg-1.min-1) and low (LO) (peak VO2 less than 35 ml.kg-1.min-1) aerobic capacities. The results indicated the LO group exercised at a higher percentage of peak heart rate and peak VO2 at all three dance levels than did either the HI or AD groups (HI = AD). Design of aerobic dance routines must consider the exercise tolerance of the intended audience. In mixed groups, individuals with low aerobic capacities should be shown how and encouraged to modify the activity to reduce the level of exertion. PMID:2028095

  19. Suggestions for Mitigation of Methane Clathrate Destabilization Along Continental Slopes Offshore and Discrimination Between Fossil and Recent Methane in the Atmosphere with Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. K.; Vincent, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    When a hydrocarbon-rich stratum intersects the outer edge of a continental shelf, at the continental slope, methane clathrates act as a partially impermeable barrier that prevents their easy escape at the end of the “layer cake” of continental sediments. If the clathrates on the continental slope melt because of rising sea bottom temperatures, hydrocarbons (natural gas and oil) can escape into the ocean, and finally into the atmosphere in the case of methane. A mitigation method is discussed that would drill vertically into the continental shelf, then horizontally toward the continental slope, and resulting production of oil and gas would reduce the pressure and the amount of methane escape to the ocean and the atmosphere. Remote sensing for lower tropospheric methane plumes will be needed to determine where drilling is needed, as well as to assess the effects of mitigation in reducing methane escape. A remote sensing method employing carbon isotopic ratios is proposed for discriminating fossil methane in natural gas from recent methane produced by decaying organic material. This is important because recent methane is recycled over decadal time frames and does not add greatly to global warming, whereas fossil methane releases carbon that has been sequestered for millions of years and is a principal cause of increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and its concomitant global warming.

  20. Formation of methane nano-bubbles during hydrate decomposition and their effect on hydrate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John; Englezos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the conditions for methane nano-bubble formation during methane hydrate dissociation in the presence of water and a methane gas reservoir. Hydrate dissociation leads to the quick release of methane into the liquid phase which can cause methane supersaturation. If the diffusion of methane molecules out of the liquid phase is not fast enough, the methane molecules agglomerate and form bubbles. Under the conditions of our simulations, the methane-rich quasi-spherical bubbles grow to become cylindrical with a radius of ∼11 Å. The nano-bubbles remain stable for about 35 ns until they are gradually and homogeneously dispersed in the liquid phase and finally enter the gas phase reservoirs initially set up in the simulation box. We determined that the minimum mole fraction for the dissolved methane in water to form nano-bubbles is 0.044, corresponding to about 30% of hydrate phase composition (0.148). The importance of nano-bubble formation to the mechanism of methane hydrate formation, growth, and dissociation is discussed. PMID:26049510

  1. Temperature effect on aerobic denitrification and nitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shu-guang; ZHANG Xiao-jian; WANG Zhan-sheng

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen loss without organic removal in biofilter was observed and its possible reason was explained. A lower hydraulic loading could improve aerobic denitrification rate. Aerobic denitrification was seriously affected by low temperature(below 10oC). However, nitrification rate remained high when the temperature dropped from 15oC to5oC. It seemed the autotrophic biofilm in BAF could alleviate the adverse effect of low temperature.

  2. Collection of "strengthening sets" of aerobics lesson.\\\\

    OpenAIRE

    CAKL, Vojtěch

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor study was to create a strengthening sets for aerobic lessons including showing these possisions in practice on selective aerobic lessons . Based on special literature the author had chosen suitable muscle development exercises to increase the body strenth. These exercises were there practised for six weeks continuously. Before and after the research were selected individuals who were compared by 4 exact same tests to detect static and dynamic body strength. The result...

  3. Evaluation of A "Floating" Aerobics Floor

    OpenAIRE

    Favor, Craig M.

    1997-01-01

    Aerobics dance floors often produce annoying floor vibrations in adjacent parts of a building due to the rhythmic impact of the aerobicists. Various types of shock absorbing aerobics and dance floors are widely used to prevent injuries to the participants, but the floors may not prevent vibrations in adjacent areas of the building. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate a temporary "floating" concrete a...

  4. Methane Emissions from Woody Stems of Tropical and Temperate Wetland Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangala, S. R.; Hornibrook, E. R.; Gowing, D. J.; Bastviken, D.; Enrich-Prast, A.; Gauci, V.

    2013-12-01

    Wetland-adapted trees are known to transport and release soil-produced methane to the atmosphere through woody stem surfaces, yet the magnitude and controls of tree-mediated methane emissions remain unknown for mature forests. Although 60% of global wetlands are forested, and many tropical forests are either permanently or seasonally flooded, the ecosystem level contribution of tree-mediated methane flux relative to other gas transport pathways (e.g., ebullition, pore-water diffusion and via aerenchyma of herbaceous plants) has received limited attention. The role of trees as a conduit for methane export from soil to the atmosphere was assessed in situ in a temperate forested wetland (Flitwick Moor, UK) and tropical forested wetlands in Borneo, Indonesia and Amazonia, Brazil. Mesocosm experiments also were conducted in the temperate region to characterise emission characteristics of Alnus glutinosa saplings subjected to different water-table treatments. Methane emissions from trees were compared to fluxes from the soil surface in both the in situ and mesocosm studies. Temperate and tropical tree species both released significant quantities of methane from stem surfaces. Emission rates for young trees exceeded that of mature trees by several orders of magnitude on a stem surface area basis. Key factors controlling rates of tree-mediated flux were tree physiology (e.g., wood specific density, stem lenticel density), abiotic conditions (e.g., soil temperature) and methane gas transport mechanisms (e.g., passive diffusion, convective transport). Tree-mediated methane emissions contributed 6 to 87% of total ecosystem methane flux with the largest relative contribution from trees occurring in tropical wetlands. Recent data from Amazonian wetlands demonstrate very high rates of tree-mediated methane emission relative to other types of forested wetlands. These results indicate that exclusion of tree-mediated methane fluxes from measurement campaigns conducted in forested

  5. Beneifcial mechanisms of aerobic exercise on hepatic lipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Guo; Emily C Liong; Kwok Fai So; Man-Lung Fung; George L Tipoe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) refers to any fatty liver disease that is not due to excessive use of alcohol. NAFLD probably results from abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin resistance. Aerobic exercise is shown to improve NAFLD. This review aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms involved in the beneifcial effects of aerobic exercise on NAFLD. DATA SOURCE:We searched articles in English on the role of aerobic exercise in NAFLD therapy in PubMed. RESULTS:The mechanisms of chronic aerobic exercise in regulating the outcome of NAFLD include: (i) reducing in-trahepatic fat content by down-regulating sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and up-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγ expression levels; (ii) decreas-ing hepatic oxidative stress through modulating the reactive oxygen species, and enhancing antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and glutathione peroxidase; (iii) ameliorating hepatic inlfammation via the inhibition of pro-inlfammatory media-tors such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta; (iv) attenuating mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by reducing cytochrome C released from the mitochondria to the cytosol; and (v) inducing hepato-protective autophagy. CONCLUSION:Aerobic exercise, via different mechanisms, signiifcantly decreases the fat content of the liver and improves the outcomes of patients with NAFLD.

  6. Mechanisms of production and emission of methane in rice fields. Impact of fertilization and cultivated species; Mechanismen der Produktion und Emission von Methan in Reisfeldern. Abhaengigkeit von Feldduengung und angebauter Varietaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    1993-12-31

    Methane emissions from rice fields are a significant source (approx. 20%) of atmospheric methane. Laboratory tests and field tests have shown that throughout the entire vegetation period, more than 80% of the total methane emissions from rice fields in Italy were released by the aerating tissue of the rice plant. The amount of methane emissions has been found to depend on the rice species cultivated, and on fertilization. Additional studies into the gas transport capability of the aerenchyma of the rice plants show a clear correlation between highest diffusion resistance of the aerenchyma of a given rice plant, and lowest methane emissions measured in the rice species. This is a result that opens up new possibilities of reducing methane emissions from rice fields. (orig.) [Deutsch] Methan-Emissionen aus Reisfeldern sind eine signifikante Quelle (ca. 20%) fuer atmosphaerisches Methan. In Labor- und Freilandexperimenten konnte nachgewiesen werden, dass waehrend der Vegetationsperiode ueber 80% der Gesamt-Methan-Emissionen aus italienischen Reisfeldern ueber das Aerenchymsystem der Reispflanze erfolgt. Die Hoehe der Methan-Emission war von der angebauten Reisvarietaet und der Feldduengung abhaengig. Ergaenzende Untersuchungen zur Gaswegigkeit des Aerenchymsystems der Reispflanze zeigten, dass die Reisvarietaet mit den groessten Diffusionswiderstaenden des Aerenchymsystems auch die niedrigsten Methan-Emissionsraten aufwies. Dieses Ergebnis eroeffnet neue Moeglichkeiten zur Reduktion der Methan-Emissionen aus Reisfeldern. (orig.)

  7. Carbon Isotopic Constraints on Arctic Methane Sources, 2008-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R. E.; Lowry, D.; Lanoiselle, M.; Sriskantharajah, S.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic methane source strengths are particularly vulnerable to large changes with year-to year meteorological variations and with climatic change. A global increase in methane seen in 2007 (Dlugokencky et al., 2009) may have been in part be due to elevated wetland emissions caused by a warm, wet summer over large parts of Siberia. In 2010 wildfires over large areas of Russia will have added methane to the Arctic atmosphere. Carbon isotopic composition of methane in air from the Arctic arriving at a measurement station can be used to identify sources of the gas. Measurement of methane δ13C in air close to sources, including wetlands, permafrost, pine forest and submarine methane clathrate has extended the available data of source signatures of methane from northern sources. Keeling plot analysis of diurnal records from field campaigns in Arctic wetlands show that bulk wetland methane emissions are typically close to δ13CCH4 -69±1 ‰. Air samples from Zeppelin (Spitsbergen, Norway), Pallas (Finland) and Barra (Outer Hebrides, Scotland) have been regularly analysed for methane δ13C. Summer campaigns at Zeppelin point to a 13C depleted bulk Arctic source of dominantly biogenic origin, at -67‰. In spring, while the wetlands are still frozen, the source signature is more enriched, -53‰, with trajectory analysis implying a large contribution from onshore gas fields. Arctic methane emissions respond rapidly to warming with strong positive feedbacks. With rapid warming there is the potential to release large stores of carbon from permafrost and methane hydrates. Isotopic data are powerful discriminants of sources. High frequency, ideally continuous, monitoring of methane δ13C from a number of Arctic sites, onshore and offshore, coupled with back-trajectory analysis and regional modelling, will be important if future changes in Arctic source strengths are to be quantified. Reference: Dlugokencky, E. J., et al. (2009), Observational constraints on recent increases

  8. The integrated nitrous oxide and methane grassland project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrated nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) grassland project aims to estimate and explain emissions of these greenhouse gases from two ecosystems, namely drained agricultural peat soil under grass at the experimental farm Zegveld and undrained peat in the nature preserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, both Netherlands. Peat soils were chosen because of their expected considerable contribution to the greenhouse gas budget considering the prevailing wet and partial anaerobic conditions. The emission dynamics of these ecosystems are considered representatives of large peat areas because the underlying processes are rather general and driven by variables like organic matter characteristics, water and nutrient conditions and type of vegetation. The research approach comprises measurements and modelling at different integration levels relating to the microbiology of the production and consumption of N2O and CH4 (laboratory studies), their movement through peat soil (rhizolab and field studies), and the resulting fluxes (field studies). Typical emissions from drained soil were 15-40 kg ha-1 y-1 N2O and virtually zero for CH4. The undrained soil in the nature preserve emitted 100-280 kg ha-1 y-1 CH4, and probably little N2O. The process knowledge, collected and partly integrated in the models, helps to explain these data. For example, the low methane emission from drained peat can more coherently be understood and extrapolated because: (1) upper soil layers are aerobic, thus limiting methane production and stimulating methane oxidation, (2) absence of aerenchymatous roots of wetland plants that connect deeper anaerobic soil layers where methane is produced to the atmosphere and supply labile carbon, (3) a low methane production potential in deep layers due to the low decomposability of organic matter, and (4) long anaerobic periods needed in the topsoil to develop a methane production potential. This research is further developed in the EU-project GEFOS (Greenhouse gas

  9. Nitrogen oxides and methane treatment by non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, E.; Pacheco, M.; Colín, A.; Sánchez, V.; Pacheco, J.; Valdivia, R.; Soria, G.

    2015-03-01

    Non thermal plasma was used to treat nitrogen oxides (NOx) and methane (CH4), since they are important constituents of hydrocarbon combustion emissions processes and, both gases, play a key role in the formation of tropospheric ozone. These gases are involved in environmental problems like acid rain and some diseases such as bronchitis and pneumonia. In the case of methane is widely known its importance in the global climate change, and currently accounts for 30% of global warming. There is a growing concern for methane leaks, associated with a rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas extraction techniques as well as a large-scale methane release from Arctic because of ice melting and the subsequent methane production of decaying organic matter. Therefore, methane mitigation is a key to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. The research, here reported, deals about the generation of non-thermal plasma with a double dielectric barrier (2DBD) at atmospheric pressure with alternating current (AC) for NOx and CH4 treatment. The degradation efficiencies and their respective power consumption for different reactor configurations (cylindrical and planar) are also reported. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of gases degradation are reported before and after treatment with cold plasma. Experimental and theoretical results are compared obtaining good removal efficiencies, superior to 90% and to 20% respectively for NOx and CH4.

  10. Hypotheses for near-surface exchange of methane on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Renyu; Gao, Peter; Miller, Charles E; Yung, Yuk L

    2016-01-01

    The Curiosity rover recently detected a background of 0.7 ppb and spikes of 7 ppb of methane on Mars. This in situ measurement reorients our understanding of the Martian environment and its potential for life, as the current theories do not entail any geological source or sink of methane that varies sub-annually. In particular, the 10-fold elevation during the southern winter indicates episodic sources of methane that are yet to be discovered. Here we suggest a near-surface reservoir could explain this variability. Using the temperature and humidity measurements from the rover, we find that perchlorate salts in the regolith deliquesce to form liquid solutions, and deliquescence progresses to deeper subsurface in the season of the methane spikes. We therefore formulate the following three testable hypotheses. The first scenario is that the regolith in Gale Crater adsorbs methane when dry and releases this methane to the atmosphere upon deliquescence. The adsorption energy needs to be 36 kJ/mol to explain the m...

  11. Methane Production by Microbial Mats Under Low Sulfate Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.; Thamdrup, Bo; Albert, Dan; Carpenter, Steven P.; Hogan, Mary; Turk, Kendra; DesMarais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats collected in hypersaline salterns were incubated in a greenhouse under low sulfate concentrations ([SO4]) and examined for their primary productivity and emissions of methane and other major carbon species. Atmospheric greenhouse warming by gases such as carbon dioxide and methane must have been greater during the Archean than today in order to account for a record of moderate to warm paleoclemates, despite a less luminous early sun. It has been suggested that decreased levels of oxygen and sulfate in Archean oceans could have significantly stimulated microbial methanogenesis relative to present marine rates, with a resultant increase in the relative importance of methane in maintaining the early greenhouse. We maintained modern microbial mats, models of ancient coastal marine communities, in artificial brine mixtures containing both modern [SO4=] (ca. 70 mM) and "Archean" [SO4] (less than 0.2 mM). At low [SO4], primary production in the mats was essentially unaffected, while rates of sulfate reduction decreased by a factor of three, and methane fluxes increased by up to ten-fold. However, remineralization by methanogenesis still amounted to less than 0.4 % of the total carbon released by the mats. The relatively low efficiency of conversion of photosynthate to methane is suggested to reflect the particular geometry and chemical microenvironment of hypersaline cyanobacterial mats. Therefore, such mats w-ere probably relatively weak net sources of methane throughout their 3.5 Ga history, even during periods of low- environmental levels oxygen and sulfate.

  12. The development of solid methane neutron moderators at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source facility of Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, J. M.; Miller, M. E.; Scott, T. L.

    1999-03-10

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) started using solid methane moderators in 1985 because of their efficient conversion (about 3.5 times greater than was achieved with a liquid hydrogen moderator) of fast neutrons to long wavelength neutrons. However, the solid methane moderators experienced numerous failures due to pressure surges caused by a combination of (1) the release of stored energy, which occurred when methane radiolytic products recombined, and (2) the expansion of hydrogen, which built up in the solid methane during irradiation. During the ensuing years studies were made to determine how to operate the solid methane moderators without causing failure. The rate at which stored energy built up during irradiation and the temperature at which hydrogen was released during annealing were determined. Since 1993 IPNS has successfully operated the solid methane moderators (at about 30 K) by periodically annealing to the liquid state around 90 K after every roughly three days of irradiation.

  13. The development of solid methane neutron moderators at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source facility of Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) started using solid methane moderators in 1985 because of their efficient conversion (about 3.5 times greater than was achieved with a liquid hydrogen moderator) of fast neutrons to long wavelength neutrons. However, the solid methane moderators experienced numerous failures due to pressure surges caused by a combination of (1) the release of stored energy, which occurred when methane radiolytic products recombined, and (2) the expansion of hydrogen, which built up in the solid methane during irradiation. During the ensuing years studies were made to determine how to operate the solid methane moderators without causing failure. The rate at which stored energy built up during irradiation and the temperature at which hydrogen was released during annealing were determined. Since 1993 IPNS has successfully operated the solid methane moderators (at about 30 K) by periodically annealing to the liquid state around 90 K after every roughly three days of irradiation.

  14. Tectonically controlled methane escape in Lake Baikal

    OpenAIRE

    Klerkx, J.; De Batist, M.; J. Poort; Hus, R.; Van Rensbergen, P.; Khlystov, O.; Granin, N.

    2006-01-01

    Methane, which is at least partly stored in the bottom sediments of Lake Baikal as gas hydrates, is released on the lake floor in the deeper parts of the basin along major faults, forming venting structures similar to small mud volcanoes. The CH4 venting structures are considered to be the surface expression of escape pathways for excess CH4 generated by the dissociation of pre-existing hydrates. The existence of a local heat flow anomaly associated with the seep area is most likely due to a ...

  15. Evolution on qualities of leachate and landfill gas in the semi-aerobic landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qifei; YANG Yufei; PANG Xiangrui; WANG Qi

    2008-01-01

    To study the characteristics of stabilization in semi-aerobic landfill, large-scale simulated landfill was constructed based on the semi-aerobic landfill theory. Consequently, the concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and nitrite nitrogen, and the pH value in leachate, as well as the component contents of landfill gas composition (methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen) in landfill were regularly monitored for 52 weeks. The results showed that COD and ammonia concentrations declined rapidly and did not show the accumulating rule like anaerobic landfill, and remained at about 300 and 100 mg/L, respectively, after 48 weeks. Meanwhile, the descending rate reached 98.9% and 96.9%, respectively. Nitrate concentration increased rapidly after 24 weeks and fluctuated between 220-280 mg/L after 43 weeks. The pH values were below 7 during the first 8 weeks and after that leachates appeared to be alkaline. Carbon dioxide was the main composition in landfill gas and its concentration remained at a high level through the whole stabilization process. The average contents of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and methane varied between 19 vol.%-28 vol.%, 2 vol.%-8 vol.%, and 5 vol.%-13 vol.%, respectively. A relative equilibrium was reached after 48 weeks. The highest temperature in the landfill chamber could amount to 75.8 degrees centigrade.

  16. Metabolic characteristics of an aerobe isolated from a methylotrophic methanogenic enrichment culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stephen V Rapheal; K R Swaminathan; K Lalitha

    2003-03-01

    An anaerobic methylotrophic methanogenic enrichment culture, with sustained metabolic characteristics, including that of methanation for over a decade, was the choice of the present study on interspecies interactions. Growth and methanation by the enrichment were suppressed in the presence of antibiotics, and no methanogen grown on methanol could be isolated using stringent techniques. The present study confirmed syntrophic metabolic interactions in this enrichment with the isolation of a strain of Pseudomonas sp. The organism had characteristic metabolic versatility in metabolizing a variety of substrates including alcohols, aliphatic acids, amino acids, and sugars. Anaerobic growth was favoured with nitrate in the growth medium. Cells grown anaerobically with methanol, revealed maximal nitrate reductase activity. Constitutive oxidative activity of the membrane system emerged from the high-specific oxygen uptake and nitrate reductase activities of the aerobically and anerobically grown cells respectively. Cells grown anaerobically on various alcohols effectively oxidized methanol in the presence of flavins, cofactor FAD and the methanogenic cofactor F420, suggesting a constitutive alcohol oxidizing capacity. In cells grown anaerobically on methanol, the rate of methanol oxidation with F420 was three times that of FAD. Efficient utilization of alcohols in the presence of F420 is a novel feature of the present study. The results suggest that utilization of methanol by the mixed culture would involve metabolic interactions between the Pseudomonas sp. and the methanogen(s). Methylotrophic, methanogenic partnership involving an aerobe is a novel feature hitherto unreported among anaerobic syntrophic associations and is of ecological significance.

  17. Large-scale simulation of methane dissociation along the West Spitzbergen Margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.

    2009-07-15

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope west of Spitsbergen could be an indication of this process, if the source of the methane can be confidently attributed to dissociating hydrates. In the first large-scale simulation study of its kind, we simulate shallow hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the West Spitsbergen margin to test the hypothesis that the observed gas release originated from hydrates. The simulation results are consistent with this hypothesis, and are in remarkable agreement with the recently published observations. They show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, when subjected to temperature increases at the seafloor, can release significant quantities of methane, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the top of the GHSZ. These results indicate the possibility that hydrate dissociation and methane release may be both a consequence and a cause of climate change.

  18. Project identification for methane reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  19. A new tracer experiment to estimate the methane emissions from a dairy cow shed using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)

    OpenAIRE

    Marik, Thomas; Levin, Ingeborg

    1996-01-01

    Methane emissions from livestock and agricultural wastes contribute globally more than 30% to the anthropogenic atmospheric methane source. Estimates of this number have been derived from respiration chamber experiments. We determined methane emission rates from a tracer experiment in a modern cow shed hosting 43 dairy cows in their accustomed environment. During a 24-hour period the concentrations of CH4, CO2, and SF6, a trace gas which has been released at a constant rate into the stable ai...

  20. Methanation: reality or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses whether it is possible to partly replace oil and natural gas by electricity-based gas, i.e. to produce methane from water by electrolysis, or by using molecule cracking in dedicated nuclear reactors, and carbon dioxide. He outlines the benefits of this perspective in terms of reduction of imports, and of national electricity production optimisation. He also discusses the drawbacks: it will be difficult to produce the huge required quantity of CO2; it will be even more difficult to produce the required quantity of electricity; the e-methane production cost is much higher than that of the currently imported natural gas. In appendix, the author discusses some key figures related to energy in France (consumption, shares, imports, crucial role of nuclear energy for the future)

  1. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  2. Oxidation and Assimilation of Atmospheric Methane by Soil Methane Oxidizers

    OpenAIRE

    Roslev, P.; Iversen, N.; Henriksen, K.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolism of atmospheric methane in a forest soil was studied by radiotracer techniques. Maximum (sup14)CH(inf4) oxidation (163.5 pmol of C cm(sup-3) h(sup-1)) and (sup14)C assimilation (50.3 pmol of C cm(sup-3) h(sup-1)) occurred at the A(inf2) horizon located 15 to 18 cm below the soil surface. At this depth, 31 to 43% of the atmospheric methane oxidized was assimilated into microbial biomass; the remaining methane was recovered as (sup14)CO(inf2). Methane-derived carbon was incorporat...

  3. Coal mine methane management, Nord‐Pas‐de‐Calais (France)

    OpenAIRE

    Défossez, Pierrick; Lemal, Sandrine; Schumacher, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    A coal mine, once closed, still "lives". Coal beds release methane, which is then trapped in the mine voids by water rising as a result of natural flooding. The consequence is a rise of pressure (a well‐known phenomenon in every coalfield) which may be dangerous, because gas can migrate directly to the surface. Controlling mine gas risk is essential for safety reasons, due to methane's highly flammable nature. A control methodology was developed by the original operator and starting on this b...

  4. Differentiation of pre-existing trapped methane from thermogenic methane in an igneous-intruded coal by hydrous pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Robert F.; Lewan, Michael D.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Kotarba, Maciej J.

    2014-01-01

    So as to better understand how the gas generation potential of coal changes with increasing rank, same-seam samples of bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin that were naturally matured to varying degrees by the intrusion of an igneous dike were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis (HP) conditions of 360 °C for 72 h. The accumulated methane in the reactor headspace was analyzed for δ13C and δ2H, and mol percent composition. Maximum methane production (9.7 mg/g TOC) occurred in the most immature samples (0.5 %Ro), waning to minimal methane values at 2.44 %Ro (0.67 mg/g TOC), and rebounding to 3.6 mg/g TOC methane in the most mature sample (6.76 %Ro). Methane from coal with the highest initial thermal maturity (6.76 %Ro) shows no isotopic dependence on the reactor water and has a microbial δ13C value of −61‰. However, methane from coal of minimal initial thermal maturity (0.5 %Ro) shows hydrogen isotopic dependence on the reaction water and has a δ13C value of −37‰. The gas released from coals under hydrous pyrolysis conditions represents a quantifiable mixture of ancient (270 Ma) methane (likely microbial) that was generated in situ and trapped within the rock during the rapid heating by the dike, and modern (laboratory) thermogenic methane that was generated from the indigenous organic matter due to thermal maturation induced by hydrous pyrolysis conditions. These findings provide an analytical framework for better assessment of natural gas sources and for differentiating generated gas from pre-existing trapped gas in coals of various ranks.

  5. On Aerobic Exercise and Behavioral and Neural Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Peplinski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic exercise promotes rapid and profound alterations in the brain. Depending upon the pattern and duration of exercise, these changes in the brain may extend beyond traditional motor areas to regions and structures normally linked to learning, cognition, and emotion. Exercise-induced alterations may include changes in blood flow, hormone and growth factor release, receptor expression, angiogenesis, apoptosis, neurogenesis, and synaptogenesis. Together, we believe that these changes underlie elevations of mood and prompt the heightened behavioral plasticity commonly observed following adoption of a chronic exercise regimen. In the following paper, we will explore both the psychological and psychobiological literatures relating to exercise effects on brain in both human and non-human animals and will attempt to link plastic changes in these neural structures to modifications in learned behavior and emotional expression. In addition, we will explore the therapeutic potential of exercise given recent reports that aerobic exercise may serve as a neuroprotectant and can also slow cognitive decline during normal and pathological aging.

  6. Tropospheric impact of methane emissions from clathrates in the Arctic Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bhattacharyya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A highly potent greenhouse gas, methane, is locked in the solid phase as ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas (mostly methane called clathrates in both ocean sediments and underneath permafrost regions. Clathrates are stable under high pressures and low temperatures. In a warming climate, increases in ocean temperatures could lead to dissociation of the clathrates and release methane into the ocean and subsequently the atmosphere. This is of particular importance in the shallow parts of the Arctic Ocean, since clathrates are expected to start outgassing abruptly at depths of around 300 m. In this paper, we present a comparison of simulations from the Community Earth System Model (CESM1 for present-day conditions with and without additional methane emissions from a plausible clathrate release scenario based on a state-of-the-art ocean sediment model. The CESM model includes a fully interactive physical ocean and we added a fast atmospheric chemistry mechanism that represents methane as a fully interactive tracer (with emissions rather than concentration boundary conditions along with the main chemical reactions for methane, ozone, and nitrous oxide. The results show that such Arctic clathrate emissions increase methane concentrations non-uniformly, and that increases in surface ozone concentrations are greatest in polluted regions. We also find that the interannual variability in surface methane and ozone increases.

  7. Methane Activation by Heterogeneous Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, R.; Schlögl, R.

    2015-01-01

    Methane activation by heterogeneous catalysis will play a key role to secure the supply of energy, chemicals and fuels in the future. Methane is the main constituent of natural gas and biogas and it is also found in crystalline hydrates at the continental slopes of many oceans and in permafrost areas. In view of this vast reserves and resources, the use of methane as chemical feedstock has to be intensified. The present review presents recent results and developments in heterogeneous catalyti...

  8. Methanogens, Methane and Gastrointestinal Motility

    OpenAIRE

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Chang, Christopher; Pimentel, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic fermentation of the undigested polysaccharide fraction of carbohydrates produces hydrogen in the intestine which is the substrate for methane production by intestinal methanogens. Hydrogen and methane are excreted in the flatus and in breath giving the opportunity to indirectly measure their production using breath testing. Although methane is detected in 30%-50% of the healthy adult population worldwide, its production has been epidemiologically and clinically associated with const...

  9. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  10. Long-term ocean oxygen depletion caused by decomposition of submarine methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akitomo; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro; Oka, Akira; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako

    2014-05-01

    Ocean oxygen depletion associated with global warming significantly affects macrofauna and ocean biogeochemical cycles over thousands of years. Methane released from the decomposition of submarine methane hydrates accelerates oxygen depletion via oxidation in seawater; however, the global impact of this process is yet to be quantitatively investigated. We have projected the potential impact of oxygen depletion due to methane hydrate decomposition via numerical modeling. We find that the global methane hydrate inventory decreases by approximately 70% under four times CO2 concentration and is accompanied by significant global oxygen depletion on a timescale of thousands of years. In particular, we demonstrate the great expansion of suboxic and hypoxic regions, having adverse impact on marine organisms and ocean biogeochemical cycles. The expansion induced by methane release is half (same) of that induced by oxygen solubility decrease due to seawater warming, under the condition that half (all) the methane decomposed into free gas is released from the seafloor to the ocean. This is because methane hydrate decomposition primarily occurs in the Pacific Ocean, where present-day seawater has low oxygen concentration. Consequently, severe oxygen depletion occurs in this region, particularly in so-called oxygen minimum zones. Besides the decrease in oxygen solubility and reduced ventilation associated with global warming, the process described in this study is also important in oxygen depletion.

  11. Methanization of industrial liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a first part, this work deals with the theoretical aspects of the methanization of the industrial effluents; the associated reactional processes are detailed. The second part presents the technological criteria for choosing the methanization process in terms of the characteristics of the effluent to be treated. Some of the methanization processes are presented with their respective advantages and disadvantages. At last, is described the implementation of an industrial methanization unit. The size and the main choices are detailed: the anaerobic reactor, the control, the valorization aspects of the biogas produced. Some examples of industrial developments illustrate the different used options. (O.M.)

  12. On methane pyrolysis special applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toncu, D. C.; Toncu, G.; Soleimani, S.

    2015-11-01

    Methane pyrolysis represents one of the most important processes in industrial use, with applications rising from the chemical and petrochemical industry, combustion, materials and protective coatings. Despite the intense research, experimental data lack kinetic aspects, and the thermodynamics involved often leads to inaccurate results when applied to various systems. Carrying out a comparative analysis of several available data on methane pyrolysis, the paper aims to study the phenomenon of methane pyrolysis under different environments (combustion and plasma), concluding on the most possible reaction pathways involved in many of its applications. Computer simulation using different database underlines the conclusion, helping to the understanding of methane pyrolysis importance in future technologies.

  13. Methane flux from wetlands areas

    OpenAIRE

    BAKER-BLOCKER, ANITA; Donahue, Thomas M.; MANCY, KHALIL H.

    2011-01-01

    Ebullient gases from Michigan wetlands have been collected and analyzed to deduce in situ methane fluxes. Methane flux has been found to be a function of mean air temperature. This relationship has been utilized to extrapolate observed methane fluxes to estimates of fluxes from the Pripet marshes, Sudd, Everglades, and Ugandan swamps. These four wetlands together provide a yearly source of 6.8 × 1013 g of methane to the atmosphere.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1977.tb00731.x

  14. Estimation of methane emissions from a wastewater treatment plant in Valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ars, Sébastien; Yver Kwok, Camille; Bousquet, Philippe; Broquet, Grégoire; Ciais, Philippe; Wu, Lin

    2014-05-01

    Methane is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas emitted; its 20 year global-warming potential is about 56 to 72 depending on authors. One of its sources is the treatment of wastewaters and more particularly anaerobic digestion processes and sludge treatment. To reduce methane emissions from wastewater treatment plants, it is necessary to precisely quantify the amount emitted globally by the plant but also for each step of the process. Fixing the potential leaks and collecting the methane emitted by the different processes allows to reduce methane emissions and costs as methane can be sold or used on-site as an energy source. Moreover improve methods to estimate flow from atmospheric measurements of methane will reduce uncertainties in the inversion models. Several measurement campaigns have been realized in the wastewater treatment plant of Valence, France. This plant treats up to 2800 m3/h of polluted water through a biological treatment. To quantify methane emissions from this wastewater treatment plant, a dual tracer method had been used. It consists in releasing acetylene collocated with the methane source and in measuring both concentrations in the emitted plumes. In parallel, an atmospheric local scale model was used to compare with the experimental results. The higher concentration of methane's emissions was observed around the wastewater arrival. Plant's emissions are in the same range as estimations from the CITEPA French inventory. Measurements during the campaign are well correlated with the model results.

  15. [Effect of moisture content on anaerobic methanization of municipal solid waste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xian; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Bouchez, Théodore

    2009-03-15

    Biogas production, gas and liquid characteristics were investigated for comparing the effect of moisture content on methanization process of MSW with different compositions of food waste and cellulosic waste. Batch reactors were used to study the anaerobic methanization of typical Chinese and French municipal solid waste (MSW) and cellulosic waste with different moisture content, as 35%, field capacity (65%-70%), 80%, and saturated state (> 95%). The results showed that for the typical Chinese and French waste, which contained putrescible waste, the intermediate product, VFA, was diluted by high content of water, which helped to release the VFA inhibition on hydrolysis and methanization. Mass amount of methane was produced only when the moisture content of typical French waste was higher than 80%, while higher content of moisture was needed when the content of putrescible waste was higher in MSW, as > 95% for typical Chinese waste. Meanwhile the methane production rate and the ultimate cumulated methane production were increased when moisture content was leveled up. The ultimate cumulated methane production of the typical French waste with saturated state was 0.6 times higher than that of the waste with moisture content of 80%. For cellulosic waste, high moisture content of cellulosic materials contributed to increase the attachment area of microbes and enzyme on the surface of the materials, which enhance the waste hydrolysis and methanization. When the moisture content of the cellulosic materials increased from field capacity (65%) to saturated state (> 95%), the ultimate cumulated methane production increased for 3.8 times. PMID:19432351

  16. Effect of sludge age on methanogenic and glycogen accumulating organisms in an aerobic granular sludge process fed with methanol and acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Pronk, M; Abbas, B.; Kleerebezem, R.; M. C. M. van Loosdrecht

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sludge age on granular sludge formation and microbial population dynamics in a methanol- and acetate-fed aerobic granular sludge system operated at 35°C was investigated. During anaerobic feeding of the reactor, methanol was initially converted to methane by methylotrophic methanogens. These methanogens were able to withstand the relatively long aeration periods. Lowering the anaerobic solid retention time (SRT) from 17 to 8 days enabled selective removal of the methanogens a...

  17. Plasma cell‐free mitochondrial DNA declines in response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Shockett, Penny E.; Khanal, Januka; Sitaula, Alina; Oglesby, Christopher; Meachum, William A.; Castracane, V. Daniel; Kraemer, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increased plasma cell‐free mitochondrial DNA (cf‐mDNA), a damage‐associated molecular pattern (DAMP) produced by cellular injury, contributes to neutrophil activation/inflammation in trauma patients and arises in cancer and autoimmunity. To further understand relationships between cf‐mDNA released by tissue injury, inflammation, and health benefits of exercise, we examined cf‐mDNA response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise. Seven healthy moderately trained young men (age = 22.4 ...

  18. [Anaerobic-aerobic infection in acute appendicitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamchich, V I; Ulitovskiĭ, I V; Savich, E I; Znamenskiĭ, V A; Beliaeva, O A

    1998-01-01

    362 patients with acute appendicitis (AA) were examined. For microbiological diagnosis of aerobic and anaerobic nonclostridial microflora we used complex accelerated methods (including evaluation of gram-negative microorganisms in comparison with tinctorial-fermentative method of differential staining according to oxygen sensitivity of catalasopositive together with aerobic and cathalasonegative anaerobic microorganisms) as well as complete bacteriologic examination with determination of sensitivity of the above microorganism to antimicrobial remedies. High rate of aerobic-anaerobic microbial associations and substantial identity of microflora from appendicis and exudate from abdominal cavity was revealed, which evidenced the leading role of endogenous microorganisms in etiology and pathogenesis of AA and peritonitis i. e. autoinfection. In patients with destructive forms of AA, complicated by peritonitis it is recommended to use the accelerated method of examination of pathologic material as well as the complete scheme of examination with the identification of the isolated microorganisms and the correction of antibiotic treatment. PMID:9511291

  19. Mechanism of Kenaf Retting Using Aerobes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢士森; 陈季华; 黄秀宝

    2001-01-01

    The experimental results showed that the duration of microbial retting processing of kenaf fibers by using aerobic microbe was four times shorter than that by using anaerobic microbe. The residual gum percentage,breaking strength, breaking elongation and linear density of aerobic retted kenaf bundle fibers did not show significantly difference with that of anaerobic retted kenaf bundle fibers by ANOVA-Tukey's studentized test at a = 5% except for the softness. The bioenergetic principle and the calculation of the amount of ATP produced during the decomposition processing of kenaf gums were used to explain why the retting duration in the case of using aerobic microbes was much shorter than that of using anaerobic microbes.

  20. Enhancing Cognitive Training Through Aerobic Exercise After a First Schizophrenia Episode: Theoretical Conception and Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuechterlein, Keith H; Ventura, Joseph; McEwen, Sarah C; Gretchen-Doorly, Denise; Vinogradov, Sophia; Subotnik, Kenneth L

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive training (CT) and aerobic exercise have separately shown promise for improving cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Aerobic exercise releases brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which promotes synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Thus, aerobic exercise provides a neurotrophic platform for neuroplasticity-based CT. The combination of aerobic exercise and CT may yield more robust effects than CT alone, particularly in the initial course of schizophrenia. In a pilot study, 7 patients with a recent onset of schizophrenia were assigned to Cognitive Training & Exercise (CT&E) and 9 to CT alone for a 10-week period. Posit Science programs were used for CT. Neurocognitive training focused on tuning neural circuits related to perceptual processing and verbal learning and memory. Social cognitive training used the same learning principles with social and affective stimuli. Both groups participated in these training sessions 2d/wk, 2h/d. The CT&E group also participated in an aerobic conditioning program for 30 minutes at our clinic 2d/wk and at home 2d/wk. The effect size for improvement in the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery Overall Composite score for CT&E patients relative to CT patients was large. Functional outcome, particularly independent living skills, also tended to improve more in the CT&E than in the CT group. Muscular endurance, cardiovascular fitness, and diastolic blood pressure also showed relative improvement in the CT&E compared to the CT group. These encouraging pilot study findings support the promise of combining CT and aerobic exercise to improve the early course of schizophrenia. PMID:27460618

  1. Opportunities to reduce methane emissions in the natural gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowgill, R.M. [Radian Corporation, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) cofunded a project to quantify methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry. Methane, the major constituent of natural gas, is a potent greenhouse gas that is believed to increase the effect of global warming when released to the atmosphere. Reducing emissions from natural gas systems would lessen the greenhouse gas effect attributable to atmospheric CH{sub 4}. Further, mitigation methods to reduce emissions of natural gas, a marketable resource, could save money and increase energy efficiency. This presentation summarizes the major sources and quantity of methane being emitted to the atmosphere for all segments of the U.S. gas industry: production; processing; storage; transmission; and distribution. A description of how those emissions were determined is included here, as well as a discussion of which sources are potential candidates for reducing emissions. (author)

  2. Methane from wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  3. Making methane visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, Magnus; Olofsson, Göran; Crill, Patrick; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, and an important energy carrier in biogas and natural gas. Its large-scale emission patterns have been unpredictable and the source and sink distributions are poorly constrained. Remote assessment of CH4 with high sensitivity at a m2 spatial resolution would allow detailed mapping of the near-ground distribution and anthropogenic sources in landscapes but has hitherto not been possible. Here we show that CH4 gradients can be imaged on the sink attribution and scaling issues.

  4. Methanogenesis and methane genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the pathways leading to methane biosynthesis is presented. The steps investigated to date by gene cloning and DNA sequencing procedures are identified and discussed. The primary structures of component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase encoded by mcr operons in different methanogens are compared. Experiments to detect the primary structure of the genes encoding F420 reducing hydrogenase (frhABG) and methyl hydrogen reducing hydrogenase (mvhDGA) in methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain H are compared with each other and with eubacterial hydrogenase encoding genes. A biotechnological use for hydrogenases from hypermorphillic archaebacteria is suggested. (author)

  5. Effect of sludge age on methanogenic and glycogen accumulating organisms in an aerobic granular sludge process fed with methanol and acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, M; Abbas, B; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-09-01

    The influence of sludge age on granular sludge formation and microbial population dynamics in a methanol- and acetate-fed aerobic granular sludge system operated at 35°C was investigated. During anaerobic feeding of the reactor, methanol was initially converted to methane by methylotrophic methanogens. These methanogens were able to withstand the relatively long aeration periods. Lowering the anaerobic solid retention time (SRT) from 17 to 8 days enabled selective removal of the methanogens and prevented unwanted methane formation. In absence of methanogens, methanol was converted aerobically, while granule formation remained stable. At high SRT values (51 days), γ-Proteobacteria were responsible for acetate removal through anaerobic uptake and subsequent aerobic growth on storage polymers formed [so called metabolism of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO)]. When lowering the SRT (24 days), Defluviicoccus-related organisms (cluster II) belonging to the α-Proteobacteria outcompeted acetate consuming γ-Proteobacteria at 35°C. DNA from the Defluviicoccus-related organisms in cluster II was not extracted by the standard DNA extraction method but with liquid nitrogen, which showed to be more effective. Remarkably, the two GAO types of organisms grew separately in two clearly different types of granules. This work further highlights the potential of aerobic granular sludge systems to effectively influence the microbial communities through sludge age control in order to optimize the wastewater treatment processes. PMID:26059251

  6. Efficiency of the benthic filter: Biological control of the emission of dissolved methane from sediments containing shallow gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Pfannkuche, O.; Linke, P.; Luff, R.; Greinert, J.; Drews, M.; Gubsch, S.; Pieper, M.; Poser, M.; Viergutz, T.

    2006-06-01

    In marine sedimentary environments, microbial methanotrophy represents an important sink for methane before it leaves the seafloor and enters the water column. Using benthic observatories in conjunction with numerical modeling of pore water gradients, we investigated seabed methane emission rates at cold seep sites with underlying gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin. Measurements were conducted at three characteristic sites which have variable fluid flow and sulfide flux and sustain distinct chemosynthetic communities. In sediments covered with microbial mats of Beggiatoa, seabed methane efflux ranges from 1.9 to 11.5 mmol m-2 d-1. At these sites of relatively high advective flow, total oxygen uptake was very fast, yielding rates of up to 53.4 mmol m-2 d-1. In sediments populated by colonies with clams of the genus Calyptogena and characterized by low advective flow, seabed methane emission was 0.6 mmol m-2 d-1, whereas average total oxygen uptake amounted to only 3.7 mmol m-2 d-1. The efficiency of methane consumption at microbial mat and clam field sites was 66 and 83%, respectively. Our measurements indicate a high potential capacity of aerobic methane oxidation in the benthic boundary layer. This layer potentially restrains seabed methane emission when anaerobic methane oxidation in the sediment becomes saturated or when methane is bypassing the sediment matrix along fractures and channels.

  7. Instruments for Methane Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Sibu Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives the explanation of different instruments for detecting methane gas in detail. This paper discusses their working principles. Methane gas detection is essentially required in the areas like in coal mines, power plant, Waste Water Treatment, Boiler Rooms etc. This paper also discusses their roles in various applications.

  8. Instruments for Methane Gas Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Sibu Thomas; Ms. Nishi Shahnaj Haider

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives the explanation of different instruments for detecting methane gas in detail. This paper discusses their working principles. Methane gas detection is essentially required in the areas like in coal mines, power plant, Waste Water Treatment, Boiler Rooms etc. This paper also discusses their roles in various applications.

  9. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  10. A pelletized solid methane moderator for a medium-to-high power neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid methane has been an elusive neutron moderator medium for some years. Good physics has been done using frozen blocks of methane and innovative ways have been found to compensate for its low thermal conductivity. Annealing techniques have been evolved to release chemical energy by polymerization, but the use of solid methane remains limited to low power applications. This paper describes a possible way of using solid methane for very much higher energy applications. It presents some ideas on how mobile solid methane in the form of pellets might be employed. Initial feasibility calculations are included along with a possible configuration for a practical moderator. Well-developed techniques, like those used in fusion reactor systems have been explored for the production of pellets. (author) 3 figs., 4 tabs., 8 refs

  11. A water column study of methane around gas flares located at the West Spitsbergen continental margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentz, Torben; Damm, Ellen; von Deimling, Jens Schneider;

    2014-01-01

    ebullition of methane into the water column at more than 250 sites in an area of 665 km2. We conducted a detailed study of a subregion of this area, which covers an active gas ebullition area of 175 km2 characterized by 10 gas flares reaching from the seafloor at ∼245 m up to 50 m water depth to identify the...... fate of the released gas due to dissolution of methane from gas bubbles and subsequent mixing, transport and microbial oxidation. The oceanographic data indicated a salinity-controlled pycnocline situated ∼20 m above the seafloor. A high resolution sampling program at the pycnocline at the active gas...... ebullition flare area revealed that the methane concentration gradient is strongly controlled by the pycnocline. While high methane concentrations of up to 524 nmol L1 were measured below the pycnocline, low methane concentrations of less than 20 nmol L1 were observed in the water column above. Variations in...

  12. Methanation of carbon oxides. History, status quo and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltner, W.; Rakoczy, R.A. [Clariant SE, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    With increasing demand in fossil sources and especially crude oil based energy carrier, proven reserves will be diminishing. Besides alternative and sustainable sources the conversion of coal into fuels which can be distributed within the existing infrastructure becomes extremely important in areas of fast growing energy demand. Driver for these technologies is mostly the lack of crude oil and availability of coal like in China or South Africa. The most common way to convert coal into chemicals and fuels is the gasification to yield a gas mixture known as synthesis gas. Synthesis gas can be converted in highly pure methane used as 'substitute natural gas' (SNG) in gas grids of major cities to produce heat at home and industry. All available SNG technologies are characterized by the difficulty to control the extreme heat release of the methanation reaction. This presentation will give an overview on available gasification and methanation technologies from recent point of view. A lot of processes are already described in literature and there are pilot and real plants for methanation and especially SNG built. Moreover, a new process to produce methane from synthesis gas without the need of recycle streams and high temperatures will be introduced. This novel process developed by Foster Wheeler - using catalysts from Clariant - is called 'VESTA Process' in accordance with the Roman goddess of hearth and fire. (orig.)

  13. Three stages MBR (methanogenic, aerobic biofilm and membrane filtration) for the treatment of low-strength wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntner, D; Sánchez Sánchez, A; Garrido, J M

    2011-01-01

    The use of a new three stages MBR process with a first methanogenic UASB stage, a second stage with aerobic biofilm growing on small carrier elements maintained in suspension and third stage with membrane filtration module is presented. The objective of the first methanogenic chamber is to diminish COD of the raw wastewater, producing a biogas rich in methane, and decrease the sludge production. In the second stage, the remaining soluble biodegradable COD is oxidized by heterotrophs. In the third stage, the membrane modules could be operated at higher fluxes than those reported for AnMBR systems, and similar to those obtained in aerobic MBRs. In this sense, the concept of these three stages MBR is to join the advantages of the methanogenic and aerobic membrane bioreactor processes, by reducing energy requirements for aeration, producing biogas with high methane percentage and a permeate with very low COD content. A synthetic wastewater was fed to the three stages MBR. COD in the influent was between 200 and 1,200 mg/L, ammonium ranged from 10 to 35 mg/L and phosphorous concentration was 8 mg/L. OLR in-between 1 and 3 kg COD/(m3 d) and a HRT of 13-21 h were applied. Temperature was between 17.5 and 23.2 degrees C. During the whole operating period the COD removal efficiencies were in the range of 90 and 96% of which in between 40 and 80% was removed in the first methanogenic chamber. Biogas production with methane content between 75 and 80% was observed. With regard to membrane operation, average permeabilities around 150 L/(m2 h bar) were achieved, operating with fluxes of 11-15 L/(m2 h). PMID:22097013

  14. THE RATE AND NATURE OF WOMEN INJURIES IN STEP AEROBICS

    OpenAIRE

    Gholam Ali Ghasemi; Vahid Zolaktaf; Fereshteh Kazemi

    2011-01-01

    Step aerobics is a form of aerobic exercise that utilizes a 90×45×20 centimeter platform. ItsInternational competitions are held annually. This sport is popular in Iranian specialist femalesport clubs and its national competitions are growing gradually. The purpose of this survey wasto determine the rate and nature of sport injury in Iranian athletes of step aerobics. Weadministered a structured interview using a modified version of standard questionnaire of"Aerobics Pathology". The populatio...

  15. Methane emissions from vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, E K; Jensen, T E; Wallington, T J

    2004-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas emitted by vehicles. We report results of a laboratory study of methane emissions using a standard driving cycle for 30 different cars and trucks (1995-1999 model years) from four different manufacturers. We recommend the use of an average emission factor for the U.S. on-road vehicle fleet of (g of CH/g of CO2) = (15 +/- 4) x 10(-5) and estimate that the global vehicle fleet emits 0.45 +/- 0.12 Tg of CH4 yr(-1) (0.34 +/- 0.09 Tg of C yr(-1)), which represents effects of vehicle aging, cold start, and hot running emissions. The contribution of CH4 emissions from vehicles to radiative forcing of climate change is 0.3-0.4% of that of CO2 emissions from vehicles. The environmental impact of CH4 emissions from vehicles is negligible and is likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. PMID:15112800

  16. Meal induced gut hormone secretion is altered in aerobically trained compared to sedentary young healthy males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Michael Taulo; Taudorf, Lærke; Hartmann, Bolette;

    2013-01-01

    Postprandial insulin release is lower in healthy aerobically trained (T) compared to untrained (UT) individuals. This may be mediated by a lower release of the two incretin hormones [glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP)] in T. The aim of this study...... h after a 200 ml liquid meal (1,260 kJ and 27, 41 and 32 energy % as protein, carbohydrates and fat, respectively) in ten T and ten UT young, healthy male subjects. The insulin and GIP responses were markedly lower in T than UT and correlated during the first 30 min after the liquid meal. Baseline...

  17. Delineation of the sources and sinks of heterogeneously distributed methane in the Pearl River and its estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Xie, W.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2013-12-01

    Methane in low temperature environments is mostly produced by methanogens. Sharp decrease in methane concentration has been observed from freshwater to marine water in coastal regions. The goal of this study was to delineate the sources and sinks of methane from the lower Pearl River (including, North, West, and East segments) and its estuary along a salinity gradient (0.0 % to 3.4%). Methane concentration in lower Pearl River ranged from 50.1 to 10578 nmol L-1 in the winter (average = 565.5 × 1464.9 nmol L-1) and from 38.4 to 974.1 nmol L-1 in the summer (average = 179.6 × 165.7 nmol L-1). In the estuary, however, methane concentration was 5-10 folds lower in winter and 3-8 folds lower in summer. The sea-to-air methane flux was also much higher in the fresh water (3159.6 umol/d.m2) than in the estuary (528.1 umol/d.m2). Abnormally high methane concentrations and methane flux in the East Pearl River appear to be associated with effluents of industrial or municipal wastes. DNA sequencing of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene indicates predominance of methanogens in the freshwater and their disappearance in the estuary. This is supported by the archaeal lipoid analysis, which showed the predominance of archaeol and caldarchaeol that characterize the methanogens. It is unknown, however, how aerobic (bacteria) and anerobic (archaea) methanotrophs may be involved in the oxidation of methane in the estuary environment where methane consumption is apparently occurring.

  18. Transformation of deep-water methane bubbles into hydrate

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Alexander V; Rozhkov, Aleksey N

    2013-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the mechanics of the methane bubbles in the gas hydrate stability zone of the basin. Transformation of deep-water methane bubbles into solid hydrate was investigated in Lake Baikal in situ. Released from the bottom methane bubbles were caught by different traps with transparent walls. It was observed that when bubbles entered into internal space of the trap, the bubbles could be transformed into two different solid hydrate structures depending on ambient conditions. The first structure is hydrate granular matter consisted of solid fragments with sizes of order of 1 mm. The second structure is high porous solid foam consisted of solid bubbles with sizes of order of 5 mm. The formed granular matter did not change during trap lifting up to top border of gas hydrate stability zone, whereas free methane intensively released from solid foam sample during it lifting. It was concluded that the decrease of the depth of bubble sampling and the decrease of the bubble flux rate assist to formati...

  19. Dynamics of the methane profile through the water column of meromictic Fayetteville Green Lake, N.Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, B. E.; Havig, J. R.; Sowers, T. A.; Hamilton, T. L.; McCormick, M.; Kump, L. R.

    2013-12-01

    Green Lake in Fayetteville, N.Y. is a meromictic lake with a chemocline approximately 21 meters below the surface where redox chemistry shifts from micro-aerobic to euxinic, and a purple- and green- sulfur bacterial plate is a predominant feature. Historic data, mirrored by our recent (November 2012) high-resolution sampling and analysis, document a monimolimnion methane concentration profile that increases nearly linearly with depth to the bottom sediments. Gas chromatography (GC) and Flame Ionization Detection (FID) analyses reveal concentrations exceeding20 μM CH4 at 30 cm depth in the sediments, lower concentrations ranging from ~5 μM CH4 at 44 m to 1.5 μM CH4 at 21.75 m in the water column, and decreased concentrations with an average of 0.12 μM CH4 from 21 m through the chemocline and the oxic zone, demonstrating a diffusive trend from sediments to the chemocline. However, our findings exhibit a departure from linearity from 21-30 meters in which methane concentrations were higher than expected if the sediments were the sole source of methane. We incubated biomass collected from 24 m (June 2013) to examine the source of this unexpected ';hump' in methane concentrations in the water column. To date, no methane production has been observed. Isotopic analysis for δ 13C in CH4 of seven water samples collected from depths above, below and in the methane ';hump' indicate that methane present in the water column is biogenic. Furthermore, the δ 13C values observed, approximately -100‰, indicate biologically- mediated cycling of methane. δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) indicate input of oxidized methane. These findings suggest that two sources of methane with similar isotopic compositions exist, one diffusing from lake-bottom sediments and the other laterally injected from seeps at or near the chemocline, with consumption near the base of the chemocline. Coupled geochemical analyses show that sulfide and ammonia exhibit a similar concentration

  20. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L-1 concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn’t show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic

  1. Glycogen metabolism in aerobic mixed cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dircks, Klaus; Beun, J.J.; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.;

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the metabolism of glycogen storage and consumption in mixed cultures under aerobic conditions is described. The experimental results are used to calibrate a metabolic model, which as sole stoichiometric variables has the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation (delta) and maintenan...

  2. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulpa, C.F. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  3. Hydroxylation of methane through component interactions in soluble methane monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydroxylation through methane monooxygenases (MMOs) is a key aspect due to their control of the carbon cycle in the ecology system and recent applications of methane gas in the field of bioenergy and bioremediation. Methanotropic bacteria perform a specific microbial conversion from methane, one of the most stable carbon compounds, to methanol through elaborate mechanisms. MMOs express particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in most strains and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) under copper-limited conditions. The mechanisms of MMO have been widely studied from sMMO belonging to the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. This enzyme has diiron active sites where different types of hydrocarbons are oxidized through orchestrated hydroxylase, regulatory and reductase components for precise control of hydrocarbons, oxygen, protons, and electrons. Recent advances in biophysical studies, including structural and enzymatic achievements for sMMO, have explained component interactions, substrate pathways, and intermediates of sMMO. In this account, oxidation of methane in sMMO is discussed with recent progress that is critical for understanding the microbial applications of C-H activation in one-carbon substrates. PMID:27033202

  4. Quantifying Urban Natural Gas Leaks from Street-level Methane Mapping: Measurements and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fischer, J. C.; Ham, J. M.; Griebenow, C.; Schumacher, R. S.; Salo, J.

    2013-12-01

    Leaks from the natural gas pipeline system are a significant source of anthropogenic methane in urban settings. Detecting and repairing these leaks will reduce the energy and carbon footprints of our cities. Gas leaks can be detected from spikes in street-level methane concentrations measured by analyzers deployed on vehicles. While a spike in methane concentration indicates a leak, an algorithm (e.g., inverse model) must be used to estimate the size of the leak (i.e., flux) from concentration data and supporting meteorological information. Unfortunately, this drive-by approach to leak quantification is confounded by the complexity of urban roughness, changing weather conditions, and other incidental factors (e.g., traffic, vehicle speed, etc.). Furthermore, the vehicle might only pass through the plume one to three times during routine mapping. The objective of this study was to conduct controlled release experiments to better quantify the relationship between mobile methane concentration measurements and the size and location of the emission source (e.g., pipeline leakage) in an urban environment. A portable system was developed that could release methane at known rates between 10 and 40 LPM while maintaining concentrations below the lower explosive limit. A mapping vehicle was configured with fast response methane analyzers, GPS, and meteorological instruments. Portable air-sampling tripods were fabricated that could be deployed at defined distances downwind from the release point and automatically-triggered to collect grab samples. The experimental protocol was as follows: (1) identify an appropriate release point within a city, (2) release methane at a known rate, (3) measure downwind street-level concentrations with the vehicle by making multiple passes through the plume, and (4) collect supporting concentration and meteorological data with the static tripod samplers deployed in the plume. Controlled release studies were performed at multiple locations and

  5. A novel denitrifying bacterial isolate that degrades trimethylamine both aerobically and anaerobically via two different pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S G; Bae, H S; Lee, S T

    2001-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium from an enrichment culture with trimethylamine inoculated with activated sludge was studied. Based on 16S rDNA analysis, this strain was identified as a Paracoccus sp. The isolate, strain T231, aerobically degraded trimethylamine, dimethylamine and methylamine and released a stoichiometric amount of ammonium ion into the culture fluid as a metabolic product, indicating that these methylated amines were completely degraded to formaldehyde and ammonia. The strain degraded trimethylamine also under denitrifying conditions and consumed a stoichiometric amount of nitrate, demonstrating that complete degradation of trimethylamine was coupled with nitrate reduction. Cell-free extract prepared from cells grown aerobically on trimethylamine exhibited activities of trimethylamine mono-oxygenase, trimethylamine N-oxide demethylase, dimethylamine mono-oxygenase, and methylamine mono-oxygenase. Cell-free extract from cells grown anaerobically on trimethylamine and nitrate exhibited activities of trimethylamine dehydrogenase and dimethylamine dehydrogenase. These results indicate that strain T231 had two different pathways for aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine. This is a new feature for trimethylamine metabolism in denitrifying bacteria. PMID:11685371

  6. Identification of Novel Methane-, Ethane-, and Propane-Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps by Stable Isotope Probing ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Redmond, Molly C.; Valentine, David L.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2010-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps supply oil and gas to microorganisms in sediments and overlying water. We used stable isotope probing (SIP) to identify aerobic bacteria oxidizing gaseous hydrocarbons in surface sediment from the Coal Oil Point seep field located offshore of Santa Barbara, California. After incubating sediment with ^(13)C-labeled methane, ethane, or propane, we confirmed the incorporation of ^(13)C into fatty acids and DNA. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) a...

  7. EFFECTS OF AQUA AEROBICS AND FLOOR AEROBICS ON BREATH HOLDING TIME AMONG SCHOOL GIRLS

    OpenAIRE

    P.V. Shelvam; S. Arunadevi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find out the effects of aqua aerobics and floor aerobics on breath holding time among school girls. To achieve this purpose of the study, ninety school girls were selected as subjects who were studied Cornation Higher Secondary School, Sivakasi. The selected subjects were aged between 15 to 17 years. The selected subjects were randomly divided into three groups of 30 subjects each group. Group one acted as experimental group I and group two acted as experimenta...

  8. Global warming and carbon dynamics in permafrost soils: methane production and oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Wagner; Susanne Liebner;  ,

    2009-01-01

    The Arctic plays a key role in the Earths climate system, because global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes, and one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. The degradation of permafrost and the associated intensified release of methane, a climate-relevant trace gas, represent potential environmental hazards. The microorganisms driving methane production and oxidation in Arctic permafrost soils have remained poorly investiga...

  9. Potentiale und Risiken der Nutzung von Methan aus Methanhydraten als Energieträger

    OpenAIRE

    Groth, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Marine and permafrost-based methane hydrates are the largest existing fossil carbon resource, whereby the marine deposits far outweigh the terrestrial ones. Their broad geographic distribution, especially in comparison to oil and conventional gas, make them a promising future source of energy. However, there is a danger of forcing the greenhouse effect in the event of a release of methane into the atmosphere as well as causing the collapse of oceanic slope sediments. Also the technical diffic...

  10. Visualization and interpretation of methane hydrate growth and dissociation in synthetic porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Flatlandsmo, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentary natural gas hydrates might play an important role in the future energy mix and the impact of methane release from natural gas hydrates can be significant also with respect to climate change. Vast amounts of methane gas are trapped in the subsurface permafrost and in submarine environments below sea floors. To understand the mechanisms of formation and dissociation on pore scale is fundamental to explain phenomena on core scale and making hydrate simulators on field scale. The thre...

  11. Stabilization of fine fraction from landfill mining in anaerobic and aerobic laboratory leach bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkäre, Tiina J; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2015-11-01

    Fine fraction (FF, mined landfill was stabilized in four laboratory-scale leach bed reactors (LBR) over 180 days. The aim was to study feasibility of biotechnological methods to treat FF and if further stabilization of FF is possible. Four different stabilization methods were compared and their effects upon quality of FF were evaluated. Also during the stabilization experiment, leachate quality as well as gas composition and quantity were analyzed. The methods studied included three anaerobic LBRs (one without water addition, one with water addition, and one with leachate recirculation) and one aerobic LBR (with water addition). During the experiment, the most methane was produced in anaerobic LBR without water addition (18.0 L CH4/kg VS), while water addition and leachate recirculation depressed methane production slightly, to 16.1 and 16.4 L CH4/kg VS, respectively. Organic matter was also removed via the leachate and was measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD). Calculated removal of organic matter in gas and leachate was highest in LBR with water addition (59 g COD/kg VS), compared with LBR without water addition or with leachate recirculation (51 g COD/kg VS). Concentrations of COD, ammonium nitrogen and anions in leachate decreased during the experiment, indicating washout mechanism caused by water additions. Aeration increased sulfate and nitrate concentrations in leachate due to oxidized sulfide and ammonium. Molecular weight distributions of leachates showed that all the size categories decreased, especially low molecular weight compounds, which were reduced the most. Aerobic stabilization resulted in the lowest final VS/TS (13.1%), lowest respiration activity (0.9-1.2 mg O2/g TS), and lowest methane production after treatment (0.0-0.8 L CH4/kg VS), with 29% of VS being removed from FF. Anaerobic stabilization methods also reduced organic matter by 9-20% compared with the initial amount. Stabilization reduced the quantity of soluble nitrogen in FF and did

  12. The phase transformation of methane caused by pressure change during its rising from seepage, revealed by video observation and acoustic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, D.; Aoyama, C.

    2014-12-01

    The plume comes out to the surface of the water, and methane is released for low water temperature and low temperature in the Arctic Ocean by the atmosphere. Methane released by the atmosphere is combined with oxygen and becomes carbon dioxide and the water, and the greenhouse effect is higher in 20 times than carbon dioxide. If quantity of the methane plume is quantified, I may estimate the quantity of existing methane underground and can estimate the scale of methane melting into it in seawater. The methane plume solved in seawater is one element of the carbon cycle. It is important that I elucidate this element in thinking about the carbon cycle of the wide sense. However, there is not the report that I showed quantitatively how much methane melts into it in seawater a year from the methane plume. Therefore, in this article, I identified an aspect of gush methane as it by the sound data with the fishfinder and by a gush picture of the methane plume. With that in mind, I quantified the quantity of the methane plume. As a result, the following things became clear. The methane hydrate grain to gush out from a gush mouth is a solid at the bottom of the sea direct top. In this sea area, methane of 7.7*104m3 per unit area gushes out. In addition, the sea area where 6.3*106m3 gushed out existed.

  13. Release and fate of fluorocarbons in a shredder residue landfill cell: 2. Field investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Nedenskov, Jonas; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The shredder residues from automobiles, home appliances and other metal containing products are often disposed in landfills, as recycling technologies for these materials are not common in many countries. Shredder waste contains rigid and soft foams from cushions and insulation panels blown with fluorocarbons. The objective of this study was to determine the gas composition, attenuation, and emission of fluorocarbons in a monofill shredder residue landfill cell by field investigation. Landfill gas generated within the shredder waste primarily consisted of CH(4) (27%) and N(2) (71%), without CO(2), indicating that the gas composition was governed by chemical reactions in combination with anaerobic microbial reactions. The gas generated also contained different fluorocarbons (up to 27 μg L(-1)). The presence of HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 indicated that anaerobic degradation of CFC-11 occurred in the landfill cell, as neither of these compounds has been produced for industrial applications. This study demonstrates that a landfill cell containing shredder waste has a potential for attenuating CFC-11 released from polyurethane (PUR) insulation foam in the cell via aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation processes. In deeper, anaerobic zones of the cell, reductive dechlorination of CFCs to HCFCs was evident, while in the shallow, oxic zones, there was a high potential for biooxidation of both methane and lesser chlorinated fluorocarbons. These findings correlated well with both laboratory results (presented in a companion paper) and surface emission measurements that, with the exception from a few hot spots, indicated that surface emissions were negative or below detection. PMID:20444588

  14. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane hydrate...

  15. Archaebacterial Fuel Production: Methane from Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, John E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses microbial production of methane from biomass. Topics include methogens (bacteria producing methane), ecology of methanogenesis, methanogenesis in ruminant/nonruminant and other environments, role of methanogenesis in nature, and methane production in sewage treatment plants. Also discusses construction of methane digesters (and related…

  16. Digestion with initial thermophilic hydrolysis step for sanitation and enhanced methane extraction in wastewater treatment plants; Roetning med inledande termofilt hydrolyssteg foer hygienisering och utoekad metanutvinning paa avloppsreningsverk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Emelie; Ossiansson, Elin [BioMil AB, Lund (Sweden); Carlsson, My; Uldal, Martina; Johannesson, Sofia [AnoxKaldnes AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-02-15

    other sludge samples. The VS reduction increased more than the methane production as a result of thermophilic pre-hydrolysis prior to mesophilic AD. Possible explanations are loss of hydrogen gas and/or volatile organic compounds in the pre-hydrolysis step, partially aerobic degradation and errors in the gas flow measurements. None of the performed measurements or analyses can confirm the cause, but loss of methane potential through hydrogen release in the pre-hydrolysis step seems most likely. The study has shown that thermophilic pre-hydrolysis has a hygienising effect. In the pilot trial with pre-hydrolysis at 6 hours exposure time and 1.5 days hydraulic retention time the requirements for pathogen reduction that have been suggested for sewage sludge for Salmonella and E-coli were reached, but could not be reached with respect to Enterococcus. In the lab-scale trials with 24 h exposure time the same level of pathogen reduction could not be reached. The results were in these cases inconsequent and difficult to interpret, both from pasteurization and from thermophilic pre-hydrolysis. A possible explanation for this could be that the area of contact per volume is considerably larger in lab scale than in pilot scale. The gas produced in the pre-hydrolysis step needs to be introduced into the main digester in order for it to be fully utilized. If there is a risk that the concentration of hydrogen gas in the pre-hydrolysis step can exceed 25 % by volume, the safety requirements of the plant need to be revised. Simulations have shown that the hydrogen level may momentarily increase after intermittent feeding, so this should be further investigated.

  17. High Time Resolution Measurements of Methane Fluxes From Enteric Fermentation in Cattle Rumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S.; Fortner, E.; Roscioli, J. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Knighton, W. B.; Molina, L. T.; Zavala, M.; Castelán, O.; Ku Vera, J.; Castillo, E.

    2013-12-01

    Methane accounts for roughly 20% of the global radiative climate forcing in the last two and a half centuries. Methane emissions arise from a number of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In some areas enteric fermentation in livestock produces over 90% of agricultural methane. In the spring of 2013, as a part of the Short Lived Climate Forcer-Mexico field campaign, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory in partnership with the Molina Center for the Environment studied methane production associated with enteric fermentation in the rumen of cattle. A variety of different breeds and stocks being raised in two agricultural and veterinary research facilities located in different areas of Mexico were examined. Methane fluxes were quantified using two methods: 1) an atmospherically stable gaseous tracer release was collocated with small herds in a pasture, allowing tracer ratio flux measurements; 2) respiratory CO2 was measured in tandem with methane in the breath of individual animals allowing methane production to be related to metabolism. The use of an extensive suite of very high time response instruments allows for differentiation of individual methane producing rumination events and respiratory CO2 from possible background interferences. The results of these studies will be presented and compared to data from traditional chamber experiments.

  18. AEROBIC AND STRENGTH TRAINING RESPONSES IN THE VO2max

    OpenAIRE

    Pilar Sánchez Collado; Cíntia Campolina Duarte Rocha; Sandro Fernandes da Silva; José Antonio De Paz

    2007-01-01

    The strength training of produces improvements in the skeletal muscle as to the muscular hypertrophy, already the aerobic training produces an increase in him I number and in the size of the mitochondria. The objective was verifying the answers of the aerobic training and of force in the aerobic variables. The study was composed of 3 groups. The Aerobic Group (G1) that performed 6 weeks of training of aerobic, the Strength Group (G2) that did a program of 6 strength training weeks and the Gro...

  19. Methane gas seepage - Disregard of significant water column filter processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Schmale, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Marine methane seepage represents a potential contributor for greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and is discussed as a driver for climate change. The ultimate question is how much methane is released from the seafloor on a global scale and what fraction may reach the atmosphere? Dissolved fluxes from methane seepage sites on the seabed were found to be very efficiently reduced by benthic microbial oxidation, whereas transport of free gas bubbles from the seabed is considered to bypass the effective benthic methane filter. Numerical models are available today to predict the fate of such methane gas bubble release to the water column in regard to gas exchange with the ambient water column, respective bubble lifetime and rise height. However, the fate of rising gas bubbles and dissolved methane in the water column is not only governed by dissolution, but is also affected by lateral oceanographic currents and vertical bubble-induced upwelling, microbial oxidation, and physico-chemical processes that remain poorly understood so far. According to this gap of knowledge we present data from two study sites - the anthropogenic North Sea 22/4b Blowout and the natural Coal Oil point seeps - to shed light into two new processes gathered with hydro-acoustic multibeam water column imaging and microbial investigations. The newly discovered processes are hereafter termed Spiral Vortex and Bubble Transport Mechanism. Spiral Vortex describes the evolution of a complex vortical fluid motion of a bubble plume in the wake of an intense gas release site (Blowout, North Sea). It appears very likely that it dramatically changes the dissolution kinetics of the seep gas bubbles. Bubble Transport Mechanism prescribes the transport of sediment-hosted bacteria into the water column via rising gas bubbles. Both processes act as filter mechanisms in regard to vertical transport of seep related methane, but have not been considered before. Spiral Vortex and Bubble Transport Mechanism represent the

  20. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Christopher H; Beal, Emily J; Orphan, Victoria J

    2011-01-01

    On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2) found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to release), a total

  1. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J. Orphan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2 found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to

  2. Recent advances in methane activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuska, M.; Kataja, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Considerable work has been done in the research and development of methane conversion technologies. Although some promising conversion processes have been demonstrated, further advances in engineering and also in the chemistry are needed before these technologies become commercial. High-temperature processes, e.g. the oxidative coupling of methane, studied thoroughly during the last 15 years, suffer from severe theoretical yield limits and poor economics. In the long term, the most promising approaches seem to be the organometallic and, especially, the biomimetic activation of methane. (author) (22 refs.)

  3. Studies on Methane Emissions from Pastoral Farming in New Zealand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Meng-meng; ZHANG Gui-guo; SUN Xue-zhao; DONG Shu-ting; Simone O. Hoskin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to give a basic understanding of studies on methane emissions of New Zealand, as we know the agriculture of New Zealand is pastoral farming, most livestock animals are grazed in pasture, and quantities of methane were released from the digestive tract and animals excreta. In New Zealand some 50% greenhouse gases (GHG) sources are attributed to agriculture and one third is methane from livestock enteric formation. For many years, many researchers have been exploiting the techniques and methods to measure the emission of methane of New Zealand, further more studing the available options to alleviate the methane emissions. Their pioneering work and successful experiences including the determined methods and mitigation strategies are worth learning for scholars around the world. Some of their approaches were not only suitable for New Zealand grazed livestock, but for many other countries, even the animals are intensively bred in pen. The calorimeter/respiration chamber is the most exactly method in present, but it needs expensive equipments and skilled manipulators, so there are still some dififculty in applying this approach extensively in practice. Sulfur hexalfuoride (SF6) trace technique is much adopted for grazed livestock evaluating the methane emission, though its veracity was doubted by some researchers, it is still a good option in present for studying the GHG emissions for grazing animals. By measuring the rumen volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration to estimate the methane emission is a relatively simple approach, it is just only a rough evaluation, and it is unsuitable for exact study, but this method may be used in China for extensively raised ruminant. In present China, the ruminants are fed in an extensively managed state, the diversities of roughage and animals varieties caused dififcult to exactly estimate the methane emission. So exploiting theavailable options is much important for constituting the exhaustive emission

  4. Reducing uncertainty in methane emission estimates from permafrost peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Torben R.

    2016-04-01

    Reducing uncertainty in methane emission estimates from permafrost peatlands Torben R. Christensen1,2 and coworkers 1) Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Sweden 2) Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Denmark Depending on factors including temperature, snow duration and soil moisture conditions, emissions of the greenhouse gas methane from permafrost peatlands can vary by factors of 2-4 between years. This variability is clear in atmospheric measurements of the gas, but a lack of ground-based data is making it hard to locate the methane sources responsible. Methane monitoring in the Arctic is expensive, requiring sophisticated analysis equipment such as power requiring laser spectrometer analysis made in remote places. This also puts demands on the logistics where infrastructures and field stations that offer line-power in the field are in high demand but very rarely found. Research projects therefore typically focus on one site, and run for a year or two. Longer term monitoring programs, which document climate, hydrology, phenology and population dynamics of birds and mammals, rarely include carbon fluxes since it is technically challenging to measure. One that does is the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring program that started at the Zackenberg research station, which has recorded substantial methane flux variations for almost a decade in North-east Greenland. Such multi-year studies show that, while there is some connection between the amounts of methane released from one year to the next, accurate forecasting is difficult. They also highlight the importance of extending monitoring beyond the growing period into the frozen season, both in spring and autumn. A spatially distributed network of long-term monitoring stations in the Arctic, with consistency between measurements, is badly needed to improve this situation. Productive methane 'hot spots', many sporadic, have also been identified in recent studies. By ventilating

  5. Examination of methane ebullition in a Swiss hydropower reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelSontro, T.; Ostrovsky, I.; Eugster, W.; McGinnis, D. F.; Wehrli, B.

    2012-04-01

    Ebullition is one of the most important methane emission pathways from inland water bodies, yet the stochastic nature of ebullition complicates its monitoring. Therefore, a bubble-calibrated 120 kHz split-beam echosounder (Simrad EK60, Kongsberg Maritime) was utilized to survey the active ebullition area of a small temperate hydropower reservoir (Lake Wohlen, Switzerland), which is known for intense methane bubble release in summer. The performed bubble size calibration agreed well with the literature and the presented hydroacoustic technique to estimate methane bubble flux in the presence of non-bubble targets was determined to be the most appropriate post-processing method for this reservoir. The acoustically-determined average methane ebullition flux from the sediment to the water column from seven campaigns was 580 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 (range, 130 to 1450). Bubble size distribution, which mostly included 1 to 20 mm diameter bubbles, was strongly related to the magnitude of sediment ebullition flux. The bubble size distribution is an important consideration when calculating the resulting surface efflux using a bubble dissolution model. Using the Sauter mean diameter to represent the volume to surface area to volume ratio of the bubble size distribution in the bubble model resulted in an average atmospheric emission of 490 mg CH4 m-2 d-1. The spatially-averaged data and the standard deviation from seven sampling campaigns revealed areas of 'high' and 'low' ebullition fluxes that seemed to correlate to geomorphology of the reservoir, which still contains the former river channel. The hydroacoustic flux estimates were compared with other methods of methane flux assessments used simultaneously: the traditional chamber method and the eddy covariance technique combined with spectrometer methane measurements (Fast Methane Analyzer, Los Gatos Research). Chamber measurements on all but one day were higher than the hydroacoustic survey results (but within the same order of

  6. Mathematical modeling of the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradation of natural and anthropogenic chelating agents directly and indirectly affects the speciation, and, hence, the mobility of actinides in subsurface environments. We combined mathematical modeling with laboratory experimentation to investigate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide [Np(IV/V), Pu(IV)] speciation. Under aerobic conditions, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) biodegradation rates were strongly influenced by the actinide concentration. Actinide-chelate complexation reduced the relative abundance of available growth substrate in solution and actinide species present or released during chelate degradation were toxic to the organisms. Aerobic bio-utilization of the chelates as electron-donor substrates directly affected actinide speciation by releasing the radionuclides from complexed form into solution, where their fate was controlled by inorganic ligands in the system. Actinide speciation was also indirectly affected by pH changes caused by organic biodegradation. The two concurrent processes of organic biodegradation and actinide aqueous chemistry were accurately linked and described using CCBATCH, a computer model developed at Northwestern University to investigate the dynamics of coupled biological and chemical reactions in mixed waste subsurface environments. CCBATCH was then used to simulate the fate of Np during anaerobic citrate biodegradation. The modeling studies suggested that, under some conditions, chelate degradation can increase Np(IV) solubility due to carbonate complexation in closed aqueous systems

  7. Mathematical modelling of the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradation of natural and anthropogenic chelating agents directly and indirectly affects the speciation, and hence, the mobility of actinides in subsurface environments. We combined mathematical modelling with laboratory experimentation to investigate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide [Np(IV/V), Pu(IV)] speciation. Under aerobic conditions, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) biodegradation rates were strongly influenced by the actinide concentration. Actinide-chelate complexation reduced the relative abundance of available growth substrate in solution and actinide species present or released during chelate degradation were toxic to the organisms. Aerobic bioutilization of the chelates as electron-donor substrates directly affected actinide speciation by releasing the radionuclides from complexed form into solution, where their fate was controlled by inorganic ligands in the system. Actinide speciation was also indirectly affected by pH changes caused by organic biodegradation. The two concurrent processes of organic biodegradation and actinide aqueous chemistry were accurately linked and described using CCBATCH, a computer model developed at Northwestern University to investigate the dynamics of coupled biological and chemical reactions in mixed waste subsurface environments. CCBATCH was then used to simulate the fate of Np during anaerobic citrate biodegradation. The modelling studies suggested that, under some conditions, chelate degradation can increase Np(IV) solubility due to carbonate complexation in closed aqueous systems. (orig.)

  8. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Wenwu; Wang Dong; Tao Hengyi; Sun XueJun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the e...

  9. Linking methane oxidation with perchlorate reduction: a microbial base for possible Martian life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. G.; Carlstrom, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Coates, J. D.; Oremland, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observations of methane (CH4) and perchlorate (ClO4-) within the atmosphere and surface of Mars, respectively, provide impetus for establishing a metabolic linkage between these compounds whereby CH4 acts as an electron donor and perchlorate acts as an electron acceptor. Direct linkage through anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) has not been observed. However, indirect syntrophic oxygenase-dependent oxidation of CH4 with an aerobic methane oxidizer is feasible. The pathway for anaerobic dissimilatory perchlorate reduction includes 3 steps. The first 2 are sequential reductions of (1) perchlorate to chlorate and (2) chlorate to chlorite, mediated by perchlorate reductase. The third step is disproportionation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen, mediated by chlorite dismutase. Utilization of thusly derived oxygen by hydrocarbon-degrading organisms in anoxic environments was first demonstrated by Coates et. al. (1998)1, however the link to aerobic methane oxidation was not examined at that time. Here, we systematically explore the potential for several species of aerobic methanotrophs to couple with chlorite during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. In one experiment, 0.5 kPa CH4 was completely removed in one day from the headspace of combined cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB and Methylococcus capsulatus in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Oxidation of labeled 14CH4 to 14CO2 under similar conditions was later confirmed. Another experiment demonstrated complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 over several days by Methylobacter albus strain BG8 with strain CKB in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Finally, we observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing natural soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and strain CKB and in the presence of 10 mM chlorite. This soil, collected from a pristine lake shoreline, demonstrated endogenous methane, perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite uptake. Other soil and

  10. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils. PMID:26037076

  11. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm-3, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH4 m-2 d-1, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH4 m-2 d-1 and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air

  12. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Gröngröft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm(-3), reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1), covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1) and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of

  13. Entropy based statistical inference for methane emissions released from wetland

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sabolová, R.; Sečkárová, Vladimíra; Dušek, Jiří; Stehlík, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 1 (2015), s. 125-133. ISSN 0169-7439 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13502S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/1151; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/12/0083; GA UK(CZ) SVV 2014-260105 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : chaos * entropy * Kullback-Leibler divergence * Pareto distribution * saddlepoint approaximation * wetland ecosystem Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (UEK-B) Impact factor: 2.321, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/AS/seckarova-0438651.pdf

  14. Biodegradation of tributyl phosphate, an organosphate triester, by aerobic granular biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancharaiah, Y.V., E-mail: venkatany@gmail.com; Kiran Kumar Reddy, G.; Krishna Mohan, T.V.; Venugopalan, V.P.

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Aerobic granular biomass was cultivated by feeding TBP along with acetate. • Rapid biodegradation of TBP when used as a co-substrate or as the sole carbon source. • Biodegradation of 2 mM TBP in 5 h with degradation rate of 0.4 μmol mL{sup −1} h{sup −1}. • High phosphatase activity was observed in TBP-degrading granular biomass. • n-Butanol, hydrolyzed product of TBP, was rapidly metabolized by aerobic granules. - Abstract: Tributyl phosphate (TBP) is commercially used in large volumes for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. TBP is a very stable compound and persistent in natural environments and it is not removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. In this study, cultivation of aerobic granular biofilms in a sequencing batch reactor was investigated for efficient biodegradation of TBP. Enrichment of TBP-degrading strains resulted in efficient degradation of TBP as sole carbon or along with acetate. Complete biodegradation of 2 mM of TBP was achieved within 5 h with a degradation rate of 0.4 μmol mL{sup −1} h{sup −1}. TBP biodegradation was accompanied by release of inorganic phosphate in stoichiometric amounts. n-Butanol, hydrolysed product of TBP was rapidly biodegraded. But, dibutyl phosphate, a putative intermediate of TBP degradation was only partially degraded pointing to an alternative degradation pathway. Phosphatase activity was 22- and 7.5-fold higher in TBP-degrading biofilms as compared to bioflocs and acetate-fed aerobic granules. Community analysis by terminal restriction length polymorphism revealed presence of 30 different bacterial strains. Seven bacterial stains, including Sphingobium sp. a known TBP degrader were isolated. The results show that aerobic granular biofilms are promising for treatment of TBP-bearing wastes or ex situ bioremediation of TBP-contaminated sites.

  15. Biodegradation of tributyl phosphate, an organosphate triester, by aerobic granular biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Aerobic granular biomass was cultivated by feeding TBP along with acetate. • Rapid biodegradation of TBP when used as a co-substrate or as the sole carbon source. • Biodegradation of 2 mM TBP in 5 h with degradation rate of 0.4 μmol mL−1 h−1. • High phosphatase activity was observed in TBP-degrading granular biomass. • n-Butanol, hydrolyzed product of TBP, was rapidly metabolized by aerobic granules. - Abstract: Tributyl phosphate (TBP) is commercially used in large volumes for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. TBP is a very stable compound and persistent in natural environments and it is not removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. In this study, cultivation of aerobic granular biofilms in a sequencing batch reactor was investigated for efficient biodegradation of TBP. Enrichment of TBP-degrading strains resulted in efficient degradation of TBP as sole carbon or along with acetate. Complete biodegradation of 2 mM of TBP was achieved within 5 h with a degradation rate of 0.4 μmol mL−1 h−1. TBP biodegradation was accompanied by release of inorganic phosphate in stoichiometric amounts. n-Butanol, hydrolysed product of TBP was rapidly biodegraded. But, dibutyl phosphate, a putative intermediate of TBP degradation was only partially degraded pointing to an alternative degradation pathway. Phosphatase activity was 22- and 7.5-fold higher in TBP-degrading biofilms as compared to bioflocs and acetate-fed aerobic granules. Community analysis by terminal restriction length polymorphism revealed presence of 30 different bacterial strains. Seven bacterial stains, including Sphingobium sp. a known TBP degrader were isolated. The results show that aerobic granular biofilms are promising for treatment of TBP-bearing wastes or ex situ bioremediation of TBP-contaminated sites

  16. Oxygen-Methane Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two main innovations will be developed in the Phase II effort that are fundamentally associated with our gaseous oxygen/gaseous methane RCS thruster. The first...

  17. Methane Liquid Level Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Methane Liquid-Level Sensor, (MLS) for In-Space cryogenic storage capable of continuous monitoring...

  18. Miniature Airborne Methane Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — KalScott Engineering, and the subcontractor, Princeton University propose the development and demonstration of compact and robust methane sensor for small Unmanned...

  19. Oxygen-Methane Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orion Propulsion, Inc. proposes to develop an Oxygen and Methane RCS Thruster to advance the technology of alternate fuels. A successful Oxygen/CH4 RCS Thruster...

  20. Methane LIDAR Laser Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes to develop laser technology intended to meet NASA's need for innovative lidar technologies for atmospheric measurements of methane. NASA and the...

  1. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m3 CH4/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH4/(m2 h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC

  2. Measuring Methane Emissions from Industrial and Waste Processing Sites Using the Dual Tracer Flux Ratio Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, S.; Floerchinger, C.; Roscioli, J. R.; Yacovitch, T.; Franklin, J. P.; Shorter, J. H.; Kolb, C. E.; Subramanian, R.; Robinson, A. L.; Molina, L. T.; Allen, D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to directly quantify facility scale methane emissions during recent multi-state measurement campaigns we have deployed novel tracer release emission characterization approaches to investigate a wide variety of facility types. The development and application of a dual tracer flux ratio methodology will be discussed. Using known release rates of two (or more) inert tracer species, downwind methane plume measurements can be used to quantify and evaluate the uncertainty in known releases and unknown emissions of methane. Results from experiments designed to challenge the experimental methodology will be presented, which determined that for downwind sampling distances in excess of ~200 m, the dual tracer release method is quite robust (emission rate error) under many atmospheric conditions and landscape variations. At downwind distances less than ~200 m, the assumption of equivalent dispersion between spatially separated release points can break down. For some facilities, this can be used to distinguish and estimate the magnitude of methane emissions taking place at different spatial points within the facility. Measured emissions for selected facilities will be presented and, where possible, the accurate quantification of the episodic releases during specific activities, as well as continuous fugitive emissions are identified and will be discussed . Collaboration with on-site operators allows these measurements to inform the design and implementation of effective mitigation strategies.

  3. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Nieto Gutiérrez, Joaquín José; Ventosa Ucero, Antonio; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms...

  4. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning

    OpenAIRE

    Renza Perini; Marta Bortoletto; Michela Capogrosso; Anna Fertonani; Carlo Miniussi

    2016-01-01

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cor...

  5. Experimental evidence for aerobic bio-denitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Nitrate pollution of groundwater is paid more and more attention for its hazardous to environments and human health. A strain of DN11 was isolated from soil and used in the laboratory columns filled with various media for nitrate removal. The experimental results showed that DN11could reduce nitrate at different rates in different media under the aerobic condition. The mechanism for nitrate removal with DN11 is explained meanwhile.

  6. Alpha- and Gammaproteobacterial Methanotrophs Codominate the Active Methane-Oxidizing Communities in an Acidic Boreal Peat Bog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, Kaitlin C; Lin, Xueju; Kumaresan, Deepak; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Murrell, J Colin; Kostka, Joel E

    2016-04-15

    The objective of this study was to characterize metabolically active, aerobic methanotrophs in an ombrotrophic peatland in the Marcell Experimental Forest, in Minnesota. Methanotrophs were investigated in the field and in laboratory incubations using DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP), expression studies on particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) genes, and amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Potential rates of oxidation ranged from 14 to 17 μmol of CH4g dry weight soil(-1)day(-1) Within DNA-SIP incubations, the relative abundance of methanotrophs increased from 4%in situto 25 to 36% after 8 to 14 days. Phylogenetic analysis of the(13)C-enriched DNA fractions revealed that the active methanotrophs were dominated by the generaMethylocystis(type II;Alphaproteobacteria),Methylomonas, andMethylovulum(both, type I;Gammaproteobacteria). In field samples, a transcript-to-gene ratio of 1 to 2 was observed forpmoAin surface peat layers, which attenuated rapidly with depth, indicating that the highest methane consumption was associated with a depth of 0 to 10 cm. Metagenomes and sequencing of cDNApmoAamplicons from field samples confirmed that the dominant active methanotrophs wereMethylocystisandMethylomonas Although type II methanotrophs have long been shown to mediate methane consumption in peatlands, our results indicate that members of the generaMethylomonasandMethylovulum(type I) can significantly contribute to aerobic methane oxidation in these ecosystems. PMID:26873322

  7. Nitrification and aerobic denitrification in anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzate Marin, Juan C; Caravelli, Alejandro H; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of achieving nitrogen (N) removal using a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) exposed to anoxic/aerobic (AN/OX) phases, focusing to achieve aerobic denitrification. This process will minimize emissions of N2O greenhouse gas. The effects of different operating parameters on the reactor performance were studied: cycle duration, AN/OX ratio, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration (DOC), and organic load. The highest inorganic N removal (NiR), close to 70%, was obtained at pH=7.5, low organic load (440mgCOD/(Lday)) and high aeration given by 12h cycle, AN/OX ratio=0.5:1.0 and DOC higher than 4.0mgO2/L. Nitrification followed by high-rate aerobic denitrification took place during the aerobic phase. Aerobic denitrification could be attributed to Tetrad-forming organisms (TFOs) with phenotype of glycogen accumulating organisms using polyhydroxyalkanoate and/or glycogen storage. The proposed AN/OX system constitutes an eco-friendly N removal process providing N2 as the end product. PMID:26512862

  8. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the exact mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects is required to be further elucidated. Methane can cross the membrane and is easy to collect due to its abundance in natural gas. Although methane is flammable, saline rich in methane can be prepared for clinical use. These seem to be good news in application of methane as a therapeutic gas. Conclusion Several problems should be resolved before its wide application in clinical practice.

  9. Gammaproteobacterial Methanotrophs Dominate Cold Methane Seeps in Floodplains of West Siberian Rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Oshkin, Igor Y; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Lüke, Claudia; Glagolev, Mikhail V.; Filippov, Illiya V.; Pimenov, Nikolay V.; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N.

    2014-01-01

    A complex system of muddy fluid-discharging and methane (CH4)-releasing seeps was discovered in a valley of the river Mukhrinskaya, one of the small rivers of the Irtysh Basin, West Siberia. CH4 flux from most (90%) of these gas ebullition sites did not exceed 1.45 g CH4 h−1, while some seeps emitted up to 5.54 g CH4 h−1. The δ13C value of methane released from these seeps varied between −71.1 and −71.3‰, suggesting its biogenic origin. Although the seeps were characterized by low in situ tem...

  10. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial activity in deep subsurface sediments from the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methanogenesis, sulfate reduction, and rates of carbon mineralization were determined for samples derived at different depths from four cores drilled at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken South Carolina. Three gram subsamples of the sediments were dispersed to 10-ml serum bottles under 5% H2 95% N2 and amended with 0.5 mL degassed distilled water with or without the following solutes: formate plus acetate, bicarbonate, lactate, and radiolabeled sulfate, glucose, and indole. After incubating 1 to 5 days, the sediments were assayed for methane, H2, 35S, and 14CO2. No methanogenesis was detected at any depth in any core and sulfate was rarely reduced. Evolution of 14CO2 from glucose and indole was detected in sediments as deep as 262 and 259 m, respectively. At some depths the 14CO2 evolution rate was comparable to that of surface soils; however, at other depths no 14CO2 evolution could be detected. Injection of sterile air into anaerobic incubations increased rates of carbon mineralization at all depths that had demonstrated anaerobic activity and stimulated mineralization activity in sediments that were inactive anaerobically, suggesting a predominance of aerobic metabolism. Increasing the concentration of added glucose and indole often increased the resulting rates of 14CO2 evolved from these substrates. The data indicate that both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms are present and metabolically active in samples from deep subsurface environments. 16 refs., 3 figs

  11. Progress and Yield Bottleneck of Aerobic Rice in the North China Plain: A Case Study of Varieties Handao 297 and Handao 502

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Guang-hui; YU Jun; WANG Hua-qi; BAM Bouman

    2008-01-01

    Aerobic rice has been considered a promising rice cultivation system as water scarcity is increasing in the world. This article summarizes the advances in aerobic rice management researches in the North China Plain, focusing on yield formation and its bottleneck. High-yielding and good-quality aerobic rice varieties adapted to aerobic soil conditions have been released officially and adopted by farmers in North China. The varieties Handao 502 and Handao 297 have been recognized as the most promising varieties reaching a yield level ranging 3.5-5.0t ha-1 with 450-650mm water input. Compared with lowland rice, water input in aerobic rice was more than 50% lower, and water productivity was 60% higher. Researches on responses of rice cultivars to nitrate nitrogen (N) and ammonium N supplied at early growth stages provided the first evidence for a preference of aerobic rice HD 297 for nitrate N supply, compared with the lowland rice variety. Zinc uptake studies demonstrated that introduction of aerobic rice system on calcareous soils may increase zinc deficiency problems. Sink size was identified as the limitation of aerobic rice yield, because its spikelet number m-2 was too low (20000-24000) compared with the lowland rice. For future research, more attention is suggested to be paid to yield formation focusing on effects of water regimes on tiller dynamics. Understanding of nutrient uptake and response to fertilization effects are also urgently required to establish optimized crop management technology. Additionally, alternative cropping systems based on aerobic rice should be established, and key sustainability and environmental impact issues in the systems need to be identified.

  12. Fact-finding survey of actual garbage discharged from dormitory and its biological anaerobic-aerobic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T; Ukita, M; Sekine, M; Fukagawa, M; Nakanishi, H

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find a possibility of complete treatment of garbage and resource recovery (production of methane from available utility of carbon resource in garbage) by biological treatment process. As the first step, a fact-finding survey of actual garbage discharged from the dormitory of the Ube National College of Technology (equivalent to 300 population) was carried out. Second, the combined biological anaerobic-aerobic treatment, i.e. combination of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process and aerobic membrane bioreactor (AMB) process, was applied to the garbage treatment. The applicability and efficiency of this system were investigated in this study. The survey results showed that the composition and quantity of garbage from a student dormitory changed slightly during a week due to the change of the menu, however, they remained almost unchanged during the entire experimental period. The experimental results showed high biodegradability of the garbage, and demonstrated its suitability for methane production. The soluble nitrogen removal was high: over 97%. No excess sludge was wasted from the system. A high treatment efficiency of simultaneous organic carbon and nitrogen was obtained. The possibility of complete treatment of garbage with this process has been positively demonstrated by this study. PMID:11381983

  13. Tracking the MSL-SAM methane detection source location Through Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-García, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction: The putative in situ detection of methane by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on Curiosi-ty at Gale crater has garnered significant attention because of the potential implications for the presence of geological methane sources or indigenous Martian organisms [1, 2]. SAM reported detection of back-ground levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69±0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period, SAM observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2±2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source. There are many major unresolved questions regard-ing this detection: 1) What are the potential sources of the methane release? 2) What causes the rapid decrease in concentration? and 3) Where is the re-lease location? 4) How spatially extensive is the re-lease? 5) For how long is CH4 released? Regarding the first question, the source of methane, is so far not identified. It could be related with geo-logical process like methane release from clathrates [3], serpentinisation [4] and volcanism [5]; or due to biological activity from methanogenesis [6]. To answer the second question, the rapid decrease in concentration, it is important to note that the photo-chemical lifetime of methane is of order 100 years, much longer than the atmospheric mixing time scale, and thus the gas should tend to be well mixed except near a source or shortly after an episodic release. The observed spike of 7 ppb from the background of LPI contributions, 1719: 1366; [2] Webster et al. (2015), Science, vol. 347, no. 6220, 415-417; [3] Chastain and Chevrier (2007). Planet. Space Science, 55, 1246-1256; [4] Oze and Sharma (2005). Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L10203; [5] Etiope et al. (2007), J. Volcanol. Geo-therm. Res., 165, 76-86; [6] Reid et al. (2006), Int. J. Astrobiol., 5, 89-97; [7] Jensen et al. (2014), Icarus

  14. Localization of methane distributions by spectrally tuned infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Werner; Hierl, Thomas; Scheuerpflug, H.; Schirl, U.; Schreer, Oliver; Schulz, Max J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a novel method, the Gas Imaging (GIm) method, developed for the localization of gas distributions in the atmosphere. The method is suitable for the detection of a gases which exhibit at least one absorption line in the IR spectral range. In this paper the GIm method is demonstrated for methane released into the atmosphere from leaks along natural gas pipelines. Methane distributions in the atmosphere around the leaky pipeline are detected and visualized by spectrally tuned IR imaging. In contrast to conventional techniques which utilize laser radiation sources or scanning, we irradiate the overall region under investigation by 1 kW halogen lamps. The scene background is subtracted by a real-time computer evaluation of the image. The methane gas emitted from the leak creates a flickering cloud in the image which is easily recognized. Methane concentrations as low as 0.03 percent by volume are visible. The method was successfully tested under realistic conditions on a buried pipeline by a natural gas provider.

  15. Geogenic methane emissions in central and eastern Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baciu, Calin; Ionescu, Artur; Pop, Cristian; Etiope, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: methane, greenhouse gases, geogenic emissions, Romania Relatively often, the hydrocarbon reservoirs are not completely sealed, thus permitting the channeling to the surface of various amounts of gas, mainly consisting of methane and homologues. When important volumes of gas are released, features as mud volcanoes and everlasting fires may occur. When the gas amount is low, the degassing can be revealed by instrumental means only. The gas seeps may be useful as indicators in the hydrocarbon exploration, but may be also hazardous when gas is accumulating in closed spaces. Additionally, the geogenic methane degassing represents an important contribution to the atmospheric budget of greenhouse gases. Romania is one of the European important hydrocarbon producers, with oil and gas deposits in different geologic and tectonic contexts. As well, the frequency of gas emitting features and seepage areas is high. Some relevant hydrocarbon-prone areas from Romania, namely the Neogene Transylvanian Basin, the Carpathian Foredeep, and the Moldavian Platform, are comparatively analysed within the current work from the point of view of methane emissions. The Carpathian Foredeep hosts the most impressive mud volcanoes and everlasting fires in Romania, classified among the biggest in Europe. The degassing area also extends in the Carpathian Flysch zone. The Transylvanian Basin hosts numerous gas-bearing structures, mainly of biogenic origin. With some exceptions, the methane-emitting features are small, releasing relatively low amounts of gas. A relatively high number of seeps have been described on the Moldavian Platform, although no commercial hydrocarbon reservoirs have been identified. The seeps are small, and they are releasing low amounts of methane. However, it is important to notice that the investigated zone partly corresponds to an area of interest for shale gas, related to the deep-seated Silurian shales. For all mentioned areas, the main geochemical

  16. Shifts in methanogenic community composition and methane fluxes along the degradation of discontinuous permafrost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Susanne; Ganzert, Lars; Kiss, Andrea; Yang, Sizhong; Wagner, Dirk; Svenning, Mette M

    2015-01-01

    The response of methanogens to thawing permafrost is an important factor for the global greenhouse gas budget. We tracked methanogenic community structure, activity, and abundance along the degradation of sub-Arctic palsa peatland permafrost. We observed the development of pronounced methane production, release, and abundance of functional (mcrA) methanogenic gene numbers following the transitions from permafrost (palsa) to thaw pond structures. This was associated with the establishment of a methanogenic community consisting both of hydrogenotrophic (Methanobacterium, Methanocellales), and potential acetoclastic (Methanosarcina) members and their activity. While peat bog development was not reflected in significant changes of mcrA copy numbers, potential methane production, and rates of methane release decreased. This was primarily linked to a decline of potential acetoclastic in favor of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Although palsa peatland succession offers similarities with typical transitions from fen to bog ecosystems, the observed dynamics in methane fluxes and methanogenic communities are primarily attributed to changes within the dominant Bryophyta and Cyperaceae taxa rather than to changes in peat moss and sedge coverage, pH and nutrient regime. Overall, the palsa peatland methanogenic community was characterized by a few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs). These OTUs seem to be indicative for methanogenic species that thrive in terrestrial organic rich environments. In summary, our study shows that after an initial stage of high methane emissions following permafrost thaw, methane fluxes, and methanogenic communities establish that are typical for northern peat bogs. PMID:26029170

  17. Shifts in methanogenic community composition and methane fluxes along the degradation of discontinuous permafrost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Marianne Svenning

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The response of methanogens to thawing permafrost is an important factor for the global greenhouse gas budget. We tracked methanogenic community structure, activity, and abundance along the degradation of sub-Arctic palsa peatland permafrost. We observed the development of pronounced methane production, release, and abundance of functional (mcrA methanogenic gene numbers following the transitions from permafrost (palsa to thaw pond structures. This was associated with the establishment of a methanogenic community consisting both of hydrogenotrophic (Methanobacterium, Methanocellales and potential acetoclastic (Methanosarcina members and their activity. While peat bog development was not reflected in significant changes of mcrA copy numbers, potential methane production and rates of methane release decreased. This was primarily linked to a decline of potential acetoclastic in favour of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Although palsa peatland succession offers similarities with typical transitions from fen to bog ecosystems, the observed dynamics in methane fluxes and methanogenic communities are primarily attributed to changes within the dominant Bryophyta and Cyperaceae taxa rather than to changes in peat moss and sedge coverage, pH and nutrient regime. Overall, the palsa peatland methanogenic community was characterized by a few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs. These OTUs seem to be indicative for methanogenic species that thrive in terrestrial organic rich environments. In summary, our study shows that after an initial stage of high methane emissions following permafrost thaw, methane fluxes and methanogenic communities establish that are typical for northern peat bogs.

  18. Spatial variations of community structures and methane cycling across a transect of Lei-Gong-Hou mud volcanoes in eastern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ling eWang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed cored sediments retrieved from sites distributed across a transect of the Lei-Gong-Hou mud volcanoes in eastern Taiwan to uncover the spatial distributions of biogeochemical processes and community assemblages involved in methane cycling. The profiles of methane concentration and carbon isotopic composition revealed various orders of the predominance of specific methane-related metabolisms along depth. At a site proximal to the bubbling pool, the methanogenic zone was sandwiched by the anaerobic methanotrophic zones. For two sites distributed toward the topographic depression, the methanogenic zone overlaid the anaerobic methanotrophic zone. The predominance of anaerobic methanotrophy at specific depth intervals is supported by the enhanced copy numbers of the ANME-2a 16S rRNA gene and coincides with high dissolved Fe/Mn concentrations and copy numbers of the Desulfuromonas/Pelobacter 16S rRNA gene. Assemblages of 16S rRNA and mcrA genes revealed that methanogenesis was mediated by Methanococcoides and Methanosarcina. pmoA genes and a few 16S rRNA genes related to aerobic methanotrophs were detected in limited numbers of subsurface samples. While dissolved Fe/Mn signifies the presence of anaerobic metabolisms near the surface, the correlations between geochemical characteristics and gene abundances, and the absence of aerobic methanotrophs in top sediments suggest that anaerobic methanotrophy is potentially dependent on iron/manganese reduction and dominates over aerobic methanotrophy for the removal of methane produced in situ or from a deep source. Near-surface methanogenesis contributes to the methane emissions from mud platform. The alternating arrangements of methanogenic and methanotrophic zones at different sites suggest that the interactions between mud deposition, evaporation, oxidation and fluid transport modulate the assemblages of microbial communities and methane cycling in different compartments of terrestrial

  19. Methane cycling in alpine wetlands - an interplay of microbial communities and vascular plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberger, Ruth; Cheema, Simrita; Zeyer, Josef

    2014-05-01

    Wetland environments play an important role for the global climate, as they represent a major terrestrial carbon store. These environments are potential sinks for atmospheric carbon due to reduced decomposition rates of plant material in the waterlogged, anoxic subsurface. In contrast, wetlands are also a major source of the highly potent greenhouse gas methane (CH4), which is produced in the anoxic zones through methanogenic archaea (methanogens) degrading organic matter. The CH4 emitted into the pore water diffuses upwards towards the surface, and is partially oxidized in the oxic zones by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (methanotrophs) before reaching the atmosphere. Nonetheless, global emissions of atmospheric CH4 from natural wetlands are estimated to range from 100 to 230 Tg a-1. Natural wetlands can be found around the globe, and are also common in temperate-cold climates in the Northern hemisphere. Methane release from these environments is influenced by many factors (e.g., vegetation, water table, temperature, pH) and shows high seasonal and spatial variability. To comprehend these variations and further predict potential responses to climate change, the biotic and abiotic processes involved in CH4 turnover need to be understood in detail. Many research projects focus on (sub-)arctic wetland areas, while studies on CH4 emissions from alpine wetlands are scarce, despite similar processes occurring in these different regions. Recently, we conducted a survey of 14 wetlands (i.e., fens vegetated with vascular plants) located in the Swiss Alps, showing CH4 emissions between 74 ± 43 and 711 ± 212 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 (Franchini et al., in press). A detailed study of one fen also revealed that CH4 emission was highest immediately after snowmelt, followed by a decrease in CH4 emission throughout the snow-free period (Liebner et al., 2012). Even though the CH4 cycle is largely driven by microbially mediated processes, vascular plants also play a crucial role in CH4

  20. Atmospheric constraints on the methane emissions from the East Siberian Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchet, Antoine; Bousquet, Philippe; Pison, Isabelle; Locatelli, Robin; Chevallier, Frédéric; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Dlugokencky, Ed J.; Laurila, Tuomas; Hatakka, Juha; Viisanen, Yrjo; Worthy, Doug E. J.; Nisbet, Euan; Fisher, Rebecca; France, James; Lowry, David; Ivakhov, Viktor; Hermansen, Ove

    2016-03-01

    Subsea permafrost and hydrates in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) constitute a substantial carbon pool, and a potentially large source of methane to the atmosphere. Previous studies based on interpolated oceanographic campaigns estimated atmospheric emissions from this area at 8-17 TgCH4 yr-1. Here, we propose insights based on atmospheric observations to evaluate these estimates. The comparison of high-resolution simulations of atmospheric methane mole fractions to continuous methane observations during the whole year 2012 confirms the high variability and heterogeneity of the methane releases from ESAS. A reference scenario with ESAS emissions of 8 TgCH4 yr-1, in the lower part of previously estimated emissions, is found to largely overestimate atmospheric observations in winter, likely related to overestimated methane leakage through sea ice. In contrast, in summer, simulations are more consistent with observations. Based on a comprehensive statistical analysis of the observations and of the simulations, annual methane emissions from ESAS are estimated to range from 0.0 to 4.5 TgCH4 yr-1. Isotopic observations suggest a biogenic origin (either terrestrial or marine) of the methane in air masses originating from ESAS during late summer 2008 and 2009.

  1. Low pressure storage of methane on interlayered clays for potential vehicular applications. [Comparison with activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Innes, R.A.; Lutinski, F.E.; Occelli, M.L.; Kennedy, J.V.

    1984-07-01

    Inexpensive, high surface area sorbents were prepared by treating naturally occurring hectorite and bentonite clays with aluminum chlorohydroxide, zirconium chlorohydroxide, or silica-sol solutions. Data were obtained comparing these interlayered clays with activated carbons and zeolites as sorbents for the low pressure storage of methane onboard natural gas powered vehicles. Methane sorption at pressures up to 7 MPa (1000 psig) resembled a Langmuir-type curve with a saturation sorption equal to about six micromoles of methane per square meter of surface area. Even at low pressures, methane sorption capacity was largely determined by surface area. At 2.2 MPa (300 psig), the best interlayered clay sorbed less than one-third the methane sorbed by an equal volume of Witco grade 9JXC activated carbon. Both the activated carbons and interlayered clays exhibited excellent release-on-demand capability. Driving ranges were calculated for a 2500-lb automobile equipped with three, 35-liter fuel tanks filled with sorbent and pressurized to 3.6 MPa (500 psig) with methane. Enough methane was stored with the best interlayered clay to travel 41 km (25 mi). With 9JXC carbon, one could travel 82 km (51 mi). The same vehicle equipped with high pressure (2400 psig) fuel tanks having the same volume but containing no sorbent would have a 190 km (118 mi) range.

  2. Methane Isotope Instrument Validation and Source Identification at Four Corners, New Mexico, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Caleb; Rahn, Thom; Dubey, Manvendra K

    2016-03-10

    Measurements of δ(13)CH4 and CH4 concentration were made at a field site in Four Corners, New Mexico (FC), where we observed large sustained CH4 enhancements (2-8 ppm peaks for hours) during nocturnal inversions. Potential sources of this large CH4 signal at FC include (1) fugitive emissions from coal mining and gas processing that are thermogenic and isotopically (13)C enriched relative to background atmosphere and (2) emissions from agriculture, ruminants, landfills, and coalbed biogenic methane that are(13)C depleted relative to background atmosphere. We analyze our measurements of methane concentration and δ(13)C during spring and summer of 2012 to identify fugitive methane sources. We find CH4 plumes that are both enriched and depleted in (13)C relative to CH4 in background air. Keeling plots show a continuum of δ(13)C source compositions between -40‰ and -60‰ that are consistent with thermogenic and biogenic sources. The Picarro Mobile Methane Investigator (PMMI), a mobile δ(13)CH4 instrument platform, was deployed in the spring of 2013 and used to verify the isotopic enrichment of coal bed methane in the region. We combine our results with meteorological data to spatially separate these sources in the Four Corners regions. Using CO and CO2 data, along with meteorological data, we propose that the high methane concentration events ([CH4] > 3.5 ppm) are from both thermogenic and biogenic methane released from coal beds. PMID:26840278

  3. Trees are important conduits for emission of methane from temperate and tropical wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Vincent; Pangala, Sunitha; Gowing, David; Hornibrook, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Methane produced in wetland soil generally is thought to be emitted to the atmosphere primarily via diffusion through pore water, release of gas bubbles (i.e., ebullition), and gas phase diffusion through the aerenchyma of herbaceous plants. The role of trees as a conduit for methane export from soil to the atmosphere has received limited attention despite evidence from mesocosm experiments showing that seedlings and saplings of wetland trees have a significant capacity to transport soil-produced gases. Notably ~60% of global wetlands are forested. We present in situ measurements of methane flux from a temperate carr (swamp) composed of alder (Alnus glutinosa) and birch (Betula pubescens) situated in the United Kingdom and a tropical forested peat swamp located in Borneo. The in situ data are complemented by a mesocosm experiment in which methane emissions were measured from alder saplings subjected to two water-regime treatments. In both the in situ and mesocosm studies, emissions from trees are compared to methane flux from the ground surface, the latter occurring via pore water diffusion, ebullition or the aerenchyma of herbaceous plants. We show that tree stem emissions are controlled by a number of factors including tree species, soil pore-water concentration and stem lenticel density. Our results demonstrate that the omission of tree-mediated methane fluxes from measurement campaigns conducted in forested wetland can significantly underestimate total ecosystem flux of methane.

  4. Weed competitiveness and yielding ability of aerobic rice genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords:    Broad-sense heritability; Crop vigour; Genetic correlation; Indirect selection index; Plant erectness; Rice germplasm; Seeding rate; Vegetative growth; Weed-suppressive ability.Aerobic rice, grown under aerobic soil conditions like maize or wheat, is an innovative way to cope with the growing demand for rice and the increasing water scarcity. Weeds are the most severe constraint to aerobic rice. The use of herbicides causes environmental pollution and induces the proliferation of...

  5. WAYS TO IMPROVE THE PHYSICAL FITNESS THROUGH AEROBIC GYMNASTICS MEANS

    OpenAIRE

    Zaharia A.M.; Rață G.

    2013-01-01

    This research aimed to study the probable effects that aerobic gymnastics could have on the body, for improving the physical fitness. The main goal of the research was to identify the effects the aerobic gymnastics has in improving physical fitness.This research was conducted on 15 subjects between 18 and 30 years old, who participated in aerobic gymnastics fitness-type lessons, three times a week. The programs comprised exercises of physical development , stretching and elasticity, of relaxa...

  6. Identification of functionally active aerobic methanotrophs in sediments from an arctic lake using stable isotope probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Catranis, Catharine; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Arctic lakes are a significant source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), but the role that methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play in limiting the overall CH4 flux is poorly understood. Here, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques to identify the metabolically active aerobic methanotrophs in upper sediments (0–1 cm) from an arctic lake in northern Alaska sampled during ice-free summer conditions. The highest CH4 oxidation potential was observed in the upper sediment (0–1 cm depth) with 1.59 μmol g wet weight-1 day-1 compared with the deeper sediment samples (1–3 cm, 3–5 cm and 5–10 cm), which exhibited CH4 oxidation potentials below 0.4 μmol g wet weight-1 day-1. Both type I and type II methanotrophs were directly detected in the upper sediment total communities using targeted primer sets based on 16S rRNA genes. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and functional genes (pmoA and mxaF) in the 13C-DNA from the upper sediment indicated that type I methanotrophs, mainly Methylobacter, Methylosoma, Methylomonas and Methylovulum miyakonense, dominated the assimilation of CH4. Methylotrophs, including the genera Methylophilus and/or Methylotenera, were also abundant in the 13CDNA. Our results show that a diverse microbial consortium acquired carbon from CH4 in the sediments of this arctic lake.

  7. Methane as a climate gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsdottir, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Methane is a key component in the atmosphere where its concentration has increased rapidly since pre-industrial time. About 2/3 of it is caused by human activities. Changes in methane will affect the concentrations of other gases, and a model is a very important tool to study sensitivity due to changes in concentration of gases. The author used a three-dimensional global chemistry transport model to study the effect of changes in methane concentration on other trace gases. The model includes natural and anthropogenic emissions of NOx, CO, CH{sub 4} and non-methane hydrocarbons. Wet and dry deposition are also included. The chemical scheme in the model includes 49 compounds, 101 reactions, and 16 photolytic reactions. The trace gas concentrations are calculated every 30 min, using a quasi steady state approximation. Model calculations of three cases are reported and compared. Enhanced methane concentration will have strongest effect in remote regions. In polluted areas local chemistry will have remarked effect. The feedback was always positive. Average atmospheric lifetime calculated in the model was 7.6 years, which agrees with recent estimates based on observations. 8 refs.

  8. Towards the identification of methanogenic archaeal groups as targets of methane mitigation in livestock animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eSt-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In herbivores, enteric methane is a by-product from the digestion of plant biomass by mutualistic gastrointestinal tract (GIT microbial communities. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is not assimilated by the host and is released into the environment where it contributes to climate change. Since enteric methane is exclusively produced by methanogenic archaea, the investigation of mutualistic methanogen communities in the GIT of herbivores has been the subject of ongoing research by a number of research groups. In an effort to uncover trends that would facilitate the development of efficient methane mitigation strategies for livestock species, we have in this review summarized and compared currently available results from published studies on this subject. We also offer our perspectives on the importance of pursuing current research efforts on the sequencing of gut methanogen genomes, as well as investigating their cellular physiology and interactions with other GIT microorganisms.

  9. Opaque closed chambers underestimate methane fluxes of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Anke; Jurasinski, Gerald; Huth, Vytas; Glatzel, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    Closed chamber measurements for methane emission estimation are often carried out with opaque chambers to avoid heating of the headspace. However, mainly in wetlands, some plants possess an internal convective gas transport which quickly responds to changes in irradiation. These plants have also been found to often channel a large part of the released methane in temperate fens. We compare methane fluxes derived from transparent versus opaque chambers on Carex-, Phragmites-, and Typha-dominated stands of a temperate fen. Transparent chamber fluxes almost doubled opaque chamber fluxes in the convective transporting Phragmites stand. In Typha, a trend of higher fluxes determined with the transparent chambers was detectable, whereas in Carex, transparent and opaque chamber fluxes did not differ significantly. Thus, opaque chambers bias the outcome of methane measurements, depending on dominant vegetation. We recommend the use of transparent chambers when determining emissions of convective plants or extrapolating fluxes to larger scales. PMID:24213640

  10. Geological emission of methane from the Yakela condensed oil/gas field in Talimu Basin, Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Junhong; BAO Zhengyu; XIANG Wu; GOU Qinghong

    2008-01-01

    A static flux chamber method was applied to study natural emissions of methane into the atmosphere in the Yakela condensed oil/gas field in Talimu Basin, Xinjiang, China. Using an online method, which couples a gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/MS) together, the 13C/12C ratios of methane in the flux chambers were measured. The results demonstrated that methane gases were liable to migrate from deep oil/gas reservoir to the surface through microseepage and pervasion, and that a part of the migrated methane that remained unoxidized could emit into the atmosphere. Methane emission rates varied less in the oil/gas field because the whole region was homogeneous in geology and geography, with a standard deviation of less than 0.02 mg/(m2·h). These were the differences in methane emission flux in the day and at night in the oil/gas field. The maximum methane emission flux reached 0.15 mg/(m2·h) at 5:00-6:00 early in the morning, and then decreased gradually. The minimum was shown 0.10 mg/(m2·h) at 17:00-18:00 in the afternoon, and then increased gradually. The daily methane released flux of the study area was 2.89 mg/(m2·d), with a standard deviation of 0.43 mg/(m2·d), using the average methane flux of every hour in a day for all chambers. δ13C of methane increased with the increase of methane concentration in the flux chambers, further indicating that the pyrogenetic origin of methane was come from deep oil/gas reservoirs.

  11. A novel pathway of direct methane production and emission by eukaryotes including plants, animals and fungi: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangong; Chen, Huai; Zhu, Qiuan; Shen, Yan; Wang, Xue; Wang, Meng; Peng, Changhui

    2015-08-01

    Methane (CH4) is a powerful greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 28 times that of carbon dioxide (CO2). CH4 is responsible for approximately 20% of the Earth's warming since pre-industrial times. Knowledge of the sources of CH4 is crucial due to the recent substantial interannual variability of growth rates and uncertainties regarding individual sources. The prevailing paradigm is that methanogenesis carried out by methanogenic archaea occurs primarily under strictly anaerobic conditions. However, in the past decade, studies have confirmed direct CH4 release from three important kingdoms of eukaryotes-Plantae, Animalia and Fungi-even in the presence of oxygen. This novel CH4 production pathway has been aptly termed "aerobic CH4 production" to distinguish it from the well-known anaerobic CH4 production pathway, which involves catalytic activity by methanogenic archaeal enzymes. In this review, we collated recent experimental evidence from the published literature and documented this novel pathway of direct CH4 production and emission by eukaryotes. The mechanisms involved in this pathway may be related to protective strategies of eukaryotes in response to changing environmental stresses, with CH4 a by-product or end-product during or at the end of the process(es) that originates from organic methyl-type compounds. Based on the existing, albeit uncertain estimates, plants seem to contribute less to the global CH4 budget (3-24%) compared to previous estimates (10-37%). We still lack estimates of CH4 emissions by animals and fungi. Overall, there is an urgent need to identify the precursors for this novel CH4 source and improve our understanding of the mechanisms of direct CH4 production and the impacts of environmental stresses. An estimate of this new CH4 source, which was not considered as a CH4 source by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2013), could be useful for better quantitation of the global CH4 budget.

  12. Managing Water and Soils to Achieve Adaptation and Reduce Methane Emissions and Arsenic Contamination in Asian Rice Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Wichelns

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rice production is susceptible to damage from the changes in temperature and rainfall patterns, and in the frequency of major storm events that will accompany climate change. Deltaic areas, in which millions of farmers cultivate from one to three crops of rice per year, are susceptible also to the impacts of a rising sea level, submergence during major storm events, and saline intrusion into groundwater and surface water resources. In this paper, I review the current state of knowledge regarding the potential impacts of climate change on rice production and I describe adaptation measures that involve soil and water management. In many areas, farmers will need to modify crop choices, crop calendars, and soil and water management practices as they adapt to climate change. Adaptation measures at the local, regional, and international levels also will be helpful in moderating the potential impacts of climate change on aggregate rice production and on household food security in many countries. Some of the changes in soil and water management and other production practices that will be implemented in response to climate change also will reduce methane generation and release from rice fields. Some of the measures also will reduce the uptake of arsenic in rice plants, thus addressing an important public health issue in portions of South and Southeast Asia. Where feasible, replacing continuously flooded rice production with some form of aerobic rice production, will contribute to achieving adaptation objectives, while also reducing global warming potential and minimizing the risk of negative health impacts due to consumption of arsenic contaminated rice.

  13. Aerobic capacity related to cardiac size in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, M; Wollmer, P; Karlsson, M;

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic capacity, defined as peak oxygen uptake (VO2PEAK), is generally considered to be the best single marker for aerobic fitness. We assessed if VO2PEAK is related to different cardiac dimensions in healthy young children on a population base.......Aerobic capacity, defined as peak oxygen uptake (VO2PEAK), is generally considered to be the best single marker for aerobic fitness. We assessed if VO2PEAK is related to different cardiac dimensions in healthy young children on a population base....

  14. Research on aerobics classes influence on physical prepareduess of students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasulia M. А.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical skills of female students doing aerobics have been studied. 165 female students aged 17-18 divided into three groups of 55 each have taken part in the experiment. Groups have been trained according to different methods conventionally called 'power aerobics', 'dance aerobics' and 'jump aerobics'. Level of female students' physical skills has been determined by the results of seven tests in the beginning of an academic year and after six-months term. Mathematical treatment of the results has been carried out. The most preferable as to improving physical skills level method has been discovered to be the one aimed on power abilities development method.

  15. Gas releases from salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  16. Microbial methane oxidation at the redoxcline of the Gotland Deep (Central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Schmale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane concentrations in the stratified water column of the Gotland Deep (Central Baltic Sea show a strong gradient from high values in the saline deep water (max. 504nM to low concentrations in the less dense, brackish surface water (about 4 nM. The steepest gradient is present within the redoxcline (between 115 and 135 m water depth that separates the anoxic deep part from the oxygenated surface water, implying a methane consumption rate of 0.28 nM d−1. The process of microbial methane oxidation within the redoxcline is mirrored by a shift of the stable carbon isotope ratio of methane between the bottom water (δ13C CH4 = −82.4‰ and the suboxic depth interval (δ13C CH4 = −38.7‰. A water column sample from 100 m water depth was studied to identify the microorganisms responsible for the methane turnover at the redoxcline. Notably, methane monoxygenase gene expression analyses for the specific water depth demonstrated that accordant methanotrophic activity was due to only one microbial phylotype. An imprint of these organisms on the particular organic matter was revealed by distinctive lipid biomarkers showing bacteriohopanepolyols and lipid fatty acids characteristic for aerobic type I methanotrophic bacteria (e.g. 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol. In conjunction with earlier findings, our results support the idea that biogeochemical cycles in Central Baltic Sea redoxclines are mainly driven by only a few microbial key species.

  17. Aerobic Biostabilization of Old MSW Landfills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Zanetti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many years after the end of the cultivation phase, landfills may generate intense odours, toxic and explosive gases and heavily-polluted leachate. A wide-spreading trend in the management of MSW landfills is represented by the forced aeration of wastes in order to achieve the stabilization, reducing the negative environmental impact of uncontrolled sites (old landfills which can be definitely considered as contaminated sites and the management costs of controlled and working facilities. One of the most interesting challenges is the in situ waste aerobic stabilization, obtained by insufflating air into the wastes. The aerobic metabolism is energetically convenient in comparison with the anaerobic one, it is characterized by a higher degradation rate and a temperature increase (like in the compost production. In order to obtain an aerobic biostabilization of waste in landfills, several air injection systems have been developed and applied in the last years, like Biopuster© or AEROflott® patented systems. The feasibility of the application of in situ biostabilization must be evaluated by means of different tests, in order to evaluate the main characteristics of the wastes. The main parameters to be evaluated are the biological stability and the air permeability of the wastes. In March 2006, the biological stability of the wastes located in the Trinitapoli Landfill, Italy, has been evaluated by the Politecnico di Torino. Black Index Test and Static Respirometric Index Test have been performed in the laboratories of the Politecnico. On the basis of the obtained results, the potential biogas production from the examined landfill was estimated together with the potential volume reduction.

  18. 2004 Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Manure Management in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhele Edmond Moeletsi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Manure management in livestock makes a significant contribution towards greenhouse gas emissions in the Agriculture; Forestry and Other Land Use category in South Africa. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions are prevalent in contrasting manure management systems; promoting anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. In this paper; both Tier 1 and modified Tier 2 approaches of the IPCC guidelines are utilized to estimate the emissions from South African livestock manure management. Activity data (animal population, animal weights, manure management systems, etc. were sourced from various resources for estimation of both emissions factors and emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. The results show relatively high methane emissions factors from manure management for mature female dairy cattle (40.98 kg/year/animal, sows (25.23 kg/year/animal and boars (25.23 kg/year/animal. Hence, contributions for pig farming and dairy cattle are the highest at 54.50 Gg and 32.01 Gg respectively, with total emissions of 134.97 Gg (3104 Gg CO2 Equivalent. Total nitrous oxide emissions are estimated at 7.10 Gg (2272 Gg CO2 Equivalent and the three main contributors are commercial beef cattle; poultry and small-scale beef farming at 1.80 Gg; 1.72 Gg and 1.69 Gg respectively. Mitigation options from manure management must be taken with care due to divergent conducive requirements of methane and nitrous oxide emissions requirements.

  19. Biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes by a methane-utilizing mixed culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorinated ethenes are toxic substances which are widely distributed groundwater contaminants and are persistent in the subsurface environment. Reports on the biodegradation of these compounds under anaerobic conditions which might occur naturally in groundwater show that these substances degrade very slowly, if at all. Previous attempts to degrade chlorinated ethenes aerobically have produced conflicting results. A mixed culture containing methane-utilizing bacteria was obtained by methane enrichment of a sediment sample. Biodegradation experiments carried out in sealed culture bottles with radioactively labeled trichloroethylene (TCE) showed that approximately half of the radioactive carbon had been converted to 14CO2 and bacterial biomass. In addition to TCE, vinyl chloride and vinylidene chloride could be degraded to products which are not volatile chlorinated substances and are therefore likely to be further degraded to CO2. Two other chlorinated ethenes, cis and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, were shown to degrade to chlorinated products, which appeared to degrade further. A sixth chlorinated ethene, tetrachloroethylene, was not degraded by the methane-utilizing culture under these conditions. The biodegradation of TCE was inhibited by acetylene, a specific inhibitor of methane oxidation by methanotrophs. This observation supported the hypothesis that a methanotroph is responsible for the observed biodegradations

  20. 2004 Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Manure Management in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeletsi, Mokhele Edmond; Tongwane, Mphethe Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Manure management in livestock makes a significant contribution towards greenhouse gas emissions in the Agriculture; Forestry and Other Land Use category in South Africa. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions are prevalent in contrasting manure management systems; promoting anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. In this paper; both Tier 1 and modified Tier 2 approaches of the IPCC guidelines are utilized to estimate the emissions from South African livestock manure management. Activity data (animal population, animal weights, manure management systems, etc.) were sourced from various resources for estimation of both emissions factors and emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. The results show relatively high methane emissions factors from manure management for mature female dairy cattle (40.98 kg/year/animal), sows (25.23 kg/year/animal) and boars (25.23 kg/year/animal). Hence, contributions for pig farming and dairy cattle are the highest at 54.50 Gg and 32.01 Gg respectively, with total emissions of 134.97 Gg (3104 Gg CO₂ Equivalent). Total nitrous oxide emissions are estimated at 7.10 Gg (2272 Gg CO₂ Equivalent) and the three main contributors are commercial beef cattle; poultry and small-scale beef farming at 1.80 Gg; 1.72 Gg and 1.69 Gg respectively. Mitigation options from manure management must be taken with care due to divergent conducive requirements of methane and nitrous oxide emissions requirements. PMID:26479229

  1. Dancing the aerobics "Hearing loss choreography"

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz M. Pinto; Carvalho, A.; Sérgio Oliveira

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the health clubs acoustic problems when used for aerobics exercises classes (and similar) with loud noise levels in sound amplified music. A sample of five schools in Portugal was chosen for this survey. Noise levels in each room were measured and analyzed to calculate the standardized daily personal noise exposure levels (Leq8). Leq8 values up to 96 dB(A) were found in this type of room inducing a health risk for its occupants. This type of gymnasium is usu...

  2. A Meteor Shower Origin for Martian Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Christou, A.; Archer, D.; Conrad, P.; Cooke, W.; Eigenbrode, J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Matney, M.; Niles, P.; Sykes, M.; Steele, A.; Treiman, A.

    2015-07-01

    We present and discuss the hypothesis that martian methane arises from a meteor shower source. Infall material produces methane by UV photolysis, generating localized plumes that occur after Mars/comet orbit interactions. This hypothesis is testable.

  3. [Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification of the Hypothermia Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium: Arthrobacter arilaitensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng-xia; Ni, Jiu-pai; Li, Zhen-lun; Sun, Quan; Ye Qing; Xu, Yi

    2016-03-15

    High concentrations of ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen were employed to clarify the abilities of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. Meanwhile, by means of inoculating the strain suspension into the mixed ammonium and nitrate, ammonium and nitrite nitrogen simulated wastewater, we studied the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification ability of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. In addition, cell optical density was assayed in each nitrogen removal process to analyze the relationship of cell growth and nitrogen removal efficiency. The results showed that the hypothermia denitrification strain Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 exhibited high nitrogen removal efficiency during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification. The ammonium, nitrate and nitrite removal rates were 65.0%, 100% and 61.2% respectively when strain Y-10 was cultivated for 4 d at 15°C with initial ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen concentrations of 208.43 mg · L⁻¹, 201.16 mg · L⁻¹ and 194.33 mg · L⁻¹ and initial pH of 7.2. Nitrite nitrogen could only be accumulated in the medium containing nitrate nitrogen during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification process. Additionally, the ammonium nitrogen was mainly removed in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. In short, Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 could conduct nitrification and denitrification effectively under aerobic condition and the ammonium nitrogen removal rate was more than 80.0% in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. PMID:27337904

  4. Methane from landfills in Sweden. Final report; Metan fraan avfallsupplag i Sverige. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsson, Jerker [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Galle, Bo; Boerjesson, Gunnar [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Water and Environmental Studies

    2006-01-15

    Three years of measurements has been conducted at seven Swedish landfills, quantifying methane emission, methane oxidation and methane production. The measurements reveal a large span between the sites in terms of gas recovery efficiency, 29-78% during normal operation. The fraction of the totally produced methane that is eventually leaking out to the atmosphere, was found to vary between 21-68%. Regarding methane oxidation, the study shows that of the methane going from the landfill interior towards the atmosphere, 6-43% is oxidised to CO{sub 2} in the different landfill cover soils. The highest methane oxidation was found in closed landfills during summertime, and the lowest at active landfills during wintertime, due to the strong temperature dependence of the oxidation. The equipment developed for methane emission measurements is based on time resolved concentration measurements with FTIR spectroscopy in combination with tracer gas releases from the surface of the landfill. The method has proven to be able to state the methane emission from the landfills with high accuracy, {+-}18% of the emission estimate (95% confidence interval). This is in line with what has been achieved in the literature for fugitive emission sources. The system has also proven to be useful for on site leak search. The precision for the methane production measurement was demonstrated to be high, down to {+-}4.2%. This enables trend studies and verification of improvement measures taken at the landfill sites. In terms of absolute accuracy for the production estimate, a 95%-confidence interval of down to (-6.0%, +6.2%) has been achieved. At times of strong methane oxidation the uncertainties increase, particularly if the emission is high. The gas production at the landfill site is therefore preferably measured during autumn-winter-spring when the temperature and the methane oxidation are low. The methane oxidation has been measured by carbon isotope technique, utilising the enrichment in

  5. The effects of aerobic and combined aerobic and resistance exercise training on physical fitness in young women.

    OpenAIRE

    Batalha, Nuno; Marmeleira, José; Dias, João

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic training alone or combined with strength training on the physical fitness of young women. Methods Sixty-five women (18–28 years old), who were not engaged in any exercise program for at least one year, were randomly assigned to an aerobic training group, a combined training group, or a control group. The aerobic training consisted of indoor cycling sessions and the combined training consisted of indoor cycl...

  6. METHANE INCORPORATION BY PROCARYOTIC PHOTOSYNTHETICMICROORGANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, Charles J.; Kirk, Martha; Calvin, Melvin

    1970-08-01

    The procaryotic photosynthetic microorganisms Anacystis nidulans, Nostoc and Rhodospirillum rubrum have cell walls and membranes that are resistant to the solution of methane in their lipid components and intracellular fluids. But Anacystis nidulans, possesses a limited bioxidant system, a portion of which may be extracellularly secreted, which rapidly oxidizes methane to carbon dioxide. Small C{sup 14} activities derived from CH{sub 4} in excess of experimental error are detected in all the major biochemical fractions of Anacystis nidulans and Nostoc. This limited capacity to metabolize methane appears to be a vestigial potentiality that originated over two billion years ago in the early evolution of photosynthetic bacteria and blue-green algae.

  7. Low methane (CH4) emissions downstream of a monomictic subtropical hydroelectric reservoir (Nam Theun 2, Lao PDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Chandrashekhar; Guérin, Frédéric; Labat, David; Pighini, Sylvie; Vongkhamsao, Axay; Guédant, Pierre; Rode, Wanidaporn; Godon, Arnaud; Chanudet, Vincent; Descloux, Stéphane; Serça, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs could represent a significant fraction of global CH4 emissions from inland waters and wetlands. Although CH4 emissions downstream of hydroelectric reservoirs are known to be potentially significant, these emissions are poorly documented in recent studies. We report the first quantification of emissions downstream of a subtropical monomictic reservoir. The Nam Theun 2 Reservoir (NT2R), located in the Lao People's Democratic Republic, was flooded in 2008 and commissioned in April 2010. This reservoir is a trans-basin diversion reservoir which releases water into two downstream streams: the Nam Theun River below the dam and an artificial channel downstream of the powerhouse and a regulating pond that diverts the water from the Nam Theun watershed to the Xe Bangfai watershed. We quantified downstream emissions during the first 4 years after impoundment (2009-2012) on the basis of a high temporal (weekly to fortnightly) and spatial (23 stations) resolution of the monitoring of CH4 concentration. Before the commissioning of NT2R, downstream emissions were dominated by a very significant degassing at the dam site resulting from the occasional spillway discharge for controlling the water level in the reservoir. After the commissioning, downstream emissions were dominated by degassing which occurred mostly below the powerhouse. Overall, downstream emissions decreased from 10 GgCH4 yr-1 after the commissioning to 2 GgCH4 yr-1 4 years after impoundment. The downstream emissions contributed only 10 to 30 % of total CH4 emissions from the reservoir during the study. Most of the downstream emissions (80 %) occurred within 2-4 months during the transition between the warm dry season (WD) and the warm wet season (WW) when the CH4 concentration in hypolimnic water is maximum (up to 1000 µmol L-1) and downstream emissions are negligible for the rest of the year. Emissions downstream of NT2R are also lower than expected because

  8. Handbook methane potential; Handbok metanpotential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My (AnoxKaldnes AB (Sweden)); Schnurer, Anna (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2011-07-15

    Before using a organic material for biogas production it is essential to evaluate the methane production potential. The methane potential is one important tool possible to use during planning of new plants but also when new materials are considered for already running biogas plants. The chemical composition of different organic material varies extensively and this will have an impact on both the degradability and the methane potential. Information about the methane potential of a specific material can sometimes be found in the literature or can be calculated after a chemical/ physical or biological characterization. Here, the BMP test (Biochemical Methane Potential) is a commonly used method. Today the BMP test is a commonly used method to determine the methane potential. Many national and international research groups, consultants as well as personal at biogas plants are using this method and there is a lot of data available in the literature from such tests. In addition there are several protocols giving guidelines on how to execute a BMP-test. The BMP-test is performed in many different ways, not always under optimized conditions, and there is a lack of information on how to interpret the obtained data. This report summarizes knowledge from the literature and the experience from a Swedish referee group, consisting of persons being active performers of BMP-tests. The report does not include a standardized protocol as the procedure can be performed in different ways depending on available equipment and on the type of material to be tested. Instead the report discusses different factors of great importance for a successful test giving reliable results. The report also summarizes important information concerning the interpretation and how to present results in order to allow comparison of data from different test.

  9. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage. PMID:22932387

  10. Mitigation of methane emission from an old unlined landfill in Klintholm, Denmark using a passive biocover system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedersen, Rasmus Broen; Petersen, Per Haugsted;

    2014-01-01

    usefulness as bioactive methane oxidizing material and a suitable compost mixture was selected. Whole site methane emission quantifications based on combined tracer release and downwind measurements in combination with several local experimental activities (gas composition within biocover layers, flux......Methane generated at landfills contributes to global warming and can be mitigated by biocover systems relying on microbial methane oxidation. As part of a closure plan for an old unlined landfill without any gas management measures, an innovative biocover system was established. The system was...... designed based on a conceptual model of the gas emission patterns established through an initial baseline study. The study included construction of gas collection trenches along the slopes of the landfill where the majority of the methane emissions occurred. Local compost materials were tested as to their...

  11. Transformation of methane in peatland environments

    OpenAIRE

    Stępniewska, Zofia; Goraj, Weronika; Kuźniar, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands and particularly peatlands are the main natural source of methane. Data indicate that 10–45% of methane emission comes from these sources. Methane emission from wetlands is the result of the balance between methanogenesis and methanotrophic processes and is actively affected by the wetland plant community composition. There are many factors affecting the balance of CH4: for instance, vegetation has a strong effect on CH4 emissions from wetland ecosystems by influencing methane ...

  12. Surface effects on flammable extent of hydrogen and methane jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourri, A.; Angers, B.; Benard, P. [Hydrogen Research Institute, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, 3351 Blvd. DesForges, P.O. Box 500, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, G9A 5H7 (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    Studies on the effect of surfaces on the extent of the flammable cloud of high-pressure horizontal and vertical jets of hydrogen and methane are performed using CFD numerical simulations. For the horizontal jets, two scenarios pertaining to the location of the surface are studied: horizontal surface (the ground), and vertical surface (side wall). For a constant flow rate release, the extent of the flammable cloud is determined as a function of time. Effects of the proximity of the surface on the flammable extent along the axis of the jet and its impact on the maximum extent of the flammable cloud is explored and compared for both hydrogen and methane. The results are also compared to the predictions of the Birch correlations for flammable extents. It is found that the presence of a surface and its proximity to the jet centerline result in a pronounced increase in the extent of the flammable cloud compared to a free jet. (author)

  13. Concentrations and fate of sugars, proteins and lipids during domestic and agro-industrial aerobic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, Dominique; Choubert, Jean-Marc; le Pimpec, Paul; Heduit, Alain

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates the composition and the fate of sugars, lipids, proteins, amino acids under aerobic conditions for 13 domestic and 4 agro-industrial wastewaters, sampled before and after treatment. The rates of aerobic degradation were moreover studied with a 21-day continuous aeration batch test. It is shown that the sum of the biochemical forms represented 50 to 85% of the total chemical oxygen demand (COD). Lipids represented the half of the identified COD; sugars and proteins correspond to a quarter of the identified COD. Aerobic processes provided an increase of the relative fractions for proteins, whereas the ones of lipids decreased and sugars fraction remains stable. For the wastewaters released from cheese dairy (lipid-rich) and slaughterhouses (protein/lipid-rich), the dissolved phase after biological treatment is composed of proteins whereas the particulate one is composed of lipids. After the 21-day test, the concentration in proteins was nearby 10 mg/L. The results should be used for operations of WWTP to detect when a dysfunction is about to occur. They can be used to predict the concentrations in the treated water when upgrading an existing municipal plant that will admit agro-industrial discharge. PMID:21866767

  14. Simultaneous biodegradation of carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene in a coupled anaerobic/aerobic biobarrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kiwook; Shim, Hojae; Bae, Wookeun; Oh, Juhyun; Bae, Jisu

    2016-08-01

    Simultaneous biodegradation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in a biobarrier with polyethylene glycol (PEG) carriers was studied. Toluene/methanol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were used as electron donors and an electron acceptor source, respectively, in order to develop a biologically active zone. The average removal efficiencies for TCE and toluene were over 99.3%, leaving the respective residual concentrations of ∼12 and ∼57μg/L, which are below or close to the groundwater quality standards. The removal efficiency for CT was ∼98.1%, with its residual concentration (65.8μg/L) slightly over the standards. TCE was aerobically cometabolized with toluene as substrate while CT was anaerobically dechlorinated in the presence of electron donors, with the respective stoichiometric amount of chloride released. The oxygen supply at equivalent to 50% chemical oxygen demand of the injected electron donors supported successful toluene oxidation and also allowed local anaerobic environments for CT reduction. The originally augmented (immobilized in PEG carriers) aerobic microbes were gradually outcompeted in obtaining substrate and oxygen. Instead, newly developed biofilms originated from indigenous microbes in soil adapted to the coupled anaerobic/aerobic environment in the carrier for the simultaneous and almost complete removal of CT, TCE, and toluene. The declined removal rates when temperature fell from 28 to 18°C were recovered by doubling the retention time (7.2 days). PMID:27054665

  15. Methane Production in Minnesota Peatlands

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Richard T; Crawford, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    Rates of methane production in Minnesota peats were studied. Surface (10- to 25-cm) peats produced an average of 228 nmol of CH4 per g (dry weight) per h at 25°C and ambient pH. Methanogenesis rates generally decreased with depth in ombrotrophic peats, but on occasion were observed to rise within deeper layers of certain fen peats. Methane production was temperature dependent, increasing with increasing temperature (4 to 30°C), except in peats from deeper layers. Maximal methanogenesis from t...

  16. Molecular Iodine-Catalyzed Aerobic α,β-Diamination of Cyclohexanones with 2-Aminopyrimidine and 2-Aminopyridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Ermolenko, Ludmila; Retailleau, Pascal; Al-Mourabit, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Molecular iodine is shown to be an excellent catalyst for aerobic oxidative α,β-diamination of cyclohexanones with 2-aminopyrimidine/2-aminopyridines. This α,β-C-H functionalization is remarkable for its simplicity in both substrates and conditions, involving one and a half oxygen molecules and releasing three water molecules as the only byproduct. In addition, the functionalized products including protected 2-aminoimidazoles introduced without aromatization can serve as useful building blocks for natural product synthesis and medicinal chemistry. PMID:27088653

  17. 40 CFR 721.4820 - Methane, bromodifluoro-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane, bromodifluoro-. 721.4820... Substances § 721.4820 Methane, bromodifluoro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as methane, bromodifluoro- is subject to reporting...

  18. 46 CFR 154.703 - Methane (LNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methane (LNG). 154.703 Section 154.703 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... and Temperature Control § 154.703 Methane (LNG). Unless a cargo tank carrying methane (LNG)...

  19. 30 CFR 75.342 - Methane monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane monitors. 75.342 Section 75.342 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.342 Methane monitors. (a)(1) MSHA approved methane monitors shall be installed on all face cutting machines, continuous miners, longwall...

  20. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  1. 76 FR 59667 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice...

  2. 78 FR 26337 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  3. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is...

  4. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  5. Methane-fueled vehicles: A promising market for coalbed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most acceptable alternative fuel for motor vehicles is compressed natural gas (CNG). An important potential source of such gas is coalbed methane, much of which is now being wasted. Although there are no technological impediments to the use of CNG it has not been adequately promoted for a variety of reasons: structural, institutional and for coalbed gas, legal. The benefits of using CNG fuel are manifold: clean burning, low cost, abundant, and usable in any internal combustion engine. Even though more than 30,000 CNG vehicles are now in use in the U.S.A., they are not readily available, fueling stations are not easily accessible, and there is general apathy on the part of the public because of negligence by such agencies as the Department of Energy, the Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency. The economic benefits of using methane are significant: 100,000 cubic feet of methane is equivalent to 800 gallons of gasoline. Considering the many millions of cubic feet methane wasted from coal mines conservation and use of this resource is a worthy national goal

  6. A synthesis of methane emissions from 71 northern, temperate, and subtropical wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetsky, Merritt R.; Kotowska, Agnieszka; Bubier, Jill; Dise, Nancy B.; Crill, Patrick; Hornibrook, Ed R.C.; Minkkinen, Kari; Moore, Tim R.; Myers-Smith, Isla H.; Nykanen, Hannu; Olefeldt, David; Rinne, Janne; Saarnio, Sanna; Shurpali, Narasinha; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Waddington, J. Michael; White, Jeffrey R.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Wilmking, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of atmospheric methane. Here, we assess controls on methane flux using a database of approximately 19 000 instantaneous measurements from 71 wetland sites located across subtropical, temperate, and northern high latitude regions. Our analyses confirm general controls on wetland methane emissions from soil temperature, water table, and vegetation, but also show that these relationships are modified depending on wetland type (bog, fen, or swamp), region (subarctic to temperate), and disturbance. Fen methane flux was more sensitive to vegetation and less sensitive to temperature than bog or swamp fluxes. The optimal water table for methane flux was consistently below the peat surface in bogs, close to the peat surface in poor fens, and above the peat surface in rich fens. However, the largest flux in bogs occurred when dry 30-day averaged antecedent conditions were followed by wet conditions, while in fens and swamps, the largest flux occurred when both 30-day averaged antecedent and current conditions were wet. Drained wetlands exhibited distinct characteristics, e.g. the absence of large flux following wet and warm conditions, suggesting that the same functional relationships between methane flux and environmental conditions cannot be used across pristine and disturbed wetlands. Together, our results suggest that water table and temperature are dominant controls on methane flux in pristine bogs and swamps, while other processes, such as vascular transport in pristine fens, have the potential to partially override the effect of these controls in other wetland types. Because wetland types vary in methane emissions and have distinct controls, these ecosystems need to be considered separately to yield reliable estimates of global wetland methane release.

  7. Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in California's San Joaquin Valley: Characterizing Large Point Source Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Duren, R. M.; Miller, C. E.; Aubrey, A. D.; Falk, M.; Holland, L.; Hook, S. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Johnson, W. R.; Kuai, L.; Kuwayama, T.; Lin, J. C.; Thorpe, A. K.; Worden, J. R.; Lauvaux, T.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric pollutant that contributes to global warming and tropospheric ozone production. Methane mitigation could reduce near term climate change and improve air quality, but is hindered by a lack of knowledge of anthropogenic methane sources. Recent work has shown that methane emissions are not evenly distributed in space, or across emission sources, suggesting that a large fraction of anthropogenic methane comes from a few "super-emitters." We studied the distribution of super-emitters in California's southern San Joaquin Valley, where elevated levels of atmospheric CH4 have also been observed from space. Here, we define super-emitters as methane plumes that could be reliably detected (i.e., plume observed more than once in the same location) under varying wind conditions by airborne thermal infrared remote sensing. The detection limit for this technique was determined to be 4.5 kg CH4 h-1 by a controlled release experiment, corresponding to column methane enhancement at the point of emissions greater than 20% above local background levels. We surveyed a major oil production field, and an area with a high concentration of large dairies using a variety of airborne and ground-based measurements. Repeated airborne surveys (n=4) with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer revealed 28 persistent methane plumes emanating from oil field infrastructure, including tanks, wells, and processing facilities. The likelihood that a given source type was a super-emitter varied from roughly 1/3 for processing facilities to 1/3000 for oil wells. 11 persistent plumes were detected in the dairy area, and all were associated with wet manure management. The majority (11/14) of manure lagoons in the study area were super-emitters. Comparing to a California methane emissions inventory for the surveyed areas, we estimate that super-emitters comprise a minimum of 9% of inventoried dairy emissions, and 13% of inventoried oil emissions in this region.

  8. Aerobic Thermophilic Composting of Municipal Solid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D V Wadkar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Composting is a natural process that turns organic material into a dark rich substance called compost. Aerobic Composting is the creation of compost that depends on bacteria that thrive in an oxygen rich environment. Aerobic bacteria manage the chemical process by converting the inputs (i.e. air, water and carbon and nitrogen rich materials into heat, carbon dioxide and ammonium. The ammonium is further converted by bacteria into plant nourishing nitrites and nitrates through the process of nitrification. Thermophilic Composting is breaking down biological waste with thermophilic (heat loving bacteria. A cylindrical reactor was made. Organic wasteincluded dry vegetable waste collected from MSW ramp, Koregaon park, Pune. The characteristics of compost like pH, moisture content, temperature, C/N ratio and volume reduction were studied for the period of maturation (42days. It can be concluded that the values are within the desired limits and compost is suitable for ornamental plants. The setup of reactor is affordable and thus the compost obtained is effective and economical.

  9. The Roles of Sphagnum and Cyperaceae in the Methane Cycle of an Ombrotrophic Bog Revealed by the Carbon Isotope Ratios of Leaf Waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isles, P. D.; Nichols, J. E.; Peteet, D. M.; Kenna, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    Methane is a strong greenhouse gas, and the role of the terrestrial carbon cycle in the concentrations of atmospheric methane is poorly understood. What is clear, is that northern peatlands are a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. A recent discovery, and a topic of much scrutiny, has been the relationship between Sphagnum in peatlands and symbiotic methanotrophic bacteria. These bacteria oxidize methane produced at depth in peatlands before it is released to the atmosphere, contributing 13C-depleted CO2 to Sphagnum photosynthate. We seek to better understand the fate of methane produced in peatlands at depth, and the relationship between methane release from peatland surfaces and parameters such as temperature, moisture, and vegetation type. We compare carbon isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes from sphagnum and vascular plants and major element chemistry at three different microhabitats, hummock, hollow, and sedge tussock, in Mer Bleue an ombrotrophic peatland near Ottowa, Ontario, Canada. We use these compound-specific carbon isotope measurements to constrain the amount of methane-derived CO2 incorporated by Sphagnum. We also compare our multiannually resolved down-core measurements to data from long-term monitoring of climate parameters and methane flux from the same microhabitats to ground-truth our sedimentary signature of methane with instrumental measurements.

  10. Reducing Uncertainty in Methane Emission Estimates from Permafrost Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, T. R.; Mastepanov, M.; Lund, M.; Tamstorf, M. P.; Parmentier, F. J. W.; Rysgård, S.; Lilienthal, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Depending on factors including temperature, snow duration and soil moisture conditions, emissions of the greenhouse gas methane from permafrost wetlands can vary by factors of 2-4 between years. This variability is clear in atmospheric measurements of the gas, but a lack of ground-based data is making it hard to locate the methane sources responsible. Methane monitoring in the Arctic is expensive, requiring sophisticated analysis equipment such as power requiring laser spectrometer analysis made in remote places. This also puts demands on the logistics where infrastructures and field stations that offer line-power in the field are in high demand but very rarely found. Research projects therefore typically focus on one site, and run for a year or two. Longer term monitoring programs, which document climate, hydrology, phenology and population dynamics of birds and mammals, rarely include carbon fluxes since it is technically challenging to measure. One that does is the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring program that started at the Zackenberg research station, which has recorded substantial methane flux variations for almost a decade in North-east Greenland. Such multi-year studies show that, while there is some connection between the amounts of methane released from one year to the next, accurate forecasting is difficult. They also highlight the importance of extending monitoring beyond the growing period into the frozen season, both in spring and autumn. A spatially distributed network of long-term monitoring stations in the Arctic, with consistency between measurements, is badly needed to improve this situation. Productive methane 'hot spots', many sporadic, have also been identified in recent studies. By ventilating surface waters, storms trigger emissions in the East Siberian Sea Shelf. Shallow lakes formed when permafrost thaws can belch methane from decomposing old organic deposits, of which there are huge amounts in the Arctic. All of these potentially important

  11. Aerobic granules formation and nutrients removal characteristics in sequencing batch airlift reactor (SBAR) at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the effect of low temperature on the formation of aerobic granules and their nutrient removal characteristics, an aerobic granular sequencing batch airlift reactor (SBAR) has been operated at 10 deg. C using a mixed carbon source of glucose and sodium acetate. The results showed that aerobic granules were obtained and that the reactor performed in stable manner under the applied conditions. The granules had a compact structure and a clear out-surface. The average parameters of the granules were: diameter 3.4 mm, wet density 1.036 g mL-1, sludge volume index 37 mL g-1, and settling velocity 18.6-65.1 cm min-1. Nitrite accumulation was observed, with a nitrite accumulation rate (NO2--N/NOx--N) between 35% and 43% at the beginning of the start-up stage. During the stable stage, NOx was present at a level below the detection limit. However, when the influent COD concentration was halved (resulting in COD/N a reduction of the COD/N from 20:1 to 10:1) nitrite accumulation was observed once more with an effluent nitrite accumulation rate of 94.8%. Phosphorus release was observed in the static feeding phase and also during the initial 20-30 min of the aerobic phase. Neither the low temperature nor adjustment of the COD/P ratio from 100:1 to 25:1 had any influence on the phosphorus removal efficiency under the operating conditions. In the granular reactor with the influent load rates for COD, NH4+-N, and PO43--P of 1.2-2.4, 0.112 and 0.012-0.024 kg m-3 d-1, the respective removal efficiencies at low temperature were 90.6-95.4%, 72.8-82.1% and 95.8-97.9%.

  12. Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megonigal, Patrick [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Pitz, Scott [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-04-19

    This exploratory research on Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems was motivated by evidence that upland ecosystems emit 36% as much methane to the atmosphere as global wetlands, yet we knew almost nothing about this source. The long-term objective was to refine Earth system models by quantifying methane emissions from upland forests, and elucidate the biogeochemical processes that govern upland methane emissions. The immediate objectives of the grant were to: (i) test the emerging paradigm that upland trees unexpectedly transpire methane, (ii) test the basic biogeochemical assumptions of an existing global model of upland methane emissions, and (iii) develop the suite of biogeochemical approaches that will be needed to advance research on upland methane emissions. We instrumented a temperate forest system in order to explore the processes that govern upland methane emissions. We demonstrated that methane is emitted from the stems of dominant tree species in temperate upland forests. Tree emissions occurred throughout the growing season, while soils adjacent to the trees consumed methane simultaneously, challenging the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycling in the rate of methane emissions, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for methane transport. We propose the forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Stem emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration, resolving differences between models and measurements. The methods we used can be effectively implemented in order to determine if the phenomenon is widespread.

  13. Methane as a biomarker in the search for extraterrestrial life: Lessons learned from Mars analog hypersaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, B.; Tazaz, A.; Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Davila, A.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Methane released from discrete regions on Mars, together with previous reports of methane determined with ground-based telescopes, has revived the possibility of past or even extant life near the surface on Mars, since 90% of the methane on Earth has a biological origin. This intriguing possibility is supported by the abundant evidence of large bodies of liquid water, and therefore of conditions conducive to the origin of life, early in the planet's history. The detection and analysis of methane is at the core of NASA’s strategies to search for life in the solar system, and on extrasolar planets. Because methane is also produced abiotically, it is important to generate criteria to unambiguously assess biogenicity. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signature of methane, as well as its ratio to other low molecular weight hydrocarbons (the methane/(ethane + propane) ratio: C1/(C2 + C3)), has been suggested to be diagnostic for biogenic methane. We report measurements of the concentrations and stable isotopic signature of methane from hypersaline environments. We focus on hypersaline environments because spectrometers orbiting Mars have detected widespread chloride bearing deposits resembling salt flats. Other evaporitic minerals, e.g., sulfates, are also abundant in several regions, including those studied by the Mars Exploration Rovers. The presence of evaporitic minerals, together with the known evolution of the Martian climate, from warmer and wetter to cold and hyper-arid, suggest that evaporitic and hypersaline environments were common in the past. Hypersaline environments examined to date include salt ponds located in Baja California, the San Francisco Bay, and the Atacama Desert. Methane was found in gas produced both in the sediments, and in gypsum- and halite-hosted (endolithic) microbial communities. Maximum methane concentrations were as high as 40% by volume. The methane carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition showed a wide range of values, from about

  14. Aerobic Fitness Thresholds Associated with Fifth Grade Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittberg, Richard; Cottrell, Lesley A.; Davis, Catherine L.; Northrup, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Whereas effects of physical fitness and physical activity on cognitive function have been documented, little is known about how they are related. Purpose: This study assessed student aerobic fitness measured by FITNESSGRAM Mile times and/or Pacer circuits and whether the nature of the association between aerobic fitness and…

  15. Differential production of slime under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, L P; Simpson, W A; Christensen, G D

    1990-01-01

    A series of 37 clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci previously identified as negative for slime production by the tube test were reexamined by the tissue culture plate test under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. None of the strains produced slime under anaerobic conditions; however, five strains (13%) produced slime under aerobic conditions.

  16. EFFECTS OF CORN SILAGE INOCULANTS ON AEROBIC STABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerobic stability of corn silage can be a major problem for farmers particularly in warm weather. Silage inoculants, while the most common type of silage additive, have not been consistently effective at improving aerobic stability. This study investigated new and proposed inoculant products over ...

  17. Aerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This manual contains the textual material for a single-lesson unit on aerobic sludge digestion. Topic areas addressed include: (1) theory of aerobic digestion; (2) system components; (3) performance factors; (4) indicators of stable operation; and (5) operational problems and their solutions. A list of objectives, glossary of key terms, and…

  18. Water Aerobics as a Form of Health Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Anna S. Batrak; Antonina V. Polyakova

    2013-01-01

    The offered literature review considers water aerobics as a form of health activities. Water aerobics is wide spread and popular, especially among women, because it is also the form of adaptive and health activities. It enlarges general physiological effect of physical exercises on the human body. Regular exercises improve physical fitness and physical development, health, mood, sleep, intensify activities and working efficiency.

  19. Methane emission from natural wetlands: interplay between emergent macrophytes and soil microbial processes. A mini review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007, natural wetlands contribute 20–39 % to the global emission of methane. The range in the estimated percentage of the contribution of these systems to the total release of this greenhouse gas is large due to difference

  20. Online membrane inlet mass spectrometry (Inspectr200-200) for quantification of the methane concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Gentz, Torben; Schlüter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, the release of methane from sediments of lakes, coastal regions as well as ocean margins is observed. The gas release is often associated with specific features like pockmarks (morphological depressions at the seafloor), mud volcanoes, cold seeps as well as occurrence of gas hydrates. For such sites gas plumes were observed by underwater camera systems as well as acoustic techniques. Compared to such semi-quantitative information, rather little-known is the concentration field o...

  1. Aerobic training alone or combined with strength training affects fitness in elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burich, Rasmus; Teljigović, Sanel; Boyle, Eleanor;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate if combined strength and aerobic training can enhance aerobic capacity in the elderly to a similar extent as aerobic training alone when training duration is matched. METHODS: Elderly men and women (age 63.2 ± 4.7) were randomized into two intervention groups: an aerobic...... subsequently to the aerobic training. Combined training additionally improves strength and self-assessed general health more than aerobic training alone....

  2. The response of methane hydrate beneath the seabed offshore Svalbard to ocean warming during the next three centuries

    OpenAIRE

    Marín-Moreno, Héctor; Minshull, Timothy A.; Westbrook, Graham K.; Sinha, Bablu; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2013-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and large-scale rapid release of methane from hydrate may have contributed to past abrupt climate change inferred from the geological record. The discovery in 2008 of over 250 plumes of methane gas escaping from the seabed of the West Svalbard continental margin at ~400 m water depth (mwd) suggests that hydrate is dissociating in the present-day Arctic. Here we model the dynamic response of hydrate-bearing sediments over a period of 2300 years and investigat...

  3. Renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweda, Frank; Friis, Ulla; Wagner, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located...

  4. Methane and seismicity: A reply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Thomas; Soter, Steven

    In a recent Forum article in Eos (“Methane in Association With Seismic Activity,” June 14, 1983, p. 410), R. S. Oremland presents observations which he claims contradict the deep methane gas hypothesis. His principal case rests on observations of one M 5.7 earthquake near the volcanic area of Mammouth Lakes, California, which did not result in any increase in methane content of gases in four local seeps.In our published discussions of the deep gas hypothesis [Gold and Soter, 1980, 1982], we proposed (1) that outgassing from mantle depths is an ongoing process both in volcanic and nonvolcanic regions; (2) that the gases CO2 and CH4 are the principal carriers of the surface excess carbon; (3) that chemical equilibrium between CO2 and CH4 in the presence of hot or liquid rock is strongly shifted towards CO2, especially in the low pressure domain, and that therefore active volcanic or high heat flow regions would be less likely to exhibit CH4; and (4) that faultlines, particularly those which are seismically active, are locations where outgassing in cool regions can be sampled. The evidence there is that flames from the ground are often seen in association with major earthquakes. (Just as in many mud volcano eruptions, ignition of combustible gases can be attributed to electrostatic effects.) Methane is also observed in many of the major crustal rifts, together with helium having the high 3He to 4He ratio indicative of deep origin [Lupton, 1983].

  5. Methane Dynamics in Flooded Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with a heat trapping capacity 34 times greater than that of carbon dioxide on a100 year time scale. Known anthropogenic CH4 sources include livestock production, rice agriculture, landfills, and natural gas m...

  6. Methane emissions in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane is the most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. Detailed national emission estimates are needed to narrow the gap between world emission estimates and budget results from atmospheric chemistry. These estimates have to be based on sound emission factors and better extrapolation of methane measurement results. The article identifies the most important sources of methane in the Netherlands as landfills, ruminants, manure and the production, distribution and combustion of gas. It explains that emissions from landfills will decrease as a result of policies to reduce landfilling. The encouragement of increased internal use of otherwise vented gas on oil and gas production platforms and the planned extra maintenance of destribution networks should further decrease emissions. Policies to reduce milk and beef surplus and the introduction of new types of stabling and manure handling systems will reduce emissions in the agriculture sector. These measures should produce a total reduction of methane of 20% in 2000 with respect to 1990 levels. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Coal Mine Methane in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses coal mine methane emissions (CMM) in the Russian Federation and the potential for their productive utilisation. It highlights specific opportunities for cost-effective reductions of CMM from oil and natural gas facilities, coal mines and landfills, with the aim of improving knowledge about effective policy approaches.

  8. Methane generation from waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Zohrab A.; Hanson, Adrian T.; Macias-Corral, Maritza

    2010-03-23

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  9. Methane on the greenhouse agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Kathleen B.; Hoffman, John S.; Thompson, Anne M.

    1991-01-01

    Options for reducing methane emissions, which could have a significant effect on global warming, are addressed. Emissions from landfills, coal mining, oil and natural gas systems, ruminants, animal wastes and wastewater, rice cultivation, and biomass burning are considered. Methods for implementing these emission reductions are discussed.

  10. Heart rate during aerobics classes in women with different previous experience of aerobics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen, R M; Kalaja, M K; Kalaja, S P; Holmala, E B; Paavolainen, L M; Tummavuori, M; Virtanen, P; Rusko, H K

    2001-01-01

    This study measured heart rate during floor and step aerobic classes at three intensity levels. A group of 20 female occasional exercisers [mean age 33 (SD 8) years, mean body mass index 21 (SD 2) kg.m-2 volunteered to participate in six aerobic classes (three floor classes, three step classes) and in a laboratory test as members of one of two groups according to their prestudy regular participation in aerobics classes. Subjects in group A had participated four or more times a week and those of group B less than twice a week. The characteristics of the groups were as follows: group A, n = 10, mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) 38.7 (SD 3.6) ml.kg-1.min-1, mean maximal heart rate (HRmax) 183 (SD 8) beats.min-1; group B, n = 10, VO2max 36.1 (SD 3.6) ml.kg-1.min-1, HRmax 178 (SD 7) beats.min-1. Each class consisted of a warm-up, a 20 min period of structured aerobic exercise (cardiophase) and a cool-down. The cardiophase was planned and guided as light, (rate of perceived exertion, RPE 11-12), moderate (RPE 13-14) or heavy (RPE 15-17) by an experienced instructor. The mean heart rates during the light classes were 72 (step) and 74 (floor) %HRmax in group A and 75 (step) and 79 (floor) %HRmax in group B; during the moderate classes, 84 (step) and 80 (floor) %HRmax in group A and 82 (step) and 83 (floor) %HRmax in group B, and during the heavy classes 89 (step and floor) %HRmax in group A and 88 (step) and 92 (floor) %HRmax in group B. Differences in heart rate and %HRmax were not statistically significant between the groups. However, differences in heart rate and %HRmax between the intensities (light vs moderate, moderate vs heavy and light vs heavy) were significant within both groups (all, P < 0.01). Based on the results, we conclude that intensity management during the aerobics classes was generally successful regardless of the participants' prior participation in aerobics. However, some individuals who were older and/or had less prior participation tended to

  11. Insights into Methane Formation Temperatures, Biogenic Methanogenesis, and Natural Methane Emissions from Clumped Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Dallimore, S.; Paull, C. K.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Winterdahl, M.; Smith, D. A.; Luhmann, A. J.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Eiler, J. M.; Ponton, C.; Sessions, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiply substituted isotopologues of methane are a valuable new tool for characterizing and understanding the source of methane in different Earth environments. Here we present methane clumped isotope results from natural gas wells, hydrothermal vents, marine and lacustrine methane seeps, and culture experiments. We observe a wide range of formation temperatures for thermogenic methane. Methane samples from low-maturity reservoirs indicate formation temperatures between 102-144° C, high-maturity conventional and shale gasses indicate temperatures between 158-246 °C, and thermogenic coal gases indicate temperatures between 174-267 °C. Methane formation temperatures generally correlate positively with δ13C, and negatively with gas wetness indices. Methane samples from a set of marine hydrothermal vents indicate a formation temperature of 290-350 °C. Methane sampled from subsurface and marine biogenic sources typically indicate temperatures consistent with the formation environment (0-64° C). In contrast, freshwater biogenic methane samples, and cultures of hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens, express low levels of isotopic clumping inconsistent with their formation temperature. These data and complementary models suggest that kinetic isotope effects, likely modulated by rates and pathways of methanogenesis, affect biogenic methane in cultures and freshwater environments. Alternatively, non-equilibrium signatures may result from mixing of methane with widely differing δD and δ13C values. Analyses of biogenic methane emissions from lakes indicate a correlation between methane flux and non-equilibrium clumped isotope fractionations in a given lake. Results from large methane seeps in Alaskan lakes confirm that some seeps emit thermogenic methane, but also indicate that other seeps emit subsurface biogenic methane or variable mixtures of biogenic and thermogenic methane. These results point to diverse sources for large Arctic methane seeps.

  12. Understanding the Recent Methane Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhwiler, L.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Masarie, K.

    2010-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources are thought to account for roughly 2/3 of the global atmospheric methane budget, with natural sources making up the other 1/3. Emissions from wetlands are the largest contribution from natural sources while agriculture (rice and ruminants) and waste dominate anthropogenic emissions. Fugitive emissions from fossil fuel extraction are thought to make up about 20% of the global atmospheric methane budget. It is generally recognized that observed inter-annual variability in global network observations can be attributed to natural sources such as wetlands and biomass burning, while longer-term trends likely indicate changes in anthropogenic sources. Exceptions include an abrupt decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the early 1990s associated with political changes in the Former Soviet Union, and long-term trends in emissions from the Arctic due to a warming climate. The growth rate of global average atmospheric methane since the 1980s shows a steady decline until recent years when it started to increase again. Superimposed on these trends are episodes of higher growth rates. The cause of the recent increase is not currently well-understood, although climate-driven increases in wetland emissions likely played an important role, especially in the tropics. Recent increases in anthropogenic emissions, especially from rapidly expanding Asian economies cannot be ruled out. In addition, trends in the photochemical lifetime of methane must also be considered. In this paper we use both traditional data analysis of observations of methane and related species, and a state-of-the-art ensemble data assimilation system (CarbonTracker-CH4) to attribute methane variability and trends to anthropogenic and natural source processes. We pay particular attention to the Arctic, where some recent years have been the warmest on record, and to the tropics and the potential role of ENSO in driving variability of wetland emissions. Finally, we explore whether a signal in

  13. Aerobic exercise reduces biomarkers related to cardiovascular risk among cleaners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Ravn, Marie Højbjerg; Holtermann, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    aerobic exercise worksite intervention changes the level of inflammation biomarkers among cleaners. METHODS: The design was a cluster-randomized controlled trial with 4-month worksite intervention. Before the 116 cleaners aged 18-65 years were randomized, they signed an informed consent form. The...... reference group (n = 59) received lectures, and the aerobic exercise group (n = 57) performed worksite aerobic exercise (30 min twice a week). Levels of biomarkers (high-sensitive C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, cholesterol, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride) were collected at...... that an aerobic exercise intervention among cleaners leads to reduced levels of high-sensitive C-reactive protein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and an unaltered level of fibrinogen. The aerobic exercise seems to improve inflammatory levels and lipoprotein profile among cleaners, with no...

  14. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen and methane cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kox, Martine A.R.; Villanueva, Laura; Jetten, Mike S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are areas in the global ocean where oxygen concentrations drop to below one percent. Low oxygen concentrations allow alternative respiration with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor to become prevalent in these areas, making them main contributors to oceanic nitrogen loss. The contribution of anammox and denitrification to nitrogen loss seems to vary in different OMZs. In the Arabian Sea, both processes were reported. Here, we performed a metagenomics study of the upper and core zone of the Arabian Sea OMZ, to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic potential for nitrogen and methane cycling. We propose that aerobic ammonium oxidation is carried out by a diverse community of Thaumarchaeota in the upper zone of the OMZ, whereas a low diversity of Scalindua-like anammox bacteria contribute significantly to nitrogen loss in the core zone. Aerobic nitrite oxidation in the OMZ seems to be performed by Nitrospina spp. and a novel lineage of nitrite oxidizing organisms that is present in roughly equal abundance as Nitrospina. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) can be carried out by yet unknown microorganisms harbouring a divergent nrfA gene. The metagenomes do not provide conclusive evidence for active methane cycling; however, a low abundance of novel alkane monooxygenase diversity was detected. Taken together, our approach confirmed the genomic potential for an active nitrogen cycle in the Arabian Sea and allowed detection of hitherto overlooked lineages of carbon and nitrogen cycle bacteria. PMID:27077014

  15. Nutrient Controls on Methane Emissions in a Permafrost Thaw Subarctic Peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashi, N. N.; Perryman, C. R.; Malhotra, A.; Marek, E. A.; Giesler, R.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Permafrost peatlands in northern latitudes are large reservoirs of sequestered carbon that are vulnerable to climate change. While peatlands account for a small fraction of total global land surfaces, their potential to release sequestered carbon in response to higher temperatures is of concern. Of particular relevance is the conversion of these carbon stores into methane (CH4), a strong greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 20 times greater than that of CO2 over a 100-year time frame. Here, we explore how key nutrients impact the consumption of CH4 at the Stordalen Mire in Abisko, Sweden, a discontinuous permafrost peatland with expanding thaw over the last century. Peatland CH4 emissions are highly spatially variable due to multiple emission pathways and strong dependence on several environmental factors. Among controls on CH4 emissions, such as temperature and water table depth, primary production of wetland vegetation is also a strong factor in the variability of CH4 emissions. Plant community shifts among permafrost thaw stages subsequently change nutrient cycling and availability, which in turn impacts primary production. Early stages of permafrost thaw are mosaicked with a variety of vascular plants and mosses. We analyzed potential enzymatic activities of chitinase, glucosidase, and phosphatase as proxies for organic nitrogen, carbon, and phosphorus cycling, respectively, in tandem with potential CH4 oxidation rates. In addition, stoichiometric ratios of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentrations are used to illustrate nutrient limitation controls on CH4 oxidation rates. While CH4 emissions are low throughout initial thaw stages, < 7 CH4 mg m-2 day-1, we found they had the highest rates of potential CH4 oxidation. These permafrost thaw-induced CH4 oxidation rates are 5 and 11 times higher, in the surface and depth of the peat profile respectively, than subsequent aerobic permafrost thaw stages. As CH4 emissions are low in intact permafrost

  16. 7-week aerobic exercise training reduces adipocyte area and improves insulin sensitivity in Wistar rats fed a highly palatable diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia F. Garcia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect aerobic exercise training on fat pad mass, adipocyte size, leptin release and insulin sensitivity in rats fed with high fat-palatable diet. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (250-260g were divided into four groups: sedentary control (CTR/SD, trained control (CTR/TR, obese sedentary (OB/SD and obese trained (OB/TR. Obese groups were fed with high fat-palatable diet (27% of fat and control groups fed with AIN-93. Our results showed that aerobic exercise training was effective to reduce body weight and epididymal fat mass in CTR/TR and OB/TR. Insulin and glucose levels were increased in OB/TR compared with OB/SD. Aerobic exercise training reduced the average area of adipocytes in CTR/TR and OB/TR and it was associated with reduced plasma insulin and leptin. In conclusion, 7-week aerobic exercise training reduces adipocyte area and improves insulin sensitivity and leptin levels in high fat-palatable diet-fed Wistar rats.

  17. Aerobic exercises: their cardiovascular and other benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerobic exercise can help prevent ischemic heart disease and other diseases. Physical inactivity is a major factor for developing Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) which is characterized by deposit of cholesterol, calcium and other substances in the inner lining of the arteries, that supply to cardiac muscle. It also contributes to other risk factors including obesity, hypertension, increased triglycerides, low level of HDL cholesterol and diabetes. The essential components of a systematic individualized exercise prescription include the appropriate mode, intensity, duration, frequency and progression of physical activity. There are four components of exercise program; a warm up, an endurance phase, optional recreational activity and a cool down. For sedentary individuals, exercise should start at 60% of maximum heart rare. Benefits of physical activity depend on the total amount of exercise. Vigorous leisure time activity should be promoted in order to give way to healthy living. (author)

  18. Aerobics trainer, health club settle discrimination lawsuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A health club settled out-of-court, agreeing to pay an undisclosed sum of money and to train its managers on the legal obligations of people with HIV and other disabilities, following litigation brought by an aerobics instructor at the club. The instructor filed the suit after he was forced to either disclose his HIV status to the 3,000 members or be fired. He was fired after he refused to sign a letter drafted by the club's manager. Six months later the club's president gave club employees the letter which the plaintiff argued violated his right to privacy. This is the second time a health club has settled an AIDS discrimination case. Both cases focused on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In settling the case, the club denied any wrongdoing and said they settled out of court to avoid the costs of litigation. PMID:11362274

  19. [Research of aerobic granule characteristics with different granule age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Man; Yang, Chang-Zhu; Pu, Wen-Hong; Luo, Ying-Dong; Gong, Jian-Yu

    2012-03-01

    In the SBR reactor, we studied the different style, physicochemical characteristic, pollutants removal and microbial activity between the short age and long age aerobic granule, respectively. The short age aerobic granule was cultivated from activated floccules sludge and the other was gotten from aerobic granular sludge which was operated stably more than one year. The results indicated that the wet density, the specific gravity and integrated coefficient (IC) of the short age aerobic granule were 1.066 g x cm(-1), 1.013 g x cm(-3) and 98.7%, respectively. And that of long age were 1.026 g x cm(-3), 1.010 g x cm(-3) and 98.4%, respectively. All of them were higher than the long age aerobic granule. The mean diameters of them were 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively. The settling velocity of short age and long age aerobic granule were 0.005-0.032 m x s(-1) and 0.003-0.028 m x s(-1), respectively, and two kinds of aerobic granule settling velocity increased with the diameter increased. SVI of the former was lower. The COD removal rates of two aerobic granules were above 90%, and the NH4(+) -N removal rates of them were about 85%. The results of the COD effluent concentration, NH4(+) -N effluent concentration and the pollutants concentration in a typical cycle indicated that the short age aerobic granule had better pollutants removal efficiency. The TP removal rates of them were between 40% -90% and 32% -85%, respectively. The TN removal rates of them were about 80%. The SOUR(H) SOUR(NH4) and SOUR(NO2) of the short age aerobic granule were 26.4, 14.8 and 11.2 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. And that of long age were 25.2, 14.4 and 8.4 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. In summary, the aerobic granule had significantly different physical and chemical characteristics because of different granule age, and the short age aerobic granule exhibited better pollutants removal ability, higher microbial activity and more stability than the long age aerobic granule. PMID:22624385

  20. Effects of Kettlebell Training on Aerobic Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falatic, J Asher; Plato, Peggy A; Holder, Christopher; Finch, Daryl; Han, Kyungmo; Cisar, Craig J

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the effects of a kettlebell training program on aerobic capacity. Seventeen female National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate soccer players (age: 19.7 ± 1.0 years, height: 166.1 ± 6.4 cm, weight: 64.2 ± 8.2 kg) completed a graded exercise test to determine maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2max). Participants were assigned to a kettlebell intervention group (KB) (n = 9) or a circuit weight-training (CWT) control group (n = 8). Participants in the KB group completed a kettlebell snatch test to determine individual snatch repetitions. Both groups trained 3 days a week for 4 weeks in addition to their off-season strength and conditioning program. The KB group performed the 15:15 MVO2 protocol (20 minutes of kettlebell snatching with 15 seconds of work and rest intervals). The CWT group performed multiple free-weight and dynamic body-weight exercises as part of a continuous circuit program for 20 minutes. The 15:15 MVO2 protocol significantly increased V̇O2max in the KB group. The average increase was 2.3 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹, or approximately a 6% gain. There was no significant change in V̇O2max in the CWT control group. Thus, the 4-week 15:15 MVO2 kettlebell protocol, using high-intensity kettlebell snatches, significantly improved aerobic capacity in female intercollegiate soccer players and could be used as an alternative mode to maintain or improve cardiovascular conditioning. PMID:26102260

  1. The atmospheric cycling of radiomethane and the "fossil fraction" of the methane source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Lassey

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The cycling of 14CH4 ("radiomethane" through the atmosphere has been strongly perturbed in the industrial era by the release of 14C-free methane from geologic reservoirs ("fossil methane" emissions, and in the nuclear era, especially since ca 1970, by the direct release of nucleogenic radiomethane from nuclear power facilities. Contemporary measurements of atmospheric radiomethane have been used to estimate the proportion of fossil methane in the global methane source (the "fossil fraction", but such estimates carry high uncertainty due to the ill-determined nuclear-power source. Guided by a mass-balance formulation in a companion paper, we apply a contemporary time series of atmospheric radiomethane to quantify both the fossil fraction and the strength of the nuclear power source. We deduce that 30.0±2.3% (1 s.d. of the global methane source for 1986–2000 has fossil origin, a fraction which may include some 14C-depleted refractory carbon such as from aged peat deposits. Since this estimate depends upon the validity of assumptions underlying a linear regression model, it should be seen as providing a plausible re-estimate rather than a definitive revision. Such a fossil fraction would be much larger (by 50% than is commonly accepted, with implications for inventory compilation. The co-estimated strength of the global nuclear-power source of radiomethane is consistent with values inferred independently from local nuclear facilities.

  2. [Pre-alarming apparatus for earthquake based on mid-infrared trace methane detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, He; Liu, Ming-jun; Tian, Xiao-feng

    2014-06-01

    With the rapid development of gas observation technology in seismic fracture zone, in order to accurately predict the earthquake, and reduce the people's lives and property losses caused by earthquake, a mid-infrared methane sensor was designed and developed, which is based on the microscopic relation between methane release and earthquake fissures on the crustal rocks. This instrument utilizes quantum cascaded laser (QCL) operating at 7.65 μm, combined with MIR multipass herriott cell with 76 m absorption path length to obtain low detection sensitivity down to 40 nmol x mol(-1) level in 4s acquisition time. Meanwhile, to decrease the primary noise source (1/f noise), semiconductor laser frequency modulation of direct absorption technology was utilized to obtain gas detection limitation as low as 5 nmol x mol(-1) (40 s acquiring time). In field experiments, controllable vibrator was used as vibration source, a number of trace methane detectors were placed with 100 m distance interval to carry out the dynamic measurement of methane concentration on the ground surface at different distances from the vibration source. Experimental results show that the instrument can monitor the release of underground methane before the earthquake and provide a novel measure as a pre-alarming for earthquake. PMID:25358158

  3. Survey the effect of aerobic exercise on aerobic capacity in patients with coronary artery disease (cad)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased aerobic exercise capacity appears to reduce both all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality. Physical exercise to improve maximal oxygen consumption (VO/sub 2max/) is thus strongly recommended, however evidence regarding the most efficient training intensity for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is still lacking. The purpose of this randomized study was to assess the effects of aerobic exercise for increasing VO/sub 2max/ in stable CAD-patients. Thirty stable CAD-patients were randomized to supervised walking 30 min three times a week for 10 weeks. Before and after training VO/sub 2max/ was predicted from Bruce treadmill test. Before training VO/sub 2max/ was 35.2+-4.32 ml/kg/min and after training the mean VO/sub 2max/ was 43.1+-3.4 ml/kg/min. This difference was significant (p<0.05). Aerobic exercise is effective for increasing VO/sub 2max/ in stable CAD-patients. As VO/sub 2max/ seems to reflect a continuum between health and cardiovascular disease and death, the present data may be useful in designing effective training programmes for improved health in the future. (author)

  4. Conceptual design of a cold methane moderator system for the European Spallation Source (ESS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the work for the target station of the planned European spallation source (ESS) the Central Department of Technology at the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH is also concerned with the moderators, particular attention being given to the development of cold methane moderators. This report discusses the technical feasibility of solid methane moderators. Methods to tailor the neutron output by adding absorption materials (decouplers or poisons) are not considered here, neither are composite moderators. Based on the given target-moderator-reflector assembly of the ESS project a concept for the ESS cold methane moderators has been developed and is being examined at the Forschungszentrum Juelich. According to this moderator concept the moderator is a fixed bed of small spheres, which makes moderator container filling homogeneous and reproducible. Since spheres form a defined packed bed, cooling of the moderator bed by H2 is reliable. The process of filling the moderator container and of removing the pellets is batchwise to ensure complete removal of the pellets, so that no spent methane pellets accumulate in the system. For removal of the moderator spheres the fixed bed in the moderator container is fluidized with subsequent hydraulic transport of the pellets. The spent methane pellets are separated from the transport fluid and the methane is released over the stack or purified and reused. Depending on the kind and amount of the radioactive isotopes present these may have to be separated and stored. (orig.)

  5. Effects of pH and Eh on release of nitrogen and phosphorus from sediments of West Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡勤海; 朱荫湄; 宋静; 李震宇; 温军杰

    2003-01-01

    The effects of pH and Eh on release of nitrogen and phosphorus from sediments of West Lake under different conditions were investigated by simulation test. Results showed that the net flux of NH4+ -N re-lease from sediments increased with pH, but NO3- -N showed negative-going release at all tested pH levels.The net flux of NH4+ -N release from sediments was higher under anaerobic or aerobic condition of the overly-ing water, but only under aerobic condition would net release of NO3- -N occur. It was also shown that phos-phorus released was mainly in its inorganic form, higher pH and anaerobic conditions of overlying water greatly stimulated release of phosphorus. In situ measurement at several West Lake locations indicated that sediment resuspension induced by boat propeller stimulated nutrients release from sediment into overlying water.

  6. Evolution of the microbial community of the biofilm in a methane-based membrane biofilm reactor reducing multiple electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ran; Luo, Yi-Hao; Chen, Jia-Xian; Zhang, Yin; Wen, Li-Lian; Shi, Ling-Dong; Tang, Youneng; Rittmann, Bruce E; Zheng, Ping; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Previous work documented complete perchlorate reduction in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) using methane as the sole electron donor and carbon source. This work explores how the biofilm's microbial community evolved as the biofilm stage-wise reduced different combinations of perchlorate, nitrate, and nitrite. The initial inoculum, carrying out anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (ANMO-D), was dominated by uncultured Anaerolineaceae and Ferruginibacter sp. The microbial community significantly changed after it was inoculated into the CH4-based MBfR and fed with a medium containing perchlorate and nitrite. Archaea were lost within the first 40 days, and the uncultured Anaerolineaceae and Ferruginibacter sp. also had significant losses. Replacing them were anoxic methanotrophs, especially Methylocystis, which accounted for more than 25 % of total bacteria. Once the methanotrophs became important, methanol-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria, namely, Methloversatilis and Methylophilus, became important in the biofilm, probably by utilizing organic matter generated by the metabolism of methanotrophs. When methane consumption was equal to the maximum-possible electron-donor supply, Methylomonas, also an anoxic methanotroph, accounted for >10 % of total bacteria and remained a major part of the community until the end of the experiments. We propose that aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification and perchlorate reduction (AMO-D and AMO-PR) directly oxidized methane and reduced NO3 (-) to NO2 (-) or N2O under anoxic condition, producing organic matter for methanol-assimilating denitrification and perchlorate reduction (MA-D and MA-PR) to reduce NO3 (-). Simultaneously, bacteria capable of anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification and perchlorate reduction (ANMO-D and ANMO-PR) used methane as the electron donor to respire NO3 (-) or ClO4 (-) directly. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26841777

  7. Aerobic methanotrophs drive the formation of a seasonal anoxic benthic nepheloid layer in monomictic Lake Lugano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blees, Jan; Niemann, Helge; Wenk, Christine B.; Zopfi, Jacob; Schubert, Carsten J.; Jenzer, Joël S.; Veronesi, Mauro L.; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2014-05-01

    In the southern basin of Lake Lugano, thermal stratification of the water column during summer and autumn leads to a lack of exchange between surface and deep water masses, and consequently to seasonal bottom water anoxia, associated with high methane concentrations. With the onset of bottom water anoxia, a dense layer of high particulate matter concentration - a so-called benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) - develops in the bottom waters. A sharp redox gradient marks the upper boundary of the BNL. At its maximum, the BNL extends 15 - 30 m from the sediment into the water column. We investigated the identity of the BNL and key environmental factors controlling its formation in the framework of a seasonal study. Compound specific C-isotope measurements and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH) of suspended particulate organic matter, radioactive tracer based measurements of methane oxidation, as well as investigation of geochemical water column parameters were performed in spring and autumn. Our analyses revealed that the microbial biomass within the BNL is dominated by methanotrophic bacteria. Aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) was restricted to a narrow zone at the top of the BNL, reaching maximum rates of up to 1.8 μM/day. The rates of MOx activity effectively consumed most (>99%) of the uprising methane, leading to the formation of a sharp CH4 concentration gradient and a strongly suppressed kinetic isotope effect (ɛ = -2.8o). CH4 oxidation was limited by the diffusive supply of O2 from the upper hypolimnion, implying that methanotrophy is the primary driver of the seasonal expansion of the anoxic bottom water volume, and explaining the vertical migration of the BNL in response to its own O2 consumption. The bulk organic matter extracted from the BNL was strongly depleted in 13C (δ13C methanotrophic. The cell size of methanotrophs was significantly larger than of other microbial cells, and an independent approach to quantify the contribution of methanotroph

  8. Emission of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) during the aerobic decomposition of orange wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Wang, Xinming

    2015-07-01

    Oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) emitted from orange wastes during aerobic decomposition were investigated in a laboratory-controlled incubator for a period of two months. Emission of total OVOCs (TOVOCs) from orange wastes reached 1714 mg/dry kg (330 mg/wet kg). Ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, methyl acetate, 2-butanone and acetaldehyde were the most abundant OVOC species with shares of 26.9%, 24.8%, 20.3%, 13.9%, 2.8% and 2.5%, respectively, in the TOVOCs released. The emission fluxes of the above top five OVOCs were quite trivial in the beginning but increased sharply to form one "peak emission window" with maximums at days 1-8 until leveling off after 10 days. This type of "peak emission window" was synchronized with the CO2 fluxes and incubation temperature of the orange wastes, indicating that released OVOCs were mainly derived from secondary metabolites of orange substrates through biotic processes rather than abiotic processes or primary volatilization of the inherent pool in oranges. Acetaldehyde instead had emission fluxes decreasing sharply from its initial maximum to nearly zero in about four days, suggesting that it was inherent rather than secondarily formed. For TOVOCs or all OVOC species except 2-butanone and acetone, over 80% of their emissions occurred during the first week, implying that organic wastes might give off a considerable amount of OVOCs during the early disposal period under aerobic conditions. PMID:26141879

  9. Biogeochemistry of Methane-Driven Destruction of Trichloroethylene in a Basalt Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, F.; Conrad, M.; Paszcynski, A.; Brodie, E.; Delwiche, M.; Radtke, C.; Lee, H.; Paidisetti, R.; Crawford, R.; Bernardini, N.; Johnson, A.; Starr, R.; Swift, D.; Newby, D.; Barnes, J.

    2008-12-01

    We studied the biogeochemical processes responsible for cycling methane and the fortuitous destruction of trichloroethylene (TCE) across spatially distinct locations in a basalt aquifer. This field study was accomplished by examining the attached and unattached microbial communities inherent to the aquifer by using a flow-through in situ reactor (FTISR) and large volumes of aquifer water from which microbial communities were concentrated. After incubation for 238 days, basalt and water were collected from the FTISR and analyzed using proteomics, gene expression, metabolic activity, microbial community structure, and kinetics of TCE degradation. Stable carbon isotopes and PhyloChip gene hybridization analyses were done on groundwater samples. Microbes from the FTSIR co-metabolically degraded approximately 7.5 mg of TCE per liter of groundwater. Proteins from aerobic methanotrophs were detected in the aquifer and on the basalt from the FTISR. Methanotrophic activity in the groundwater and on the FTISR basalt was also confirmed by combined use of enzyme biochemical probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization. Real-time PCR identified ca. 3000 copies of mmoX (a methanotrophic gene) per g of basalt and reverse transcriptase PCR determined that the mmoX subunit was actively transcribed. Stable carbon isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved methane indicated increased levels of methane oxidation with distance from the source of the TCE (-55 to 28 per mil for methane; >8 to -13 per mil for DIC) corresponding to increased dissolved oxygen concentrations in the aquifer. These geochemistry data are consistent with community composition and activity determinations that identified a gradient of methanogenic to methanotrophic populations along the contaminant plume. Multiple analyses using samples from the FTISR and aquifer water comprehensively demonstrate that both attached and unattached microbial communities are responsible for methane-driven co

  10. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Biosynthesis Dynamics of Slow Growing Methane Based Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Skennerton, Connor T.; Li, Zhou; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; Pan, Chongle; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    Marine methane seep habitats represent an important control on the global flux of methane. Nucleotide-based meta-omics studies outline community-wide metabolic potential, but expression patterns of environmentally relevant proteins are poorly characterized. Proteomic stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) provides additional information by characterizing phylogenetically specific, functionally relevant activity in mixed microbial communities, offering enhanced detection through system-wide product integration. Here we applied proteomic SIP to 15NH4+ and CH4 amended seep sediment microcosms in an attempt to track protein synthesis of slow-growing, low-energy microbial systems. Across all samples, 3495 unique proteins were identified, 11% of which were 15N-labeled. Consistent with the dominant anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) activity commonly observed in anoxic seep sediments, proteins associated with sulfate reduction and reverse methanogenesis—including the ANME-2 associated methylenetetrahydromethanopterin reductase (Mer)—were all observed to be actively synthesized (15N-enriched). Conversely, proteins affiliated with putative aerobic sulfur-oxidizing epsilon- and gammaproteobacteria showed a marked decrease over time in our anoxic sediment incubations. The abundance and phylogenetic range of 15N-enriched methyl-coenzyme M reductase (Mcr) orthologs, many of which exhibited novel post-translational modifications, suggests that seep sediments provide niches for multiple organisms performing analogous metabolisms. In addition, 26 proteins of unknown function were consistently detected and actively expressed under conditions supporting AOM, suggesting that they play important roles in methane seep ecosystems. Stable isotope probing in environmental proteomics experiments provides a mechanism to determine protein durability and evaluate lineage-specific responses in complex microbial communities placed under environmentally relevant conditions. Our work here

  11. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  12. Methane Emission Estimates from Landfills Obtained with Dynamic Plume Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane emissions from 3 different landfills in the Netherlands were estimated using a mobile Tuneable Diode Laser system (TDL). The methane concentration in the cross section of the plume is measured downwind of the source on a transect perpendicular to the wind direction. A gaussian plume model was used to simulate the concentration levels at the transect. The emission from the source is calculated from the measured and modelled concentration levels.Calibration of the plume dispersion model is done using a tracer (N2O) that is released from the landfill and measured simultaneously with the TDL system. The emission estimates for the different locations ranged from 3.6 to 16 m3 ha-1 hr-1 for the different sites. The emission levels were compared to emission estimates based on the landfill gas production models. This comparison suggests oxidation rates that are up to 50% in spring and negligible in November. At one of the three sites measurements were performed in campaigns in 3 consecutive years. Comparison of the emission levels in the first and second year showed a reduction of the methane emission of about 50% due to implementation of a gas extraction system. From the second to the third year emissions increased by a factor of 4 due to new land filling. Furthermore measurements were performed in winter when oxidation efficiency was reduced. This paper describes the measurement technique used, and discusses the results of the experimental sessions that were performed

  13. [Effects of salinity on N2O production during nitrification using aerobic granular sludge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan-Shan; iang, Hong; Gao, Da-Wen

    2014-11-01

    An aerobic SBR biological wastewater treatment system was adopted to measure the N2O production and nitrogen removal using aerobic granular sludge nitrification process under 0, 5, 10 g x L(-1) salinity conditions. The results showed that the N2O production increased with the increase of salinity concentration. At three salinity levels (0, 5, 10 g x L(-1)), the dissolved N2O production was 1.21, 8.99, 24.81 mg x m(-3), respectively, and the released N2O was 0.95, 3.46, 16.45 mg x m(-3), respectively. The N2O release rates at the 5 g x L(-1) and 10 g x L(-1) salinity levels were 3.6 and 17.4 times as high as that at the 0 g x L(-1) salinity level. Under various salinity conditions both the dissolved and releasing state N2O production first increased and then decreased, and the dissolved N2O production was greater than that in the releasing state. In addition, when the salinity was low (less than 5 g x L(-1)), the NH4(+)-N removal rate was less affected and almost the same with the condition of 0 g x L(-1), both over 98%. When the salinity was increased to 10 g x L(-1), the NH4(+)-N removal rate dropped to 70%. Thus, increasing the salinity of wastewater not only affected the system nitrogen removal rate but also increased the amount of N2O production. PMID:25639101

  14. Shallow-ocean methane leakage and degassing to the atmosphere: triggered by offshore oil-gas and methane hydrate explorations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yong; Zhai, Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Both offshore oil-gas exploration and marine methane hydrate recovery can trigger massive CH4 release from seafloor. During upward transportation of CH4 plume through water column, CH4 is subjected to dissolution and microbial consumption despite the protection of hydrate and oil coating on bubbles surface. The ultimate CH4 degassing to the atmosphere appears to be water-depth dependent. In shallow oceans with water depth less than 100 m, the natural or human-induced leakages or both lead to ...

  15. Performances and microbial features of an aerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor developed to post-treat an olive mill effluent from an anaerobic GAC reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Leonardo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive mill wastewater (OMW is the aqueous effluent of olive oil producing processes. Given its high COD and content of phenols, it has to be decontaminated before being discharged. Anaerobic digestion is one of the most promising treatment process for such an effluent, as it combines high decontamination efficiency with methane production. The large scale anaerobic digestion of OMWs is normally conducted in dispersed-growth reactors, where however are generally achieved unsatisfactory COD removal and methane production yields. The possibility of intensifying the performance of the process using a packed bed biofilm reactor, as anaerobic treatment alternative, was demonstrated. Even in this case, however, a post-treatment step is required to further reduce the COD. In this work, a biological post-treatment, consisting of an aerobic biological "Manville" silica bead-packed bed aerobic reactor, was developed, tested for its ability to complete COD removal from the anaerobic digestion effluents, and characterized biologically through molecular tools. Results The aerobic post-treatment was assessed through a 2 month-continuous feeding with the digested effluent at 50.42 and 2.04 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. It was found to be a stable process, able to remove 24 and 39% of such organic loads, respectively, and to account for 1/4 of the overall decontamination efficiency displayed by the anaerobic-aerobic integrated system when fed with an amended OMW at 31.74 and 1.70 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of biomass samples from the aerobic reactor biofilm revealed that it was colonized by Rhodobacterales, Bacteroidales, Pseudomonadales, Enterobacteriales, Rhodocyclales and genera incertae sedis TM7. Some taxons occurring in the influent were not detected in the biofilm, whereas others, such as Paracoccus, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Enterobacter

  16. Yolo County's Accelerated Anaerobic and Aerobic Composting (Full-Scale Controlled Landfill Bioreactor) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, R.; Kieffer, J.; Akau, H.; Augenstein, D.

    2002-12-01

    Sanitary landfilling is the dominant method of solid waste disposal in the United States, accounting for about 217 million tons of waste annually (U.S. EPA, 1997) and has more than doubled since 1960. In spite of increasing rates of reuse and recycling, population and economic growth will continue to render landfilling as an important and necessary component of solid waste management. Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works, Division of Integrated Waste Management is demonstrating a new landfill technology called Bioreactor Landfill to better manage solid waste. In a Bioreactor Landfill, controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray-water, etc.) are added and recirculated to increase the moisture content of the waste and improve waste decomposition. As demonstrated in a small-scale demonstration project at the Yolo County Central Landfill in 1995, this process significantly increases the biodegradation rate of waste and thus decreases the waste stabilization and composting time (5 to 10 years) relative to what would occur within a conventional landfill (30 to 50 years or more). When waste decomposes anaerobically (in absence of oxygen), it produces landfill gas (biogas). Biogas is primarily a mixture of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) which can be recovered for electricity or other uses. Other benefits of a bioreactor landfill composting operation include increased landfill waste settlement which increases in landfill capacity and life, improved leachate chemistry, possible reduction of landfill post-closure management time, opportunity to explore decomposed waste for landfill mining, and abatement of greenhouse gases through highly efficient methane capture over a much shorter period of time than is typical of waste management through conventional landfilling. This project also investigates the aerobic decomposition of waste of 13,000 tons of waste (2.5 acre) for

  17. Proteomic and targeted qPCR analyses of subsurface microbial communities for presence of methane monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrzej J. Paszczynski; Ravindra Paidisetti; Andrew K. Johnson; Ronald L. Crawford; Frederick S. Colwell; Tonia Green; Mark Delwiche; Hope Lee; Deborah Newby; Eoin L. Brodie; Mark Conrad

    2011-11-01

    The Test Area North (TAN) site at the Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, USA, sits over a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminant plume in the Snake River Plain fractured basalt aquifer. Past observations have provided evidence that TCE at TAN is being transformed by biological natural attenuation that may be primarily due to co-metabolism in aerobic portions of the plume by methanotrophs. TCE co-metabolism by methanotrophs is the result of the broad substrate specificity of microbial methane monooxygenase which permits non-specific oxidation of TCE in addition to the primary substrate, methane. Arrays of experimental approaches have been utilized to understand the biogeochemical processes driving intrinsic TCE co-metabolism at TAN. In this study, aerobic methanotrophs were enumerated by qPCR using primers targeting conserved regions of the genes pmoA and mmoX encoding subunits of the particulate MMO (pMMO) and soluble MMO (sMMO) enzymes, respectively, as well as the gene mxa encoding the downstream enzyme methanol dehydrogenase. Identification of proteins in planktonic and biofilm samples from TAN was determined using reverse phase ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with a quadrupole-time-of-flight (QToF) mass spectrometer to separate and sequence peptides from trypsin digests of the protein extracts. Detection of MMO in unenriched water samples from TAN provides direct evidence of intrinsic methane oxidation and TCE co-metabolic potential of the indigenous microbial population. Mass spectrometry is also well suited for distinguishing which form of MMO is expressed in situ either soluble or particulate. Using this method, pMMO proteins were found to be abundant in samples collected from wells within and adjacent to the TCE plume at TAN.

  18. Is aerobic workload positively related to ambulatory blood pressure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Clays, Els; Lidegaard, Mark;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cardiovascular disease is prevalent among workers with high levels of occupational physical activity. The increased risk may be due to a high relative aerobic workload, possibly leading to increased blood pressure. However, studies investigating the relation between relative aerobic...... workload and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) are lacking. The aim was to explore the relationship between objectively measured relative aerobic workload and ABP. METHODS: A total of 116 cleaners aged 18-65 years were included after informed consent was obtained. A portable device (Spacelabs 90217) was...

  19. Escape of methane gas from the seabed along the West Spitsbergen continental margin

    OpenAIRE

    Westbrook, Graham K.; Thatcher, Kate E.; Rohling, Eelco J; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Pälike, Heiko; Osborne, Anne H.; Nisbet, Euan G; Minshull, Tim A.; Lanoisellé, Mathias; James, Rachael H.; Huhnerbach, Veit; Green, Darryl; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Crocker, Anya J.; Chabert, Anne

    2009-01-01

    More than 250 plumes of gas bubbles have been discovered emanating from the seabed of the West Spitsbergen continental margin, in a depth range of 150-400 m, at and above the present upper limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). Some of the plumes extend upward to within 50 m of the sea surface. The gas is predominantly methane. Warming of the northward-flowing West Spitsbergen current by 1°C over the last thirty years is likely to have increased the release of methane from the seabed...

  20. Novel microbial communities of the Haakon Mosby mud volcano and their role as a methane sink

    OpenAIRE

    Niemann, H.; Losekann, T; D. de Beer; Elvert, M.; Nadalig, T; K. Knittel; Amann, R.; Sauter, E.; Schluter, M.; Klages, M.; Foucher, Jean-Paul; A. Boetius

    2006-01-01

    Mud volcanism is an important natural source of the greenhouse gas methane to the hydrosphere and atmosphere(1,2). Recent investigations show that the number of active submarine mud volcanoes might be much higher than anticipated ( for example, see refs 3 - 5), and that gas emitted from deep-sea seeps might reach the upper mixed ocean(6-8). Unfortunately, global methane emission from active submarine mud volcanoes cannot be quantified because their number and gas release are unknown(9). It is...